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Sample records for kaon mass measurement

  1. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.; Lebedev, A.; Abrams, R.J.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; Baker, W.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Bergfeld, T.; Beverly, L.; Bujak, A.; Carey, D.; /Fermilab /Virginia U. /Iowa U.

    2009-09-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which is within 1.4{sigma} of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  2. Measurement of the charged kaon mass with the MIPP RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Nicholas J.

    2008-08-01

    The currently accepted value of the charged kaon mass is 493.677 ± 0.013 MeV (26 ppm). It is a weighted average of six measurements, most of which use kaonic atom X-ray energy techniques. The two most recent and precise results dominate the average but differ by 122 ppm. Inconsistency in the data set needs to be resolved, preferably using independent techniques. One possibility uses the Cherenkov effect. A measurement of the charged kaon mass using this technique is presented. The data was taken with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a tagged beam of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from 37 GeV/c to 63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 ± 1.7 MeV. This is within 1.4σ of the current value. An improvement in precision by a factor of 35 would make this technique competitive for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data.

  3. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  4. Dressed Quark Mass Dependence of Pion and Kaon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Y.; Bentz, W.; Cloet, I. C.

    2015-02-04

    The structure of hadrons is described well by the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, which is a chiral effective quark theory of QCD. In this work we explore the electromagnetic structure of the pion and kaon using the three-flavor NJL model in the proper-time regularization scheme, including effects of the pion cloud at the quark level. In the calculation there is only one free parameter, which we take as the dressed light quark (u and d) mass. In the regime where the dressed light quark mass is approximately 0.25 GeV we find that the calculated values of the kaon decay constant, current quark masses, and quark condensates are consistent with experiment- and QCD-based analyses. We also investigate the dressed light quark mass dependence of the pion and kaon electromagnetic form factors, where comparison with empirical data and QCD predictions also favors a dressed light quark mass near 0.25 GeV.

  5. Effective kaon masses in dense nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    The effective mass and decay width of kaonic modes in baryonic matter are studied within a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, π∑, πΛ system. Including Pauli blocking and Fermi motion in the kaon dispersion relation, we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K - effective mass and decay width in symmetric nuclear matter at densities around 0.1 times normal nuclear matter density ϱ0 due to the in-medium dynamics of the Λ(1405) resonance. At higher densities the K - effective mass decreases slowly but stays above 0.5 mK at least up to densities below 3 ϱ0. In neutron matter the K - effective mass decreases almost linearly with increasing density but remains relatively large ( m K∗ > 0.65 m K) for ϱn ≲ 3 ϱ0. The K + effective mass turns out to increase very slowly with rising density.

  6. Measurement of the Induced Polarization of Λ (1116) in Kaon Electroproduction with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielyan, Marianna; Raue, Brian; Dhamija, Seema; Carman, Daniel S.

    2010-08-01

    The CLAS Collaboration is using the p(e, e'K+p)π- reaction to measure the induced polarization of the electroproduced Λ(1116). In this experiment a 5.499-GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) was used to detect the scattered electron, the kaon, and the decay proton from the Λ hyperon. CLAS allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in Q2(0.75≤Q2≤3.5 GeV2) and W(1.6≤W≤3.0 GeV), as well as the kaon center-of-mass scattering angle. The goal is to map out the kinematic dependencies for the induced polarization in order to provide new constraints on models of K-hyperon production. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables from CLAS, LEPS, SAPHIR, and GRAAL, these new induced polarization data are needed in coupled-channel analyses to search for previously unobserved s-channel resonances. Preliminary polarization results are presented.

  7. The Measurement of CP Asymmetries in the Three-Body Charmless Decay Neutral B Meson Decays to Neutral Kaon(S) Neutral Kaon(S) Neutral Kaon(S)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadavand, Haleh K.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-03-28

    In this dissertation, a measurement of CP-violating effects in decays of neutral B mesons is presented. The data sample for this measurement consists of about 272 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2004 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. One neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in the CP eigenstate B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}. The other B meson is determined to be either a B{sup 0} or a {bar B}{sup 0}, at the time of its decay, from the properties of its decay products. The proper time {Delta}t elapsed between the decay of the two mesons is determined by reconstructing their decay vertices, and by measuring the distance between them. A novel technique for determining the B vertex of the decay to the CP eigenstate B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0} has been applied since the tracks in the final state do not originate from the B decay vertex. The time-dependent CP asymmetry amplitudes are determined by the distributions of {Delta}t in events with a reconstructed B meson in the CP eigenstate. The detector resolution and the b flavor tagging parameters are constrained by the {Delta}t distributions of events with a fully reconstructed flavor eigenstate. Because of the special topology of this decay, the detector resolution on {Delta}t must be checked for consistency with decays with tracks which originate from the B decay. From a maximum likelihood fit to the {Delta}t distributions of all selected events, the value of the CP violating asymmetries are measured to be S{sub 3K{sub S}{sup 0}} = -0.71{sub -0.32}{sup +0.38} {+-} 0.04 and C{sub 3K{sub S}{sup 0}} = -0.34{sub -0.25}{sup +0.28} {+-} 0.05. Fixing C = 0 we measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry amplitude sin 2{beta} = -S{sub 3K{sub S}{sup 0}} = 0.79{sub -0.36}{sup +0.39} {+-} 0.04. The value of sin 2{beta} is

  8. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  9. Flavor changing kaon decays from hypercp: Measurements of the K+ ---> pi+- mu+ mu- branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    E. Craig Dukes et al.

    2004-01-12

    The Fermilab HyperCP collaboration is making precision studies of charged hyperon and kaon decays, as well as searches for rare and forbidden hyperon and kaon decays. We report here on measurements of the branching ratios of the flavor-changing neutral-current decays: K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and compare our results to theoretical predictions. This is the first observation of the K{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} decay.

  10. Masses and decay constants of pions and kaons in mixed-action staggered chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.; Kim, Jongjeong; Lee, Weonjong; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Yoon, Boram

    2017-08-01

    Lattice QCD calculations with different staggered valence and sea quarks can be used to improve determinations of quark masses, Gasser-Leutwyler couplings, and other parameters relevant to phenomenology. We calculate the masses and decay constants of flavored pions and kaons through next-to-leading order in staggered-valence, staggered-sea mixed-action chiral perturbation theory. We present the results in the valence-valence and valence-sea sectors, for all tastes. As in unmixed theories, the taste-pseudoscalar, valence-valence mesons are exact Goldstone bosons in the chiral limit, at nonzero lattice spacing. The results reduce correctly when the valence and sea quark actions are identical, connect smoothly to the continuum limit, and provide a way to control light quark and gluon discretization errors in lattice calculations performed with different staggered actions for the valence and sea quarks.

  11. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. 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De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Godoy, D. A. Moreira De; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Silva, A. C. Oliveira Da; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Costa, H. Pereira Da; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Stassinaki, M. Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Maarel, J. Van Der; Hoorne, J. W. Van; Leeuwen, M. van; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B. von; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of primary , , and production at mid-rapidity ( 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  12. Two measurements of B 0overlineB0 mixing using kaon tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Eiges, V.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Igonkina, O.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have made two measurements of the mixing parameter χd using kaons as flavour tags. Using D ∗+ K ± correlations we found χd = 0.20 ± 0.13 ± 0.12 and from the study of (D ∗+ℓ -) K ± correlations we obtained χd = 0.19 ± 0.07 ± 0.09. The branching ratio for overlineB → D ∗+ X has been updated: Br( overlineB → D ∗+ X) = (19.6 ± 1.9) %. We have also determined the average multiplicity of charged kaons in B0 decays to be 0.78 ± 0.08.

  13. Measurement of the fifth structure function in kaon electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Raue, Brian; Carman, Daniel

    2004-10-01

    The single spin asymmetry, A_LT' and the polarized structure function, σ_LT', for the p(e,e'K^+)Λ reaction in the resonance region have been measured using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. Data were taken at electron beam energy of 2.567 GeV. The large acceptance of CLAS allows for full azimuthal angle coverage over a large range of center-of-mass scattering angles. Results are obtained that span a range in Q^2 from 0.5 to 1.3 GeV^2 and W from threshold up to 2.1 GeV and are compared to existing theoretical calculations. The fifth structure function is directly related to the imaginary part of the interference between the transverse and longitudinal components of the reaction amplitudes. The W dependence of σ_LT' in the kinematic regions dominated by s and u channel exchange indicates possible resonance structures not predicted by theoretical calculations. In the very forward angles where the reaction is dominated by t-channel exchange, the average σ_LT' is zero. This might be indicating the dominance of a single t-channel exchange.

  14. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  15. Supersymmetry and Kaon physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Kaon physics has played an essential role in testing the Standard Model and in searching for new physics with measurements of CP violation and rare decays. Current progress of lattice calculations enables us to predict kaon observables accurately, especially for the direct CP violation, ε‧/ε, and there is a discrepancy from the experimental data at the 2.9 σ level. On the experimental side, the rare kaon decays and are ongoing to be measured at the SM accuracy by KOTO at J-PARC and NA62 at CERN. These kaon observables are good probes for new physics. We study supersymmetric effects; the chargino and gluino contributions to Z penguin, in kaon observables.

  16. Measurement of scattering lengths using kaon(pi3) decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Troy Andrew

    2000-10-01

    The determination of N-N and pp scattering lengths is of fundamental importance in the studies of hadron dynamics. A direct measurement of pp scattering lengths is impossible due to a lack of processes with just two pions in both the initial and final state. Therefore indirect methods must be used. In the past, pN-->ppN and Ke4 decay[1] have been employed. These analyses are complicated due to problems of (a)extrapolation to threshold, (b)contribution of higher multipoles, and (c)inelasticity effects. In this thesis we present a novel analysis of stopped K+p3 decays (K+-->p+p0 p0) to deduce the scattering lengths ( a00 and a20 ) in a nearly model independent way. The model of Sawyer and Wali[2], incorporating Chew and Mandelstam's[3] result for pp scattering, was used to analyze the data. The data is a kinematically complete determination of Kp3 decays, a byproduct of the T-violation experiment at KEK[4]. It is fit to an amplitude At' (s1,s2,s3 )=- 2lp( 2lp+/ [t20(s1 )+t20( s2)]+/[t0 0(s3)-t 20(s3) ]) (0.1) where l,lp are the Kp-->pp and pp-->pp coupling constants, si are the center of mass energies of pion pairs and, tI ( I = 0, 2) is the S wave scattering amplitude for isospin I given by the Roy equation: tI(s)=s- 4m2p eid(s) sind( s) . Here d(s) is phase shift which depends on the scattering length, a. We deduce p+p0(p 0p0) scattering lengths to be a00 = 0.199 +/- 0.003(stat) +/- 0.002( syst) and a20 = -0.0285 +/- 0.0008 (stat)+0.0012 - 0.0007 (syst). This also is the first experimental determination of Weinberg's universal curve[5] W=2a20- 5a2 0=0.540+/-0.007(stat) +0.005-0.007(syst) .

  17. Leading isospin-breaking corrections to pion, kaon, and charmed-meson masses with twisted-mass fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, D.; Lubicz, V.; Tarantino, C.; Martinelli, G.; Sanfilippo, F.; Simula, S.; Tantalo, N.; RM123 Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present a lattice computation of the isospin-breaking corrections to pseudoscalar meson masses using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2 +1 +1 dynamical quarks at three values of the lattice spacing (a ≃0.062 , 0.082, and 0.089 fm) with pion masses in the range Mπ≃210 - 450 MeV . The strange and charm quark masses are tuned at their physical values. We adopt the RM123 method based on the combined expansion of the path integral in powers of the d - and u -quark mass difference (m^d-m^u) and of the electromagnetic coupling αe m. Within the quenched QED approximation, which neglects the effects of the sea-quark charges, and after the extrapolations to the physical pion mass and to the continuum and infinite volume limits, we provide results for the pion, kaon, and (for the first time) charmed-meson mass splittings, for the prescription-dependent parameters ɛπ0, ɛγ(M S ¯ ,2 GeV ) , ɛK0(M S ¯ ,2 GeV ) , related to the violations of the Dashen's theorem, and for the light quark mass difference (m^ d-m^ u)(M S ¯ ,2 GeV ) .

  18. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA62 Collaboration; Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K±→e±ν and K±→μ±ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ˜150000 reconstructed K±→e±ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK=(2.488±0.010)×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  19. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K± →e± ν and K± →μ± ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ∼ 150 000 reconstructed K± →e± ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488 ± 0.010) ×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  20. A Measurement of the Time Dependence of B{sub d}-bar B{sub d} Mixing with Kaon Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Wittlin, Jodi L.

    2001-12-10

    The time dependence of B{sub d} - {bar B}{sub d} mixing has been measured in b{bar b} events containing one or more kaons at the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A simultaneous measurement of the ''right sign production fraction'' of kaons from B{sub d} decays has also been made. The initial state B hadron flavor was determined using the large forward-backward asymmetry provided by the polarized electron beam of the SLC in combination with a jet charge technique and information from the opposite hemisphere. From a sample of 400,000 Z{sup 0} events collected by the SLD experiment at SLC from 1996 to 1998, the kaon right sign production fraction has been measured to be 0.797 {+-} 0.022 and the mass difference between the two B{sub d} eigenstates has been measured to be {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.503 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.020 ps{sup -1}.

  1. Measurements of Direct CP Violation, CPT Symmetry, and Other Parameters in the Neutral Kaon System

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, Elizabeth Turner

    2007-12-01

    The authors present precision measurements of the direct CP violation parameter, Re(ϵ'/ϵ), the kaon parameters, Δm and τS, and the CPT tests, Φ± and ΔΦ, in neutral kaon decays. These results are based on the full dataset collected by the KTeV experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1996, 1997, and 1999. This dataset contains ~ 15 million K → π0π0 decays and ~ 69 million K → π+π- decays. They describe significant improvements to the precision of these measurements relative to previous KTeV analyses. They find Re(ϵ'/ϵ = [19.2 ± 1.1(stat) ± 1.8(syst)] x 10-4, Δm = (5265 ± 10) x 106 hs-1, and τS = (89.62 ± 0.05) x 10-12 s. They measure Φ± = (44.09 ± 1.00)° and ΔΦ = (0.29 ± 0.31)°; these results are consistent with CPT symmetry.

  2. Measurement of Induced Polarization of λ(1116) in Kaon Electroproduction With CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Raue, B. A.; Dhamija, S.; Carman, D. S.

    2009-10-01

    The CLAS Collaboration is using the p(e,e'K^+p)&-circ; reaction to perform a measurement of the induced polarization of the electroproduced λ(1116). The parity-violating weak decay of the λ into p&-circ; (64%) allows extraction of the recoil polarization of the λ. This study uses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to detect the scattered electron, the kaon, and the decay proton. CLAS allows for a large kinematic acceptance in Q^2 (0.73<=Q^2<=3.5 GeV^2), W (1.6<=W <=3.0 GeV), as well as the kaon scattering angle. In this experiment a 5.499 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. The goal is to map out the kinematic dependencies for this polarization observable to provide new constraints for models of the electromagnetic production of K-hyperon final states. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables from CLAS, SAPHIR, and GRAAL, these data will ultimately be useful in coupled-channel analyses and will potentially help identify previously unobserved or poorly determined s-channel resonance terms. Preliminary results will be presented.

  3. Measurement of production properties of positively charged kaons in proton-carbon interactions at 31 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Argyriades, J.; Baatar, B.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogusz, M.; Boldizsar, L.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bubak, A.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Cetner, T.; Choi, K.-U.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Ferrero, A.; Fulop, A.; Garrido, X.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hakobyan, H.; Hasegawa, T.; Idczak, R.; Ivanov, Y.; Ivashkin, A.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Katryńska, N.; Kiełczewska, D.; Kikola, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kochebina, O.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kurepin, A.; Lacey, R.; Lagoda, J.; Laszlo, A.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Malakhov, A. I.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Maris, I.; Marin, V.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Meregaglia, A.; Messina, M.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paul, T.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Płaneta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Renfordt, R.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Shibata, M.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Strabel, C.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szaflik, P.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarć, A.; Yi, J.-G.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2012-03-01

    Spectra of positively charged kaons in p+C interactions at 31 GeV/c were measured with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS. The analysis is based on the full set of data collected in 2007 with a graphite target with a thickness of 4% of a nuclear interaction length. Interaction cross sections and charged pion spectra were already measured using the same set of data. These new measurements in combination with the published ones are required to improve predictions of the neutrino flux for the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. In particular, the knowledge of kaon production is crucial for precisely predicting the intrinsic electron neutrino component and the high-energy tail of the T2K beam. The results are presented as a function of laboratory momentum in two intervals of the laboratory polar angle covering the range from 20 to 240 mrad. The kaon spectra are compared with predictions of several hadron production models. Using the published pion results and the new kaon data, the K+/π+ ratios are computed.

  4. Direct Measurement of Ab and Ac Using Vertex/Kaon Charge Tags at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-10-13

    Exploiting the manipulation of the SLC electron-beam polarization, we present precise direct measurements of the parity violation parameters A{sub c} and A{sub b} in the Z boson-c quark and Z boson-b quark coupling. Quark/antiquark discrimination is accomplished via a unique algorithm that takes advantage of the precise SLD CCD vertex detector, employing the net charge of displaced vertices as well as the charge of kaons that emanate from those vertices. From the 1996-98 sample of 400,000 Z decays, produced with an average beam polarization of 73.4%, we find A{sub c} = 0.673 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.) and A{sub b} = 0.919 {+-} 0.018(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.).

  5. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e⁺e⁻ Annihilation at √s=10.52 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Vossen, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Kouzes, R. T.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, A.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e⁺e⁻ annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider using a data sample containing 113×106 e⁺e⁻→qq¯ events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections dσ/dz for h±={π±,K±} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/√s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for π± (K±) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the z dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z⁰ resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.

  6. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e⁺e⁻ Annihilation at √s=10.52 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; ...

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e⁺e⁻ annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider using a data sample containing 113×106 e⁺e⁻→qq¯ events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections dσh±/dz for h±={π±,K±} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/√s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for π± (K±) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the zmore » dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z⁰ resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.« less

  7. Measurements of CP-Violating Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in the Decays of B Mesons to Charged Pions and Kaons at the Babar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, Morris Nicholas; /Princeton U.

    2006-04-10

    This dissertation describes the measurement of branching fractions and CP asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmless two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. CP violation is a poorly-constrained phenomenon in the Standard model (SM) of particle physics and had been studied only in the kaon system before the Babar and Belle experiments. The decay of the neutral B meson to charged pions and kaons is particularly useful for the study of CP violation because they can be related to the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha}.

  8. Long-lived neutral-kaon flux measurement for the KOTO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, T.; Ahn, J. K.; Banno, S.; Campbell, M.; Comfort, J.; Duh, Y. T.; Hineno, T.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Inagaki, T.; Iwai, E.; Kawasaki, N.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, J. W.; Komatsubara, T. K.; Kurilin, A. S.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J. W.; Lee, S. K.; Lim, G. Y.; Ma, J.; MacFarland, D.; Maeda, Y.; Matsumura, T.; Murayama, R.; Naito, D.; Nakaya, Y.; Nanjo, H.; Nomura, T.; Odani, Y.; Okuno, H.; Ri, Y. D.; Sasao, N.; Sato, K.; Sato, T.; Seki, S.; Shimogawa, T.; Shinkawa, T.; Shiomi, K.; Son, J. S.; Sugiyama, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Tajima, Y.; Takahashi, G.; Takashima, Y.; Tecchio, M.; Togawa, M.; Toyoda, T.; Tung, Y. C.; Wah, Y. W.; Watanabe, H.; Woo, J. K.; Xu, J.; Yamanaka, T.; Yanagida, Y.; Yoshida, H. Y.; Yoshimoto, H.

    2016-01-24

    The KOTO(K0 at Tokai) experiment aims to observe the CP-violating rare decay KL → π0νν¯ over bar by using a long-lived neutral-kaon beam produced by the 30 GeV proton beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The KL flux is an essential parameter for the measurement of the branching fraction. Three KL neutral decay modes, KL → 3 π0, KL → 2 π0, and KL → 2γ, were used to measure the KL flux in the beam line in the 2013 KOTO engineering run. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the detector acceptance for these decays. Agreement was found between the simulation model and the experimental data, and the remaining systematic uncertainty was estimated at the 1.4% level. Here, the KL flux was measured as (4.183 ± 0.017stat. ± 0.059sys.) x 107 KL per 2 x 1014 protons on a 66-mm-long Au target.

  9. Long-lived neutral-kaon flux measurement for the KOTO experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Masuda, T.; Ahn, J. K.; Banno, S.; ...

    2016-01-24

    The KOTO(K0 at Tokai) experiment aims to observe the CP-violating rare decay KL → π0νν¯ over bar by using a long-lived neutral-kaon beam produced by the 30 GeV proton beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The KL flux is an essential parameter for the measurement of the branching fraction. Three KL neutral decay modes, KL → 3 π0, KL → 2 π0, and KL → 2γ, were used to measure the KL flux in the beam line in the 2013 KOTO engineering run. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the detector acceptance for these decays. Agreementmore » was found between the simulation model and the experimental data, and the remaining systematic uncertainty was estimated at the 1.4% level. Here, the KL flux was measured as (4.183 ± 0.017stat. ± 0.059sys.) x 107 KL per 2 x 1014 protons on a 66-mm-long Au target.« less

  10. Pion yields and the nature of kaon-pion ratios in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisons: models versus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, B.; Guptaroy, P.

    2001-08-01

    The pion densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions, to date, are available. In the light of two models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a sound dynamical basis - we would try to examine here the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  11. Spontaneous superfluid current generation in the kaon condensed color flavor locked phase at nonzero strange quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kryjevski, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    We find that for a large enough strange quark mass, m{sub s}{sup 2}/4{mu}{delta}>2/3(1-0.023) ({mu} is the quark number chemical potential, {delta} is the superconducting gap), the kaon condensed color flavor locked (CFL) phase of asymptotically dense strongly interacting 3 flavor quark matter is unstable with respect to spontaneous generation of currents of Nambu Goldstone bosons due to spontaneous breaking of baryon number symmetry and hypercharge symmetry in the CFLK{sup 0} ground state. The total baryon and hypercharge currents vanish in the ground state. We find that CFLK{sup 0} and the new state are separated by a first order phase transition. The result is derived in the mean field approximation of high density effective theory with electromagnetic interactions turned off.

  12. Measurement of two body B meson decays to pions and kaons with the CLEO III detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magerkurth, Alan Jay

    We have measured the branching ratios of the decays of B mesons to pseudoscalar kaons and pions using data from the CLEO III detector. We combine our results with the CLEO II measurement and find the branching ratios for the decays BR(B0 → K+pi-) = 18.0+2.3+1.2-2.1-0.9 x 10-6, BR(B + → K+pi0) = 12.9+2.4+1.2-2.2-1.1 x 10-6, BR(B + → K0pi+) = 18.8+3.7+2.1-3.3-1.8 x 10-6, BR(B 0 → K0pi0) = 12.8+4.0+1.7-3.3-1.4 x 10-6, and BR( B0 → pi+pi-) = 4.5+1.4+0.5-1.2-0.4 x 10-6, BR(B 0 → pi+pi0) = 4.6+1.8+0.6-1.6-0.7 x 10-6, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. We set limits on the branching ratios BR(B0 → pi0pi 0) < 4.4 x 10-6, BR( B0 → K+ K-) < 0.8 x 10-6, BR(B+ → K +K¯0) < 3.3 x 10 -6, and BR(B0 → K0K¯0) < 3.3 x 10-6 at the 90% confidence level. We also discuss the possibility of constraining the (rho, eta) plane from the measurement of these branching ratios.

  13. Model independent measurement of the leptonic kaon decay K± → μ± νμe + e-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzo, Letizia

    2017-07-01

    The NA48/2 experiment at CERN collected a very large sample of charged kaon decays into multiple final states. From this data sample we have reconstructed about 1500 events of the very rare decay K± → μ±νμe + e- over almost negligible background in the region with M(e + e- ) above 140 MeV, which is of great interest in Chiral Perturbation Theory. We present the Mee spectrum and a model-independent measurement of the decay rate for this region.

  14. Kaon Production Off the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Rafi; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2011-10-06

    We have studied the weak kaon production off the nucleon induced by neutrinos at the low and intermediate energies. The studied mechanisms are the main source of kaon production for neutrino energies up to 1.2 to 1.5 GeV for the various channels and the cross sections are large enough to be amenable to be measured by experiments such as MINERvA and T2K.

  15. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton–proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Valle, Z. Conesa del; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Caro, A. De; Cataldo, G. de; Cuveland, J. de; Falco, A. De; Gruttola, D. De; Marco, N. De; Pasquale, S. De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D’Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. -Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Lu, X. -G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal’Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Godoy, D. A. Moreira De; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Silva, A. C. Oliveira Da; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Costa, H. Pereira Da; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. -P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Stassinaki, M. Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Maarel, J. Van Der; Hoorne, J. W. Van; Leeuwen, M. van; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B. von; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-27

    The measurement of primary π±, K±, p and p¯ production at mid-rapidity (|y|< 0.5) in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/c for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/c for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/c for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Lastly, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  16. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7$$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2015-05-27

    The measurement of primary π±, K±, p and p¯ production at mid-rapidity (|y|< 0.5) in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/c for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/c for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/c for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios aremore » compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Lastly, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.« less

  17. Measurement of charged kaon semileptonic decay branching fractions and their ratio at the NA48/2 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Anne Evelyn

    Measurements of the ratios of charged kaon decay rates for Ke3/K2 pi, Kmu3/K2pi and Kmu3/Ke3 are presented. These measurements are based on charged kaon decays collected in a dedicated run in 2003 by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN. The results obtained are Ke3/K2pi = 0.2470 +/- 0.0009 (stat) +/- 0.0004 (syst ) and Kmu3/K2pi = 0.1637 +/- 0.0006 (stat) +/- 0.0003 (syst). Using the PDG average for the K2pi normalization mode, both values are found to be larger than the current values given by the Particle Data Book and lead to a larger magnitude of the Vus parameter in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix than previously accepted. When combined with the latest Particle Data Book value of |Vud|, |Vus| is in agreement with unitarity of the CKM matrix. A new measured value of the ratio of the semileptonic decay rates, Kmu3/Ke3 = 0.663 +/- 0.003(stat) +/- 0.001(syst) is compared to semi-empirical predictions based on the latest form factor measurements.

  18. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV.

    PubMed

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Leogrande, E; Monzón, I León; Leoncino, M; Lévai, P; Li, S; Li, X; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Lodato, D F; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Loizides, C; Lopez, X; Torres, E López; Lowe, A; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahajan, S; Mahmood, S M; Maire, A; Majka, R D; Malaev, M; Cervantes, I Maldonado; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Margutti, J; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martin, N A; Blanco, J Martin; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez García, G; Pedreira, M Martinez; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Masui, H; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Mcdonald, D; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meninno, E; Pérez, J Mercado; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Mieskolainen, M M; Mikhaylov, K; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Minervini, L M; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitra, J; Mitu, C M; Mohammadi, N; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Zetina, L Montaño; Montes, E; Morando, M; Godoy, D A Moreira De; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Mühlheim, D; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Mulligan, J D; Munhoz, M G; Murray, S; Musa, L; Musinsky, J; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Naru, M U; Nattrass, C; Nayak, K; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nellen, L; Ng, F; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Niedziela, J; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Norman, J; Nyanin, A; Nystrand, J; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Ohlson, A; Okatan, A; Okubo, T; Olah, L; Oleniacz, J; Silva, A C Oliveira Da; Oliver, M H; Onderwaater, J; Oppedisano, C; Velasquez, A Ortiz; Oskarsson, A; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozdemir, M; Pachmayer, Y; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Pan, J; Pandey, A K; Pant, D; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Pareek, P; Park, W J; Parmar, S; Passfeld, A; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Costa, H Pereira Da; Filho, E Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D; Lara, C E Pérez; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petrov, V; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Piyarathna, D B; Płoskoń, M; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polichtchouk, B; Poljak, N; Poonsawat, W; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Porter, J; Pospisil, J; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puccio, M; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Raha, S; Rajput, S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Razazi, V; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Reidt, F; Ren, X; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Ristea, C; Rivetti, A; Rocco, E; Cahuantzi, M Rodríguez; Manso, A Rodriguez; Røed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Ronflette, L; Rosnet, P; Rossi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Roy, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Montero, A J Rubio; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Ryabov, Y; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahlmuller, B; Sahoo, P; Sahoo, R; Sahoo, S; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakai, S; Saleh, M A; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Castro, X Sanchez; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Santagati, G; Sarkar, D; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schulc, M; Schuster, T; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Seeder, K S; Seger, J E; Sekiguchi, Y; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senosi, K; Seo, J; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabanov, A; Shabetai, A; Shadura, O; Shahoyan, R; Shangaraev, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, N; Shigaki, K; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siddhanta, S; Sielewicz, K M; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Slupecki, M; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Snellman, T W; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Song, J; Song, M; Song, Z; Soramel, F; Sorensen, S; Spacek, M; Spiriti, E; Sputowska, I; Stassinaki, M Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Suleymanov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Symons, T J M; Szabo, A; Toledo, A Szanto de; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szymanski, M; Takahashi, J; Tanaka, N; Tangaro, M A; Takaki, J D Tapia; Peloni, A Tarantola; Tariq, M; Tarzila, M G; Tauro, A; Muñoz, G Tejeda; Telesca, A; Terasaki, K; Terrevoli, C; Teyssier, B; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Toia, A; Trogolo, S; Trubnikov, V; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Usai, G L; Utrobicic, A; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Palomo, L Valencia; Vallero, S; Maarel, J Van Der; Hoorne, J W Van; Leeuwen, M van; Vanat, T; Vyvre, P Vande; Varga, D; Vargas, A; Vargyas, M; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vauthier, A; Vechernin, V; Veen, A M; Veldhoen, M; Velure, A; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Limón, S Vergara; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Baillie, O Villalobos; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Vislavicius, V; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S A; Volpe, G; Haller, B von; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, J; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Watanabe, D; Weber, M; Weber, S G; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Winn, M; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, P; Yano, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yurchenko, V; Yushmanov, I; Zaborowska, A; Zaccolo, V; Zaman, A; Zampolli, C; Zanoli, H J C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhigareva, N; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, Z; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zinovjev, G; Zyzak, M

    The measurement of primary [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] production at mid-rapidity ([Formula: see text] 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/[Formula: see text] for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/[Formula: see text] for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/[Formula: see text] for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  19. Measurement of the relative amplitude and strong phase between antineutral D meson decaying to kaon+ resonance kaon- and neutral D meson decaying to kaon+ resonance kaon- via Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decaying to kaon+ kaon- neutral pion decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Paras P.

    I present physics concepts, which are useful to understand our analyses, and describe the CLEO III and CLEO-c experiments at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. I also present motivations for a Dalitz plot analysis of the Cabibbo-suppressed charmed meson decay mode D0 → K+K-pi 0 at CLEO. The analysis uses 9.0 fb-1 of data collected at s ≈ 10.58 GeV with the CLEO III detector. We find the strong phase difference deltaD ≡ argAD 0→K*+K- AD0→K*+K - = 332° +/- 8° +/- 11° and relative amplitude rD ≡ AD0→ K*+K-A D0→K*+K- = 0.52 +/- 0.05 +/- 0.04. This measurement indicates significant destructive interference between D0 → K+(K-pi 0)K*- and D0 → K- (K+pi0) K*+ in the D 0 → K+ K-pi0 Dalitz plot region where these two modes overlap. The fit includes the K*+/- and φ resonances and a non-resonant amplitude, and the measured fit fractions for each resonance (with statistical uncertainty only) are (46.1 +/- 3.1)% for the K*+, (12.3 +/- 2.2)% for the K*-, (14.9 +/- 1.6)% for the φ, and (36.0 +/- 3.7)% for the non-resonant contribution. We find deltaD = 313° +/- 9° (stat.) and an amplitude ratio of rD = 0.52 +/- 0.05 (stat.) from a second fit which substitutes scalar kappa+/- (mass 878 MeV/c2, width 499 MeV/c2) amplitudes for the non-resonant amplitude. The measured fit fractions for each resonance (with statistical uncertainty only) are (48.1 +/- 4.5)% for the K*+, (12.9 +/- 2.6)% for the K*-, (16.1 +/- 1.9)% for the φ, (12.6 +/- 5.8)% for the kappa+, and (11.1 +/- 4.7)% for the kappa-. We also investigate the D 0 → K+K -pi0 Dalitz plot in 281 pb-1 of data collected at s ≈ 3.77 GeV with the CLEO-c detector. We find results which are consistent with the CLEO III analysis. I conclude by summarizing our results and present a brief appendix detailing the K-matrix formalism.

  20. Kaon Electroproduction on Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch, Pawel Ambrozewicz; Chris Armstrong; John Arrington; K. Assamagan; Kevin Bailey; Oliver K. Baker; Shelton Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; G. Collins; C. Cothran; W.J. Cummings; Samuel Danagoulian; Fraser Duncan; Jim Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; Lars Ewell; H.T. Fortune; Haiyan Gao; Donald Geesaman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Paul Gueye; Jens-Ole Hansen; Wendy Hinton; Hal Jackson; Cynthia Keppel; Andi Klein; D. Koltenok; David Mack; Richard Madey; Pete Markowitz; C.J. Martoff; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; S.K. Mtingwa; Tom O'Neill; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Dave Potterveld; John Price; Philip Roos; Brian Raue; J.J. Reidy; Juerg Reinhold; G. Savage; Reyad Sawafta; J.P. Schiffer; Ralph Segel; Stepan Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; Liguang Tang; B. Terburg; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Ben Zeidman; Beni Zihlmann

    1998-08-01

    Kaon electroproduction on deuterium and hydrogen targets has been measured at beam energies of 3.245 and 2.445GeV and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=0.38 and O.5(GeV/c ){sup 2} Associated production off a proton in the deuteron exhibits a quasifree production mechanism. The electroproduction of a Sigma - off the neutron could be extracted for the first time with reasonable errors.

  1. Panofsky Prize Talk: Measurements of Direct CP Violation in the Decays of Neutral Kaons at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstein, Bruce

    2007-04-01

    For many years after its discovery, CP Violation appeared to be a phenomenon isolated from the rest of physics. The first goal was to see if tCP violation was due to a ``superweak'' interaction in neutral kaon mixing (``indirect'' CP violation) or if there were a ``direct'' effect which would be manifest in the kaon decays themselves. For years, it seemed to be an interaction of the former kind, one that might not have any additional manifestations. A few years after the discovery, Sakharov realized that CP Violation in the very early Universe, in particular direct CP Violation, could lead to the matter-antimatter imbalance. A key development was the Kobayashi-Maskawa model which provided a framework in which to think about the problem, connecting it to quark mixing. This motivated a series of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generation experiments to isolate the predicted direct effect. This talk will review how the problem was addressed in 3 Fermilab- based experiments spanning a 20 year period which culminated in a definitive detection of the effect by KTeV. The motivation and technical approaches to isolate this tiny effect with good control of systematic uncertainty will be reviewed together with the results and future prospects.

  2. Electromagnetic charged and neutral kaon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Burden, C.J.; Thomson, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    The electromagnetic form factor of the charged and neutral kaon is calculated using the approach applied in the successful study of the pion form factor, described above. The charged kaon form factor will be measured in forthcoming experiments at CEBAF. Our calculation involves the dressed strange quark propagator, to which F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) is not sensitive, and hence it provides us with constraints on the strange-quark sector of QCD. Our preliminary results are encouraging. We find that the strange and up/down quark propagators are not too different, once the change in the current-quark-mass is accounted for. However, the difference that remains is important since it allows {l_angle}{bar s}s{r_angle}<{l_angle}{bar u}u{r_angle}. This calculation is the first to yield a value of f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} that is in good agreement with experiment and also yields r{sub K+}/r{sub {pi}} in good agreement with experiment. Our calculated charged kaon form factor provides a prediction that will be tested in the forthcoming CEBAF experiments. Our studies also show that K{sup 0} has a negative charge radius, as is to be expected. Our calculated value will be compared with that measured in K{sub s}{sup 0} regeneration from electrons.

  3. Sterile neutrinos facing kaon physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, A.; Bečirević, D.; Sumensari, O.; Weiland, C.; Funchal, R. Zukanovich

    2017-04-01

    We discuss weak kaon decays in a scenario in which the Standard Model is extended by massive sterile fermions. After revisiting the analytical expressions for leptonic and semileptonic decays we derive the expressions for decay rates with two neutrinos in the final state. By using a simple effective model with only one sterile neutrino, compatible with all current experimental bounds and general theoretical constraints, we conduct a thorough numerical analysis which reveals that the impact of the presence of massive sterile neutrinos on kaon weak decays is very small, less than 1% on decay rates. The only exception is B (KL→ν ν ) , which can go up to O (10-10), thus possibly within the reach of the KOTO, NA62 and SHIP experiments. Plans have also been proposed to search for this decay at the NA64 experiment. In other words, if all the future measurements of weak kaon decays turn out to be compatible with the Standard Model predictions, this will not rule out the existence of massive light sterile neutrinos with non-negligible active-sterile mixing. Instead, for a sterile neutrino of mass below mK, one might obtain a huge enhancement of B (KL→ν ν ), otherwise negligibly small in the Standard Model.

