Science.gov

Sample records for kalimer-600 simplified core

  1. Conceptual design features of the Kalimer-600 sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Dohee; Kim, Yeong-Il; Kim, Seong-O; Lee, Jae-Han; Lee, Yong-Bum; Jeong, Hae-Yong

    2007-07-01

    An advanced sodium cooled fast reactor concept, KALIMER-600, has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to satisfy the Gen-IV technology goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economics and proliferation resistance. The concept enables an efficient utilization of uranium resources and a reduction of the radioactive waste. The core design has been developed with a strong emphasis on a proliferation resistance by adopting a single enrichment fuel without blanket assemblies. In addition, a passive residual heat removal system, shortened intermediate heat-transport system piping and seismic isolation have been realized in the reactor system design as enhancements to its safety and economics. The inherent safety characteristics of the KALIMER-600 design were verified through a safety analysis of its bounding events. The results for various unprotected events imply that the KALIMER-600 design can accommodate all the analyzed ATWS events. This self-regulation capability of the power without a scram is mainly attributed to the inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms implemented in the metal fuel core design and completely passive decay heat removal system. (authors)

  2. Simplified cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Although filter inductor designers have routinely tended to specify molypermalloy powder cores for use in high frequency power converters and pulse-width modulated switching regulators, there are sigificant advantages in specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels which should not be overlooked. Such steel cores can develop flux densities of 1.6 tesla, with useful linearity to 1.2 tesla, whereas molypermalloy cores carrying d.c. current have useful flux density capabilities only to about 0.3 tesla. The use of silicon steel cores thus makes it possible to design more compact cores, and therefore inductors of reduced volume, or conversely to provide greater load capacity in inductors of a given volume. Information is available which makes it possible to obtain quick and close approximations of significant parameters such as size, weight and temperature rise for silicon steel cores for breadboarding. Graphs, nomographs and tables are presented for this purpose, but more complete mathematical derivations of some of the important parameters are also included for a more rigorous treatment.

  3. Simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Gérôme, Frédéric; Jamier, Raphaël; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Humbert, Georges; Blondy, Jean-Marc

    2010-04-15

    An original design of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber composed of a thin silica ring suspended in air by six silica struts is proposed. This structure can be viewed as a simplified Kagomé-lattice fiber reduced to one layer of air holes. By working on the core surround parameters, an efficient antiresonant air guiding was successfully demonstrated. Two large low-loss windows (visible/IR) were measured with a minimum attenuation less than 0.2 dB radicalm at yellow wavelengths, comparable with state-of-the-art designs. The curvature behavior was also studied, showing low bending loss sensitivity for the fundamental transmission band. These relevant features might open a new route to propose original hollow-core fiber designs while making their production simpler and faster than previously.

  4. Simplifying the ELA Common Core; Demystifying Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Mike; Jago, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core State Standards ([CCSS], 2010) could have a transformational effect on American education. Though the process seems daunting, one can begin immediately integrating the essence of the ELA Common Core in every subject area. This article shows how one could implement the Common Core and create coherent,…

  5. Modal interferometer based on volatile organic compounds diffused in a simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Luo; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Kang, Juan; Ye, Man-Ping

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a modal interferometer based on a simplified hollow-core PCF, which diffused with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air holes, is proposed and investigated in our experiment. When light travels through the input single mode fiber and transmits into the simplified hollow-core PCF, there is only fundamental core mode. However, the high-order core modes will be excited when the molecules of VOCs diffuse into the air holes. After propagation of these modes in the simplified hollow-core PCF, they will recombine at the exit single mode fiber. The ethanol is chosen as the VOC sample in our experiments. The interference pattern of the interferometer, based on a 5.1 cm long simplified hollow-core PCF, exhibited fringe spacing of ~30 nm. The transmission intensity decreases while the fringe visibility increases as the ethanol concentration becomes larger, and the interference spectrum of the ethanol-diffused simplified hollow-core PCF modal interferometer has a red-shift, from 1542.96 nm at 250 ppm to 1545.52 nm at 1000 ppm. The modal interference proposed above has great potential as an optical fiber sensor, measuring physical parameters such as the concentration of VOCs.

  6. STOCHASTICITY AND EFFICIENCY IN SIMPLIFIED MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D. E-mail: reubendb@utk.edu

    2015-11-01

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce core-collapse supernova environment in three spatial dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a “critical neutrino luminosity” for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are much more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is “smeared out” into a rising probability of explosion over a ∼20% range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3–4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.

  7. Simplified technique for rebuilding a post and core foundation with a preexisting crown: a case report.

    PubMed

    Signore, Antonio; Benedicenti, Stefano; Kaitsas, Vassilios; Barone, Michele

    2010-03-01

    A 58-year-old patient presented with a dislodged crown and post and core on the maxillary right first premolar. After endodontic retreatment, two tapered glass-fiber posts were adhesively cemented. The core foundation was completed by retrofitting the existing crown with a self-curing composite core material. The intaglio surface was lubricated with petroleum jelly, which allowed for easy removal of the crown. Adequate cement thickness was ensured by the finishing procedures of the core buildup that respected the existing tooth margins. The glass-fiber posts and composite buildup provided adequate stability and retention to the original casting. The technique described in this short clinical report enables clinicians to rebuild a post-and-core foundation using the existing crown without the original die or its replica in a simple and time-saving way.

  8. Rearchitecting IT: Simplify. Simplify

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    Simplifying and securing an IT infrastructure is not easy. It frequently requires rethinking years of hardware and software investments, and a gradual migration to modern systems. Even so, writes the author, universities can take six practical steps to success: (1) Audit software infrastructure; (2) Evaluate current applications; (3) Centralize…

  9. A simplified model of aerosol scrubbing by a water pool overlying core debris interacting with concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.A.; Sprung, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    A classic model of aerosol scrubbing from bubbles rising through water is applied to the decontamination of gases produced during core debris interactions with concrete. The model, originally developed by Fuchs, describes aerosol capture by diffusion, sedimentation, and inertial impaction. This original model for spherical bubbles is modified to account for ellipsoidal distortion of the bubbles. Eighteen uncertain variables are identified in the application of the model to the decontamination of aerosols produced during core debris interactions with concrete by a water pool of specified depth and subcooling. These uncertain variables include properties of the aerosols, the bubbles, the water and the ambient pressure. Results are analyzed using a nonparametric, order statistical analysis that allows quantitative differentiation of stochastic and phenomenological uncertainty. The sampled values of the decontamination factors are used to construct estimated probability density functions for the decontamination factor at confidence levels of 50%, 90% and 95%. The decontamination factors for pools 30, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 cm deep and subcooling levels of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 70{degrees}C are correlated by simple polynomial regression. These polynomial equations can be used to estimate decontamination factors at prescribed confidence levels.

  10. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  11. Development of long operating cycle simplified BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Maruya, T.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Narabayash, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes an innovative plant concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) In this plant concept, 1) Long operating cycle ( 3 to 15 years), 2) Simplified systems and building, 3) Factory fabrication in module are discussed. Designing long operating core is based on medium enriched U-235 with burnable poison. Simplified systems and building are realized by using natural circulation with bottom located core, internal CRD and PCV with passive system and an integrated reactor and turbine building. This LSBWR concept will have make high degree of safety by IVR (In Vessel Retention) capability, large water inventory above the core region and no PCV vent to the environment due to PCCS (Passive Containment Cooling System) and internal vent tank. Integrated building concept could realize highly modular arrangement in hull structure (ship frame structure), ease of seismic isolation capability and high applicability of standardization and factory fabrication. (authors)

  12. Stealth Supersymmetry simplified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, JiJi; Krall, Rebecca; Pinner, David; Reece, Matthew; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2016-07-01

    In Stealth Supersymmetry, bounds on superpartners from direct searches can be notably weaker than in standard supersymmetric scenarios, due to suppressed missing energy. We present a set of simplified models of Stealth Supersymmetry that motivate 13 TeV LHC searches. We focus on simplified models within the Natural Supersymmetry framework, in which the gluino, stop, and Higgsino are assumed to be lighter than other superpartners. Our simplified models exhibit novel decay patterns that differ significantly from topologies of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, with and without R-parity. We determine limits on stops and gluinos from searches at the 8 TeV LHC. Existing searches constitute a powerful probe of Stealth Supersymmetry gluinos with certain topologies. However, we identify simplified models where the gluino can be considerably lighter than 1 TeV. Stops are significantly less constrained in Stealth Supersymmetry than the MSSM, and we have identified novel stop decay topologies that are completely unconstrained by existing LHC searches.

  13. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  14. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  15. Simplified tritium permeation model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1993-09-17

    In this model I seek to provide a simplified approach to solving permeation problems addressed by TMAP4. I will assume that there are m one-dimensional segments with thickness L{sub i}, i = 1, 2, {hor_ellipsis}, m, joined in series with an implantation flux, J{sub i}, implanting at the single depth, {delta}, in the first segment. From material properties and heat transfer considerations, I calculate temperatures at each face of each segment, and from those temperatures I find local diffusivities and solubilities. I assume recombination coefficients K{sub r}{sub 1} and K{sub r}{sub 2} are known at the upstream and downstream faces, respectively, but the model will generate Baskes recombination coefficient values on demand. Here I first develop the steady-state concentration equations and then show how trapping considerations can lead to good estimates of permeation transient times.

  16. IRIS Simplified LERF Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maioli, A.; Finnicum, D.J.; Kumagai, Y.

    2004-10-06

    Westinghouse is currently conducting the pre-application licensing of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS). One of the key aspects of the IRIS design is its safety-by-designTM philosophy and within this framework the PRA is being used as an integral part of the design process. The most ambitious risk-related goal for IRIS is to reduce the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) to within the exclusion area by demonstrating that the off-site doses are consistent with the US Protective Action Guidelines (PAGs) for initiation of emergency response so that the required protective actions would be limited to the exclusion area. As a first step, a model has been developed to provide a first order approximation of the Large Early Release Frequency (LERF) as a surrogate predictor of the off-site doses. A key-aspect of the LERF model development is the characterization of the possible paths of release. Four main categories have been historically pointed out: (1) Core Damage (CD ) sequences with containment bypass, (2) CD sequences with containment isolation failure, (3) CD sequences with containment failure at low pressure and (4) CD sequences with containment failure at high pressure. They have been reevaluated to account for the IRIS design features.

  17. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  18. SEA - A Simplified Employee Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, L

    2001-04-23

    This paper presents a proposal for modifying the current employee annual evaluation process in SCAD. It purports to simplify that process, primarily by breaking up the resultant document into a set of more or less independent components. It claims to reduce the overall time and effort required from each actor.

  19. 75 FR 81459 - Simplified Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... filing person's address, business telephone number, cell telephone number if available, fax number if..., business telephone number, cell telephone number if available, fax number if available, and e-mail address... Simplified Proceedings in certain civil penalty proceedings. 75 FR 28223. The Commission explained that...

  20. Simplifying the Water Poverty Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Danny I.; Ogwang, Tomson; Opio, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, principal components methodology is used to derive simplified and cost effective indexes of water poverty. Using a well known data set for 147 countries from which an earlier five-component water poverty index comprising of "Resources," "Access," "Capacity," "Use" and "Environment" was constructed, we find that a simplified…

  1. Simplified Relativistic Force Transformation Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Benjamin U.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified relativistic force transformation equation is derived and then used to obtain the equation for the electromagnetic forces on a charged particle, calculate the electromagnetic fields due to a point charge with constant velocity, transform electromagnetic fields in general, derive the Biot-Savart law, and relate it to Coulomb's law.…

  2. Simplifying plasma chemistry via ILDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, T.; Kemaneci, E.; Graef, W.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-02-01

    A plasma fluid model containing a large number of chemical species and reactions yields a high computational load. One of the methods to overcome this difficulty is to apply Chemical Reduction Techniques as used in combustion engineering. The chemical reduction technique that we study here is ILDM (Intrinsic Lower Dimensional Manifold). The ILDM method is used to simplify an argon plasma model and then a comparison is made with a CRM (Collisional Radiative Model).

  3. Neuron Model with Simplified Memristive Ionic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegab, Almoatazbellah M.; Salem, Noha M.; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Chua, Leon

    2015-06-01

    A simplified neuron model is introduced to mimic the action potential generated by the famous Hodgkin-Huxley equations by using the genetic optimization algorithm. Comparison with different neuron models is investigated, and it is confirmed that the sodium and potassium channels in our simplified neuron model are made out of memristors. In addition, the channel equations in the simplified model may be adjusted to introduce a simplified memristor model that is in accordance with the theoretical conditions of the memristive systems.

  4. Simplifying microbial electrosynthesis reactor design.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Cloelle G S; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodward, Trevor; Lovley, Derek R; Butler, Caitlyn S

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, an artificial form of photosynthesis, can efficiently convert carbon dioxide into organic commodities; however, this process has only previously been demonstrated in reactors that have features likely to be a barrier to scale-up. Therefore, the possibility of simplifying reactor design by both eliminating potentiostatic control of the cathode and removing the membrane separating the anode and cathode was investigated with biofilms of Sporomusa ovata. S. ovata reduces carbon dioxide to acetate and acts as the microbial catalyst for plain graphite stick cathodes as the electron donor. In traditional 'H-cell' reactors, where the anode and cathode chambers were separated with a proton-selective membrane, the rates and columbic efficiencies of microbial electrosynthesis remained high when electron delivery at the cathode was powered with a direct current power source rather than with a potentiostat-poised cathode utilized in previous studies. A membrane-less reactor with a direct-current power source with the cathode and anode positioned to avoid oxygen exposure at the cathode, retained high rates of acetate production as well as high columbic and energetic efficiencies. The finding that microbial electrosynthesis is feasible without a membrane separating the anode from the cathode, coupled with a direct current power source supplying the energy for electron delivery, is expected to greatly simplify future reactor design and lower construction costs.

  5. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-06-09

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards` uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper.

  6. Simplifying microbial electrosynthesis reactor design.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Cloelle G S; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodward, Trevor; Lovley, Derek R; Butler, Caitlyn S

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, an artificial form of photosynthesis, can efficiently convert carbon dioxide into organic commodities; however, this process has only previously been demonstrated in reactors that have features likely to be a barrier to scale-up. Therefore, the possibility of simplifying reactor design by both eliminating potentiostatic control of the cathode and removing the membrane separating the anode and cathode was investigated with biofilms of Sporomusa ovata. S. ovata reduces carbon dioxide to acetate and acts as the microbial catalyst for plain graphite stick cathodes as the electron donor. In traditional 'H-cell' reactors, where the anode and cathode chambers were separated with a proton-selective membrane, the rates and columbic efficiencies of microbial electrosynthesis remained high when electron delivery at the cathode was powered with a direct current power source rather than with a potentiostat-poised cathode utilized in previous studies. A membrane-less reactor with a direct-current power source with the cathode and anode positioned to avoid oxygen exposure at the cathode, retained high rates of acetate production as well as high columbic and energetic efficiencies. The finding that microbial electrosynthesis is feasible without a membrane separating the anode from the cathode, coupled with a direct current power source supplying the energy for electron delivery, is expected to greatly simplify future reactor design and lower construction costs. PMID:26029199

  7. SIMPLIFIED SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, R.W.

    1963-03-01

    This patent relates to a nuclear power reactor comprising a reactor vessel, shielding means positioned at the top of said vessel, means sealing said reactor vessel to said shielding means, said vessel containing a quantity of sodium, a core tank, unclad graphite moderator disposed in said tank, means including a plurality of process tubes traversing said tank for isolating said graphite from said sodium, fuel elements positioned in said process tubes, said core tank being supported in spaced relation to the walls and bottom of said reactor vessel and below the level of said sodium, neutron shielding means positioned adjacent said core tank between said core tank and the walls of said vessel, said neutron shielding means defining an annuiar volume adjacent the inside wall of said reactor vessel, inlet plenum means below said core tank for providing a passage between said annular volume and said process tubes, heat exchanger means removably supported from the first-named shielding means and positioned in said annular volume, and means for circulating said sodium over said neutron shielding means down through said heat exchanger, across said inlet plenum and upward through said process tubes, said last-named means including electromagnetic pumps located outside said vessel and supported on said vessel wall between said heat exchanger means and said inlet plenum means. (AEC)

  8. Simplified Radioimmunoassay for Diagnostic Serology

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Harriet D.; Ziegler, Donald W.

    1972-01-01

    A simplified, indirect radioimmunoassay is described for Escherichia coli, vaccinia virus, and herpesvirus. The antigens were affixed to glass cover slips; thus both the primary and secondary reactions take place on the cover slips, and the unbound antiserum is easily separated from the bound antiserum by rinsing. Rabbit or human immune sera were reacted with the antigens, and the primary immune complex was quantitated by a secondary reaction with 125I-indicator globulin (anti-rabbit or anti-human). A direct relationship between the antiserum concentration and the 125I absorption was established. Variations in titers were detectable, and the titers were comparable to complement fixation titers. Homologous and heterologous reactions were distinguishable. The method affords an objective, quantitative, and qualitative evaluation of antibody, and results are reproducible. PMID:4344958

  9. Simplified experimental human dermatophytosis model.

    PubMed

    Aly, R; Maibach, H I; Ho, I; Abrams, B B

    1992-02-01

    The authors have improved and simplified previous methods for producing localized mycotic skin infections in an attempt to compare topical antifungal agents for their bioequivalency. Healthy human volunteers who had negative results for commercial, purified Trichophyton antigen (Trichophytin) were inoculated with Trichophyton mentagrophytes on two sites on each forearm in a randomized study designed to compare the antifungal activities of two ciclopirox olamine formulations. The lesions, easily induced by the authors' method, were localized and did not spread under the occlusive dressings. Infections established at the four sites on 26 subjects were treated twice daily for 14 days with the two active drug formulations and their vehicles. There were no significant differences in culture-documented cure rates or alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms between ciclopirox olamine lotion and cream. Each drug was significantly better than its vehicle. The authors' method seems to be effective and suitable for therapeutic studies.

  10. 48 CFR 453.213 - Simplified Acquisition and other simplified purchase procedures (AD-838).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... other simplified purchase procedures (AD-838). 453.213 Section 453.213 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 453.213 Simplified Acquisition and other simplified purchase procedures (AD-838). Form AD-838, Purchase Order, is prescribed...

  11. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  12. 3. 6 simplified methods for design

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, R.E.; Yahr, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Simplified design analysis methods for elevated temperature construction are classified and reviewed. Because the major impetus for developing elevated temperature design methodology during the past ten years has been the LMFBR program, considerable emphasis is placed upon results from this source. The operating characteristics of the LMFBR are such that cycles of severe transient thermal stresses can be interspersed with normal elevated temperature operational periods of significant duration, leading to a combination of plastic and creep deformation. The various simplified methods are organized into two general categories, depending upon whether it is the material, or constitutive, model that is reduced, or the geometric modeling that is simplified. Because the elastic representation of material behavior is so prevalent, an entire section is devoted to elastic analysis methods. Finally, the validation of the simplified procedures is discussed.

  13. Veitch diagram plotter simplifies Boolean functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. K.

    1964-01-01

    This device for simplifying the plotting of a Veitch diagram consists of several overlays for blocking out the unwanted squares. This method of plotting the various input combinations to a computer is used in conjunction with the Boolean functions.

  14. Simplified two and three dimensional HTTR benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan Zhang; Dingkang Zhang; Justin M. Pounders; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of diffusion or transport methods for reactor calculations, it is desirable to create heterogeneous benchmark problems that are typical of whole core configurations. In this paper we have created two and three dimensional numerical benchmark problems typical of high temperature gas cooled prismatic cores. Additionally, a single cell and single block benchmark problems are also included. These problems were derived from the HTTR start-up experiment. Since the primary utility of the benchmark problems is in code-to-code verification, minor details regarding geometry and material specification of the original experiment have been simplified while retaining the heterogeneity and the major physics properties of the core from a neutronics viewpoint. A six-group material (macroscopic) cross section library has been generated for the benchmark problems using the lattice depletion code HELIOS. Using this library, Monte Carlo solutions are presented for three configurations (all-rods-in, partially-controlled and all-rods-out) for both the 2D and 3D problems. These solutions include the core eigenvalues, the block (assembly) averaged fission densities, local peaking factors, the absorption densities in the burnable poison and control rods, and pin fission density distribution for selected blocks. Also included are the solutions for the single cell and single block problems.

  15. Simplified models for LHC new physics searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Sekhar Chivukula, R.; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig (Editor, Rouven; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; Freitas, Ayres; Gainer, James S.; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Gregoire, Thomas; Gripaios, Ben; Gunion, Jack; Han, Tao; Haas, Andy; Hansson, Per; Hewett, JoAnne; Hits, Dmitry; Hubisz, Jay; Izaguirre, Eder; Kaplan, Jared; Katz, Emanuel; Kilic, Can; Kim, Hyung-Do; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Koay, Sue Ann; Ko, Pyungwon; Krohn, David; Kuflik, Eric; Lewis, Ian; Lisanti (Editor, Mariangela; Liu, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Lu, Ran; Luty, Markus; Meade, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Mrenna, Stephen; Nojiri, Mihoko; Okui, Takemichi; Padhi, Sanjay; Papucci, Michele; Park, Michael; Park, Myeonghun; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael; Phalen, Daniel; Rehermann, Keith; Rentala, Vikram; Roy, Tuhin; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Sanz, Veronica; Schmaltz, Martin; Schnetzer, Stephen; Schuster (Editor, Philip; Schwaller, Pedro; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Schwartzman, Ariel; Shao, Jing; Shelton, Jessie; Shih, David; Shu, Jing; Silverstein, Daniel; Simmons, Elizabeth; Somalwar, Sunil; Spannowsky, Michael; Spethmann, Christian; Strassler, Matthew; Su, Shufang; Tait (Editor, Tim; Thomas, Brooks; Thomas, Scott; Toro (Editor, Natalia; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker (Editor, Jay; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Yavin, Itay; Yu, Felix; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn; LHC New Physics Working Group

    2012-10-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the ‘Topologies for Early LHC Searches’ workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first ˜50-500 pb-1 of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  16. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Chivukula, R.Sekhar; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig, Rouven,; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; /more authors..

    2012-06-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the 'Topologies for Early LHC Searches' workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first {approx} 50-500 pb{sup -1} of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  17. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Simplified Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Raitano, Paul; Le, Dzu K.; Ouzts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This document addresses the modeling task plan for the hypersonic GN&C GRC team members. The overall propulsion system modeling task plan is a multi-step process and the task plan identified in this document addresses the first steps (short term modeling goals). The procedures and tools produced from this effort will be useful for creating simplified dynamic models applicable to a hypersonic vehicle propulsion system. The document continues with the GRC short term modeling goal. Next, a general description of the desired simplified model is presented along with simulations that are available to varying degrees. The simulations may be available in electronic form (FORTRAN, CFD, MatLab,...) or in paper form in published documents. Finally, roadmaps outlining possible avenues towards realizing simplified model are presented.

  18. SIMPLIFIED LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY WITH TWO INCISIONS

    PubMed Central

    ABAID, Rafael Antoniazzi; CECCONELLO, Ivan; ZILBERSTEIN, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has traditionally been performed with four incisions to insert four trocars, in a simple, efficient and safe way. Aim To describe a simplified technique of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with two incisions, using basic conventional instrumental. Technique In one incision in the umbilicus are applied two trocars and in epigastrium one more. The use of two trocars on the same incision, working in "x" does not hinder the procedure and does not require special instruments. Conclusion Simplified laparoscopic cholecystectomy with two incisions is feasible and easy to perform, allowing to operate with ergonomy and safety, with good cosmetic result. PMID:25004296

  19. Heavy Flavor Simplified Models at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Izaguirre, Eder; Kaplan, Jared; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    We consider a comprehensive set of simplified models that contribute to final states with top and bottom quarks at the LHC. These simplified models are used to create minimal search strategies that ensure optimal coverage of new heavy flavor physics involving the pair production of color octets and triplets. We provide a set of benchmarks that are representative of model space, which can be used by experimentalists to perform their own optimization of search strategies. For data sets larger than 1 fb{sup -1}, same-sign dilepton and 3b search regions become very powerful. Expected sensitivities from existing and optimized searches are given.

  20. simplified aerosol representations in global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Peters, Karsten; Stevens, Bjorn; Rast, Sebastian; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    The detailed treatment of aerosol in global modeling is complex and time-consuming. Thus simplified approaches are investigated, which prescribe 4D (space and time) distributions of aerosol optical properties and of aerosol microphysical properties. Aerosol optical properties are required to assess aerosol direct radiative effects and aerosol microphysical properties (in terms of their ability as aerosol nuclei to modify cloud droplet concentrations) are needed to address the indirect aerosol impact on cloud properties. Following the simplifying concept of the monthly gridded (1x1 lat/lon) aerosol climatology (MAC), new approaches are presented and evaluated against more detailed methods, including comparisons to detailed simulations with complex aerosol component modules.

  1. A simplified model for glass formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhlmann, D. R.; Onorato, P. I. K.; Scherer, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified model of glass formation based on the formal theory of transformation kinetics is presented, which describes the critical cooling rates implied by the occurrence of glassy or partly crystalline bodies. In addition, an approach based on the nose of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curve as an extremum in temperature and time has provided a relatively simple relation between the activation energy for viscous flow in the undercooled region and the temperature of the nose of the TTT curve. Using this relation together with the simplified model, it now seems possible to predict cooling rates using only the liquidus temperature, glass transition temperature, and heat of fusion.

  2. Angular momentum conservation in a simplified Venus General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2012-11-01

    Angular momentum (AM) conservation and transport are critical components of all General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations, and particularly for simulations of the Venus atmosphere. We show that a Venus GCM based upon the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Flexible Modeling System (FMS) GCM conserves angular momentum to better than 2% per 1000 Venus years (≈225,000 Earth days) of integration under the extreme conditions of a simplified Venus simulation with low surface torques. With no topography in the GCM, physical torques due to surface/atmosphere frictional interactions dominate the acceleration of an initially stationary atmosphere and provide more than four times the angular momentum of solid body co-rotation over an integration period of 100 Venus years. During the subsequent steady state period of 200 Venus years negligible mean physical torques cause variation in the total angular momentum of less than 5% and produce a stable multi-century simulation. Diffusion and damping processes within the GCM account for AM losses of less than 0.2% per 1000 Venus years. This study provides a stable comparison point for other GCMs by employing a simplified forcing scheme. The diagnostics and analysis require little or no modification to the core GCM and are sufficiently robust to allow easy model inter-comparison.

  3. Basic Rules of Alphabetical Sequence Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Michael's Coll., Winooski, VT. Library.

    As developed by the nonprofessional staff of St. Michael's College Library, Basic Rules of Alphabetic Sequence Simplified (BRASS) is a refined system of alphabetic filing for library card catalogs. It is designed to be a concise set of principles, consistently applied, making it therefore faster than other standard filing systems. BRASS consists…

  4. Gaining Algorithmic Insight through Simplifying Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginat, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses algorithmic problem solving in computer science education, particularly algorithmic insight, and focuses on the relevance and effectiveness of the heuristic simplifying constraints which involves simplification of a given problem to a problem in which constraints are imposed on the input data. Presents three examples involving…

  5. Simplified Recipes for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmussen, Patricia D.

    The spiral-bound collection of 156 simplified recipes is designed to help those who prepare food for groups of children at day care centers. The recipes provide for 25 child-size servings to meet the nutritional needs and appetites of children from 2 to 6 years of age. The first section gives general information on ladle and scoop sizes, weights…

  6. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  7. Simplified models of mixed dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Sanford, David E-mail: dsanford@caltech.edu

    2014-02-01

    We explore simplified models of mixed dark matter (DM), defined here to be a stable relic composed of a singlet and an electroweak charged state. Our setup describes a broad spectrum of thermal DM candidates that can naturally accommodate the observed DM abundance but are subject to substantial constraints from current and upcoming direct detection experiments. We identify ''blind spots'' at which the DM-Higgs coupling is identically zero, thus nullifying direct detection constraints on spin independent scattering. Furthermore, we characterize the fine-tuning in mixing angles, i.e. well-tempering, required for thermal freeze-out to accommodate the observed abundance. Present and projected limits from LUX and XENON1T force many thermal relic models into blind spot tuning, well-tempering, or both. This simplified model framework generalizes bino-Higgsino DM in the MSSM, singlino-Higgsino DM in the NMSSM, and scalar DM candidates that appear in models of extended Higgs sectors.

  8. Simplified dichromated gelatin hologram recording process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgekutty, Tharayil G.; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1987-01-01

    A simplified method for making dichromated gelatin (DCG) holographic optical elements (HOE) has been discovered. The method is much less tedious and it requires a period of processing time comparable with that for processing a silver halide hologram. HOE characteristics including diffraction efficiency (DE), linearity, and spectral sensitivity have been quantitatively investigated. The quality of the holographic grating is very high. Ninety percent or higher diffraction efficiency has been achieved in simple plane gratings made by this process.

  9. Broadening and Simplifying the First SETI Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, M. A. G.

    The Declaration of Principles Concerning Activities Following the Detection of Extraterrestrial Intelligence, known informally as the First SETI Protocol, is the primary existing international guidance on this subject. During the fifteen years since the document was issued, several people have suggested revisions or additional protocols. This article proposes a broadened and simplified text that would apply to the detection of alien technology in our solar system as well as to electromagnetic signals from more remote sources.

  10. A simplified solar cell array modelling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the energy conversion/self sufficiency efforts of DSN engineering, it was necessary to have a simplified computer model of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system. This article describes the analysis and simplifications employed in the development of a PV cell array computer model. The analysis of the incident solar radiation, steady state cell temperature and the current-voltage characteristics of a cell array are discussed. A sample cell array was modelled and the results are presented.

  11. Cloud computing can simplify HIT infrastructure management.

    PubMed

    Glaser, John

    2011-08-01

    Software as a Service (SaaS), built on cloud computing technology, is emerging as the forerunner in IT infrastructure because it helps healthcare providers reduce capital investments. Cloud computing leads to predictable, monthly, fixed operating expenses for hospital IT staff. Outsourced cloud computing facilities are state-of-the-art data centers boasting some of the most sophisticated networking equipment on the market. The SaaS model helps hospitals safeguard against technology obsolescence, minimizes maintenance requirements, and simplifies management.

  12. Cloud computing can simplify HIT infrastructure management.

    PubMed

    Glaser, John

    2011-08-01

    Software as a Service (SaaS), built on cloud computing technology, is emerging as the forerunner in IT infrastructure because it helps healthcare providers reduce capital investments. Cloud computing leads to predictable, monthly, fixed operating expenses for hospital IT staff. Outsourced cloud computing facilities are state-of-the-art data centers boasting some of the most sophisticated networking equipment on the market. The SaaS model helps hospitals safeguard against technology obsolescence, minimizes maintenance requirements, and simplifies management. PMID:21866720

  13. Simplified robot arm dynamics for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Paul, R. P.

    1981-01-01

    A brief summary and evaluation is presented on the use of symbolic state equation techniques in order to represent robot arm dynamics with sufficient accuracy for controlling arm motion. The use of homogeneous transformations and the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics offers a convenient frame for the derivation, analysis and simplification of complex robot dynamics equations. It is pointed out that simplified state equations can represent robot arm dynamics with good accuracy.

  14. Growth adjusted sonographic age. A simplified method.

    PubMed

    Sabbagha, R E; Hughey, M; Depp, R

    1978-03-01

    It recently has been shown that the sonar predictive accuracy of gestational age can be markedly enhanced by separating fetuses into one of three cephalic growth patterns, namely, large, average, and small. In this way it becomes possible to adjust fetal age in relation to biparietal diameter (BPD) growth. In this report we are defining the application of a growth adjusted sonographic age (GASA). Additionally, we are introducing a table which simplifies the assignment of GASA on a routine basis.

  15. European simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR) plant

    SciTech Connect

    Posta, B.A.; Goldenberg, E.A.; Sawhney, P.S.; Rao, A.S.

    1996-07-01

    This paper covers innovative ideas which made possible the redesign of the US 660-MW Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) Reactor Island for a 1,200-MW size reactor while actually reducing the building cost. This was achieved by breaking down the Reactor Island into multiple buildings separating seismic-1 from non-seismic-1 areas, providing for better space utilization, shorter construction schedule, easier maintainability and better postaccident accessibility.

  16. Simplified Analytical Model of a Six-Degree-of-Freedom Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified analytical model of a six-degree-of-freedom large-gap magnetic suspension system is presented. The suspended element is a cylindrical permanent magnet that is magnetized in a direction which is perpendicular to its axis of symmetry. The actuators are air core electromagnets mounted in a planar array. The analytical model consists of an open-loop representation of the magnetic suspension system with electromagnet currents as inputs.