  4. Extracting the kaon Collins function from e+e- hadron pair production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Hernandez, J. O. Gonzalez; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.; Prokudin, A.

    2016-02-01

    The latest data released by the BABAR Collaboration on azimuthal correlations measured for pion-kaon and kaon-kaon pairs produced in e+e- annihilations allow, for the first time, a direct extraction of the kaon Collins functions. These functions are then used to compute the kaon Collins asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes, which result in good agreement with the measurements performed by the HERMES and COMPASS collaborations.

  5. Measurement of Branching Fractions for Two-Body Charmless B Decays to Charged Pions and Kaons at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-28

    The authors present preliminary results of a search for charmless two-body B decays to charged pions and kaons using data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II Storage ring. In a sample of 8.8 million produced B anti-B pairs the authors measure the branching fractions beta(B{sup 0} --> pi{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (9.3{sub {minus}2.3{minus}1.4}{sup +2.6+1.2}) x 10{sup {minus}6} and beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (12.5{sub {minus}2.6{minus}1.7}{sup +3.0+1.3}) x 10{sup {minus}6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. For the decay B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} they find no significant signal and set an upper limit of beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}) < 6.6 x 10{sup {minus}6} at the 90% confidence level.

  6. Developement of a same-side kaon tagging algorithm of B^0_s decays for measuring delta m_s at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /Heidelberg U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors developed a Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm to determine the production flavor of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. Until the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency is clearly observed the performance of the Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm can not be measured on data but has to be determined on Monte Carlo simulation. Data and Monte Carlo agreement has been evaluated for both the B{sub s}{sup 0} and the high statistics B{sup +} and B{sup 0} modes. Extensive systematic studies were performed to quantify potential discrepancies between data and Monte Carlo. The final optimized tagging algorithm exploits the particle identification capability of the CDF II detector. it achieves a tagging performance of {epsilon}D{sup 2} = 4.0{sub -1.2}{sup +0.9} on the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} sample. The Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm presented here has been applied to the ongoing B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis, and has provided a factor of 3-4 increase in the effective statistical size of the sample. This improvement results in the first direct measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency.

  7. Precision measurement of charged pion and kaon multiplicities in E+E- annihilation at Q = 10.52 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgab, Martin

    This thesis presents a high precision measurement of inclusive charged pion and kaon production in e+e- annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB collider at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan, on a sample of 113 x 106 annihilation events. Uncertainties are kept small by applying experimental-data-driven as well as Monte Carlo-based corrections of systematic effects on measured hadron yields, such as particle misidentification, event selection and radiative corrections. This analysis represents the first precision measurement of multiplicities at low energy scales, far from the Z0 mass energy scale of the LEP and SLC colliders where most previous precision measurements were performed. In addition, for the first time hadron multiplicities are measured for high fractional hadron energies relative to the energy of the fragmenting parton. Comparable or higher precision than existing measurements is achieved, while still maintaining high resolution in fractional hadron energy. Measuring high precision hadron multiplicities at low center-of-mass energy from e+e- annihilation data will reduce uncertainties on fragmentation functions (FFs). These objects parametrize hadronization, the formation of hadrons from partons in the final state of scattering reactions with large momentum transfers. FFs cannot be calculated from first principles in the theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which describes the interaction between color-charged particles, quarks and gluons. Thus FFs have to be extracted from experimentally measured multiplicity data from e+e- annihilations, lepton-nucleon scattering and proton-proton collisions in perturbative QCD (pQCD) analyses. Reducing uncertainties on FFs not only directly enhances our understanding of the process of hadronization, which is omnipresent in any reaction with hadronic final state particles. It will also allow tests of tools and concepts of QCD which currently much

  8. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries In Neutral B Meson Decays Into Three Kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joshua M.

    2008-12-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics successfully describes all of the observed interactions of the fundamental particles (with the exception of non-zero neutrino mass). Despite this enormous success, the SM is widely viewed as an incomplete theory. For example, the size of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter is not nearly large enough to account for the abundance of matter observed throughout the universe. It is thus believed that as-yet-unknown physical phenomena must exist that introduce new asymmetries between matter and antimatter. In this thesis, by studying decays that happen only rarely in the SM, we make measurements of asymmetries between matter and antimatter that are potentially sensitive to the existence of processes beyond the SM. At the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, electrons and positrons are collided at the Υ(4S) resonance to create pairs of B mesons. The BABAR detector is used to measure the subsequent decay products. Using 383 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ decays, we study the decay B0 → K+K-K0. In the SM, this decay is dominated by loop amplitudes. Asymmetries between matter and antimatter (CP asymmetries) are extracted by measuring the time-dependence of the complex amplitudes describing the B0 and $\\bar{B}$0 decays as functions of their kinematics. The interference between decays with and without the mixing of neutral B mesons allows for the measurement of the angle βeff, which is a measure of CP violation. We also measure the direct CP asymmetry ACP. Data samples reconstructed from three K0 modes (KS0 → π+π-, KS0 → π0π0, and KL0) are fit simultaneously. They find ACP = -0.015 ± 0.077 ± 0.053 and βeff = 0.352 ± 0.076 ± 0.026 rad, corresponding to a CP violation

  9. Kaon condensation, black holes, and cosmological natural selection.

    PubMed

    Brown, G E; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, Mannque

    2008-08-29

    It is argued that a well-measured double neutron-star binary in which the two neutron stars are more than 4% different from each other in mass or a massive neutron star with mass M > or approximately 2M(middle dot in circle) would put in serious doubt or simply falsify the following chain of predictions: (1) a nearly vanishing vector meson mass at chiral restoration, (2) kaon condensation at a density n-3n0, (3) the Brown-Bethe maximum neutron-star mass Mmax approximately 1.5M(middle dot in circle), and (4) Smolin's "cosmological natural selection" hypothesis.

  10. Kaon femtoscopy at the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidrych, Jindřich; STAR Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The properties of the quark-gluon plasma have been extensively studied in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. Femtoscopic measurements of two-particle correlations at small relative momenta reveal the space-time characteristics of the system at the moment of particle emission. In comparison to analyses using the most abundant pions, like-sign kaons provide a cleaner probe of the emission source as they less frequently result from resonance weak decays. Additionally, kaons contain strange quarks so these measurements can be sensitive to different effects and earlier collision stages. Pairs of like-sign kaons exhibit correlations due to Coulomb interactions and Bose-Einstein quantum statistics. The system of unlike-sign kaons contains a narrow φ(1020) resonance in the final state. Femtoscopic measurements have been predicted to be particularly sensitive to the source size and momentum-space correlations in the region of this resonance. In this proceedings, we present the STAR preliminary results on the like-sign and unlike-sign kaon femtoscopic correlation functions in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Collision centrality and the transverse pair momentum kT dependence of the radius parameters will be discussed. The results from unlike-sign kaon correlation functions will be compared with model predictions [1].

  11. Measurement of charged kaon semileptonic decay branching fraction using ISTRA+ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, V. A.; Akimenko, S. A.; Bolotov, V. N.; Britvich, G. I.; Duk, V. A.; Filin, A. P.; Inyakin, A. V.; Kholodenko, S. A.; Khudyakov, A. A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Leontiev, V. M.; Makarov, A. I.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Polyakov, V. A.; Polyarush, A. Yu.; Popov, A. V.; Romanovsky, V. I.; Stenyakin, O. V.; Tchikilev, O. G.; Yushchenko, O. P.

    2014-06-01

    The ratio of branching fractions for and K - → π-π0 decays has been measured using the ISTRA+ spectrometer. The result of our measurement is the following: Using the current PDG value for the K 2π branching fraction, this result leads to the measured K e3 branching fraction of Br( K e3) = 0.0501 ± 0.0009 and to the value of | V us | f +(0) = 0.2115 ± 0.0021.

  12. Measurements of CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions in the decays of B mesons to charged pions and kaons at the Babar detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Morris Nicholas

    This dissertation describes the measurement of branching fractions and CP asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmless two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. CP violation is a poorly-constrained phenomenon in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics and had been studied only in the kaon system before the Babar and Belle experiments. The decay of the neutral B meson to charged pions and kaons is particularly useful for the study of CP violation because they can be related to the Unitarity Triangle angle alpha. We use an extended maximum likelihood technique that incorporates kinematic, event-shape, and particle identification information to measure the branching fractions of the neutral B meson to pipi, Kpi. These branching fractions are found to be (5.6 +/- 0.4 +/- 0.3) x 10-6 and (19.2 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.6) x 10 -6 respectively. The decay to KK is found to have a branching fraction of less than 0.4 x 10-6 at the 90% confidence level. We also measure the direct CP-violating asymmetry between decays to K+pi- and K-pi+ to be -0.133 +/- 0.030 +/- 0.009. Decay time information and b quark flavor information are then added to determine the time-dependent CP violation parameters S and C, which we find to be -0.30 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.03 and -0.09 +/- 0.15 +/- 0.04, respectively. For all measurements above the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are obtained from a data sample of 227 million decays of the Υ(4S) to B0 B¯z collected between 1999 and 2004 with the Babar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  14. Measurements of the Collins asymmetries for kaons and pions in e+e- annihilations at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, A.

    2016-07-01

    New measurements of the Collins asymmetries were performed by BABAR exploiting inclusive e+e- → h1h2 X annihilations (with h1,2 = π and/or K) mainly at the energy of the ϒ(4S), which corresponds to a squared transferred momentum Q2 ~ 110 GeV2c4. For the first time asymmetries following strange quarks fragmentation could be derived as a function of the fractional energy carried out by inclusively emitted hadron pairs.

  15. Measurement of Mass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerer, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Various instruments and techniques for measuring mass are discussed, focusing on the physics behind techniques employed. Equal-arm balances, electronic substitution balance (using electromagnetic force), non-gravimetric weighing (intertial-mass measurement) are among the instruments/techniques considered. (JN)

  16. Measurement of CP observables with B meson going to neutral D meson kaon resonance decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Quincy

    Using a sample of 379 million Upsilon(4S) → BB¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory, I study decays of B - → D0 K*- where K*- → K0s pi-, K0s → pi+pi- and D0 decays into K+/-pi ∓ and CP-eigenstates. Both CP+ (K+K-, pi +pi-) and CP- final states ( K0s pi0, K0s φ, K0s o) are included. Using the Gronau-London-Wyler (GLW) and Atwood-Dunietz-Soni (ADS) methods, CP-observables which are sensitive to the CKM angle gamma are measured.

  17. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  18. Pion and kaon structure functions at 12 GeV JLab and EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Pions and kaons are, along with protons and neutrons, the main building blocks of nuclear matter. They are connected to the Goldstone modes of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, the mechanism thought to generate all hadron mass in the visible universe. The distribution of the fundamental constituents, the quarks and gluons, is expected to be different in pions, kaons, and nucleons. However, experimental data are sparse. As a result, there has been persistent doubt about the behavior of the pion's valence quark structure function at large Bjorken-x and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of gluons. A 12 GeV JLab experiment using tagged DIS may contribute to the resolution of the former. The Electron-Ion Collider with an acceptance optimized for forward physics could provide access to structure functions over a larger kinematic region. This would allow for measurements testing if the origin of mass is encoded in the differences of gluons in pions, kaons, and nucleons, and measurements testing assumptions used in the extraction of structure functions and the pion and kaon form factors. Electroweak measurements at an EIC would also potentially allow to disentangle the role of quark flavors at high x. In this talk we will discuss the prospects of such measurements. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  19. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  20. KAON CONDENSATION IN NEUTRON STARS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAMOS,A.; SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; WAMBACH,J.

    2001-04-24

    We discuss the kaon-nucleon interaction and its consequences for the change of the properties of the kaon in the medium. The onset of kaon condensation in neutron stars under various scenarios as well its effects for neutron star properties are reviewed.

  1. Top quark mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  2. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  3. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  4. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  5. Kaon electroproduction at large four-momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Markowitz

    2003-06-16

    Exclusive H(e,e'K)Y data were taken in January, March and April of 2001 at the Jefferson Lab Hall A. The electrons and kaons were detected in coincidence in the hall's two High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS). The kaon arm of the pair had been specifically outfitted with two aerogel Cerenkov threshold detectors, designed to separately provide pion and proton particle identification thus allowing kaon identification. Preliminary data show the cross section's dependence on the invariant mass, W, along with results of systematic studies. Ultimately the data will be used to perform a Rosenbluth Separation as well, separating the longitudinal from the transverse response functions.

  6. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, G.

    2008-11-01

    Direct neutrino mass measurements are based on high precision spectroscopy studies close to the kinematic end-point of low-energy β-emitters such as 3H and 187Re. Relying only on energy-momentum conservation in β-decay, they offer the only model-independent method to measure the absolute ν-mass scale with sub-eV sensitivity. The two most sensitive detection principles, electrostatic retarding spectrometers and microbolometers, are complementary to each other, and two experiments are currently being prepared to explore ν-masses down to m(ν) = 200 meV. β-spectroscopy will thus allow to constrain the role of neutrino hot dark matter in structure formation, as well as to explore the parameter region of ν-mass scenarios with quasi-degenerate pattern. The MARE project will investigate the β-decay of 187Re with bolometers based on metallic Re and AgReO4 in a two-staged approach: in a phase-I set-up a sensitivity of m(ν) = 2 eV is expected, forming the basis for a later sub-eV phase-II. The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is currently being set-up on the site of Tritium Laboratory at KIT. The experiment will combine an ultra-luminous windowless gaseous tritium source with a high resolution electrostatic spectrometer and offer an unprecedented precision in β-decay studies, pushing this technique to its technological limits. First KATRIN measurements with 3H after successful system integration are expected for mid-2011. This contribution gives a status report and outlook for both experiments and discusses the impact of direct ν-mass experiments on astroparticle physics.

  7. Freeze-out dynamics via charged kaon femtoscopy in sNN=200 GeV central Au + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present measurements of three-dimensional correlation functions of like-sign, low-transverse-momentum kaon pairs from sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions. A Cartesian surface-spherical harmonic decomposition technique was used to extract the kaon source function. The latter was found to have a three-dimensional Gaussian shape and can be adequately reproduced by Therminator event-generator simulations with resonance contributions taken into account. Compared to the pion one, the kaon source function is generally narrower and does not have the long tail along the pair transverse momentum direction. The kaon Gaussian radii display a monotonic decrease with increasing transverse mass mT over the interval of 0.55≤mT≤1.15 GeV/c2. While the kaon radii are adequately described by the mT -scaling in the outward and sideward directions, in the longitudinal direction the lowest mT value exceeds the expectations from a pure hydrodynamical model prediction.

  8. Charged kaon and proton production in B-hadron decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegenfeldt, Fredrik Per

    The production of charged kaons and protons in B-hadron decays has been measured in e+e- annihilations at centre-of-mass energies corresponding to the Z0 mass. In total 1.6 million hadronic Z0 decays were analysed, corresponding to about 690000 B-hadron decays. They were collected using the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN during 1994 and 1995. Events containing B-hadron decays were identified using special characteristics of the B-hadron decay topology. In particular, the long lifetime of the B-hadron leads to decay vertices significantly displaced relative the interaction point. These so called secondary vertices were reconstructed using a powerful micro vertex detector. In order to discriminate B-hadron decay products from fragmentation tracks, a method was used where the impact parameter measured by the vertex detector was employed as a discriminating variable. The tracks were thus divided into two classes, one compatible with the interaction point and the other compatible with a secondary vertex. An unfolding method was used to extract the true B-hadron decay tracks from the two classes. Charged kaons and protons were identified using the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector and corrected for misidentification using an efficiency matrix. The analysis resulted in charged kaon and proton spectra from B-hadron decays, including previously unmeasured momentum regions. Integrating the spectra yielded the following multiplicities n(B- hadron-->K+/- X)=0.683+/-0.021(stat) +/-0.017(syst) n(B- hadron-->p/p X)=0.127+/-0.013(stat) +/-0.019(syst) where the proton multiplicity does not include Λ baryon decay products.

  9. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Direct neutrino mass experiments are complementary to searches for neutrinoless double β-decay and to analyses of cosmological data. The previous tritium beta decay experiments at Mainz and at Troitsk have achieved upper limits on the neutrino mass of about 2 eV/c2 . The KATRIN experiment under construction will improve the neutrino mass sensitivity down to 200 meV/c2 by increasing strongly the statistics and—at the same time—reducing the systematic uncertainties. Huge improvements have been made to operate the system extremely stably and at very low background rate. The latter comprises new methods to reject secondary electrons from the walls as well as to avoid and to eject electrons stored in traps. As an alternative to tritium β-decay experiments cryo-bolometers investigating the endpoint region of 187Re β-decay or the electron capture of 163Ho are being developed. This article briefly reviews the current status of the direct neutrino mass measurements.

  10. Kaon Transverse Charge Density from Space- and Time-like Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas; Meija-Ott, Johann; Carmignotto, Marco; Horn, Tanja; Miller, Gerald; Pegg, Ian; Resca, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic form factors play an important role in our understanding of the structure and interactions of hadrons based on the principles of QCD. Transverse charge densities provide a framework for the interpretation of these form factors in terms of the physical charge and magnetization densities. They are obtained as two-dimensional Fourier transforms of the elastic form factors and describe the distribution of charge and magnetization in the plane transverse to the propagation direction of a fast moving nucleon. They are related to the Generalized Parton distributions (GPDs), which are expected to provide a universal (process-independent) description of the nucleon. The simplest hadronic system that also includes a heavier strange quark is the kaon, whose valence structure is a bound state of a quark and an antiquark. Its elastic electromagnetic structure is parameterized by a single form factor. Recent calculations suggest that strange quarks play a large role in, e.g., the shape of the parton distribution amplitude, making studies of the kaon's internal structure of the kaon even more important. I will present the first extraction of the kaon transverse charge density from timelike and spacelike data including new data at high center of mass energies. NSF Grant PHY-1306227, PHY-1306418; USDOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER-41014; Vitreous State Laboratory.

  11. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. CPT Tests: Kaon vs neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-07-09

    CPT violation has an impressive limit in the neutral kaon system |m(K{sup 0})-m({bar K}{sup 0})| < 10{sup -18} m{sub K} = 0.50 x 10{sup -18} GeV. However, if viewed as a constraint on the mass-squared, the bound appears weak, |m{sup 2}(K{sup 0})-m{sup 2}({bar K}{sup 0})| < 0.25 eV{sup 2}. the authors point out that neutrino oscillation offers better limits on CPT violation in this case. The comparison of solar and rector neutrino results puts the best limit on CPT violation by far, |{Delta}m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-{Delta}m{sub {rho}}{sup 2}| < 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} (90% CL).

  13. Kaon, pion, and proton associated photofission of Bi nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Margaryan, A.; Acha, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Baker, O. K.; Baturin, P.; Benmokhtar, F.; Carlini, R.; Chen, X.; Christy, M.; Cole, L.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; Dharmawardane, V.; Egiyan, K.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.

    2010-10-15

    The first measurement of proton, pion, and kaon associated fission of Bi nuclei has been performed in a photon energy range 1. 45 < E{sub {gamma}}< 1. 55 GeV. The fission probabilities are compared with an inclusive fission probabilities obtained with photons, protons and pions. The fission probability of Bi nuclei in coincidence with kaons is 0. 18 {+-} 0. 06 which is {approx}3 times larger than the proton and pion associated fission probabilities and {approx}2 times larger than inclusive ones. The kaon associated excess fission events are explained in terms of bound {Lambda} residual states and their weak nonmesonic decays.

  14. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984-2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  15. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) → π+π-e+e- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Golossanov, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using KL → π+π-e+e- decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K0 charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re(ϵ'/ϵ) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The KL → π+π-e+e-L decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  16. Kaon Flavour Physics Strikes Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.

    2017-01-01

    In this short presentation I emphasize the increased importance of kaon flavour physics in the search for new physics (NP) that we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade. The main actors will be the branching ratios for the rare decays and , to be measured by NA62 and KOTO, and their correlations with the ratio ɛ‧/ɛ on which recently progress by lattice QCD and large N dual QCD approach has been made implying a new flavour anomaly. Further correlations of , and ɛ‧/ɛ with ɛK , ΔMK , KL → μ + μ - and will help us to identify indirectly possible NP at short distance scales. This talk summarizes the present highlights of this facinating field including some results from concrete NP scenarios.

  17. Measurement of branching fractions and search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless two-body B decays into pions and kaons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bartelt, J; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Trunov, A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobering, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-10-08

    We present measurements, based on a sample of approximately 23x10(6) BB pairs, of the branching fractions and a search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states of kaons and pions. We find the branching fractions B(B0-->pi(+)pi(-)) = (4.1+/-1.0+/-0.7)x10(-6), B(B0-->K+pi(-)) = (16.7+/-1.6+/-1.3)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0)) = (10.8(+2.1)(-1.9)+/-1.0)x10(-6), B(B+-->K0pi(+)) = (18.2(+3.3)(-3.0)+/-2.0)x10(-6), B(B0-->K0pi(0)) = (8.2(+3.1)(-2.7)+/-1.2)x10(-6). We also report 90% confidence level upper limits for B meson decays to the pi(+)pi(0), K+K-, and K0K+ final states. In addition, charge asymmetries have been found to be consistent with zero, where the statistical precision is in the range of +/-0.10 to +/-0.18, depending on the decay mode.

  18. Pion and kaon freezeout in NA44

    SciTech Connect

    NA44 Collaboration

    1994-12-01

    The NA44 spectrometer is optimized for the study of single and two-particle particle spectra near mid-rapidity for transverse momenta below {approx} 1 GeV/c. A large fraction of all pairs in the spectrometer`s acceptance are at low relative momenta, resulting in small statistical uncertainties on the extracted size parameters. In addition, the spectrometer`s clean particle identification allows the authors to measure correlation functions for pions, kaons, and protons. This contribution will concentrate on the source size parameters determined from pion and kaon correlation functions. These size parameters will be compared to calculations from the RQMD event generator and also interpreted in the context of a hydrodynamic model. Finally, the measured single particle spectra will be examined from the viewpoint of hydrodynamics.

  19. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  20. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  1. Photoproduction of the kaon(+)kaon(-)(1750)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Ryan Edward

    2003-07-01

    While photoproduction has often been advertised as an important environment in which to study light meson spectroscopy, solid experimental results are sparse. In fact, beyond the relatively straightforward photoproduction of the rho, o, and φ mesons, the few results of exclusive photoproduction that do exist are poorly understood, and several, perhaps, have even been misinterpreted. After extensively reviewing the sometimes tenuous history of the exclusive photoproduction of the "rho'(1600)," the "opi0(1250)," the "o(1650)," and the "K+K -(1750)," new results from the E831/FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab are presented which address the interpretation of the K+K-(1750). This enhancement in low-pT K +K- pairs at a mass near 1750 MeV/c2 has been observed by several previous photoproduction experiments, but, despite several apparent inconsistencies, it has always been interpreted as the JPC = 1-- φ(1680) meson. With nearly two orders of magnitude more events than any previous observation of the K+ K-(1750), and based on precise measurements of its mass and width, and its absence from the K* K final state, the FOCUS data can finally render this interpretation implausible. In addition, several steps have been taken towards establishing a new interpretation. Based on limited angular analyses of its decay and the beam energy dependence of its production, we argue that, in the absence of any wild interference scenarios, the K+ K-(1750) has JPC ≠ 1--, and, in fact, the most likely assignment appears to be 2++. It is hoped that this work can help set the stage for future reevaluations and new insights in photoproduction.

  2. Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in Neutral B Meson Decays to Charged Pions and Kaons with the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Farbin, A.

    2005-02-10

    This dissertation presents a measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions for neutral B meson decays to two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. The results are obtained from a data sample of about 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A fit to kinematic, topological, and particle identification information measures the charge-averaged branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.7 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (17.9 {+-} 0.9 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -6}; the 90% confidence level upper limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) < 0.6 x 10{sup -6}; and the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub K{pi}} = -0.102 {+-} 0.050 {+-} 0.016 [-0.188, -0.016], where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic and the ranges in square brackets indicate the 90% confidence interval. A fit which adds decay time and b-flavor tagging information measures the CP-violating parameters for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays S{sub {pi}{pi}} = 0.02 {+-} 0.34 {+-} 0.05 [-0.54, +0.58] and C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.30 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.04 [-0.72, +0.12].

  3. Weak kaon production off the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Rafi Alam, M.; Sajjad Athar, M.; Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2010-08-01

    The weak kaon production off the nucleon induced by neutrinos is studied at the low and intermediate energies of interest for some ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This process is also potentially important for the analysis of proton decay experiments. We develop a microscopical model based on the SU(3) chiral Lagrangians. The basic parameters of the model are f{sub {pi},} the pion decay constant, Cabibbo's angle, the proton and neutron magnetic moments, and the axial vector coupling constants for the baryons octet, D and F, that are obtained from the analysis of the semileptonic decays of neutron and hyperons. The studied mechanisms are the main source of kaon production for neutrino energies up to 1.2 to 1.5 GeV for the various channels and the cross sections are large enough to be amenable to be measured by experiments such as Minerva and T2K.

  4. Photoproduction of Neutral Kaons on Deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckford, Brian

    2006-11-01

    Experimentation to greater understand the strangeness production mechanism can be performed by observing the electromagnetic interaction that leads to Kaon photoproduction. The n (γ, K^0) λ reaction may assist in answering questions about the strangeness photo-production process. An experiment into the elementary Kaon photoproduction process was investigated in an experiment conducted at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science of Tohoku University (LNS) using the Neutral Kaon Spectrometer. (NKS). The experiment was conducted by the d (γ, K^0) reaction. K^0 will be measured in the K^0->π^+π^- decay chain by the NKS. The NKS implements many detectors working in coincidence: These ranging from the Tagged Photon Beam generated by the 1.2 GeV Electron beam via bremsstrahlung, an Inner Plastic Scintillator Hodoscope (IH), a Straw Drift Chamber (SDC), a Cylindrical Drift Chamber (CDC), and an Outer Plastic Scintillator Hodoscope. Due to the background produced through the γ-> e+e- process, electron veto counters (EV) were placed in the middle of the OH to reject charged particles in the horizontal plane of the beam line. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates the need for pulse height correction. This was achieved by analysis of the Inner and Outer hodoscopes, and determining the energy deposit in the scintillators.

  5. Exclusive production of pion and kaon meson pairs in two photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-09-01

    Exclusive production of /π and K meson pairs in two photon collisions is measured with ALEPH data collected between 1992 and 2000. Cross-sections are presented as a function of cosθ* and invariant mass, for cosθ*<0.6 and invariant masses between 2.0 and 6.0 GeV/c2 (2.25 and 4.0 GeV/c2) for pions (kaons). The shape of the distributions are found to be well described by QCD predictions but the data have a significantly higher normalization.

  6. Spin Observables in Kaon Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    O.K. Baker

    1998-06-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab has proven to be a powerful tool for use in studying the electromagnetic production of hadronic systems containing a strange constituent quark. The electromagnetic probe only marginally disturbs the system being investigated, and is well understood. Its use as a means to probe the internal structure of hadronic systems has been well documented. Among the most studied of these hadronic systems, currently, is the nucleon. The unique opportunities afforded by the use of polarized, high-current, high-duty-factor electron beams provides an even more powerful probe of the electromagnetic structure of hadronic systems; the study of the spin dependence of the electromagnetic production and weak decay of the hyperon, specifically the {Lambda}-hyperon, becomes feasible. An experiment to study the electroproduction of the {Lambda} as a function of virtual photon momentum transfer, angle, and energy, using spin polarization observables in order to extract insights into its production and weak decay dynamics has already been approved at Jefferson Lab (E98-101; Spin Polarization in Kaon Electroproduction). The experiment aims to study the mechanism of polarization transfer in the reaction e + p {yields} e' + K + {Lambda}. The experiment requires only moderate momentum resolution and no specialized equipment other than that associated with the polarized beam. The data quality is expected to improve with higher electron beam energies, for higher Q{sup 2} measurements. Additionally, at higher energies the increased virtual photon flux allows the 4experiment to be run at lower currents (and therefore high beam polarization). A polarized electron beam and an unpolarized cryogenic hydrogen target are required. The study uses the electron arm spectrometer and the hadron arm spectrometer to detect the scattered electron and the electroproduced kaon before it decays in flight, respectively. Additionally, the hadron arm will be used to detect the

  7. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  8. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately Mmore » $$2\\atop{u}$$/Ms$$2\\atop{s}$$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.« less

  9. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately M$2\\atop{u}$/Ms$2\\atop{s}$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.

  10. New directions in kaon-nucleus physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The prospects for nuclear physics with kaons are reviewed including (1) elementary interactions k/sup +-/N; (2) K/sup +/-induced processes on nuclei; (3) resonance physics with K/sup -/ and ..pi../sup +-/ (greater than or equal to 1 GeV/c/); (4) neutral kaon interactions; and (5) hypernuclear physics. Summary of kaon beam requirements is given. (WHK)

  11. The Kaon identification system of the NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, E.

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare decay with 10% accuracy. This can be achieved by detecting about 100 Standard Model events with 10% background in 2 - 3 years of data taking. NA62 is exposed to a 750 MHz high-energy unseparated charged hadron beam, with a 6% kaons component, and uses kaon decay-in-flight technique. Precise timing matching of the incident kaon and of the downstream charged track is essential to reject accidental coincidences when working in such a high rate environment. This is achieved by the kaon tagging system KTAG, which identifies kaons with an efficiency higher than 95% and provides precise time information with a resolution better than 100 ps. KTAG re-uses the Cherenkov radiator and optics of a CEDAR, a ring-focusing Cherenkov detector designed for MHz beam intensity in the 1970s. To reach the required performance, KTAG is equipped with new photon detectors, electronics readout, mechanics, cooling and safety systems.

  12. Simulations for Kaon Absorption Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Danielle; Wood, Michael; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The three pieces needed to determine the Ks0 transparency ratios are the kaon yields, the target thickness, and the detector acceptance. This poster will describe our simulations for the neutral kaon acceptance by the CLAS detector for the E01-112 experiment. The experiment was conducted in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for the purpose of searching for medium modifications of mesons. The reactions are the photo-production of mesons from targets of deuterium, carbon, iron, and lead. Our calculations employ the PLUTO++ software for the generator and GSIM to simulate the detector.

  13. Measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions in charmless two-body B-meson decays to pions and kaons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-03-01

    We present improved measurements of CP-violation parameters in the decays B0→π+π-, B0→K+π-, and B0→π0π0, and of the branching fractions for B0→π0π0 and B0→K0π0. The results are obtained with the full data set collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, corresponding to (467±5)×106 BB¯ pairs. We find the CP-violation parameter values and branching fractions: Sπ+π-=-0.68±0.10±0.03, Cπ+π-=-0.25±0.08±0.02, AK-π+=-0.107±0.016-0.004+0.006, Cπ0π0=-0.43±0.26±0.05, B(B0→π0π0)=(1.83±0.21±0.13)×10-6, B(B0→K0π0)=(10.1±0.6±0.4)×10-6, where in each case, the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7 standard deviations for B0→π+π- and 6.1 standard deviations for B0→K+π-, including systematic uncertainties. Constraints on the unitarity triangle angle α are determined from the isospin relations among the B→ππ rates and asymmetries. Considering only the solution preferred by the Standard Model, we find α to be in the range [71°,109°] at the 68% confidence level.

  14. Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in Charmless Two-Body B-Meson Decays to Pions and Kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-06-18

    We present improved measurements of CP-violation parameters in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The results are obtained with the full data set collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. We find the CP-violation parameter values and branching fractions S{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004}{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K0{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where in each case, the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 6.1 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, including systematic uncertainties. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relations among the B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries. Considering only the solution preferred by the Standard Model, we find {alpha} to be in the range [71{sup o}, 109{sup o}] at the 68% confidence level.

  15. Preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} mixing with kaon and charge dipole tags

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    We report two preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}- B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using novel techniques with a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup O} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC. B decay vertices are reconstructed inclusively with a topological technique and the B hadron flavor at production is determined by exploiting the large left-right forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup O} {r_arrow} b {bar b} decays in combination with a jet charge technique. Two methods are used to tag the B flavor at decay. The first uses the charge of kaons attached to the B decay vertex and identified with the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. The second measurement is based on the construction of a charge dipole of the topological vertices to separate the B{sub d}{sup O}/B{sub d}{sup 0} decays by exploiting the B {r_arrow} D cascade charge structure. The measurement of the oscillation frequency yields {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.58 {+-} 0.07(stat){+-}0.08(syst) ps{sup -1} and 0.56 {+-} 0.08(stat){+-}0.04(syst) ps{sup {minus}1} for the kaon and dipole tags respectively.

  16. Exposing strangeness: Projections for kaon electromagnetic form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-Xin; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2017-08-01

    A continuum approach to the kaon and pion bound-state problems is used to reveal their electromagnetic structure. For both systems, when used with parton distribution amplitudes appropriate to the scale of the experiment, Standard Model hard-scattering formulas are accurate to within 25% at momentum transfers Q2≈8 GeV2. There are measurable differences between the distribution of strange and normal matter within the kaons, e.g. the ratio of their separate contributions reaches a peak value of 1.5 at Q2≈6 GeV2. Its subsequent Q2 evolution is accurately described by the hard scattering formulas. Projections for the ratio of kaon and pion form factors at timelike momenta beyond the resonance region are also presented. These results and projections should prove useful in planning next-generation experiments.

  17. Equivalence between classical and quantum dynamics. Neutral kaons and electric circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, M. Fanchiotti, H.; Canal, C.A. Garcia

    2011-10-15

    An equivalence between the Schroedinger dynamics of a quantum system with a finite number of basis states and a classical dynamics is presented. The equivalence is an isomorphism that connects in univocal way both dynamical systems. We treat the particular case of neutral kaons and found a class of electric networks uniquely related to the kaon system finding the complete map between the matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian of kaons and those elements of the classical dynamics of the networks. As a consequence, the relevant {epsilon} parameter that measures CP violation in the kaon system is completely determined in terms of network parameters. - Highlights: > We provide a formal equivalence between classical and quantum dynamics. > We make use of the decomplexification concept. > Neutral kaon systems can be represented by electric circuits. > CP symmetry violation can be taken into account by non-reciprocity. > Non-reciprocity is represented by gyrators.

  18. Kaon physics: Probing the standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The status and prospects of current and future kaon physics experiments is discussed. Both precision measurements and the search for and measurement of ultra-rare decays are powerful probes of many models of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The physics reach of these experiments is briefly discussed.

  19. The low energy kaon program at the celsius storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Librizzi, F.; Mascali, A.; Nicotra, D.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Russo, G.; Santoro, A.; Turrisi, R.; Dunin, V.; Ekström, C.; Ericsson, G.; Höistad, B.; Johansson, J.; Johansson, T.; Westerberg, L.; Zlomaczhuk, J.

    1997-02-01

    The CLAMSUD spectrometer has been recently installed at the jet-target position of the CELSIUS ring at "THE SVEDBERG LABORATORY." The physical purpose is the study of kaon production at energies below the N-N threshold. Due to the low cross-section and short lifetime of kaons we increased the solid angle by means of two quadrupoles positioned at the entrance of the dipole. The experimental quality of the measurements due both to the beam characteristics and to the CLAMSUD detector will be shown.

  20. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-18

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson’s momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as ( 1 - x ) 2 when Bjorken- x → 1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U ( 3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion’s light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  1. Precision Mass Measurements at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, D.; van Schelt, J.; Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Sternberg, M.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.; Segel, R.; Sharma, K.

    2010-02-01

    Neutron separation energies (Sn) are essential inputs to models of explosive r-process nucleosynthesis. However, for nuclei farther from stability, the precision of Sn decreases as production decreases and observation of those nuclei become more difficult. Many of the most critical inputs to the models are based on extrapolations from measurements of masses closer to stability than the predicted r-process path. Measuring masses that approach and lie on the predicted r-process path will further constrain the systematic uncertainties in these extrapolated values. The Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (CPT) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has measured the masses of more than 160 nuclei to high precision. A recent move to the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at ANL has given the CPT unique access to weakly produced nuclei that cannot be easily reached via proton induced fission of ^238U. CARIBU will eventually use a 1 Ci source of ^252Cf to produce these nuclei. Installation of the CPT at CARIBU as well as the first CPT mass measurements of neutron rich nuclei at CARIBU will be discussed. )

  2. Kaon condensation in proto-neutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Reddy, Sanjay; Ellis, Paul J.; Prakash, Madappa; Lattimer, James M.

    2000-09-01

    We study the equation of state of kaon-condensed matter including the effects of temperature and trapped neutrinos. Several different field-theoretical models for the nucleon-nucleon and kaon-nucleon interactions are considered. It is found that the order of the phase transition to a kaon-condensed phase, and whether or not Gibbs' rules for phase equilibrium can be satisfied in the case of a first order transition, depend sensitively on the choice of the kaon-nucleon interaction. To avoid the anomalous high-density behavior of previous models for the kaon-nucleon interaction, a new functional form is developed. For all interactions considered, a first order phase transition is possible only for magnitudes of the kaon-nucleus optical potential (greater-or-similar sign)100 MeV. The main effect of finite temperature, for any value of the lepton fraction, is to mute the effects of a first order transition, so that the thermodynamics becomes similar to that of a second order transition. Above a critical temperature, found to be at least 30-60 MeV depending upon the interaction, the first order transition disappears. The phase boundaries in baryon density versus lepton number and baryon density versus temperature planes are delineated, which is useful in understanding the outcomes of proto-neutron star simulations. We find that the thermal effects on the maximum gravitational mass of neutron stars are as important as the effects of trapped neutrinos, in contrast to previously studied cases in which the matter contained only nucleons or in which hyperons and/or quark matter were considered. Kaon-condensed equations of state permit the existence of metastable neutron stars, because the maximum mass of an initially hot, lepton-rich proto-neutron star is greater than that of a cold, deleptonized neutron star. The large thermal effects imply that a metastable proto-neutron star's collapse to a black hole could occur much later than in previously studied cases that allow

  3. Proton decay and new contribution to 0 ν2 β decay in SO(10) with low-mass Z' boson, observable oscillation, lepton flavor violation, and rare kaon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, M. K.; Awasthi, Ram Lal; Sahu, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the conventional approach to observable oscillation through Pati-Salam intermediate gauge symmetry in SO(10), the canonical seesaw mechanism is also constrained by the symmetry breaking scale M R ˜ M C ≤ 106 GeV which yields light neutrino masses several orders larger than the neutrino oscillation data. A method to evade this difficulty is through TeV scale gauged inverse seesaw mechanism which has been recently exploited while predicting experimentally verifiable W {/R ±}, Z R bosons with a new dominant contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay in the W L - W L channel and other observable phenomena, but with proton lifetime far beyond the accessible limits. In the present work, adopting the view that W {/R ±} may be heavy and currently inaccessible to accelerator tests, we show how a class of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models allows a TeV scale Z' boson, experimentally testable proton decay along with observable oscillation, and lepto-quark gauge boson mediated rare kaon decays without resorting to additional fine-tuning of parameters. The occurrence of Pati-Salam gauge symmetry with unbroken D-parity and two gauge couplings at the highest intermediate scale guarantees precision unification with vanishing GUT-threshold or gravitational corrections on sin2 θ W ( M Z ) prediction in this model. Predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay in the W L - W L channel is analysed in detail including light and heavy sterile neutrino exchange contributions by means of normal and band plots and also by scattered plots while a new formula for half-life is derived. Comparison with available data from various groups by normal and scattered plots reveals how the existing experimental bounds are satisfied irrespective of the mass hierarchy in the light neutrino sector leading to the lower bound on the lightest sterile neutrino mass, GeV. The model also predicts branching ratios for charged lepton flavor violation verifiable by ongoing search experiments. We also

  4. Quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Lee; T. MART; Cornelius Bennhold; Lester Wright

    2001-12-01

    Investigations of the quasifree reaction A({gamma}, K Y)B are presented in the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA). For this purpose, we present a revised tree-level model of elementary kaon photoproduction that incorporates hadronic form factors consistent with gauge invariance, uses SU(3) values for the Born couplings and uses resonances consistent with multi-channel analyses. The potential of exclusive quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei to reveal details of the hyperon-nucleus interaction is examined. Detailed predictions for the coincidence cross section, the photon asymmetry, and the hyperon polarization and their sensitivities to the ingredients of the model are obtained for all six production channels. Under selected kinematics these observables are found to be sensitive to the hyperon-nucleus final state interaction. Some polarization observables are found to be insensitive to distortion effects, making them ideal tools to search for possible medium modifications of the elementary amplitude.

  5. Electroproduction of kaons on hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenuk, Douglas Michael

    1999-10-01

    High-statistics data have been acquired for the reactions p(e,e'K+) and d(e,eK+) over a range of W from 1.70-1.95 GeV. Coincidence measurements at Q 2 = 0.38, 0.50, and 0.52 GeV2 cover a range of virtual photon-kaon angles for both liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets. Monte Carlo simulations have been matched to the data in order to extract cross sections. The W-dependence of the p(e,e'K+)Λ and p(e,e'K+)Σ0 cross sections deviates from a previous model fitted to photoproduction data. The difference in cross sections on hydrogen and on the proton in deuterium has been quantified for Λ production. The subtraction of the Λ and Σ 0 contribution from the proton in the deuteron allows the extraction of n(e,e'K+)Σ- cross sections. The wealth of new data on Λ, Σ0, and Σ - production will put tight constraints on existing models for kaon production and form factors.

  6. Bayesian analysis for kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Marsainy, T. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated contribution of the nucleon resonances in the kaon photoproduction process by using an established statistical decision making method, i.e. the Bayesian method. This method does not only evaluate the model over its entire parameter space, but also takes the prior information and experimental data into account. The result indicates that certain resonances have larger probabilities to contribute to the process.

  7. Searches for very rare decays of kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.

    1997-01-01

    The physics motivation for searches for very rare kaon decays, either forbidden or suppressed within the Standard Model, is briefly discussed. Simple arguments conclude that such searches probe possible new forces at a 200 TeV mass scale or constitute a precision test of the electroweak model. The examples of such process are decays of K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu} {sup {+-}}e{sup -+}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {mu}{sup +} e{sup -}, K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and K{sup +} {yields} {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. We present the current experimental status and describe the new efforts to reach sensitivities down to one part in 10{sup 12}. The discussion is focused on the experimental program at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where intense beams make such studies possible.

  8. Collins and Sivers asymmetries in muonproduction of pions and kaons off transversely polarised protons

    DOE PAGES

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged pions and charged and neutral kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of high energy muons off transversely polarised protons are presented. The results were obtained using all the available COMPASS proton data, which were taken in the years 2007 and 2010. The Collins asymmetries exhibit in the valence region a non-zero signal for pions and there are hints of non-zero signal also for kaons. The Sivers asymmetries are found to be positive for positive pions and kaons and compatible with zero otherwise.

  9. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric {phi}-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K{sub S} {yields} K{sub L} regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric {phi}-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  10. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric [phi]-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K[sub S] [yields] K[sub L] regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric [phi]-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  11. Hints for Enhanced b -> sg From Charm and Kaon Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Rathsman, Johan

    2003-05-09

    Previously, motivation for enhanced b {yields} sg from new flavor physics has centered on discrepancies between theory and experiment. Here two experimental hints are considered: (1) updated measurements of the charm multiplicity and {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar c}s}) at the {Upsilon}(4S) imply {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub no charm}) {approx} 12.4 {+-} 5.6%, (2) the {bar B} {yields} K{sup -}X and {bar B} {yields} K{sup +}/K{sup -}X branching fractions are in excess of conventional {bar B} {yields} X{sub c} {yields} KX yields by about 16.9 {+-} 5.6% and 18 {+-} 5.3%, respectively. JETSET 7.4 was used to estimate kaon yields from s{bar s} popping in {bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar u}d} decays. JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlos for {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub sg}) {approx} 15% imply that the additional kaon production would lead to 1{sigma} agreement with observed charged and neutral kaon yields. The K{sub s} momentum spectrum would be consistent with recent CLEO bounds in the end point region. Search strategies for enhanced b {yields} sg are discussed in light of large theoretical uncertainty in the standard model fast kaon background from b {yields} s penguin operators.

  12. Direct measurements of neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments in the experimental search for neutrino mass are discussed. New data from Los Alamos on the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay give an upper limit of 9.3 eV at the 95% confidence level. This result is not consistent with the long-standing ITEP result of 26(5) eV within a model-independent'' range of 17 to 40 eV. It now appears that the electron neutrino is not sufficiently massive to close the universe by itself. Hime and Jelley report finding new evidence for a 17-keV neutrino in the {Beta} decay of {sup 35}S and {sup 63}Ni. Many other experiments are being reported and the situation is still unresolved. 56 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Tests of Discrete Symmetries in the Semileptonic Decays of Neutral Kaons at Cplear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin

    The semileptonic decays of neutral kaon beams, K0/rightarrow/pi e/nu and /bar K0/rightarrow/pi e/nu, were measured in the CPLEAR experiment, and the parameters /Delta m, Re (x), Im (x), and Re (ɛ S) were extracted using the time-dependent asymmetries in the rates for these two decay channels. Here, /Delta m is the mass difference between the long and short lived components of the neutral kaons, Re (x) and Im (x) are proportional to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of the /Delta S=-/Delta Q amplitude in semileptonic decays, and Re (ɛ S) is the real part of the [/cal CP] violating mixing parameter for the short lived neutral kaon. The experiment was performed at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN. Antiprotons were stopped in a gaseous hydrogen target, and the reactions pp /rightarrow K+/bar K0/pi/sp- and pp /rightarrow K/sp- K0π+ were selected. This resulted in beams of neutral kaons with known initial strangeness: K0 and K0. Using CPLEAR data taken during 1993 and 1994, 669K semileptonic events were selected. By fitting the decay rate asymmetries, the parameters were measured to be:/eqalign[/Delta m&=(0.5278/pm0.0029stat./pm0.0007syst.)×1010/hbar/s/cr [ Re]/ (x)&=(5.5/pm10.2stat./pm7.5syst.)×10- 3/cr [ Im]/ (x)&=(1.6/pm3.4stat./pm1.8syst.)×10- 3/cr [ Re]/ (ɛ S)&=(2.25/pm0.76stat./pm0.52syst.)×10- 3/cr]where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. The precision of Δm obtained from this analysis is on the same order as the best published values. The results for x are much better than previously published values, and are consistent with the standard model prediction of |x| ~10-6. This is the first experiment to make a measurement of Re (ɛ S), and the value obtained in this analysis is in agreement with the published value of Re (ɛ L), as predicted by [/cal CPT] invariance.

  14. Spin-Orbit Correlations in Kaon SIDIS at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H.; Hafidi, K.

    2009-08-04

    We present studies of the transverse momentum dependence of valence quark transverse and longitudinal spin distributions through measurements of spin-azimuthal asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) of kaons using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV polarized electron beam and the CLAS12 detector with longitudinally polarized proton and deuteron targets. Measurements with kaons are complementary to measurements with pions and will provide additional information on the Collins fragmentation mechanism. The P{sub T} dependence of the double spin asymmetry provides additional information on the flavor and polarization dependence of transverse-momentum-dependent helicity distributions of quarks, which provides complementary to the Single-Spin Asymmetry (SSA) measurements access to spin-orbit correlations. The large acceptance of CLAS12 would allow simultaneous detection of scattered electrons and leading hadrons, providing information on the struck quark's flavor and transverse momentum.

  15. Lattice QCD study of mixed systems of pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Smigielski

    2011-07-01

    The O(100) different ground state energies of N-pion and M-kaon systems for N+M <= 12 are studied in lattice QCD. These energies are then used to extract the various two- and three- body interactions that occur in these systems. These calculations are performed using one ensemble of 2+1 flavor anisotropic lattices with a spatial lattice spacing $a_s$ ~ 0.125 fm, an anisotropy factor $\\xi=a_s/a_t=3.5$, and a spatial volume $L^3\\sim (2.5\\ {\\rm fm})^3$. Particular attention is paid to additional thermal states present in the spectrum because of the finite temporal extent. The quark masses used correspond to pion and kaon masses of $m_\\pi$ ~ 383 MeV and $m_K$ ~ 537 MeV, respectively. The isospin and strangeness chemical potentials of these systems are found to be in the region where chiral perturbation theory and hadronic models predict a phase transition between a pion condensed phase and a kaon condensed phase.

  16. Body Mass Measurement Chair - Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Skylab's Body Mass Measurement chair, the facility of the Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172), is shown here in this 1970 photograph. The M172 experiment determined the body mass of each crew member and observed changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight in significantly aided in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  17. Body Mass Measurement Chair - Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Skylab's Body Mass Measurement chair, the facility of the Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172), is shown here in this 1970 photograph. The M172 experiment determined the body mass of each crew member and observed changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight in significantly aided in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  18. CP violation and kaon-pion interactions in B→Kπ+π- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, B.; Furman, A.; Kamiński, R.; Leśniak, L.; Loiseau, B.; Moussallam, B.

    2009-05-01

    We study CP violation and the contribution of the strong kaon-pion interactions in the three-body B→Kπ+π- decays. We extend our recent work on the effect of the two-pion S- and P-wave interactions to that of the corresponding kaon-pion ones. The weak amplitudes have a first term derived in QCD factorization and a second one as a phenomenological contribution added to the QCD penguin amplitudes. The effective QCD coefficients include the leading order contributions plus next-to-leading order vertex and penguins corrections. The matrix elements of the transition to the vacuum of the kaon-pion pairs, appearing naturally in the factorization formulation, are described by the strange Kπ scalar (S-wave) and vector (P-wave) form factors. These are determined from Muskhelishvili-Omn e s coupled channel equations using experimental kaon-pion T-matrix elements, together with chiral symmetry and asymptotic QCD constraints. From the scalar form factor study, the modulus of the K0*(1430) decay constant is found to be (32±5)MeV. The additional phenomenological amplitudes are fitted to reproduce the Kπ effective mass and helicity angle distributions, the B→K*(892)π branching ratios and the CP asymmetries of the recent data from Belle and BABAR collaborations. We use also the new measurement by the BABAR group of the phase difference between the B0 and Bmacr 0 decay amplitudes to K*(892)π. Our predicted B±→K0*(1430)π±, K0*(1430)→K±π∓ branching fraction, equal to (11.6±0.6)×10-6, is smaller than the result of the analyzes of both collaborations. For the neutral B0 decays, the predicted value is (11.1±0.5)×10-6. In order to reduce the large systematic uncertainties in the experimental determination of the B→K0*(1430)π branching fractions, a new parametrization is proposed. It is based on the Kπ scalar form factor, well constrained by theory and experiments other than those of B decays.

  19. A measurement of the branching ration of the neutral pion Dalitz decay using kaon(long) going to 3 neutral pion decays from KTeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzaid, Erin E.

    2007-12-01

    We present a measurement of B(pi0 → e+e- g )/B(pi0 → gg ) using data taken in 1999 by the E832 KTeV experiment at Fermilab. The pi0s were produced by KL decays in flight that are fully reconstructed. We find 63,693 K L → 3pi0 → gggg e+e- g decays in KTeV data (an increase of a factor of ˜ 20 in event statistics over previous experiments), and normalize to KL → 3pi0 → 6 g , to extract Bp0 →e+e-g,me+e ->15MeV/c2 /Bp0→gg =3.920+/-0.016+/-0.036 x10-3, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Using the Mikaelian and Smith prediction for the e +e- mass spectrum as implemented in the KTeV Monte Carlo to correct to the full e+ e- mass range yields Bp0 →e+e-g /Bp0→gg =1.1559+/-0.0046+/-0.0107 %. This result is consistent with previous measurements and with theoretical predictions, and the uncertainty is a factor of three smaller than any previous measurement.

  20. Kaon physics at Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Y.

    1992-03-01

    For high precision and high sensitivity studies of the physics of kaon physics of kaon decays, the important characteristics of the new Main Injector at Fermilab are its high energy (relative to other factories'') and its high intensity. Experiments of this kind are becoming increasingly important in the study of CP violation and for searches for new interactions. An extracted beam of 120 GeV will produce a source of high energy kaons (10--50 GeV) that will not be surpassed in intensity by any facility new under consideration world-wide.

  1. Kaon physics at Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Y.

    1992-03-01

    For high precision and high sensitivity studies of the physics of kaon physics of kaon decays, the important characteristics of the new Main Injector at Fermilab are its high energy (relative to other ``factories``) and its high intensity. Experiments of this kind are becoming increasingly important in the study of CP violation and for searches for new interactions. An extracted beam of 120 GeV will produce a source of high energy kaons (10--50 GeV) that will not be surpassed in intensity by any facility new under consideration world-wide.

  2. The Strange Quark Polarisation from Charged Kaon Production on Deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Windmolders, R.

    2009-08-04

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) is derived at LO from the semi-inclusive and inclusive spin asymmetries measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The significance of the results is found to depend critically on the ratio of the s-bar and u quark fragmentation functions into kaons {integral}D{sub s-bar}{sup K+}(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  3. Exposing strangeness: Projections for kaon electromagnetic form factors

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Fei; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu -Xin; ...

    2017-08-28

    A continuum approach to the kaon and pion bound-state problems is used to reveal their electromagnetic structure. For both systems, when used with parton distribution amplitudes appropriate to the scale of the experiment, Standard Model hard-scattering formulas are accurate to within 25% at momentum transfers Q2 ≈ 8 GeV2. There are measurable differences between the distribution of strange and normal matter within the kaons, e.g. the ratio of their separate contributions reaches a peak value of 1.5 at Q2 ≈ 6 GeV2. Its subsequent Q2 evolution is accurately described by the hard scattering formulas. Projections for the ratio of kaonmore » and pion form factors at timelike momenta beyond the resonance region are also presented. In conclusion, these results and projections should prove useful in planning next-generation experiments.« less

  4. Rare and radiative kaon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss theoretical issues in radiative rare kaon decays. The interest is twofold: to extract useful short-distance information and understand the underlying dynamics. We emphasize channels where either we can understand non-perturbative aspects of QCD or there is a chance to test the Standard Model. An interesting channel, K + → π + π 0 e + e ‑, is studied also in connection with the recent experimental NA48 results. Motivated by LHCB results on KS → μ + μ ‑ we discuss other channels like KS,L → l + l ‑ l + l ‑. Motivated by recent theoretical work by Buras and collaborators we study also the K ± → π±l + l ‑ form factor.

  5. Kaon electro-production on protons at JLab in Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro Iodice

    2003-07-15

    The elementary reaction of kaon exclusive electro-production on protons has been studied in a broad kinematical range at Jefferson Lab in Hall A. Data have been taken at different values of the invariant center-of-mass energy W in the range W=1.8-2.2 GeV, for two values of the transferred 4-momentum Q2 =1.9 and 2.4 (GeV/c)2. Each kinematics was measured at different electron beam energies so as to separate the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) contributions to the cross-section. The LT interference term has also been measured for a limited number of kinematics. The preliminary data are compared to results of different models developed in the framework of hadronic field and Regge theories.

  6. Measuring Transmission Efficiencies Of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1989-01-01

    Coincidence counts yield absolute efficiencies. System measures mass-dependent transmission efficiencies of mass spectrometers, using coincidence-counting techniques reminiscent of those used for many years in calibration of detectors for subatomic particles. Coincidences between detected ions and electrons producing them counted during operation of mass spectrometer. Under certain assumptions regarding inelastic scattering of electrons, electron/ion-coincidence count is direct measure of transmission efficiency of spectrometer. When fully developed, system compact, portable, and used routinely to calibrate mass spectrometers.

  7. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  8. Body Mass Measurement - Skylab Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart provides details on Skylab's Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172). The M172 experiment was a medical study to determine the body mass of each crew member and observe changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight aided significantly in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  9. Body Mass Measurement - Skylab Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart provides details on Skylab's Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172). The M172 experiment was a medical study to determine the body mass of each crew member and observe changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight aided significantly in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  10. Induced polarization of Λ(1116) in kaon electroproduction with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielyan, Marianna; Raue, Brian; Carman, Daniel S.; Park, Kijun

    2013-10-01

    The CLAS Collaboration is using the p(e,e'K+p)π- reaction to perform a measurement of the induced polarization of the electroproduced Λ(1116). The parity-violating weak decay of the Λ into p&pgr- (64%) allows extraction of the recoil polarization of the Λ. This study uses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to detect the scattered electron, the kaon, and the decay proton. CLAS allows for a large kinematic acceptance with 0.8 ≤ Q2 ≤ 3.5 GeV2, 1.6 ≤ W ≤ 3.0 GeV, as well as the kaon scattering angle. In this experiment a 5.5 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. The goal is to map out the kinematic dependencies for this polarization observable to provide new constraints for theoretical models of the electromagnetic production of kaon-hyperon final states. Along with previously published photo- and electro-production cross sections and polarization observables from CLAS, SAPHIR, and GRAAL, these data are needed in a coupled-channel analysis to identify previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  11. Hadron spectroscopy at RHIC and KAON

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the sub-processes pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}{sup +}+{gamma}{sup +} {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 10.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of u, d, c, b and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. Of particular interest is the possibility of carrying out a CP-violation study in the B decays. The KAON facility, proposed for TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada, is an intense hadron factory with a proton flux some 25 times higher than that available at the BNL AGS with the Booster. Therefore, a general purpose hadron spectrometer will be able to tackle the problem of studying gluonic and multiquark degrees of freedom in strangeonia. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  13. Mass measurements with a Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-21

    Penning trap mass measurements on radioactive isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended. The most recent measurements were carried out on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. An accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  14. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton antiproton collider, precise measurements of its mass are ongoing. Using data recorded by the D0 and CDF experiment, corresponding to up to the full Tevatron data sample, top quark mass measurements performed in different final states using various extraction techniques are presented in this article. The recent Tevatron top quark mass combination yields m_t=173.20 +-0.87 GeV. Furthermore, measurements of the top antitop quark mass difference from the Tevatron are discussed.

  15. Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1996-10-01

    A measurement of the mass of the W boson is presented based on a sample of 5982 W-->eν decays observed in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector during the 1992-1993 run. From a fit to the transverse mass spectrum, combined with measurements of the Z boson mass, the W boson mass is measured to be MW = 80.350+/-0.140\\(stat\\)+/-0.165\\(syst\\)+/-0.160\\(scale\\) GeV/c2.

  16. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is m{sub top} = 172.6 {+-} 1.4 GeV.

  17. PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-30

    ISS020-E-015853 (30 June 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, uses the IM mass measurement device to perform the PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement Russian biomedical routine assessments in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  18. X International Conference on Kaon Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-01-01

    The International Conference on Kaon Physics 2016 took place at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) on 14–17 September 2016. This conference continued the KAON series, offering an opportunity for theorists and experimentalists from the high-energy physics community to discuss all aspects of kaon physics. The 2016 edition saw a strong participation from theory and phenomenology and the first kaon results from the LHCb experiment at CERN, as well as updates from several experiments around the world including NA62 and KOTO. All papers published in this volume of KAON2016 have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the proceedings Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The organizers and the participants wish to thank the University of Birmingham, the European Research Council, CERN, the UK Science and Technology Facility Council and the UK Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology for their support in the organization of this successful edition. Figure for summary

  19. The kaon identification system in the NA62 experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of the NA62 experiment at CERN is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare K{sup +} → π{sup +} ν ν-bar decay with 10% accuracy. NA62 will use a 750 MHz high-energy un-separated charged hadron beam, with kaons corresponding to ∼6% of the beam, and a kaon decay-in-flight technique. The positive identification of kaons is performed with a differential Cherenkov detector (CEDAR), filled with Nitrogen gas and placed in the incoming beam. To stand the kaon rate (45 MHz average) and meet the performances required in NA62, the Cherenkov detector has been upgraded (KTAG) with new photon detectors, readout, mechanics and cooling systems. The KTAG provides a fast identification of kaons with an efficiency of at least 95% and precise time information with a resolution below 100 ps. A half-equipped KTAG detector has been commissioned during a technical run at CERN in 2012, while the fully equipped detector, its readout and front-end have been commissioned during a pilot run at CERN in October 2014. The measured time resolution and efficiency are within the required performances. (authors)

  20. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  1. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.

    2016-11-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays K+ → π+vv¯ and KL → π0vv¯ by NA62 and KOTO that being theoretically clean and very sensitive to new physics (NP) could hint for new phenomena even beyond the reach of the LHC without any significant theoretical uncertainties. Indeed simultaneously the advances in the calculations of perturbative and in particular non-perturbative QCD effects in ɛ'/ɛ, ɛK, ΔMK, KL → μ+μ- and KL → π0ℓ+ℓ- will increase the role of these observables in searching for NP. In fact the hints for NP contributing to ɛ'/ɛ have been already signalled last year through improved estimates of hadronic matrix elements of QCD and electroweak penguin operators Q6 and Q8 by lattice QCD and large N dual QCD approach. This talk summarizes in addition to this new flavour anomaly the present highlights of this field including some results from concrete NP scenarios.

  2. Mass measurements of exotic nuclides at SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mazzocco, M.; Mukherjee, M.; Quint, W.; Rahaman, S.; Rauth, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vorobjev, G.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Weber, C.

    2007-05-22

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP is installed behind the velocity-filter SHIP at GSI for high-precision mass measurements of fusion-evaporation residues. To facilitate an efficient stopping of the reaction products a buffer gas stopping cell is utilized. In an investigation of neutron-deficient nuclides in the terbium-to-thulium region around A {approx_equal} 146, 18 new or improved mass values have been obtained, resulting in a more accurate determination of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium. With the present performance of SHIPTRAP, a first direct mass measurement of transuranium elements in the nobelium region is within reach.

  3. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  4. The atmospheric charged kaon/pion ratio using seasonal variation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grashorn, E. W.; de Jong, J. K.; Goodman, M. C.; Habig, A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mufson, S.; Osprey, S.; Schreiner, P.

    2010-04-01

    Observed since the 1950s, the seasonal effect on underground muons is a well studied phenomenon. The interaction height of incident cosmic rays changes as the temperature of the atmosphere changes, which affects the production height of mesons (mostly pions and kaons). The decay of these mesons produces muons that can be detected underground. The production of muons is dominated by pion decay, and previous work did not include the effect of kaons. In this work, the methods of Barrett and MACRO are extended to include the effect of kaons. These efforts give rise to a new method to measure the atmospheric K/π ratio at energies beyond the reach of current fixed target experiments. These methods were applied to data from the MINOS far detector. A method is developed for making these measurements at other underground detectors, including OPERA, Super-K, IceCube, Baksan and the MINOS near detector.

  5. Kaon to Two Pions decays from Lattice QCD: Delta I = 1/2 rule and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi

    We report a direct lattice calculation of the K to pipi decay matrix elements for both the DeltaI=1/2 and 3/2 amplitudes A0 and A2 on a 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion, 163x32x16 lattice ensemble and a 243x64x16 lattice ensemble. This is a complete calculation in which all contractions for the required ten, four-quark operators are evaluated, including the disconnected graphs in which no quark line connects the initial kaon and final two-pion states. These lattice operators are non-perturbatively renormalized using the Rome-Southampton method and the quadratic divergences are studied and removed. This is an important but notoriously difficult calculation, requiring high statistics on a large volume. In this work we take a major step towards the computation of the physicalK→pipi amplitudes by performing a complete calculation at unphysical kinematics with pions of mass 422 MeV and 329 MeV at rest in the kaon rest frame. With this simplification we are able to resolve Re(A0) from zero for the first time, with a 25% statistical error on the 163 lattice and 15% on the 243 lattice. The complex amplitude A2 is calculated with small statistical errors. We obtain the DeltaI=1/2 rule with an enhancement factor of 9.1(21) and 12.0(17) on these two ensembles. From the detailed analysis of the results we gain a deeper understanding of the origin of the DeltaI=1/2 rule. We also calculate the complex amplitude A0, a calculation central to understanding and testing the standard model of CP violation in the kaon system. The final result for the measure of direct CP violation, epsilon', calculated at unphysical kinematics has an order of 100% statistical error, so this only serves as an order of magnitude check.

  6. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  7. Top quark mass measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    We present recent measurements of the mass of the top quark performed at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These measurements use the full Run II data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 9.3 fb$^{-1}$. We also report the first world combination of the measurements from the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron experiments resulting in a top mass of 173.34 {\\pm} 0.76 GeV with a relative precision of 0.44\\%.

  8. Gas measurement using Coriolis mass flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlas, G.; Patten, T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper demonstrates Coriolis mass flowmeters (CMF) can provide a solution for measuring the mass flowrate of gases directly, i.e. no knowledge of the gas properties is required. The test results for natural gas and compressed air presented here were obtained using a standard factory water calibration. This demonstrates properly designed CMF and linear devices and can provide accurate results independent of gas composition over wide pressure and mass flowrate ranges.

  9. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blusk, Steven R.

    1998-05-01

    The first evidence and subsequent discovery of the top quark was reported nearly 4 years ago. Since then, CDF and D0 have analyzed their full Run 1 data samples, and analysis techniques have been refined to make optimal use of the information. In this paper, we report on the most recent measurements of the top quark mass, performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. The CDF collaboration has performed measurements of the top quark mass in three decay channels from which the top quark mass is measured to be 175.5 {+-} 6.9 GeV=c{sup 2}. The D0 collaboration combines measurements from two decay channels to obtain a top quark mass of 172.1 {+-} 7.1 GeV/c{sup 2}. Combining the measurements from the two experiments, assuming a 2 GeV GeV/c{sup 2} correlated systematic uncertainty, the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron is 173.9 {+-} 5.2 GeV/c{sup 2}. This report presents the measurements of the top quark mass from each of the decay channels which contribute to this measurement.

  11. Neutral kaon femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at √ sNN = 2.76 TeV at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinpreis, Matthew

    Femtoscopy is an experimental method used to study the spatio-temporal characteristics of the particle-emitting "sources" of ultra-relativistic particle collisions. This method allows us to measure the size, shape, and lifetime of the kinetic freeze-out region of the particles created in the collisions as they are emitted from the expanding system. Studying these source regions allows us to investigate the dynamics of the system as it evolves from the hot, dense state of matter known as the Quark-Gluon Plasma into a dilute, free-streaming hadronic gas. The analysis of the extracted femtoscopic radii and their dependences on event centrality, momentum, and particle species can help put constaints on unknown quantities used in theoretical models such as time-scales and particle-particle scattering parameters. The femtoscopic tool is the two-particle relative momentum correlation function, which connects the final-state momentum distributions measured by the detector to the spacetime distributions of particle emission, which are on the order of 10--15 m, or femtometers, and cannot be directly measured. These correlations are sensitive to the quantum statistics of identical particles as well as the strong and/or Coulomb interactions between particles. Neutral kaon femtoscopy acts as an excellent complement to similar analyses of other particle species. Kaon analyses are generally able to reach higher values of transverse momentum (KT) and transverse mass (MT = √ K2 T + m2) than the more commonly studied pion analyses. The comparison of kaon radii with those of pions and protons allows us to check for universal MT-scaling, which is predicted by some hydrodynamic models. The study of neutral kaons also acts as a convenient consistency check for the charged kaon analysis, as both analyses are expected to produce similar results while employing significantly different analysis methods, e.g. directly measured tracks vs. decay vertex reconstruction and Coulomb-dominated vs

  12. Apparatus to measure relativistic mass increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetzelschwab, John W.

    2003-09-01

    An apparatus that uses readily available material to measure the relativistic mass increase of beta particles from a radioactive 204Tl source is described. Although the most accurate analysis uses curve fitting or a Kurie plot, students may just use the raw data and a simple calculation to verify the relativistic mass increase.

  13. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGES

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themore » difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.« less

  14. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  15. SLAMMD (Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-05

    ISS029-E-017480 (5 Oct. 2011) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer, uses the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  16. SLAMMD (Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-05

    ISS029-E-017474 (5 Oct. 2011) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer, prepares to use the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  17. Pentaquark, cusp and rescattering in single kaon photoproduction off deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Laget

    2006-02-28

    In very well defined part of the phase space, K N and {Lambda} N rescattering depend on on-shell elementary matrix elements and on the low momentum components of the deuteron wave function. This provides us with the unique opportunity to study details in the scattering amplitudes that may have escaped the analysis of reactions induced on a nucleon target by Kaon and Hyperon beams at low energies. When folded with a typical experimental mass resolution, a narrow state with a width of 1 {approx} MeV would contribute by no more than 10% to the KN mass spectrum. On the contrary, a cusp would be easily detected near the {Sigma} production threshold in the {Lambda} N mass spectrum.

  18. Inclusive production of charged pions, kaons and protons in υ(4 S) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1993-06-01

    Using the detector ARGUS at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, we have investigated inclusive momentum spectra of charged pions, kaons, and protons from decays of the υ(4S) meson. The kaon spectra have been measured in two independent ways, by coherently exploiting the detector's particle identification capabilities, and by detecting decays in-flight. The extracted mean multiplicities for charged hadrons are 7.17±0.05±0.14 pions, 1.56±0.03±0.05 kaons and 0.110±0.010±0.007 protons per υ(4 S) decay, where pions and protons from K {/s o } and Δ decays have been subtracted.

  19. Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Kluge, H.-J.

    2010-06-15

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a {sup 48}Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

  20. Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Eliseev, S.; Fleckenstein, T.; Haettner, E.; Herfurth, F.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Mazzocco, M.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Plaß, W. R.; Popeko, A.; Rahaman, S.; Rodríguez, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Thirolf, P. G.; Vorobyev, G. K.; Wang, M.; Weber, C.

    2010-06-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes No252-254 were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a Ca48 beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

  1. MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Serra, Ana Laura E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: serra@to.infn.it

    2013-02-10

    Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

  2. The quantum CP-violating kaon system reproduced in the electronic laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, M.; Fanchiotti, H.; García Canal, C. A.; Mayosky, M.; Veiga, A.

    2016-11-01

    The equivalence between the Schrödinger dynamics of a quantum system with a finite number of basis states and a classical dynamics is realized in terms of electric networks. The isomorphism that connects in a univocal way both dynamical systems was applied to the case of neutral mesons, kaons in particular, and the class of electric networks univocally related to the quantum system was analysed. Moreover, under CPT invariance, the relevant ɛ parameter that measures CP violation in the kaon system is reinterpreted in terms of network parameters. All these results were explicitly shown by means of both a numerical simulation of the implied networks and by constructing the corresponding circuits.

  3. The transverse momentum dependence of charged kaon Bose–Einstein correlations in the SELEX experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Nigmatkulov, G. A.; et al.

    2015-12-18

    We report the measurement of the one-dimensional charged kaon correlation functions using 600 GeV/c Σ–, π– and 540 GeV/Cρ beams from the SELEX (E781) experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. K±K± correlation functions are studied for three transverse pair momentum, kT, ranges and parameterized by a Gaussian form. The emission source radii, R, and the correlation strength, λ, are extracted. Furthermore, the analysis shows a decrease of the source radii with increasing kaon transverse pair momentum for all beam types.

  4. Investigating young children's learning of mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea; Ferguson, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports results of a design experiment regarding young children's concepts of mass measurement. The research built on an earlier study in which a framework of "growth points" in early mathematics learning and a related, task-based, one-to-one interview to assess children's understanding of the measurement of mass were developed. Prompted by the results and recommendations from the earlier study, five lessons were developed that offered rich learning experiences regarding concepts of mass. The 119 Year 1 and 2 children participating in the study were interviewed using the same protocol before and after the teaching period. The assessment data showed that the majority of these children moved from using nonstandard units to using standard units and instruments for measuring mass. The findings from this study challenge the traditional approach of using informal units for an extended period before the introduction of standard units.

  5. PLANS FOR KAON PHYSICS AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    REDLINGER,G.

    2004-06-05

    The author gives an overview of current plans for kaon physics at BNL. The program is centered around the rare decay modes K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} and K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  6. CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1997-05-01

    A brief review of the theoretical status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is presented. We focus on three important topics: {epsilon}, {epsilon}`/{epsilon} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{anti {nu}}.

  7. CP violation and kaon-pion interactions in B {r_arrow} K {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bennich, B.; Furman, A.; Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Loiseau, B.; Moussallam, B.; Physics; Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie; ul. Bronowicka; Polish Academy of Sciences; Univ. Paris-Sud

    2009-01-01

    We study CP violation and the contribution of the strong kaon-pion interactions in the three-body B {yields} Kpi{sup +}pi{sup -} decays. We extend our recent work on the effect of the two-pion S- and P-wave interactions to that of the corresponding kaon-pion ones. The weak amplitudes have a first term derived in QCD factorization and a second one as a phenomenological contribution added to the QCD penguin amplitudes. The effective QCD coefficients include the leading order contributions plus next-to-leading order vertex and penguins corrections. The matrix elements of the transition to the vacuum of the kaon-pion pairs, appearing naturally in the factorization formulation, are described by the strange Kpi scalar (S-wave) and vector (P-wave) form factors. These are determined from Muskhelishvili-Omnes coupled channel equations using experimental kaon-pion T-matrix elements, together with chiral symmetry and asymptotic QCD constraints. From the scalar form factor study, the modulus of the K*{sub 0}(1430) decay constant is found to be (32 {+-} 5) MeV. The additional phenomenological amplitudes are fitted to reproduce the Kpi effective mass and helicity angle distributions, the B {yields} K*(892)pi branching ratios and the CP asymmetries of the recent data from Belle and BABAR collaborations. We use also the new measurement by the BABAR group of the phase difference between the B{sup 0} and [overline B]{sup 0} decay amplitudes to K*(892)pi. Our predicted B{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sub 0}(1430)pi{sup {+-}}, K*{sub 0}(1430) {yields} K{sup {+-}}pi{sup {-+}} branching fraction, equal to (11.6 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6}, is smaller than the result of the analyzes of both collaborations. For the neutral B{sup 0} decays, the predicted value is (11.1 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. In order to reduce the large systematic uncertainties in the experimental determination of the B {yields} K*{sub 0}(1430)pi branching fractions, a new parametrization is proposed. It is based on the Kpi scalar

  8. CP violation and kaon-pion interactions in B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bennich, B.; Furman, A.; Loiseau, B.; Moussallam, B.