  17. Simplifying tool usage in teleoperative tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Thomas; Paul, Richard P.

    1993-03-01

    Modern robotic research has presented the opportunity for enhanced teleoperative systems. Teleprogramming has been developed for teleoperation in time-delayed environments, but can also lead to increased productivity in non-delayed teleoperation. Powered tools are used to increase the abilities of the remote manipulator. However, tools add to the complexity of the system, both in terms of control and sensing. Teleprogramming can be used to simplify the operators interaction with the manipulator/tool system. Further, the adaptive sensing algorithm of the remote site system (using an instrumented compliant wrist for feedback) simplifies the sensory requirements of the system. Current remote-site implementation of a teleprogramming tool-usage strategy that simplifies tool use is described in this document. The use of powered tools in teleoperation tasks is illustrated by two examples, one using an air-powered impact wrench, and the other using an electric winch. Both of these tools are implemented at our remote site workcell, consisting of a Puma 560 robot working on the task of removing the top of a large box.

  18. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Simplified tools for evaluating domestic ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maansson, L.G.; Orme, M.

    1999-07-01

    Within an International Energy Agency (IEA) project, Annex 27, experts from 8 countries (Canada, France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA) have developed simplified tools for evaluating domestic ventilation systems during the heating season. Tools for building and user aspects, thermal comfort, noise, energy, life cycle cost, reliability and indoor air quality (IAQ) have been devised. The results can be used both for dwellings at the design stage and after construction. The tools lead to immediate answers and indications about the consequences of different choices that may arise during discussion with clients. This paper presents an introduction to these tools. Examples applications of the indoor air quality and energy simplified tools are also provided. The IAQ tool accounts for constant emission sources, CO{sub 2}, cooking products, tobacco smoke, condensation risks, humidity levels (i.e., for judging the risk for mould and house dust mites), and pressure difference (for identifying the risk for radon or land fill spillage entering the dwelling or problems with indoor combustion appliances). An elaborated set of design parameters were worked out that resulted in about 17,000 combinations. By using multi-variate analysis it was possible to reduce this to 174 combinations for IAQ. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was made using 990 combinations. The results from all the runs were used to develop a simplified tool, as well as quantifying equations relying on the design parameters. A computerized energy tool has also been developed within this project, which takes into account air tightness, climate, window airing pattern, outdoor air flow rate and heat exchange efficiency.

  20. 29 CFR 2200.203 - Commencing Simplified Proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commencing Simplified Proceedings. 2200.203 Section 2200.203 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Simplified Proceedings § 2200.203 Commencing Simplified Proceedings. (a)...

  1. 29 CFR 2200.203 - Commencing Simplified Proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commencing Simplified Proceedings. 2200.203 Section 2200.203 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Simplified Proceedings § 2200.203 Commencing Simplified Proceedings. (a)...

  2. 29 CFR 2200.203 - Commencing Simplified Proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commencing Simplified Proceedings. 2200.203 Section 2200.203 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Simplified Proceedings § 2200.203 Commencing Simplified Proceedings. (a)...

  3. Simplified Explosive Joining of Tubes to Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bailey, J. W.; Perry, R.; Finch, M. S.

    1987-01-01

    Technique simplifies tube-to-fitting joining, as compared to fusion welding, and provides improvement on standard procedures used to join tubes explosively to tube fittings. Special tool inserted into tube to be joined. Tool allows strip of ribbon explosive to be placed right at joint. Ribbon explosive and mild detonating fuse allows use of smaller charge. Assembled tool storable, and process amenable to automation. Assembly of components, insertion of tool into weld site, and joining operation mechanized without human contact. Used to assemble components in nuclear reactors or in other environments hostile to humans.

  4. Simplified dynamic buckling assessment of steel containments

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Renick, D.H.

    1993-02-01

    A simplified, three-degree-of-freedom analytical procedure for performing a response spectrum buckling analysis of a thin containment shell is developed. Two numerical examples with R/t values which bound many existing steel containments are used to illustrate the procedure. The role of damping on incipient buckling acceleration level is evaluated for a regulatory seismic spectrum using the two numerical examples. The zero-period acceleration level that causes incipient buckling in either of the two containments increases 31% when damping is increased from 1% to 4% of critical. Comparisons with finite element results on incipient buckling levels are favorable.

  5. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  6. Simplifying informed consent for biorepositories: Stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Beskow, Laura M.; Friedman, Joelle Y.; Hardy, Natalie C.; Lin, Li; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Complex and sometimes controversial information must be conveyed during the consent process for participation in biorepositories, and studies suggest that consent documents in general are growing in length and complexity. As a first step toward creating a simplified biorepository consent form, we gathered data from multiple stakeholders about what information was most important for prospective participants to know when making a decision about taking part in a biorepository. Methods We recruited 52 research participants, 12 researchers, and 20 institutional review board representatives from Durham and Kannapolis, NC. These subjects were asked to read a model biorepository consent form and highlight sentences they deemed most important. Results On average, IRB representatives identified 72.3% of the sentences as important; researchers selected 53.0%, and participants 40.4% (P = 0.0004). Participants most often selected sentences about the kinds of individual research results that might be offered, privacy risks, and large-scale data sharing. Researchers highlighted sentences about the biorepository's purpose, privacy protections, costs, and participant access to individual results. IRB representatives highlighted sentences about collection of basic personal information, medical record access, and duration of storage. Conclusion The differing mandates of these three groups can translate into widely divergent opinions about what information is important and appropriate to include a consent form. These differences could frustrate efforts to move simplified forms—for biobanking as well as for other kinds of research—into actual use, despite continued calls for such forms. PMID:20697289

  7. Simplified dynamic models of grass field ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingcun; Zeng, Xiaodong; Lu, Peisheng

    1994-12-01

    Some simplified dynamic models of grass field ecosystem are developed and investigated. The maximum simplified one consists of two variables, living grass biomass and soil wetness. The analyses of such models show that there exists only desert regime without grasses if the precipitation p is less than a critical value p c ; the grass biomass continuously depends on p if the interaction between grass biomass and the soil wetness is weak, but the strong interaction results in the bifurcation of grass biomass in the vicinity of p c : the grass biomass is rich as p > p c , but it becomes desertification as p

  8. Simplified Simulation of Mass Transfer in Double White Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannah, Sara; Frank, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    The behavior both stable and unstable mass transfer in semi-detached double white dwarfs triggers a cornucopia of astrophysical phenomena including Type Ia supernovae and AM CVn stars. Current 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution these systems following the mass transfer, binary orbital parameters, and the self-consistent gravitational field over several tens of orbital periods have produced a wealth of data. However, these simulations can take weeks to months in high-performance computing platforms to execute. To help with the interpretation of results of such large scale simulations, and to enable a quick exploration of binary parameter space, we have developed a Mathematica code that integrates forward in time a system of 5 ODEs describing the orbit-averaged evolution of the binary separation as well as the radius, mass, and spin angular momentum of both components of the binary. By adjusting a few parameters describing the mass transfer as a function of the Roche-lobe overflow and the strength of the tidal coupling between the orbit and component spins we are able to obtain approximate fits to previously run hydrodynamic simulations. This simplified simulation is able to run simulations similar to the hydrodynamic versions in a matter of seconds on a dual-core PC or Mac computer.

  9. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  10. Constructing Simplified Plans via Truth Criteria Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, S.; DeJong, G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper has presented an approach to dealing with the complexity of explanation-based learning plans in complex domains. This approach uses a simplified algorithm to construct plans, and employs later refinements to repair bugs in constructed plans. This algorithm has the theoretical properties of completeness and convergence upon soundness. This incremental reasoning planning and learning algorithm has been implemented using a partial-order constraint posting planner and empirically compared to a conventional exhaustive reasoning partial-order constraint-posting planner and learning algorithm. This comparison showed that 1) incremental reasoning significantly reduced learning costs compared to exhaustive reasoning, 2) Explanation-based Learning (EBL) reduced failures from incremental reasoning, 3) EBL with incremental reasoning required less search to solve problems than EBL with exhaustive reasoning.

  11. Space station ECLSS simplified integrated test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathyrn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the Space Station Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) was conducted. The first in a series of three integrated Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system tests, the primary objectives of the SIT were to verify proper operation of ECLS subsystems functioning in an integrated fashion as well as to gather preliminary performance data for the partial ECLS system used in the test. A description of the SIT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements and water and gas samples taken during the test are included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test is reported providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item.

  12. Simplifying cardiovascular magnetic resonance pulse sequence terminology.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Matthias G; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; White, James A; Plein, Sven; Moon, James C; Almeida, Ana G; Kramer, Christopher M; Neubauer, Stefan; Pennell, Dudley J; Petersen, Steffen E; Kwong, Raymond Y; Ferrari, Victor A; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Sakuma, Hajime; Schelbert, Erik B; Larose, Éric; Eitel, Ingo; Carbone, Iacopo; Taylor, Andrew J; Young, Alistair; de Roos, Albert; Nagel, Eike

    2014-01-01

    We propose a set of simplified terms to describe applied Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) pulse sequence techniques in clinical reports, scientific articles and societal guidelines or recommendations. Rather than using various technical details in clinical reports, the description of the technical approach should be based on the purpose of the pulse sequence. In scientific papers or other technical work, this should be followed by a more detailed description of the pulse sequence and settings. The use of a unified set of widely understood terms would facilitate the communication between referring physicians and CMR readers by increasing the clarity of CMR reports and thus improve overall patient care. Applied in research articles, its use would facilitate non-expert readers' understanding of the methodology used and its clinical meaning. PMID:25551695

  13. Aeroacoustic Analysis of a Simplified Landing Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi, R.; Li, Fei

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid approach is used to investigate the noise generated by a simplified landing gear without small scale parts such as hydraulic lines and fasteners. The Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to predict the noise at far-field observer locations from flow data provided by an unsteady computational fluid dynamics calculation. A simulation with 13 million grid points has been completed, and comparisons are made between calculations with different turbulence models. Results indicate that the turbulence model has a profound effect on the levels and character of the unsteadiness. Flow data on solid surfaces and a set of permeable surfaces surrounding the gear have been collected. Noise predictions using the porous surfaces appear to be contaminated by errors caused by large wake fluctuations passing through the surfaces. However, comparisons between predictions using the solid surfaces with the near-field CFD solution are in good agreement giving confidence in the far-field results.

  14. Nonlinear optimization simplified by hypersurface deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stillinger, F.H.; Weber, T.A.

    1988-09-01

    A general strategy is advanced for simplifying nonlinear optimization problems, the ant-lion method. This approach exploits shape modifications of the cost-function hypersurface which distend basins surrounding low-lying minima (including global minima). By intertwining hypersurface deformations with steepest-descent displacements, the search is concentrated on a small relevant subset of all minima. Specific calculations demonstrating the value of this method are reported for the partitioning of two classes of irregular but nonrandom graphs, the prime-factor graphs and the pi graphs. We also indicate how this approach can be applied to the traveling salesman problem and to design layout optimization, and that it may be useful in combination with simulated annealing strategies.

  15. Immunodiagnosis simplified: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Technologies suitable for the development of simplified immunodiagnostic tests were reviewed by a Working Group of the WHO Advisory Committee on Medical Research in Geneva in June 1983. They included agglutination tests and use of artificial particles coated with immunoglobulins, direct visual detection of antigen-antibody reactions, enzyme-immunoassays, and immunofluorescence and fluoroimmunoassays. The use of monoclonal antibodies in immunodiagnosis and of DNA/RNA probes to identify viruses was also discussed in detail. The need for applicability of these tests at three levels, i.e., field conditions (or primary health care level), local laboratories, and central laboratories, was discussed and their use at the field level was emphasized. PMID:6375885

  16. Entropy reduction via simplified image contourization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The process of contourization is presented which converts a raster image into a set of plateaux or contours. These contours can be grouped into a hierarchical structure, defining total spatial inclusion, called a contour tree. A contour coder has been developed which fully describes these contours in a compact and efficient manner and is the basis for an image compression method. Simplification of the contour tree has been undertaken by merging contour tree nodes thus lowering the contour tree's entropy. This can be exploited by the contour coder to increase the image compression ratio. By applying general and simple rules derived from physiological experiments on the human vision system, lossy image compression can be achieved which minimizes noticeable artifacts in the simplified image.

  17. Simplified Model of Nonlinear Landau Damping

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Yampolsky and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-16

    The nonlinear interaction of a plasma wave with resonant electrons results in a plateau in the electron distribution function close to the phase velocity of the plasma wave. As a result, Landau damping of the plasma wave vanishes and the resonant frequency of the plasma wave downshifts. However, this simple picture is invalid when the external driving force changes the plasma wave fast enough so that the plateau cannot be fully developed. A new model to describe amplification of the plasma wave including the saturation of Landau damping and the nonlinear frequency shift is proposed. The proposed model takes into account the change of the plasma wave amplitude and describes saturation of the Landau damping rate in terms of a single fluid equation, which simplifies the description of the inherently kinetic nature of Landau damping. A proposed fluid model, incorporating these simplifications, is verified numerically using a kinetic Vlasov code.

  18. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  19. Simplifying the circuit of Josephson parametric converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Baleegh; Brink, Markus; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Keefe, George

    Josephson parametric converters (JPCs) are quantum-limited three-wave mixing devices that can play various important roles in quantum information processing in the microwave domain, including amplification of quantum signals, transduction of quantum information, remote entanglement of qubits, nonreciprocal amplification, and circulation of signals. However, the input-output and biasing circuit of a state-of-the-art JPC consists of bulky components, i.e. two commercial off-chip broadband 180-degree hybrids, four phase-matched short coax cables, and one superconducting magnetic coil. Such bulky hardware significantly hinders the integration of JPCs in scalable quantum computing architectures. In my talk, I will present ideas on how to simplify the JPC circuit and show preliminary experimental results

  20. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  1. Thermodynamic behaviour of simplified geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hiriart, G.; Sanchez, E.

    1985-01-22

    Starting from the basic laws of conservation of mass and energy, the differential equations that represent the thermodynamic behavior of a simplified geothermal reservoir are derived. Its application is limited to a reservoir of high permeability as it usually occurs in the central zone of a geothermal field. A very practical method to solve numerically the equations is presented, based on the direct use of the steam tables. The method, based in one general equation, is extended and illustrated with a numerical example to the case of segregated mass extraction, variable influx and heat exchange between rock and fluid. As it is explained, the method can be easily coupled to several influx models already developed somewhere else. The proposed model can become an important tool to solve practical problems, where like in Los Azufres Mexico, the geothermal field can be divided in an inner part where flashing occurs and an exterior field where storage of water plays the main role.

  2. Structure and strategy in encoding simplified graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiano, Diane J.; Tversky, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Tversky and Schiano (1989) found a systematic bias toward the 45-deg line in memory for the slopes of identical lines when embedded in graphs, but not in maps, suggesting the use of a cognitive reference frame specifically for encoding meaningful graphs. The present experiments explore this issue further using the linear configurations alone as stimuli. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that perception and immediate memory for the slope of a test line within orthogonal 'axes' are predictable from purely structural considerations. In Experiments 3 and 4, subjects were instructed to use a diagonal-reference strategy in viewing the stimuli, which were described as 'graphs' only in Experiment 3. Results for both studies showed the diagonal bias previously found only for graphs. This pattern provides converging evidence for the diagonal as a cognitive reference frame in encoding linear graphs, and demonstrates that even in highly simplified displays, strategic factors can produce encoding biases not predictable solely from stimulus structure alone.

  3. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  4. Simplified probabilistic risk assessment in fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    An evaluation was made to determine if a backup mass tracking computer would significantly reduce the probability of criticality in the fuel reprocessing of the Integral Fast Reactor. Often tradeoff studies, such as this, must be made that would greatly benefit from a Probably Risk Assessment (PRA). The major benefits of a complete PRA can often be accrued with a Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA). An SPRA was performed by selecting a representative fuel reprocessing operation (moving a piece of fuel) for analysis. It showed that the benefit of adding parallel computers was small compared to the benefit which could be obtained by adding parallelism to two computer input steps and two of the weighing operations. The probability of an incorrect material moves with the basic process is estimated to be 4 out of 100 moves. The actual values of the probability numbers are considered accurate to within an order of magnitude. The most useful result of developing the fault trees accrue from the ability to determine where significant improvements in the process can be made. By including the above mentioned parallelism, the error move rate can be reduced to 1 out of 1000.

  5. Simplified probabilistic risk assessment in fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    An evaluation was made to determine if a backup mass tracking computer would significantly reduce the probability of criticality in the fuel reprocessing of the Integral Fast Reactor. Often tradeoff studies, such as this, must be made that would greatly benefit from a Probably Risk Assessment (PRA). The major benefits of a complete PRA can often be accrued with a Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA). An SPRA was performed by selecting a representative fuel reprocessing operation (moving a piece of fuel) for analysis. It showed that the benefit of adding parallel computers was small compared to the benefit which could be obtained by adding parallelism to two computer input steps and two of the weighing operations. The probability of an incorrect material moves with the basic process is estimated to be 4 out of 100 moves. The actual values of the probability numbers are considered accurate to within an order of magnitude. The most useful result of developing the fault trees accrue from the ability to determine where significant improvements in the process can be made. By including the above mentioned parallelism, the error move rate can be reduced to 1 out of 1000.

  6. Simplified environmental study on innovative bridge structure.

    PubMed

    Bouhaya, Lina; Le Roy, Robert; Feraille-Fresnet, Adélaïde

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to present a simplified life cycle assessment on an innovative bridge structure, made of wood and ultra high performance concrete, which combines mechanical performance with minimum environmental impact. The environmental analysis was conducted from cradle to grave using the Life Cycle Assessment method. It was restricted to energy release and greenhouse gas emissions. Assumptions are detailed for each step of the analysis. For the wood end-of-life, three scenarios were proposed: dumping, burning, and recycling. Results show that the most energy needed is in the production phase, which represents 73.4% of the total amount. Analysis shows that the renewable energy is about 70% of the production energy. Wood, through its biomass CO2, contributes positively to the environmental impact. It was concluded that no scenario can be the winner on both impacts. Indeed, the end-of-life wood recycling gives the best impact on CO2 release, whereas burning wood, despite its remarkable energy impact is the worst. According to the emphasis given to each impact, designers will be able to choose one or the other. PMID:19368215

  7. Simplified methods for calculating photodissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Ogawa, T.; Farrell, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified methods for calculating the transmission of solar UV radiation and the dissociation coefficients of various molecules are compared. A significant difference sometimes appears in calculations of the individual band, but the total transmission and the total dissociation coefficients integrated over the entire SR (solar radiation) band region agree well between the methods. The ambiguities in the solar flux data affect the calculated dissociation coefficients more strongly than does the method. A simpler method is developed for the purpose of reducing the computation time and computer memory size necessary for storing coefficients of the equations. The new method can reduce the computation time by a factor of more than 3 and the memory size by a factor of more than 50 compared with the Hudson-Mahle method, and yet the result agrees within 10 percent (in most cases much less) with the original Hudson-Mahle results, except for H2O and CO2. A revised method is necessary for these two molecules, whose absorption cross sections change very rapidly over the SR band spectral range.

  8. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  9. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  10. Simplified tube models for entangled supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudara, Victor; Read, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This presentation describes current efforts investigating non-linear rheology of entangled, supramolecular polymeric materials. We describe two recently developed models: 1) We have developed a simplified model for the rheology of entangled telechelic star polymers. This is based on a pre-averaged orientation tensor, a stretch equation, and stretch-dependant probability of detachment of the sticker. In both linear and non-linear regimes, we produce maps of the whole parameter space, indicating the parameter values for which qualitative changes in response to flow are predicted. Results in the linear rheology regime are consistent with previous more detailed models and are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. 2) Using the same modelling framework, we investigate entangled linear polymers with stickers along the backbone. We use a set of coupled equations to describe the stretch between each stickers, and use equations similar to our star model for attachment/detachment of the sticky groups. This model is applicable to industrial polymers such as entangled thermoplastic elasomers, or functionalised model linear polymers. The work leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 607937 (SUPOLEN).

  11. Surgical quality assessment. A simplified approach.

    PubMed

    DeLong, D L

    1991-10-01

    The current approach to QA primarily involves taking action when problems are discovered and designing a documentation system that records the deliverance of quality care. Involving the entire staff helps eliminate problems before they occur. By keeping abreast of current problems and soliciting input from staff members, the QA at our hospital has improved dramatically. The cross-referencing of JCAHO and AORN standards on the assessment form and the single-sheet reporting form expedite the evaluation process and simplify record keeping. The bulletin board increases staff members' understanding of QA and boosts morale and participation. A sound and effective QA program does not require reorganizing an entire department, nor should it invoke negative connotations. Developing an effective QA program merely requires rethinking current processes. The program must meet the department's specific needs, and although many departments concentrate on documentation, auditing charts does not give a complete picture of the quality of care delivered. The QA committee must employ a variety of data collection methods on multiple indicators to ensure an accurate representation of the care delivered, and they must not overlook any issues that directly affect patient outcomes. PMID:1952907

  12. Simplified liquid oxygen propellant conditioning concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleary, N. L.; Holt, K. A.; Flachbart, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    Current liquid oxygen feed systems waste propellant and use hardware, unnecessary during flight, to condition the propellant at the engine turbopumps prior to launch. Simplified liquid oxygen propellant conditioning concepts are being sought for future launch vehicles. During a joint program, four alternative propellant conditioning options were studied: (1) passive recirculation; (2) low bleed through the engine; (3) recirculation lines; and (4) helium bubbling. The test configuration for this program was based on a vehicle design which used a main recirculation loop that was insulated on the downcomer and uninsulated on the upcomer. This produces a natural convection recirculation flow. The test article for this program simulated a feedline which ran from the main recirculation loop to the turbopump. The objective was to measure the temperature profile of this test article. Several parameters were varied from the baseline case to determine their effects on the temperature profile. These parameters included: flow configuration, feedline slope, heat flux, main recirculation loop velocity, pressure, bleed rate, helium bubbling, and recirculation lines. The heat flux, bleed rate, and recirculation configurations produced the greatest changes from the baseline temperature profile. However, the temperatures in the feedline remained subcooled. Any of the options studied could be used in future vehicles.

  13. Simplified Pattern Recognition Based On Multiaperture Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Richard T.; Lin, Shih-Chao

    1987-05-01

    Multiaperture optics systems are similar in design to the concepts applying to the insect eye. Digitizing at the detector level is inherent in these systems. The fact that each eyelet forms one pixel of the overall image lends itself to optical preprocessing. There-fore a simplified pattern recognition scheme can be used in connection with multiaperture optics systems. The pattern recognition system used is based on the conjecture that all shapes encountered can be dissected into a set of rectangles. This is accomplished by creating a binary image and comparing each row of numbers starting at the top of the frame with the next row below. A set of rules is established which decides if the binary ones of the next row are to be incorporated in the present rectangle or start a new rectangle. The number and aspect ratios of the rectangles formed constitute a recognition code. These codes are kept and updated in a library. Since the same shape may give rise to different recognition codes depending on the attitude of the shape in respect to the detector grid, all shapes are rotated and normalized prior to dissecting. The rule is that the pattern is turned to maximize the number of straight edges which line up with the detector grid. The mathematical mechanism for rotation of the shape is described. Assuming a-priori knowledge of the size of the object exists, the normalization procedure can be used for distance determination. The description of the hardware for acquisition of the image is provided.

  14. Interferometric phase reconstruction using simplified coherence network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kui; Song, Ruiqing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Di; Wang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Interferometric time-series analysis techniques, which extend the traditional differential radar interferometry, have demonstrated a strong capability for monitoring ground surface displacement. Such techniques are able to obtain the temporal evolution of ground deformation within millimeter accuracy by using a stack of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. In order to minimize decorrelation between stacked SAR images, the phase reconstruction technique has been developed recently. The main idea of this technique is to reform phase observations along a SAR stack by taking advantage of a maximum likelihood estimator which is defined on the coherence matrix estimated from each target. However, the phase value of a coherence matrix element might be considerably biased when its corresponding coherence is low. In this case, it will turn to an outlying sample affecting the corresponding phase reconstruction process. In order to avoid this problem, a new approach is developed in this paper. This approach considers a coherence matrix element to be an arc in a network. A so-called simplified coherence network (SCN) is constructed to decrease the negative impact of outlying samples. Moreover, a pointed iterative strategy is designed to resolve the transformed phase reconstruction problem defined on a SCN. For validation purposes, the proposed method is applied to 29 real SAR images. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has an excellent computational efficiency and could obtain more reliable phase reconstruction solutions compared to the traditional method using phase triangulation algorithm.

  15. Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system phase 3 simplified integrated test detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B. C.; Carrasquillo, R. L.; Dubiel, M. Y.; Ogle, K. Y.; Perry, J. L.; Whitley, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF) in 1989 is presented. This was the first test in the phase 3 series integrated environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) tests. The basic goal of the SIT was to achieve full integration of the baseline air revitalization (AR) subsystems for Space Station Freedom. Included is a description of the SIT configuration, a performance analysis of each subsystem, results from air and water sampling, and a discussion of lessons learned from the test. Also included is a full description of the preprototype ECLSS hardware used in the test.

  16. SSPTA- SIMPLIFIED SHUTTLE PAYLOAD THERMAL ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skladany, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Simplified Shuttle Payload Thermal Analyzer program (SSPTA) was developed to aid in the evaluation of thermal design concepts of instruments to be flown in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. SSPTA consists of a collection of programs that are currently used in the thermal analysis of spacecraft and have been modified for quick, preliminary analysis of payloads. SSPTA includes a reduced math model of the Shuttle cargo bay to simplify use of the program for payload analysis. One of the prime objectives in developing SSPTA was to create a program which was easy to use. With SSPTA, the user required input is simple and the user is free from many of the concerns of computer usage such as disk space handling, tape usage, and complicated program control. Although SSPTA was designed primarily to analyze Shuttle payloads, it can easily be used to perform thermal analysis in other situations. SSPTA is comprised of a system of data files called 'bins', a master program, and a set of thermal subprograms. The bin system is a collection of disk files which contain data required by or computed by the thermal subprograms. SSPTA currently has the capability of handling 50 bins. The master program serves primarily as a manager for the bin system and its interaction with the thermal subprograms. Input to the master program consists of simple user commands which direct the data manipulation procedures, prepare the data for these procedures, and call the appropriate thermal subprograms. The subprograms of SSPTA are all based on programs which have been used extensively in the analysis of orbiting spacecraft and space hardware. Subprogram CONSHAD uses the user supplied geometric radiation model to compute black body view factors, shadow factors, and a description of the surface model. The subprogram WORKSHEET uses the surface model description, optical property data, and node assignment data to prepare input for SCRIPTF. Subprogram SCRIPTF computes the inverses of the infrared (IR) and

  17. Simplified overturn stability monitoring of agricultural tractors.

    PubMed

    Nichol, C I; Sommer, H J; Murphy, D J

    2005-02-01

    Agricultural tractors are the most common source of farm work fatalities in the U.S., with overturns the most common type of incident. For the year 2001, there were 15 tractor-related fatalities in Pennsylvania, 9 of which were due to tractor rollover. A new device using low-cost sensors and microcomputers was developed around a simplified mathematical model of an agricultural tractor to inform the operator of potential tractor instability. This device communicates the current rollover potential, along with a recent history of rollover potential, to the operator of the tractor via a simple bar-graph display. The device uses a single-chip accelerometer to sense the current rollover potential and a small microprocessor to analyze the accelerometer data, compensate for variations due to temperature, and then send this information to a visual display. The use of these low-cost "off the shelf" components enabled the fabrication of a very inexpensive sensor system. Because agricultural tractors have a long service life, it was important to make the device low cost and flexible. This could enable it to be sold as an aftermarket add-on for a variety of tractor models. The device is also capable of interfacing with newer on-board tractor systems via a CAN bus to make it more attractive to tractor manufacturers who may want to incorporate this device into new models. Work is continuing on the development of an improved display to inform the tractor operator of possible instability, including display ergonomic studies, investigation of threshold levels for alerting an operator of potential instability, and investigation into audible warning signals.

  18. Simplified models for heat transfer in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graca, Guilherme C. C. Carrilho Da

    Buildings protect their occupants from the outside environment. As a semi-enclosed environment, buildings tend to contain the internally generated heat and air pollutants, as well as the solar and conductive heat gains that can occur in the facade. In the warmer months of the year this generally leads to overheating, creating a need for a cooling system. Ventilation air replaces contaminated air in the building and is often used as the dominant medium for heat transfer between indoor and outdoor environments. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to develop a better understanding of the important parameters in the performance of ventilation systems and to develop simplified convective heat transfer models. The general approach used in this study seeks to capture the dominant physical processes for these problems with first order accuracy, and develop simple models that show the correct system behavior trends. Dimensional analysis, in conjunction with simple momentum and energy conservation, scaled model experiments and numerical simulations, is used to improve airflow and heat transfer rate predictions in both single and multi room ventilation systems. This study includes the three commonly used room ventilation modes: mixing, displacement and cross-ventilation. A new modeling approach to convective heat transfer between the building and the outside is presented: the concept of equivalent room heat transfer coefficient. The new model quantifies the reduction in heat transfer between ventilation air and internal room surfaces caused by limited thermal capacity and temperature variation of the air for the three modes studied. Particular emphasis is placed on cross-ventilation, and on the development of a simple model to characterize the airflow patterns that occur in this case. The implementation of the models in a building thermal simulation software tool is presented as well as comparisons between model predictions, experimental results and complex

  19. [Simplified defecography technique. Description and results].

    PubMed

    Berretta, O; Chaussade, S; Coquet, M; Couturier, D; Bonnin, A; Guerre, J

    1990-10-13

    Defecography is a useful paraclinical examination to explore disturbances of continence or defecation. The purpose of this study was to present a simplified defecography technique and assess its validity in subjects without defecation problems (n = 10) and in patients complaining of idiopathic chronic constipation (n = 35). The anorectal angle at rest (RAA) and when straining at stool was not significantly different in constipated patients and in controls. Defecography often gave abnormal results. Anterior rectocele was found in almost 50 percent (17/35) of constipated patients and in 20 percent (2/10) of controls (P less than 0.05). None of the patients had posterior rectocele. Persistent imprint of the puborectal muscle during straining was present in 36 percent (9/35) of constipated patients and in 10 percent (1/10) of controls (NS). The imprint was not always associated with closure of the RAA between rest and straining; this closure was never found in controls but was observed in 6 out of 17 constipated patients (35 percent; P less than 0.05). Perineal descent (PD) varied from 0.6 to 3.7 cm (mean +/- s.e.m.: 2.0 +/- 0.63 cm) in controls, as against 0.6 to 7.9 cm (mean +/- s.e.m.: 2.7 +/- 0.45 cm) in constipated patients. In 24 percent of the constipated patients PD was greater than 3.7 cm (the maximum value recorded in controls). All constipated patients with closure of the RAA during defecation had a PD of less than 1 cm, thus confirming the concept of "pelvic floor muscle hypertonia". Disorders of rectal statics are more frequent in subjects with constipation, but their significance is varied. Some abnormalities could be the cause of constipation (e.g. anismus) and others its consequence (anterior rectal prolapse, anterior rectocele, PD).

  20. A Simplified HTTR Diffusion Theory Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Rodolfo M. Ferrer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema

    2010-10-01

    The Georgia Institute of Technology (GA-Tech) recently developed a transport theory benchmark based closely on the geometry and the features of the HTTR reactor that is operational in Japan. Though simplified, the benchmark retains all the principal physical features of the reactor and thus provides a realistic and challenging test for the codes. The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first goal is an extension of the benchmark to diffusion theory applications by generating the additional data not provided in the GA-Tech prior work. The second goal is to use the benchmark on the HEXPEDITE code available to the INL. The HEXPEDITE code is a Green’s function-based neutron diffusion code in 3D hexagonal-z geometry. The results showed that the HEXPEDITE code accurately reproduces the effective multiplication factor of the reference HELIOS solution. A secondary, but no less important, conclusion is that in the testing against actual HTTR data of a full sequence of codes that would include HEXPEDITE, in the apportioning of inevitable discrepancies between experiment and models, the portion of error attributable to HEXPEDITE would be expected to be modest. If large discrepancies are observed, they would have to be explained by errors in the data fed into HEXPEDITE. Results based on a fully realistic model of the HTTR reactor are presented in a companion paper. The suite of codes used in that paper also includes HEXPEDITE. The results shown here should help that effort in the decision making process for refining the modeling steps in the full sequence of codes.