    2009-05-01

    We study CP violation and the contribution of the strong kaon-pion interactions in the three-body B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. We extend our recent work on the effect of the two-pion S- and P-wave interactions to that of the corresponding kaon-pion ones. The weak amplitudes have a first term derived in QCD factorization and a second one as a phenomenological contribution added to the QCD penguin amplitudes. The effective QCD coefficients include the leading order contributions plus next-to-leading order vertex and penguins corrections. The matrix elements of the transition to the vacuum of the kaon-pion pairs, appearing naturally in the factorization formulation, are described by the strange K{pi} scalar (S-wave) and vector (P-wave) form factors. These are determined from Muskhelishvili-Omnes coupled channel equations using experimental kaon-pion T-matrix elements, together with chiral symmetry and asymptotic QCD constraints. From the scalar form factor study, the modulus of the K{sub 0}*(1430) decay constant is found to be (32{+-}5) MeV. The additional phenomenological amplitudes are fitted to reproduce the K{pi} effective mass and helicity angle distributions, the B{yields}K*(892){pi} branching ratios and the CP asymmetries of the recent data from Belle and BABAR collaborations. We use also the new measurement by the BABAR group of the phase difference between the B{sup 0} and B{sup 0} decay amplitudes to K*(892){pi}. Our predicted B{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sub 0}*(1430){pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sub 0}*(1430){yields}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} branching fraction, equal to (11.6{+-}0.6)x10{sup -6}, is smaller than the result of the analyzes of both collaborations. For the neutral B{sup 0} decays, the predicted value is (11.1{+-}0.5)x10{sup -6}. In order to reduce the large systematic uncertainties in the experimental determination of the B{yields}K{sub 0}{sup *}(1430){pi} branching fractions, a new parametrization is proposed. It is based on the K{pi} scalar form

  9. Mass Measurements for the rp Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankainen, Anu; Canete, Laetitia; Eronen, Tommi; Gorelov, Dmitry; Hakala, Jani; Jokinen, Ari; Kolhinen, Veli S.; Koponen, Jukka; Moore, Iain D.; Nesterenko, Dimitrii; Reinikainen, Juuso; Rinta-Antila, Sami; Äystö, Juha

    One of the key parameters for the reaction network calculations for the rapid proton capture (rp) process, occurring e.g., in type I X-ray bursts, are the masses of the involved nuclei. Nowadays, masses of even rather exotic nuclei can be measured very precisely employing Penning-trap mass spectrometry. With the JYFLTRAP Penning trap at the IGISOL facility, masses of around 100 neutron-deficient nuclei have been determined with a typical precision of a few keV. Most recently, 25Al, 30P, 31Cl, and 52Co have been measured. Of these, the precision of the mass-excess value of 31Cl was improved from 50 to 3.4 keV, and the mass of 52Co was experimentally determined for the first time. The mass of 31Cl is relevant for estimating the waiting-point conditions for 30S as the 31Cl(γ, p)30S-30S(p, γ)31Cl equilibrium ratio depends exponentially on the Q value. For 52Co, located at the path towards 56Ni, a deviation from the extrapolated mass value has been revealed. In this contribution, recent JYFLTRAP experiments for the rp process will be discussed.

  10. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  11. Mass Measurement with Rare-RI Rin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Mass measurement with Rare-RI Ring in RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) will be presented. The main purpose of Rare-RI Ring is to measure the mass for very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rate of which is very small (rare RI) and the life-time of which is predicted to be very short (less than 10 ms). In Rare-RI Ring, mass measurements will be performed based on isochronous mass spectrometry. There are two innovative apparatus in Rare-RI Ring: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RI one-by-one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances (~1%). By these apparatus, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RI, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA in RIBF. Construction of Rare-RI Ring has started from the 2012 fiscal year. Construction of the storage ring itself was almost completed. In this fiscal year, we succeeded to store alphas from 241Am source and to check the production of isochronous fields in the storage ring. In this talk, present status of Rare-RI Ring and the possible mass measurement there will be presented.

  12. Uncertainty assessment of Si molar mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Valkiers, S.; Willenberg, G.-D.

    2010-01-01

    The uncertainty of the Si molar mass measurement is theoretically investigated by means of a two-isotope model, with particular emphasis to the role of this measurement in the determination of the Avogadro constant. This model allows an explicit calibration formula to be given and propagation of error analysis to be made. It also shows that calibration cannot correct for non-linearity.

  13. Mass-spectrometric measurements for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The need of an on-site inspection device to provide isotopic ratio measurements led to the development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer mounted in a van. This mobile laboratory has the ability, through the use of the resin bead technique, to acquire, prepare, and analyze samples of interest to nuclear safeguards. Precision of the measurements is about 1 to 2%.

  14. Satellite measurements of aerosol mass and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, R. S.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Mahoney, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The aerosol optical thickness over land is derived from satellite measurements of the radiance of scattered sunlight. These data are used to estimate the columnar mass density of particulate sulfur on a day with a large amount of sulfur. The horizontal transport of the particulate sulfur is calculated using wind vectors measured with rawins.

  15. The 'horn' in the kaon-to-pion ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jajati K.; Banik, Sarmistha; Alam, Jan-e

    2010-08-15

    A microscopic approach has been employed to study the kaon productions in heavy-ion collisions. The momentum-integrated Boltzmann equation has been used to study the evolution of strangeness in the system formed in heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. The kaon productions have been calculated for different center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s{sub NN})) ranging from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results have been compared with available experimental data. We obtain a nonmonotonic hornlike structure for K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} when plotted with {radical}(s{sub NN}) with the assumption of an initial partonic phase beyond a certain threshold in {radical}(s{sub NN}). However, a monotonic rise of K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} is observed when a hadronic initial state is assumed for all {radical}(s{sub NN}). Experimental values of K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} are also reproduced within the ambit of the same formalism. Results from scenarios where the strange quarks and hadrons are formed in equilibrium and evolve with and without secondary productions have also been presented.

  16. Penning trap mass measurement of 72Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, A. A.; Bollen, G.; Cooper, K.; Eibach, M.; Gulyuz, K.; Izzo, C.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) Penning trap mass spectrometer was used to perform an improved-precision mass measurement of 72Br and the low-lying isomeric state, Brm72, giving mass excesses of -59 062.2 (1.0 )keV and -58 960.9 (1.2 )keV , respectively. These values are consistent with the values from the 2012 atomic mass evaluation [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012), 10.1088/1674-1137/36/12/003] and the Nubase2012 evaluation of nuclear properties [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1157 (2012), 10.1088/1674-1137/36/12/001]. The uncertainties on the mass of the ground state and isomeric state have been reduced by a factor of seven.

  17. Leptonic and charged kaon decay modes of the phi meson measured in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN super proton synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Adamová, D; Agakichiev, G; Antończyk, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Bielcíková, J; Braun-Munzinger, P; Busch, O; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Z; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Krobath, G; Kushpil, V; Ludolphs, W; Maas, A; Marín, A; Milosević, J; Miśkowiec, D; Ortega, R; Panebrattsev, Y; Petchenova, O; Petrácek, V; Radomski, S; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Sako, H; Schmitz, W; Schukraft, J; Sedykh, S; Shimansky, S; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, I; Tsiledakis, G; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Wurm, J P; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2006-04-21

    We report on results of a measurement of meson production in central Pb-Au collisions at E(lab) = 158A GeV. For the first time in the history of high energy heavy-ion collisions, phi mesons were reconstructed both in the K+K- and the dilepton decay channels in the same experiment. This measurement yields rapidity densities near midrapidity, from the two decay channels, of 2.05 +/- 0.14(stat) +/- 0.25(syst) and 2.04 +/- 0.49(stat) +/- 0.32(syst), respectively. The shape of the measured transverse momentum spectrum is also in close agreement in both decay channels. The data rule out a possible enhancement of the phi yield in the leptonic over the hadronic decay channel of a factor 1.6 or larger at the 95% C.L. This rules out the discrepancy reported in the literature between measurements of the hadronic and dimuon decay channels by two different experiments.

  18. Measurement of the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-11-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass using data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron during 1994-1995. We identify W bosons by their decays to eν final states. We extract the W mass MW by fitting the transverse mass and transverse electron momentum spectra from a sample of 28 323 W-->eν decay candidates. We use a sample of 3563 dielectron events, mostly due to Z-->ee decays, to constrain our model of the detector response. From the transverse mass fit we measure MW=80.44+/-0.10(stat)+/-0.07(syst) GeV. Combining this with our previously published result from data taken in 1992-1993, we obtain MW=80.43+/-0.11 GeV.

  19. Electroproduction of kaons and light hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed investigation of the basic hyperon-nucleon interactions in nuclei is one of the aims of Experiment 91-016, approved with high priority at CEBAF, to study the electroproduction of kaons on targets of deuterium, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He. Inasmuch as both the electron and K{sup +} are particles that interact relatively weakly with nucleons, electroproduction of light hypernuclei provides a low-distortion method for investigating the fundamental interactions between nucleons, {Alpha}`s, and {Epsilon}`s in few-body systems. In particular, the (e,e`K{sup +}) reactions on cryogenic targets of D, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He will be studied at incident electron energies near 3 GeV with coincident detection of the emergent e and K{sup +} in the HMS and SOS magnetic spectrometers in Hall C. Construction of the He target, operating at {approximately}10 atm, {approximately}50 K and capable of dissipating {approximately}30 W, is expected to be complete prior to commencement of production runs in Hall C. The first data runs for E91-016, expected to begin late in FY 1995, will also be the basis for a doctoral thesis at Hampton University. In addition to providing new information on the phases of hyperon-nucleon interactions, measurements of cross sections for hypernuclear formation, and interference phenomena, the data may provide evidence for the presence of bound {Epsilon}`s and strange di-baryonic states that are the subject of considerable theoretical discussion.

  20. Measurement of the W boson mass.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-10-02

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in W-->e(nu) decays using 1 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W-->e(nu) candidate events, we measure M(W)=80.401+/-0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  1. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  2. Possibility of studying. nu. /sub e/ and anti. nu. /sub e/ interactions at a Kaon Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1981-03-01

    The possibility of observing ..nu../sub e/- and anti ..nu../sub e/-induced reactions at a high-flux Kaon Factory is discussed. A recently suggested neutrino beam derived from K/sub L//sup 0/ decays is the enriched source of ..nu../sub e/ and anti ..nu../sub e/. Some specific measurements which are feasible are described.

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limon, P.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Patrick, J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; DellAgnello, S.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; and others

    1998-03-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using a sample of t{bar t} decays into an electron or a muon, a neutrino, and four jets. The data were collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup {minus}1} . We measure the top quark mass to be 175.9{plus_minus}4.8(stat){plus_minus}4.9( syst) GeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Analysis of the consistency of kaon photoproduction data with Λ in the final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydžovský, P.; Mart, T.

    2007-12-01

    The recent CLAS 2005, SAPHIR 2003, LEPS, and the old, pre-1972, data on K+Λ photoproduction are compared with theoretical calculations in the energy region of Eγlab<2.6 GeV in order to learn about their mutual consistency. The isobaric models Kaon-Maid and Saclay-Lyon, along with new fits to the CLAS data, are utilized in this analysis. The SAPHIR 2003 data are shown to be coherently shifted down with respect to the CLAS, LEPS, and pre-1972 data, especially at forward kaon angles. The CLAS, LEPS, and pre-1972 data in the forward hemisphere can be described satisfactorily by using the isobaric model without hadronic form factors. The inclusion of the hadronic form factors yields a strong suppression of the cross sections at small kaon angles and c.m. energies larger than 1.9 GeV, which is not observed in the existing experimental data. We demonstrate that the discrepancy between the CLAS and SAPHIR data has a significant impact on the predicted values of the mass and width of the “missing resonance” D13(1895) in the Kaon-Maid model.

  5. Kaon Condensation and Lambda-Nucleon Loop in the Relativistic Mean-Field Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoyuki Maruyama; Takumi Muto; Toshitaka Tatsumi; Kazuo Tsushima; Anthony W. Thomas

    2005-02-24

    The possibility of kaon condensation in high-density symmetric nuclear matter is investigated including both s- and p-wave kaon-baryon interactions within the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory. Above a certain density, we have a collective K{sub s} state carrying the same quantum numbers as the antikaon. The appearance of the K{sub s} state is caused by the time component of the axial-vector interaction between kaons and baryons. It is shown that the system becomes unstable with respect to condensation of K-Kbar{sub s} pairs. We consider how the effective baryon masses affect the kaon self-energy coming from the time component of the axial-vector interaction. Also, the role of the spatial component of the axial-vector interaction on the possible existence of the collective kaonic states is discussed in connection with Lambda-mixing effects in the ground state of high-density matter. Implications of K-Kbar{sub s} condensation for high-energy heavy-ion collisions are briefly mentioned.

  6. A measurement of the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Richard John

    1999-11-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass is presented using data taken by the ALEPH detector during the 1997 running of the Large Electron-Positron Collider II (LEPII) at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland. A high efficiency, high purity analysis which selects and reconstructs semi-leptonic W+W- final states (W +W- --> jjlν) is employed to define the sample. To improve the mass resolution of the detector, a constrained kinematic fit is developed to impose four- momentum conservation on each selected event. An unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the constrained two dimensional WW mass distribution is then constructed to extract the W pole mass. With 56.84 pb-1 of data taken by the ALEPH detector near a center of mass energy of s = 183 GeV, the W boson is measured to have a mass of MW=80.20+/-0.19( stat)+/-0.06 (syst)GeV consistent with predictions from the Standard Model.

  7. Measurement of CP Violation in B Anti-B Mixing on the Recoil of Partially Reconstructed Anti-B0 to D* L- Anti-Nu/L Using Kaon Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Gaz, Alessandro

    2011-11-16

    of reach of current experiments, but several New Physics models contain new particles and couplings which can enhance it up to detectable levels. In this thesis we search for CP-violation in Bd - $\\bar{B}$d mixing at the BABAR experiment. We reconstruct one of the two B mesons produced at the PEP-II electromagnetic collider using the partial reconstruction technique, while the flavor of the other B is inferred by the charge of a kaon identified among its decay products. Given the smallness of the physical asymmetry we want to measure, a crucial aspect of this analysis is the control of spurious charge asymmetries arising from the interaction of particles with the detector material. We accomplish this by using a control sample of charged kaons on the same data we use in our analysis. After a brief introduction of the theoretical framework and the phenomenology of the decays of B mesons at a B-factory (chapters 1 and 2), we will review in chapter 3 the current experimental results on this topic. We will then describe the characteristics of the collider and the experimental apparatus (chapter 4) used to perform our measurement. The available dataset and the event pre-selection techniques are treated in chapter 5, while the analysis method is discussed in detail in the following one. In chapters 7 and 8 the definitions of the probability density functions used to model each component of our sample are given and then they are tested in samples of simulated data. Toy and reweighted Monte Carlo data are used in chapter 9 to test the sensitivity of our fitting procedure to the physical parameters related to CP violation; chapter 10 discusses the possibility of modeling some of the components of our sample directly on the data. Finally the fit on the real data sample is described in chapter 11 and the treatment of systematic uncertainties is done in chapter 12, while the final result is given in chapter 13.

  8. Microbalance accurately measures extremely small masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.

    1970-01-01

    Oscillating fiber microbalance has a vibrating quartz fiber as balance arm to hold the mass to be weighed. Increasing fiber weight decreases its resonant frequency. Scaler and timer measure magnitude of the shift. This instrument withstands considerable physical abuse and has calibration stability at normal room temperatures.

  9. Testing Young Children's Ideas of Mass Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an innovative use of photographs in a pencil-and-paper test which was developed to assess young children's understanding of mass measurement. Two hundred and ninety-five tests were administered by thirteen teachers of Years 1 and 2 children in 3 urban and rural schools. Many of these children of 6-8 years of age were able to…

  10. Body Mass Index Measurement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihiser, Allison J.; Lee, Sarah M.; Wechsler, Howell; McKenna, Mary; Odom, Erica; Reinold, Chris; Thompson, Diane; Grummer-Strawn, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Background: School-based body mass index (BMI) measurement has attracted much attention across the nation from researchers, school officials, legislators, and the media as a potential approach to address obesity among youth. Methods: An expert panel, convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2005, reviewed and provided…

  11. Body Mass Index Measurement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihiser, Allison J.; Lee, Sarah M.; Wechsler, Howell; McKenna, Mary; Odom, Erica; Reinold, Chris; Thompson, Diane; Grummer-Strawn, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Background: School-based body mass index (BMI) measurement has attracted much attention across the nation from researchers, school officials, legislators, and the media as a potential approach to address obesity among youth. Methods: An expert panel, convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2005, reviewed and provided…

  12. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the KΛN vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  13. Induced polarization of Λ (1116) in kaon electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielyan, M.; Raue, B. A.; Carman, D. S.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Baturin, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have measured. the induced polarization of the Λ(1116) in the reaction ep →e'K+Λ, detecting the scattered e' and K+ in the final state along with the proton from the decay Λ →pπ-. The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy W (1.6≤W≤2.7 GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer Q2=1.90GeV2. In this experiment a 5.50-GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the W and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially Q2 independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the Q2 covered here there must be a strong Q2 dependence. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables, these data are needed for the development of models, such as effective field theories, and as input to coupled-channel analyses that can provide evidence of previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  14. Kaons, hyperphotons, and the fifth force

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.H.; Cheng, Hai Yang; Fischbach, E.; Sudarsky, D.; Talmadge, C.; Trampetic, J.

    1988-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the status of recent experiments looking for the fifth force in ordinary matter, we discuss two classes of experiments sensitive to the presence of a coupling of kaons to the fifth force. These are attempts to detect hyperphotons (..gamma../sub Y/) in the decay K/sub L/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..gamma../sub Y/, and searches for an energy-dependence of the K/sup 0/ - /bar K/sup 0// parameters. 29 refs.

  15. Nonsinglet kaon fragmentation function from e{sup +}e{sup -} kaon production

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, Simon; Christova, Ekaterina

    2010-05-01

    We perform fits to the available charged and neutral kaon-production data in e{sup +}+e{sup -{yields}}K+X, K=K{sup {+-},} and K{sub S}{sup 0}, and determine the nonsinglet combination of kaon fragmentation functions D{sub u}{sup K{+-}-}D{sub d}{sup K{+-}}in a model independent way and without any correlations to the other fragmentation functions. Only nuclear isospin invariance is assumed. Working with nonsinglets allows us to include the data at very low momentum fractions, which have so far been excluded in global fits, and to perform a first next-next-to leading order fit to fragmentation functions. We find that the kaon nonsinglet fragmentation function at large z is larger than that obtained by the other collaborations from global fit analysis and differs significantly at low z.

  16. A measurement of the tau mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II storage ring, a new measurement of the mass of the τ lepton has been obtained. An analysis of the tau pseudomass spectrum for decays of the type τ- → π-π-π+ντ finds mτ = 1776.3±2.4±1.4 MeV/ c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the ντ mass to mντ < 31 MeV/ c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  17. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Ratio of Pion Kaon Production in Proton Carbon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Andrey V.

    2007-05-01

    The ratio of pion-kaon production by 120 GeV/c protons incident on carbon target is presented. The data was recorded with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Production ratios of K++, K--, K-/K+, and π-+ are measured in 24 bins in longitudinal momentum from 20 to 90 GeV/c and transverse momentum up to 2 GeV/c. The measurement is compared to existing data sets, particle production Monte Carlo results from FLUKA-06, parametrization of proton-beryllium data at 400/450 GeV/c, and ratios measured by the MINOS experiment on the NuMI target.

  19. Direct Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nes̆iĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pus̆eljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-08-01

    We measure the top quark mass mt using tt¯ pairs produced in the D0 detector by s = 1.8 TeVpp¯ collisions in a 125 pb-1 exposure at the Fermilab Tevatron. We make a two constraint fit to mt in tt¯-->bW+b¯W- final states with one W decaying to qq¯ and the other to eν or μν. Events are binned in fit mass versus a measure of probability for events to be signal rather than background. Likelihood fits to the data yield mt = 173.3+/-5.6\\(stat\\)+/-6.2\\(syst\\) GeV/c2.

  20. Measuring neutrino masses with weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2006-11-17

    Weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies by large scale structure (LSS) provides an unbiased way to map the matter distribution in the low redshift universe. This technique, based on the measurement of small distortions in the images of the source galaxies induced by the intervening LSS, is expected to become a key cosmological probe in the future. We discuss how future lensing surveys can probe the sum of the neutrino masses at the 0 05 eV level.

  1. Measurement of the W boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, A.V.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-11-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the {ital W} boson mass using data collected by the D{null} experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron during the 1994-1995 collider run 1b. We use {ital W} {r_arrow} {ital e}{nu} decays to extract the {ital W} mass from the observed spectrum of transverse mass of the electron ({vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {lt} 1. 2) and the inferred neutrino We use {ital Z}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {ital ee} decays to constrain our model of the detector response. We measure {ital m}{sub W}/{ital m}{sub Z} = 0.8815 {+-} 0.0011({ital stat}) {+-} 0.0014({ital syst}) and {ital m}{sub W} = 80.38 {+-} 0.07 ({ital W stat}) {+-} 0.13({ital syst}) GeV. Combining this result with our previous measurement from the 1992-1993 data, we obtain {ital m}{sub W} = 80.37 {+-} 0.15 GeV (errors combined in quadrature).

  2. Continuous Measurement Of Mass Density Of Yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Johnston, John D.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype instrument provides measurement data from which one computes mass density of strand of yarn. Includes fixtures placing known length of yarn under known tension across fixed and movable support. Transverse vibrations induced in yarn by moving movable support up and down. Source of light illuminates photodetector at midlength of yarn, and photodetector senses repeated shadowing caused by vibration of yarn through light, thereby measuring vibrations. Also used for continuous real-time monitoring of such yarn-manufacturing processes as coating or impregnation.

  3. Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Measurements from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W.; Cravens, T.; Luhmann, J.; McNutt, R.; Ip, W.-H.; Gell, D.; Muller-Wordag, I. C. F.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) aboard the Cassini orbiter has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in its first flyby of Titan. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon s upper atmosphere do not appear to be changed since the Voyager flyby in 1979. However, the more sensitive techniques provided by modern in-situ mass spectrometry also give evidence for large-spatial-scale large-amplitude atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and for a plethora of stable carbon-nitrile compounds above 1174 km. Furthermore, they allow the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which provide interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The atmosphere was first accreted as ammonia and ammonia ices from the Saturn sub-nebula. Subsequent photochemistry likely converted the atmosphere into molecular nitrogen. The early atmosphere was 1.5 to 5 times more substantial and was lost via escape over the intervening 4.5 billion years due to the reduced gravity associated with the relatively small mass of Titan. Carbon in the form of methane has continued to outgas over time from the interior with much of it being deposited in the form of complex hydrocarbons on the surface and some of it also being lost to space.

  4. Antiproton-proton annihilation into collinear charged pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.; Amsler, C.; Armenteros, R.; Auld, E.; Axen, D.; Bailey, D.; Barlag, S.; Beer, G.; Bizot, J.h.; Botlo, M.; and others

    1986-10-15

    AN analysis is presented of two body final states of collinear charged pions or kaons from antiproton-proton annihilation at rest in the ASTERIX spectrometer at LEAR. The relative branching ratio of kaons to pions, which is sensitive to the dynamics of quark-antiquark annihilation and rearrangement, is shown to differ for P and S wave initial states.

  5. The production of neutral kaons in Z0 decays and their Bose-Einstein correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capdevielle, N.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fischer, P.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Jui, C.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwick, C.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Tousignant, O.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yeaman, A.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-09-01

    The production of neutral kaons in e+e- annihilation at centre-of-mass energies in the region of the Z0 mass and their Bose-Einstein correlations are investigated with the OPAL detector at LEP. A total of about 1.26×106 Z0 hadronic decay events are used in the analysis. The production rate of K0 mesons is found to be 1.99±0.01±0.04 per hadronic event, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Both the rate and the differential cross section for K0 production are compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo generators. This comparison indicates that the fragmentation is too soft in both Jetset and Herwig. Bose-Einstein correlations in K{s/0}K{s/0} pairs are measured through the quantity Q, the four momentum difference of the pair. A threshold enhancement is observed in K{s/0}K{s/0} pairs originating from a mixed sample ofK^0 bar K^0 and K0K0 (bar K^0 bar K^0) pairs. For the strength of the effect and for the radius of the emitting source we find values of λ=1.14±0.23±0.32 and R 0=(0.76±0.10±0.11) fm respectively. The first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  6. Measurement of neutrino masses from relative velocities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek; Yu, Yu

    2014-09-26

    We present a new technique to measure neutrino masses using their flow field relative to dark matter. Present day streaming motions of neutrinos relative to dark matter and baryons are several hundred km/s, comparable with their thermal velocity dispersion. This results in a unique dipole anisotropic distortion of the matter-neutrino cross power spectrum, which is observable through the dipole distortion in the cross correlation of different galaxy populations. Such a dipole vanishes if not for this relative velocity and so it is a clean signature for neutrino mass. We estimate the size of this effect and find that current and future galaxy surveys may be sensitive to these signature distortions.

  7. Synchronised Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, Eiko

    2010-05-01

    Up to twelve Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMSs) were operated simultaneously at rural and background stations (EMEP and EUSAAR sites) across Europe. Measurements took place during three intensive periods, in collaboration between the European EUCAARI IP and the EMEP monitoring activities under the UNECE Convention for Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) during three contrasting months (May 2008, Sep/Oct 2008, Feb/Mar 2009). These measurements were conducted, analysed and quality controlled carefully using a unified protocol, providing the largest spatial database of aerosol chemical composition measured with a unified online technique to date, and a unique snapshots of the European non-refractory submicron aerosol climatology. As campaign averages over all active monitoring sites, organics represent 28 to 43%, sulphate 18 to 25%, ammonium 13 to 15% and nitrate 15 to 36% of the resolved aerosol mass, with the highest relative nitrate contribution during the Feb/Mar campaign. The measurements demonstrate that in NW Europe (e.g. Ireland, UK, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland) the regional submicron aerosol tends to be neutralised and here nitrates make a major contribution to the aerosol mass. By contrast, periods with low nitrate and acidic aerosol were observed at sites in S and E Europe (e.g. Greece, Finland), presumably due to a combination of larger SO2 point sources in Easter Europe, smaller local NH3 sources and, in the case of Greece, higher temperatures. While at the more marine and remote sites (Ireland, Scotland, Finland) nitrate concentrations were dominated by episodic transport phenomena, at continental sites (Switzerland, Germany, Hungary) nitrate followed a clear diurnal cycle, reflecting the thermodynamic behaviour of ammonium nitrate. The datasets clearly shows spatially co-ordinated, large-scale pollution episodes of organics, sulphate and nitrate, the latter being most pronounced during the Feb/Mar campaign. At selected

  8. Small mass measurement instrument for measuring weight under weightless conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, R. F., Jr.

    1984-05-01

    A small mass measurement instrument (SMMI), developed for NASA experiments conducted in the near zero environment is described. The SMMI is based on the principle of an oscillating spring-mass system, for which a period of oscillation is a function of the system's mass. It has the capacity of weighing specimens in the weight range of below 1 g to over 10,000 g, with an accuracy of 0.05 percent. The instrument has a keyboard, liquid crystal display, and microprocessor, which provide capabilities for entering and deleting data, display of messages, prompts, and specimen weight values, memory, and self-calibration features. The SMMI is scheduled for use beginning with Spacelab 4. Included in the description are the SMMI block diagram, detailed descriptions of the principles involved in the construction of the assemblies of the instrument, and photographs of its various parts.

  9. Facilitating Precision Mass Measurements at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, Daniel; van Schelt, Jon; Savard, Guy; Segel, Ralph; Clark, Jason; Sharma, Kumar; Caldwell, Shane; Gang, Li; Sternberg, Matthew; Greene, John; Levand, Anthony; Zabransky, Bruce

    2011-10-01

    The Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (CPT) has begun a campaign of precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei produced via spontaneous fission of 252Cf as part of the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. As of the time of submission of this abstract, we have measured neutron rich isotopes of Cs, I, Te, Sb, and Sn. CARIBU is currently running with a 60 mCi source of 252Cf which will be upgraded to a 1 Ci source in the future. In order to make this campaign possible, several upgrades to the CARIBU and CPT system were required including a new Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion buncher to CARIBU's low energy beamline, cryogenic cooling of the RFQ Paul trap below the CPT, and an electrostatic elevator to allow for transport of ion bunches from a 50 kV platform to the CPT system's 2 kV beamline. Construction and commissioning of the buncher and modified Paul Trap will be discussed as well as their impact on the measurements in this campaign. Support from U.S. DOE, Nucl Phys Div and NSERC Canada.

  10. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  11. Aerosol mass spectrometer measurements of organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, D.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Boudries, H.; Onasch, T.; Jimenez, J.; Slowik, J.; Coe, H.

    2003-12-01

    Organic species are known to be ubiquitous and comprise a significant component of ambient aerosols. Identifying the sources, chemical compositions, and loadings of particulate organics remains a difficult, yet important problem as organic components may affect the formation, hygroscopicity, growth, reactivity, and radiative effects of ambient particles. Unraveling this complexity inherently must rely on chemical information (such as off-line filter analyses and collector/concentrator techniques), but also on real-time instruments that are capable of combining particle physical measurements (size, density) with chemical speciation information. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) has been deployed on many different measurement platforms around the world and is generating a rich data set capable of providing insight into the complexity of particulate organics. Highlights of the aerosol measurements will be presented. Although the AMS cannot uniquely classify individual organic compounds, it has been become evident that classes of organic compounds can be identified. These include the identification of a size-resolved chemical signature for fresh diesel and gasoline particulate emissions. Electron impact ionization mass spectral signatures of oxidized organic components and the temporal and spatial relationships between the signatures for fresh organic emissions and aged/oxidized organic components. Laboratory studies on soot and other organic aerosols will also be presented within this context.

  12. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  13. Kaon condensation and multi-strange matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2010-04-01

    We report on dynamical calculations of multi- K¯ hypernuclei, which were performed by adding K¯ mesons to particle-stable configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. The K¯ separation energy as well as the baryonic densities saturate with the number of antikaons. We demonstrate that the saturation is a robust feature of multi- K¯ hypernuclei. Because the K¯ separation energy B does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in finite strong-interaction self-bound {N,Λ,Ξ} strange hadronic systems.

  14. Resonance effects in pion and kaon decay constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Hui; Sanz-Cillero, Juan José

    2014-05-01

    In this article we study the impact of the lightest vector and scalar resonance multiplets in the pion and kaon decay constants up to next-to-leading order in the 1/NC expansion, i.e., up to the one-loop level. The Fπ and FK predictions obtained within the framework of resonance chiral theory are confronted with lattice simulation data. The vector loops (and the ρ-ππ coupling GV in particular) are found to play a crucial role in the determination of the chiral perturbation theory couplings L4 and L5 at next-to-leading order in 1/NC. Puzzling, values of GV≲40 MeV seem to be necessary to agree with current phenomenological results for L4 and L5. Conversely, a value of GV≳60 MeV compatible with standard ρ -ππ determinations turns these chiral couplings negative. However, in spite of the strong anti-correlation with L4, the SU(3) chiral coupling F0 remains stable all the time and stays within the range 78˜86 MeV when GV is varied in a wide range, from 40 up to 70 MeV. Finally, we would like to remark that the leading order expressions used in this article for the η-η' mixing, mass splitting of the vector multiplet masses and the quark mass dependence of the ρ(770) mass are found in reasonable agreement with the lattice data.

  15. To quark mass measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Florencia Canelli

    2003-10-15

    We present two new measurements of the top-quark mass. Using the same methodology applied in Run I, the CDF experiment uses 72 pb{sup -1} of Run II data to measure M{sub top} = 171.2 {+-} 13.4{sub stat} {+-} 99{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}. On the other hand, the D0 experiment, using 125 pb{sup -1} from Run I, and applying a new method that extracts information from data through a direct calculation of a probability for each event, obtains M{sub top} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6{sub stat} {+-} 4.0{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Exoplanets mass measurement using gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, Clement; Cassan, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered so far, and after the pioneer era, when the discovery of a single planet was a notable event, the interest is moving to the more complex work of planet and planetary system taxonomy, trying to put some order and eventually understand why they are so different from each others. The characterization of planets is tied to the knowledge of their host stars. Nearly all planets known so far however belong to isolated field stars, and their mass and radius are affected by large errors that transfer directly onto the precision of the planet parameters. On the contrary, distances, ages, mass and overall characteristics of stars in Open Clusters are much better measured than for field stars. OC stars are chemically homogeneous, so we can effectively investigate the effect of the presence of a planetary systems on the host star chemistry, e.g. if the observed trend of chemical elements with respect to their condensation temperature is effectively related to the presence planets. Curiously, at the present time, only less than ten planets have been confirmed or validated around Main Sequence stars in OCs. In this proposed talk I will give a short historical review on previous searches for exoplanets in OCs, then I will introduce our on-going survey aimed at detecting Neptune-mass planets around close, intermediate-age OC stars with HARPS (8 night/year) and HARPS-N (5 nights/semester, within the GAPS program). I will discuss our observational strategy and how we are dealing with activity, the main limiting factor in this kind of research, and the impact of the forth-coming K2 observations on our search. I will finally present our latest discoveries, including the first planetary multiple system around a OC star.

  17. Survey and Experimental Testing of Nongravimetric Mass Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Lorenz, R.

    1977-01-01

    Documentation presented describes the design, testing, and evaluation of an accelerated gravimetric balance, a low mass air bearing oscillator of the spring-mass type, and a centrifugal device for liquid mass measurement. A direct mass readout method was developed to replace the oscillation period readout method which required manual calculations to determine mass. A protoype 25 gram capacity micro mass measurement device was developed and tested.

  18. The time-like electromagnetic form factors of proton and charged kaon at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anulli, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Initial State Radiation method in the BABAR experiment has been used to measure the time-like electromagnetic form factors at the momentum transfer from 9 to 42 (GeV/c)2 for proton and from 7 to 56 (GeV/c)2 for charged kaon. The obtained data show the tendency to approach the QCD asymptotic prediction for kaons and space-like form factor values for proton. The BABAR data have been used together with data from other experiments, to perform a model-independent determination of the relative phases between the single-photon and the three-gluon amplitudes in ψ → KK ¯ decays. The values of the branching fractions measured in the reaction e+e- → K+ K- are shifted due to interference of resonant and nonresonant amplitudes. We have determined the absolute values of the shifts to be 5% for J/ψ and 15% for ψ(2S) decays.

  19. Decay of B mesons into charged and neutral kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kooy, H.; Moneti, G.C.; Pistilli, P.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Fridman, A.; Hicks, R.G.; Panvini, R.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, R.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Morrow, F.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Shinsky, K.A.; Siemann, R.H.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Talman, R.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Hempstead, M.; Izen, J.M.; Longuemare, C.; Loomis, W.A.; MacKay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Chauveau, J.; Ganci, P.; Gentile, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.; Green, J.; Mueller, J.J.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Snyder, A.; Stone, R.

    1982-04-19

    Data on inclusive kaon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at energies in the vicinity of the UPSILON(4S) resonance are presented. A clear excess of kaons is observed on the UPSILON(4S) compared to the continuum. Under the assumption that the UPSILON(4S) decays into BB-bar, a total of 3.38 +- 0.34 +- 0.68 kaons per UPSILON(4S) decay is found. In the context of the standard B-decay model this leads to a value for (b..-->..c)/(b..-->..all) of 1.09 +- 0.33 +- 0.13.

  20. Multiplicities of charged kaons from deep-inelastic muon scattering off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Thiel, A.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-04-01

    Precise measurements of charged-kaon multiplicities in deep inelastic scattering were performed. The results are presented in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y, and the fraction z of the virtual-photon energy carried by the produced hadron. The data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration by scattering 160 GeV muons off an isoscalar 6LiD target. They cover the kinematic domain 1(GeV / c)2 5 GeV /c2 in the invariant mass of the hadronic system. The results from the sum of the z-integrated K+ and K- multiplicities at high x point to a value of the non-strange quark fragmentation function larger than obtained by the earlier DSS fit.

  1. Kaon pair production in pp, pd and dd collisions at COSY

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Dzyuba, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Maeda, Y.; Polyanskiy, A.; Wilkin, C.; Yuan, X.

    2010-08-05

    The near-threshold production of kaon-pairs has been investigated in proton-proton, proton-deuteron and deuteron-deuteron collisions at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The excitation function for the pp{yields}ppK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction and the invariant K{sup -}p, K{sup -}pp, and K{sup +}K{sup -} mass distributions indicate the presence of both K{sup -}p and K{sup +}K{sup -} final state interactions. Analogous final-state interactions of antikaons with deuterons has been found in the pp{yields}dK{sup +}K{sup 0}-bar reaction as well as in the pn{yields}dK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction, measured in the quasi-free pd{yields}p{sub sp}dK{sup +}K{sup -} process with a 'spectator' proton (p{sub sp}). The existing COSY data on the pd{yields}{sup 3}HeK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction are not yet sufficient to study the K{sup -3}He and K{sup +}K{sup -} final state interactions. A very small total cross section was found for the dd{yields}{sup 4}HeK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction.

  2. Kaon condensation in CFL quark matter, the Goldstone theorem, and the 2PI Hartree approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leganger, Lars E.

    2011-05-01

    At very high densities, QCD is in the color-flavor-locked phase, which is a color-superconducting phase. The diquark condensates break chiral symmetry in the same way as it is broken in vacuum QCD and gives rise to an octet of pseudo-Goldstone bosons and a superfluid mode. The lightest of these are the charged and neutral kaons. For energies below the superconducting gap, the kaons are described by an O(2)×O(2)-symmetric effective scalar field theory with chemical potentials. We use this effective theory to study Bose-condensation of kaons and their properties as functions of the temperature and the chemical potentials. We use the 2-particle irreducible effective action formalism in the Hartree approximation. The renormalization of the gap equations and the effective potential is studied in detail and we show that the counterterms are independent of temperature and chemical potentials. We determine the phase diagram and the medium-dependent quasiparticle masses. It is shown that the Goldstone theorem is satisfied to a very good approximation.

  3. Kaon condensation in CFL quark matter, the Goldstone theorem, and the 2PI Hartree approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Leganger, Lars E.

    2011-05-23

    At very high densities, QCD is in the color-flavor-locked phase, which is a color-superconducting phase. The diquark condensates break chiral symmetry in the same way as it is broken in vacuum QCD and gives rise to an octet of pseudo-Goldstone bosons and a superfluid mode. The lightest of these are the charged and neutral kaons. For energies below the superconducting gap, the kaons are described by an O(2)xO(2)-symmetric effective scalar field theory with chemical potentials. We use this effective theory to study Bose-condensation of kaons and their properties as functions of the temperature and the chemical potentials. We use the 2-particle irreducible effective action formalism in the Hartree approximation. The renormalization of the gap equations and the effective potential is studied in detail and we show that the counterterms are independent of temperature and chemical potentials. We determine the phase diagram and the medium-dependent quasiparticle masses. It is shown that the Goldstone theorem is satisfied to a very good approximation.

  4. One-dimensional pion, kaon, and proton femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadlovska, S.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luz, P. H. F. N. D.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The size of the particle emission region in high-energy collisions can be deduced using the femtoscopic correlations of particle pairs at low relative momentum. Such correlations arise due to quantum statistics and Coulomb and strong final state interactions. In this paper, results are presented from femtoscopic analyses of π±π±,K±K±,KS0KS0,p p , and p ¯p ¯ correlations from Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. One-dimensional radii of the system are extracted from correlation functions in terms of the invariant momentum difference of the pair. The comparison of the measured radii with the predictions from a hydrokinetic model is discussed. The pion and kaon source radii display a monotonic decrease with increasing average pair transverse mass mT which is consistent with hydrodynamic model predictions for central collisions. The kaon and proton source sizes can be reasonably described by approximate mT scaling.

  5. One-dimensional pion, kaon, and proton femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Tmore » he size of the particle emission region in high-energy collisions can be deduced using the femtoscopic correlations of particle pairs at low relative momentum. Such correlations arise due to quantum statistics and Coulomb and strong final state interactions. In this paper, results are presented from femtoscopic analyses of π± π±, K± K±, K$$0\\atop{S}$$K$$0\\atop{S}$$, pp , and $$\\overline{p}$$ $$\\overline{p}$$ correlations from Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 eV by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. One-dimensional radii of the system are extracted from correlation functions in terms of the invariant momentum difference of the pair. he comparison of the measured radii with the predictions from a hydrokinetic model is discussed. he pion and kaon source radii display a monotonic decrease with increasing average pair transverse mass m which is consistent with hydrodynamic model predictions for central collisions. Lastly, the kaon and proton source sizes can be reasonably described by approximate m scaling.« less

  6. Measurement Corner Mass, Moles and Avogadro's Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses and clarifies the confusion arising from the use of the terms "mass,""volume,""matter,""mole," and "Avogadro's number." Suggests three laboratory activities concerning mass, volume, and number of particles in a given volume. (CS)

  7. Measurement Corner Mass, Moles and Avogadro's Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses and clarifies the confusion arising from the use of the terms "mass,""volume,""matter,""mole," and "Avogadro's number." Suggests three laboratory activities concerning mass, volume, and number of particles in a given volume. (CS)

  8. Calculating Measurement Uncertainties for Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, R. M.; Goldberg, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    A complete and transparent characterization of measurement uncertainty is fundamentally important to the interpretation of analytical results. We have observed that the calculation and reporting of uncertainty estimates for isotopic measurement from a variety of analytical facilities are inconsistent, making it difficult to compare and evaluate data. Therefore, we recommend an approach to uncertainty estimation that has been adopted by both US national metrology facilities and is becoming widely accepted within the analytical community. This approach is outlined in the ISO "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement" (GUM). The GUM approach to uncertainty estimation includes four major steps: 1) Specify the measurand; 2) Identify uncertainty sources; 3) Quantify components by determining the standard uncertainty (u) for each component; and 4) Calculate combined standard uncertainty (u_c) by using established propagation laws to combine the various components. To obtain a desired confidence level, the combined standard uncertainty is multiplied by a coverage factor (k) to yield an expanded uncertainty (U). To be consistent with the GUM principles, it is also necessary create an uncertainty budget, which is a listing of all the components comprising the uncertainty and their relative contribution to the combined standard uncertainty. In mass spectrometry, Step 1 is normally the determination of an isotopic ratio for a particular element. Step 2 requires the identification of the many potential sources of measurement variability and bias including: gain, baseline, cup efficiency, Schottky noise, counting statistics, CRM uncertainties, yield calibrations, linearity calibrations, run conditions, and filament geometry. Then an equation expressing the relationship of all of the components to the measurement value must be written. To complete Step 3, these potential sources of uncertainty must be characterized (Type A or Type B) and quantified. This information

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich Ward

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass mt using events recorded during a 125 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to √s=1.8 TeV $\\bar{p}$p collisions. Six events consistent with the hypothesis t$\\bar{t}$ → bW+, $\\bar{b}$W-measurement of mt based on these relative solution likelihoods gives mt2+, $\\bar{b}$W- → b$\\bar{l}$v, $\\bar{b}$q$\\bar{q}$ , and this, in combination with an estimate on the likelihood that each event is top, yields mt = 173.3 ± 5.6 (stat.) ± 6.2 (syst.) GeV/c2measurements gives mt = 173.1 ± 5.2 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) GeV/c2

  10. Charged kaon femtoscopic correlations in pp collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, S.; Das, I.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harton, A.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kompaniets, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kour, R.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhailov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizuno, S.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oh, S.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, C.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sinha, B. C.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-03-01

    Correlations of two charged identical kaons (KchKch) are measured in pp collisions at s=7TeV by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). One-dimensional KchKch correlation functions are constructed in three multiplicity and four transverse momentum ranges. The KchKch femtoscopic source parameters R and λ are extracted. The KchKch correlations show a slight increase of femtoscopic radii with increasing multiplicity and a slight decrease of radii with increasing transverse momentum. These trends are similar to the ones observed for ππ and Ks0Ks0 correlations in pp and heavy-ion collisions. However at high multiplicities, there is an indication that the one-dimensional correlation radii for charged kaons are larger than those for pions in contrast to what was observed in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

  11. Pion and kaon interferometry of nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Padula, S.S.

    1989-08-04

    In the study complex reactions, the simple space-time interpretation of pion interferometry often breaks down due to strong correlations between spatial and momentum coordinates. In those cases, pion interferometry is still useful as a complementary test of specific dynamic models, but a refined formalism must be used, as discussed in the introduction. With this formalism, we show that recent NA35 data on O + Au {yields} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}} + X at 200 AGeV are consistent with both hadronic resonance and quark-gluon plasma models for this reaction. The sensitivity of the outward and sideward transverse projected correlation function for pions is investigated. Finally, we compare pion and kaon interferometry predictions of these two models. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Strange Baryonic Matter and Kaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    In this contribution we address the question whether kaon condensation could occur in strongly interacting self-bound strange hadronic matter. In our comprehensive dynamical relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of nuclear and hypernuclear systems containing several antikaons we found saturation of bar K separation energy as well as the associated nuclear and bar K density distributions upon increasing the number of bar K mesons. The saturation pattern was found to be a universal feature of these multi-strangeness configurations. Since in all cases the bar K separation energy does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that bar K mesons do not provide the physical "strangeness" degrees of freedom for self-bound strange hadronic matter.

  13. Multi-kaonic Hypernuclei and Kaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2011-09-01

    This contribution reports on dynamical, self-consistent calculations of multi-bar K hypernuclei, which were performed by adding antikaons to particle-stable nuclear configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. Our results show a robust pattern of saturation of the bar K separation energy Bbar K as a function of the number of bar K mesons, with Bbar K bounded from above by 200 MeV. The associated baryon densities saturate at values 2-3 times nuclear-matter density. The main reason for saturation is the repulsion induced by the vector meson fields between bar K mesons, similarly to what was found for multi-bar K nuclei. The calculations confirm that strangeness in finite strong-interaction self-bound systems is realized through hyperons, with no room for kaon condensation.

  14. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-11-01

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  15. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    SciTech Connect

    Eronen, Tommi; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  16. Rare and forbidden kaon decays at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kettell, S.

    1997-12-09

    An overview of the Rare Kaon Decay program at the AGS is presented, with particular emphasis on the three major experiments currently running and analyzing data. A brief overview of earlier kaon decay experiments and of the AGs performance improvements is also provided. This review concludes with a discussion of proposed and developing experiments planned to run in the year 2000 and beyond (AGS-2000).

  17. Nuclear Mass Measurement and Evaluation Relevant to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng

    Nuclear mass data are crucial input for the astrophysics models. Thanks to the developments of radioactive nuclear beam facilities and novel mass spectrometers, the experimental knowledge of nuclear masses has been continuously expanding to the exotic nuclei far from the stability which play a critical role in astrophysics. The recent progress and future perspective of mass measurement relevant to astrophysics will be discussed. By evaluating all available experimental data from nuclear reactions, radioactive decays and direct mass measurements, the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) serve the research community with reliable source for comprehensive information related to the nuclear masses. The next AME version is envisioned to be published at the end of 2016.

  18. Kaon production and kaon to pion ratio in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=130 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Deng, W.S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R.S.; et al.

    2002-06-13

    Mid-rapidity transverse mass spectra and multiplicity densities of charged and neutral kaons are reported for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=130 GeV at RHIC. The spectra are exponential in transverse mass, with an inverse slope of about 280 MeV in central collisions. The multiplicity densities for these particles scale with the negative hadron pseudo-rapidity density. The charged kaon to pion ratios are K{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} = 0.161 {+-} 0.002(stat) {+-} 0.024(syst) and K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} = 0.146 {+-} 0.002(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst) for the most central collisions. The K{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} ratio is lower than the same ratio observed at the SPS while the K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} is higher than the SPS result. Both ratios are enhanced by about 50% relative to p+p and {bar p}+p collision data at similar energies.

  19. Hunting Down Massless Dark Photons in Kaon Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrichesi, M.; Gabrielli, E.; Mele, B.

    2017-07-01

    If dark photons are massless, they couple to standard-model particles only via higher dimensional operators, while direct (renormalizable) interactions induced by kinetic mixing, which motivates most of the current experimental searches, are absent. We consider the effect of possible flavor-changing magnetic-dipole couplings of massless dark photons in kaon physics. In particular, we study the branching ratio for the process K+→π+π0γ ¯ with a simplified-model approach, assuming the chiral quark model to evaluate the hadronic matrix element. Possible effects in the K0-K¯ 0 mixing are taken into account. We find that branching ratios up to O (10-7) are allowed—depending on the dark-sector masses and couplings. Such large branching ratios for K+→π+π0γ ¯ could be of interest for experiments dedicated to rare K+ decays like NA62 at CERN, where γ ¯ can be detected as a massless invisible system.

  20. Kaon B-parameter in mixed action chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Laiho, Jack; Water, Ruth S. van de

    2007-02-01

    We calculate the kaon B-parameter, B{sub K}, in chiral perturbation theory for a partially quenched, mixed-action theory with Ginsparg-Wilson valence quarks and staggered sea quarks. We find that the resulting expression is similar to that in the continuum, and in fact has only two additional unknown parameters. At 1-loop order, taste-symmetry violations in the staggered sea sector only contribute to flavor-disconnected diagrams by generating an O(a{sup 2}) shift to the masses of taste-singlet sea-sea mesons. Lattice discretization errors also give rise to an analytic term which shifts the tree-level value of B{sub K} by an amount of O(a{sup 2}). This term, however, is not strictly due to taste breaking, and is therefore also present in the expression for B{sub K} for pure Ginsparg-Wilson lattice fermions. We also present a numerical study of the mixed B{sub K} expression in order to demonstrate that both discretization errors and finite volume effects are small and under control on the MILC improved staggered lattices.

  1. Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more osteoporotic fractures. Low Bone Mass Versus Osteoporosis The information provided by a BMD test can ... products. NIH Pub. No. 15-7877-E NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 ...

  2. Measuring masses of large biomolecules and bioparticles using mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Ping; Chou, Szu-Wei; Patil, Avinash A

    2014-07-21

    Large biomolecules and bioparticles play a vital role in biology, chemistry, biomedical science and physics. Mass is a critical parameter for the characterization of large biomolecules and bioparticles. To achieve mass analysis, choosing a suitable ion source is the first step and the instruments for detecting ions, mass analyzers and detectors should also be considered. Abundant mass spectrometric techniques have been proposed to determine the masses of large biomolecules and bioparticles and these techniques can be divided into two categories. The first category measures the mass (or size) of intact particles, including single particle quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry, cell mass spectrometry, charge detection mass spectrometry and differential mobility mass analysis; the second category aims to measure the mass and tandem mass of biomolecular ions, including quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry and orbitrap mass spectrometry. Moreover, algorithms for the mass and stoichiometry assignment of electrospray mass spectra are developed to obtain accurate structure information and subunit combinations.

  3. Mass measurements along the r-process path at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy; Clark, Jason; van Schelt, Jon; Lascar, Dan; Levand, Anthony; Zabransky, Bruce; Sharma, Kumar

    2012-10-01

    The CARIBU facility is now operational and a large body of new mass measurements around the N=82 waiting point has been accumulated. The masses of over 70 neutron-rich isotopes from the heavy Californium fission peak have been measured with the CPT Penning trap mass spectrometer yielding a typical accuracy of 10 keV/c2. The most neutron-rich masses show significant deviations from either masses measured by other means when available or from extrapolated values from the last Atomic Mass Evaluation when no measurements where available. The system used for these measurements will be briefly described and an analysis of the modification to the delay for the r-process in this region when taking into accounts the new masses will be presented.

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation of pions in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and the spectra of kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomeitsev, E.E. |; Voskresensky, D.N.

    1995-12-01

    The properties of a pion gas that is formed in ultrarelativistic collisions of nuclei are studied in the Weinberg, model for {pi}{pi} interaction. The possible Bose-Einstein condensation of a dense n-gas is considered. The Green`s function and the spectrum of the overcondensate excitations are calculated. For a weak condensate, the results coincide with those obtained in the {lambda}{var_phi}{sup 4} model ({lambda} = const), while for a developed condensate there are significant differences. The properties of kaons are considered for temperatures below the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein pion condensation. It is shown that, in the presence of a condensate, the K-effective mass becomes substantially larger, while the K{sup +} effective mass becomes smaller. These features may manifest themselves in the observable momentum distributions of kaons. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Pion and kaon condensations in three-flavor random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Ryoichi; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2008-11-01

    We study the QCD phase structure in a three-flavor random matrix model with symmetries of QCD formulated at finite temperature and nonzero chemical potentials of baryon number, isospin, and strangeness. We numerically investigate the phase diagram in the chemical potential plane at zero temperature with finite quark masses. We find a rich phase structure separated by both first and second order phase transition lines, which qualitatively agrees with the predictions of effective chiral models and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models. The phases are characterized by the chiral condensates of three flavors, pion and kaon condensates.

  6. Innovative mechanism for measuring the mass properties of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolcott, Kedron R.; Graham, Todd A.; Doty, Keith L.

    1994-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Robotics Group recently completed development and testing on a novel approach to measure the mass properties of a rigid body. This unique design can measure the payload's weight, mass center location, and moments of inertia about three orthogonal axes. Furthermore, these measurements only require a single torque sensor and a single angular position sensor.

  7. Selected Topics from Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    The most recent results of the top-quark mass measurements at the Tevatron at Fermilab are presented. Data were collected in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV by the CDF and D0 experiments. Top quark mass measurements in the lepton+jets, dilepton and alljet final states as well as their combination and the extraction of the mass from the cross-section measurement are presented.

  8. a Semirelativistic Quark Model for Kaon Photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anita

    A semirelativistic quark model which incorporates the Isgur-Karl model is developed. It describes both electromagnetic as well as strong interactions. The Hamiltonian explicitly entails the production of qq pairs and thus permits description of strong decays. In this formulation no adjustable parameters beyond those of the Isgur-Karl model are used. This model has been applied to kaon production from protons by real photons (gamma+pto K^++Lambda ^0, gamma+pto K^++Sigma ^0). The differential cross sections and polarizations for both the KLambda and KSigma channels are calculated. The relative contributions of the Born terms, the seagull term and the various s-, u- and t-channel resonances are discussed. It is seen that the seagull term and the s-channel resonances dominate the cross sections. The results are compared with calculations from phenomenological models and experimental data. A reasonable agreement with the experimental data is obtained in most cases, but the need for more data of a better quality is evident.

  9. Multi-K¯ nuclei and kaon condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2008-04-01

    We extend previous relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of multi-K¯ nuclei, using vector boson fields with SU(3) PPV coupling constants and scalar boson fields constrained phenomenologically. For a given core nucleus, the resulting K¯ separation energy BK¯, as well as the associated nuclear and K¯-meson densities, saturate with the number κ of K¯ mesons for κ>κsat~10. Saturation appears robust against a wide range of variations, including the RMF nuclear model used and the type of boson fields mediating the strong interactions. Because BK¯ generally does not exceed 200 MeV, it is argued that multi-K¯ nuclei do not compete with multihyperonic nuclei in providing the ground state of strange hadronic configurations and that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in strong-interaction self-bound strange hadronic matter. Last, we explore possibly self-bound strange systems made of neutrons and K¯0 mesons, or protons and K- mesons, and study their properties.

  10. The search for the H dibaryon with the BNL 2. 0 GeV/c kaon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    The status is given for two experiments being carried out to search for evidence of the H dibaryon. BNL experiments E813 and E836 will use the new 2 GeV/c kaon beam line. The former has recently begun data taking. They cover complementary regions of mass-sensitivity and promise to provide sensitive tests of the existence of the H. 12 refs.

  11. High precision mass measurements for wine metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Witting, Michael; Gougeon, Régis D.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the critical steps for the non-targeted Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-ToF-MS) analysis of wine chemistry is given, ranging from the study design, data preprocessing and statistical analyses, to markers identification. UPLC-Q-ToF-MS data was enhanced by the alignment of exact mass data from FTICR-MS, and marker peaks were identified using UPLC-Q-ToF-MS2. In combination with multivariate statistical tools and the annotation of peaks with metabolites from relevant databases, this analytical process provides a fine description of the chemical complexity of wines, as exemplified in the case of red (Pinot noir) and white (Chardonnay) wines from various geographic origins in Burgundy. PMID:25431760

  12. High precision mass measurements for wine metabolomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Witting, Michael; Gougeon, Régis; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    An overview of the critical steps for the non-targeted Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-ToF-MS) analysis of wine chemistry is given, ranging from the study design, data preprocessing and statistical analyses, to markers identification. UPLC-Q-ToF-MS data was enhanced by the alignment of exact mass data from FTICR-MS, and marker peaks were identified using UPLC-Q-ToF-MS². In combination with multivariate statistical tools and the annotation of peaks with metabolites from relevant databases, this analytical process provides a fine description of the chemical complexity of wines, as exemplified in the case of red (Pinot noir) and white (Chardonnay) wines from various geographic origins in Burgundy.

  13. New Directions in Mass Communications Research: Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James E.

    Psychophysiological research into the effects of mass media, specifically the music of the masses, promises increased insight into the control the media exert on all their consumers. Attention and retention of mass media messages can be tested by measuring the receiver's electrodernal activity, pupil dilation, peripheral vasodilation, and heart…

  14. Gravitational mass attraction measurement for drag-free references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, Aaron J.

    Exciting new experiments in gravitational physics are among the proposed future space science missions around the world. Such future space science experiments include gravitational wave observatories, which require extraordinarily precise instruments for gravitational wave detection. In fact, future space-based gravitational wave observatories require the use of a drag free reference sensor, which is several orders of magnitude more precise than any drag free satellite launched to date. With the analysis methods and measurement techniques described in this work, there is one less challenge associated with achieving the high-precision drag-free satellite performance levels required by gravitational wave observatories. One disturbance critical to the drag-free performance is an acceleration from the mass attraction between the spacecraft and drag-free reference mass. A direct measurement of the gravitational mass attraction force is not easily performed. Historically for drag-free satellite design, the gravitational attraction properties were estimated by using idealized equations between a point mass and objects of regular geometric shape with homogeneous density. Stringent requirements are then placed on the density distribution and fabrication tolerances for the drag-free reference mass and satellite components in order to ensure that the allocated gravitational mass attraction disturbance budget is not exceeded due to the associated uncertainty in geometry and mass properties. Yet, the uncertainty associated with mass properties and geometry generate an unacceptable uncertainty in the mass attraction calculation, which make it difficult to meet the demanding drag-free performance requirements of future gravitational wave observatories. The density homogeneity and geometrical tolerances required to meet the overall drag-free performance can easily force the use of special materials or manufacturing processes, which are impractical or not feasible. The focus of

  15. First Penning Trap Mass Measurements beyond the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mukherjee, M.; Rahaman, S.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Di, Z.; Plass, W. R.; Eliseev, S.; Vorobjev, G.; Habs, D.

    2008-01-11

    The masses of six neutron-deficient rare holmium and thulium isotopes close to the proton drip line were determined with the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. For the first time the masses of the proton-unbound isotopes {sup 144,145}Ho and {sup 147,148}Tm were directly measured. The proton separation energies were derived from the measured mass values and compared to predictions from mass formulas. The new values of the proton separation energies are used to determine the location of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium more accurately.

  16. Ratio method of measuring the W boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DO experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → enu fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → enu data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → enu data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/M Z). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → enu and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb--1 DO Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 +/- 43(stat) +/- 26(sys)MeV.

  17. Mass spectrometric measurement of thermospheric wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, J. R.; Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    The open source neutral mass spectrometer (OSS) on the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite was periodically operated in an experimental 'fly-through' mode. When the satellite is spinning, the signal from this mode displays a sharp maximum that occurs when the instrument source faces directly into the oncoming gas. Thus the location of this maximum is sensitive to neutral wind components in the spin plane. Twenty-two spinning fly-through orbits were analyzed to determine vertical wind magnitudes in the altitude range 160-250 km. Large (up to 65 m/s) magnitudes were detected in the early morning sector of the auroral zone.

  18. Cosmic Ray Mass Measurements with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitink, Stijn; Bonardi, Antonio; Corstanje, Arthur; Enriquez, J. Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katie; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg Paul; Rossetto, Laura; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; Thoudam, Satyendra; Trinh, Gia; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    In the dense core of LOFAR individual air showers are detected by hundreds of dipole antennas simultaneously. We reconstruct Xmax by using a hybrid technique that combines a two-dimensional fit of the radio profile to CoREAS simulations and a one-dimensional fit of the particle density distribution. For high-quality detections, the statistical uncertainty on Xmax is smaller than 20 g/cm2. We present results of cosmic-ray mass analysis in the energy regime of 1017 - 1017.5 eV. This range is of particular interest as it may harbor the transition from a Galactic to an extragalactic origin of cosmic rays.

  19. Influence and measurement of mass ablation in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spears, B.; Hicks, D.; Velsko, C.; Stoyer, M.; Robey, H.; Munro, D.; Haan, S.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.

    2008-05-01

    Point design ignition capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently use an xray-driven Be(Cu) ablator to compress the DT fuel. Ignition specifications require that the mass of unablated Be(Cu), called residual mass, be known to within 1% of the initial ablator mass. The specifications also require that the implosion bang time, a surrogate measurement for implosion velocity, be known to 50 ps RMS. Experiments designed to measure and to tune experimentally the amount of residual mass are being developed as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). Tuning adjustments of the residual mass and peak velocity can be achieved using capsule and laser parameters. We currently plan to measure the residual mass using streaked radiographic imaging of surrogate tuning capsules. This technique, together with bang time measurements, should allow us to tune ignition capsules to meet NIC specs.

  20. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Neutron Rich Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, A.; Matos, M.; Amthor, A. M.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Lorusso, G.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Portillo, M.; Stolz, A.; Galaviz, D.; Pereira, J.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Wallace, M.

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear masses of neutron rich isotopes in the region of Z ˜ 20-30 have been measured using the time-of-flight technique at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). The masses of 5 isotopes have been measured for the first time, and the precision of several other masses has been improved. The time-of-flight technique has shown the potential to access nuclear masses very far from stability when applied at radioactive beam facilities like the NSCL. Such measurements are important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of β-stability, and provide valuable information for astrophysical model calculations of processes involving very unstable nuclides.

  1. The effects of external fields on the neutral kaon system

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarsky, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors extended the field theoretical treatment developed by Sachs for the neutral kaon system to study the possible observable effects that external macroscopic fields may cause on this system. In particular, he used this treatment to study the interaction of the kaon system with the hypothetical hypercharge fields of various spatial configurations, and compared the theoretical predictions with the available experimental results. He recovered the results of ABCF {sup 38} for the case of a spatially constant potential, and concluded that the most interesting parameters to study are the phase {phi}{sub +{minus}} of the CP violation parameter {eta}{sub +{minus}}, and the charge asymmetry parameter {delta}. He also applied the formalism to study the effects of the interaction of the neutral kaon system with the hypothetical cosmological axion field, and concluded that the effects are too small to be observable. Furthermore, he illustrated the use of the formalism to give derivations of the regeneration formula.

  2. Results of the First TOF Mass Measurements at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Stolz, A.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Wallace, M.

    2008-04-01

    Time-of-Flight mass measurements technique, recently developed at the NSCL, MSU, was used to measure masses of exotic neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations as well as for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. Results from the experiment will be presented and discussed.

  3. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  4. PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement in Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-06

    ISS019-E-014216 (6 May 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, uses the IM mass measurement device to perform the PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement Russian biomedical routine assessments in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  5. PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement in Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-06

    ISS019-E-014222 (6 May 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, uses the IM mass measurement device to perform the PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement Russian biomedical routine assessments in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  6. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  7. Measuring Monodisperse Small Particles En Masse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New optical method enables determination of sizes of approximately-micron-sized particles. Arrays of particles act as diffraction gratings. Simple and inexpensive apparatus replaces high-magnification microscopes in measurements of diameters of small polystyrene latex spheres. Device being used to determine monodispersity and diameters of polystyrene latex microspheres used as seeding material for laser-velocimetry flow measurements in NASA's wind tunnels. Characterization of particle sizes important in wide range of fields, including manufacture of plastics and ceramics, biochemistry, and medicine.

  8. Measuring Monodisperse Small Particles En Masse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New optical method enables determination of sizes of approximately-micron-sized particles. Arrays of particles act as diffraction gratings. Simple and inexpensive apparatus replaces high-magnification microscopes in measurements of diameters of small polystyrene latex spheres. Device being used to determine monodispersity and diameters of polystyrene latex microspheres used as seeding material for laser-velocimetry flow measurements in NASA's wind tunnels. Characterization of particle sizes important in wide range of fields, including manufacture of plastics and ceramics, biochemistry, and medicine.

  9. Glacier mass budget measurements by hydrologic means

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangborn, Wendell V.

    1966-01-01

    Ice storage changes for the South Cascade Glacier drainage basin were determined for the 1957–1964 period using basin runoff and precipitation measurements. Measurements indicate that evaporation and condensation are negligible compared with the large runoff and precipitation values. Runoff, measured by a stream discharge station, averaged 4.04 m/yr; precipitation, determined by snow accumulation measurements at a central point on the glacier and by storage gages, averaged 3.82 m/yr, resulting in a basin net loss of about 0.22 m/yr. During the same period, South Cascade Glacier net budgets were determined by ablation stakes, snow density-depth profiles, and maps. The average glacier net budget for the period was −0.61sol;yr of water. This amount is equivalent to −0.26 m of water when averaged over the drainage basin (43% glacier-covered), which is in fair agreement with the net storage change measured by hydrologic methods. Agreement between the two methods for individual years is slightly less perfect. (Key words: Glaciers; water balance.)

  10. Phase-imaging Mass Measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orford, Rodney; Clark, Jason A.; Nystrom, Andrew; Savard, Guy; Aprahamian, Ani; Brodeur, Maxime; Buchinger, Fritz; Burdette, Daniel; Burkey, Mary T.; Hirsh, Tsviki Y.; Kelly, James; Lascar, Daniel; Ling-Ying, Lin; Morgan, Graeme E.; Sharma, Kumar S.; Siegl, Kevin

    The Canadian Penning trap mass spectrometer (CPT) is currently dedicated to making precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei approaching the astrophysical r-process path. Over the past two years, upgrades to CARIBU and to the detector system of the CPT have been made in order to probe shorter-lived nuclei further from stability. The installation of the MR-TOF and the commissioning of the modern phase-imaging mass measurement technique at the CPT are reported.

  11. Results on kaon physics from OKA setup at U-70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Some recent results from OKA setup are presented. First, the decay K + →π0 e+υ(K e3) is studied. About 3.15M events are selected for the analysis. The linear and quadratic slopes for the decay formfactor f +(t) are measured: . For the exotic scalar and tensor interactions we get: FS /f +(0) = (-0.44±0.7±0.24) × 10-2 FT /f +(0) = (0.16±2±1.3) × 10-2. Several alternative parametrizations are tried: the Pole fit parameter is found to be MV = 890 ± 3.7 MeV; the parameter of the Dispersive parametrization is measured to be Λ+ = (24.72 ± 0.23) × 10-3. Second, the results of a search for heavy neutrino in the K μ2 decay are shown. The upper limits on the mixing parameter of the heavy neutrino with the muon neutrino |U μH |2 are obtained. Typically, |U μH |2 ≤ 10-6 for the region 225 ≤ mH ≤ 375 MeV. Third, a new study of the radiative K μ3 decay are presented. The number of signal events is ˜ 580 which is 4 times larger than in previous measurements. which should be compared with 4.7 × 10-4 from the theory. An estimate of the T-odd asymmetry gives A ξ = (-0.19±0.05±0.09). A space asymmetry over , where is the angle between photon and muon momenta in the kaon rest frame is measured to be A(cosθ*) = 0.6±0.05±0.1.

  12. A Novel Technique for Automated Mass Measurements of Individual Snowflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, M.; Shkurko, K.; Simon, E.

    2016-12-01

    Snowflake mass is a crucial parameter for the description of microwave scattering by a single snowflake or by a collection of many snowflakes. A realistic characterization of snowflake masses within snow clouds is therefore required for reliable retrievals of snow-cloud ice content and snowfall rate from atmospheric remote sensing observations. Thus far, snowflake masses have been determined from melted drop sizes of manually sampled snowflakes; and automated snowflake imaging has been used to approximate individual snowflake volumes and then relate the integrated snowflake volumes for a series of recorded snowflakes to corresponding measurements of the total snow water content. These methods have either relied on laborious manual sampling or derived descriptions of snowflake mass by averaging over many snowflakes. In contrast, the novel technique presented in this study allows automated mass measurements of individual snowflakes, based on the amount of energy required to evaporate a snowflake hitting a thin aluminum hotplate that is kept at a constant temperature above the boiling point. Here, snowflake mass is derived from the temperature drop at the hotplate that is associated with the evaporation of the snowflake. First measurements in the field indicate that the current hotplate sensor allows measurements of snowflake masses mf > 0.4 mg and a resolution of snowflake inter-arrival times between consecutive snowflake mass measurements of about 2 to 10 s depending on snowflake mass, when the influence of wind gusts on the hotplate is minimized through a wind fence. Planned applications of the hotplate sensor are to use the sensor (i) by itself for measurements of the statistical distribution of snowflake masses during snowstorms and (ii) in combination with high-resolution snowflake imaging techniques for coincident snowflake mass and shape measurements.

  13. Microelectrode measurements of local mass transport rates in heterogeneous biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, K; Lewandowski, Z

    1998-08-05

    Microelectrodes were used to measure oxygen profiles and local mass transfer coefficient profiles in biofilm clusters and interstitial voids. Both profiles were measured at the same location in the biofilm. From the oxygen profile, the effective diffusive boundary layer thickness (DBL) was determined. The local mass transfer coefficient profiles provided information about the nature of mass transport near and within the biofilm. All profiles were measured at three different average flow velocities, 0.62, 1.53, and 2.60 cm sec-1, to determine the influence of flow velocity on mass transport. Convective mass transport was active near the biofilm/liquid interface and in the upper layers of the biofilm, independent of biofilm thickness and flow velocity. The DBL varied strongly between locations for the same flow velocities. Oxygen and local mass transfer coefficient profiles collected through a 70 micrometer thick cluster revealed that a cluster of that thickness did not present any significant mass transport resistance. In a 350 micrometer thick biofilm cluster, however, the local mass transfer coefficient decreased gradually to very low values near the substratum. This was hypothetically attributed to the decreasing effective diffusivity in deeper layers of biofilms. Interstitial voids between clusters did not seem to influence the local mass transfer coefficients significantly for flow velocities of 1.53 and 2.60 cm sec-1. At a flow velocity of 0.62 cm sec-1, interstitial voids visibly decreased the local mass transfer coefficient near the bottom. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Charged Kaon interferometric probes of space-time evolution in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-10-02

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons are used to probe Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV and are compared to charged pion probes, which have a larger hadronic scattering cross section. Three-dimensional Gaussian source radii are extracted, along with a one-dimensional kaon emission source function. The centrality dependences of the three Gaussian radii are well described by a single linear function of N(part)1/3 with a zero intercept. Imaging analysis shows a deviation from a Gaussian tail at r greater than or approximately equal to 10 fm, although the bulk emission at lower radius is well described by a Gaussian. The presence of a non-Gaussian tail in the kaon source reaffirms that the particle emission region in a heavy-ion collision is extended, and that similar measurements with pions are not solely due to the decay of long-lived resonances.

  15. New Rotary Table Providing Improved Mass Property Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messing, R.; Appolloni, M.; Sablerolle, S.; Tavares, A.; Hervieu, M.

    2014-06-01

    ESA Test Centre at ESTEC, Noordwijk is a unique place in Europe, which is geared to perform environmental tests on large spacecraft at system level. The Test Centre includes the whole environmental facilities family: shakers, acoustic chamber, mass properties measurement facilities, electro-magnetic compatibility facilities and thermal vacuum chambers.Center of gravity (CoG) measurements require at least two force measurements in combination with a mass measurement to determine the CoG in the horizontal x-y plane. To achieve more quickly two or more orientations of the specimen with respect to the force cell the Test Centre implemented a rotary table on top of its W50/M6 mass property machine. This paper focuses on the acceptance and implementation of the rotary table and how by its use the CoG measurements could be improved in terms of measurement time, measurement uncertainty and measurement reliability.

  16. Influence and measurement of mass ablation in ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, B K; Hicks, D; Velsko, C; Stoyer, M; Robey, H; Munro, D; Haan, S; Landen, O; Nikroo, A; Huang, H

    2007-09-05

    Point design ignition capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently use an x-ray-driven Be(Cu) ablator to compress the DT fuel. Ignition specifications require that the mass of unablated Be(Cu), called residual mass, be known to within 1% of the initial ablator mass when the fuel reaches peak velocity. The specifications also require that the implosion bang time, a surrogate measurement for implosion velocity, be known to +/- 50 ps RMS. These specifications guard against several capsule failure modes associated with low implosion velocity or low residual mass. Experiments designed to measure and to tune experimentally the amount of residual mass are being developed as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). Tuning adjustments of the residual mass and peak velocity can be achieved using capsule and laser parameters. We currently plan to measure the residual mass using streaked radiographic imaging of surrogate tuning capsules. Alternative techniques to measure residual mass using activated Cu debris collection and proton spectrometry have also been developed. These developing techniques, together with bang time measurements, will allow us to tune ignition capsules to meet NIC specs.

  17. A 50 Hz dipole magnet for the TRIUMF KAON Factory booster ring

    SciTech Connect

    Otter, A.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The 3 GeV Booster synchrotron for TRIUMF's KAON Factory will need 24 dipole magnets each 3.0 m long operating with a resonant power system designed to give a 50 Hz ac field superimposed onto a dc field. The maximum and minimum field levels are 1.118 and 0.295 T respectively. In this paper the magnet design is presented and compared with measured results from a prototype which was constructed to evaluate fabrication procedures and to verify the ac loss calculations. The experiences gained from this fabrication are described.

  18. Galaxies and Mass: Lensing and Dynamical Measurements from the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. A.

    2003-06-01

    Probing the relationship between galaxies and mass is a major goal of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this contribution we describe measurements of galaxy-mass correlations using both lensing and dynamical probes. The observables we discuss include the projected mass density contrast measured in SDSS imaging data and luminous particle motions measured as part of the SDSS galaxy redshift survey. Both probes of mass are sensitive measures, varying significantly with galaxy luminosity for example. Interpreting these results is complex. As a first step, we obtain best fit model parameters for various toy models. This exercise reveals the importance of making the comparison between theory and observation at the observable level. We argue for the use of full simulations, including both large scale structure and galaxy formation prescriptions, in the interpretation of these measurements. We conclude with a first generation example of such a comparison.

  19. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Z. J.; Yaniv, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces. PMID:27500016

  20. Kaon photoproduction in field theoretic and multipoles approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we review our strategy to update the phenomenological model Kaon-Maid, which has been used since the year of 2000 and starts to indicate some inconsistencies with the presently available experimental data. There are two approaches used to this end, i.e., the field-theoretic and multipoles models. The advantages and disadvantages of both models are briefly discussed.