  1. 26 CFR 1.41-9 - Alternative simplified credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit. 1.41-9 Section 1.41-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9 Alternative simplified credit. For further guidance, see § 1.41-9T....

  2. 26 CFR 1.41-9 - Alternative simplified credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit. 1.41-9 Section 1.41-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9 Alternative simplified credit. For further guidance, see § 1.41-9T....

  3. 26 CFR 1.41-9 - Alternative simplified credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... June 9, 2011, see § 1.41-9T as contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2011. ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit. 1.41-9 Section 1... Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9 Alternative simplified credit. (a) Determination of credit. At the...

  4. Communication: A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian for polarizable embedding.

    PubMed

    Krause, Katharina; Klopper, Wim

    2016-01-28

    A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian, which is linear in the Lagrangian multipliers, is proposed for the coupled-cluster treatment of a quantum mechanical system in a polarizable environment. In the simplified approach, the amplitude equations are decoupled from the Lagrangian multipliers and the energy obtained from the projected coupled-cluster equation corresponds to a stationary point of the Lagrangian. PMID:26827193

  5. 12 CFR 324.144 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA....144 Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA). (a) General requirements for the SSFA. To use the SSFA to determine the risk weight for a securitization exposure, an FDIC-supervised institution...

  6. 12 CFR 3.211 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA... CAPITAL ADEQUACY STANDARDS Risk-Weighted Assets-Market Risk § 3.211 Simplified supervisory formula... (with unpaid principal used as the weight for each exposure) total capital requirement of the...

  7. 12 CFR 3.144 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA... Risk-Weighted Assets for Securitization Exposures § 3.144 Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA). (a) General requirements for the SSFA. To use the SSFA to determine the risk weight for...

  8. 12 CFR 324.211 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA... Risk § 324.211 Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA). (a) General requirements. To use the... principal used as the weight for each exposure) total capital requirement of the underlying...

  9. 46 CFR 178.330 - Simplified stability proof test (SST).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Simplified stability proof test (SST). 178.330 Section... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Intact Stability Standards § 178.330 Simplified stability proof test (SST). (a) A vessel must be in the condition specified in this paragraph when...

  10. 12 CFR 217.211 - Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA... Simplified supervisory formula approach (SSFA). (a) General requirements. To use the SSFA to determine the... the weight for each exposure) total capital requirement of the underlying exposures calculated...

  11. A Simplified Model of Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    An axisymmetric model of tropical cyclone intensification is presented. The model is based on Salmon's wave-vortex approximation, which can describe flows with high Rossby number and low Froude number. After introducing an additional approximation designed to filter propagating inertia-gravity waves, the problem is reduced to the prediction of potential vorticity (PV) and the inversion of this PV to obtain the balanced wind and mass fields. This PV prediction/inversion problem is solved analytically for two types of forcing: a two-region model in which there is nonzero forcing in the cyclone core and zero forcing in the far-field; a three-region model in which there is non-zero forcing in both the cyclone core and the eyewall, with zero forcing in the far-field. The solutions of the two-region model provide insight into why tropical cyclones can have long incubation times before rapid intensification and how the size of the mature vortex can be influenced by the size of the initial vortex. The solutions of the three-region model provide insight into the formation of hollow PV structures and the inward movement of angular momentum surfaces across the radius of maximum wind.

  12. Mercury's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. Convincing radar evidence indicates that the mantle rests on a liquid layer (Margot et al. 2005), but there are no empirical constraints on the moment of inertia C/MR2, which constraints must wait for the determination of the gravitational coefficients J2 and C22 from the MESSENGER orbiting spacecraft, and an accurate determination of the obliquity of the Cassini state. Tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, so the spin should occupy the Cassini state and thereby define its obliquity---unless there has been a recent excitation of a free precession of the spin. Another way the spin might be displaced from the Cassini state is if the variations in the orbital elements, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin axis to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. Fortunately, the solid angle the spin axis encloses as it precesses around the Cassini state is an adiabatic invariant, and it is conserved if the orbital element variations are slow compared to the precession rate. As the precession period is O(1000) years, and the time scales of orbital parameter variations are O(105) years, the spin axis should remain very close to the Cassini state if it were ever close. But how close is close? The increasing precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurements warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. By numerically following the positions of the spin axis and Cassini state with orbital parameters varying with time scales and amplitudes comparable to the real variations, we show that the spin should remain within 1″ of the Cassini state once dissipative torques bring it there. The current spin axis position should thus define the Cassini state sufficiently to put reasonably tight constraints on the core structure

  13. Physiologic response to a simplified venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia system.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Sumpter, L Ryan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Thomas, Joe; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-01-01

    Our original venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system appeared to significantly improve the survival of patients with lung cancer, but was too complex with numerous dialysis problems. We tested a simplified vv-PISH circuit that includes the Avalon Elite (Avalon Laboratories, LLC, Rancho Dominguez, CA) double lumen cannula, a modified heat exchanger, a water heater/cooler, and a centrifugal pump. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this simplified vv-PISH system (without hemodialyzer) and to investigate the physiologic response to whole-body hyperthermia in pigs. We tested our vv-PISH circuit in healthy adult female swine (n = 7, 55-68 kg). The therapeutic core temperature (42°C), calculated as mean of rectal, bladder, and esophageal temperatures, was achieved in six swine. A maximum difference of 0.5°C was observed between the individual temperature sensor readings, indicating homogeneous heat distribution. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were transiently altered, but were safely managed. A significant elevation in pulmonary artery pressure occurred during the heating phase, resulting in death of one pig. In all other pigs, pulmonary artery pressure returned to physiologic values during the therapeutic phase. Arterial blood electrolytes were maintained without the need of a dialyzer. Major organ function was within normal parameters. The simplified vv-PISH circuit reliably delivered the hyperthermic dose with no need of dialysis. PMID:23085942

  14. Physiologic response to a simplified venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia system.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Sumpter, L Ryan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Thomas, Joe; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-01-01

    Our original venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system appeared to significantly improve the survival of patients with lung cancer, but was too complex with numerous dialysis problems. We tested a simplified vv-PISH circuit that includes the Avalon Elite (Avalon Laboratories, LLC, Rancho Dominguez, CA) double lumen cannula, a modified heat exchanger, a water heater/cooler, and a centrifugal pump. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this simplified vv-PISH system (without hemodialyzer) and to investigate the physiologic response to whole-body hyperthermia in pigs. We tested our vv-PISH circuit in healthy adult female swine (n = 7, 55-68 kg). The therapeutic core temperature (42°C), calculated as mean of rectal, bladder, and esophageal temperatures, was achieved in six swine. A maximum difference of 0.5°C was observed between the individual temperature sensor readings, indicating homogeneous heat distribution. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were transiently altered, but were safely managed. A significant elevation in pulmonary artery pressure occurred during the heating phase, resulting in death of one pig. In all other pigs, pulmonary artery pressure returned to physiologic values during the therapeutic phase. Arterial blood electrolytes were maintained without the need of a dialyzer. Major organ function was within normal parameters. The simplified vv-PISH circuit reliably delivered the hyperthermic dose with no need of dialysis.

  15. Simplifying CEA through Excel, VBA, and Subeq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Many people use compound equilibrium programs for very different reasons, varying from refrigerators to light bulbs to rockets. A commonly used equilibrium program is CEA. CEA can take various inputs such as pressure, temperature, and volume along with numerous reactants and run them through equilibrium equations to obtain valuable output information, including products formed and their relative amounts. A little over a year ago, Bonnie McBride created the program subeq with the goal to simplify the calling of CEA. Subeq was also designed to be called by other programs, including Excel, through the use of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The largest advantage of using Excel is that it allows the user to input the information in a colorful and user-friendly environment while allowing VBA to run subeq, which is in the form of a FORTRAN DLL (Dynamic Link Library). Calling subeq in this form makes it much faster than if it were converted to VBA. Since subeq requires such large lists of reactant and product names, all of which can't be passed in as an array, subeq had to be changed to accept very long strings of reactants and products. To pass this string and adjust the transfer of input and output parameters, the subeq DLL had to be changed. One program that does this is Compaq Visual FORTRAN, which allows DLLs to be edited, debugged, and compiled. Compaq Visual FORTRAN uses FORTRAN 90/95, which has additional features to that of FORTRAN 77. My goals this summer include finishing up the excel spreadsheet of subeq, which I started last summer, and putting it on the Internet so that others can use it without having to download my spreadsheet. To finish up the spreadsheet I will need to work on debugging current options and problems. I will also work on making it as robust as possible, so that all errors that may arise will be clearly communicated to the user. New features will be added old ones will be changed as I receive comments from people using the spreadsheet

  16. Simplified circuit corrects faults in parallel binary information channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.

    1966-01-01

    Corrective circuit prevents the appearance of erroneous output signals from the possible failure of any single-channel element interconnected in parallel binary information channels. The circuit is simplified and economical because it does not use redundant channels.

  17. Photographic and drafting techniques simplify method of producing engineering drawings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provisor, H.

    1968-01-01

    Combination of photographic and drafting techniques has been developed to simplify the preparation of three dimensional and dimetric engineering drawings. Conventional photographs can be converted to line drawings by making copy negatives on high contrast film.

  18. 48 CFR 1532.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 1532.003 Section 1532.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 1532.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. (a) Scope. This subpart provides for authorization of advance and interim payments...

  19. 48 CFR 32.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 32.003 Section 32.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 32.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Unless agency regulations otherwise permit, contract financing shall not be provided...

  20. 48 CFR 32.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 32.003 Section 32.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 32.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Unless agency regulations otherwise permit, contract financing shall not be provided...

  1. 48 CFR 1532.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 1532.003 Section 1532.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 1532.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. (a) Scope. This subpart provides for authorization of advance and interim payments...

  2. Simplified method for numerical modeling of fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Shtyrina, O V; Yarutkina, I A; Fedoruk, M P

    2014-12-29

    A simplified numerical approach to modeling of dissipative dispersion-managed fiber lasers is examined. We present a new numerical iteration algorithm for finding the periodic solutions of the system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing the intra-cavity dynamics of the dissipative soliton characteristics in dispersion-managed fiber lasers. We demonstrate that results obtained using simplified model are in good agreement with full numerical modeling based on the corresponding partial differential equations.

  3. cFE/CFS (Core Flight Executive/Core Flight System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildermann, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes in detail the requirements and goals of the Core Flight Executive (cFE) and the Core Flight System (CFS). The Core Flight Software System is a mission independent, platform-independent, Flight Software (FSW) environment integrating a reusable core flight executive (cFE). The CFS goals include: 1) Reduce time to deploy high quality flight software; 2) Reduce project schedule and cost uncertainty; 3) Directly facilitate formalized software reuse; 4) Enable collaboration across organizations; 5) Simplify sustaining engineering (AKA. FSW maintenance); 6) Scale from small instruments to System of Systems; 7) Platform for advanced concepts and prototyping; and 7) Common standards and tools across the branch and NASA wide.

  4. Simplifier: a web tool to eliminate redundant NGS contigs

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Azevedo, Vasco; Schneider, Maria Paula; Barh, Debmalya; Silva, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Modern genomic sequencing technologies produce a large amount of data with reduced cost per base; however, this data consists of short reads. This reduction in the size of the reads, compared to those obtained with previous methodologies, presents new challenges, including a need for efficient algorithms for the assembly of genomes from short reads and for resolving repetitions. Additionally after abinitio assembly, curation of the hundreds or thousands of contigs generated by assemblers demands considerable time and computational resources. We developed Simplifier, a stand-alone software that selectively eliminates redundant sequences from the collection of contigs generated by ab initio assembly of genomes. Application of Simplifier to data generated by assembly of the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 258 reduced the number of contigs generated by ab initio methods from 8,004 to 5,272, a reduction of 34.14%; in addition, N50 increased from 1 kb to 1.5 kb. Processing the contigs of Escherichia coli DH10B with Simplifier reduced the mate-paired library 17.47% and the fragment library 23.91%. Simplifier removed redundant sequences from datasets produced by assemblers, thereby reducing the effort required for finalization of genome assembly in tests with data from Prokaryotic organisms. Availability Simplifier is available at http://www.genoma.ufpa.br/rramos/softwares/simplifier.xhtmlIt requires Sun jdk 6 or higher. PMID:23275695

  5. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  6. Simplified Design Criteria for Very High Temperature Applications in Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McGreevy, TE

    2004-12-15

    The goal of this activity is to provide simplified criteria which can be used in rapid feasibility assessments of the structural viability of very high temperature components in conceptual and early preliminary design phases for Generation IV reactors. The current criteria in ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, hereafter referred to as NH, (and Code Case N-201 for core support structures) are difficult and require a complex deconstruction of finite element analysis results for their implementation. Further, and most important, times, temperatures and some materials of interest to the very high temperature Generation IV components are not covered by the current provisions of NH. Future revisions to NH are anticipated that will address very high temperature Generation IV components and materials requirements but, until that occurs interim guidance is required for design activities to proceed. These simplified criteria are for design guidance and are not necessarily in rigorous compliance with NH methodology. Rather, the objective is for criteria which address the early design needs of very high temperature Generation IV components and materials. The intent is to provide simplified but not overly conservative design methods. When more rigorous criteria and methods are incorporated in NH, the degree of conservatism should obviously be reduced. These criteria are based on currently available information. Although engineering judgments have been made in the formulation of these criteria they are not intended to require additional development or testing prior to implementation as a tool for use in conceptual and early preliminary design. Appendices are provided herein that contain useful information. The simplified methods were developed specifically with Alloy 617 in mind; however, they could be applied for the same intended purpose for other materials such as 9Cr-1Mo, Alloy 800H, etc. However, supporting design curves, stress allowables, and isochronous curves may

  7. A simplified diphenylamine colorimetric method for growth quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youbao; Xiang, Sihai; Dai, Xida; Yang, Keqian

    2013-06-01

    Cell growth needs to be monitored in biological studies and bioprocess optimization. In special circumstances, such as microbial fermentations in media containing insoluble particles, accurate cell growth quantification is a challenge with current methods. Only the Burton method is applicable in such circumstances. The original Burton method was previously simplified by adopting a two-step sample pretreatment in perchloric acid procedure to eliminate the need for DNA extraction. Here, we further simplified the Burton method by replacing the previous two-step perchloric acid pretreatment with a new and one-step diphenylamine reagent pretreatment. The reliability and accuracy of this simplified method were assessed by measuring the biomass of four model microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Streptomyces clavuligerus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Trichoderma reesei grown in normal media or those containing solid particles. The results demonstrate that this new simplified method performs comparably to the conventional methods, such as OD600 or the previously modified Burton method, and is much more sensitive than the dry weight method. Overall, the new method is simple, reliable, easy to perform, and generally applicable in most circumstances, and it reduces the operation time from more than 12 h (for the previously simplified Burton method) to about 2 h.

  8. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  9. Optical chirp z-transform processor with a simplified architecture.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Nam Quoc

    2014-12-29

    Using a simplified chirp z-transform (CZT) algorithm based on the discrete-time convolution method, this paper presents the synthesis of a simplified architecture of a reconfigurable optical chirp z-transform (OCZT) processor based on the silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. In the simplified architecture of the reconfigurable OCZT, the required number of optical components is small and there are no waveguide crossings which make fabrication easy. The design of a novel type of optical discrete Fourier transform (ODFT) processor as a special case of the synthesized OCZT is then presented to demonstrate its effectiveness. The designed ODFT can be potentially used as an optical demultiplexer at the receiver of an optical fiber orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission system. PMID:25607197

  10. A simplified model for two phase face seal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, S. Y.; Hughes, W. F.; Basu, P.; Beatty, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified quasi-isothermal low-leakage laminar model for analyzing the stiffness and the stability characteristics of two-phase face seals with real fluids is developed. Sample calculations with this model for low-leakage operations are compared with calculations for high-leakage operations, performed using the adiabatic turbulent model of Beatty and Hughes (1987). It was found that the seal characteristics predicted using the two extreme models tend to overlap with each other, indicating that the simplified laminar model may be a useful tool for seal design. The effect of coning was investigated using the simplified model. The results show that, for the same balance, a coned seal has a higher leakage rate than a parallel face seal.

  11. Optical chirp z-transform processor with a simplified architecture.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Nam Quoc

    2014-12-29

    Using a simplified chirp z-transform (CZT) algorithm based on the discrete-time convolution method, this paper presents the synthesis of a simplified architecture of a reconfigurable optical chirp z-transform (OCZT) processor based on the silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. In the simplified architecture of the reconfigurable OCZT, the required number of optical components is small and there are no waveguide crossings which make fabrication easy. The design of a novel type of optical discrete Fourier transform (ODFT) processor as a special case of the synthesized OCZT is then presented to demonstrate its effectiveness. The designed ODFT can be potentially used as an optical demultiplexer at the receiver of an optical fiber orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission system.

  12. Analyses of a new simplified large deployable reflector structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Chen, Mei; He, Jie

    New large deployable mesh reflectors are frequently used recently. Here we propose a new simplified large deployable reflector structure, with lower surface density and better package ratio both in radial direction and in height direction. Its surface modeling manner is fairly simple. Conceptual design of such a new simplified large deployable reflector structure is described. Deploying ability analyses of the structure with 30m diameter show that the structure can be deployed successfully. Surface precision analyses of the deployed structure show that it has potential to reach surface precision demand. A deploying test of a small deployable model with 3m diameter shows the deploying ability of the backbone. Such a new simplified large deployable reflector structure has potential to be used in future large deployable reflectors in space applications.

  13. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  14. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  15. Development of a simplified procedure for cyclic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Development was extended of a simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYMP) for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects can be calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress, or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials, and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite-element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  16. A simplified inelastic seismic analysis method for piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This report presents results of a three-year EPRI-funded effort to develop a simplified inelastic-dynamic analysis method for piping systems under earthquake loadings. The method uses a simplified plastic analysis that replaces highly loaded components with the idealized moment-rotation behavior observed in dynamic tests of piping components. The method uses increments of increased loading whose equivalence to seismic loads is established using the system ductility predicted by the simplified plastic solution. Results of high-level shaker table tests of piping systems are compared to the method's predictions. A conservative design qualification method is proposed in the format of an ASME Code Case. Results are provided for linear and nonlinear detailed time history ABAQUS solutions of shaker table tests. 91 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Demonstration of fully coupled simplified extended station black-out accident simulation with RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin; Zou, Ling; Anders, David; Martineau, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The RELAP-7 code develop-ment effort started in October of 2011 and by the end of the second development year, a number of physical components with simplified two phase flow capability have been de-veloped to support the simplified boiling water reactor (BWR) extended station blackout (SBO) analyses. The demonstration case includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety system components for the safety relief valve (SRV), the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system, and the wet well. Three scenar-ios for the SBO simulations have been considered. Since RELAP-7 is not a severe acci-dent analysis code, the simulation stops when fuel clad temperature reaches damage point. Scenario I represents an extreme station blackout accident without any external cooling and cooling water injection. The system pressure is controlled by automatically releasing steam through SRVs. Scenario II includes the RCIC system but without SRV. The RCIC system is fully coupled with the reactor primary system and all the major components are dynamically simulated. The third scenario includes both the RCIC system and the SRV to provide a more realistic simulation. This paper will describe the major models and dis-cuss the results for the three scenarios. The RELAP-7 simulations for the three simplified SBO scenarios show the importance of dynamically simulating the SRVs, the RCIC sys-tem, and the wet well system to the reactor safety during extended SBO accidents.

  18. Using simplified blood pressure tables to avoid underdiagnosing childhood hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay P; Mohammed, Javed; Thomas, Benson; Singh, Ram N; Filler, Guido

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have revealed that hypertension remains underdiagnosed in a significant number of children despite their recorded office blood pressure (OBP) exceeding the recommended fourth report OBP thresholds. Simplified OBP thresholds have been proposed to reduce this underdiagnosis of hypertension in children. In clinical practice, OBP screened as elevated according to the fourth report OBP thresholds are referred for ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring to rule out ‘white coat’ hypertension. OBJECTIVES: The present study tested the usefulness of simplified OBP thresholds to screen abnormal OBP for ABP monitoring referral. METHODS: A total of 155 subjects were retrospectively analyzed with paired OBP and ABP recordings obtained from an outpatient referral clinic. OBP recordings were classified as abnormal according to the simplified and fourth report OBP thresholds. ABP measurements were classified as abnormal according to the ABP reference tables. RESULTS: Simplified blood pressure (BP) tables correctly identified all OBP classified as abnormal according to fourth report BP thresholds (kappa [κ] 0.72 [95% CI 0.61 to 0.83]) for systolic OBP; κ 0.92 [95% CI 0.86 to 0.99] for diastolic OBP). OBP classified as abnormal by the simplified BP thresholds and by the fourth report BP thresholds performed similarly for correctly identifying abnormal ABP measurements as per ABP references (overlapping 95% CIs of the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and likelihood ratios). CONCLUSIONS: Simplified BP tables, proposed to reduce the underdiagnosis of hypertension in children, can serve as a useful screening tool to decide a referral for ABP monitoring. Future prospective studies are needed to establish these findings. PMID:26435668

  19. Simplified Solutions for Activity Deposited on Moving Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Smith, David L; Chabot, George E

    2016-10-01

    Simplified numerical solutions for particulate activity viewed on moving filter continuous air monitors are developed. The monitor configurations include both rectangular window (RW) and circular window (CW) types. The solutions are demonstrated first for a set of basic airborne radioactivity cases, for a series of concentration pulses, and for indicating the effects of step changes in reactor coolant system (RCS) leakage for a pressurized water reactor. The method is also compared to cases from the prior art. These simplified solutions have additional benefits: They are easily adaptable to multiple radionuclides, they will accommodate collection and detection efficiencies that vary in known ways across the collection area, and they also ease the solution programming.

  20. A simplified dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Ahmet; Gu, Zhen; Litt, Jonathan S.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified open-loop dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine, valid within the normal operating range of the engine, is developed. This model is obtained by linking linear state space models obtained at different engine operating points. Each linear model is developed from a detailed nonlinear engine simulation using a multivariable system identification and realization method. The simplified model may be used with a model-based real time diagnostic scheme for fault detection and diagnostics, as well as for open loop engine dynamics studies and closed loop control analysis utilizing a user generated control law.

  1. Simplifying Probability Elicitation and Uncertainty Modeling in Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R; Carroll, Thomas E; Sivaraman, Chitra; Neorr, Peter A; Unwin, Stephen D; Hossain, Shamina S

    2011-04-16

    In this paper we contribute two methods that simplify the demands of knowledge elicitation for particular types of Bayesian networks. The first method simplify the task of providing probabilities when the states that a random variable takes can be described by a new, fully ordered state set in which a state implies all the preceding states. The second method leverages Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to provide a way for the expert to express the degree of ignorance that they feel about the estimates being provided.

  2. Simplified pregnant woman models for the fetus exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jala, Marjorie; Conil, Emmanuelle; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Moulines, Éric; Lévy-Leduc, Céline

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a study that we carried out in order to validate the use of a simplified pregnant woman model for the assessment of the fetus exposure to radio frequency waves. This simplified model, based on the use of a homogeneous tissue to replace most of the inner organs of the virtual mother, would allow us to deal with many issues that are raised because of the lack of pregnant woman models for numerical dosimetry. Using specific absorption rate comparisons, we show that this model could be used to estimate the fetus exposure to plane waves.

  3. The simplified reference tissue model: model assumption violations and their impact on binding potential.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Cristian A; Searle, Graham E; Gunn, Roger N

    2015-02-01

    Reference tissue models have gained significant traction over the last two decades as the methods of choice for the quantification of brain positron emission tomography data because they balance quantitative accuracy with less invasive procedures. The principal advantage is the elimination of the need to perform arterial cannulation of the subject to measure blood and metabolite concentrations for input function generation. In particular, the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) has been widely adopted as it uses a simplified model configuration with only three parameters that typically produces good fits to the kinetic data and a stable parameter estimation process. However, the model's simplicity and its ability to generate good fits to the data, even when the model assumptions are not met, can lead to misplaced confidence in binding potential (BPND) estimates. Computer simulation were used to study the bias introduced in BPND estimates as a consequence of violating each of the four core SRTM model assumptions. Violation of each model assumption led to bias in BPND (both over and underestimation). Careful assessment of the bias in SRTM BPND should be performed for new tracers and applications so that an appropriate decision about its applicability can be made. PMID:25425078

  4. Evaluation of a passive containment cooling system for a simplified BWR (boiling water reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Otonari, J.; Arai, K. ); Oikawa, H.; Nagasaka, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Simplified boiling water reactors (BWRs) are characterized for the adoption of a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) and a passive emergency core cooling system (ECCS). TOSPAC, which had been developed as the preliminary design code for several PCCS concepts, was compared with TRAC for verification. TOSPAC analyses were also performed to show the effectiveness of the isolation condenser (IC) as a PCCS over a wide range of break spectra. The selected reference plant for the analysis is a natural circulation BWR plant with 1,800-MW(thermal) power. The ECCS consists of a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) and depressurization valves. The IC and drywell cooler are considered for the PCCS. The IC units and drywell coolers are placed in the IC pool and GDCS pool, respectively.

  5. Battery powered means and method for facilitating measurements while coring

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, F. L.; Barnum, D. C.; Corea, W. C.

    1985-02-19

    In accordance with the present invention, rotation of the inner barrel relative of the axis of symmetry of the core barrel (indicative of core twist off or core sand erosion during coring operations) is detected by a novel sensor combination comprising a battery-powered Hall-effect device fitted to the inner barrel imbedded in a support sleeve of a custom safety sub attached to the outer core barrel adjacent to a single signature magnet. During coring, circumferential passage of the Hall-effect device adjacent to the signature magnet (during rotation of the outer core barrel to generate a core), produces a series of signals of constant repetition rate. But with the occurrence of rotation of the inner core barrel irregular repetition intervals are produced at uphole indicating equipment connected to the Hall-effect device through conventional downhole telemetering and power generating equipment. Result: sticking and jamming of the core can be immediately detected and uphole parameters modified to ease unsafe conditions. Use of a battery pack to power the Hall-effect device, simplifies operations, especially where the present invention is used in conjunction with the MWC mud pulse telemetering equipment.

  6. Simplified seismic performance assessment and implications for seismic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Timothy J.; Welch, David P.; Calvi, Gian Michele

    2014-08-01

    The last decade or so has seen the development of refined performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) approaches that now provide a framework for estimation of a range of important decision variables, such as repair costs, repair time and number of casualties. This paper reviews current tools for PBEE, including the PACT software, and examines the possibility of extending the innovative displacement-based assessment approach as a simplified structural analysis option for performance assessment. Details of the displacement-based s+eismic assessment method are reviewed and a simple means of quickly assessing multiple hazard levels is proposed. Furthermore, proposals for a simple definition of collapse fragility and relations between equivalent single-degree-of-freedom characteristics and multi-degree-of-freedom story drift and floor acceleration demands are discussed, highlighting needs for future research. To illustrate the potential of the methodology, performance measures obtained from the simplified method are compared with those computed using the results of incremental dynamic analyses within the PEER performance-based earthquake engineering framework, applied to a benchmark building. The comparison illustrates that the simplified method could be a very effective conceptual seismic design tool. The advantages and disadvantages of the simplified approach are discussed and potential implications of advanced seismic performance assessments for conceptual seismic design are highlighted through examination of different case study scenarios including different structural configurations.

  7. Simplified Load-Following Control for a Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    A simplified load-following control scheme has been proposed for a fuel cell power system. The scheme could be used to control devices that are important parts of a fuel cell system but are sometimes characterized as parasitic because they consume some of the power generated by the fuel cells.

  8. A Linguistic Analysis of Simplified and Authentic Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Louwerse, Max M.; McCarthy, Philip M.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2007-01-01

    The opinions of second language learning (L2) theorists and researchers are divided over whether to use authentic or simplified reading texts as the means of input for beginning- and intermediate-level L2 learners. Advocates of both approaches cite the use of linguistic features, syntax, and discourse structures as important elements in support of…

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of the Simplified Chinese Version of Flourishing Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Xiaoqing; Duan, Wenjie; Wang, Zhizhang; Liu, Tianyuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The Flourishing Scale (FS) was developed to measure psychological well-being from the eudaimonic perspective, highlighting the flourishing of human functioning. This article evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the simplified Chinese version of FS among a Chinese community population. Method: A total of 433 participants from…

  10. 48 CFR 3032.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FINANCING Scope of Part 3032.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Contract financing may be permitted for purchases made under the authority of (FAR) 48 CFR Part 13. This authority is delegated to... procedures financing. 3032.003 Section 3032.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF...

  11. 48 CFR 3032.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FINANCING Scope of Part 3032.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Contract financing may be permitted for purchases made under the authority of (FAR) 48 CFR Part 13. This authority is delegated to... procedures financing. 3032.003 Section 3032.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. 48 CFR 1332.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 1332.003 Section 1332.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 1332.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Contract financing may be provided for purchases made under the authority of FAR Part 13....

  13. 48 CFR 432.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 432.003 Section 432.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 432.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. (a) The chief of the contracting office may approve contract financing on a contract to...

  14. 48 CFR 1332.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 1332.003 Section 1332.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 1332.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. Contract financing may be provided for purchases made under the authority of FAR Part 13....

  15. 48 CFR 432.003 - Simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures financing. 432.003 Section 432.003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 432.003 Simplified acquisition procedures financing. (a) The chief of the contracting office may approve contract financing on a contract to...

  16. A Simplified Diagnostic Method for Elastomer Bond Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A simplified method has been developed for determining bond durability under exposure to water or high humidity conditions. It uses a small number of test specimens with relatively short times of water exposure at elevated temperature. The method is also gravimetric; the only equipment being required is an oven, specimen jars, and a conventional laboratory balance.

  17. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in…

  18. Simplify Web Development for Faculty and Promote Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, David C.

    Faculty members are often overwhelmed with the prospect of implementing Web-based instruction. In an effort to simplify the process and incorporate some basic instructional design elements, the Educational Technology Team at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University created a course template for WebCT. Utilizing rapid prototyping, the template…

  19. 7 CFR 4280.109 - Qualification for simplified applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Renewable Energy... must use commercially available renewable energy systems or energy efficiency improvements. (5... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualification for simplified applications....

  20. 7 CFR 4280.109 - Qualification for simplified applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Renewable Energy... must use commercially available renewable energy systems or energy efficiency improvements. (5... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification for simplified applications....

  1. 7 CFR 4280.114 - Qualification for simplified applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... America Program General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.114... proposed project must use commercially available renewable energy systems or energy efficiency improvements... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification for simplified applications....

  2. 7 CFR 273.25 - Simplified Food Stamp Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TANF plan as defined at 45 CFR 260.30. (3) Pure-TANF household means a household in which all members... CFR 260.31. (b) Limit on benefit reduction for mixed-TANF households under the SFSP. If a State agency... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Simplified Food Stamp Program. 273.25 Section...

  3. The Choice of Traditional vs. Simplified Characters in US Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Shi-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Which form of Chinese characters should be taught in Chinese language classes: traditional or simplified? The results of a questionnaire distributed to sections at the University of Florida show the reasons for students' preferences for one or the other form. In view of the students' awareness that traditional characters are more beneficial to…

  4. Flat pack interconnection structure simplifies modular electronic assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1967-01-01

    Flat pack interconnection structure composed of stick modules simplifies modular electronic assemblies by allowing a single axis mother board. Two of the wiring planes are located in the stick module, which is the lower level of assembly, with the third wiring plane in the mother board.

  5. 77 FR 54482 - Allocation of Costs Under the Simplified Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG07 Allocation of Costs Under the Simplified Methods... document contains proposed regulations on allocating costs to certain property produced by the taxpayer or... resellers of property that are required to capitalize certain costs to the property and that allocate...

  6. Laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation: a simplified dome advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Link, Richard E; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Laparoscopic Boari flap reimplantation has been used to treat long distal ureteral strictures. This technique requires extensive bladder mobilization and complex intracorporeal suturing. This demonstrates a novel laparoscopic bladder dome advancement approach for ureteral reimplantation. This technique obviates the need for bladder pedicle dissection and simplifies the required suturing.