  1. Determination of Transverse Charge Density from Kaon Form Factor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Ott, Johann; Horn, Tanja; Pegg, Ian; Mecholski, Nicholas; Carmignotto, Marco; Ali, Salina

    2016-09-01

    At the level of nucleons making up atomic nuclei, among subatomic particles made up of quarks, K-mesons or kaons represent the most simple hadronic system including the heavier strange quark, having a relatively elementary bound state of a quark and an anti-quark as its valence structure. Its electromagnetic structure is then parametrized by a single, dimensionless quantity known as the form factor, the two-dimensional Fourier transform of which yields the quantity of transverse charge density. Transverse charge density, in turn, provides a needed framework for the interpretation of form factors in terms of physical charge and magnetization, both with respect to the propagation of a fast-moving nucleon. To this is added the value of strange quarks in ultimately presenting a universal, process-independent description of nucleons, further augmenting the importance of studying the kaon's internal structure. The pressing character of such research questions directs the present paper, describing the first extraction of transverse charge density from electromagnetic kaon form factor data. The extraction is notably extended to form factor data at recently acquired higher energy levels, whose evaluation could permit more complete phenomenological models for kaon behavior to be proposed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  2. Pion and kaon in the Beth-Uhlenbeck approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, A.; Blaschke, D.; Radzhabov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work the Mott effect for pions and kaons is described within a Beth- Uhlenbeck approach on the basis of the PNJL model. The contribution of these degrees of freedom to the thermodynamics is encoded in the temperature dependence of their phase shifts. A comparison with results from Nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD thermodynamics is performed.

  3. Recent results and prospects on kaon physics at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, Fabio; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Anzivino, G.; Arcidiacono, R.; Baldini, W.; Balev, S.; Batley, J. R.; Behler, M.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Bizzeti, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Bocquet, G.; Bolotov, V.; Bucci, F.; Cabibbo, N.; Calvetti, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cenci, P.; Cerri, C.; Cheshkov, C.; Chèze, J. B.; Clemencic, M.; Collazuol, G.; Costantini, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Coward, D.; Cundy, D.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Agostini, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Damiani, C.; Danielsson, H.; De Beer, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Derré, J.; Dibon, H.; Di Filippo, D.; DiLella, L.; Doble, N.; Duk, V.; Engelfried, J.; Eppard, K.; Falaleev, V.; Fantechi, R.; Fidecaro, M.; Fiorini, L.; Fiorini, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Frabetti, P. L.; Fucci, A.; Gallorini, S.; Gatignon, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gianoli, A.; Giudici, S.; Gonidec, A.; Goudzovski, E.; Goy Lopez, S.; Gushchin, E.; Hallgren, B.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Holder, M.; Hristov, P.; Iacopini, E.; Imbergamo, E.; Jeitler, M.; Kalmus, G.; Kekelidze, V.; Kleinknecht, K.; Kozhuharov, V.; Kubischta, W.; Kurshetsov, V.; Lamanna, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Litov, L.; Madigozhin, D.; Maier, A.; Mannelli, I.; Marchetto, F.; Marel, G.; Markytan, M.; Marouelli, P.; Martini, M.; Masetti, L.; Massarotti, P.; Mazzucato, E.; Michetti, A.; Mikulec, I.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Monnier, E.; Moosbrugger, U.; Morales Morales, C.; Moulson, M.; Movchan, S.; Munday, D. J.; Napolitano, M.; Nappi, A.; Neuhofer, G.; Norton, A.; Numao, T.; Obraztsov, V.; Palladino, V.; Patel, M.; Pepe, M.; Peters, A.; Petrucci, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Peyaud, B.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pierazzini, G.; Polenkevich, I.; Popov, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Raggi, M.; Renk, B.; Retière, F.; Riedler, P.; Romano, A.; Rubin, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Salamon, A.; Saracino, G.; Savrié, M.; Scarpa, M.; Semenov, V.; Sergi, A.; Serra, M.; Shieh, M.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Slater, M. W.; Sozzi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Stoynev, S.; Swallow, E.; Szleper, M.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valente, P.; Vallage, B.; Velasco, M.; Veltri, M.; Venditti, S.; Wache, M.; Wahl, H.; Walker, A.; Wanke, R.; Widhalm, L.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Wood, M. D.; Wotton, S. A.; Yushchenko, O.; Zinchenko, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    A review of recent experimental results on charged kaon decays from NA48/2 and NA62 collaborations is given, together with a description of the NA62 experiment to study the ultra-rare decay K+→π+νν¯ starting in fall 2014.

  4. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  5. Algebraic Singularity Method for Mass Measurements with Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2010-02-26

    We propose a novel generalized method for mass measurements based on phase space singularity structures that can be applied to any event topology with missing energy. Our method subsumes the well-known end point and transverse mass methods and yields new techniques for studying 'missing particle' events, such as the double chain production of stable neutral particles at the LHC.

  6. Distributed Capacitive Sensor for Sample Mass Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; McKinney, Colin; Jackson, Shannon P.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Manohara, Harish; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey

    2011-01-01

    Previous robotic sample return missions lacked in situ sample verification/ quantity measurement instruments. Therefore, the outcome of the mission remained unclear until spacecraft return. In situ sample verification systems such as this Distributed Capacitive (DisC) sensor would enable an unmanned spacecraft system to re-attempt the sample acquisition procedures until the capture of desired sample quantity is positively confirmed, thereby maximizing the prospect for scientific reward. The DisC device contains a 10-cm-diameter pressure-sensitive elastic membrane placed at the bottom of a sample canister. The membrane deforms under the weight of accumulating planetary sample. The membrane is positioned in close proximity to an opposing rigid substrate with a narrow gap. The deformation of the membrane makes the gap narrower, resulting in increased capacitance between the two parallel plates (elastic membrane and rigid substrate). C-V conversion circuits on a nearby PCB (printed circuit board) provide capacitance readout via LVDS (low-voltage differential signaling) interface. The capacitance method was chosen over other potential approaches such as the piezoelectric method because of its inherent temperature stability advantage. A reference capacitor and temperature sensor are embedded in the system to compensate for temperature effects. The pressure-sensitive membranes are aluminum 6061, stainless steel (SUS) 403, and metal-coated polyimide plates. The thicknesses of these membranes range from 250 to 500 m. The rigid substrate is made with a 1- to 2-mm-thick wafer of one of the following materials depending on the application requirements glass, silicon, polyimide, PCB substrate. The glass substrate is fabricated by a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication approach. Several concentric electrode patterns are printed on the substrate. The initial gap between the two plates, 100 m, is defined by a silicon spacer ring that is anodically bonded to the glass

  7. Determination of accurate protein monoisotopic mass with the most abundant mass measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Chang, C Allen; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2013-09-01

    While recent developments in mass spectrometry enable direct evaluation of monoisotopic masses (M(mi)) of smaller compounds, protein M(mi) is mostly determined based on its relationship to average mass (Mav). Here, we propose an alternative approach to determining protein M(mi) based on its correlation with the most abundant mass (M(ma)) measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry. To test this supposition, we first empirically calculated M(mi) and M(ma) of 6158 Escherichia coli proteins, which helped serendipitously uncover a linear correlation between these two protein masses. With the relationship characterized, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to measure M(ma) of protein samples in its ion cluster with the highest signal in the mass spectrum. Generally, our method produces a short series of likely M(mi) in 1-Da steps, and the probability of each likely M(mi) is assigned statistically. It is remarkable that the mass error of this M(mi) is as miniscule as a few parts per million, indicating that our method is capable of determining protein M(mi) with high accuracy. Benefitting from the outstanding performance of modern mass spectrometry, our approach is a significant improvement over others and should be of great utility in the rapid assessment of protein primary structures.

  8. Black hole mass function from gravitational wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Cholis, Ilias; Breysse, Patrick C.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-05-01

    We examine how future gravitational-wave measurements from merging black holes (BHs) can be used to infer the shape of the black-hole mass function, with important implications for the study of star formation and evolution and the properties of binary BHs. We model the mass function as a power law, inherited from the stellar initial mass function, and introduce lower and upper mass cutoff parametrizations in order to probe the minimum and maximum BH masses allowed by stellar evolution, respectively. We initially focus on the heavier BH in each binary, to minimize model dependence. Taking into account the experimental noise, the mass measurement errors and the uncertainty in the redshift dependence of the merger rate, we show that the mass function parameters, as well as the total rate of merger events, can be measured to <10 % accuracy within a few years of advanced LIGO observations at its design sensitivity. This can be used to address important open questions such as the upper limit on the stellar mass which allows for BH formation and to confirm or refute the currently observed mass gap between neutron stars and BHs. In order to glean information on the progenitors of the merging BH binaries, we then advocate the study of the two-dimensional mass distribution to constrain parameters that describe the two-body system, such as the mass ratio between the two BHs, in addition to the merger rate and mass function parameters. We argue that several years of data collection can efficiently probe models of binary formation, and show, as an example, that the hypothesis that some gravitational-wave events may involve primordial black holes can be tested. Finally, we point out that in order to maximize the constraining power of the data, it may be worthwhile to lower the signal-to-noise threshold imposed on each candidate event and amass a larger statistical ensemble of BH mergers.

  9. Report of the working group on precision measurements - measurements of the W boson mass and width.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R.; Erler, J.; Kim, Y.-K.; Marciano, W.; Ashmanskas, W.; Baur, U.; Ellison, J.; Lancaster, M.; Nodulman, L.; Rha, J.; Waters, D.; Womersley, J.

    2000-11-29

    We discuss the prospects for measuring the W mass and width in Run II. The basic techniques used to measure M{sub W} are described and the statistical, theoretical and detector-related uncertainties are discussed in detail. Alternative methods of measuring the W mass at the Tevatron and the prospects for M{sub W} measurements at other colliders are also described.

  10. SLAMMD (Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device) payload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-29

    ISS020-E-015513 (29 June 2009) --- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 20 flight engineer, works with the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  11. SLAMMD (Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device) payload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-29

    ISS020-E-015509 (29 June 2009) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk, Expedition 20 flight engineer, works with the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. Study of the inclusive production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 0.9, 2.76,{ and }7 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martin Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Roinishvili, V.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pp collisions at the LHC for sqrt{s} = 0.9, 2.76,{ and } 7 {TeV}. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range p T≈0.1-1.7 GeV/ c and for rapidities | y|<1 are identified via their energy loss in the CMS silicon tracker. The average p T increases rapidly with the mass of the hadron and the event charged-particle multiplicity, independently of the center-of-mass energy. The fully corrected p T spectra and integrated yields are compared to various tunes of the Pythia 6 and Pythia 8 event generators.

  13. Using buoyant mass to measure the growth of single cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Michel; Delgado, Francisco Feijó; Son, Sungmin; Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Tzur, Amit; Jorgensen, Paul; Payer, Kris; Grossman, Alan D; Kirschner, Marc W; Manalis, Scott R

    2010-05-01

    We used a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) combined with picoliter-scale microfluidic control to measure buoyant mass and determine the 'instantaneous' growth rates of individual cells. The SMR measures mass with femtogram precision, allowing rapid determination of the growth rate in a fraction of a complete cell cycle. We found that for individual cells of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse lymphoblasts, heavier cells grew faster than lighter cells.

  14. Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry for measuring dissolved gases

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M; Hudson, G

    2005-08-10

    A Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometer (MIMS) is used to measure dissolved gas concentrations in environmental water samples. Gases are exsolved out of water by passing the sample through a silicone gas permeable membrane that is under vacuum. A quadrupole mass spectrometer attached to the vacuum system is capable of measuring a variety of gases over a wide range of concentration. The MIMS is a versatile and field portable instrument.

  15. Goldstone boson currents in a kaon condensed color-flavor locked phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhold, A.; Schaefer, T.; Kryjevski, A.

    2007-03-01

    We study the stability of the kaon condensed color-flavor locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter with regard to the formation of a nonzero Goldstone boson current. In the kaon condensed phase there is an electrically charged fermion which becomes gapless near {mu}{sub s}{sup (1)}{approx_equal}1.35{delta} and a neutral fermion which becomes gapless near {mu}{sub s}{sup (2)}{approx_equal}1.61{delta}. Here, {mu}{sub s}=m{sub s}{sup 2}/(2p{sub F}) is the shift in the Fermi energy due to the strange quark mass m{sub s} and {delta} is the gap in the chiral limit. The transition to the gapless phase is continuous at {mu}{sub s}{sup (1)} and first order at {mu}{sub s}{sup (2)}. We find that the magnetic screening masses are real in the regime {mu}{sub s}<{mu}{sub s}{sup (2)}, but some screening masses are imaginary for {mu}{sub s}>{mu}{sub s}{sup (2)}. We show that there is a very weak current instability for {mu}{sub s}>{mu}{sub s}{sup (1)} and a more robust instability in a small window near {mu}{sub s}{sup (2)}. We show that in the Goldstone boson current phase all components of the magnetic screening mass are real. There is a range of values of {mu}{sub s} below 2{delta} in which the magnetic gluon screening masses are imaginary but the phase is stable with respect to electrically neutral fluctuations of the gauge field.

  16. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Shrikanth, V; Bobji, M S

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  17. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrikanth, V.; Bobji, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  18. Accurate mass measurement: terminology and treatment of data.

    PubMed

    Brenton, A Gareth; Godfrey, A Ruth

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry has become ever more accessible with improvements in instrumentation, such as modern FT-ICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. This has resulted in an increase in the number of articles submitted for publication quoting accurate mass data. There is a plethora of terms related to accurate mass analysis that are in current usage, many employed incorrectly or inconsistently. This article is based on a set of notes prepared by the authors for research students and staff in our laboratories as a guide to the correct terminology and basic statistical procedures to apply in relation to mass measurement, particularly for accurate mass measurement. It elaborates on the editorial by Gross in 1994 regarding the use of accurate masses for structure confirmation. We have presented and defined the main terms in use with reference to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations for nomenclature and symbolism for mass spectrometry. The correct use of statistics and treatment of data is illustrated as a guide to new and existing mass spectrometry users with a series of examples as well as statistical methods to compare different experimental methods and datasets. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  20. DISCOVERY AND MASS MEASUREMENTS OF A COLD, 10 EARTH MASS PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Sumi, T.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Becker, A. C.; Skowron, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, S. E-mail: bennett@nd.edu

    2011-11-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, performed with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m{sub p} = 10.4 {+-} 1.7 M{sub +} and orbits a star of mass M{sub *} = 0.56 {+-} 0.09 M{sub sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 3.2{sub -0.5}{sup +1.9} AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6{sub -1.5}{sup +7+7} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure the microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a 'failed' gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.

  1. Measurement of the mass difference between t and t quarks.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-04-15

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and t quarks using tt candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron pp Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6  fb(-1), we measure a mass difference, ΔM(top) = M(t) - M(t) = -3.3 ± 1.4(stat) ± 1.0(syst)  GeV/c2, approximately 2 standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference.

  2. Measurement of mass distribution of chemical species in aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    Aerosols may be generated through the nebulizing of solutions and the evaporation of their solvent, leaving the dry solute particles. Attention is presently given to a method for the direct determination of the masses of chemical species in individual aerosol particles on a continuous, real-time basis, using mass spectrometry. After the aerosol particles are introduced into the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the particles impinge on a hot rhenium filament in the mass spectrometer's ion source. The resulting vapor plume is ionized by electron bombardment, and a pulse of ions is generated by each particle. The intensities of different masses in the ion pulses can then be measured by the mass spectrometer.

  3. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Freitas, A.; Schmitt, M.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  4. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  5. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  6. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  7. Constraints in measuring body mass during simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuhito; Fujii, Yusaku

    2008-12-01

    The authors proposed "Space Scale" concept for measuring astronaut body mass in spacecraft on orbit. For the development of the flight hardware, accuracy/precision/operability verification tests under simulated microgravity are mandatory. We tested our device on a business jet flying parabolas to simulate microgravity. In addition to design constraints from microgravity, human factor engineering aspects also had to be dealt with. Methods (1) Mass was calculated based on (Mass) = (Force) x (Acceleration). (2) For Flight Test Series #1, a metal dummy mass of 9.37kg was used on parabolic flight tests. (3)For Flight Test Series #2, human subject mass was measured. (4) To eliminate acceleration noise from cabin vibration and air turbulence, data were rigorously filtered post-flight. Results With Flight Test Series #1, mass of the dummy was successfully derived with the standard uncertainty of 2.1 % for single measurement, and 0.7 % for the mean value of 12 measurements. Each measurement duration was less than 3sec., with rubber cord length reduction of 1 m. Conclusion The parabolic flight environment was a noisy acceleration field. Future studies should look more into human factor engineering aspects.

  8. MEASURING THE MASS OF SOLAR SYSTEM PLANETS USING PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Van Straten, W.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Purver, M. B.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Stairs, I. H.

    2010-09-10

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) x10{sup -4} M {sub sun}, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  9. Direct mass measurements of the heaviest elements with Penning traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M.

    2015-12-01

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry (PTMS) is a mature technique to provide atomic masses with highest precision. Applied to radionuclides it enables us to investigate their nuclear structure via binding energies and derived quantities such as nucleon separation energies. Recent progress in slowing down radioactive ion beams in buffer gas cells in combination with advanced ion-manipulation techniques has opened the door to access even the elements above fermium by PTMS. Such elements are produced in complete fusion-evaporation reactions of heavy ions with lead, bismuth, and actinide targets at very low rates. Pioneering high-precision mass measurements of nobelium and lawrencium isotopes have been performed with SHIPTRAP at the GSI Darmstadt, Germany. These have illustrated that direct mass measurements provide reliable anchor points to pin down decay chains and that they allow mapping nuclear shell effects, the reason for the very existence of the heaviest elements. Thus, accurate masses contribute to our understanding of these exotic nuclei with extreme proton numbers. In this article experimental challenges in mass measurements of the heaviest elements with Penning traps are discussed. Some illustrative examples of the nuclear structure features displayed based on the presently known masses are given.

  10. A highly efficient measure of mass segregation in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczak, C.; Spurzem, R.; Henning, Th.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Investigations of mass segregation are of vital interest for the understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of stellar systems on a wide range of spatial scales. A consistent analysis requires a robust measure among different objects and well-defined comparison with theoretical expectations. Various methods have been used for this purpose but usually with limited significance, quantifiability, and application to both simulations and observations. Aims: We aim at developing a measure of mass segregation with as few parameters as possible, robustness against peculiar configurations, independence of mass determination, simple implementation, stable algorithm, and that is equally well adoptable for data from either simulations or observations. Methods: Our method is based on the minimum spanning tree (MST) that serves as a geometry-independent measure of concentration. Compared to previous such approaches we obtain a significant refinement by using the geometrical mean as an intermediate-pass. Results: The geometrical mean boosts the sensitivity compared to previous applications of the MST. It thus allows the detection of mass segregation with much higher confidence and for much lower degrees of mass segregation than other approaches. The method shows in particular very clear signatures even when applied to small subsets of the entire population. We confirm with high significance strong mass segregation of the five most massive stars in the Orion nebula cluster (ONC). Conclusions: Our method is the most sensitive general measure of mass segregation so far and provides robust results for both data from simulations and observations. As such it is ideally suited for tracking mass segregation in young star clusters and to investigate the long standing paradigm of primordial mass segregation by comparison of simulations and observations.

  11. A precision measurement of the mass of the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davis, G. A.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, A.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Kooten, R.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2004-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics contains parameters-such as particle masses-whose origins are still unknown and which cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top quark (Mt) and W boson (MW) constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of Mt can therefore indicate where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a standard model Higgs is consistent with experimental data. As top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only about 10-24s into various final states, reconstructing their masses from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision (of +/- 5.3GeV/c2) when compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the only other measurements available, the new world average for Mt becomes 178.0 +/- 4.3GeV/c2. As a result, the most likely Higgs mass increases from the experimentally excluded value of 96 to 117GeV/c2, which is beyond current experimental sensitivity. The upper limit on the Higgs mass at the 95% confidence level is raised from 219 to 251GeV/c2.

  12. Pion and kaon correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.L.; Wolf, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV {sup 208}Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered {sup 208}Pb + Pb collisions. An upgraded multi-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-pion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au+Au reaction, taken with full event characterization. 35 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The kaon identification system in the NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurkin, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    The fixed target experiment NA62 at CERN aims at measuring the ultra-rare decay K+ →π+ ν ν bar , whose branching ratio is of the order of 10-11. The main challenges faced by the experiment to achieve a 10% precision measurement are the required beam intensity and background rejection factor. The differential Cherenkov detector KTAG must be able to tag charged kaons in an unseparated hadron beam with an average particle rate of 750 MHz, of which 45 MHz are kaons, with a time precision of at least 100 ps and an efficiency higher than 95%. The additional pion contamination must be kept lower than 10-4. The RICH has been designed to separate charged pions from muons in the momentum range 15 < p < 35 GeV / c, contributing to a further muon rejection factor of 100. In order to match the upstream and downstream activity, a time resolution similar to the one of KTAG must be achieved. The RICH is also used as a primitive trigger generator for the level-0 trigger system. The construction and commissioning of both detectors was completed and their performances were studied during the 2014-2015 runs.

  14. Top quark mass measurement at CDF Run-II

    SciTech Connect

    T. Maruyama

    2004-05-11

    CDF has resumed the top quark mass measurement with upgraded detectors and Tevatron complex. High statistics should allow us to determine the top mass with an uncertainty of a few GeV/c{sup 2} by the end of Run II. The current measured value, using an integrated luminosity of {approx} 108 pb{sup -1}, is 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7} (stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} (lepton + jets with one b-jet tagged mode: the current best mode), which is consistent with RunI measurements.

  15. Measurement of the mass of the D0 meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pappenheimer, C.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report a measurement of the D0 meson mass using the decay chain D*(2010)+→D0π+ with D0→K-K-K+π+. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(4S) resonance, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 477fb-1. We obtain m(D0)=(1864.841±0.048±0.063)MeV, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The uncertainty of this measurement is half that of the best previous measurement.

  16. Investigating Young Children's Learning of Mass Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea; Ferguson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results of a design experiment regarding young children's concepts of mass measurement. The research built on an earlier study in which a framework of "growth points" in early mathematics learning and a related, task-based, one-to-one interview to assess children's understanding of the measurement of mass…

  17. Investigating Young Children's Learning of Mass Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea; Ferguson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results of a design experiment regarding young children's concepts of mass measurement. The research built on an earlier study in which a framework of "growth points" in early mathematics learning and a related, task-based, one-to-one interview to assess children's understanding of the measurement of mass…

  18. Body Mass Index Measurement in Schools. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    As the United States continues to search for answers to the growing problem of obesity among children and adolescents, much attention has focused on body mass index (BMI) measurement programs in schools. The BMI is the ratio of weight to height squared. It is often used to assess weight status because it is relatively easy to measure and it…

  19. Mass measuring instrument for use under microgravity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yusaku; Yokota, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Seiji; Sugita, Yoichi; Ito, Hitomi; Shimada, Kazuhito

    2008-05-15

    A prototype instrument for measuring astronaut body mass under microgravity conditions has been developed and its performance was evaluated by parabolic flight tests. The instrument, which is the space scale, is applied as follows. Connect the subject astronaut to the space scale with a rubber cord. Use a force transducer to measure the force acting on the subject and an optical interferometer to measure the velocity of the subject. The subject's mass is calculated as the impulse divided by the velocity change, i.e., M={integral}Fdt/{delta}v. Parabolic flight by using a jet aircraft produces a zero-gravity condition lasting approximately 20 s. The performance of the prototype space scale was evaluated during such a flight by measuring the mass of a sample object.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.

    1999-09-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using six candidate events for the process pp¯-->tt¯+X-->l+νbl-ν¯b¯+X, observed in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab pp¯ collider. Using maximum likelihood fits to the dynamics of the decays, we measure a mass for the top quark of mt=168.4+/-12.3(stat)+/-3.6(syst) Gev. We combine this result with our previous measurement in the tt¯-->l+jets channel to obtain mt=172.1+/-7.1 GeV as the best value of the mass of the top quark measured by D0.

  1. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  2. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  3. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  4. Mass Measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orford, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Roughly half of the elements heavier than iron are thought to be produced through the astrophysical r process of nucleosynthesis. Despite its large influence in explaining the observed abundance of heavy elements, much of the r process is still poorly understood. A more thorough library of nuclear data of neutron-rich nuclei is needed to improve the accuracy and progression of r-process calculations. In particular, accurate mass measurements are in demand due to the strong coupling between mass and other nuclear properties such as β-decay and neutron-capture rates. For nearly three decades, direct mass measurements conducted by Penning trap mass spectrometers have proven to be an accurate method of determining masses to a precision suitable for r-process calculations (Δm / m <10-7). The Canadian Penning trap mass spectrometer (CPT) is currently located in the CARIBU facility at Argonne National Laboratory where intense radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei are produced from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Since moving into CARIBU the CPT has successfully measured the masses of more than 110 isotopes to a typical precision of 15 keV/c2. In order to push measurements to nuclides further from stability which may play a part in the r process, a number of upgrades to both the CPT and CARIBU have been made. A Multi-Reflection Time-Of-Flight (MR-TOF) mass separator has been added to the CARIBU beamline providing cleaner beams to low-energy experiments, and at the CPT a position-sensitive multichannel plate detector has been installed to facilitate a contemporary phase-imaging mass measurement technique. This technique allows for faster measurements with fewer ions and provides more than an order of magnitude improvement in mass resolving power without loss in precision. These upgrades, alongside recent measurements of neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes will be discussed. This work was supported by NSERC Canada. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility

  5. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  6. New mass measurements of neutron rich nuclides at the NSCL.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, Milan; Amthor, Matthew; Bazin, Daniel; Becerril, Ana; Elliot, Thom; Gade, Alexandra; Galaviz, Daniel; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Pereira, Jorge; Portillo, Mauricio; Rogers, Andrew; Schatz, Hendrik; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Ed; Stolz, Andreas; Wallace, Mark

    2007-10-01

    A mass measurement of exotic isotopes in the region of 68Fe has been performed at the NSCL using the time-of-flight technique recently established. Experimental knowledge of the mass of very neutron rich nuclides is an important input for astrophysical applications, such as nucleosynthesis during the r-process and the evolution of matter in the crust of an accreting neutron star, where present calculations are mostly limited to using theoretical mass extrapolations. We present the details of the experimental set up, as well as preliminary results.

  7. MASS MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY TRANSIENTS: IS THERE A MASS GAP?

    SciTech Connect

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D.; Farr, Will M.; Kalogera, Vicky

    2012-09-20

    We explore possible systematic errors in the mass measurements of stellar mass black holes (BHs). We find that significant errors can arise from the assumption of zero or constant emission from the accretion flow, which is commonly used when determining orbital inclination by modeling ellipsoidal variations. For A0620-00, the system with the best available data, we show that typical data sets and analysis procedures can lead to systematic underestimates of the inclination by 10 Degree-Sign or more. A careful examination of the available data for the 15 other X-ray transients with low-mass donors suggests that this effect may significantly reduce the BH mass estimates in several other cases, most notably that of GRO J0422+32. Assuming that GRO J0422+32 behaves similarly to A0620-00, the reduction in the mass of GRO J0422+32 fills the mass gap between the low end of the distribution and the maximum theoretical neutron star mass, as has been identified in previous studies. Otherwise, we find that the mass distribution retains other previously identified characteristics, namely a peak around 8 M{sub Sun }, a paucity of sources with masses below 5 M{sub Sun }, and a sharp drop-off above 10 M{sub Sun }.

  8. Improved W boson mass measurement with the DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Anderson, E. W.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frame, K. C.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Mutaf, Y.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2002-07-01

    We have measured the W boson mass using the DØ detector and a data sample of 82 pb-1 from the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This measurement uses W-->eν decays, where the electron is close to a boundary of a central electromagnetic calorimeter module. Such ``edge'' electrons have not been used in any previous DØ analysis, and represent a 14% increase in the W boson sample size. For these electrons, new response and resolution parameters are determined, and revised backgrounds and underlying event energy flow measurements are made. When the current measurement is combined with previous DØ W boson mass measurements, we obtain MW=80.483+/-0.084 GeV. The 8% improvement from the previous DØ measurement is primarily due to the improved determination of the response parameters for non-edge electrons using the sample of Z bosons with non-edge and edge electrons.

  9. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of t$\\bar{t}$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  10. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tmore » $$\\bar{t}$$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$$\\bar{p}$$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  11. Measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

    2012-04-01

    The mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb{sup -1} of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of m{sub top} = 173.2 {+-} 0.9 GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of m{sub top} at the Tevatron.

  12. KTAG: The Kaon Identification Detector for CERN experiment NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    In the study of ultra-rare kaon decays, CERN experiment NA62 exploits an unseparated monochromatic (75 GeV/c) beam of charged particles of flux 800 MHz, of which 50 MHz are K+. Kaons are identified with more than 95% efficiency, a time resolution of better than 100 ps, and misidentification of less than 10-4 using KTAG, a differential, ring-focussed, Cherenkov detector. KTAG utilises 8 sets of 48 Hamamatsu PMTs, of which 32 are of type 9880 and 16 of type 7400, with signals fed directly to the differential inputs of NINO front-end boards and then to TDC cards within the TEL62 system. Leading and trailing edges of the PMT signal are digitised, enabling slewing corrections to be made, and a mean hit rate of 5 MHz per PMT is supported. The electronics is housed within a cooled and insulated Faraday cage with environmental monitoring capabilities.

  13. Studies of the Strange Sea-Quarks Spin with Kaons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Voloshin, Andrew; Goodwill, Justin; Lendacky, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that quarks and gluons give the substructure to the nucleons. and understanding of the spin structure of the nucleon in terms of quarks and gluons has been the goal of intense investigations during the last decades. The determination of strangeness is challenging and the only way of determining the strange distribution accurately from data is to improve the semi-inclusive information. This talk is focused on the determination of the strange sea contribution to the nucleon spin through the pseudo-scalar method using semi-inclusive Kaon detection technique with CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab. A Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is under construction and will be used for pion-kaon-proton separation. National Science Foundation #1615067.

  14. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-02

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  15. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-01

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  16. MEASURING THE MASS OF 4UO900-40 DYNAMICALLY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Etzel, Paul B.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurements of neutron star masses are needed to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter - of importance to both particle physics and the astrophysics of neutron stars - and to identify the evolutionary track of the progenitor stars that form neutron stars. The best measured values of the mass of 4UO900-40 (= Vela XR-l), 1.86 +/- 0.16 Msun (Barziv et al. 2001) and 1.93 +/- 0.20 Msun (Abubekerov et al. 2004), make it a leading candidate for the most massive neutron star known. The direct relationship between the maximum mass of neutron stars and the equation of state of ultra-dense matter makes 4UO900-40 an important neutron star mass to determine accurately. The confidence interval on previous mass estimates, obtained from observations that include parameters determined by non-dynamical methods, are not small enough to significantly restrict possible equations of state. We describe here a purely dynamical method for determining the mass of 4UO900-40, an X-ray pulsar, using the reprocessed UV pulses emitted by its BO.5Ib companion. One can derive the instantaneous radial velocity of each component by simultaneous X-ray and UV observations at the two quadratures of the system. The Doppler shift caused by the primary's rotational velocity and the illumination pattern of the X-rays on the primary, two of the three principal contributors to the uncertainty on the derived mass of the neutron star, almost exactly cancel by symmetry in this method. A heuristic measurement of the mass of 4UO900-40 using observations obtained previously with the High Speed Photometer on HST is given in Appendix A.

  17. Kaon Photoproduction at Large Space-Like Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    O.K. Baker

    2000-05-12

    The ^1H(e,e'K^+)Lambda reaction was studied as a function of squared four-momentum transfer, Q^2, between 0.52 and 2.00 (GeV/c)^2, and of the virtual photon polarization parameter, epsilon, with high precision. The experiment, E93018, was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 1996. The results of the experiment show the need for revision of the previous models of kaon electroproduction in this kinematic regime.

  18. Classical illustrations of CP violation in kaon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Jonathan L.; Slezak, Scott A.

    2001-01-01

    It is easy to construct classical two-state systems illustrating the behavior of the short-lived and long-lived neutral K mesons in the limit of CP conservation. The emulation of CP violation is more tricky, but is provided by the two-dimensional motion of a Foucault pendulum. Analogies are drawn between the pendulum and observables in neutral kaon decays. An emulation of CP and CPT violation using electric circuits is also discussed.

  19. Mixing kaons with mixed action chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Christopher

    2006-12-01

    We calculate the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK , to next-to-leading order in mixed action (domain-wall valence with staggered sea quarks) chiral perturbation theory. We find the expres- sion for BK in this mixed-action case only differs from the continuum partially quenched expres- sion by an additional analytic term. Additionally, in preparation for a lattice calculation of BK with a mixed action, we discuss quantitatively the effects of the taste violations as well as finite volume effects.

  20. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  1. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, Sub-Neptune Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing exoplanet detection method is uniquely sensitive to cold, low-mass planets which orbit beyond the snow-line, where the most massive planets are thought to form. The early statistical results from microlensing indicate that Neptune-Saturn mass planets located beyond the snow-line are substantially more common than their counterparts in closer orbits that have found by the Doppler radial velocity method. We present the discovery of the planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, which demonstrates that the gravitational microlensing method also has the capability to measure the masses of cold, low-mass planets. The mass measurements of the host star and the planet are made possible by the detection of the microlensing parallax signal due to the orbital motion or the Earth as well as observations from the EPOXI spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The microlensing light curve indicates a planetary host star mass of M(sun) = 0.54 + / - 0.05M(sun) located at a distance of DL= 2.94 _ 0.21 kpc, orbited by a planet of mass mp= 9.8 +/-1.1M(Earth) with a semi-major axis of a = 3.1(+1.9-0.4)MAU.

  2. Observation and mass measurement of the baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-08-03

    We report the observation and measurement of the mass of the bottom, strange baryon Xi(b)- through the decay chain Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, where J/psi-->mu+mu-, Xi- -->Lambdapi-, and Lambda-->ppi-. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 6.6 x 10(-15), or 7.7 Gaussian standard deviations. The Xi(b)- mass is measured to be 5792.9+/-2.5(stat) +/- 1.7(syst) MeV/c2.

  3. Mass Property Measurements of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft mass properties were measured on a spin balance table prior to launch. This paper discusses the requirements and issues encountered with the setup, qualification, and testing using the spin balance table, and the idiosyncrasies encountered with the test system. The final mass measurements were made in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at Kennedy Space Center on the fully assembled and fueled spacecraft. This set of environmental tests required that the control system for the spin balance machine be at a remote location, which posed additional challenges to the operation of the machine

  4. Mass Property Measurements of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft mass properties were measured on a spin balance table prior to launch. This paper discusses the requirements and issues encountered with the setup, qualification, and testing using the spin balance table, and the idiosyncrasies encountered with the test system. The final mass measurements were made in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at Kennedy Space Center on the fully assembled and fueled spacecraft. This set of environmental tests required that the control system for the spin balance machine be at a remote location, which posed additional challenges to the operation of the machine

  5. Measuring the mass of the W at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, S.; Womersley, J.

    1997-01-01

    We explore the ability of the Large Hadron Collider to measure the mass of the W boson. We believe that a precision better than {approximately} 15 MeV could be attained, based on a year of operation at low luminosity (10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}). If this is true, this measurement will be the world`s best determination of the W mass. We feel this interesting opportunity warrants investigation in more detail. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  7. Mass and lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei in storage rings.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Bernhard; Geissel, Hans; Münzenberg, Gottfried

    2008-01-01

    Mass and lifetime measurements lead to the discovery and understanding of basic properties of matter. The isotopic nature of the chemical elements, nuclear binding, and the location and strength of nuclear shells are the most outstanding examples leading to the development of the first nuclear models. More recent are the discoveries of new structures of nuclides far from the valley of stability. A new generation of direct mass measurements which allows the exploration of extended areas of the nuclear mass surface with high accuracy has been opened up with the combination of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR and the FRragment Separator FRS at GSI Darmstadt. In-flight separated nuclei are stored in the ring. Their masses are directly determined from the revolution frequency. Dependent on the half-life two complementary methods are applied. Schottky Mass Spectrometry SMS relies on the measurement of the revolution frequency of electron cooled stored ions. The cooling time determines the lower half-life limit to the order of seconds. For Isochronous Mass Spectrometry IMS the ring is operated in an isochronous ion-optical mode. The revolution frequency of the individual ions coasting in the ring is measured using a time-of-flight method. Nuclides with lifetimes down to microseconds become accessible. With SMS masses of several hundreds nuclides have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy in the 2 x 10(-7)-range. This high accuracy and the ability to study large areas of the mass surface are ideal tools to discover new nuclear structure properties and to guide improvements for theoretical mass models. In addition, nuclear half-lives of stored bare and highly charged ions have been measured. This new experimental development is a significant progress since nuclear decay characteristics are mostly known for neutral atoms. For bare and highly charged ions new nuclear decay modes become possible, such as bound-state beta decay. Dramatic changes in the nuclear lifetime

  8. Kaon Contributions to the Gerasimov-Drell Integrals on the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, T.

    Using KAON-MAID, an operator for kaon photo- and electro-production on the nucleon, we calculate contributions of kaon-hyperon final states to the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) integrals on the proton. We also calculate the corresponding contributions to the forward spin polarizability γ0 of the proton. By extending the operator to the finite Q2 region we then calculate kaon contributions to the generalized GDH integrals, as well as to the longitudinal-transverse polarizability δ0. Our results show relatively small but still sizable contributions.