  7. Tricuspid balloon valvuloplasty: a more simplified approach using inoue balloon.

    PubMed

    Patel, T M; Dani, S I; Shah, S C; Patel, T K

    1996-01-01

    We report a more simplified technique of the balloon tricuspid valvuloplasty using inoue balloon set in a patient suffering from severe rheumatic tricuspid stenosis. We believe that this technique may be useful in a difficult case of tricuspid valvuloplasty. PMID:8770490

  8. Delayed ripple counter simplifies square-root computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R.

    1965-01-01

    Ripple subtract technique simplifies the logic circuitry required in a binary computing device to derive the square root of a number. Successively higher numbers are subtracted from a register containing the number out of which the square root is to be extracted. The last number subtracted will be the closest integer to the square root of the number.

  9. Investigations in a Simplified Bracketed Grid Approach to Metrical Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Patrick Pei

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the fundamental mechanisms and assumptions of the Simplified Bracketed Grid Theory (Idsardi 1992) in two ways: first, by comparing it with Parametric Metrical Theory (Hayes 1995), and second, by implementing it in the analysis of several case studies in stress assignment and syllabification. Throughout these…

  10. Measuring Phantom Recollection in the Simplified Conjoint Recognition Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Christoph; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2009-01-01

    False memories are sometimes strong enough to elicit recollective experiences. This phenomenon has been termed Phantom Recollection (PR). The Conjoint Recognition (CR) paradigm has been used to empirically separate PR from other memory processes. Recently, a simplification of the CR procedure has been proposed. We herein extend the simplified CR…

  11. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  12. On Simplifying Features in OpenStreetMap database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xinlin; Tao, Kunwang; Wang, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Currently the visualization of OpenStreetMap data is using a tile server which stores map tiles that have been rendered from vector data in advance. However, tiled map are short of functionalities such as data editing and customized styling. To enable these advanced functionality, Client-side processing and rendering of geospatial data is needed. Considering the voluminous size of the OpenStreetMap data, simply sending region queries results of OSM database to client is prohibitive. To make the OSM data retrieved from database adapted for client receiving and rendering, It must be filtered and simplified at server-side to limit its volume. We propose a database extension for OSM database to make it possible to simplifying geospatial objects such as ways and relations during data queries. Several auxiliary tables and PL/pgSQL functions are presented to make the geospatial features can be simplified by omitting unimportant vertices. There are five components in the database extension: Vertices weight computation by polyline and polygon simplification algorithm, Vertices weight storage in auxiliary tables. filtering and selecting of vertices using specific threshold value during spatial queries, assembling of simplified geospatial objects using filtered vertices, vertices weight updating after geospatial objects editing. The database extension is implemented on an OSM APIDB using PL/pgSQL. The database contains a subset of OSM database. The experimental database contains geographic data of United Kingdom which is about 100 million vertices and roughly occupy 100GB disk. JOSM are used to retrieve the data from the database using a revised data accessing API and render the geospatial objects in real-time. When serving simplified data to client, The database allows user to set the bound of the error of simplification or the bound of responding time in each data query. Experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods in building a

  13. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  14. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  15. On the joint inversion of geophysical data for models of the coupled core-mantle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1991-01-01

    Joint inversion of magnetic, earth rotation, geoid, and seismic data for a unified model of the coupled core-mantle system is proposed and shown to be possible. A sample objective function is offered and simplified by targeting results from independent inversions and summary travel time residuals instead of original observations. These data are parameterized in terms of a very simple, closed model of the topographically coupled core-mantle system. Minimization of the simplified objective function leads to a nonlinear inverse problem; an iterative method for solution is presented. Parameterization and method are emphasized; numerical results are not presented.

  16. Core Design Applications

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  17. A simplified model of heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Cila; Chen, Yuwen

    2006-08-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer was developed to investigate the thermal behavior of heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic devices. The model took advantage of previous results describing the thermal behavior of the thermoacoustic core and heat transfer in oscillating flow to study the performance of heat exchangers attached to the core. The configuration considered is a flat tube (with a working fluid flowing in the tube) of the thickness of the stack plate attached to both ends of the stack plate. Geometrical and operational parameters as well as thermophysical properties of the heat exchangers, transport fluids in the heat exchangers, stack plate and the thermoacoustic working fluid were organized into dimensionless groups that allowed accounting for their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Two types of thermal boundary conditions were considered: constant temperature and constant heat flux along the heat exchanger tubes. Numerical simulations were carried out with the model introduced in the paper. The temperature distributions and heat fluxes near the edge of the stack plate were found to be nonlinear. The influence of system parameters on the thermal performance of the heat exchangers was analyzed.

  18. Interpretation of searches for supersymmetry with simplified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Park, M.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P., III; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2013-09-01

    The results of searches for supersymmetry by the CMS experiment are interpreted in the framework of simplified models. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.73 to 4.98fb-1. The data were collected at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. This paper describes the method of interpretation and provides upper limits on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction as a function of new particle masses for a number of simplified models. These limits and the corresponding experimental acceptance calculations can be used to constrain other theoretical models and to compare different supersymmetry-inspired analyses.

  19. Simplified Solutions for Activity Deposited on Moving Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Smith, David L; Chabot, George E

    2016-10-01

    Simplified numerical solutions for particulate activity viewed on moving filter continuous air monitors are developed. The monitor configurations include both rectangular window (RW) and circular window (CW) types. The solutions are demonstrated first for a set of basic airborne radioactivity cases, for a series of concentration pulses, and for indicating the effects of step changes in reactor coolant system (RCS) leakage for a pressurized water reactor. The method is also compared to cases from the prior art. These simplified solutions have additional benefits: They are easily adaptable to multiple radionuclides, they will accommodate collection and detection efficiencies that vary in known ways across the collection area, and they also ease the solution programming. PMID:27575345

  20. Effect of peak thermal strain on simplified ratchetting analysis procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Sartory, W.K.

    1989-01-01

    Omission of peak strain in the O'Donnell-Porowski simplified ratchetting rules of ASME Code Case N-47, which governs design of elevated-temperature nuclear components, can lead to nonconservatism. The O'Donnell-Porowski method is therefore modified in this paper to include peak strain. The revised technique eliminates nonconservatism that was originally found in comparing the simplified rules with the results of two- and three-dimensional analyses and that was used as a basis for restricting the O'Donnell-Porowski method to one-dimensional geometries. Since the new method is found to be conservative in all the one-, two-, and three-dimensional problems in which it is has been tested, it is under consideration by the code for inclusion in N-47 without restriction as to dimensionality. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH TO ANALYZE AND MODEL INDUCTIVE VOLTAGE ADDER

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; ENG, W.; PAI, C.; SANDBERG, J.; TAN, Y.; TIAN, Y.

    2007-06-25

    We have recently developed a simplified model and a set of simple formulas for inductive voltage adder design. This model reveals the relationship of output waveform parameters and hardware designs. A computer simulation has demonstrated that parameter estimation based on this approach is accurate as compared to an actual circuit. This approach can be used in early stages of project development to assist feasibility study, geometry selection in engineering design, and parameter selection of critical components. In this paper, we give the deduction of a simplified model. Among the estimation formulas we present are those for pulse rise time, system impedance, and number of stages. Examples are used to illustrate the advantage of this approach. This approach is also applicable to induction LINAC design.

  2. Equations simplify dynamic analysis of deepwater drilling risers

    SciTech Connect

    Huagui, Li )

    1993-12-13

    A set of nonlinear equations with practical simplifying assumptions on the governing motion equations and operational boundary conditions can improve the dynamic analysis of marine drilling risers. The dynamic analysis of marine drilling risers includes time domain and frequency domain analyses. This article simplifies the four-order nonlinear partial differential equation and boundary conditions used to describe marine drilling riser motion. The nonlinear dynamic analysis is numerically simulated by using a finite difference method. The top tension on marine risers was studied using four sea states that correspond to increasingly difficult drilling modes. The results from this numerical method are consistent with those from an analysis of a riser in operation. The paper describes the mathematical model, the numerical method, and drilling limitations, and gives an example calculation.

  3. Simplified scheme for routine identification of human Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Kloos, W E; Schleifer, K H

    1975-01-01

    From a total of 40 characters that were previously used to differentiate species of staphylococci, 13 key characters were selected to make a simplified scheme that could be easily used by the routine clinical laboratory for identifying human staphylococci. These key characters included coagulase activity, hemolysis, nitrate reduction, and aerobic acid production from fructose, xylose, arabinose, ribose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, trehalose, mannitol, and xylitol. In the simplified scheme, 924 strains of staphylococci were placed into 11 positions, each of which contained the major portion (greater than or equal to 80%) of strains of one of the recognized species. Several positions contained a rare or few uncommon strains of one or more additional species and these could be resolved on the basis of other key characters.

  4. Simplified scheme for entanglement preparation with Rydberg pumping via dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shi-Lei; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by recent work [Carr and Saffman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033607 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.033607], we propose a simplified scheme to prepare the two-atom maximally entangled states via dissipative Rydberg pumping. Compared with the former scheme, the simplified one involves fewer classical laser fields and Rydberg interactions, and the asymmetric Rydberg interactions are avoided. Master equation simulations demonstrate that the fidelity and the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt correlation of the maximally entangled state could reach up to 0.999 and 2.821, respectively, under certain conditions. Furthermore, we extend the physical thoughts to prepare the three-dimensional entangled state, and the numerical simulations show that, in theory, both the fidelity and the negativity of the desired entanglement could be very close to unity under certain conditions.

  5. A simplified model of aerosol removal by containment sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.A. ); Burson, S.B. . Div. of Safety Issue Resolution)

    1993-06-01

    Spray systems in nuclear reactor containments are described. The scrubbing of aerosols from containment atmospheres by spray droplets is discussed. Uncertainties are identified in the prediction of spray performance when the sprays are used as a means for decontaminating containment atmospheres. A mechanistic model based on current knowledge of the physical phenomena involved in spray performance is developed. With this model, a quantitative uncertainty analysis of spray performance is conducted using a Monte Carlo method to sample 20 uncertain quantities related to phenomena of spray droplet behavior as well as the initial and boundary conditions expected to be associated with severe reactor accidents. Results of the uncertainty analysis are used to construct simplified expressions for spray decontamination coefficients. Two variables that affect aerosol capture by water droplets are not treated as uncertain; they are (1) [open quote]Q[close quote], spray water flux into the containment, and (2) [open quote]H[close quote], the total fall distance of spray droplets. The choice of values of these variables is left to the user since they are plant and accident specific. Also, they can usually be ascertained with some degree of certainty. The spray decontamination coefficients are found to be sufficiently dependent on the extent of decontamination that the fraction of the initial aerosol remaining in the atmosphere, m[sub f], is explicitly treated in the simplified expressions. The simplified expressions for the spray decontamination coefficient are given. Parametric values for these expressions are found for median, 10 percentile, and 90 percentile values in the uncertainty distribution for the spray decontamination coefficient. Examples are given to illustrate the utility of the simplified expressions to predict spray decontamination of an aerosol-laden atmosphere.

  6. Simplified Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stanton, P.L.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified, rugged VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) system has been developed using a non-removable delay element and an essentially non-adjustable interferometer cavity. In this system, the critical interference adjustments are performed during fabrication of the cavity, freeing the user from this task. Prototype systems are easy to use and give extremely high quality results. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Simplifying the writing process for the novice writer.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Mary Connie

    2002-10-01

    Nurses take responsibility for reading information to update their professional knowledge and to meet relicensure requirements. However, nurses are less enthusiastic about writing for professional publication. This article explores the reluctance of nurses to write, the reasons why writing for publication is important to the nursing profession, the importance of mentoring to potential writers, and basic information about simplifying the writing process for novice writers. PMID:12384898

  8. 7 CFR 273.25 - Simplified Food Stamp Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... at 45 CFR 260.30. (3) Pure-TANF household means a household in which all members receive assistance... (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) means “assistance” as defined in regulations at 45 CFR 260.31. (b) Limit on... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Simplified Food Stamp Program. 273.25 Section...

  9. Simplified Knotless Mattress Repair of Type II SLAP Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chia, Marcus Robert; Hatrick, Cameron

    2015-12-01

    Arthroscopic repair of lesions of the superior labrum and biceps anchor has been shown to provide good to excellent results. We describe a simplified arthroscopic surgical technique using a single knotless anchor with a mattress suture configuration. This technique provides an effective and reproducible method to reattach and re-create the normal appearance of the superior labrum and biceps anchor in a time-efficient manner without the need for knot tying.

  10. Simplified optical correlation-domain reflectometry without reference path.

    PubMed

    Shizuka, Makoto; Hayashi, Neisei; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-20

    We develop a simplified configuration for optical correlation-domain reflectometry (OCDR) without an explicit reference path. Instead, the Fresnel-reflected light generated at the distal open end of the sensing fiber is exploited as a reference light. After the fundamental demonstration, the optimal incident power is found to be approximately 8 dBm. We also show that the loss near the distal end should not be applied, unlike in the case of Brillouin-based OCDR. PMID:27411116

  11. Simplified approach for prosthetic rehabilitation of an enucleated ophthalmic socket.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, V; Mohamed, Kasim; MadhanKumar, Seenivasan; Prathibha, P; Padmanabhan, T V

    2014-09-01

    Physical defects that compromise appearance or function, prevents an individual from leading a normal life, prompt the individual to seek treatment that will reinstate an acceptable normalcy. The disfigurement associated with loss of an eye can cause significant physical and emotional problems. The role of maxillofacial prosthodontists in fabricating an ocular prosthesis with acceptable esthetics and restoring normal appearance is essential. This article presents simplified impression technique and fabrication of ocular prosthesis.

  12. Dark matter phenomenology of GUT inspired simplified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    We discuss some aspects of dark matter phenomenology, in particular related to Direct detection and collider searches, of models in which a fermionic Dark Matter interacts with SM fermions through spin 1 mediators. Contrary to conventional simplified models we will consider fixed assignments of the couplings of the (Z' ) mediator, according theoretically motivated embeddings. This allows to predict signals at future experimental facilities which can be used to test and possibly discriminate different realizations.

  13. Simplified tornado depressurization design methods for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N.M.; Krasnopoler, M.I.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified approach for the calculation of tornado depressurization effects on nuclear power plant structures and components is based on a generic computer depressurization analysis for an arbitrary single volume V connected to the atmosphere by an effective vent area A. For a given tornado depressurization transient, the maximum depressurization ..delta..P of the volume was found to depend on the parameter V/A. The relation between ..delta..P and V/A can be represented by a single monotonically increasing curve for each of the three design-basis tornadoes described in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.76. These curves can be applied to most multiple-volume nuclear power plant structures by considering each volume and its controlling vent area. Where several possible flow areas could be controlling, the maximum value of V/A can be used to estimate a conservative value for ..delta..P. This simplified approach was shown to yield reasonably conservative results when compared to detailed computer calculations of moderately complex geometries. Treatment of severely complicated geometries, heating and ventilation systems, and multiple blowout panel arrangements were found to be beyond the limitations of the simplified analysis.

  14. A simplified technique of performing splenorenal shunt (Omar's technique).

    PubMed

    Shah, Omar Javed; Robbani, Irfan

    2005-01-01

    The splenorenal shunt procedure introduced by Robert Linton in 1947 is still used today in those regions of the world where portal hypertension is a common problem. However, because most surgeons find Linton's shunt procedure technically difficult, we felt that a simpler technique was needed. We present the surgical details and results of 20 splenorenal anastomosis procedures performed within a period of 30 months. Half of the patients (Group I) underwent Linton's conventional technique of splenorenal shunt; the other half (Group II) underwent a newly devised, simplified shunt technique. This new technique involves dissection of the fusion fascia of Toldt. The outcome of the 2 techniques was identical with respect to the reduction of preshunt portal pressure. However, our simplified technique was advantageous in that it significantly reduced the duration of surgery (P <0.001) and the amount of intraoperative blood loss (P <0.003). No patient died after either operation. Although Linton's splenorenal shunt is difficult and technically demanding, it is still routinely performed. The new technique described here, in addition to being simpler, helps achieve good vascular control, permits easier dissection of the splenic vein, enables an ideal anastomosis, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and reduces the duration of surgery. Therefore, we recommend the routine use of this simplified technique (Omar's technique) for the surgical treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:16429901

  15. Simplified panel of assimilation tests for identification of Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed

    Kenchappa, Prashanth; Sreenivasmurthy, Badrinath

    2003-10-01

    A total of 66 Acinetobacter isolates obtained from JIPMER hospital wards were subjected to phenotypic identification schemes involving 25-test and a simplified 13-test panel of carbon utilization or assimilation tests. Reference strains belonging to different DNA groups (n=24) were also tested. Identification was done using numerical approach based on a matrix constructed of phenotypic data published elsewhere and the strains were assigned to different DNA groups according to classification of Tjernberg & Ursing. Sixty-six strains tested represented 10 DNA groups in matrix of large test panel; at a probability level of 0.95. Much simplified scheme of 13 assimilation test panel failed to differentiate some isolates with in A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex (Acb-complex) unlike extended panel. In all, from the large panel 95% of isolates were identified correctly among all the isolates and it did not identify 5% of isolates. From the small panel, a total of 89% of isolates were identified correctly and it could not identify 11% of isolates. Reduced number of assimilation tests to 13 from the large panel bought reduction in identification percentage rate by only 6%. It is impossible for many bacterial diagnostic labs worldwide to perform large panel of carbon utilization tests in routine practice. Simplified panel of assimilation tests suggested here seems to be the best alternative method for identification of Acinetobacter species. PMID:15025386

  16. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  17. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  18. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  20. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of... GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR)...

  1. Health Information in Chinese - Simplified (简体中文): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Gout Purine Restricted Diet (For Patients with Gout) - English 降尿酸饮食建议 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Chinese Community ...

  2. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  3. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  4. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 1s core correlation on properties and energy separations are analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be1S - 1P, the C 3P - 5S,m and CH(+) 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi separations, and CH(+) spectroscopic constants, dipole moment, and 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi transition dipole moment have been studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods.

  5. A Simplified Model of Choice Behavior under Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Lin, Yu-Kai; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Huang, Jong-Tsun; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated. PMID:27582715

  6. A Simplified Model of Choice Behavior under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Lin, Yu-Kai; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Huang, Jong-Tsun; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated. PMID:27582715

  7. A Simplified Model of Choice Behavior under Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Lin, Yu-Kai; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Huang, Jong-Tsun; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated.

  8. Model complexity and performance: How far can we simplify?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raick, C.; Soetaert, K.; Grégoire, M.

    2006-07-01

    Handling model complexity and reliability is a key area of research today. While complex models containing sufficient detail have become possible due to increased computing power, they often lead to too much uncertainty. On the other hand, very simple models often crudely oversimplify the real ecosystem and can not be used for management purposes. Starting from a complex and validated 1D pelagic ecosystem model of the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea), we derived simplified aggregated models in which either the unbalanced algal growth, the functional group diversity or the explicit description of the microbial loop was sacrificed. To overcome the problem of data availability with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, the outputs of the complex model are used as the baseline of perfect knowledge to calibrate the simplified models. Objective criteria of model performance were used to compare the simplified models’ results to the complex model output and to the available data at the DYFAMED station in the central Ligurian Sea. We show that even the simplest (NPZD) model is able to represent the global ecosystem features described by the complex model (e.g. primary and secondary productions, particulate organic matter export flux, etc.). However, a certain degree of sophistication in the formulation of some biogeochemical processes is required to produce realistic behaviors (e.g. the phytoplankton competition, the potential carbon or nitrogen limitation of the zooplankton ingestion, the model trophic closure, etc.). In general, a 9 state-variable model that has the functional group diversity removed, but which retains the bacterial loop and the unbalanced algal growth, performs best.

  9. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.

  10. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  11. Simplified seismic fatigue evaluation for rigid steel connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shama, Ayman A.; Mander, John B.; Chen, Stuart S.

    2003-12-01

    A simplified fatigue-life model is proposed for assessing the seismic inelastic rotational capacity of steel connections. First relations are developed for rigid steel connections under lateral loading. Next this is extended to account for the effects of the welded steel moment frame (WSMF) connections of the so-called pre-Northridge type. The seismic fatigue theory is validated against experimental results. The experiments were conducted under increasing ductility amplitudes until the onset of fracture. Miner’ rule was used to convert the test results to given an equivalent constant amplitude cyclic fatigue life. Satisfactory agreement is obtained when comparing the experimental observations with the theoretical predictions.

  12. Simplified Virtual Instrument Design Based on Mini Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Wenshi

    The most simplified virtual instrument (SVI) is designed through the mini-interface board (seven components), general PC Sound card and MATLAB programs. To deal with the limits followed by our mini-interface board, we cram necessary filters and noise-depressor into PC in form of software. The other key technologies include impedance matching for optimal signal transportation and near-infrared wavelength selection for improving the acquisition signal sensitivity in verification tests aiming at smile versus calm. Also three important contrast cases are discussed to support further our design validity. This work may enhance the base on brain health monitoring at home.

  13. A new simplified onlay technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Salim, Rodrigo; Fogagnolo, Fabricio; Kfuri, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    The integrity of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is essential for the normal kinematics of the knee. Injury to the PCL has adverse consequences, with worsening of functional performance and an increased risk to develop osteoarthritis. Conservative treatment is sometimes adopted, not only because it is an acceptable option for selected patients but also due to the lack of consensus in the orthopedic literature regarding the best surgical method. Hereby we describe a simplified technique for onlay PCL reconstruction pointing out possible advantages if compared with the traditional transtibial or inlay techniques.

  14. A simplified biosphere model for global climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Y.; Sellers, P. J.; Kinter, J. L.; Shukla, J.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the simple biosphere model (SIB) of Sellers et al. (1986) is performed in an effort to bridge the gap between the typical hydrological treatment of the land surface biosphere and the conventional general circulation model treatment, which is specified through a single parameter. Approximations are developed that stimulate the effects of reduced soil moisture more simply, maintaining the essence of the biophysical concepts utilized in SIB. Comparing the reduced parameter biosphere with those from the original formulation in a GCM and a zero-dimensional model shows the simplified version to reproduce the original results quite closely.

  15. Simplified solution for point contact deformation between two elastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A linear-regression by the method of least squares is made on the geometric variables that occur in the equation for point contact deformation. The ellipticity and the complete eliptic integrals of the first and second kind are expressed as a function of the x, y-plane principal radii. The ellipticity was varied from 1 (circular contact) to 10 (a configuration approaching line contact). These simplified equations enable one to calculate easily the point-contact deformation to within 3 percent without resorting to charts or numerical methods.

  16. Simplified simulation models for control studies of turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, T. C.; Leake, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The essential dynamical characteristics of a simple single spool turbojet engine were determined through simulation of low order system models on an analog computer. An accurate model was studied and system complexity was reduced through various linearizations and approximations. A derivation of a seventh order simplified simulation model is presented with a derivation of an even simpler third order model, and simulation results from each. The control problem studied is one of getting from zero fuel flow equilibrium to a high thrust equilibrium while taking into account surge margin and turbine inlet temperature constraints.

  17. On mono-W signatures in spin-1 simplified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Ulrich; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2016-09-01

    The potential sensitivity to isospin-breaking effects makes LHC searches for mono-W signatures promising probes of the coupling structure between the Standard Model and dark matter. It has been shown, however, that the strong sensitivity of the mono-W channel to the relative magnitude and sign of the up-type and down-type quark couplings to dark matter is an artifact of unitarity violation. We provide three different solutions to this mono-W problem in the context of spin-1 simplified models and briefly discuss the impact that our findings have on the prospects of mono-W searches at future LHC runs.

  18. A simplified correlation technique for position location using earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, S. C.; Davies, W. D. T.

    1972-01-01

    To derive range to a moving vehicle for surveillance and navigation purposes, the phase delays in sets of sinusoidal tones may be measured using synchronous satellites for signal relay. When the number of users is large, problems of rapid acquisition and measurement occur in multiple-access systems. This paper describes the selection and processing of an orthogonal tone set which has several useful features. The paper also presents a simulation of a simplified digital technique for the noise-free case, as well as for a composite signal buried in wideband noise. The digital simulation is also modified to include the proposed 'hard limiting' or clipping technique.

  19. A simplified approach to calibrating [sup 14]C dates

    SciTech Connect

    Talma, A.S.; Vogel, J.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors propose a simplified approach to the calibration of radiocarbon dates. They use splines through the tree-ring data as calibration curves, thereby eliminating a large part of the statistical scatter of the actual data points. To express the age range, they transform the [plus minus]1 [sigma] and [plus minus]2 [sigma] values of the BP age to calendar dates and interpret them as the 68% and 95% confidence intervals. This approach by-passes the conceptual problems of the transfer of individual probability values from the radiocarbon to the calendar age. They have adapted software to make this calibration possible.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    L. Brand, D. Cautley, D. Bohac, P. Francisco, L. Shen, and S. Gloss

    2015-12-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives.

  1. A simplified oil-film skin-friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    The oil-film method of skin friction measurement, which does not require calibration, nevertheless entails that interferometric measurements of the oil film be obtained. The oil-film method is presently simplified by eliminating interferometry and its requisite polished surface, by taking direct and dynamic measurements of the oil-film slope with a small position-sensing photodiode. This technique has undergone verification in incompressible turbulent and laminar flows in flat-plate boundary layers and pipe flows; the meter is judged to be inexpensive, simple, and robust.

  2. A simplified In Situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and testing of a new, simplified in situ radiocarbon extraction system at the University of Arizona. Blank levels for the new system are low ((234 ?? 11) ?? 103 atoms (1 ??; n = 7)) and stable. The precision of a given measurement depends on the concentration of 14C, but is typically <5% for concentrations of 100 ?? 103 atoms g-1 or more. The new system is relatively small and easy to construct, costs significantly less than the original in situ 14C extraction system at Arizona, and lends itself to future automation. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  3. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozlowski, C.P.; Bauman, J.E.; Hahn, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

  4. A VLSI architecture for simplified arithmetic Fourier transform algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Shih, Ming-Tang; Truong, T. K.; Hendon, E.; Tufts, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The arithmetic Fourier transform (AFT) is a number-theoretic approach to Fourier analysis which has been shown to perform competitively with the classical FFT in terms of accuracy, complexity, and speed. Theorems developed in a previous paper for the AFT algorithm are used here to derive the original AFT algorithm which Bruns found in 1903. This is shown to yield an algorithm of less complexity and of improved performance over certain recent AFT algorithms. A VLSI architecture is suggested for this simplified AFT algorithm. This architecture uses a butterfly structure which reduces the number of additions by 25 percent of that used in the direct method.

  5. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  6. Simplified quantum bit commitment using single photon nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2014-10-01

    We simplified our previously proposed quantum bit commitment (QBC) protocol based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, by replacing symmetric beam splitters with asymmetric ones. It eliminates the need for random sending time of the photons; thus, the feasibility and efficiency are both improved. The protocol is immune to the cheating strategy in the Mayers-Lo-Chau no-go theorem of unconditionally secure QBC, because the density matrices of the committed states do not satisfy a crucial condition on which the no-go theorem holds.

  7. Simplified fatigue life analysis for traction drive contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified fatigue life analysis for traction drive contacts of arbitrary geometry is presented. The analysis is based on the Lundberg-Palmgren theory used for rolling-element bearings. The effects of torque, element size, speed, contact ellipse ratio, and the influence of traction coefficient are shown. The analysis shows that within the limits of the available traction coefficient, traction contacts exhibit longest life at high speeds. Multiple, load-sharing roller arrangements have an advantageous effect on system life, torque capacity, power-to-weight ratio and size.

  8. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  9. Cardiac dynamics: a simplified model for action potential propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a new semiphysiological ionic model, used recently to study reexitations and reentry in cardiac tissue [I.R. Cantalapiedra et al, PRE 82 011907 (2010)]. The aim of the model is to reproduce action potencial morphologies and restitution curves obtained, either from experimental data, or from more complex electrophysiological models. The model divides all ion currents into four groups according to their function, thus resulting into fast-slow and inward-outward currents. We show that this simplified model is flexible enough as to accurately capture the electrical properties of cardiac myocytes, having the advantage of being less computational demanding than detailed electrophysiological models. Under some conditions, it has been shown to be amenable to mathematical analysis. The model reproduces the action potential (AP) change with stimulation rate observed both experimentally and in realistic models of healthy human and guinea pig myocytes (TNNP and LRd models, respectively). When simulated in a cable it also gives the right dependence of the conduction velocity (CV) with stimulation rate. Besides reproducing correctly these restitution properties, it also gives a good fit for the morphology of the AP, including the notch typical of phase 1. Finally, we perform simulations in a realistic geometric model of the rabbit’s ventricles, finding a good qualitative agreement in AP propagation and the ECG. Thus, this simplified model represents an alternative to more complex models when studying instabilities in wave propagation. PMID:23194429

  10. Simplified signal processing for impedance spectroscopy with spectrally sparse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annus, P.; Land, R.; Reidla, M.; Ojarand, J.; Mughal, Y.; Min, M.

    2013-04-01

    Classical method for measurement of the electrical bio-impedance involves excitation with sinusoidal waveform. Sinusoidal excitation at fixed frequency points enables wide variety of signal processing options, most general of them being Fourier transform. Multiplication with two quadrature waveforms at desired frequency could be easily accomplished both in analogue and in digital domains, even simplest quadrature square waves can be considered, which reduces signal processing task in analogue domain to synchronous switching followed by low pass filter, and in digital domain requires only additions. So called spectrally sparse excitation sequences (SSS), which have been recently introduced into bio-impedance measurement domain, are very reasonable choice when simultaneous multifrequency excitation is required. They have many good properties, such as ease of generation and good crest factor compared to similar multisinusoids. Typically, the usage of discrete or fast Fourier transform in signal processing step is considered so far. Usage of simplified methods nevertheless would reduce computational burden, and enable simpler, less costly and less energy hungry signal processing platforms. Accuracy of the measurement with SSS excitation when using different waveforms for quadrature demodulation will be compared in order to evaluate the feasibility of the simplified signal processing. Sigma delta modulated sinusoid (binary signal) is considered to be a good alternative for a synchronous demodulation.

  11. Simplified Physics Based Models Research Topical Report on Task #2

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Srikanta; Ganesh, Priya

    2014-10-31

    We present a simplified-physics based approach, where only the most important physical processes are modeled, to develop and validate simplified predictive models of CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. We use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. Similar correlations are also developed to predict the average pressure within the injection reservoir, and the pressure buildup within the caprock.

  12. A simplified memory network model based on pattern formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiyun; Wang, Chaoqing; Liu, Zonghua

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments have evidenced the transition with different time scales from short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) in mammalian brains, while its theoretical understanding is still under debate. To understand its underlying mechanism, it has recently been shown that it is possible to have a long-period rhythmic synchronous firing in a scale-free network, provided the existence of both the high-degree hubs and the loops formed by low-degree nodes. We here present a simplified memory network model to show that the self-sustained synchronous firing can be observed even without these two necessary conditions. This simplified network consists of two loops of coupled excitable neurons with different synaptic conductance and with one node being the sensory neuron to receive an external stimulus signal. This model can be further used to show how the diversity of firing patterns can be selectively formed by varying the signal frequency, duration of the stimulus and network topology, which corresponds to the patterns of STM and LTM with different time scales. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the underlying mechanism of firing patterns.

  13. Earthquake response analysis of RC bridges using simplified modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do Hyung; Kim, Dookie; Park, Taehyo

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, simplified modeling approaches describing the hysteretic behavior of reinforced concrete bridge piers are proposed. For this purpose, flexure-axial and shear-axial interaction models are developed and implemented into a nonlinear finite element analysis program. Comparative verifications for reinforced concrete columns prove that the analytical predictions obtained with the new formulations show good correlation with experimental results under various levels of axial forces and section types. In addition, analytical correlation studies for the inelastic earthquake response of reinforced concrete bridge structures are also carried out using the simplified modeling approaches. Relatively good agreement is observed in the results between the current modeling approach and the elaborated fiber models. It is thus encouraging that the present developments and approaches are capable of identifying the contribution of deformation mechanisms correctly. Subsequently, the present developments can be used as a simple yet effective tool for the deformation capacity evaluation of reinforced concrete columns in general and reinforced concrete bridge piers in particular.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of a simplified engine-propeller system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. D.; Warwick, S. A.; Zhang, X.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a procedure for studying dynamical behaviors of a simplified engine-propeller dynamical system consisting of a number of bodies of plane motions. The equation of motion of the complex system is obtained using the Lagrange equation and solved numerically using the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. Various simulations were performed to investigate the transient and steady state behaviors of the multiple body system while taking into consideration the engine pressure pulsations, nonlinear inertia of moving bodies, and nonlinear aerodynamic load. Sub-harmonics and super harmonics in the steady state responses for different power and propeller pitch settings are obtained using the fast Fourier transform. Numerical simulations indicate that the 1.5 order is the dominant order of harmonics in the steady state oscillatory motion of the crankshaft. The findings and procedure presented in the paper are useful to the aerospace industry in certifying reciprocating engines and propellers. The crankshaft oscillatory velocities obtained from the simplified rigid body model are in good agreement with the experimental data for a SAITO-450 engine and a SOLO propeller at a 6″ pitch setting.