  9. About Neutral Kaons and Similar Systems:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machet, B.

    Systems of neutral interacting mesons are investigated, concerning in particular their description by an effective Hamiltonian, with a special emphasis on discrete symmetries. Several ambiguities are pointed out. First, the connection to quantum field theory, in which the physical masses mL2 and mS2 are the poles of the full renormalized propagator, shows that, for mass-split binary systems, two mass matrices rather than a single effective one are at work; they correspond to the two values p2=mL^2 and p2=mS^2 of the momentum squared. Transformation properties of the physical eigenstates by discrete symmetries may not reflect the ones of these two mass matrices (and those of the Lagrangian at any given p2). Then, after showing that a bi-orthogonal basis has to be used to diagonalize the complex mass matrix of such unstable systems, and not a bi-unitary transformation, we turn to the ambiguity linked to the commutation of the fields of the K0 and of its charge conjugate /line K0: any constant effective mass matrix is defined, in the (K0, /line K0) basis, up to arbitrary diagonal antisymmetric terms; I use this freedom to deform it in various ways, in both the (K0,/line{K^0}) and (KL,KS) basis, and I study the consequences on the spectrum. CPT symmetry is specially concerned. An effective mass matrix can always be cast into a CPT invariant form, and only T violating eigenstates can never be cast into CP eigenstates. The dual formalism of |in> and mass matrix and CPT symmetry in the framework of quantum field theory will be investigated in connection with experimental results.

  10. Measuring consistent masses for 25 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmig, Brian; Seth, Anil; Ivans, Inese I.; Anderton, Tim; Gregersen, Dylan; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson

    2015-02-01

    We present central velocity dispersions, masses, mass-to-light ratios (M/Ls ), and rotation strengths for 25 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We derive radial velocities of 1951 stars in 12 GCs from single order spectra taken with Hectochelle on the MMT telescope. To this sample we add an analysis of available archival data of individual stars. For the full set of data we fit King models to derive consistent dynamical parameters for the clusters. We find good agreement between single-mass King models and the observed radial dispersion profiles. The large, uniform sample of dynamical masses we derive enables us to examine trends of M/L with cluster mass and metallicity. The overall values of M/L and the trends with mass and metallicity are consistent with existing measurements from a large sample of M31 clusters. This includes a clear trend of increasing M/L with cluster mass and lower than expected M/Ls for the metal-rich clusters. We find no clear trend of increasing rotation with increasing cluster metallicity suggested in previous work.

  11. Identification and Quantitative Measurements of Chemical Species by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zondlo, Mark A.; Bomse, David S.

    2005-01-01

    The development of a miniature gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system for the measurement of chemical species of interest to combustion is described. The completed system is a fully-contained, automated instrument consisting of a sampling inlet, a small-scale gas chromatograph, a miniature, quadrupole mass spectrometer, vacuum pumps, and software. A pair of computer-driven valves controls the gas sampling and introduction to the chromatographic column. The column has a stainless steel exterior and a silica interior, and contains an adsorbent of that is used to separate organic species. The detection system is based on a quadrupole mass spectrometer consisting of a micropole array, electrometer, and a computer interface. The vacuum system has two miniature pumps to maintain the low pressure needed for the mass spectrometer. A laptop computer uses custom software to control the entire system and collect the data. In a laboratory demonstration, the system separated calibration mixtures containing 1000 ppm of alkanes and alkenes.

  12. A Critical Assessment of Stellar Mass Measurement Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey J.; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Bell, Eric; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fazio, Giovanni; Finlator, Kristian; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Naveen; Santini, Paola; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2015-07-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at investigating the main sources of uncertainty in measuring the observable parameters in galaxies from their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In the first paper we presented a detailed account of the photometric redshift measurements and an error analysis of this process. In this paper we perform a comprehensive study of the main sources of random and systematic error in stellar mass estimates for galaxies, and their relative contributions to the associated error budget. Since there is no prior knowledge of the stellar mass of galaxies (unlike their photometric redshifts), we use mock galaxy catalogs with simulated multi-waveband photometry and known redshift, stellar mass, age and extinction for individual galaxies. The multi-waveband photometry for the simulated galaxies were generated in 13 filters spanning from U-band to mid-infrared wavelengths. Given different parameters affecting stellar mass measurement (photometric signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), SED fitting errors and systematic effects), the inherent degeneracies and correlated errors, we formulated different simulated galaxy catalogs to quantify these effects individually. For comparison, we also generated catalogs based on observed photometric data of real galaxies in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South field, spanning the same passbands. The simulated and observed catalogs were provided to a number of teams within the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey collaboration to estimate the stellar masses for individual galaxies. A total of 11 teams participated, with different combinations of stellar mass measurement codes/methods, population synthesis models, star formation histories, extinction and age. For each simulated galaxy, the differences between the input stellar masses, Minput, and those estimated by each team, Mest, is defined as {{Δ }}{log}(M)\\equiv {log}({M}{estimated})-{log}({M}{input}), and used to

  13. Investigation of the low-energy kaons hadronic interactions in light nuclei by AMADEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordo, A.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Fabbietti, L.; Marton, J.; Piscicchia, K.; Sirghi, D.; Tucakovic, I.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Wycech, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-11-01

    The AMADEUS experiment deals with the investigation of the low-energy kaon-nuclei hadronic interaction at the DAΦNE collider at LNF-INFN. This study is fundamental to solve longstanding questions concerning interactions of strange quarks in the non-perturbative QCD. AMADEUS step 0 consisted in the reanalysis of the 2004/2005 KLOE data, exploiting K- absorptions in H, 4He, 9Be and 12C, leading to the first invariant mass spectroscopy study with very low momentum (100 MeV/c) in-flight K- captures. In this paper, we present an overview of the analysis strategy, with particular emphasis on the results obtained in the analyses of the events with correlated Σ0 and p.

  14. The kaon B-parameter from 2+1-flavor Domain-Wall-Fermion lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Saul; Anthony, David

    2007-11-01

    We present the final results of the RBC/UKQCD calculation of the kaon B-parameter on 2+1- flavor domain-wall fermion lattices at a^?1 = 1.73(3) GeV. We simulate on two lattice volumes of about (1.8 fm)^3 and (2.7 fm)^3, with the lightest valence pion about on the large volume approximately 250 MeV. The light pion masses and our chiral fermion action allow us to compare lattice data to NLO chiral perturbation theory, facilitating a controlled extrapolation to the physical point. We present a final result including nonperturbative renormalization and detailed systematic errors. Our final result is BMS/K (2 GeV) = 0.524(10)(28).

  15. Probing a dark photon using rare leptonic kaon and pion decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2017-04-01

    Rare leptonic kaon and pion decays K+ (π+) →μ+νμe+e- can be used to probe a dark photon of mass O (10) MeV, with the background coming from the mediation of a virtual photon. This is most relevant for the 16.7-MeV dark photon proposed to explain a 6.8σ anomaly recently observed in 8Be transitions by the Atomki Collaboration. We evaluate the reach of future experiments for the dark photon with vectorial couplings to the standard model fermions except for the neutrinos, and show that a great portion of the preferred 16.7-MeV dark photon parameter space can be decisively probed. We also show the use of angular distributions to further distinguish the signal from the background.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Carlos Andres

    2002-01-01

    At the Tevatron, protons and antiprotons collide with a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. In this energy range the dominant source of top quarks is the production of tt¯ pairs via quark-antiquark annhilation and gluon-gluon fusion. We present our analyses to determine the mass of the top quark reconstructed through the "lepton+jets" decay channel in the 106 +/- 4.1 pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from 1992--1996. In the past, the top mass was obtained by comparing the observed kinematic features of top events to those predicted for different top quark masses. These distributions are known as templates. While any kinematic variable, which exhibits sensitivity to the top mass can be used to calculate the mass of the top quark, the lowest statistical uncertainty is achieved by reconstructing the top mass from the decay products of the tt¯ pair. It was also observed that it is possible to obtain a better estimate of the top mass by fitting the different templates to a smooth function. Previously, we have used a combination of a Gaussian and a Gamma function to fit the distributions. In this analysis, we find that using a Neural Network (NN) to fit the distribution gives slightly better results, and that the NN fitting technique is applicable to any kinematic variable. Following this recipe the top mass is measured to be 177.9 +/- 4.7(stat.) +/- 4.6(syst.) GeV/c2 when using the reconstructed mass, Mrec. When we use the total transverse energy of the events, HT, the mass of the top quark is found to be 204.4 +/- 9.2(stat.) +/- 9.2(syst.) GeV/c2. As noted, there are different kinematic variables that can be used to calculate the top mass. A Neural Network provides a simple and elegant way of combining all of these variables which have mass information. The idea is that combining the information from more than one kinematic variable would result in a more accurate measurement of the top mass. Therefore, this NN based technique uses a

  17. A New Top Mass Measurement in The Dilepton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, Marco; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U.

    2008-01-01

    The top quark discovery completed the present picture of the fundamental constituents of the nature. Since then, the Collider Detector at Fermilab and D0 Collaborations have been spending great efforts to measure its properties better. About 30 times larger than the second heaviest quark, the mass of the top has been measured with increased statistic and more and more sophisticated techniques in order to reduce as much as possible its uncertainty. This is because the top is expected to play a fundamental role in the Standard Model. The value of its mass sets boundaries on the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson, and perhaps more appealing, studies of its properties might lead to the discovery of new physics.

  18. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1999-01-15

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  19. Improvements to TITAN's mass measurement and decay spectroscopy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, D.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Alanssari, M.; Chowdhury, U.; Even, J.; Finlay, A.; Gallant, A. T.; Good, M.; Klawitter, R.; Kootte, B.; Li, T.; Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Mayer, A. J.; Schultz, B. E.; Schupp, R.; Short, D. A.; Andreoiu, C.; Dilling, J.; Gwinner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of β -stability than ever before goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their less exotic counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity, and open the door to access isotopes not available from the ISOL method via in-trap decay and recapture. This was recently demonstrated during TITAN's mass measurement of 30 Al. The EBIT's decay spectroscopy setup was commissioned with a successful branching ratio and half-life measurement of 124 Cs. Charge breeding in the EBIT increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap for mass measurement, so a new Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET), which aims to cool highly charged ions with an electron plasma, is undergoing offline commissioning. Already CPET has demonstrated the trapping and self-cooling of a room-temperature electron plasma that was stored for several minutes. A new detector has been installed inside the CPET magnetic field which will allow for in-magnet charged particle detection.

  20. Microwave measurement of the mass of frozen hydrogen pellets

    DOEpatents

    Talanker, Vera; Greenwald, Martin

    1990-01-01

    A nondestructive apparatus and method for measuring the mass of a moving object, based on the perturbation of the dielectric character of a resonant microwave cavity caused by the object passing through the cavity. An oscillator circuit is formed with a resonant cavity in a positive feedback loop of a microwave power amplifier. The moving object perturbs the resonant characteristics of the cavity causing a shift in the operating frequency of the oscillator proportional to the ratio of the pellet volume to the volume of the cavity. Signals from the cavity oscillation are mixed with a local oscillator. Then the IF frequency from the mixer is measured thereby providing a direct measurement of pellet mass based upon known physical properties and relationships. This apparatus and method is particularly adapted for the measurement of frozen hydrogen pellets.

  1. Laser Adaptive System for Measurement of Molecule Mass and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashko, R. V.; Kulchin, Y. N.; Efimov, T. A.; Sergeev, A. A.; Nepomnyashiy, A. V.

    A Laser adaptive microweighting system for measurement of molecules mass based on the principles of adaptive holog aphic interferometry is proposed and experimentally tested in task of gas concentration measurement. A sensitive element of the system is a microcantilever coated by a layer of chitosan, which can adsorb different molecules. Changes in gas concentration re ult in change in mass of molecules adsorbed in chitosan, and, as sequence, result in change in natural frequency of cantilever oscillations, which are measured by an adaptive holographic interferometer. The operation of the system has been experimentally demonstrated in measurement of water vapor concentration. The detected change in concentration of H2O molecules amounted to 125 ppm.

  2. Mass Measurements of Black Holes in X-Ray Transients: Is There a Mass Gap?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, C. D.; Farr, W. M.; Kalogera, V.

    2012-05-01

    We present a framework to estimate the systematic error in mass measurements of stellar mass black holes. We find that the dominant error arises from assuming zero or constant emission from the accretion disk when fitting orbital inclination. To quantify the effects of these assumptions, we develop a method to characterize the time variability of disk emission in X-ray binary lightcurves based on long-term monitoring of the source A0620-00. Using this characterization, we simulate a large sample of A0620-00 lightcurves and fit each of them for inclination with a star-only model of ellipsoidal variability. The resulting inclination estimates are typically 10° less than the value obtained by Cantrell et al. (2010), which accounts for variable disk emission. The systematic error due to neglecting disk emission can be predicted from the nonstellar light (NSL) fraction of the lightcurve. We use this result to generalize the systematic error for A0620-00 to 15 additional sources. We estimate the NSL fraction of each system by scaling the typical NSL fraction of A0620-00 relative to the system’s orbital parameters. The mass estimates that incorporate these calculated errors are as much as 2.3 times smaller than other estimates in the literature. Using the corrected mass estimates, we perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution. The distribution inferred from fitting a power law model peaks near 8 solar masses and falls off sharply above 10 solar masses. In contrast to prior studies of the mass distribution, our analysis does not produce a significant gap between the smallest black hole mass and the maximum theoretical neutron star mass.

  3. MEASURING TINY MASS ACCRETION RATES ONTO YOUNG BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2009-05-10

    We present low-resolution Keck I/LRIS spectra spanning from 3200 to 9000 A of nine young brown dwarfs and three low-mass stars in the TW Hya Association and in Upper Sco. The optical spectral types of the brown dwarfs range from M5.5 to M8.75, though two have near-IR spectral types of early L dwarfs. We report new accretion rates derived from excess Balmer continuum emission for the low-mass stars TW Hya and Hen 3-600A and the brown dwarfs 2MASS J12073347-3932540, UScoCTIO 128, SSSPM J1102-3431, USco J160606.29-233513.3, DENIS-P J160603.9-205644, and Oph J162225-240515B, and upper limits on accretion for the low-mass star Hen 3-600B and the brown dwarfs UScoCTIO 112, Oph J162225-240515A, and USco J160723.82-221102.0. For the six brown dwarfs in our sample that are faintest at short wavelengths, the accretion luminosity or upper limit is measurable only when the image is binned over large wavelength intervals. This method extends our sensitivity to accretion rate down to {approx}10{sup -13} M{sub sun}yr{sup -1} for brown dwarfs. Since the ability to measure an accretion rate from excess Balmer continuum emission depends on the contrast between excess continuum emission and the underlying photosphere, for objects with earlier spectral types the upper limit on accretion rate is much higher. Absolute uncertainties in our accretion rate measurements of {approx}3-5 include uncertainty in accretion models, brown dwarf masses, and distance. The accretion rate of 2 x 10{sup -12} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} onto 2MASS J12073347-3932540 is within 15% of two previous measurements, despite large changes in the H{alpha} flux.

  4. Mass measurement using energy spectra in three-body decays

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; ...

    2016-05-24

    In previous works we have demonstrated how the energy distribution of massless decay products in two body decays can be used to measure the mass of decaying particles. In this study, we show how such results can be generalized to the case of multi-body decays. The key ideas that allow us to deal with multi-body final states are an extension of our previous results to the case of massive decay products and the factorization of the multi-body phase space. The mass measurement strategy that we propose is distinct from alternative methods because it does not require an accurate reconstruction ofmore » the entire event, as it does not involve, for instance, the missing transverse momentum, but rather requires measuring only the visible decay products of the decay of interest. To demonstrate the general strategy, we study a supersymmetric model wherein pair-produced gluinos each decay to a stable neutralino and a bottom quark-antiquark pair via an off -shell bottom squark. The combinatorial background stemming from the indistinguishable visible final states on both decay sides can be treated by an “event mixing” technique, the performance of which is discussed in detail. In conclusion, taking into account dominant backgrounds, we are able to show that the mass of the gluino and, in favorable cases, that of the neutralino can be determined by this mass measurement strategy.« less

  5. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  6. High-Precision Measurement of the Proton's Atomic Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiße, F.; Köhler-Langes, F.; Rau, S.; Hou, J.; Junck, S.; Kracke, A.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Werth, G.; Blaum, K.; Sturm, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the precise measurement of the atomic mass of a single proton with a purpose-built Penning-trap system. With a precision of 32 parts per trillion our result not only improves on the current CODATA literature value by a factor of 3, but also disagrees with it at a level of about 3 standard deviations.

  7. Mass measurement using energy spectra in three-body decays

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2016-05-24

    In previous works we have demonstrated how the energy distribution of massless decay products in two body decays can be used to measure the mass of decaying particles. In this study, we show how such results can be generalized to the case of multi-body decays. The key ideas that allow us to deal with multi-body final states are an extension of our previous results to the case of massive decay products and the factorization of the multi-body phase space. The mass measurement strategy that we propose is distinct from alternative methods because it does not require an accurate reconstruction of the entire event, as it does not involve, for instance, the missing transverse momentum, but rather requires measuring only the visible decay products of the decay of interest. To demonstrate the general strategy, we study a supersymmetric model wherein pair-produced gluinos each decay to a stable neutralino and a bottom quark-antiquark pair via an off -shell bottom squark. The combinatorial background stemming from the indistinguishable visible final states on both decay sides can be treated by an “event mixing” technique, the performance of which is discussed in detail. In conclusion, taking into account dominant backgrounds, we are able to show that the mass of the gluino and, in favorable cases, that of the neutralino can be determined by this mass measurement strategy.

  8. Calibration of nozzle for air mass flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Jan; Kanta, Lukáš

    2017-09-01

    The effort to make calibration measurement of mass flow through a nozzle was not satisfying. Traversing across the pipe radius with Pitot probe was done. The presence of overshoot behind the bend in the pipe was found. The overshoot led to an asymmetric velocity profile.

  9. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  10. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements for high-throughput food lipids profiling.

    PubMed

    Vichi, Stefania; Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, accurate mass measurements by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry with Orbitrap-Exactive working at resolving power R: 100,000 (m/z 200, full width at half maximum) with an accuracy better than 2 ppm in all the mass range (m/z 200 to 2000) were used to show a detailed molecular composition of diverse edible oils and fats. Flow injection was used to introduce samples into the mass spectrometer, obtaining a complete analysis of each sample in less than 10 min, including blanks. Meticulous choice of organic solvents and optimization of the ion source and Orbitrap mass analyzer parameters were carried out, in order to achieve reproducible mass spectra giving reliable elemental compositions of the lipid samples and to prevent carry over. More than 200 elemental compositions attributable to diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols (TAGs), and their oxidation products have been found in the spectra of food lipids from different origin. Several compounds with very close molecular mass could only be resolved through ultrahigh resolution, allowing detailed and robust TAG profiling with a high characterization potential. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  12. Measurements of Masses with the Canadian Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Nystrom, Andrew; Aprahamian, Ani; Brodeur, Maxime; Burdette, Daniel; Buchinger, Fritz; Orford, Rodney; Clark, Jason; Hirsh, Tsviki; Ling-Ying, Lin; Savard, Guy; Burkey, Mary; Klimes, Jeffery; Dwaipayan, Ray; Sharma, Kumar; Morgan, Graeme

    2016-09-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Laboratory is to determine the masses of various isotopes relevant to the rprocess, an astrophysical process thought to be responsible for the creation of half the elements heavier than iron. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at Argonne National Laboratory's ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.0 Curie source of 252Cf. The mass measurements of these nuclei are accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes captured in the trap. This frequency is measured with a position-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP), which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap for different phase accumulation times. This summer, the CPT group was able to successfully measure to a precision of 10 keV/c2 the masses of 142I and 156 , 158 , 159Nd, which are key nuclei needed to more accurately model the rprocess. This also marks the first time that any of these nuclei had ever been measured. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract PHY-1205412, the University of Notre Dame, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Mass Spectrometric Measurement of Martian Krypton and Xenon Isotopic Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Mauersberger, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment provided significant data on the atmospheric composition at the surface of Mars, including measurements of several isotope ratios. However, the limited dynamic range of this mass spectrometer resulted in marginal measurements for the important Kr and Xe isotopic abundance. The Xe-129 to Xe-132 ratio was measured with an uncertainty of 70%, but none of the other isotope ratios for these species were obtained. Accurate measurement of the Xe and Kr isotopic abundance in this atmosphere provides an important data point in testing theories of planetary formation and atmospheric evolution. The measurement is also essential for a stringent test for the Martian origin of the SNC meteorites, since the Kr and Xe fractionation pattern seen in gas trapped in glassy nodules of an SNC (EETA 79001) is unlike any other known solar system resevoir. Current flight mass spectrometer designs combined with the new technology of a high-performance vacuum pumping system show promise for a substantial increase in gas throughput and the dynamic range required to accurately measure these trace species. Various aspects of this new technology are discussed.

  14. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  15. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2012-11-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a EUCLID-like photometric galaxy and cosmic shear survey will be able to constrain the absolute neutrino mass scale. Adopting conservative assumptions about the survey specifications and assuming complete ignorance of the galaxy bias, we estimate that the minimum mass sum of Σm{sub ν} ≅ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5σ to 2.5σ significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from PLANCK. With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4σ. Interestingly, neither PLANCK+shear nor PLANCK+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to Σm{sub ν}, EUCLID-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias ( < 1σ) in the parameter estimation is induced by fitting inaccurate models of the neutrino mass splittings to the mock data, nor does the goodness-of-fit of these models suffer any significant degradation relative to the true one (Δχ{sub eff}{sup 2} < 1)

  16. A precise measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Brian N.

    2007-04-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. Events are selected from the single lepton plus jets final state (t$\\bar{t}$ → W+bW-$\\bar{b}$ → ℓvbq$\\bar{q}$'$\\bar{b}$). The top quark mass is extracted using a calculation of the probability density for a t$\\bar{t}$ final state to resemble a data event. This probability density is a function of both top quark mass and energy scale of calorimeter jets, constrained in situ with the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb-1 integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of top quark mass to date of 170.8 ± 2.2 (stat.) ± 1.4 (syst.) GeV/c2, where the quoted statistical uncertainty includes uncertainty from the determination of the jet energy scale.

  17. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent.

  19. Stochastic evaluation of mass discharge from pointlike concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Ronnie L; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2010-01-15

    The contaminant mass discharge crossing a control plane is an important metric in the assessment of natural attenuation at contaminated sites. For risk-assessment purposes, the mass discharge must be estimated together with a level of uncertainty. We present a conditional Monte Carlo approach that allows estimating the statistical distribution of mass discharge. The approach is based on conditioning multiple realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field on all data available. We jointly determine a first-order decay coefficient in each realization, leading to conditional statistical distributions of all estimated parameters and the total mass discharge. The resulting statistical distribution of contaminant mass discharges can be used in the assessment of risks at the contaminated site. The method is applied to data of hypothetical test cases, which gives the opportunity to compare estimation results to the true field. As concentration data, we account for pointlike measurements obtained in multi-level sampling wells. The obtained empirical distribution of mass discharge crossing the multi-level sampling fence could be well fitted by a log-normal distribution.

  20. Pendulum Mass Affects the Measurement of Articular Friction Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Akelman, Matthew R.; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Jay, Gregory D.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton’s equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton’s model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton’s equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  1. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  2. CAN THE MASSES OF ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS GRAVITATIONAL LENSES BE MEASURED BY TERRESTRIAL PARALLAX?

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Muraki, Y.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Christie, G. W.; Natusch, T.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Skowron, J.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits ≥10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M {sub J} and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ∼40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  3. Can the Masses of Isolated Planetary-mass Gravitational Lenses be Measured by Terrestrial Parallax?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Christie, G. W.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Moorhouse, D. M.; Muraki, Y.; Natusch, T.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Skowron, J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tan, T.-G.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits >=10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M J and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ~40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  4. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  5. Transverse Mass Dependence of Boson Interferometry in Heavy Ion Collision at the CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Rama

    1995-01-01

    First results of the transverse mass, m _{T}, dependence of pi ^+pi^+ and rm K^+K^+ correlations from S + Pb collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon measured by the focusing spectrometer of the NA44 experiment at CERN are presented. Multi-dimensional fits characterize the pion and kaon emission volume. The pion radius parameter decreases with increasing p _{T}. Furthermore, the pion and kaon radii show a common 1/sqrt m_ {T} dependence. This behaviour can be interpreted as a result of a strong momentum-position correlation arising from collective flow. Further, a way to determine source sizes from deuterons is studied and compared with the source sizes obtained from HBT.

  6. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  7. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  8. Neutrino Mass Measurement Using a Directed Mono-Energetic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsifrinovich, Vladimir; Folan, Lorcan

    2015-04-01

    It was shown that a directed mono-energetic neutrino beam can be generated by electron capture beta-decay in a sample with a strong hyperfine field at the radioactive nuclei. We study the conditions required to measure the neutrino rest mass using the recoil force produced by a directed neutrino beam. We consider the displacement of an atomic force microscope cantilever due to such a recoil force. We find the change in the cantilever displacement associated with the non-zero neutrino mass, as a function of nuclear half-life T1 / 2, cantilever spring constant, and temperature. We consider the opportunity to increase the sensitivity of the neutrino mass measurement using averaging of the measurement signal. We show that the optimal time for the signal accumulation is, approximately, 1.8T1 / 2. We compute the optimal signal-to-noise ratio for 119Sb nuclei decaying to 119Sn with a decrease in the nuclear spin from I = 5/2 to I = 3/2, and T1 / 2 = 38.2 hours. Finally, we present the parameters values required for detection of sub-eV neutrino rest mass, and estimate the angular distribution of neutrino radiation as a function of temperature.

  9. MASS MEASUREMENTS ALONG THE RP-PROCESS PATH.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNER,D.S.

    1999-08-30

    The path and termination point for the t-p-process above {sup 56}Ni is uncertain due to a lack of knowledge of nuclear properties, especially masses, near the proton drip line. To address this need we have begun a program to measure masses of nuclei along the r-p-process pathway in the A{approximately}60-80 region using {beta}-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy. Results for {sup 71}Se are presented and a preliminary experiment for {sup 72}Br is described.

  10. Lensing measurements of the mass distribution in SDSS voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2015-12-01

    We measure weak lensing mass profiles of voids from a volume-limited sample of SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We find voids using an algorithm designed to maximize the lensing signal by dividing the survey volume into 2D slices, and then finding holes in this 2D distribution of LRGs. We perform a stacked shear measurement on about 20 000 voids with radii between 15 and 55 Mpc h-1, and redshifts between 0.16 and 0.37. We measure the characteristic radial shear signal of voids with a signal to noise of 7. The mass profile corresponds to a fractional underdensity of about -0.4 inside the void radius and a slow approach to the mean density indicating a partially compensated void structure. We compare our measured shape and amplitude with the predictions of Krause et al. Voids in the galaxy distribution have been extensively modelled using simulations and measured in the SDSS. We discuss how the addition of void mass profiles can enable studies of galaxy formation and cosmology.

  11. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  12. Precision measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, Daniel; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-05-01

    We report precision measurements of the top quark mass using events collected by the D0 and CDF II detectors from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Measurements are presented in multiple decay channels. In addition, we present a combination of the most precise measurements in each channel to date: M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.3{sub stat} {+-} 1.9{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Control System Upgrade for a Mass Property Measurement Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mass Property Measurement Facility (MPMF) at the Goddard Space Flight Center has undergone modifications to ensure the safety of Flight Payloads and the measurement facility. The MPMF has been technically updated to improve reliability and increase the accuracy of the measurements. Modifications include the replacement of outdated electronics with a computer based software control system, the addition of a secondary gas supply in case of a catastrophic failure to the gas supply and a motor controlled emergency stopping feature instead of a hard stop.

  14. High-precision mass measurements for the isobaric multiplet mass equation at A = 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, D. A.; Kankainen, A.; Canete, L.; Block, M.; Cox, D.; Eronen, T.; Fahlander, C.; Forsberg, U.; Gerl, J.; Golubev, P.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Lalović, N.; Lorenz, Ch; Moore, I. D.; Papadakis, P.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rudolph, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2017-06-01

    Masses of 52Co, 52Co m , 52Fe, 52Fe m , and 52Mn have been measured with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer. The isobaric multiplet mass equation for the T = 2 quintet at A = 52 has been studied employing the new mass values. No significant breakdown (beyond the 3σ level) of the quadratic form of the IMME was observed ({χ }2/n=2.4). The cubic coefficient was 6.0(32) keV ({χ }2/n=1.1). The excitation energies for the isomer and the T = 2 isobaric analog state in 52Co have been determined to be 374(13) keV and 2922(13) keV, respectively. The measured mass values for 52Co and 52Co m are 29(10) keV and 16(15) keV higher, respectively, than obtained in a recent storage-ring experiment, and significantly lower than predicted by extrapolations. Consequently, this has an impact on the proton separation energies for 52Co and 53Ni relevant for the astrophysical rapid proton capture process. The Q value for the proton decay from the 19/{2}- isomer in 53Co has been determined with an unprecedented precision, {Q}p=1558.8(17) keV.

  15. Calibration measurements using the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.; Uckan, T.; Sumner, J.; Mattingly, J.; Mihalczo, J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of fissile-mass-flow measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This Flow Monitor is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) that will be installed in at least two Russian Federation (R.F.) blending facilities. The key objectives of the demonstration of the ORNL Flow Monitor are two: (a) demonstrate that the ORNL Flow Monitor equipment is capable of reliably monitoring the mass flow rate of {sup 235}UF{sub 6} gas, and (b) provide a demonstration of ORNL Flow Monitor system in operation with UF{sub 6} flow for a visiting R.F. delegation. These two objectives have been met by the PGDP demonstration, as presented in this paper.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel based on approximately 370 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We employ two different methods to extract the top quark mass. We show that both methods yield consistent results using ensemble tests of events generated with the D0 Monte Carlo simulation. We combine the results from the two methods to obtain a top quark mass m{sub t} = 178.1 {+-} 8.2 GeV. The statistical uncertainty is 6.7 GeV and the systematic uncertainty is 4.8 GeV.

  17. Measurements of the Mass of Coronal Mass Ejections from the EUV Dimming Observed with STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The masses of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) have traditionally been determined from white-light coronagraphs (based on Thomson scattering of electrons), as well as from EUV dimming observed with one spacecraft. Here we report on an improved method of measuring CME masses based on EUV dimming observed with the dual STEREO/EUVI spacecraft in multiple temperature filters that includes 3D volume and density modeling in the dimming region and background corona. As a test we investigate 8 CME events with previous mass determinations from STEREO/COR2, of which 6 cases are reliably detected with EUVI using our automated multi-wavelength detection code. We find CME masses in the range of m_CME = (2-7) * 10^(15) g. The agreement between the two EUVI/A and B spacecraft is m_A/m_B =1.3+/-0.6$ and the consistency with white-light measurements by COR2 is m_EUVI/m_COR2 = 1.1+/-0.3. The consistency between EUVI and COR2 implies no significant mass backflows (or inflows) at r < 4 R_sun and adequate temperature coverage for the bulk of the CME mass in the range of T = 0.5-3.0 MK. The temporal evolution of the EUV dimming allows us also to model the evolution of the CME density n_e(t), volume V(t), height-time h(t), and propagation speed v(t) in terms of an adiabatically expanding self-similar geometry. We determine e-folding EUV dimming times of t_D=1.3+/-1.4 hrs. We test the adiabatic expansion model in terms of the predicted detection delay dt = 0.7 hr between EUVI and COR2 for the fastest CME event (2008-Mar-25) and find good agreement with the observed delay dt = 0.8 hr.

  18. Thermally induced filter bias in TEOM mass measurement.

    PubMed

    Page, Steven J; Tuchman, Donald P; Vinson, Robert P

    2007-07-01

    Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have long used stationary tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOMs) in laboratory settings. They have served to assess the mass concentration of laboratory-generated particulates in experimental dust chambers and they provide a reference method for comparison with other particulate-measuring instruments. Current NIOSH research is focused on further adapting TEOM technology as a wearable personal dust monitor (PDM) for coal mining occupations. This investigation's goal is to help identify, quantify, and provide means for resolving certain TEOM-related error. The present research investigated bias caused by thermal effects on filter assemblies. New filters used in the PDM for 8 h tests show an average positive bias of 25.5 microg, while similar tests of equivalent filters used in two 1400A model TEOMs show an average positive bias of 34.3 microg. The derived bias values allow correction of previously collected biased data. Also, pre-heating the filters for 24 h at 46 degrees C shows significant bias reduction, with PDM pre-heated filters subsequently averaging -3.3 microg and 1400A TEOM filters averaging 5.9 microg. On a single-point comparison to gravimetric sampling, a 25.5 microg bias is only significant at low mass loadings. At 2.5 mg, this bias represents a negligible 1% of the mass measurement. If ordinary linear regression is used, the bias is still insignificant. However, if the more valid weighted linear regression is used, it gives more weight to the smaller dependent variable values, which are more impacted by the bias. Consequently, what is 1% bias on a single high-mass value can translate into a larger bias percentage at high-mass values when performing a weighted regression on data that include a large number of low-mass values.

  19. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with t{bar t} {yields} {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}b{ell}{prime}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{prime} decays. The likelihood is formed as the convolution of the leading-order matrix element and detector resolution functions. The joint likelihood is the product of likelihoods for each of 33 events collected in 340 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, yielding a top quark mass M{sub t} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This first application of a matrix-element technique to t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, decays gives the most precise single measurement of M{sub t} in dilepton events. Combined with other CDF Run II measurements using dilepton events, we measure M{sub t} = 167.9 {+-} 5.2(stat.) {+-} 3.7(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Measurement of Long-Lived Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, David; Phillips, Fred M.

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 129I can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10-12 to 10-15 and as few as 105 atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of half-lives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences.

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Elmore, D; Phillips, F M

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes (10)Be, (14)C,(26)A1, 36Cl, and (129)1 can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10(-12) to 10(- 5) and as few as 10(5) atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of halflives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences.

  2. Validation of a Compression Mass Gauge using ground tests for liquid propellant mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Juan; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Li, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    To properly estimate orbital lifetimes and predict the maneuverability of spacecraft, the remaining liquid propellant mass must be accurately known at every moment of a space mission. This paper studies the Compression Mass Gauge (CMG) method to determine the mass of liquid contained in a tank in a low-gravity environment with high accuracy. CMG is a thermodynamic method used to determine the quantity of liquid by measuring the gas pressure change when the tank volume changes, and has been previously theoretically and experimentally studied by researchers. The primary objective of this investigation is to explore the effects of attitude disturbance and the spacecraft thermal environment on the accuracy of the method. A ground test system, consisting of several test apparatuses, was fabricated and described as part of this study. The test results and analyses indicate that the CMG performs well and has an accuracy of ±1%. Additionally, demonstrations were performed to show that measurement errors do not increase drastically or exceed ±1% when the test system is vibrated to simulate the tank being perturbed as a result of an attitude disturbance. Liquid sloshing resonance was found to have a significant effect on the gauging accuracy. Measurements in a real thermal environment in which heat transfers into and out of the propellant tank were also conducted. The results show that the gauging accuracy is acceptable for normal liquid propellant. Furthermore, theoretical research shows that heat leakage has a significant influence on cryogenic propellant mass gauging.

  3. Kaon condensation in the linear sigma model at finite density and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Nguyen Van Long; Nguyen Tuan Anh; Le Viet Hoa

    2008-11-15

    Basing on the Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis effective action approach we formulate a theoretical formalism for studying kaon condensation in the linear sigma model at finite density and temperature. We derive the renormalized effective potential in the Hartree-Fock approximation, which preserves the Goldstone theorem. This quantity is then used to consider physical properties of kaon matter.

  4. [Automatic Measurement of the Stellar Atmospheric Parameters Based Mass Estimation].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-ping; Wei, Hui-ming; Luo, A-li; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2015-11-01

    We have collected massive stellar spectral data in recent years, which leads to the research on the automatic measurement of stellar atmospheric physical parameters (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallic abundance [Fe/ H]) become an important issue. To study the automatic measurement of these three parameters has important significance for some scientific problems, such as the evolution of the universe and so on. But the research of this problem is not very widely, some of the current methods are not able to estimate the values of the stellar atmospheric physical parameters completely and accurately. So in this paper, an automatic method to predict stellar atmospheric parameters based on mass estimation was presented, which can achieve the prediction of stellar effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallic abundance [Fe/H]. This method has small amount of computation and fast training speed. The main idea of this method is that firstly it need us to build some mass distributions, secondly the original spectral data was mapped into the mass space and then to predict the stellar parameter with the support vector regression (SVR) in the mass space. we choose the stellar spectral data from the United States SDSS-DR8 for the training and testing. We also compared the predicted results of this method with the SSPP and achieve higher accuracy. The predicted results are more stable and the experimental results show that the method is feasible and can predict the stellar atmospheric physical parameters effectively.

  5. Cortisol production rates measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Yergey, A.L. )

    1990-04-01

    Cortisol production rates (FPRs) in physiologic and pathologic states in humans have been investigated over the past 30 years. However, there has been conflicting evidence concerning the validity of the currently accepted value of FPRs in humans (12 to 15 mg/m2/d) as determined by radiotracer methodology. The present study reviews previous methods proposed for the measurement of FPRs in humans and discusses the applications of the first method for the direct determination of 24-hour plasma FPRs during continuous administration of a stable isotope, using a thermospray high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. The technique is fast, sensitive, and, unlike gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, does not require derivatization, allowing on-line detection and quantification of plasma cortisol after a simple extraction procedure. The results of determination of plasma FPRs by stable tracer/mass spectrometry are directly in units of mass/time and, unlike radiotracer methods, are independent of any determination of volume of distribution or cortisol concentration. Our methodology offers distinct advantages over radiotracer techniques in simplicity and reliability since only single measurements of isotope ratios are required. The technique was validated in adrenalectomized patients. Circadian variations in daily FRPs were observed in normal volunteers, and, to date, results suggest a lower FRP in normal children and adults than previously believed. 88 references.

  6. Development of a continuous aerosol mass concentration measurement device.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Thomas, D; Contal, P; Subra, I

    2003-08-01

    A dynamic aerosol mass concentration measurement device has been developed for personal sampling. Its principle consists in sampling the aerosol on a filter and monitoring the change of pressure drop over time (Delta P). Ensuring that the linearity of the Delta P = f(mass of particles per unit area of filter) relationship has been well established, the change of concentration can be deduced. The response of the system was validated in the laboratory with a 3.5 microm alumina aerosol (mass median diameter) generated inside a 1-m(3) ventilated enclosure. As the theory predicted that the mass sensitivity of the system would vary inversely with the square of the particle diameter, only sufficiently fine aerosols were able to be measured. The system was tested in the field in a mechanical workshop in the vicinity of an arc-welding station. The aerosol produced by welding is indeed particularly well-adapted due to the sub-micronic size of the particles. The device developed, despite this limitation, has numerous advantages over other techniques: robustness, compactness, reliability of calibration, and ease of use.

  7. Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-11-01

    The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples.

  8. Twin Knudsen Cell Configuration for Activity Measurements by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1996-01-01

    A twin Knudsen cell apparatus for alloy activity measurements by mass spectrometry is described. Two Knudsen cells - one containing an alloy and one containing a pure component - are mounted on a single flange and translated into the sampling region via a motorized x-y table. Mixing of the molecular beams from the cells is minimized by a novel system of shutters. Activity measurements were taken on two well-characterized alloys to verify the operation of the system. Silver activity measurements are reported for Ag-Cu alloys and aluminum activity measurements are reported for Fe-Al alloys. The temperature dependence of activity for a 0.474 mol fraction Al-Fe alloy gives a partial molar heat of aluminum. Measurements taken with the twin cell show good agreement with literature values for these alloys.

  9. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Andreoiu, C.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter 74Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding 78Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of 71Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  10. ISOLTRAP Mass Measurements for Weak-Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerbauer, A.; Delahaye, P.; Herlert, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Mukherjee, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; George, S.; Schweikhard, L.

    2006-04-26

    The conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are two fundamental postulates of the Standard Model. While existing data on CVC supports vector current conservation, the unitarity test of the CKM matrix currently fails by more than two standard deviations. High-precision mass measurements performed with the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN provide crucial input for these fundamental studies by greatly improving our knowledge of the decay energy of super-allowed {beta} decays. Recent results of mass measurements on the {beta} emitters 18Ne, 22Mg, 34Ar, and 74Rb as pertaining to weak-interaction studies are presented.

  11. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  12. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  13. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at [Formula: see text]5.02[Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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Harris, P; Hartl, C; Hinzmann, A; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Karavakis, E; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lee, Y-J; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malberti, M; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Nesvold, E; Orsini, L; Cortezon, E Palencia; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Quertenmont, L; Racz, A; Reece, W; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Santanastasio, F; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Segoni, I; Sekmen, S; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Stoye, M; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wöhri, H K; Worm, S D; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lecomte, P; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marini, A C; Del Arbol, P Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D; Mohr, N; Moortgat, F; Nägeli, C; Nef, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Peruzzi, M; Ronga, F J; Rossini, M; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Starodumov, A; Stieger, B; Takahashi, M; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Urscheler, C; Wallny, R; Weber, H A; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Favaro, C; Ivova Rikova, M; Kilminster, B; Millan Mejias, B; Otiougova, P; Robmann, P; Snoek, H; Taroni, S; Tupputi, S; Verzetti, M; Cardaci, M; Chen, K H; Ferro, C; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Volpe, R; Yu, S S; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Dietz, C; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Kao, K Y; Lei, Y J; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Asavapibhop, B; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; 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Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Suarez, R Gonzalez; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; 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Dasu, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at [Formula: see text]. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range [Formula: see text]-1.7[Formula: see text] and laboratory rapidity [Formula: see text] are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average [Formula: see text] increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average [Formula: see text] with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that Epos Lhc, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is able to reproduce most of the data features, unlike Hijing and Ampt. The [Formula: see text] spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.

  14. Servo-amplifiers for ion current measurement in mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Russell, R.D.; Kollar, F.

    1965-01-01

    A servo-voltmeter can provide a useful alternative to the d.c. amplifier or vibrating reed electrometer for the accurate measurement of mass spectrometer ion currents, and has some advantages which recommend its use in certain applications. A generalized analysis based on servomechanism theory is presented as an aid for understanding the design criteria for this type of device. Two existing systems are described and their operation and performance are examined.

  15. Present status of the MISTRAL mass measurement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Monsanglant, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Duma, M.; Jacotin, M.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Lebee, G.; Lunney, M. D.; Toader, C.

    1998-10-26

    The MISTRAL experiment for measuring masses of very short-lived nuclides at ISOLDE has been installed during the summer of 1997 and has had its first radioactive beam in November 1997. Tests are presently been carried out to study all possible systematic effects. This paper recalls the basic principles of the Smith-type radio-frequency spectrometer, gives its present characteristics and limitations, and describes the methods used to improve its performances.

  16. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  17. TOF-Bρ Mass Measurements at the NSCL, MSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mato&{Caron; S}, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Shapira, D.; Schatz, H.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2006-10-01

    The radioactive beam facilities such as the NSCL offer ideal opportunities for time-of-flight mass measurements of very exotic ions. We have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique at the NSCL and performed a mass measurement of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region. Masses of neutron rich nuclei are important for r- process calculations, and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. At the NSCL, a primary beam ^86Kr was accelerated in the K500 and K1200 coupled superconducting cyclotrons to the energy of 100MeV/u. A fast radioactive beam was then produced by fragmentation reactions in the 47 mg/cm^2 and 94 mg/cm^2 Be targets and separated in the A1900 fragment separator. For this experiment a 58 m long time-of-flight path was used starting at the extended focal plane of the A1900 and ending at the focal plane of the S800 spectrograph. Fast scintillation detectors provided a timing resolution of about σ=30 ps, the relative magnetic rigidity Bρ was measured at the momentum dispersive plane of the S800 by position sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors. Details of the experimental technique will be discussed and preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Measuring peptide mass spectrum correlation using the quantum Grover algorithm.

    PubMed

    Choo, Keng Wah

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the use of the quantum Grover algorithm in the mass-spectrometry-based protein identification process. The approach coded the mass spectra on a quantum register and uses the Grover search algorithm for searching multiple solutions to find matches from a database. Measurement of the fidelity between the input and final states was used to quantify the similarity between the experimental and theoretical spectra. The optimal number of iteration is proven to be pi/4sqrt[N/k] , where k refers to the number of marked states. We found that one iteration is sufficient for the search if we let more that 62% of the N states be marked states. By measuring the fidelity after only one iteration of Grover search, we discovered that it resembles that of the correlation-based measurement used in the existing protein identification software. We concluded that the quantum Grover algorithm can be adapted for a correlation-based mass spectra database search, provided that decoherence can be kept to a minimum.

  19. Radionuclide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Zabel, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years, Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has become established as an important method for radionuclide analysis. In the Arizona system the accelerator is operated at a thermal voltage of 1.8MV for C-14 analysis, and 1.6 to 2MV for Be-10. Samples are inserted into a cesium sputter ion source in solid form. Negative ions sputtered from the target are accelerated to about 25kV, and the injection magnet selects ions of a particular mass. Ions of the 3+ charge state, having an energy of about 9MeV are selected by an electrostatic deflector, surviving ions pass through two magnets, where only ions of the desired mass-energy product are selected. The final detector is a combination ionization chamber to measure energy loss (and hence, Z), and a silicon surface-barrier detector which measures residual energy. After counting the trace iosotope for a fixed time, the injected ions are switched to the major isotope used for normalization. These ions are deflected into a Faraday cup after the first high-energy magnet. Repeated measurements of the isotope ratio of both sample and standards results in a measurement of the concentration of the radionuclide. Recent improvements in sample preparation for C-14 make preparation of high-beam current graphite targets directly from CO2 feasible. Except for some measurements of standards and backgrounds for Be-10 measurements to date have been on C-14. Although most results have been in archaeology and quaternary geology, studies have been expanded to include cosmogenic C-14 in meteorites. The data obtained so far tend to confirm the antiquity of Antarctic meteorites from the Allan Hills site. Data on three samples of Yamato meteorites gave terrestrial ages of between about 3 and 22 thousand years.

  20. Prompt (n,γ) Mass Measurements for the AVOGADRO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Annette; Röttger, Stefan; Zimbal, Andreas; Keyser, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the AVOGADRO project is to replace the kilogram artefact by a high-purity, perfect single crystal of natural or isotope-enriched silicon. The isotopic composition and the impurities of the silicon crystal must, therefore, be known with highest possible accuracy and precision. The only method to obtain all this information without destruction of the massive samples is prompt (n,γ)-spectrometry. The measurements are performed at a thermal neutron guide of the ILL (Institut Max von Laue Paul Langevin) in Grenoble, France. The spectrometry of γ-radiation emitted by a nucleus promptly after thermal neutron capture allows a highly precise determination of atomic mass differences, as well as the determination of isotope abundances leading to the molar mass. The uncertainties assigned to the results for the respective atomic masses determined by the mass differences amount to up to 10-10, while the molar mass of an isotope-enriched Si single crystal has so far been determined with an uncertainty of 1 ṡ 10-4. A direct comparison (for example, relative value of isotope abundances determined by (n,γ)-spectrometry omitting the thermal neutron cross section) furnishes a value of 7 ṡ 10-5. The final aim of the AVOGADRO project is to provide a well specified crystal, which allows a more accurate value of the Avogadro constant to be determined. This constant is the key input parameter for tabulated values of fundamental constants and for a new definition of the unit of mass - the kilogram itself.

  1. Thermodynamic Activity Measurements with Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Coupling the Knudsen effusion method with mass spectrometry has proven to be one of the most useful experimental techniques for studying the equilibrium between condensed phases and complex vapors. The Knudsen effusion method involves placing a condensed sample in a Knudsen cell, a small "enclosure", that is uniformly heated and held until equilibrium is attained between the condensed and vapor phases. The vapor is continuously sampled by effusion through a small orifice in the cell. A molecular beam is formed from the effusing vapor and directed into a mass spectrometer for identification and pressure measurement of the species in the vapor phase. Knudsen cell mass spectrometry (KCMS) has been used for nearly fifty years now and continues to be a leading technique for obtaining thermodynamic data. Indeed, much of the well-established vapor specie data in the JANAF tables has been obtained from this technique. This is due to the extreme versatility of the technique. All classes of materials can be studied and all constituents of the vapor phase can be measured over a wide range of pressures (approximately 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -11) bar) and temperatures (500-2800 K). The ability to selectively measure different vapor species makes KCMS a very powerful tool for the measurement of component activities in metallic and ceramic solutions. Today several groups are applying KCMS to measure thermodynamic functions in multicomponent metallic and ceramic systems. Thermodynamic functions, especially component activities, are extremely important in the development of CALPHAD (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) type thermodynamic descriptions. These descriptions, in turn, are useful for modeling materials processing and predicting reactions such as oxide formation and fiber/matrix interactions. The leading experimental methods for measuring activities are the Galvanic cell or electro-motive force (EMF) technique and the KCMS technique. Each has specific advantages, depending on

  2. Loop corrections to pion and kaon neutrino production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddikov, Marat; Schmidt, Iván

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the next-to-leading-order corrections to deeply virtual pion and kaon production in neutrino experiments. We estimate these corrections in the kinematics of the minerva experiment at Fermilab, and find that they are sizable and increase the leading-order cross section by up to a factor of 2. We provide a computational code which can be used for the evaluation of the cross sections, taking into account these corrections and employing various generalized parton distribution models.

  3. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Bashir, A.; Roberts, C. D.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-06-16

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  4. Kaon-nucleon scattering in three-dimensional technique

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, Agus Fachruddin, Imam

    2016-03-11

    Kaon-nucleon (KN) scattering is formulated in the three-dimensional (3D) momentum space, in which the basis state is not expanded into partial waves. Based on this basis the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the T-matrix is evaluated. We obtain as final equation for the T-matrix elements a set of two coupled integral equations in two variables, which are the momentum’s magnitude and the scattering angle. Calculations for the differential cross section and some spin observables are shown, for which we employ a hadrons exchange model with the second order contributions only.

  5. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trang; Bashir, Adnan; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2011-06-15

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  6. CEBAF at higher energies and the kaon electromagnetic form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, O.K.

    1994-04-01

    The electromagnetic production of strangeness, the physics of exciting systems having strangeness degrees of freedom (production of hadrons with one or more strange constituent quarks) using electromagnetic probes (real or virtual photons), is one of the frontier areas of research which will be investigated at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) when it becomes operational. CEBAF is expected to have an important impact upon this field of research using its specialized set of detection instruments and high quality electron beam. This paper focusses upon one aspect of the associated production of strangeness - the determination of the kaon electromagnetic form factor at high squared momentum transfers.

  7. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  8. First Run II Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m{sub W} using 200 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63,964 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 51,128 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates, we measure m{sub W} = [80.413 {+-} 0.034(stat.) {+-} 0.034 (sys.) = 80.413 {+-} 0.048] GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the single most precise m{sub W} measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons.

  9. Spectral Measurements of Plasma Rotation and Mass Separation in the Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, K. R.; Anderegg, F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Freeman, R. L.; Gilleland, J.; Isler, R. C.; Lee, W. D.; Litvak, A.; Mavrin, V.; Miller, R. L.; Ohkawa, T.; Putvinski, S.

    2003-10-01

    The Archimedes Demonstration Unit (ADU), a full scale experiment based upon the Plasma Mass Filter^1 technology, began plasma operations early this year. The Filter is a cylindrical device with an axial magnetic field that utilizes end electrodes to generate a radial electric field in a noble gas plasma of density ˜10^18 m-3. In addition to microwave interferometry, bolometry, videography and Langmuir probe diagnostics, high-resolution and survey spectroscopy is utilized to monitor the plasma emission. This is accomplished through the use of several in-vacuum optical arrays which have collimated views parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic axis. Optical measurements are compared to other diagnostics and electrode currents. Doppler shifts, linewidths and line ratios have been measured to determine rotation speed, temperature and separation in noble gas plasmas. ^1T. Ohkawa, "Plasma Mass Filter", U.S. Patent 6,096,220, August 1, 2000.

  10. Prospects for Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Masses with TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan; Wright, Shelley A.; Barth, Aaron J.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Simard, Luc; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of giant-segmented mirror telescopes will enable us to observe galactic nuclei at much higher angular resolution and sensitivity than ever before. These capabilities will introduce a revolutionary shift in our understanding of the origin and evolution of supermassive black holes by enabling more precise black hole mass measurements in a mass range that is unreachable today. We present simulations and predictions of the observations of nuclei that will be made with the Thirty Meter Telescope and the adaptive optics assisted integral- field spectrograph IRIS, which is capable of diffraction-limited spectroscopy from Z band (0.9 μm) to K band (2.2 μm). These simulations, for the first time, use realistic values for the sky, telescope, adaptive optics system, and instrument to determine the expected signal-to-noise ratio of a range of possible targets spanning intermediate mass black holes of ˜10^4 M⊙ to the most massive black holes known today of >10^10 M⊙. I will present simulations across a spectrum of black hole masses and galaxy types to show the ability of IRIS and TMT to quantitatively explore the demographics of black holes in the universe. I will discuss how these observations will enable our study of the origin of the MBH - galaxy velocity dispersion and MBH - galaxy luminosity relationships, and the evolution of black holes through cosmic time.

  11. Detecting rapid mass movements using electrical self-potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Limbrock, Jonas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Rapid mass movements are a latent danger for lives and infrastructure in almost any part of the world. Often such mass movements are caused by increasing pore pressure, for example, landslides after heavy rainfall or dam breaking after intrusion of water in the dam. Among several other geophysical methods used to observe water movement, the electrical self-potential method has been applied to a broad range of monitoring studies, especially focusing on volcanism and dam leakage but also during hydraulic fracturing and for earthquake prediction. Electrical self-potential signals may be caused by various mechanisms. Though, the most relevant source of the self-potential field in the given context is the streaming potential, caused by a flowing electrolyte through porous media with electrically charged internal surfaces. So far, existing models focus on monitoring water flow in non-deformable porous media. However, as the self-potential is sensitive to hydraulic parameters of the soil, any change in these parameters will cause an alteration of the electric signal. Mass movement will significantly influence the hydraulic parameters of the solid as well as the pressure field, assuming that fluid movement is faster than the pressure diffusion. We will present results of laboratory experiments under drained and undrained conditions with fluid triggered as well as manually triggered mass movements, monitored with self-potential measurements. For the undrained scenarios, we observe a clear correlation between the mass movements and signals in the electric potential, which clearly differ from the underlying potential variations due to increased saturation and fluid flow. In the drained experiments, we do not observe any measurable change in the electric potential. We therefore assume that change in fluid properties and release of the load causes disturbances in flow and streaming potential. We will discuss results of numerical simulations reproducing the observed effect. Our

  12. Evaluation of the Dekati mass monitor for the measurement of exhaust particle mass emissions.

    PubMed

    Mamakos, Athanasios; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Samaras, Zissis

    2006-08-01

    The Dekati mass monitor (OMM) is an instrument which measures the mass concentration of airborne particles in real time by combining aerodynamic and mobility size particle classification. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the DMM by sampling exhaust from five engines and vehicles of different technologies in both steady-state and transient tests. DMM results are found higher than the filter-based particulate matter (PM) by 39 +/- 24% (range stands for +/- one standard deviation) for 62 diesel tests conducted in total and 3% and 14% higher, respectively, in two gasoline tests. To explore whether the difference occurs because of the different measurement principles of DMM and filter-based PM, the DMM operation is replicated over steady-state tests by combining an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The correlation of ELPI and SMPS derived mass and filter-based PM is satisfactory (R2 = 0.95) with a mean deviation of 5 +/- 15%. For the same tests, the correlation of DMM with PM was also high (R2 = 0.95), but DMM exceeded PM by 44 +/- 23% on average. The comparison of ELPI and SMPS and DMM results reveals that the latter overestimates both the geometric mean diameter and especially the width of the particle mass-weighted size distribution. These findings demonstrate thatthe statistically significant difference between the DMM and the filter-based PM cannot just originate from the different measurement principles but also from the actual implementation of the combined aerodynamic-mobility measurement in the DMM. Optimizing the DMM will require changes in its design and/or the calculation algorithm to improve the resolution and width of the aerodynamic size distribution recorded.

  13. Measuring a Black Hole's Mass with Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    Who needs humans? Robotic observations made by telescopes in the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network (LCOGT) have tracked variability in the active galaxy Arp 151 over 200 days. These observations have proven to be enough information to estimate the mass of the black hole at the galaxys center.Mapping EchoesMeasuring the masses of supermassive black holes is notoriously difficult. Except in the few cases where were able to resolve actual objects orbiting around the supermassive black hole (for instance, in the case of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way), our estimates of black-hole mass must come from indirect measurements.One clever approach is called reverberation mapping. In an active galactic nucleus (AGN), continuum emission from the black holes accretion disk photoionizes gas clouds in the nearby broad-line region, causing the clouds to emit light. In reverberation mapping, we track the time lag between variability in the disks continuum emission and the clouds broad-line emission, obtaining a distance scale. Combining this information with a velocity (provided by the broad-line width) allows us to infer the enclosed mass in this case, that of the black hole.So whats the catch? Getting this information requires a lot of man-hours and telescope-hours, because AGN need to be observed over long periods of time to see the variability and the lags needed to make these inferences. This is where LCOGT comes in.Robotic NetworkArp 151 light curves. The top panel shows the continuum emission from the disk; the remaining panels show various emission lines from the broad-line-region clouds. The variability of the line emission lags slightly behind that of the continuum emission. [Valenti et al. 2015]LCOGT is a completely robotic telescope network. Everything from the scheduling to the telescope alignment is done without human involvement. Because of this feature, the LCOGT is an ideal facility for conducting time-intensive observations of AGN

  14. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic abundance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a relatively new laser-based technique for the determination of isotopic abundances. The resonance ionization process depends upon the stepwise absorption of photons from the laser, promoting atoms of the element of interest through progressively higher electronic states until an ion is formed. Sensitivity arises from the efficiency of the resonant absorption process when coupled with the power available from commercial laser sources. Selectivity derives naturally from the distinct electronic structure of different elements. This isobaric discrimination has provided the major impetus for development of the technique. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used for analysis of the isotopic abundances of the rare earth lutetium. Isobaric interferences from ytterbium severely effect the ability to measure small amounts of the neutron-deficient Lu isotopes by conventional mass spectrometric techniques. Resonance ionization for lutetium is performed using a continuous-wave laser operating at 452 nm, through a sequential two-photon process, with one photon exciting the intermediate resonance and the second photon causing ionization. Ion yields for microgram-sized quantities of lutetium lie between 10(6) and 10(7) ions per second, at overall ionization efficiencies approaching 10(-4). Discrimination factors against ytterbium greater than 10(6) have been measured. Resonance ionization for technetium is also being explored, again in response to an isobaric interference, molybdenum. Because of the relatively high ionization potential for Tc, three-photon, two-color RIMS processes are being developed.

  15. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.

    1998-02-17

    The research that is described in this paper is part of a program to study strong interaction mechanisms in proton proton collisions. The program consists of two experiments: Brookhaven E766 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 27.5 GeV/c incident protons and Fermilab E690 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 800 GeV/c incident protons. In these experiments, we employed state-of-the-art data acquisition sys- tems and acquired large samples of data: at Brookhaven we amassed 300 million high multiplicity events and at Fermilab, 5.5 billion events. Our uncertainty in the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass is more than 7 times smaller than the best previous result and was based on 16 times the statistics. Likewise, the {Sigma}{sup 0} - {Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference is more than 14 times more accurate than the previous best result. Finally, we note that this measurement is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass.

  16. Results of precision mass measurements from CARIBU with the CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Greene, J. P.; Levand, A. F.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.; Caldwell, S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Chaudhuri, A.; Sharma, K. S.; Li, G.

    2011-10-01

    An array of neutron-rich nuclides from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at ANL beyond 132Sn has been subjected to precision mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer, including many never-before-measured nuclides. Neutron-separation energies calculated directly from these results provide essential input to models of the astrophysical r-process. Trends in binding energies far from stability provide input to nuclear mass models and identify regions of deformation. Additional nuclear structure information can be extracted from symmetry energy and observations of isomeric states. Implications for all of these topics will be discussed as well as future plans with the more intense CARIBU source. This work performed under the auspices of NSERC, Canada, application number 216974, and the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Nos. DE-AC02- 06CH11357, DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-98ER41086 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Reporting and measurement of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Blum, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Hg isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS is an important new approach for fingerprinting Hg sources and monitoring Hg redox reactions and bioaccumulation, especially with the recent discovery of mass independent Hg isotope fractionation. Unfortunately research groups have adopted different standards, definitions of delta values, and methods of isotopic measurement. We suggest that a single standard, NIST SRM 3133, be adopted for reporting the isotopic variability of Hg isotopes. Isotope ratios should be determined by sample-standard bracketing (SSB) during analysis and reported as permil (‰) deviation from SRM 3133. For the highest precision and accuracy, a Tl internal standard along with SSB should be used to correct instrumental mass bias. Measurement routines should also include on-peak zero corrections and matching of concentration and matrix between the samples and bracketing standard. For samples that display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF), only one delta value needs to be reported (δ202/198Hg). Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (Jackson et al., 2006; Bergquist et al., 2006; Bergquist and Blum, submitted) requires additional nomenclature, and we suggest reporting MIF as the deviation in isotope ratios from the theoretical mass dependent kinetic isotope fractionation (Δxxx/198Hg)¬. External reproducibility should be monitored by analysis of secondary standards. For studies of MDF, we use an in-house secondary standard solution made from metallic Hg mined from Almaden Spain and obtain a δ202Hg of -0.55 ±0.06‰ (2SD). For studies of MIF, we use NRCC CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and obtain a mean value of δ202Hg of +0.19 ±0.13‰ (2SD), Δ201Hg of +0.89 ±0.07‰ (2SD) , and Δ199Hg of +1.07 ±0.08‰ (2SD).

  18. Electroproduction of kaons on light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    B. Zeidman; D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; P. Ambrozewicz; C. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; K. Assamagan; S. Avery; K. Bailey; O. K. Baker; S. Beedoe; H. Bitao; H. Breuer; D. S. Brown; R. Carlini; J. Cha; N. Chant; E. Christy; A. Cochran; L. Cole; G. Collins; C. Cothran; J. Crowder; W. J. Cummings; S. Danagoulian; F. Dohrmann; F. Duncan; J. Dunne; D. Dutta; T. Eden; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; L. Ewell; H. Fenker; H. T. Fortune; Y. Fujii; L. Gan; H. Gao; K. Garrow; D. F. Geesaman; P. Gueye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; J. O. Hansen; W. Hinton; H. E. Jackson; H. Juengst; C. Keppel; A. Klein; D. Koltenuk; Y. Liang; J. H. Liu; A. Lung; D. Mack; R. Madey; P. Markowitz; C. J. Martoff; D. Meekins; J. Mitchell; T. Miyoshi; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Mohring; S. K. Mtingwa; B. Mueller; T. G. O'Neill; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; D. Potterveld; J. W. Price; B. A. Raue; P. E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; P. Roos; M. Sarsour; Y. Sato; G. Savage; R. Sawafta; J. P. Schiffer; R. E. Segel; A. Semenov; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; S. Tajima; L. Tang; B. Terburg; A. Uzzle; S. Wood; H. Yamaguchi; C. Yan; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; B. Zihlmann

    2001-08-13

    The A(e,eiK+)YX reaction on H, D, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He was investigated in Hall C at CEBAF. Data were obtained for Q{sup 2} {approx} 0.35 and 0.5 GeV{sup 2} at 3.245 GeV. The missing mass spectra for both H and D are fitted with Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating peaks corresponding to Lambda production on the proton and Sigma production on both the proton and neutron. For D, the cross section ratio Sigma{sup 0}/Sigma{sup -} {approx} 2, and excess yield close to the thresholds for Lambda and Sigma production can be attributed to final-state interactions; models are compared to the data. The analysis of the data for the He targets is in a more preliminary state with broader quasi-free peaks resulting from the higher Fermi momenta. Evidence for bound Lambda-hypernuclear states is seen and other structure may be present.

  19. Electroproduction of Kaons on light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.; Abbott, D.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Armstrong, C. S.; Arrington, J.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W. J.; Dohrmann, F.; Gao, H.; Geesaman, D. F.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J. O.; Jackson, H. E.; Mueller, B.; O'Neill, T. G.; Potterveld, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Schiffer, J. P.

    2000-12-07

    The A(e,e{prime}K{sup +})YX reaction on H, D, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He was investigated in Hall C at CEBAF. Data were obtained for Q{sup 2} {approx} 0.35 and 0.5 GeV{sup 2} at 3.245 GeV. The missing mass spectra for both H and D are fitted with Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating peaks corresponding to {Lambda} production on the proton and {Sigma} production on both the proton and neutron. For D, the cross section ratio {Sigma}{sup 0}/{Sigma}{sup {minus}} {approx} 2, and excess yield close to the thresholds for {Lambda} and {Sigma} production can be attributed to final-state interactions that are compared to the data. The analysis of the data for the He targets is in a more preliminary state with broader quasi-free peaks resulting from the higher Fermi momenta. Evidence for bound {Lambda}-hypernuclear states is seen and other structure may be present.

  20. Top mass measurements at the Tevatron run II

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, Gueorgui V.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    The latest top quark mass measurements by the CDF and D0 experiments are presented here. The mass has been determined in the dilepton (t{bar t} {yields} e{mu}, ee, {mu}{mu} + jets + E{sub T}) and lepton plus jets (t{bar t} {yields} e or {mu} + jets + E{sub T}) final states. The most accurate single result from lepton plus jets channel is 173.5{sub -3.6}{sup +3.7}(stat. + Jet Energy Scale Systematic) {+-} 1.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is better than the combined CDF and D0 Run I average. A preliminary and unofficial average of the best experimental Run II results gives M{sub top} = 172.7 {+-} 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. High-Precision Mass Measurements At TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Ketelaer, J.; Knuth, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-04-01

    In order to study neutron-rich nuclides far from the valley of stability as well as long-lived actinoids the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been recently installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz. Short-lived neutron-rich fission products are produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of an actinoid target installed close to the reactor core. A helium gas-jet system with carbon aerosol particles is used to extract the fission products to the experiment. The Penning trap system has already been commissioned. Off-line mass measurements are routinely performed using a recently developed laser ablation ion source, and the gas-jet system has been tested. An overview of the experiment and current status will be given.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Application of the HKS in the identification of kaons produced in the reaction (e,e'K+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Shou; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-06-01

    At Jefferson Laboratory the experiment E02-017 was carried out to investigate the fission associated with kaons in the hypernuclei-producing interaction p(e,K+e')Λ. The newly installed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) in Hall C was used as a key instrument to identify kaons. This paper introduces the HKS hardware and describes the way the kaons are identified. Maintaining most of the kaons (nearly 100%) in the data, HKS identifies kaons with a purity of ~67% in this experiment. The resolution of the kaon target time reconstructed by HKS reaches 0.42 ns.

  3. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Nice, D. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G.; Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A.; Camilo, F.; Possenti, A.; Demorest, P. B.; Backer, D. C.

    2010-03-10

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  4. Mass Properties Measurement in the X-38 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Wayne L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the techniques used in measuring the mass properties for the X-38 family of test vehicles. The X-38 Project was a NASA internal venture in which a series of test vehicles were built in order to develop a Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. Three atmospheric test vehicles and one spaceflight vehicle were built to develop the technologies required for a CRV. The three atmospheric test vehicles have undergone flight-testing by a combined team from the NASA Johnson Space Center and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight-testing was performed at Edward's Air Force Base in California. The X-38 test vehicles are based on the X-24A, which flew in the '60s and '70s. Scaled Composites, Inc. of Mojave, California, built the airframes and the vehicles were outfitted at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Mass properties measurements on the atmospheric test vehicles included weight and balance by the three-point suspension method, four-point suspension method, three load cells on jackstands, and on three in-ground platform scales. Inertia measurements were performed as well in which Ixx, Iyy, Izz, and Ixz were obtained. This paper describes each technique and the relative merits of each. The proposed measurement methods for an X-38 spaceflight test vehicle will also be discussed. This vehicle had different measurement challenges, but integrated vehicle measurements were never conducted. The spaceflight test vehicle was also developed by NASA and was scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle before the project was cancelled.

  5. RF design of a transverse mode cavity for kaon separation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael McAshan and Rainer Wanzenberg

    2001-05-15

    Two deflecting mode RF systems can be used to separate secondary kaons from a momentum selected particle beam, primarily consisting of a mix of protons, pions and kaons, by a time of flight method. The principles of this methods and the choices of the parameters are explained. It is planned to use a 3.9 GHz 13-cell super-conducting cavity operated in a {pi}-dipole-mode. First, the passband structure of different cavity shapes, which mainly differ by the cell-to-cell coupling and the resulting dispersion slope, is investigated. The main concern is the frequency difference between the {pi}-mode and the next lowest mode in the same passband and the implications on the tuneability of the cavity. For three shapes the possible end-cell designs for a 7-cell and 13-cell cavity are presented. All numerical field calculations are performed by the MAFIA code. An equivalent circuit model, based on a two chain model, is applied to a 7-cell cavity. It is demonstrated that the dispersion diagram obtained by MAFIA calculations can be very well approximated by this equivalent circuit.

  6. Coupled Gravity and Elevation Measurement of Ice Sheet Mass Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.; Baumgartner, F.

    2005-01-01

    During June 2003, we measured surface gravity at six locations about a glaciological measurement site located on the South-central Greenland Ice. We operated a GPS unit for 90 minutes at each site -the unit was operated simultaneously with a base station unit in Sondrestrom Fjord so as to enable differential, post-processing of the data. We installed an aluminum, accumulation-rate-pole at each site. The base section of the pole also served as the mount for the GPS antenna. Two gravimeters were used simultaneously at each site. Measurements were repeated at each site with at time lapse of at least 50 minutes. We measured snow physical properties in two shallow pits The same measurement sites were occupied in 1981 and all were part of a hexagonal network of geodetic and glaciological measurements established by The Ohio State University in 1980. Additional gravity observations were acquired at three of the sites in 1993 and 1995. Gravity data were collected in conjunction with Doppler satellite measurements of position and elevation in 1981 and global positioning system measurements subsequently. The use of satellite navigation techniques permitted reoccupation of the same sites in each year to within a few 10 s of meters or better. After detrending the gravity data, making adjustments for tides and removing the residual effects of local spatial gradients in gravity, we observe an average secular decrease in gravity of about 0.01 milligal/year, but with tenths of milligal variations about the mean trend. The trend is consistent with a nearly linear increase in surface elevation of between 7 to 10 c d y r (depending on location) as measured by repeated airborne laser altimeter, surface Doppler satellite and GPS elevation measurements. Differences between the residual gravity anomalies after free air correction may be attributable to local mass changes. This project is a collaboration between the Byrd Polar Research Center of the Ohio State University and the Arctic

  7. The Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer and measurements of entry distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Reiter, P.; Ahmad, I.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Caggiano, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davids, C. N.; Henning, W. F.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Jones, G. D.; Julin, R.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2001-07-01

    The Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is designed to separate and identify evaporation residues according to their mass-to-charge ratio. The FMA in combination with GAMMASPHERE—an array of 100 compton-suppressed germanium detectors—allowed for a number of very interesting in-beam gamma-spectroscopy studies, as the FMA provided a very clean trigger on evaporation residues to obtain extremely background-free gamma-spectra. This setup was used to measure the total gamma-energy and multiplicity after particle evaporation—the so-called entry distribution—by exploiting the calorimetric properties of GAMMASPHERE, using its germanium detectors as well as its BGO shields for a maximum gamma efficiency. The entry distribution can be used to estimate the height of the fission barrier as a function of angular momentum. This method is especially favorable for unstable nuclei, for which the fission barrier is otherwise very difficult to measure. Here, the entry distributions of 220Th at beam energies of 206 MeV and 219.5 MeV in the 176Yb(48Ca,4n) reaction are presented. The results are compared to a previous measurement.

  8. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, Andrew N.

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II Detector from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The posterior probability distribution of the top quark pole mass is calculated using the differential cross-section for the t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay expressed with respect to observed leptons and jets momenta. The presence of background events in the collected sample is modeled using calculations of the differential cross-sections for major background processes. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb-1, they observe 33 candidate events and measure Mtop = 165.2 ± 61.stat ± 3.4syst GeV/c2.

  9. Bose-Einstein correlation of kaons in Si + Au collisions at 14.6 A GeV/c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akiba, Y.; Beavis, D.; Beery, P.; Britt, H. C.; Budick, B.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chi, C. Y.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cianciolo, V.

    1993-01-01

    The E-802 spectrometer at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, enhanced by a trigger for selection of events with one or more specified particles, has been used to measure the momentum-space correlation between pairs of K(+)s emitted in central Si + Au collisions at 14.6 A GeV/c. This correlation has been projected onto the Lorentz-invariant relative four-momentum axis. Fits to this correlation function yield a size for the kaon source that is comparable to that found using pi(+) pairs from a similar rapidity range, once a transformation from the particle-pair frames to a single source frame is made.

  10. Unquenched determination of the kaon parameter B{sub K} from improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Gamiz, Elvira; Collins, Sara; Davies, Christine T.H.; Lepage, G. Peter; Shigemitsu, Junko; Wingate, Matthew

    2006-06-01

    The use of improved staggered actions (HYP, Asqtad) has been proved to reduce the scaling corrections that affected previous calculations of B{sub K} with unimproved (standard) staggered fermions in the quenched approximation. This improved behavior allows us to perform a reliable calculation of B{sub K} including quark vacuum polarization effects, using the MILC configurations with n{sub f}=2+1 flavors of sea fermions. We perform such a calculation for a single lattice spacing, a=0.125 fm, and with kaons made up of degenerate quarks with m{sub s}/2. The valence strange quark mass m{sub s} is fixed to its physical value and we use two different values of the light sea quark masses. After a chiral extrapolation of the results to the physical value of the sea quark masses, we find B-circumflex{sub K}=0.83{+-}0.18, where the error is dominated by the uncertainty in the lattice to continuum matching at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}). The matching will need to be improved to get the precision needed to make full use of the experimental data on {epsilon}{sub K} to constrain the unitarity triangle.