  15. Simplified design method for shear-valve magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Haitao; Li, Zhongxian

    2014-12-01

    Based on the Bingham parallel-plate model, a simplified design method of shear-valve magnetorheological (MR) dampers is proposed considering the magnetic circuit optimization. Correspondingly, a new MR damper with a full-length effective damping path is proposed. The prototype dampers are also fabricated and studied numerically and experimentally. According to the test results, the Bingham parallel-plate model is further modified to obtain a damping force prediction model of the proposed MR dampers. This prediction model considers the magnetic saturation phenomenon. The study indicates that the proposed simplified design method is simple, effective and reliable. The maximum damping force of the proposed MR dampers with a full-length effective damping path is at least twice as large as those of conventional MR dampers. The dynamic range of damping force increases by at least 70%. The proposed damping force prediction model considers the magnetic saturation phenomenon and it can realize the actual characteristic of MR fluids. The model is able to predict the actual damping force of MR dampers precisely.

  16. Architecture analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The libration point satellite navigation system is a novel navigation architecture that consists of satellites located in periodic orbits around the Earth-Moon libration points. Superiorities of the proposed system lie in its autonomy and extended navigation capability, which have been proved in our previous works. Based on the candidate architectures obtained before, a detailed analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system, i.e. the Earth-Moon L1,2 two-satellite constellation, is conducted in this work. Firstly, relation between orbits amplitude is derived for the candidate two-satellite constellations to ensure continuous crosslink measurements between libration point satellites. Then, with the use of a reference lunar exploration mission scenario, navigation performances of different constellation configurations are evaluated by Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the amplitude and initial phase combinations of libration point orbits have direct effect on the performance of the two-satellite constellations. By using a cooperative evolutionary algorithm for configuration parameter optimization, some optimal constellations are finally obtained for the simplified navigation architecture. The results obtained in this paper may be a reference for future system design.

  17. Simplified Metadata Curation via the Metadata Management Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, D.; Pilone, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Metadata Management Tool (MMT) is the newest capability developed as part of NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System's (EOSDIS) efforts to simplify metadata creation and improve metadata quality. The MMT was developed via an agile methodology, taking into account inputs from GCMD's science coordinators and other end-users. In its initial release, the MMT uses the Unified Metadata Model for Collections (UMM-C) to allow metadata providers to easily create and update collection records in the ISO-19115 format. Through a simplified UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format, while still generating compliant metadata. More experienced users are also able to access raw metadata to build more complex records as needed. In future releases, the MMT will build upon recent work done in the community to assess metadata quality and compliance with a variety of standards through application of metadata rubrics. The tool will provide users with clear guidance as to how to easily change their metadata in order to improve their quality and compliance. Through these features, the MMT allows data providers to create and maintain compliant and high quality metadata in a short amount of time.

  18. Encapsulated membrane proteins: A simplified system for molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah C; Khalid, Syma; Pollock, Naomi L; Knowles, Tim J; Edler, Karen; Rothnie, Alice J; R T Thomas, Owen; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 50years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of biomolecular interactions at an atomic level. This in turn has allowed molecular simulation methods employing full atomistic modelling at ever larger scales to develop. However, some challenging areas still remain where there is either a lack of atomic resolution structures or where the simulation system is inherently complex. An area where both challenges are present is that of membranes containing membrane proteins. In this review we analyse a new practical approach to membrane protein study that offers a potential new route to high resolution structures and the possibility to simplify simulations. These new approaches collectively recognise that preservation of the interaction between the membrane protein and the lipid bilayer is often essential to maintain structure and function. The new methods preserve these interactions by producing nano-scale disc shaped particles that include bilayer and the chosen protein. Currently two approaches lead in this area: the MSP system that relies on peptides to stabilise the discs, and SMALPs where an amphipathic styrene maleic acid copolymer is used. Both methods greatly enable protein production and hence have the potential to accelerate atomic resolution structure determination as well as providing a simplified format for simulations of membrane protein dynamics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946242

  19. A simplified approach to calculate atomic partition functions in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ammando, Giuliano; Colonna, Gianpiero

    2013-03-15

    A simplified method to calculate the electronic partition functions and the corresponding thermodynamic properties of atomic species is presented and applied to C(I) up to C(VI) ions. The method consists in reducing the complex structure of an atom to three lumped levels. The ground level of the lumped model describes the ground term of the real atom, while the second lumped level represents the low lying states and the last one groups all the other atomic levels. It is also shown that for the purpose of thermodynamic function calculation, the energy and the statistical weight of the upper lumped level, describing high-lying excited atomic states, can be satisfactorily approximated by an analytic hydrogenlike formula. The results of the simplified method are in good agreement with those obtained by direct summation over a complete set (i.e., including all possible terms and configurations below a given cutoff energy) of atomic energy levels. The method can be generalized to include more lumped levels in order to improve the accuracy.

  20. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral

  1. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  2. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  3. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  4. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  5. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  6. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  7. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  8. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  9. Mars' core and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  10. One pass core design of a super fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qingjie; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-07-01

    One pass core design for Supercritical-pressure light water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) is proposed. The whole core is cooled with upward flow in one through flow pattern like PWR. Compared with the previous two pass core design; this new flow pattern can significantly simplify the core concept. Upper core structure, coolant flow scheme as well as refueling procedure are as simple as in PWR. In one pass core design, supercritical-pressure water is at approximately 25.0 MPa and enters the core at 280 C. degrees and is heated up in one through flow pattern upwardly to the average outlet temperature of 500 C. degrees. Great density change in vertical direction can cause significant axial power offset during the cycle. Meanwhile, Pu accumulated in the UO{sub 2} fuel blanket assemblies also introduces great power increase during cycle, which requires large amount of flow for heat removal and makes the outlet temperature of blanket low at the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC). To deal with these issues, some MOX fuel is applied in the bottom region of the blanket assembly. This can help to mitigate the power change in blanket due to Pu accumulation and to increase the outlet temperature of the blanket during cycle. Neutron transport and thermohydraulics coupled calculation shows that this design can satisfy the requirement in the Super FR principle for both 500 C. degrees outlet temperature and negative coolant void reactivity. (authors)

  11. A multi-core CPU pipeline architecture for virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Eric; Liu, Alan; Sieck, Jennifer; Muniz, Gilbert; Bowyer, Mark; Armonda, Rocco

    2009-01-01

    Physically-based virtual environments (VEs) provide realistic interactions and behaviors for computer-based medical simulations. Limited CPU resources have traditionally forced VEs to be simplified for real-time performance. Multi-core processors greatly increase the computational capacity of computers and are quickly becoming standard. However, developing non-application specific methods to fully utilize all available CPU cores for processing VEs is difficult. The paper describes a pipeline VE architecture designed for multi-core CPU systems. The architecture enables development of VEs that leverage the computational resources of all CPU cores for VE simulation. A VE's workload is dynamically distributed across the available CPU cores. A VE can be developed once and scale efficiently with the number of cores. The described pipeline architecture makes it possible to develop complex physically-based VEs for medical simulations. Initial results for a craniotomy simulator being developed have shown super-linear and near-linear speedups when tested with up to four cores.

  12. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Simplified Ion Thruster Xenon Feed System for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Randolph, Thomas M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    The successful implementation of ion thruster technology on the Deep Space 1 technology demonstration mission paved the way for its first use on the Dawn science mission, which launched in September 2007. Both Deep Space 1 and Dawn used a "bang-bang" xenon feed system which has proven to be highly successful. This type of feed system, however, is complex with many parts and requires a significant amount of engineering work for architecture changes. A simplified feed system, with fewer parts and less engineering work for architecture changes, is desirable to reduce the feed system cost to future missions. An attractive new path for ion thruster feed systems is based on new components developed by industry in support of commercial applications of electric propulsion systems. For example, since the launch of Deep Space 1 tens of mechanical xenon pressure regulators have successfully flown on commercial spacecraft using electric propulsion. In addition, active proportional flow controllers have flown on the Hall-thruster-equipped Tacsat-2, are flying on the ion thruster GOCE mission, and will fly next year on the Advanced EHF spacecraft. This present paper briefly reviews the Dawn xenon feed system and those implemented on other xenon electric propulsion flight missions. A simplified feed system architecture is presented that is based on assembling flight-qualified components in a manner that will reduce non-recurring engineering associated with propulsion system architecture changes, and is compared to the NASA Dawn standard. The simplified feed system includes, compared to Dawn, passive high-pressure regulation, a reduced part count, reduced complexity due to cross-strapping, and reduced non-recurring engineering work required for feed system changes. A demonstration feed system was assembled using flight-like components and used to operate a laboratory NSTAR-class ion engine. Feed system components integrated into a single-string architecture successfully operated

  14. Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Grudinin, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    A simplified method of generating a beam of light having a relatively high value of angular momentum (see figure) involves the use of a compact apparatus consisting mainly of a laser, a whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) resonator, and optical fibers. The method also can be used to generate a Bessel beam. ( Bessel beam denotes a member of a class of non-diffracting beams, so named because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have high values of angular momentum.) High-angular-momentum light beams are used in some applications in biology and nanotechnology, wherein they are known for their ability to apply torque to make microscopic objects rotate. High-angular-momentum light beams could also be used to increase bandwidths of fiber-optic communication systems. The present simplified method of generating a high-angular-momentum light beam was conceived as an alternative to prior such methods, which are complicated and require optical setups that include, variously, holograms, modulating Fabry-Perot cavities, or special microstructures. The present simplified method exploits a combination of the complex structure of the electromagnetic field inside a WGM resonator, total internal reflection in the WGM resonator, and the electromagnetic modes supported by an optical fiber. The optical fiber used to extract light from the WGM resonator is made of fused quartz. The output end of this fiber is polished flat and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The input end of this fiber is cut on a slant and placed very close to the WGM resonator at an appropriate position and orientation. To excite the resonant whispering- gallery modes, light is introduced into the WGM resonator via another optical fiber that is part of a pigtailed fiber-optic coupler. Light extracted from the WGM resonator is transformed into a high-angular- momentum beam inside the extraction optical fiber and this beam is emitted from the

  15. Simplified Predictive Models for CO2 Sequestration Performance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srikanta; RaviGanesh, Priya; Schuetter, Jared; Mooney, Douglas; He, Jincong; Durlofsky, Louis

    2014-05-01

    We present results from an ongoing research project that seeks to develop and validate a portfolio of simplified modeling approaches that will enable rapid feasibility and risk assessment for CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The overall research goal is to provide tools for predicting: (a) injection well and formation pressure buildup, and (b) lateral and vertical CO2 plume migration. Simplified modeling approaches that are being developed in this research fall under three categories: (1) Simplified physics-based modeling (SPM), where only the most relevant physical processes are modeled, (2) Statistical-learning based modeling (SLM), where the simulator is replaced with a "response surface", and (3) Reduced-order method based modeling (RMM), where mathematical approximations reduce the computational burden. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. In the first category (SPM), we use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. In the second category (SLM), we develop statistical "proxy models" using the simulation domain described previously with two different approaches: (a) classical Box-Behnken experimental design with a quadratic response surface fit, and (b) maximin Latin Hypercube sampling (LHS) based design with a Kriging metamodel fit using a quadratic trend and Gaussian correlation structure. For roughly the same number of

  16. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  17. A simplified DEM-CFD approach for pebble bed reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    In pebble bed reactors (PBR's), the pebble flow and the coolant flow are coupled with each other through coolant-pebble interactions. Approaches with different fidelities have been proposed to simulate similar phenomena. Coupled Discrete Element Method-Computational Fluid Dynamics (DEM-CFD) approaches are widely studied and applied in these problems due to its good balance between efficiency and accuracy. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without significant loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3-D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2-D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical geometry. Results show that this simplification can greatly enhance the efficiency for cylindrical core, which enables further inclusion of other physics such as thermal and neutronic effect in the multi-physics simulations for PBR's. (authors)

  18. An analytical study of reduced-gravity liquid reorientation using a simplified marker and cell technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, W. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program called HOPI was developed to predict reorientation flow dynamics, wherein liquids move from one end of a closed, partially filled, rigid container to the other end under the influence of container acceleration. The program uses the simplified marker and cell numerical technique and, using explicit finite-differencing, solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible viscous fluid. The effects of turbulence are also simulated in the program. HOPI can consider curved as well as straight walled boundaries. Both free-surface and confined flows can be calculated. The program was used to simulate five liquid reorientation cases. Three of these cases simulated actual NASA LeRC drop tower test conditions while two cases simulated full-scale Centaur tank conditions. It was concluded that while HOPI can be used to analytically determine the fluid motion in a typical settling problem, there is a current need to optimize HOPI. This includes both reducing the computer usage time and also reducing the core storage required for a given size problem.

  19. Development of the Medium Small BWR 'DMS' (Double MS: Modular Simplified and Medium Small Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsushi, Hino; Masao, Chaki; Kenji, Tominaga; Masayoshi, Matsuura

    2006-07-01

    A new concept of the small and medium sized light water reactor, named the DMS has been developed by Hitachi, supported by the Japan Atomic Power Company. The DMS features significantly simplified plant systems realized by adoption of a natural circulation system of coolant and a free surface separation system (FSS). The DMS employs short length fuel assemblies and this enables natural circulation with a compact RPV. By adopting the natural circulation system, recirculation pumps and their driving power sources can be eliminated. The FSS uses the concept of steam and liquid separation by gravity, which is possible because of the low steam velocity due to the natural circulation and low power density of the DMS. By adopting the FSS, steam separation equipment needed in current BWRs can be eliminated. In addition, system components are rationalized and their layouts are modularized and standardized to attain a compact PCV; these result in a construction cost per unit power output almost comparable to that of current BWRs. In this study, the core design was improved taking plant cost and fuel efficiency into consideration. It was found that the number of fuel assemblies can be reduced about 11 % while maintaining the same thermal output as before, by extending the active fuel length. This makes it possible to reduce the number of control rod drive systems by about 12 % and to cut construction cost. (authors)

  20. A simplified mass-transfer model for visual pigments in amphibian retinal-cone outer segments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Paul W; Howle, Laurens E; Murray, Mark M; Corless, Joseph M

    2011-02-01

    When radiolabeled precursors and autoradiography are used to investigate turnover of protein components in photoreceptive cone outer segments (COSs), the labeled components--primarily visual pigment molecules (opsins)--are diffusely distributed along the COS. To further assess this COS labeling pattern, we derive a simplified mass-transfer model for quantifying the contributions of advective and diffusive mechanisms to the distribution of opsins within COSs of the frog retina. Two opsin-containing regions of the COS are evaluated: the core axial array of disks and the plasmalemma. Numerical solutions of the mass-transfer model indicate three distinct stages of system evolution. In the first stage, plasmalemma diffusion is dominant. In the second stage, the plasmalemma density reaches a metastable state and transfer between the plasmalemma and disk region occurs, which is followed by an increase in density that is qualitatively similar for both regions. The final stage consists of both regions slowly evolving to the steady-state solution. Our results indicate that autoradiographic and cognate approaches for tracking labeled opsins in the COS cannot be effective methodologies for assessing new disk formation at the base of the COS.

  1. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  2. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  3. Simplified Expert Elicitation Procedure for Risk Assessment of Operating Events

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Julie Marble; William Galyean; Larry Blackwood; Harold Blackman

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a simplified, tractable, and usable procedure within the US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) for seeking expert opinion and judgment. The NRC has increased efforts to document the reliability and risk of nuclear power plants (NPPs) through Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) models. The Significance Determination Process (SDP) and Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) programs at the NRC utilize expert judgment on the probability of failure, human error, and the operability of equipment in cases where otherwise insufficient operational data exist to make meaningful estimates. In the past, the SDP and ASP programs informally sought the opinion of experts inside and outside the NRC. This document represents a formal, documented procedure to take the place of informal expert elicitation. The procedures outlined in this report follow existing formal expert elicitation methodologies, but are streamlined as appropriate to the degree of accuracy required and the schedule for producing SDP and ASP analyses.

  4. ON ENERGY CONSERVATION OF THE SIMPLIFIED TAKAHASHI-IMADA METHOD*, **

    PubMed Central

    Hairer, Ernst; McLachlan, Robert I.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    In long-time numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems, and especially in molecular dynamics simulation, it is important that the energy is well conserved. For symplectic integrators applied with sufficiently small step size, this is guaranteed by the existence of a modified Hamiltonian that is exactly conserved up to exponentially small terms. This article is concerned with the simplified Takahashi-Imada method, which is a modification of the Störmer-Verlet method that is as easy to implement but has improved accuracy. This integrator is symmetric and volume-preserving, but no longer symplectic. We study its long-time energy conservation and give theoretical arguments, supported by numerical experiments, which show the possibility of a drift in the energy (linear or like a random walk). With respect to energy conservation, this article provides empirical and theoretical data concerning the importance of using a symplectic integrator. PMID:20539750

  5. A simplified model of high pressure spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Wakamatsu, Y.; Faeth, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified model of high-pressure spray combustion is examined. The analysis relies on a kappa-epsilon-g turbulence model in conjunction with the locally homogeneous flow (LHF) approximation of two-phase flow, which implies infinitely fast transport rates between the phases. High-pressure phenomena near the thermodynamic critical point are treated using the Redlich-Kwong equation of state. Predictions are compared with existing measurements of spray boundaries in a pressure-atomized n-pentane spray (Sauter mean diameter, approximately 30 microns) burning in stagnant air at 3, 6, and 9 MPa. The LHF model overestimates the rate of development of the flow, yielding spray lengths roughly 20% shorter than measured. Calibrated drop-life-history calculations suggest that finite interphase transport rates are the primary cause of the discrepancy.

  6. Simplifying rules for optimal allocation of preventive care resources.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin

    2012-04-01

    Given the limited resources for preventive care, policy-makers need to consider the efficiency/cost-effectiveness of preventive measures, such as drugs and vaccines, when allocating preventive care resources. However, in many settings only limited information on lifetime costs and effects of preventive measures exists. Therefore, it seems useful to provide policy-makers with some simplifying rules when allocating preventive care resources. The purpose of this article is to investigate the relevance of risk and severity of the disease to be prevented for the optimal allocation of preventive care resources. The report shows - based on a constrained optimization model - that optimal allocation of preventive care resources does, in fact, depend on both factors. Resources should be allocated to the prevention of diseases with a higher probability of occurrence or larger severity. This article also identifies situations where preventive care resources should be allocated to the prevention of less severe disease.

  7. Simplified interplanetary guidance procedures using onboard optical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Simplified guidance procedures have been developed which are based on preflight determination of the characteristics of perturbed trajectories. The results are devoted primarily to planetary approach guidance; however, some considerations for midcourse guidance are included. The methods are studied for an Earth-to-Mars trajectory but would be applicable to Grand Tour and other types of missions. Generally requiring only a single onboard optical angular measurement, the approach procedure predicts guidance corrections for the control of periapsis radius as well as orbital plane orientation. An error analysis has shown that the periapsis radius at Mars can be controlled to a 1 sigma accuracy of about 20 km if the guidance is performed 1/2 day before periapsis passage. If the guidance is performed at the Martian sphere of influence (2.2 days before periapsis), the error doubles because of the increased effect of measurement and maneuvering errors.

  8. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  9. Simplified method for determining fracture toughness of two dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Sinavarat, Potchaman; Anunmana, Chuchai; Muanjit, Thitima

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the fracture toughness values (KIC), which were derived from simplified techniques: the indentation fracture (IF), the indentation strength (IS), and fractographic approach to that from a standard testing using surface cracks in flexure (SCF). Forty bar specimens, twenty IPS Empress(®) Esthetic and twenty IPS e.max(®)Ceram were prepared. Ten specimens in each material were tested by IF technique, IS technique and fractographic approach, and additional 10 specimens were tested by the SCF technique. This study showed that the mean KIC derived from fractographic approach were not significantly different from that of the SCF in both materials (p>0.05) whereas the mean KIC from indentation techniques rarely agreed with those of the standard technique. The KIC determination is sensitive to the methods used that affect accuracy. Consequently, test selection should be based on a sound understanding and inherent limitations of each technique.

  10. Cask crush pad analysis using detailed and simplified analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Uldrich, E.D.; Hawkes, B.D.

    1997-12-31

    A crush pad has been designed and analyzed to absorb the kinetic energy of a hypothetically dropped spent nuclear fuel shipping cask into a 44-ft. deep cask unloading pool at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST). This facility, located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho national Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is a US Department of Energy site. The basis for this study is an analysis by Uldrich and Hawkes. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate various hypothetical cask drop orientations to ensure that the crush pad design was adequate and the cask deceleration at impact was less than 100 g. It is demonstrated herein that a large spent fuel shipping cask, when dropped onto a foam crush pad, can be analyzed by either hand methods or by sophisticated dynamic finite element analysis using computer codes such as ABAQUS. Results from the two methods are compared to evaluate accuracy of the simplified hand analysis approach.

  11. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaling model for the fast THETA-pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high-magnetic-field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a BETA = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA THETA-pinches.

  12. Simplified Model for Analysing Ion/Photoelectron Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Wang, Bing-Xing; Guo, Wei; Wang, Yan-Qiu; Wang, Li

    2007-07-01

    Based on the Onion-Peeling algorithm (OPA) principle, we present a simplified model for analysing photoion and photoelectron images, which allows the analysis of experimental raw images. A three-dimensional distribution of the nascent charged particles, from which the radial and angular distributions are deduced, can be obtained more easily by this model than by the commonly used procedures. The analysis results of Xe photoelectron images by this model are compared with those from the standard Hankel-Abel inversion. The results imply that this model can be used for complicated (many peaks) and `difficult' (low signal-to-noise) images with cylindrical symmetries, and can provide a reliable reconstruction in some cases when the commonly used Hankel Abel transform method fails.

  13. The CryoCapsule: Simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Heiligenstein, Jérôme; Delevoye, Cédric; Hurbain, Ilse; Bardin, Sabine; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Régnier, Gilles; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at present separate live cell fluorescence imaging from contextual high-resolution electron microscopy, thus opening new strategies for full correlative light to electron microscopy. We tested the biological application of this highly optimized tool on three different specimens: the in-vitro Xenopus laevis mitotic spindle, melanoma cells over-expressing YFP-langerin sequestered in organized membranous subcellular organelles and a pigmented melanocytic cell in which the endosomal system was labeled with internalized fluorescent transferrin. PMID:24533564

  14. Simplified Dirac dark matter models and gamma-ray lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Michael; Fileviez Pérez, Pavel; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-10-01

    We investigate simplified dark matter models where the dark matter candidate is a Dirac fermion charged only under a new gauge symmetry. In this context one can understand dynamically the stability of the dark matter candidate and the annihilation through the new gauge boson is not velocity suppressed. We present the simplest Dirac dark matter model charged under the local B -L gauge symmetry. We discuss in great detail the theoretical predictions for the annihilation into two photons, into the standard model Higgs and a photon, and into the Z gauge boson and a photon. Our analytical results can be used for any Dirac dark matter model charged under an Abelian gauge symmetry. The numerical results are shown in the B -L dark matter model. We discuss the correlation between the constraints on the model from collider searches and dark matter experiments.

  15. Universal transversal gates with color codes: A simplified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubica, Aleksander; Beverland, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    We provide a simplified yet rigorous presentation of the ideas from Bombín's paper (arXiv:1311.0879v3). Our presentation is self-contained, and assumes only basic concepts from quantum error correction. We provide an explicit construction of a family of color codes in arbitrary dimensions and describe some of their crucial properties. Within this framework, we explicitly show how to transversally implement the generalized phase gate Rn=diag(1 ,e2 π i /2n) , which deviates from the method in the aforementioned paper, allowing an arguably simpler proof. We describe how to implement the Hadamard gate H fault tolerantly using code switching. In three dimensions, this yields, together with the transversal controlled-not (cnot), a fault-tolerant universal gate set {H ,c n o t ,R3} without state distillation.

  16. On a simplified two-phase slug flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Yuwen Wang ); Baushei Pei; Weikeng Lin . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A simplified model of two-phase slug flow is constructed. Model equations containing 11 parameters can describe the characteristics of slug flow completely. These equations can generally be solved by an iterative method within 15 iterations, if the relative error tolerance is chosen to be 0.1%. The model is applicable to two-phase systems with various diameters with a correction in the liquid slug void fraction. The procedures for correcting the liquid slug void fraction and for solving the model equations are also presented. Some experimental time-varying signals of slug flow are selected to be analyzed. Model calculations are compared with both previously published and new experimental data. The comparisons show that the errors in the calculated results are generally within [+-]10%

  17. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of simplified solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, G.; Casalis, G.; Estivalèzes, J.-L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the Parietal Vortex Shedding (PVS) instability that significantly influences the Pressure Oscillations of the long and segmented solid rocket motors. The eigenmodes resulting from the stability analysis of a simplified configuration, namely, a cylindrical duct with sidewall injection, are presented. They are computed taking into account the presence of a wall injection defect, which is shown to induce hydrodynamic instabilities at discrete frequencies. These instabilities exhibit eigenfunctions in good agreement with the measured PVS vortical structures. They are successfully compared in terms of temporal evolution and frequencies to the unsteady hydrodynamic fluctuations computed by numerical simulations. In addition, this study has shown that the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with the PVS are the driving force of the flow dynamics, since they are responsible for the emergence of pressure waves propagating at the same frequency.

  18. A Simplified Lateral Hinge Approach to the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; McGuire, Duncan T; McGrath, Aleksandra M

    2015-09-01

    Proximal interphalangeal joint replacement is an effective treatment for painful arthritis affecting the joint. However, the complication rate is relatively high, with many of these complications related to soft-tissue imbalance or instability. Volar, dorsal, and lateral approaches have all been described with varying results. We describe a new simplified lateral hinge approach that splits the collateral ligament to provide adequate exposure of the joint. Following insertion of the prosthesis the collateral ligament is simply repaired, side-to-side, which stabilizes the joint. As the central slip, opposite collateral ligament, flexor and extensor tendons have not been violated, early active mobilization without splinting is possible, and the risk of instability, swan-neck, and boutonniere deformity are reduced. The indications, contraindications, surgical technique, and rehabilitation protocol are described. PMID:26230632

  19. Development of a simplified urban water balance model (WABILA).

    PubMed

    Henrichs, M; Langner, J; Uhl, M

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has become more and more accepted. However, there is not any simple tool or option available to evaluate the influence of these measures on the local water balance. To counteract the impact of new settlements, planners focus on mitigating increases in runoff through installation of infiltration systems. This leads to an increasing non-natural groundwater recharge and decreased evapotranspiration. Simple software tools which evaluate or simulate the effect of WSUD on the local water balance are still needed. The authors developed a tool named WABILA (Wasserbilanz) that could support planners for optimal WSUD. WABILA is an easy-to-use planning tool that is based on simplified regression functions for established measures and land covers. Results show that WSUD has to be site-specific, based on climate conditions and the natural water balance. PMID:27120631

  20. Detailed and simplified nonequilibrium helium ionization in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2014-03-20

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is set mostly by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified three-level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling nonequilibrium helium ionization in three-dimensional numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show nonequilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis for interpretating observations.

  1. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  2. Rehabilitation of an Orbital Defect: A Simplified Technique.

    PubMed

    Muddugangadhar, B C; Sonika, Radhika; Chheda, Pratik S; Garg, Ashu

    2015-07-01

    Loss of tissue, whether congenital or traumatic or resulting from malignancy or radical surgery, is accompanied by esthetic and psychologic effects. This loss is more pronounced when the affected part is the eye and all orbital contents, resulting in gross mutilation. Success in maxillofacial prosthetics depends on the full cognizance of the principles that underlie facial harmony, color matching, anchorage and retention, weight bearing and leverage, durability and strength of materials used, tissue compatibility and tolerance. The restoration of orbital defects presents a challenge in maxillofacial prosthetics. Many variations exist in techniques and materials for fabricating orbital prostheses. Careful positioning of the ocular portion of the orbital prosthesis is one of the requirements for a successful esthetic result. A change of this position, which may occur during fabrication or may be due to distortion of the prosthetic housing or loss of retention of the prosthesis, may result in an unsatisfactory appearance. This article presents a simplified technique for fabricating an orbital prosthesis.

  3. A Simplified Lateral Hinge Approach to the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; McGuire, Duncan T; McGrath, Aleksandra M

    2015-09-01

    Proximal interphalangeal joint replacement is an effective treatment for painful arthritis affecting the joint. However, the complication rate is relatively high, with many of these complications related to soft-tissue imbalance or instability. Volar, dorsal, and lateral approaches have all been described with varying results. We describe a new simplified lateral hinge approach that splits the collateral ligament to provide adequate exposure of the joint. Following insertion of the prosthesis the collateral ligament is simply repaired, side-to-side, which stabilizes the joint. As the central slip, opposite collateral ligament, flexor and extensor tendons have not been violated, early active mobilization without splinting is possible, and the risk of instability, swan-neck, and boutonniere deformity are reduced. The indications, contraindications, surgical technique, and rehabilitation protocol are described.

  4. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s-1 and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  5. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Shaw, William L; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s(-1) and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  6. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-15

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s{sup -1} and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  7. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  8. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    This report summarizes activities for this quarter in one table. Industrial users of this repository viewed and/or checked out 163 boxes of drill cores and cuttings samples from 18 wells during the quarter.

  9. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  10. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  11. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  12. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  13. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  14. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  15. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  16. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  17. The Intensity-dependence of Tropical Cyclone Intensification in a Simplified Energetic System and a Full Physics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several recent studies based on best track data for tropical cyclones (TCs) over the North Atlantic revealed a strong dependence of the TC intensification rate (IR) on TC intensity. The TC IR shows a maximum (i.e., most rapid intensification) when the TC intensity reaches about 35 - 40 m s-1. Physically, this intensity-dependence has been explained in terms of the inner-core inertial stability and the decreased potential for a TC to intensify as it approaches its maximum potential intensity (MPI). Here, we propose a new simplified dynamical system based on TC energetics. For this purpose, the TC system is considered as a Carnot heat engine as in earlier theoretical studies, and formulated on the grounds of major energy production and dissipation processes. This offers a way to explain the IR behavior of TCs in terms of its sensitivity to the physical processes involved, and to derive a physically-based relationship between TC intensification and intensity. This relationship is consistent with observations, and in quantitative agreement with that gained from empirical relations in an alternative dynamical system proposed by DeMaria(2009), which has been formulated analogously to the logistic growth equation (LGE). Results from idealized full-physics model simulations confirm the validity of several key assumptions implicitly involved in the simplified dynamical system and the intensity-dependence of the TC IR as well.

  18. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  19. Large-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident Testing and Simulation for 200-MWe Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S.T.; Xu, Y.; Yoon, H.J.; Ishii, M.

    2002-07-01

    The performance of the safety systems of a new design of the 200-MWe simplified boiling water reactor during a large-break, loss-of-coolant accident transient was investigated through code modeling and integral system testing. The accident considered was a break in the main steam line which is the major design basis accident. RELAP5/MOD3 best estimate reactor thermalhydraulic code was used and its applicability to the reactor safety system evaluation was examined. The integral tests were performed to assess the safety systems and the response of the emergency core cooling systems to accident conditions in a scaled facility called PUMA. The details of the safety system behavior are presented. The integral test simulations examined code applicability at the scaled facility level as well as prototype key safety system performance. (authors)

  20. Solving the Heterogeneous VHTR Core with Efficient Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Kevin John; Rahnema, Farzad

    2014-06-01

    This paper uses the coarse mesh transport method COMET to solve the eigenvalue and pin fission density distribution of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). It does this using the Boltzmann transport equation without such low-order approximations as diffusion, and it does not simplify the reactor core problem through homogenization techniques. This method is chosen as it makes highly efficient use of grid computing resources: it conducts a series of calculations at the block level using Monte Carlo to model the explicit geometry within the core without approximation, and compiles a compendium of data with the solution set. From there, it is able to solve the desired core configuration on a single processor in a fraction of the time necessary for whole-core deterministic or stochastic transport calculations. Thus, the method supplies a solution which has the accuracy of a whole-core Monte Carlo solution via the computing power available to the user. The core solved herein, the VHTR, was chosen due to its complexity. With a high level of detailed heterogeneity present from the core level to the pin level, and with asymmetric blocks and control material present outside of the fueled region of the core, this reactor geometry creates problems for methods which rely on homogenization or diffusion methods. Even transport methods find it challenging to solve. As it is desirable to reduce the number of assumptions necessary for a whole core calculation, this choice of reactor and solution method combination is an appropriate choice for a demonstration on an efficient use of grid computing.

  1. A Framework to Simplify Combined Sampling Strategies in Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Justin R.; Weitzner, Brian D.; Lange, Oliver F.

    2015-01-01

    A core task in computational structural biology is the search of conformational space for low energy configurations of a biological macromolecule. Because conformational space has a very high dimensionality, the most successful search methods integrate some form of prior knowledge into a general sampling algorithm to reduce the effective dimensionality. However, integrating multiple types of constraints can be challenging. To streamline the incorporation of diverse constraints, we developed the Broker: an extension of the Rosetta macromolecular modeling suite that can express a wide range of protocols using constraints by combining small, independent modules, each of which implements a different set of constraints. We demonstrate expressiveness of the Broker through several code vignettes. The framework enables rapid protocol development in both biomolecular design and structural modeling tasks and thus is an important step towards exposing the rich functionality of Rosetta’s core libraries to a growing community of users addressing a diverse set of tasks in computational biology. PMID:26381271

  2. A simplified ecological footprint at a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Hopton, Matthew E; White, Denis

    2012-11-30

    We calculated an Ecological Footprint Analysis (EFA) at a regional scale. EFA captures the human impact on the environmental system by identifying the amount of biologically productive land necessary to support a person's level of consumption and waste generation. EFA is a commonly used metric of sustainability because it is easy to conceptualize and the calculation is relatively straightforward. Utilizing free, readily available data, we calculated an EFA for a region in southern Colorado. Gathering existing data at a regional scale is difficult because data are often collected at national or state levels. The lack of data is further confounded by the fact that data are often collected at intervals greater than one year. Variables that were missing data for certain years were estimated using linear interpolation. Data not available by county were scaled to the region from state or national level data. Thirty-five variables from 1980 to 2005 (26 years) were collected and used to calculate a time-dependent EFA and the resulting trend was visually examined. The available biocapacity in the region did not decrease during the period, but per capita biocapacity decreased due to population growth. Per capita biocapacity was at a period high of nearly 41 ha per person (ha/ca) in 1980 and steadily decreased to a low around 31 ha/ca in 2005. Ecological footprint remained constant over the 26-year period, varying from a low of 5.1 ha/ca in 1997 to a high of 5.5 ha/ca in 1985. A steady ecological footprint combined with a decreasing per capita biocapacity, implies the ecological reserve is decreasing and, thus, the region is moving away from sustainability. Although per capita consumption did not increase substantially during the 26 years, more people are drawing on a fixed quantity of resources. Our methodology is a simplified approach to EFA and does not follow standards that are currently being established. Adhering to the suggested standards would require obtaining data

  3. Accretional Heating of Asymmetric Supernova Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2000-05-01

    The role of accretion in heating a stalled bounce shock in a core-collapse supernova is investigated. We show that effective accretional heating causes an asymmetric expansion of the shock, sufficient to impart a net impulse of ~300-400 km s-1 to the neutron core. To simplify the analysis, we consider a failed accretion shock. Below such a shock, inward advection is faster than neutrino heating and the usual gain criterion does not suffice to determine a successful explosion. A mechanism that enhances buoyancy and inhibits mixing between hot and cold postshock fluid elements is required to revive the shock. We focus on the response of a magnetic field to the accretion flow. Ram heating and shearing of a low-density, magnetized fluid phase (``M-fluid'') is shown to be faster than neutrino cooling. The long duration of the accretion flow compared with the dynamical time allows for a large amplification of the magnetic energy. We calculate the stability of a spherical shock in the presence of a low-density hydrostatic atmosphere below it and show that below a critical atmospheric density the shock is unstable to a global Rayleigh-Taylor mode. We then calculate the equilibrium structure of this Rayleigh-Taylor plume as it accumulates energy and the critical size beyond which quasi-static expansion is no longer possible and its outer boundary converts to a running shock. Accretion continues while the shock expands, and an energy of ~1051 ergs is a direct consequence of the efficiency of ram heating close to the neutron core. The linear momentum imparted to the core is directly related to the mass profile of the precollapse core and explains the proper motions of (most) radio pulsars. We also estimate the net circulation imparted to the last 0.1-0.2 Msolar of collapsing material, which appears sufficient to torque the core down to a spin period of 1-100 ms. The effect of photodissociation on the shock jump conditions is calculated, and the implications for

  4. A simplified model for unstable temperature field calculation of gas turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guangxin

    1989-06-01

    A simplified model is presented for calculating the unstable temperature field of a cooled turbine rotor by the finite element method. In the simplified model, an outer radius for calculating has been chosen which is smaller than the radius of the fir-tree root groove's bottom. And an equivalent heat release coefficient has been introduced. Thus, the calculation can be treated as an axial symmetrical problem and carried out on a microcomputer. The simplified model has been used to calculate the unstable temperature field during the start-up of a rotor. A comparison with the three-dimensional calculated result shows that the simplified model is satisfactory.

  5. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  6. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  7. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  8. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  9. Simplified procedure of silymarin extraction from Silybum marianum L. Gaertner.

    PubMed

    Wianowska, Dorota; Wiśniewski, Mariusz

    2015-02-01

    Silymarin, a mixture of flavonolignans exhibiting many pharmacological activities, is obtained from the fruits of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertner). Due to the high lipid content in thistle fruits, the European Pharmacopoeia recommends a two-step process of its extraction. First, the fruits are defatted for 6 h, using n-hexane; second, silymarin is extracted with methanol for 5 more hours. The presented data show that this extremely long traditional Soxhlet extraction process can be shortened to a few minutes using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). PLE also allows to eliminate the defatting stage required in the traditional procedure, thus simplifying the silymarin extraction procedure and preventing silymarin loss caused by defatting. The PLE recoveries obtained under the optimized extraction conditions are clearly better than the ones obtained by the Pharmacopoeia-recommended Soxhlet extraction procedure. The PLE yields of silychristin, silydianin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A and isosilybin B in acetone are 3.3, 6.9, 3.3, 5.1, 2.6 and 1.5 mg/g of the non-defatted fruits, respectively. The 5-h Soxhlet extraction with methanol on defatted fruits gives only ∼72% of the silymarin amount obtained in 10 min PLE at 125°C.

  10. An experiment on simplifying conjoint analysis designs for measuring preferences.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Tara; Phillips, Kathryn A; Reed Johnson, F

    2003-12-01

    In conjoint analysis (CA) studies, choosing between scenarios with multiple health attributes may be demanding for respondents. This study examined whether simplifying the choice task in CA designs, by using a design with more overlap of attribute levels, provides advantages over standard minimal-overlap methods. Two experimental conditions, minimal and increased-overlap discrete choice CA designs, were administered to 353 respondents as part of a larger HIV testing preference survey. In the minimal-overlap survey, all six attribute levels were allowed to vary. In the increased-overlap survey, an average of two attribute levels were the same between each set of scenarios. We hypothesized that the increased-overlap design would reduce cognitive burden, while minimally impacting statistical efficiency. We did not find any significant improvement in consistency, willingness to trade, perceived difficulty, fatigue, or efficiency, although several results were in the expected direction. However, evidence suggested that there were differences in stated preferences. The results increase our understanding of how respondents answer CA questions and how to improve future surveys.

  11. New determinations and simplified representations of macromolecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Perrot, G; Maigret, B

    1990-09-01

    Several new methods or improvements of older algorithms determining the different pieces of molecular surface are presented. Their improvement in time and their complexity are discussed. Only the indexes of the atoms on which the pieces are relying are, in fact, determined, since their explicit representation from these numbers varies according to the 3D capabilities of the graphic workstation (dots, grid, etc.), and this generation is not C.P.U. consuming. To have a simplified representation of the surface of macromolecules, a polyhedron with planar triangular faces is then introduced: Each concave triangular surface piece is replaced with planar triangles relying on its three atomic centers, while saddle-shaped rectangles and convex pieces are wholly ignored. A minimal data structure of the polyhedron is then proposed, which contains only topological informations, since no coordinates have been generated. If the atomic radius is then considered to be constant (independent of atomic type), the surface of a set of N points is now defined by the choice of a subset with a topology. This choice is controlled by a parameter of rugosity (the atomic radius). Contrary to Voronoi polyhedrons partition, which gives a topology for a set of N points, our approach gives a topology only for the exterior points of this set. A few applications of this very simple definition of molecular surface are then discussed: the 3D interactive manipulation of macromolecules, the steric intermolecular recognition, and the determination of local and global properties of the surface. PMID:2279010

  12. A Simplified Mesh Deformation Method Using Commercial Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Samareh, Jamshid

    2004-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined or moving aerodynamic surface geometries is a frequently encountered task in many applications. Most existing methods are either mathematically too complex or computationally too expensive for usage in practical design and optimization. We propose a simplified mesh deformation method based on linear elastic finite element analyses that can be easily implemented by using commercially available structural analysis software. Using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries, a simple structural analysis is constructed based on a spatially varying Young s modulus to move the entire mesh in accordance with the surface geometry redefinitions. A variety of surface movements, such as translation, rotation, or incremental surface reshaping that often takes place in an optimization procedure, may be handled by the present method. We describe the numerical formulation and implementation using the NASTRAN software in this paper. The use of commercial software bypasses tedious reimplementation and takes advantage of the computational efficiency offered by the vendor. A two-dimensional airfoil mesh and a three-dimensional aircraft mesh were used as test cases to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations were performed for the deformed two-dimensional meshes.

  13. Bithermal fatigue: A simplified alternative to thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A bithermal fatigue test technique was proposed as a simplified alternative to the thermomechanical fatigue test. Both the thermomechanical cycle and the bithermal technique can be used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior. The difference between the two cycles is that in a conventional thermomechanical fatigue cycle the temperature is continuously varied concurrently with the applied mechanical strains, but in the bithermal fatigue cycle the specimen is held at zero load during the temperature excursions and all the loads are applied at the two extreme temperatures of the cycle. Experimentally, the bithermal fatigue test technique offers advantages such as ease in synchronizing the temperature and mechanical strain waveforms, in minimizing temperature gradients in the specimen gauge length, and in reducing and interpreting thermal fatigue such as the influence of alternate high and low temperatures on the cyclic stress-strain response characteristics, the effects of thermal state, and the possibility of introducing high- and low-temperature deformation mechanisms within the same cycle. The bithermal technique was used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior of alloys such as single-crystal PWA 1480, single-crystal Rene N4, cast B1900+Hf, and wrought Haynes 188.

  14. RANS simulations of a simplified tractor/trailer geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Christopher John; McWherter-Payne, Mary Anna; Salari, Kambiz; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2003-07-01

    Steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are presented for the three-dimensional flow over a simplified tractor/trailer geometry at zero degrees yaw angle. The simulations are conducted using a multi-block, structured computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The turbulence closure model employed is the two-equation Menter k-{omega} model. The discretization error is estimated by employing two grid levels: a fine mesh of 20 million cells and a coarser mesh of 2.5 million cells. Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft wind tunnel. Quantities compared include vehicle drag, surface pressures, and time-averaged velocities in the trailer near wake. The results indicate that the RANS approach is able to accurately predict the surface pressure on the vehicle, with the exception of the base region. The pressure predictions in the base region are poor due to the inability of the RANS model to accurately capture the near-wake vortical structure. However, the gross pressure levels in the base region are in reasonable agreement with experiment, and thus the overall vehicle drag is well predicted.

  15. Simplified solutions to predicting the magnetic vectors within CMEs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N.

    2015-12-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, has significant importance for forecasting terrestrial behavior. However forecasting these vectors remains largely elusive and lies predominately with the difficulty in disassociating the predictive skill of the magnetic configuration during the initiation process with the skill of understanding the evolutionary effects of the topology during propagation. Here, we discuss a simplified system for predicting the magnetic vector within CMEs, driven by observations and empirical relationships. We suggest a modification to a CME helicity rule by Bothmer & Schwenn (1998) can improve the skills with the initiation problem near the solar surface, and accurate triangulation methods of the CME with recent observational studies can improve the predictions of the evolutionary effects. Both tools in conjunction can provide the first steps to providing operationally reliable estimates of the magnetic vectors for all possible CMEs and include scope to improve individual modules within the forecasting scheme. By focusing on Earth-directed CMEs, we can develop forecasting skill scores for multiple CMEs using NOAA definitions for geomagnetic storms. We will present the skill scores of predicted CMEs in relation to their associated Kp values at Earth for CMEs that were predicted in a real-time setting at NASA Space Weather Research Center.

  16. Potentialities of TEC topping: A simplified view of parametric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    An examination of the benefits of thermionic-energy-conversion (TEC)-topped power plants and methods of increasing conversion efficiency are discussed. Reductions in the cost of TEC modules yield direct decreases in the cost of electricity (COE) from TEC-topped central station power plants. Simplified COE, overall-efficiency charts presented illustrate this trend. Additional capital-cost diminution results from designing more compact furnaces with considerably increased heat transfer rates allowable and desirable for high temperature TEC and heat pipes. Such improvements can evolve of the protection from hot corrosion and slag as well as the thermal expansion compatibilities offered by silicon-carbide clads on TEC-heating surfaces. Greater efficiencies and far fewer modules are possible with high-temperature, high-power-density TEC: This decreases capital and fuel costs much more and substantially increases electric power outputs for fixed fuel inputs. In addition to more electricity, less pollution, and lower costs, TEC topping used directly in coal-combustion products contributes balance-of-payment gains.

  17. Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Asay, Blaine W.; Prasad, Kuldeep

    1994-07-01

    A simplified model that can predict the transitions from compaction to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. In the case of compaction to detonation, the energy of early impact generates a slowly moving, convective-reactive deflagration that expands near the piston face and evolves in a manner that is characteristic of confined deflagration to detonation transition. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an exothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine-Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.

  18. Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S. ); Asay, B.W. ); Prasad, K. )

    1994-07-01

    A simplified model that can predict the transitions from compaction to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. In the case of compaction to detonation, the energy of early impact generates a slowly moving, convective-reactive deflagration that expands near the piston face and evolves in a manner that is characteristic of confined deflagration to detonation transition. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an exothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine--Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.

  19. Excitation-resolved fluorescence tomography with simplified spherical harmonics equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Pöschinger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence tomography (FT) reconstructs the three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent reporter probe distribution inside biological tissue. These probes target molecules of biological function, e.g. cell surface receptors or enzymes, and emit fluorescence light upon illumination with an external light source. The fluorescence light is detected on the tissue surface and a source reconstruction algorithm based on the simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) equations calculates the unknown 3D probe distribution inside tissue. While current FT approaches require multiple external sources at a defined wavelength range, the proposed FT method uses only a white light source with tunable wavelength selection for fluorescence stimulation and further exploits the spectral dependence of tissue absorption for the purpose of 3D tomographic reconstruction. We will show the feasibility of the proposed hyperspectral excitation-resolved fluorescence tomography method with experimental data. In addition, we will demonstrate the performance and limitations of such a method under ideal and controlled conditions by means of a digital mouse model and synthetic measurement data. Moreover, we will address issues regarding the required amount of wavelength intervals for fluorescent source reconstruction. We will explore the impact of assumed spatially uniform and nonuniform optical parameter maps on the accuracy of the fluorescence source reconstruction. Last, we propose a spectral re-scaling method for overcoming the observed limitations in reconstructing accurate source distributions in optically non-uniform tissue when assuming only uniform optical property maps for the source reconstruction process.

  20. Flow Visualization around a Simplified Two-Wheel Landing Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekci, Alis; Feltham, Graham

    2013-11-01

    The flow topology around a simplified two-wheel landing gear model is investigated experimentally by employing the hydrogen bubble flow visualization technique in a recirculating water channel. The landing gear test model consists of two identical wheels, an axle, a main strut and a support strut. The flow Reynolds number based on wheel diameter is 31,500 and wheels with varying geometric details are considered. Flow structures have been identified through analysis of long-time video recordings and linked to the model geometry. In the flow region above the wheels (wing side), the flow in the inter-wheel region either separates prematurely from the inner surfaces of the wheels and forms slant vortices in the near-wake, or remains attached till the aft wheel perimeter. Inclusion of interior wheel wells are found to result in a jet-like ejection as a result of the interaction with the axle and main strut. In the flow region below the wheels (ground side) the near wake contains periodically forming, complex, large-scale structures.

  1. A simplified, low power system for effective vessel sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, Allison B.; Kennedy, Jenifer S.; Schmaltz, Dale F.; Kennedy, Aaron S.

    2015-03-01

    The first bipolar vessel sealing system was developed nearly 15 years ago and has since become standard of care in surgery. These systems make use of radio frequency current that is delivered between bipolar graspers to permanently seal arteries, veins and tissue bundles. Conventional vessel sealing generators are based off traditional electrosurgery generator architecture and deliver high power (150-300 Watts) and high current using complex control and sense algorithms to adjust the output for vessel sealing applications. In recent years, a need for small-scale surgical vessel sealers has developed as surgeons strive to further reduce their footprint on patients. There are many technical challenges associated with miniaturization of vessel sealing devices including maintaining electrical isolation while delivering high current in a saline environment. Research into creating a small, 3mm diameter vessel sealer revealed that a highly simplified generator system could be used to achieve excellent results and subsequently a low power vessel sealing system was developed. This system delivers 25 Watts constant power while limiting voltage (<= Vrms) and current (<= Amps) until an impedance endpoint is achieved, eliminating the use of complicated control and sensing software. The result is optimized tissue effect, where high seal strength is maintained (> 360mmHg), but seal times (1.7 +/- 0.7s versus 4.1 +/- 0.7s), thermal spread (<1mm vs <=2mm) and total energy delivery are reduced, when compared to an existing high power system.

  2. A simplified model of saltcake moisture distribution. Letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    This letter report describes the formulation of a simplified model for finding the moisture distribution in a saltcake waste profile that has been stabilized by pumping out the drainable interstitial liquid. The model is based on assuming that capillarity mainly governs the distribution of moisture in the porous saltcake waste. A stead upward flow of moisture driven by evaporation from the waste surface is conceptualized to occur for isothermal conditions. To obtain hydraulic parameters for unsaturated conditions, the model is calibrated or matched to the relative saturation distribution as measured by neutron probe scans. The model is demonstrated on Tanks 104-BY and 105-TX as examples. A value of the model is that it identifies the key physical parameters that control the surface moisture content in a waste profile. Moreover, the model can be used to estimate the brine application rate at the waste surface that would raise the moisture content there to a safe level. Thus, the model can be applied to help design a strategy for correcting the moisture conditions in a saltcake waste tank.

  3. Potentialities of TEC topping: a simplified view of parametric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Reductions in the cost of thermionic-energy-conversion (TEC) modules yield direct decreases in cost of electricity (COE) from TEC-topped central-station power plants. Simplified COE, overall-efficiency charts presented illustrate this trend. Additional capital-cost diminution will result from designing more compact furnaces with considerably increased heat-transfer rates allowable and desirable for high-temperature TEC and heat pipes. Such improvements can evolve because of the protection from hot corrosion and slag as well as the thermal-expansion compatibilities offered by silicon-carbide clads on TEC-heating surfaces. Greater efficiencies and far fewer modules are possible with high-temperature, high-power-density TEC: This will decrease capital and fuel costs much more - and substantially increase electric-power outputs for fixed fuel inputs. In addition to more electricity, less pollution, and lower costs, TEC topping used directly in coal-combustion products will contribute to balance-of-payment gains and national energy independence.

  4. Discrimination of musical instrument sounds resynthesized with simplified spectrotemporal parameters.

    PubMed

    McAdams, S; Beauchamp, J W; Meneguzzi, S

    1999-02-01

    The perceptual salience of several outstanding features of quasiharmonic, time-variant spectra was investigated in musical instrument sounds. Spectral analyses of sounds from seven musical instruments (clarinet, flute, oboe, trumpet, violin, harpsichord, and marimba) produced time-varying harmonic amplitude and frequency data. Six basic data simplifications and five combinations of them were applied to the reference tones: amplitude-variation smoothing, coherent variation of amplitudes over time, spectral-envelope smoothing, forced harmonic-frequency variation, frequency-variation smoothing, and harmonic-frequency flattening. Listeners were asked to discriminate sounds resynthesized with simplified data from reference sounds resynthesized with the full data. Averaged over the seven instruments, the discrimination was very good for spectral envelope smoothing and amplitude envelope coherence, but was moderate to poor in decreasing order for forced harmonic frequency variation, frequency variation smoothing, frequency flattening, and amplitude variation smoothing. Discrimination of combinations of simplifications was equivalent to that of the most potent constituent simplification. Objective measurements were made on the spectral data for harmonic amplitude, harmonic frequency, and spectral centroid changes resulting from simplifications. These measures were found to correlate well with discrimination results, indicating that listeners have access to a relatively fine-grained sensory representation of musical instrument sounds. PMID:9972573

  5. How Good Are Simplified Models for Protein Structure Prediction?

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M. A. Hakim; Rashid, Mahmood A.; Pham, Duc Nghia; Sattar, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) has been one of the most challenging problems in computational biology for several decades. The challenge is largely due to the complexity of the all-atomic details and the unknown nature of the energy function. Researchers have therefore used simplified energy models that consider interaction potentials only between the amino acid monomers in contact on discrete lattices. The restricted nature of the lattices and the energy models poses a twofold concern regarding the assessment of the models. Can a native or a very close structure be obtained when structures are mapped to lattices? Can the contact based energy models on discrete lattices guide the search towards the native structures? In this paper, we use the protein chain lattice fitting (PCLF) problem to address the first concern; we developed a constraint-based local search algorithm for the PCLF problem for cubic and face-centered cubic lattices and found very close lattice fits for the native structures. For the second concern, we use a number of techniques to sample the conformation space and find correlations between energy functions and root mean square deviation (RMSD) distance of the lattice-based structures with the native structures. Our analysis reveals weakness of several contact based energy models used that are popular in PSP. PMID:24876837

  6. Simplified thermal model of the ITER magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, Hernán; Luongo, Cesar

    2014-09-01

    A simplified thermal model of the ITER magnet system has been developed to capture the essence of the magnet heat load dynamics without the need for extensive computations. Idealization of the magnets has been made using mainly two standard types of elements, solids and tubes. No Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for the hydraulics, but instead a simple transport model with approximation for pressure evolution has been used. The model was implemented in C language and used to investigate the important features needed to implement a computationally efficient and fast magnet thermal model capturing overall behavior in terms of superconductor cooling channel description (thermal coupling with jackets, presence of the conductor, importance of the central channel, etc.). Furthermore, the model was benchmarked against validated simulation tools such as SuperMagnet and Vincenta using the ITER Central Solenoid normal operation scenario for comparison. Dynamics were shown to be reproduced in good agreement with results attainable with these more detailed codes, considering the high level of uncertainty on the input parameters, namely the heat transfer coefficients and the values of heat loads.

  7. Simulation of spray dispersion in a simplified heavy vehicle wake

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-13

    Simulations of spray dispersion in a simplified tractor-trailer wake have been completed with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of how to mitigate this safety hazard. The Generic Conventional Model (GCM) for the tractor-trailer was used. The impact of aerodynamic drag reduction devices, specifically trailer-mounted base flaps, on the transport of spray in the vehicle wake was considered using the GCM. This analysis demonstrated that base flaps including a bottom plate may actually worsen motorist visibility because of the interaction of fine spray with large vortex flows in the wake. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.1 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

  8. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  9. Simplified calibration for broadband solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Oppenrieder, A; Hoeppe, P; Koepke, P; Reuder, J; Schween, J; Schreder, J

    2003-12-01

    Aspects of different calibration procedures for erythemally weighing broadband radiometers are presented in this study. These instruments are common in projects dealing with ultraviolet radiation effects on humans. Many erythemally weighing broadband radiometers are still operated using a single calibration factor (cf) that is provided with the instrument. The individual characteristics of every instrument are strongly dependent on the total ozone amount and the solar elevation. Therefore, a calibration procedure also has to take into account the ozone concentrations and the solar elevation to compensate for the effects of the individual characteristics and to provide comparable measurements. Given the variation of the ozone concentrations and the solar elevation, an individual cf has to be calculated for every measurement. Using a simplified version of the calibration procedure, which is presented in this study, can lessen this effort. Taking into account the relevant meteorological conditions for a measuring site, a single cf is calculated to compensate the individual characteristics of the instruments and therefore deliver comparable measurements with less effort. PMID:14743870

  10. Jogging in place. Evaluation of a simplified exercise test

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, N.; Kolokouri-Dervou, E.; Fanourakis, I.; Natsis, P.; Koutsiouba, P. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate jogging in place as an electrocardiographic exercise test. Jogging in place continuously recorded via an ordinary single-channel electrocardiograph was compared with the Bruce treadmill protocol with a three-channel monitor and recorder in 141 cases with a wide spectrum of chest complaints. Agreement for the presence or absence of electrocardiographic ischemia (ST-segment displacement greater than or equal to 1 mm at 80 ms from the J point, or U-wave inversion) for the two tests was observed in 91 percent of the cases (95 percent confidence intervals: 86 percent to 95.5 percent). One hundred of the previous cases with paired electrocardiographic exercise tests were compared with the presence of reversible defects on exercise myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy. The electrocardiographic ischemia had a similar correct classification rate in both methods (83 percent with jogging in place and 85 percent with Bruce treadmill protocol; not significant) against the finding of scintigraphic ischemia. This was also true for 52 cases having selective coronary arteriography. The correct classification rate was 54 percent (28/52) with jogging in place and 48 percent (25/52) with Bruce treadmill protocol (not significant). Given the safety and the easy applicability, even in older persons, this simplified test can be recommended as a valid alternative to the established multistage exercise tests.

  11. Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

  12. Aerodynamic drag control by pulsed jets on simplified car geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliéron, Patrick; Kourta, Azeddine

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic drag control by pulsed jets is tested in a wind tunnel around a simplified car geometry named Ahmed body with a rear slant angle of 35°. Pulsed jet actuators are located 5 × 10-3 m from the top of the rear window. These actuators are produced by a pressure difference ranging from 1.5 to 6.5 × 105 Pa. Their excitation frequency can vary between 10 and 550 Hz. The analysis of the control effects is based on wall visualizations, aerodynamic drag coefficient measurements, and the velocity fields obtained by 2D PIV measurements. The maximum drag reduction is 20 % and is obtained for the excitation frequency F j = 500 Hz and for the pressure difference ∆ P = 1.5 × 105 Pa. This result is linked with a substantial reduction in the transverse development of the longitudinal vortex structures coming from the left and right lateral sides of the rear window, with a displacement of the vortex centers downstream and with a decrease in the transverse rotational absolute values of these structures.

  13. Rehabilitation of an Orbital Defect: A Simplified Technique

    PubMed Central

    Muddugangadhar, B C; Sonika, Radhika; Chheda, Pratik S; Garg, Ashu

    2015-01-01

    Loss of tissue, whether congenital or traumatic or resulting from malignancy or radical surgery, is accompanied by esthetic and psychologic effects. This loss is more pronounced when the affected part is the eye and all orbital contents, resulting in gross mutilation. Success in maxillofacial prosthetics depends on the full cognizance of the principles that underlie facial harmony, color matching, anchorage and retention, weight bearing and leverage, durability and strength of materials used, tissue compatibility and tolerance. The restoration of orbital defects presents a challenge in maxillofacial prosthetics. Many variations exist in techniques and materials for fabricating orbital prostheses. Careful positioning of the ocular portion of the orbital prosthesis is one of the requirements for a successful esthetic result. A change of this position, which may occur during fabrication or may be due to distortion of the prosthetic housing or loss of retention of the prosthesis, may result in an unsatisfactory appearance. This article presents a simplified technique for fabricating an orbital prosthesis. PMID:26229385

  14. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.

    1994-12-31

    There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.

  15. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  17. Evaluating complex interventions and health technologies using normalization process theory: development of a simplified approach and web-enabled toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Normalization Process Theory (NPT) can be used to explain implementation processes in health care relating to new technologies and complex interventions. This paper describes the processes by which we developed a simplified version of NPT for use by clinicians, managers, and policy makers, and which could be embedded in a web-enabled toolkit and on-line users manual. Methods Between 2006 and 2010 we undertook four tasks. (i) We presented NPT to potential and actual users in multiple workshops, seminars, and presentations. (ii) Using what we discovered from these meetings, we decided to create a simplified set of statements and explanations expressing core constructs of the theory (iii) We circulated these statements to a criterion sample of 60 researchers, clinicians and others, using SurveyMonkey to collect qualitative textual data about their criticisms of the statements. (iv) We then reconstructed the statements and explanations to meet users' criticisms, embedded them in a web-enabled toolkit, and beta tested this 'in the wild'. Results On-line data collection was effective: over a four week period 50/60 participants responded using SurveyMonkey (40/60) or direct phone and email contact (10/60). An additional nine responses were received from people who had been sent the SurveyMonkey form by other respondents. Beta testing of the web enabled toolkit produced 13 responses, from 327 visits to http://www.normalizationprocess.org. Qualitative analysis of both sets of responses showed a high level of support for the statements but also showed that some statements poorly expressed their underlying constructs or overlapped with others. These were rewritten to take account of users' criticisms and then embedded in a web-enabled toolkit. As a result we were able translate the core constructs into a simplified set of statements that could be utilized by non-experts. Conclusion Normalization Process Theory has been developed through transparent procedures at

  18. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  19. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  20. A Simplified Shuttle Payload Thermal Analyzer /SSPTA/ program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, J. T.; Huckins, B.; Coyle, M.

    1979-01-01

    A simple thermal analysis program for Space Shuttle payloads has been developed to accommodate the user who requires an easily understood but dependable analytical tool. The thermal analysis program includes several thermal subprograms traditionally employed in spacecraft thermal studies, a data management system for data generated by the subprograms, and a master program to coordinate the data files and thermal subprograms. The language and logic used to run the thermal analysis program are designed for the small user. In addition, analytical and storage techniques which conserve computer time and minimize core requirements are incorporated into the program.

  1. Massive Magnetic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The massive magnetic core of the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory's Synchrocyclotron at NASA's Langley Research Center. The 3000 ton (6 million pound), 36' x 21'x 19.5' assembly of forged steel serves as the heart of the 600 million electron volt, high energy proton accelerator.

  2. Looking for Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  3. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  4. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  5. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  6. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the…

  7. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  8. Languages for Dublin Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  9. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  10. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  12. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  13. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  14. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Why a Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Sadly, amidst a vast profusion of knowledge, universities abrogate responsibility for showing young learners what is essential. Left to select for themselves, most students arrive late, if at all, to an awareness of what they want and need out of college. Thus, according to James Bernard Murphy, a well-constructed core of courses, presented in the…

  16. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  17. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  18. Lignes directrices simplifiées sur les lipides

    PubMed Central

    Allan, G. Michael; Lindblad, Adrienne J.; Comeau, Ann; Coppola, John; Hudson, Brianne; Mannarino, Marco; McMinis, Cindy; Padwal, Raj; Schelstraete, Christine; Zarnke, Kelly; Garrison, Scott; Cotton, Candra; Korownyk, Christina; McCormack, James; Nickel, Sharon; Kolber, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Produire un guide de pratique clinique comportant une approche simplifiée à la prévention primaire des maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV), en insistant sur l’estimation du risque de MCV et la prise en charge des profils lipidiques à l’intention des cliniciens de soins primaires et leurs équipes; nous avons recherché la contribution de professionnels des soins primaires qui n’avaient que peu ou pas de conflits d’intérêts et nous nous sommes concentrés sur les données probantes de la plus haute qualité accessibles. Méthodes Neuf professionnels de la santé (4 médecins de famille, 2 internistes, 1 infirmière praticienne, 1 infirmière autorisée et 1 pharmacienne) et 1 membre non votant (pharmacienne gestionnaire de projet) formaient le comité principal appelé le Lipid Pathway Committee (le comité). La sélection des membres s’est fondée sur la profession, le milieu de pratique et son emplacement. Les membres ont divulgué tous leurs conflits d’intérêts potentiels ou réels. Le processus d’élaboration des lignes directrices était itératif et s’appuyait sur des affichages en ligne, une révision détaillée des données probantes, des réunions par téléphone et en ligne. Le comité a cerné 12 questions prioritaires à répondre. Le groupe de révision des données probantes a répondu à ces questions. À la suite d’un examen des réponses, les principales recommandations ont été formulées par consensus du comité. Nous avons produit une ébauche des lignes directrices qui a ensuite été peaufinée, distribuée à un groupe de cliniciens (médecins de famille, autres spécialistes, pharmaciens, infirmières et infirmières praticiennes) et à des patients pour obtenir de la rétroaction, la réviser en conséquence et le comité l’a ensuite finalisée. Recommandations Des recommandations sont présentées concernant le dépistage et les analyses, les évaluations du risque, le suivi, de même que le r

  19. Full Core TREAT Kinetics Demonstration Using Rattlesnake/BISON Coupling Within MAMMOTH

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, Javier; DeHart, Mark D.; Gleicher, Frederick N.; Wang, Yaqi; Alberti, Anthony L.; Palmer, Todd S.

    2015-08-01

    This report summarizes key aspects of research in evaluation of modeling needs for TREAT transient simulation. Using a measured TREAT critical measurement and a transient for a small, experimentally simplified core, Rattlesnake and MAMMOTH simulations are performed building from simple infinite media to a full core model. Cross sections processing methods are evaluated, various homogenization approaches are assessed and the neutronic behavior of the core studied to determine key modeling aspects. The simulation of the minimum critical core with the diffusion solver shows very good agreement with the reference Monte Carlo simulation and the experiment. The full core transient simulation with thermal feedback shows a significantly lower power peak compared to the documented experimental measurement, which is not unexpected in the early stages of model development.

  20. Power-law rheology and flow behavior of low-invasion coring fluids

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    An improved pressure coring system has been developed in which an extremely viscous polymer mud is extruded by the core and is used to seal and protect the core from flushing by drilling fluids. The polymer mud must be extremely viscous to minimize invasion, yet must be extruded through a long, narrow annular gap with a minimum of pressure buildup. A highly non-Newtonian shear-thinning polymer is utilized in the low invasion coring fluid. This paper describes the measurement and modeling of non-Newtonian rheology from rotary viscometer data in detail since the simplified equations which are generally used with these instruments can be grossly in error. The development of both an approximate analytical solution and an exact numerical solution of the non-Newtonian extrusion process is presented. These solutions were used to optimize the non-Newtonian rheology of the low-invasion fluid which will be used in actual coring operations.

  1. Simplified Analytical Solution for Martian OH*-layer Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    In the Earth atmosphere airglow emissions of OH* are used in very diverse branches of research from gravity waves (GWs) and tides observations to minor chemical constituents and temperature measurements. Moreover, the airglow observations have good potential as, for example, for water vapor profile retrieval in the mesopause region. Recently, hydroxyl emissions were found in Mars and in Venus atmospheres. Thus, the applicability potential has been increased in spurts. Even for Earth's atmosphere there is a lack of knowledge on morphology of OH*-layer, i.e. on altitude, number density and shape variability with the intro- and extra-annual cycles, due to planetary waves (PWs), GWs, and tides. The questions on relations between OH* layer altitude, number density (volume emission, intensity), surrounding temperature, and winds (meridional and vertical) are still open. Modern satellite airglow measurements are not enough precise with a typical error in determination of altitude ~2-3 km, while the ground-based measurements are restricted by local point of observations and integrated volume emission. Thus, retrievals of emission altitudes variations to derive are awkward. The difficulties are much stronger for the investigation of the Martian OH*-layer variability and altitude diagnostics. We introduce a simplified analytical approach for OH*-layer altitude in the Martian atmosphere. The expressions for the number density and height of the OH*-layer peak, as well as relationship between both parameters, are derived for night time conditions. These OH*-layer parameters are determined by the temperature, atomic oxygen density and their vertical gradients. The approximations can be useful for analysis of ground-based and satellite-borne airglow observations. We discuss the consequences following from the derived expression.

  2. Data analytics for simplifying thermal efficiency planning in cities.

    PubMed

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, Mohammad Javad; Noshadravan, Arash; Sobstyl, Jake M; Toole, Jameson; Ferreira, Joseph; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Gonzalez, Marta C

    2016-04-01

    More than 44% of building energy consumption in the USA is used for space heating and cooling, and this accounts for 20% of national CO2emissions. This prompts the need to identify among the 130 million households in the USA those with the greatest energy-saving potential and the associated costs of the path to reach that goal. Whereas current solutions address this problem by analysing each building in detail, we herein reduce the dimensionality of the problem by simplifying the calculations of energy losses in buildings. We present a novel inference method that can be used via a ranking algorithm that allows us to estimate the potential energy saving for heating purposes. To that end, we only need consumption from records of gas bills integrated with a building's footprint. The method entails a statistical screening of the intricate interplay between weather, infrastructural and residents' choice variables to determine building gas consumption and potential savings at a city scale. We derive a general statistical pattern of consumption in an urban settlement, reducing it to a set of the most influential buildings' parameters that operate locally. By way of example, the implications are explored using records of a set of (N= 6200) buildings in Cambridge, MA, USA, which indicate that retrofitting only 16% of buildings entails a 40% reduction in gas consumption of the whole building stock. We find that the inferred heat loss rate of buildings exhibits a power-law data distribution akin to Zipf's law, which provides a means to map an optimum path for gas savings per retrofit at a city scale. These findings have implications for improving the thermal efficiency of cities' building stock, as outlined by current policy efforts seeking to reduce home heating and cooling energy consumption and lower associated greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:27097652

  3. Simplified method for detecting tritium contamination in plants and soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andraski, B.J.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Michel, R.L.; Radyk, J.C.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Johnson, M.J.; Mayers, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cost-effective methods are needed to identify the presence and distribution of tritium near radioactive waste disposal and other contaminated sites. The objectives of this study were to (i) develop a simplified sample preparation method for determining tritium contamination in plants and (ii) determine if plant data could be used as an indicator of soil contamination. The method entailed collection and solar distillation of plant water from foliage, followed by filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphitebased solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The method was evaluated using samples of creosote bush [Larrea tridentata (Sesse?? & Moc. ex DC.) Coville], an evergreen shrub, near a radioactive disposal area in the Mojave Desert. Laboratory tests showed that a 2-g SPE column was necessary and sufficient for accurate determination of known tritium concentrations in plant water. Comparisons of tritium concentrations in plant water determined with the solar distillation-SPE method and the standard (and more laborious) toluene-extraction method showed no significant difference between methods. Tritium concentrations in plant water and in water vapor of root-zone soil also showed no significant difference between methods. Thus, the solar distillation-SPE method provides a simple and cost-effective way to identify plant and soil contamination. The method is of sufficient accuracy to facilitate collection of plume-scale data and optimize placement of more sophisticated (and costly) monitoring equipment at contaminated sites. Although work to date has focused on one desert plant, the approach may be transferable to other species and environments after site-specific experiments.

  4. STEWB - Simplified Transient Estimation of the Water Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P. D.; Simmons, C. S.; Cady, R. E.; Gee, G. W.

    2001-12-01

    A simplified model describing the transient water budget of a shallow unsaturated soil profile is presented. This model was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide estimates of the time-varying net infiltration at sites containing residual levels of radioactive materials. Ease of use, computational efficiency, and use of standard parameters and available data were requirements of the model. The model's conceptualization imposes the following simplifications: a uniform soil profile, instantaneous redistribution of infiltrated water, drainage under a unit hydraulic gradient, and no drainage from the soil profile during infiltration. The model's formulation is a revision of that originally presented by Kim et al. [WRR, 32(12):3475-3484, 1996]. Daily meteorological data are required as input. Random durations for precipitation events are generated based on an estimate of the average number of exceedances per year for the specific daily rainfall depth observed. Snow accumulation and melt are described using empirical relationships. During precipitation or snowmelt, runoff is described using an infiltration equation for ponded conditions. When no water is being applied to the profile, evapotranspiration (ET) and drainage occur. The ET rate equals the potential evapotranspiration rate, PET, above a critical value of saturation, SC. Below this critical value, ET = PET*(S/SC)**p, where S is saturation and p is an empirical parameter. Drainage flux from the profile equals the hydraulic conductivity as represented by the Brooks-Corey model. The model has been implemented with an easy-to-use graphical interface and is available at http://nrc-hydro-uncert.pnl.gov/code.htm. Comparison of the model results with lysimeter measurements will be shown, including a 50-year record from the ARS-Coshocton site in Ohio. The interpretation of parameters and the sensitivity of the model to parameter values will be discussed.

  5. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  6. Data analytics for simplifying thermal efficiency planning in cities.

    PubMed

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, Mohammad Javad; Noshadravan, Arash; Sobstyl, Jake M; Toole, Jameson; Ferreira, Joseph; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Gonzalez, Marta C

    2016-04-01

    More than 44% of building energy consumption in the USA is used for space heating and cooling, and this accounts for 20% of national CO2emissions. This prompts the need to identify among the 130 million households in the USA those with the greatest energy-saving potential and the associated costs of the path to reach that goal. Whereas current solutions address this problem by analysing each building in detail, we herein reduce the dimensionality of the problem by simplifying the calculations of energy losses in buildings. We present a novel inference method that can be used via a ranking algorithm that allows us to estimate the potential energy saving for heating purposes. To that end, we only need consumption from records of gas bills integrated with a building's footprint. The method entails a statistical screening of the intricate interplay between weather, infrastructural and residents' choice variables to determine building gas consumption and potential savings at a city scale. We derive a general statistical pattern of consumption in an urban settlement, reducing it to a set of the most influential buildings' parameters that operate locally. By way of example, the implications are explored using records of a set of (N= 6200) buildings in Cambridge, MA, USA, which indicate that retrofitting only 16% of buildings entails a 40% reduction in gas consumption of the whole building stock. We find that the inferred heat loss rate of buildings exhibits a power-law data distribution akin to Zipf's law, which provides a means to map an optimum path for gas savings per retrofit at a city scale. These findings have implications for improving the thermal efficiency of cities' building stock, as outlined by current policy efforts seeking to reduce home heating and cooling energy consumption and lower associated greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Simplifying numerical ray tracing for characterization of optical systems.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Speiser, Daniel I; Johnsen, Sönke

    2014-07-20

    Ray tracing, a computational method for tracing the trajectories of rays of light through matter, is often used to characterize mechanical or biological visual systems with aberrations that are larger than the effect of diffraction inherent in the system. For example, ray tracing may be used to calculate geometric point spread functions (PSFs), which describe the image of a point source after it passes through an optical system. Calculating a geometric PSF is useful because it gives an estimate of the detail and quality of the image formed by a given optical system. However, when using ray tracing to calculate a PSF, the accuracy of the estimated PSF directly depends on the number of discrete rays used in the calculation; higher accuracies may require more computational power. Furthermore, adding optical components to a modeled system will increase its complexity and require critical modifications so that the model will describe the system correctly, sometimes necessitating a completely new model. Here, we address these challenges by developing a method that represents rays of light as a continuous function that depends on the light's initial direction. By utilizing Chebyshev approximations (via the chebfun toolbox in MATLAB) for the implementation of this method, we greatly simplified the calculations for the location and direction of the rays. This method provides high precision and fast calculation speeds that allow the characterization of any symmetrical optical system (with a centered point source) in an analytical-like manner. Next, we demonstrate our methods by showing how they can easily calculate PSFs for complicated optical systems that contain multiple refractive and/or reflective interfaces.

  8. A simplified model of decontamination by BWR steam suppression pools

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Phenomena that can decontaminate aerosol-laden gases sparging through steam suppression pools of boiling water reactors during reactor accidents are described. Uncertainties in aerosol properties, aerosol behavior within gas bubbles, and bubble behavior in plumes affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools. Uncertainties in the boundary and initial conditions that are dictated by the progression of severe reactor accidents and that will affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools are discussed. Ten parameters that characterize boundary and initial condition uncertainties, nine parameters that characterize aerosol property and behavior uncertainties, and eleven parameters that characterize uncertainties in the behavior of bubbles in steam suppression pools are identified. Ranges for the values of these parameters and subjective probability distributions for parametric values within the ranges are defined. These uncertain parameters are used in Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses to develop uncertainty distributions for the decontamination that can be achieved by steam suppression pools and the size distribution of aerosols that do emerge from such pools. A simplified model of decontamination by steam suppression pools is developed by correlating features of the uncertainty distributions for total decontamination factor, DF(total), mean size of emerging aerosol particles, d{sub p}, and the standard deviation of the emerging aerosol size distribution, {sigma}, with pool depth, H. Correlations of the median values of the uncertainty distributions are suggested as the best estimate of decontamination by suppression pools. Correlations of the 10 percentile and 90 percentile values of the uncertainty distributions characterize the uncertainty in the best estimates. 295 refs., 121 figs., 113 tabs.

  9. GeoDataspaces: Simplifying Data Management Tasks with Globus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, T.; Chard, K.; Tchoua, R. B.; Foster, I.

    2014-12-01

    Data and its management are central to modern scientific enterprise. Typically, geoscientists rely on observations and model output data from several disparate sources (file systems, RDBMS, spreadsheets, remote data sources). Integrated data management solutions that provide intuitive semantics and uniform interfaces, irrespective of the kind of data source are, however, lacking. Consequently, geoscientists are left to conduct low-level and time-consuming data management tasks, individually, and repeatedly for discovering each data source, often resulting in errors in handling. In this talk we will describe how the EarthCube GeoDataspace project is improving this situation for seismologists, hydrologists, and space scientists by simplifying some of the existing data management tasks that arise when developing computational models. We will demonstrate a GeoDataspace, bootstrapped with "geounits", which are self-contained metadata packages that provide complete description of all data elements associated with a model run, including input/output and parameter files, model executable and any associated libraries. Geounits link raw and derived data as well as associating provenance information describing how data was derived. We will discuss challenges in establishing geounits and describe machine learning and human annotation approaches that can be used for extracting and associating ad hoc and unstructured scientific metadata hidden in binary formats with data resources and models. We will show how geounits can improve search and discoverability of data associated with model runs. To support this model, we will describe efforts related towards creating a scalable metadata catalog that helps to maintain, search and discover geounits within the Globus network of accessible endpoints. This talk will focus on the issue of creating comprehensive personal inventories of data assets for computational geoscientists, and describe a publishing mechanism, which can be used to

  10. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formetta, G.; Capparelli, G.; Versace, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause loss of life and significant damages involving private and public properties, transportation system, etc. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. Reliable models' applications involve: automatic parameters calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, model sensitivity analysis. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify and compare different models and different models performances indicators in order to individuate and eventually select the models whose behaviors are more reliable for a certain case study. The procedure was implemented in package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, the optimization of the index distance to perfect classification in the receiver operating characteristic plane (D2PC) coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case.

  11. SIMPLIFIED MODELS FOR PHOTOHADRONIC INTERACTIONS IN COSMIC ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Huemmer, S.; Rueger, M.; Spanier, F.; Winter, W. E-mail: mlrueger@astro.uni-wuerzburg.d E-mail: winter@physik.uni-wuerzburg.d

    2010-09-20

    We discuss simplified models for photo-meson production in cosmic accelerators, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our self-consistent models are directly based on the underlying physics used in the SOPHIA software and can be easily adapted if new data are included. They allow for the efficient computation of neutrino and photon spectra (from {pi}{sup 0} decays) as a major requirement of modern time-dependent simulations of the astrophysical sources and parameter studies. In addition, the secondaries (pions and muons) are explicitly generated, a necessity if cooling processes are to be included. For the neutrino production, we include the helicity dependence of the muon decays which in fact leads to larger corrections than the details of the interaction model. The separate computation of the {pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -} fluxes allows, for instance, for flavor ratio predictions of the neutrinos at the source, which are a requirement of many tests of neutrino properties using astrophysical sources. We confirm that for charged pion generation, the often used production by the {Delta}(1232)-resonance is typically not the dominant process in AGNs and GRBs, and we show, for arbitrary input spectra, that the number of neutrinos are underestimated by at least a factor of two if they are obtained from the neutral-to-charged pion ratio. We compare our results for several levels of simplification using isotropic synchrotron and thermal spectra and demonstrate that they are sufficiently close to the SOPHIA software.

  12. 26 CFR 1.41-9T - Alternative simplified credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit (temporary). 1.41... INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9T Alternative simplified credit (temporary). (a) Determination of credit. At the election of the taxpayer, the credit determined under section 41(a)(1) equals...

  13. 26 CFR 1.41-9T - Alternative simplified credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit (temporary). 1.41... INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9T Alternative simplified credit (temporary). (a) Determination of credit. At the election of the taxpayer, the credit determined under section 41(a)(1) equals...

  14. 48 CFR 2953.101 - Simplified Acquisition Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216. 2953.101 Section 2953.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR CLAUSE AND FORMS FORMS General 2953.101 Simplified Acquisition Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216. The following checklist must be used to document all simplified acquisitions at or below...

  15. 48 CFR 2953.101 - Simplified Acquisition Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216. 2953.101 Section 2953.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR CLAUSE AND FORMS FORMS General 2953.101 Simplified Acquisition Documentation Checklist DL 1-2216. The following checklist must be used to document all simplified acquisitions at or below...

  16. 23 CFR 646.218 - Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing... accelerating grade crossing improvements. (a) The procedure set forth in this section is encouraged for use in simplifying and accelerating the processing of single or multiple grade crossing improvements. (b)...

  17. 23 CFR 646.218 - Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing... accelerating grade crossing improvements. (a) The procedure set forth in this section is encouraged for use in simplifying and accelerating the processing of single or multiple grade crossing improvements. (b)...

  18. 23 CFR 646.218 - Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing... accelerating grade crossing improvements. (a) The procedure set forth in this section is encouraged for use in simplifying and accelerating the processing of single or multiple grade crossing improvements. (b)...

  19. 23 CFR 646.218 - Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing... accelerating grade crossing improvements. (a) The procedure set forth in this section is encouraged for use in simplifying and accelerating the processing of single or multiple grade crossing improvements. (b)...

  20. 23 CFR 646.218 - Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Simplified procedure for accelerating grade crossing... accelerating grade crossing improvements. (a) The procedure set forth in this section is encouraged for use in simplifying and accelerating the processing of single or multiple grade crossing improvements. (b)...

  1. Significance, progress and prospects for research in simplified cultivation technologies for rice in China

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, M.; IBRAHIM, MD.; XIA, B.; ZOU, Y.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Simplified cultivation technologies for rice have become increasingly attractive in recent years in China because of their social, economical and environmental benefits. To date, several simplified cultivation technologies, such as conventional tillage and seedling throwing (CTST), conventional tillage and direct seeding (CTDS), no-tillage and seedling throwing (NTST), no-tillage and direct seeding (NTDS) and no-tillage and transplanting (NTTP), have been developed in China. Most studies have shown that rice grown under each of these simplified cultivation technologies can produce a grain yield equal to or higher than traditional cultivation (conventional tillage and transplanting). Studies that have described the influences of agronomic practices on yield formation of rice under simplified cultivation have demonstrated that optimizing agronomy practices would increase the efficiencies of simplified cultivation systems. Further research is needed to optimize the management strategies for CTST, CTDS and NTST rice which have developed quickly in recent years, to strengthen basic research for those simplified cultivation technologies that are rarely used at present (such as NTTP and NTDS), to select and breed cultivars suitable for simplified cultivation and to compare the practicability and effectiveness of different simplified cultivation technologies in different rice production regions. PMID:22505773

  2. 48 CFR 1552.232-74 - Payments-simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... acquisition procedures financing. 1552.232-74 Section 1552.232-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 1552.232-74 Payments—simplified acquisition procedures financing. As prescribed in... acquisition procedures financing. Payments—Simplified Acquisition Procedures Financing (JUN 2006)...

  3. 48 CFR 1552.232-74 - Payments-simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acquisition procedures financing. 1552.232-74 Section 1552.232-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 1552.232-74 Payments—simplified acquisition procedures financing. As prescribed in... acquisition procedures financing. Payments—Simplified Acquisition Procedures Financing (JUN 2006)...

  4. Simplified Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Systems of Conservation Laws with Convex Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Simplified forms of the space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) and discontinuous Galerkin least-squares (DGLS) finite element method are developed and analyzed. The new formulations exploit simplifying properties of entropy endowed conservation law systems while retaining the favorable energy properties associated with symmetric variable formulations.

  5. A simplified GPS C/A reciever front end with low noise performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Clements, A. D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A redesign of the antenna electronics package for the NBS/GPS C/A receiver has resulted in significantly reduced cost and improved performance. Major improvements include a simplified and more reliable multiplier/mixer, elimination of all twelve piston trimmer tuning capacitors in the original design, elimination of expensive bandpass filters, less expensive antenna and a simplified packaging scheme.

  6. A Visual Approach to Simplifying Square Roots Applied in Geometry and Advanced Algebra Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Kevin

    This report describes a program for increasing students' ability to simplify square roots. The targeted population consisted of high school students in a rural community in a midwestern plains state. The problem of the ability to understand the abstract algebraic process of simplifying square roots was documented through teacher-made tests,…

  7. Simplified computer program for the analysis of phase change in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchak, M.; Hughes, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    A simplified computer program is presented which allows for the prediction of boiling (phase change) in liquid face seals. The program determines if and when boiling occurs and then calculates the location of the boiling interface, pressure and temperature profiles, and load. The main assumption which allows for a simplified analysis is the assumption of an isothermal gas phase.

  8. Antecedent Selection: Comparing Simplified and Typical Verbal Antecedents for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Brown, Mapy; Scott, Jack; Ross, Denise E.

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the differential effects of simplified and typical verbal antecedents on acquisition of picture discriminations for four preschool children with autism. During baseline probes, participants emitted no correct selection responses to pictures of common stimuli during either simplified or typical verbal antecedent conditions.…

  9. 76 FR 44280 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Simplified Acquisition Threshold for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Regulation Supplement; Simplified Acquisition Threshold for Humanitarian or Peacekeeping Operations (DFARS... humanitarian or peacekeeping operation. The current simplified acquisition threshold is $150,000 as specified... against the United States; and (c) In support of a humanitarian or peacekeeping operation. The first...

  10. Simplified containment event tree analysis for the Sequoyah Ice Condenser containment

    SciTech Connect

    Galyean, W.J.; Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J. )

    1990-12-01

    An evaluation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) ice condenser containment was performed. In this evaluation, simplified containment event trees (SCETs) were developed that utilized the vast storehouse of information generated by the NRC's Draft NUREG-1150 effort. Specifically, the computer programs and data files produced by the NUREG-1150 analysis of Sequoyah were used to electronically generate SCETs, as opposed to the NUREG-1150 accident progression event trees (APETs). This simplification was performed to allow graphic depiction of the SCETs in typical event tree format, which facilitates their understanding and use. SCETs were developed for five of the seven plant damage state groups (PDSGs) identified by the NUREG-1150 analyses, which includes: both short- and long-term station blackout sequences (SBOs), transients, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and anticipated transient without scram (ATWS). Steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) and event-V PDSGs were not analyzed because of their containment bypass nature. After being benchmarked with the APETs, in terms of containment failure mode and risk, the SCETs were used to evaluate a number of potential containment modifications. The modifications were examined for their potential to mitigate or prevent containment failure from hydrogen burns or direct impingement on the containment by the core, (both factors identified as significant contributors to risk in the NUREG-1150 Sequoyah analysis). However, because of the relatively low baseline risk postulated for Sequoyah (i.e., 12 person-rems per reactor year), none of the potential modifications appear to be cost effective. 15 refs., 10 figs. , 17 tabs.

  11. Use of simplified PSA studies in support of the ASTRID design process

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthe, P.; Curnier, F.; Bertrand, F.; Vincon, L.; Jouve, S.; Balmain, M.; Rychkov, V.; Banchieri, Y.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the French Act of 28 June 2006 about nuclear materials and waste management, a GEN IV and actinides incineration demonstration prototype is to be commissioned in the 2020 decade. In this objective a prototype called ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is proposed to demonstrate the progress made in SFR technology at an industrial scale by qualifying innovative options, some of which still remain open in the areas requiring improvements, especially safety and operability. More specifically, we aim for a level of safety that is at least equivalent to that of the EPR (third generation), with improvements made in SFR-specific fields. The integration of safety issues in the early phase of the design of ASTRID is necessarily expected. For this purpose, CEA and its partners AREVA and EDF have planned to perform a level-1 PSA to support and orientate the preliminary design of ASTRID reactor. This paper presents the PSA approach and current studies for the assessment of safety systems and the future work to be done for the 2012-2014 period. The preliminary preparation of PSA studies is presented: objectives and scope of the early design phase PSA, definition of core damage states, selection and grouping of initiating events, assessment of safety functions and related systems. Work under progress is also presented: modelling of event trees, construction of fault trees of safety systems, transient calculations of accident sequences with the CATHARE2 code and reliability data assessment. Main objectives of a level-1 PSA performed at conceptual design stage are an early assessment of the safety architecture of the reactor and findings about the most effective areas for improvement, but also the identification of dominant accident sequences and comparison with alternative designs. After the elaboration of a simplified level-1 PSA model for nominal state and main internal initiators, various design alternatives will be

  12. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  13. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  14. Determination of lateral stresses in shocked solids: Simplified analysis of piezoresistance gauge data

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R.; Gupta, Y.M.

    1998-01-01

    Determining lateral stresses in shocked solids is an important need. Toward this end, a study was carried out to ascertain the use of simplified analyses to relate lateral piezoresistance gauge data to sample lateral stresses, with reasonable accuracy, for a class of solids. Dynamic, two-dimensional calculations were used to compute the resistance change histories of lateral manganin foil gauges in a shocked ceramic. This rigorous solution served as a bench mark for the simplified approaches. Results from several simplified methods, including those in the literature, were examined and error bars evaluated by comparing them with the ideal solution. Difficulties with simplified analyses are discussed. A combination of a simple forward analysis and a conditional lateral gauge calibration appears to provide an approach that is both efficient and consistent. Since simplified analyses are useful only in particular situations, applicability of these methods is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Crystal structure of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in which over one-third of the residues are alanines

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Sohya, Shihori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    We report the high-resolution crystal structures of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor containing 20 alanines (BPTI-20st) and a reference single-disulfide-bonded variant (BPTI-[5,55]st) at, respectively, 1.39 and 1.09 Å resolutions. The sequence was simplified based on the results of an alanine scanning experiment, as reported previously. The effects of the multiple alanine substitutions on the overall backbone structure were surprisingly small (Cα atom RMSD of 0.53 Å) being limited to small local structural perturbations. Both BPTI variants retained a wild-type level of trypsin inhibitory activity. The side-chain configurations of residues buried in the hydrophobic cores (<30% accessible surface area) were almost perfectly retained in both BPTI-20st and BPTI-[5,55]st, indicating that neither multiple alanine replacements nor the removal of the disulfide bonds affected their precise placements. However, the side chains of three partially buried residues (Q31, R20, and to some extent Y21) and several unburied residues rearranged into alternative dense-packing structures, suggesting some plasticity in their shape complementarity. These results indicate that a protein sequence simplified over its entire length can retain its densely packed, native side-chain structure, and suggest that both the design and fold recognition of natively folded proteins may be easier than previously thought. PMID:18829434

  16. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  17. Simplifying operations with an uplink/downlink integration toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Susan C.; Miller, Kevin J.; Guerrero, Ana Maria; Joe, Chester; Louie, John J.; Aguilera, Christine

    1994-01-01

    display actual values from the telemetry data stream. This toolkit was designed to greatly simplify the user's ability to access and view telemetry data, and also provide a means to view this data in the context of the commands and ground events that are used to interpret it. A closed-loop system can prove especially useful in small missions with limited resources requiring automated monitoring tools. This paper will discuss the toolkit implementation, including design trade-offs and future plans for enhancing the automated capabilities.

  18. A simplified technique for producing an ischemic wound model.

    PubMed

    Chien, Sufan; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2012-05-02

    One major obstacle in current diabetic wound research is a lack of an ischemic wound model that can be safely used in diabetic animals. Drugs that work well in non-ischemic wounds may not work in human diabetic wounds because vasculopathy is one major factor that hinders healing of these wounds. We published an article in 2007 describing a rabbit ear ischemic wound model created by a minimally invasive surgical technique. Since then, we have further simplified the procedure for easier operation. On one ear, three small skin incisions were made on the vascular pedicles, 1-2 cm from the ear base. The central artery was ligated and cut along with the nerve. The whole cranial bundle was cut and ligated, leaving only the caudal branch intact. A circumferential subcutaneous tunnel was made through the incisions, to cut subcutaneous tissues, muscles, nerves, and small vessels. The other ear was used as a non-ischemic control. Four wounds were made on the ventral side of each ear. This technique produces 4 ischemic wounds and 4 non-ischemic wounds in one animal for paired comparisons. After surgery, the ischemic ear was cool and cyanotic, and showed reduced movement and a lack of pulse in the ear artery. Skin temperature of the ischemic ear was 1-10 °C lower than that on the normal ear and this difference was maintained for more than one month. Ear tissue high-energy phosphate contents were lower in the ischemic ear than the control ear. Wound healing times were longer in the ischemic ear than in the non-ischemic ear when the same treatment was used. The technique has now been used on more than 80 rabbits in which 23 were diabetic (diabetes time ranging from 2 weeks to 2 years). No single rabbit has developed any surgical complications such as bleeding, infection, or rupture in the skin incisions. The model has many advantages, such as little skin disruption, longer ischemic time, and higher success rate, when compared to many other models. It can be safely used in

  19. Dynamics of core accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2013-02-01

    We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the `Piecewise Parabolic Method' with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either `locally isothermal' or `locally isentropic') and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as defined by locally isothermal or

  20. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  1. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  2. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  3. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  4. Critical CRBR core pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, F.D.

    1980-06-01

    The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

  5. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  6. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  7. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  8. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  9. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  10. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  11. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  12. Cross Cell Sandwich Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich core comprises two faceplates separated by a plurality of cells. The cells are comprised of walls positioned at oblique angles relative to a perpendicular axis extending through the faceplates. The walls preferably form open cells and are constructed from open cells and are constructed from rows of ribbons. The walls may be obliquely angled relative to more than one plane extending through the perpendicular axis.

  13. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  14. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  15. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  16. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  17. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  18. GEOS-CORE

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  19. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  1. A simplified approach for predicting radionuclide releases from light water reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a personal computer-based program (GENSOR) that utilizes a simplified time-dependent approach for predicting the radionuclide releases during postulated reactor accidents. This interactive computer program allows the user to generate simplified source terms based on those severe accident attributes that most influence radionuclide release. The parameters entering this simplified model were derived from existing source term data. These data consists mostly of source term code package (STCP) calculations performed in support of Draft NUREG-1150. An illustrative application of the methodology is presented in this paper. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Simplified fluorescent inhibition microtest for the titration of rabies neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Favoretto, S R; Carrieri, M L; Tino, M S; Zanetti, C R; Pereira, O A

    1993-01-01

    A simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest (SFIMT) was standardized for the evaluation of antirabies serum neutralizing antibodies based on the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and the fluorescence inhibition microtest (FIMT). The simplified test showed reproducibility similar to that of the FIMT with advantages as easier executation and quicker reading. A simple pre-treatment of Brazilian microplates produced for immune enzymatic assays (PROSIL) gave equivalent results and substantial coast reduction, in relation to imported plates (DIFCO). The simplified test can be easily implemented in less sophisticated laboratories, as alternative to the mouse serum neutralization test, still the most largely employed in Brazil, or even to others as RFFIT and FIMT.

  3. Simplified calculation of wave-coupling between lines in high-speed integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaei, George L.; Long, Stephen I.; Shu, Jeff C.-H.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of time-domain solutions by the superposition of modes is explained for the general case, which may not have any symmetry in the lines or terminations. This simplified method requires that the logic-gate terminal impedances be approximated by linear effective resistances that can be adequately determined by SPICE analysis of the actual logic gates. Several examples of results of crosstalk calculations made by the simplified method are presented and compared with corresponding results obtained using the SPICE transmission-line methods of Tripathi and Rettig (1985) along with full SPICE models of the logic gates. The simplified approach is shown to give satisfactory agreement for most purposes.

  4. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  5. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  6. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  7. Vortex core timelines and ribbon summarizations: flow summarization over time and simulation ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Alexis Y. L.; Lee, Joohwi; Taylor, Russell M.

    2013-01-01

    We present two new vortex-summarization techniques designed to portray vortex motion over an entire simulation and over an ensemble of simulations in a single image. Linear "vortex core timelines" with cone glyphs summarize flow over all time steps of a single simulation, with color varying to indicate time. Simplified "ribbon summarizations" with hue nominally encoding ensemble membership and saturation encoding time enable direct visual comparison of the distribution of vortices in time and space for a set of simulations.

  8. WEAVE core processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, James R.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Benn, Chris R.; Abrams, Don Carlos; Picó, Sergio; Middleton, Kevin; Lodi, Marcello; Bonifacio, Piercarlo

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is an approved massive wide field multi-object optical spectrograph (MOS) currently entering its build phase, destined for use on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). It will be commissioned and begin survey operations in 2017. This paper describes the core processing system (CPS) system being developed to process the bulk data flow from WEAVE. We describe the processes and techniques to be used in producing the scientifically validated 'Level 1' data products from the WEAVE data. CPS outputs will include calibrated one-d spectra and initial estimates of basic parameters such as radial velocities (for stars) and redshifts (for galaxies).

  9. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  10. A Simplified Approach to Job Analysis. Part 2. The Means of Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, D. B.; Costley, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    A representative of the Royal Air Force School of Education and a Field Training Advisor to the Civil Air Transport Industry Training Board continue the description of their simplified approach to job analysis. (LY)

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes work by Building America research teams who field tested simplified duct designs in hundreds of homes, confirming the performance of short compact duct runs, with supply registers near interior walls.

  12. A Simplified Relativity Expression for Speeds Approaching the Speed of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Neal P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a simplified method of calculating the speeds necessary to cause large relativistic changes and to determine the magnitudes of physical quantities as an object approaches the speed of light. Provides equations and two completed example problems. (JM)

  13. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  15. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data. PMID:17839632

  16. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  17. Core fluctuations test. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.S.

    1987-06-01

    Fluctuations were first encountered in the Fort St. Vrain reactor early in cycle 1 operation, during the initial rise from 40% to 70% power. Subsequent in-core tests and operation throughout cycles 1 and 2 demonstrated that fluctuations were repeatable, occurring at core pressure drops of between 2.5 psi and 4.0 psi, and that in each instance their characteristics were very similar. Subsequently, tests and analysis were done to understand the core fluctuation phenomenon. These efforts also lead to a design fix which stopped these fluctuations in the FSV reactor core. This fix required that keys be used in addition to the keys in the core support floor which already existed. This report outlines a test plan to validate that core fluctuations will not occur in the MHTGR core. 2 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A Numerical Estimation of Magnetic Induction by the Venusian Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Villarreal, Michaela; Zhang, Tielong; Luhmann, Janet

    2015-04-01

    The deep layers of Venus are usually modelled from the Earth's structure as scaled to the mass and radius of Venus, but the parameters of these layers, including the size of the Venusian core, remain unknown. Magnetic sounding provides a means to estimate the size of the metallic core using measurements by past and ongoing Venus missions. One approach of magnetic sounding is to measure the induced dipole moment of the core at low altitudes. At Venus, the magnetic field induced by the solar wind interaction with the planet should also be considered to properly estimate the total magnetic induction. In this study, we numerically model the magnetic induction within the Venusian magnetosphere. As a first attempt, our analysis is focused on a simplified two-dimensional geometry in the noon-midnight meridian. The calculation of magnetic induction is performed by the finite element method that considers the geometry and boundary conditions pertinent to the interior structure and the induced magnetosphere of Venus. The results show that magnetic field lines drape around the core on the dayside and that the field is more aligned to the tail direction at locations past the terminator. For the magnetic field anticipated by low-altitude spacecraft, the field is nearly horizontal on the dayside, and the magnitude of the dip angle increases as the spacecraft enters the nightside. When the spacecraft locations are at large solar zenith angles, the magnetic field is nearly vertical, and the dip angle rises faster when the core radius is greater, because the magnetic field direction is altered more when the distance between the core and the central tail current is shorter. We will also discuss the comparison between the modeled results and the Venus Express observations at low altitudes as well as the implications.

  19. COMET solutions to whole core CANDU-6 benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, B.; Rahnema, F.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the coarse mesh transport code COMET is used to solve CANDU-6 benchmark problems in two and three dimensional geometry. These problems are representative of a simplified quarter core reactor model. The COMET solutions, the core eigenvalue and the fuel pin fission density distribution, are compared to those from the Monte Carlo code MCNP using two-group cross sections. COMET decomposes the core volume into a set of non-overlapping sub-volumes (coarse meshes) and uses pre-computed heterogeneous response functions that are constructed using Legendre polynomials as boundary conditions to generate a user selected whole core solution (e.g., the core eigenvalue and fuel pin fission density distribution). These response functions are pre-computed by performing fixed source calculations with a modified version of MCNP in only the unique coarse meshes in the core. Reference solutions are calculated by MCNP5 with a two-group energy library generated with the HELIOS lattice code. In the 2-D problem, the angular current on the coarse mesh interfaces in COMET is expanded to 2. order in both spatial and angular variables. The COMET eigenvalue error is 0.09%. The corresponding average error in the fission density over all 3515 fuel pins is 0.5%. The maximum error observed is 2.0%. For the 3-D case, with 4. order expansion in space and azimuthal angle and 2. order expansion in the cosine of the polar angle, the eigenvalue differs from the reference solution by 0.05%. The average fission density error over the 42180 fuel pins is 0.7% with a maximum error of 3.3%. (authors)

  20. Effects of simplifying assumptions on optimal trajectory estimation for a high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Lura E.; Belle, Steve D.; Duke, Eugene L.

    1990-01-01

    When analyzing the performance of an aircraft, certain simplifying assumptions, which decrease the complexity of the problem, can often be made. The degree of accuracy required in the solution may determine the extent to which these simplifying assumptions are incorporated. A complex model may yield more accurate results if it describes the real situation more thoroughly. However, a complex model usually involves more computation time, makes the analysis more difficult, and often requires more information to do the analysis. Therefore, to choose the simplifying assumptions intelligently, it is important to know what effects the assumptions may have on the calculated performance of a vehicle. Several simplifying assumptions are examined, the effects of simplified models to those of the more complex ones are compared, and conclusions are drawn about the impact of these assumptions on flight envelope generation and optimal trajectory calculation. Models which affect an aircraft are analyzed, but the implications of simplifying the model of the aircraft itself are not studied. The examples are atmospheric models, gravitational models, different models for equations of motion, and constraint conditions.

  1. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  3. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  5. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  6. Design and Evaluation of an Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    An enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated as part of a joint United States (U.S.) - Korean International Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (INERI) investigating methods to insure In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of core materials that may relocate under severe accident conditions in advanced reactors. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary): a base material, which has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; an oxide coating material on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to prevent any potential oxidation of the base material during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes the status of core catcher design and evaluation efforts, including analyses, materials interaction tests, and prototypic testing efforts.

  7. Advances in core drilling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  8. Performance of Eleven Simplified Methods for the Identification of Elevated Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanwei; Kelishadi, Roya; Hong, Young Mi; Bovet, Pascal; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Nawarycz, Tadeusz; Krzywińska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Zong, Xin'nan; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Kim, Hae Soon; Khadilkar, Vaman; Krzyżaniak, Alicja; Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Heshmat, Ramin; Chiplonkar, Shashi; Stawińska-Witoszyńska, Barbara; El Ati, Jalila; Qorbani, Mostafa; Kajale, Neha; Traissac, Pierre; Ostrowska-Nawarycz, Lidia; Ardalan, Gelayol; Parthasarathy, Lavanya; Zhao, Min; Xi, Bo

    2016-09-01

    The identification of elevated blood pressure (BP) in children and adolescents relies on complex percentile tables. The present study compares the performance of 11 simplified methods for assessing elevated or high BP in children and adolescents using individual-level data from 7 countries. Data on BP were available for a total of 58 899 children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years from 7 national surveys in China, India, Iran, Korea, Poland, Tunisia, and the United States. Performance of the simplified methods for screening elevated or high BP was assessed with receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. When pooling individual data from the 7 countries, all 11 simplified methods performed well in screening high BP, with high area under the curve values (0.84-0.98), high sensitivity (0.69-1.00), high specificity (0.87-1.00), and high negative predictive values (≥0.98). However, positive predictive value was low for most simplified methods, but reached ≈0.90 for each of the 3 methods, including sex- and age-specific BP references (at the 95th percentile of height), the formula for BP references (at the 95th percentile of height), and the simplified method relying on a child's absolute height. These findings were found independently of sex, age, and geographical location. Similar results were found for simplified methods for screening elevated BP. In conclusion, all 11 simplified methods performed well for identifying high or elevated BP in children and adolescents, but 3 methods performed best and may be most useful for screening purposes. PMID:27432869

  9. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  10. Numerical computation for a new way to reduce vibration and noise due to magnetostriction and magnetic forces of transformer cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihua; Yang, Qingxin; Yan, Rongge; Li, Yongjian; Zhang, Xian; Yan, Weili; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-05-01

    Magnetostriction (MS) caused by the global magnetization of limbs and yokes and magnetic forces are the undisputed causes of the vibration and noise in power transformer cores. This paper presents a novel way to reduce the vibration and noise, in which nanocrystalline soft magnetic composite (NSMC) material with high permeability is used to fill the step-lap joint gaps of the power transformer magnetic cores. In order to numerically predict the effectiveness of the proposed method, a 3-D magneto-mechanical strong coupled model including MS and magnetic anisotropy of steel sheet was founded. Then, the numerical model was applied to analyze the step-lap joint region of the corner of magnetic cores. The analysis results illustrated that the deformation and noise of core with NSMC are lower than with the traditional epoxy damping material. Moreover, the validity of the proposed new way was verified by the simplified step-lap joint cores, which were achieved based on Epstein Frames.

  11. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  12. Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Efficiency Evaluation with High-Efficiency Steam Injector System

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, Goto; Shuichi, Ohmori; Michitsugu, Mori

    2006-07-01

    It is possible to establish simplified system with reduced space and total equipment weight using high-efficiency Steam Injectors (SI) instead of low-pressure feedwater heaters in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The SI works as a heat exchanger through direct contact between feedwater from condensers and extracted steam from turbines. It can get higher pressure than supplied steam pressure. The maintenance and reliability are still higher than the feedwater ones because SI has no movable parts. This paper describes the analysis of the heat balance, plant efficiency and the operation of this Innovative-Simplified NPP with high-efficiency SI. The plant efficiency and operation are compared with the electric power of 1100 MWe-class BWR system and the Innovative-Simplified BWR system with SI. The SI model is adapted into the heat balance simulator with a simplified model. The results show that plant efficiencies of the Innovated-Simplified BWR system are almost equal to original BWR ones. The present research is one of the projects that are carried out by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Toshiba Corporation, and six Universities in Japan, funded from the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) of Japan as the national public research-funded program. (authors)

  13. Simplified Deformation Analysis of 3D-body by First Order Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Khan, Md. Shawkut; Yamazaki, Koetsu; Oda, Kosuke; Hirooka, Kazuhiko

    This paper proposes a simplified analysis model of complex solid structure for three-dimensional bodies (3D-bodies) in the First Order Analysis (FOA). A simplified finite element composed of the beam elements is suggested for the deformation analysis of 3D-bodies by extending concept of conforming beam element for the finite element method (FEM). When a complex solid structure is simplified to an assemblage of simple elements applied element forces such as axial forces, shear forces, bending moments as well as twisting moments, the total stiffness equation for the FOA of the solid structure is constructed approximately and solved for the given boundary and loading conditions by the usual manner of the FEM. Then, the total deformation of the complex structure is estimated by the simplified model and the element forces are calculated in the element level. It is found that the finite element analysis via developed simplified element analysis can estimate deformations of complex 3D-bodies in a rational precision, and the results of the analysis are useful for considering the load transmitting path of the structure and for designing a better structure by changing the stiffness of structural components.

  14. On local total strain redistribution using a simplified cyclic inelastic analysis based on an elastic solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. Y.; Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Strain redistribution corrections were developed for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure to economically calculate material cyclic response at the critical location of a structure for life prediction purposes. The method was based on the assumption that the plastic region in the structure is local and the total strain history required for input can be defined from elastic finite element analyses. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was represented by a bilinear kinematic hardening model. The simplified procedure has been found to predict stress-strain response with reasonable accuracy for thermally cycled problems but needs improvement for mechanically load cycled problems. This study derived and incorporated Neuber type corrections in the simplified procedure to account for local total strain redistribution under cyclic mechanical loading. The corrected simplified method was exercised on a mechanically load cycled benchmark notched plate problem. Excellent agreement was found between the predicted material response and nonlinear finite element solutions for the problem. The simplified analysis computer program used 0.3 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  16. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, Paul D.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    Over 40 years of ground and spacecraft plasmaspheric measurements have resulted in many statistical descriptions of plasmaspheric properties. In some cases, these properties have been represented as analytical descriptions that are valid for specific regions or conditions. For the most part, what has not been done is to extend regional empirical descriptions or models to the plasmasphere as a whole. In contrast, many related investigations depend on the use of representative plasmaspheric conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Wave propagation, involving the transport of energy through the magnetosphere, is strongly affected by thermal plasma density and its composition. Ring current collisional and wave particle losses also strongly depend on these quantities. Plasmaspheric also plays a secondary role in influencing radio signals from the Global Positioning System satellites. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is an attempt to assimilate previous empirical evidence and regional models for plasmaspheric density into a continuous, smooth model of thermal plasma density in the inner magnetosphere. In that spirit, the International Reference Ionosphere is currently used to complete the low altitude description of density and composition in the model. The models and measurements on which the GCPM is currently based and its relationship to IRI will be discussed.

  17. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  18. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  19. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of liquid planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    This is the 50th anniversary of Ed Lorenz brilliant paper "Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow.'' Lorenz's work, along with many other founders' efforts, gave rise to the study of nonlinear dynamics. That field has allowed us to move beyond simple linear characterizations of nature, and to open up a deeper understanding of the Earth, other planets, and stars. Of the many things that make the Earth a habitable home, one is the existence of a planetary magnetic field generated in our liquid iron outer core. The generation process is known to be strongly nonlinear, and thereby almost certainly turbulent. Yet it is not a simple homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, but is instead heavily modified by rotation and magnetic forces. We attempt to better understand the Earth's core using a three-meter liquid sodium laboratory model of the core. Our work in sodium in this system has just begun. The system exhibits a variety of behaviors with at least twelve different states, drawing different amounts of power, and causing varying levels of magnetic field amplification. In some states, rotation and magnetic fields cause the dynamics to simplify relative to more general turbulent flows in comparable conditions. Acknowledgements: I gratefully acknowledge my collaborators Daniel Zimmerman, Santiago Triana, Donald Martin, Nolan Balew, Henri-Claude Nataf, and Barbara Brawn-Cinani, and funding from the National Science Foundation Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Geophysics programs.

  20. Complicated Politics to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  1. The Common Core Takes Hold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A survey administered in the spring of 2013 by the Center on Education Policy (CEP) inquired into the implementation of Common Core State Standards at that time. Based on self-reports by state officials, the survey found that curricula aligned to the common core were already being taught in at least some districts or grade levels. All states…

  2. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  3. Understanding Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Now that the Common Core standards are coming to just about every school, what every school leader needs is a straightforward explanation that lays out the benefits of the Common Core in plain English, provides a succinct overview, and gets everyone thinking about how to transition to this promising new paradigm. This handy, inexpensive booklet…

  4. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  5. Effect of low speed drilling on osseointegration using simplified drilling procedures.

    PubMed

    Sarendranath, A; Khan, R; Tovar, N; Marin, C; Yoo, D; Redisch, J; Jimbo, R; Coelho, P G

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to find out whether simplified drilling protocols would provide biological responses comparable to those of conventional drilling protocols at the low rotational speed of 400rpm. Seventy-eight root form endosseous implants with diameters of 3.75, 4.2, and 5mm were placed into canine tibias and allowed to heal for 3 and 5 weeks. After the dogs had been killed, the samples of implanted bone were retrieved and processed for non-decalcified histological sectioning. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) analyses were made on the histological sections. Implants treated by the simplified protocol resulted in BIC and BAFO values comparable to those obtained with the conventional drilling protocol, and there were no significant differences in the technique or diameter of the drilling. The results suggest that the simplified procedure gives biological outcomes comparable to those of the conventional procedure.

  6. Brief application of simplified habit reversal to treat stuttering in children.

    PubMed

    Elliott, A J; Miltenberger, R G; Rapp, J; Long, E S; McDonald, R

    1998-12-01

    We evaluated a brief therapy protocol involving the simplified regulated breathing method as a treatment for stuttering in children. The simplified treatment included awareness training, competing response training, and social support. Treatment was implemented in a multiple baseline across subjects design for 5 boys between the ages of 5 and 11. Each child received a 1 h treatment session, and 1/2 h booster sessions as needed. Four of the 5 children reduced their stuttering to less than 3% stuttered words (the criterion for successful treatment) after one 1 h treatment session. These results were maintained for 3 of the subjects from 6 to 9 months posttreatment. Social validity measures revealed significant differences between ratings on baseline and posttreatment speech samples. Treatment acceptability and credibility measures indicated that the subjects' guardians found the simplified regulated breathing method a reasonable treatment for stuttering in children. PMID:10037226

  7. Development and preliminary validation of a simplified-wording form of the multidimensional personality questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Christopher J; Kramer, Mark D; Tellegen, Auke; Verona, Edelyn; Kaemmer, Beverly A

    2013-08-01

    The Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) assesses a range of personality characteristics pertaining to affective and interpersonal style, behavioral restraint versus disinhibition, and capacity for sensory and imaginal engagement. Its 11 lower order trait scales map onto 3 higher order factors that reflect temperament dimensions. Its content and measurement properties have made the MPQ useful for elucidating constructs relevant to normal and abnormal behavior and investigating their neurobiological underpinnings. However, a barrier to its use in certain populations is the reading difficulty of some MPQ items. We describe efforts to develop a simplified-wording form, the MPQ-SF, composed of items readable at or below the seventh grade level (with most below sixth grade). Simplified-wording items demonstrated high convergence with original-wording items, and resulting trait scales showed adequate internal consistencies and appropriate higher order structure. The availability of a simplified version expands the potential utility of the MPQ to a wider range of samples. PMID:23180862

  8. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  9. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  10. Analysis of Wind Turbine Simulation Models: Assessment of Simplified versus Complete Methodologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia-Escribano, A.; Jimenez-Buendia, F.; Molina-Garcia, A.; Fuentes-Moreno, J. A.; Muljadi, Eduard; Gomez-Lazaro, E.

    2015-09-14

    This paper presents the current status of simplified wind turbine models used for power system stability analysis. This work is based on the ongoing work being developed in IEC 61400-27. This international standard, for which a technical committee was convened in October 2009, is focused on defining generic (also known as simplified) simulation models for both wind turbines and wind power plants. The results of the paper provide an improved understanding of the usability of generic models to conduct power system simulations.

  11. Evaluation of an existing bridge`s modal properties using simplified finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present results of a simplified approach to the dynamic finite element modeling of composite girder-slab bridges using a single beam element to represent the girder-slab cross section. Dynamic properties calculated with these simplified models are compared to experimental results and results obtained from more detailed shell element models. The method for modeling flexural behavior is first discussed followed by a discussion of modeling torsional behavior. The beam element models accurately calculated the mode shapes of the structure, but the associated resonant frequencies showed some error.

  12. Nonlinear simplified model to study localization of kinetic Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P. Gaur, Nidhi

    2014-04-15

    We have presented the numerical simulation of the coupled equations governing the dynamics of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and ion acoustic wave in the intermediate β plasma, where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. We have also developed a simplified model for this nonlinear interaction using the results obtained from the simulation to understand the physics of nonlinear evolution of KAW. Localization of magnetic field intensity of KAW has been studied by means of the simplified model.

  13. Development of a simplified analytical method for representing material cyclic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    Development of a simplified method for estimating structural inelastic stress and strain response to cyclic thermal loading is presented. The method assumes that high temperature structural response is the sum of time independent plastic and time dependent elastic/creep components. The local structural stress and strain response predicted by linear elastic analysis is modified by the simplified method to predict the inelastic response. The results with simulations by a nonlinear finite element analysis and used time independent plasticity and unified time dependent material model are compared.

  14. A simplified dual neural network for quadratic programming with its KWTA application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shubao; Wang, Jun

    2006-11-01

    The design, analysis, and application of a new recurrent neural network for quadratic programming, called simplified dual neural network, are discussed. The analysis mainly concentrates on the convergence property and the computational complexity of the neural network. The simplified dual neural network is shown to be globally convergent to the exact optimal solution. The complexity of the neural network architecture is reduced with the number of neurons equal to the number of inequality constraints. Its application to k-winners-take-all (KWTA) operation is discussed to demonstrate how to solve problems with this neural network.

  15. Design and Testing of Vacuum Breaker Check Valve for Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Xu, Y.; Revankar, S.T.

    2002-07-01

    A new design of the vacuum breaker check valve was developed to replace the mechanical valve in a simplified boiling water reactor. Scaling and design calculations were performed to obtain the geometry of new passive hydraulic vacuum breaker check valve. In order to check the valve performance, a RELAP5 model of the simplified boiling water reactor system with the new valve was developed. The valve was implemented in an integral facility, PUMA and was tested for large break loss of coolant accident. (authors)

  16. A simplified reaction mechanism for prediction of NO(x) emissions in the combustion of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, K. P.; Deur, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified reaction mechanism is developed for the prediction of NO(x) in hydrocarbon combustion. The mechanism uses fewer reacting species and reaction steps than the detailed mechanisms available in the literature and therefore takes less computer time when used in CFD calculations. The mechanism has been used to calculate NO(x) emissions in the combustion of propane. With slight modifications, the same mechanism can be used to calculate NO(x) in the combustion of other hydrocarbons. Results obtained with the simplified reaction are compared with experimental results and results obtained with a detailed kinetic mechanism.

  17. Experience with simplified inelastic analysis of piping designed for elevated temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    Screening rules and preliminary design of FFTF piping were developed in 1974 based on expected behavior and engineering judgment, approximate calculations, and a few detailed inelastic analyses of pipelines. This paper provides findings from six additional detailed inelastic analyses with correlations to the simplified analysis screening rules. In addition, simplified analysis methods for treating weldment local stresses and strains as well as fabrication induced flaws are described. Based on the FFTF experience, recommendations for future Code and technology work to reduce design analysis costs are identified.

  18. Simplified metrics for the identification of the Madden-Julian oscillation in models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Kim, Daehyun

    2012-07-01

    We propose simplified metrics to evaluate the fidelity with which the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is simulated in climate models. These metrics are based on lag correlation analysis of principal component time series (PCs). The PCs are obtained by projecting simulated 20–100 day bandpass filtered daily outgoing longwave radiation onto the two leading empirical orthogonal functions of observed MJO variability. The simplified MJO metrics, the maximum positive correlation and time lag at which it occurs, provide consistent information relative to more complex diagnostics developed by the Madden–Julian Oscillation Working Group (CLIVAR MJOWG) and by Kim et al.

  19. Simplified models vs. effective field theory approaches in dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Jacques, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    In this review we discuss and compare the usage of simplified models and Effective Field Theory (EFT) approaches in dark matter searches. We provide a state of the art description on the subject of EFTs and simplified models, especially in the context of collider searches for dark matter, but also with implications for direct and indirect detection searches, with the aim of constituting a common language for future comparisons between different strategies. The material is presented in a form that is as self-contained as possible, so that it may serve as an introductory review for the newcomer as well as a reference guide for the practitioner.

  20. A simplified procedure for gram-scale production of sialylglycopeptide (SGP) from egg yolks and subsequent semi-synthesis of Man3GlcNAc oxazoline.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingyang; Bao, Wenzheng; Tian, Xiaobo; Li, Mingjing; Liu, Hong; Dong, Jinhua; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-19

    Heterogeneity of glycan structures in native glycoconjugates always hampers precise studies on carbohydrate-involved biological functions. To construct homogeneous glycoconjugates from natural resource of homogeneous glycans is therefore a practical approach to solve this problem. We report here an optimized procedure for gram-scale production of sialylglycopeptide (SGP) containing a disialyl biantennary complex-type N-glycan from egg yolks. Our new procedure simplified the extraction process by treating the egg yolk powder with 40% acetone, avoiding massive emulsification, high-speed centrifugation, and sophisticated chromatography in reported methods. Subsequent semi-synthesis of the N-glycan core Man3GlcNAc oxazoline from SGP was accomplished for the first-time via glyco-trimming and successive oxazoline formation. This efficient semi-synthesis provides an alternative to the pure chemical approach that involves multi-step total synthesis and facilitates the application of endo-glycosidase-enabled chemoenzymatic synthesis of various homogeneous glycoconjugates. PMID:25124522

  1. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  2. Evolution of First Cores and Formation of Stellar Cores in Rotating Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigo, Kazuya; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2008-02-01

    We followed the collapse of cloud cores with various rotation speed and density frustrations using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by assuming a barotropic equation of state and examined the comprehensive evolution paths from the rotation molecule cloud core to stellar core. We found that the evolutionary paths depend only on the angular velocity of initial cloud core Ωc0. These evolutionary paths agree well with predictions of Saigo and Tomisaka's quasi-equilibrium axisymmetric models and SPH calculations of Bate. Evolutionary paths are qualitatively classified into three types. (1) A slowly rotating cloud with Ωc0 < 0.01/tff = 0.05(ρc0/10-19 g cm -3)1/2 rad Myr -1 shows spherical-type evolution, where ρc0 is the initial central density. Such a cloud forms a first core which is mainly supported by the thermal pressure. The first core has a small mass of Mcore ~ 0.01 M⊙ and a short lifetime of a few ×100 yr. After exceeding the H2 dissociation density ρ simeq 5.6 × 10-8 g cm -3, it begins the second collapse, and the whole of the first core accretes onto the stellar core/disk within a few free-fall timescales. (2) A rotating cloud with 0.01/tff < Ωc0lesssim 0.05/tff shows disk-type evolution. In this case, the first core becomes a centrifugally supported massive disk with Mcore ~ a few × 0.01-0.1 M⊙ and the lifetime is a few thousand years. The first core is unstable against nonaxisymmetric dynamic instability and forms spiral arms. The gravitational torque through spiral structure extracts angular momentum from the central region to the outer region of the first core. And only a central part with r ~ 1 AU begins the second collapse after exceeding dissociation density. However, the outer remnant disk keeps its centrifugal balance after stellar core formation. It seems that this remnant of the first core should control the mass and angular momentum accretion onto the newborn stellar system. (3) A rotating cloud with 0.05/tfflesssim Ωc0

  3. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  4. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  5. Core physics analysis of 100% MOX Core in IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, F.; Petrovic, B.

    2006-07-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced small-to-medium-size (1000 MWt) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), targeting deployment around 2015. Its reference core design is based on the current Westinghouse UO{sub 2} fuel with less than 5% {sup 235}U, and the analysis has been previously completed confirming good performance. The full MOX fuel core is currently under evaluation as one of the alternatives for the second wave of IRIS reactors. A full 3-D neutronic analysis has been performed to examine main core performance parameters, such as critical boron concentration, peaking factors, discharge burnup, etc. The enhanced moderation of the IRIS fuel lattice facilitates MOX core design, and all the obtained results are within the requirements, confirming viability of this option from the reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  6. Inner Core Structure Behind the PKP Core Phase Triplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, N.; Paulssen, H.; Deuss, A. F.; Waszek, L.

    2015-12-01

    Despite its small size, the Earth's inner core plays an important role in the Earth's dynamics. Because it is slowly growing, its structure - and the variation thereof with depth - may reveal important clues about the history of the core, its convection and the resulting geodynamo. Learning more about this structure has been a prime effort in the past decades, leading to discoveries about anisotropy, hemispheres and heterogeneity in the inner core in general. In terms of detailed structure, mainly seismic body waves have contributed to these advances. However, at depths between ~100-200 km, the seismic structure is relatively poorly known. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, whose simultaneous arrival hinders the measurement of inner core waves PKIKP at epicentral distances between roughly 143-148°. As a consequence, the interpretation of deeper structure also remains difficult. To overcome these issues, we stack seismograms in slowness and time, separating PKP and PKIKP phases which arrive simultaneously, but with different slowness. We apply this method to study the inner core's Western hemisphere between South and Central America using paths travelling in the quasi-polar direction between epicentral distances of 140-150°. This enables us to measure PKiKP-PKIKP differential travel times up to greater epicentral distance than has previously been done. The resulting differential travel time residuals increase with epicentral distance, indicating a marked increase in seismic velocity with depth compared to reference model AK135 for the studied polar paths. Assuming a homogeneous outer core, these findings can be explained by either (i) inner core heterogeneity due to an increase in isotropic velocity, or (ii) increase in anisotropy over the studied depth range. Our current data set cannot distinguish between the two hypotheses, but in light of previous work we prefer the latter interpretation.

  7. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  8. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  9. Assessing Core Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  10. Expert Meeting Report. Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, Dave

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this expert meeting was to recap the current state of knowledge in the area of simplified space conditioning systems in new and retrofitted house, and to provide a peer review of IBACOS’s research plan for new and existing unoccupied test houses with minimized space conditioning systems.

  11. 48 CFR 1513.170 - Competition exceptions and justification for sole source simplified acquisition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Competition exceptions and justification for sole source simplified acquisition procedures. 1513.170 Section 1513.170 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES...

  12. 48 CFR 1553.213 - Small purchases and other simplified purchase procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Small purchases and other simplified purchase procedures. 1553.213 Section 1553.213 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1553.213 Small purchases and...

  13. A Simplified Method for Implementing Run-Time Polymorphism in Fortran95

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Decyk, Viktor K.; Norton, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a simplified technique for software emulation of inheritance and run-time polymorphism in Fortran95. This technique involves retaining the same type throughout an inheritance hierarchy, so that only functions which are modified in a derived class need to be implemented.

  14. A simplified computational method for stress-strain analysis of tribological components

    SciTech Connect

    Rylander, H.G.; Shin, K.; Tesar, D.

    1996-11-01

    A machine designer is normally faced with the task of assembling components to make the desired machine; thus, he must interface computations for stress and strain. This research investigates the use of symbolic logic with general quadratic polynomials to simplify the process.

  15. SAFETY AND SECURITY BUILDING, TRA614. SIMPLIFIED FLOOR LAYOUT AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SAFETY AND SECURITY BUILDING, TRA-614. SIMPLIFIED FLOOR LAYOUT AND WEST ELEVATION. BLAW-KNOX 3150-14-1, 1/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0614-00-098-100024, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Orthogonal self-assembly and selective solvent vapour annealing: simplified processing of a photovoltaic blend.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giovanna; Liscio, Andrea; Battagliarin, Glauco; Chen, Long; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù; Müllen, Klaus; Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2013-05-14

    Selective solvent vapour annealing is used on a photovoltaic blend to enhance the interaction between the electron acceptor and the electron donor, simplifying thin films post-processing for photovoltaic applications. A remarkable improvement in the interfacial charge transfer in the bulk hetero-junction is attained, as measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy.

  17. 20 CFR 404.241 - 1977 simplified old-start method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 404.241 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Old-Start Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.241 1977 simplified old-start method. (a) Who is qualified. To qualify for the...

  18. Online Teaching Tool Simplifies Faculty Use of Multimedia and Improves Student Interest and Knowledge in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John P.; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Riconscente, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies can improve student interest and knowledge in science. However, researching the vast number of websites devoted to science education and integrating them into undergraduate curricula is time-consuming. We developed an Adobe ColdFusion- and Adobe Flash-based system for simplifying the construction, use, and delivery of…

  19. Order Matters: Sequencing Scale-Realistic Versus Simplified Models to Improve Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Schneps, Matthew H.; Sonnert, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Teachers choosing between different models to facilitate students' understanding of an abstract system must decide whether to adopt a model that is simplified and striking or one that is realistic and complex. Only recently have instructional technologies enabled teachers and learners to change presentations swiftly and to provide for learning based on multiple models, thus giving rise to questions about the order of presentation. Using disjoint individual growth modeling to examine the learning of astronomical concepts using a simulation of the solar system on tablets for 152 high school students (age 15), the authors detect both a model effect and an order effect in the use of the Orrery, a simplified model that exaggerates the scale relationships, and the True-to-scale, a proportional model that more accurately represents the realistic scale relationships. Specifically, earlier exposure to the simplified model resulted in diminution of the conceptual gain from the subsequent realistic model, but the realistic model did not impede learning from the following simplified model.

  20. 48 CFR 1552.232-74 - Payments-simplified acquisition procedures financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments-simplified acquisition procedures financing. 1552.232-74 Section 1552.232-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts...