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Sample records for kaposis sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

  1. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  2. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus: mechanisms of oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas F; Cesarman, Ethel

    2015-10-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV8) causes three human malignancies, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS), an endothelial tumor, as well as Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) and the plasma cell variant of Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD), two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. All three cancers occur primarily in the context of immune deficiency and/or HIV infection, but their pathogenesis differs. KS most likely results from the combined effects of an endotheliotropic virus with angiogenic properties and inflammatory stimuli and thus represents an interesting example of a cancer that arises in an inflammatory context. Viral and cellular angiogenic and inflammatory factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCD. In contrast, PEL represents an autonomously growing malignancy that is, however, still dependent on the continuous presence of KSHV and the action of several KSHV proteins.

  3. Polyadenylylated nuclear RNA encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, R; Lin, S F; Gradoville, L; Miller, G

    1996-01-01

    A newly recognized gamma herpesvirus known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is present in Kaposi sarcomas and body-cavity-based lymphomas. Here we identify a novel abundant 1.2-kb RNA, polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA), encoded by the virus. The majority of cDNAs produced from poly(A)-selected RNA isolated from a human body cavity lymphoma cell line 48 hr after butyrate induction of KSHV lytic replication represented PAN RNA. Within PAN RNA were two 9 and 16 nt stretches with 89% and 94% identity to U1 RNA. A third stretch of 14 nt was 93% complementary to U1. The 5' upstream region of PAN RNA contained both proximal and distal sequence elements characteristic of regulatory regions of U snRNAs, whereas the 3' end was polyadenylylated. PAN RNA was transcribed by RNA polymerase II, lacked a trimethylguanosine cap, and did not associate with polyribosomes. PAN RNA formed a speckled pattern in the nucleus typical of U snRNAs and colocalized with Sm protein. Therefore, PAN represents a new type of RNA, possessing features of both U snRNA and mRNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876232

  4. The role of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gramolelli, Silvia; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an unusual vascular tumour caused by an oncogenic-herpesvirus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8). KS lesions are characterized by an abundant inflammatory infiltrate, the presence of KSHV-infected endothelial cells that show signs of aberrant differentiation, as well as faulty angiogenesis/ vascularization. Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of these histological features of KS, with an emphasis on the viral proteins that are responsible for their development.

  5. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Encodes a Viral Deubiquitinase▿

    PubMed Central

    González, Carlos M.; Wang, Ling; Damania, Blossom

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV can exist in either a lytic or a latent phase during its life cycle. We report that the lytic protein encoded by KSHV open reading frame 64 (Orf64) is a viral deubiquitinase (DUB) enzyme capable of deubiquitinating cellular proteins in vitro and in vivo. Orf64 DUB activity is effective against lysine 48 (K48)- and lysine 63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains. Thus, KSHV Orf64 is a viral DUB that does not show specificity toward K48 or K63 ubiquitin linkages. Orf64 DUB activity lies within the first 205 residues of the protein, and deubiquitination is dependent on a cysteine at position 29, since mutation of this residue ablated this activity. Cell fractionation studies revealed that the N terminus and the full-length protein localized to both the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. The function of Orf64 was tested by short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown studies on latently infected cells that were induced into lytic replication. We found that depletion of Orf64 by siRNA resulted in decreased viral lytic transcription and lytic protein expression. These experiments indicate that Orf64 plays a role in KSHV lytic replication. PMID:19640989

  6. Molecular virology of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P S; Chang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the most recently discovered human tumour virus, is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and some forms of Castleman's disease. KSHV is a rhadinovirus, and like other rhadinoviruses, it has an extensive array of regulatory genes obtained from the host cell genome. These pirated KSHV proteins include homologues to cellular CD21, three different beta-chemokines, IL-6, BCL-2, several different interferon regulatory factor homologues, Fas-ligand ICE inhibitory protein (FLIP), cyclin D and a G-protein-coupled receptor, as well as DNA synthetic enzymes including thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, DNA polymerase, thymidine kinase and ribonucleotide reductases. Despite marked differences between KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus, both viruses target many of the same cellular pathways, but use different strategies to achieve the same effects. KSHV proteins have been identified which inhibit cell-cycle regulation checkpoints, apoptosis control mechanisms and the immune response regulatory machinery. Inhibition of these cellular regulatory networks app ears to be a defensive means of allowing the virus to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. However, due to the overlapping nature of innate immune and tumour-suppressor pathways, inhibition of these regulatory networks can lead to unregulated cell proliferation and may contribute to virus-induced tumorigenesis. PMID:11313008

  7. Kinetics of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, R; Lin, S F; Staskus, K; Gradoville, L; Grogan, E; Haase, A; Miller, G

    1999-03-01

    Herpesvirus gene expression can be classified into four distinct kinetic stages: latent, immediate early, early, and late. Here we characterize the kinetic class of a group of 16 Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 genes in a cultured primary effusion cell line and examine the expression of a subset of these genes in KS biopsies. Expression of two latent genes, LANA and vFLIP, was constitutive and was not induced by chemicals that induce the lytic cycle in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines. An immediate-early gene, Rta (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]), was induced within 4 h of the addition of n-butyrate, and its 3.6-kb mRNA was resistant to inhibition by cycloheximide. Early genes, including K3 and K5 that are homologues of the "immediate-early" gene of bovine herpesvirus 4, K8 that is a positional homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, vMIP II, vIL-6, and polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, appeared 8 to 13 h after chemical induction. A second group of early genes that were slightly delayed in their appearance included viral DHFR, thymidylate synthase, vMIP I, G protein-coupled receptor, K12, vBcl2, and a lytic transcript that overlapped LANA. The transcript of sVCA (ORF65), a late gene whose expression was abolished by Phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of KSHV DNA replication, did not appear until 30 h after induction. Single-cell assays indicated that the induction of lytic cycle transcripts resulted from the recruitment of additional cells into the lytic cycle. In situ hybridization of KS biopsies showed that about 3% of spindle-shaped tumor cells expressed Rta, ORF K8, vIL-6, vMIP I, vBcl-2, PAN RNA, and sVCA. Our study shows that several KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular cytokines, chemokines, and antiapoptotic factors are expressed during the viral lytic cycle in PEL cell lines and in KS biopsies. The lytic cycle of KSHV, probably under the initial control of the KSHV/Rta gene, may directly contribute to tumor

  8. Treatment of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Dirk P.; Richards, Kristy L.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-defining cancer worldwide. KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of KS, and the virus is also associated with two lymphoproliferative diseases. Both KS and KSHV-associated lymphomas, are cancers of unique molecular composition. They represent a challenge for cancer treatment and an opportunity to identify new mechanisms of transformation. Here, we review the current clinical insights into KSHV-associated cancers and discuss scientific insights into the pathobiology of KS, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. PMID:22529843

  9. Construction of a lytically replicating Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Budt, Matthias; Hristozova, Tsvetana; Hille, Georg; Berger, Katrin; Brune, Wolfram

    2011-10-01

    Karposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is found predominantly in a latent state in most cell types, impeding investigations of the lytic replication cycle. Here, we engineered the cloned KSHV genome, bacterial artificial chromosome 36 (BAC36), to enforce constitutive expression of the main lytic switch regulator, the replication and transcription activator (RTA) (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]). The resulting virus, KSHV-lyt, activated by default the lytic cycle and replicated to high titers in various cells. Using KSHV-lyt, we showed that ORF33 (encoding a tegument protein) is essential for lytic KSHV replication in cell culture, but ORF73 (encoding the latent nuclear antigen [LANA]) is not. Thus, KSHV-lyt should be highly useful to study viral gene function during lytic replication.

  10. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Boshoff, C; Weiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) occurs in Europe and the Mediterranean countries (classic KS) and Africa (endemic KS), immunosuppressed patients (iatrogenic or post-transplant KS) and those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), especially among those who acquired human immunodeficiency virus sexually (AIDS-KS). KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV-8) is unusual among herpesviruses in having a restricted geographical distribution. Like KS, which it induces in immunosuppressed or elderly people, the virus is prevalent in Africa, in Mediterranean countries, among Jews and Arabs and certain Amerindians. Distinct KSHV genotypes occur in different parts of the world, but have not been identified as having a differential pathogenesis. KSHV is aetiologically linked to three distinct neoplasms: (i) KS, (ii) primary effusion lymphoma, and (iii) plasmablastic multicentric Castleman's disease. The histogenesis, clonality and pathology of the tumours are described, together with the epidemiology and possible modes of transmission of the virus. PMID:11313009

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K7 modulates Rubicon-mediated inhibition of autophagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiming; Chang, Brian; Brulois, Kevin F; Castro, Kamilah; Min, Chan-Ki; Rodgers, Mary A; Shi, Mude; Ge, Jianning; Feng, Pinghui; Oh, Byung-Ha; Jung, Jae U

    2013-11-01

    Autophagy is an important innate safeguard mechanism for protecting an organism against invasion by pathogens. We have previously discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) evades this host defense through tight suppression of autophagy by targeting multiple steps of autophagy signal transduction. Here, we report that KSHV K7 protein interacts with Rubicon autophagy protein and inhibits the autophagosome maturation step by blocking Vps34 enzymatic activity, further highlighting how KSHV deregulates autophagy-mediated host immunity for its life cycle.

  12. Transmissible Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) in saliva of men with a history of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, J; Huang, M L; Koelle, D M; Corey, L

    1997-01-01

    We have evaluated the physical state and infectious nature of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the saliva of nine persons with past or current Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). KSHV DNA in saliva had the physical characteristics of DNA present in virions. Inoculation of 293 cells with cell-free saliva fluid resulted in the persistence of KSHV DNA in culture for at least 13 passages of the cells. The addition of tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate to KSHV-infected 293 cells led to increased viral DNA. Two virus-specific RNAs were detected by reverse transcriptase PCR in 293 cells infected with cell-free saliva fluid and in cells present in saliva from subjects with KSHV salivary shedding. These results indicate that infectious KSHV can be present in saliva of patients with KS. PMID:9261440

  13. Epigenetic Landscape of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome in Classic Kaposi's Sarcoma Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodong; Yang, Lei; Robertson, Erle S.; Lan, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically related to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). It typically displays two different phases in its life cycle, the default latency and occasional lytic replication. The epigenetic modifications are thought to determine the fate of KSHV infection. Previous studies elegantly depicted epigenetic landscape of latent viral genome in in vitro cell culture systems. However, the physiologically relevant scenario in clinical KS tissue samples is unclear. In the present study, we established a protocol of ChIP-Seq for clinical KS tissue samples and mapped out the epigenetic landscape of KSHV genome in classic KS tissues. We examined AcH3 and H3K27me3 histone modifications on KSHV genome, as well as the genome-wide binding sites of latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA). Our results demonstrated that the enriched AcH3 was mainly restricted at latent locus while H3K27me3 was widespread on KSHV genome in classic KS tissues. The epigenetic landscape at the region of vIRF3 gene confirmed its silenced state in KS tissues. Meanwhile, the abundant enrichment of LANA at the terminal repeat (TR) region was also validated in the classic KS tissues, however, different LANA binding sites were observed on the host genome. Furthermore, we verified the histone modifications by ChIP-qPCR and found the dominant repressive H3K27me3 at the promoter region of replication and transcription activator (RTA) in classic KS tissues. Intriguingly, we found that the TR region in classic KS tissues was lacking in AcH3 histone modifications. These data now established the epigenetic landscape of KSHV genome in classic KS tissues, which provides new insights for understanding KSHV epigenetics and pathogenesis. PMID:28118409

  14. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Locus Compensates for Interleukin-6 in Initial B Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Sin, Sang-Hoon; Kang, Sun Ah; Kim, Yongbaek; Eason, Anthony; Tan, Kelly; An, Hyowon; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2015-12-09

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is considered a proliferation and survival factor for B cells. To assess the role of IL-6 in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency, KSHV latency locus-transgenic mice (referred to as latency mice) lacking IL-6 were evaluated. IL-6(-/-) latency mice had the same phenotypes as the latency mice, i.e., increased frequency of marginal zone B cells, hyperplasia, and hyperglobulinemia, indicating that the KSHV latency locus, which includes all viral microRNAs (miRNAs), can compensate for lack of IL-6 in premalignant B cell activation.

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of bone marrow dendritic cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rettig, M B; Ma, H J; Vescio, R A; Põld, M; Schiller, G; Belson, D; Savage, A; Nishikubo, C; Wu, C; Fraser, J; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    1997-06-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was found in the bone marrow dendritic cells of multiple myeloma patients but not in malignant plasma cells or bone marrow dendritic cells from normal individuals or patients with other malignancies. In addition the virus was detected in the bone marrow dendritic cells from two out of eight patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to myeloma. Viral interleukin-6, the human homolog of which is a growth factor for myeloma, was found to be transcribed in the myeloma bone marrow dendritic cells. KSHV may be required for transformation from MGUS to myeloma and perpetuate the growth of malignant plasma cells.

  16. Molecular piracy: manipulation of the ubiquitin system by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Fujimuro, Masahiro; Hayward, S Diane; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitination, one of several post-translational protein modifications, plays a key role in the regulation of cellular events, including protein degradation, signal transduction, endocytosis, protein trafficking, apoptosis and immune responses. Ubiquitin attachment at the lysine residue of cellular factors acts as a signal for endocytosis and rapid degradation by the 26S proteasome. It has recently been observed that viruses, especially oncogenic herpesviruses, utilise molecular piracy by encoding their own proteins to interfere with regulation of cell signalling. Kaposi's sarcoma- associated herpesvirus (KSHV) manipulates the ubiquitin system to facilitate cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis and evasion from immunity. In this review, we will describe the strategies used by KSHV at distinct stages of the viral life-cycle to control the ubiquitin system and promote oncogenesis and viral persistence.

  17. ARID3B: a Novel Regulator of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer J.; Boyne, James R.; Paulus, Christina; Jackson, Brian R.; Nevels, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of commonly fatal malignancies of immunocompromised individuals, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). A hallmark of all herpesviruses is their biphasic life cycle—viral latency and the productive lytic cycle—and it is well established that reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle is associated with KS pathogenesis. Therefore, a thorough appreciation of the mechanisms that govern reactivation is required to better understand disease progression. The viral protein replication and transcription activator (RTA) is the KSHV lytic switch protein due to its ability to drive the expression of various lytic genes, leading to reactivation of the entire lytic cycle. While the mechanisms for activating lytic gene expression have received much attention, how RTA impacts cellular function is less well understood. To address this, we developed a cell line with doxycycline-inducible RTA expression and applied stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. Using this methodology, we have identified a novel cellular protein (AT-rich interacting domain containing 3B [ARID3B]) whose expression was enhanced by RTA and that relocalized to replication compartments upon lytic reactivation. We also show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or overexpression of ARID3B led to an enhancement or inhibition of lytic reactivation, respectively. Furthermore, DNA affinity and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that ARID3B specifically interacts with A/T-rich elements in the KSHV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt), and this was dependent on lytic cycle reactivation. Therefore, we have identified a novel cellular protein whose expression is enhanced by KSHV RTA with the ability to inhibit KSHV reactivation. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of fatal malignancies of

  18. Myc is required for the maintenance of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency.

    PubMed

    Li, Xudong; Chen, Shijia; Feng, Jun; Deng, Hongyu; Sun, Ren

    2010-09-01

    Myc is deregulated by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latent proteins, but its role in KSHV latency is not clear. We found that Myc knockdown with RNA interference (RNAi) induced KSHV reactivation and increased the protein and mRNA levels of RTA, a key viral regulator of KSHV reactivation. Myc knockdown increased, whereas Myc overexpression inhibited, RTA promoter activity. KSHV reactivation and the activation of the RTA promoter induced by Myc depletion were inhibited by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 inhibitors but not by a MEK1 inhibitor. Myc knockdown inhibited primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell proliferation through inducing apoptosis and G(1) cell cycle arrest. Thus, Myc may be a key cellular node coupling cellular transformation and KSHV latency.

  19. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of blood endothelial cells induces lymphatic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Patrick A; Brazeau, Elizabeth; Lagunoff, Michael

    2004-10-10

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is necessary for KS, a highly vascularized tumor predominated by endothelial-derived spindle cells that express markers of lymphatic endothelium. Following KSHV infection of TIME cells, an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (DMVEC) line, expression of many genes specific to lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR3, podoplanin, LYVE-1, and Prox-1, is significantly increased. Increases in VEGFR3 and podoplanin protein are also demonstrated following latent infection. Examination of cytokine secretion showed that KSHV infection significantly induces hIL-6 while strongly inhibiting secretion of IL-8, a gene product that is decreased by differentiation of blood to lymphatic endothelial cells. These studies support the hypotheses that latent KSHV infection of blood endothelial cells drives their differentiation to lymphatic endothelial cells.

  1. Multiplexed colorimetric detection of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus and Bartonella DNA using gold and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Matthew; Jiang, Li; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an infectious cancer occurring most commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients and in endemic regions, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where KS is among the top four most prevalent cancers. The cause of KS is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that while routinely diagnosed in developed nations, provides challenges to developing world medical providers and point-of-care detection. A major challenge in the diagnosis of KS is the existence of a number of other diseases with similar clinical presentation and histopathological features, requiring the detection of KSHV in a biopsy sample. In this work we develop an answer to this challenge by creating a multiplexed one-pot detection system for KSHV DNA and DNA from a frequently confounding disease, bacillary angiomatosis. Gold and silver nanoparticle aggregation reactions are tuned for each target and a multi-color change system is developed capable of detecting both targets down to levels between 1 nM and 2 nM. The system developed here could later be integrated with microfluidic sample processing to create a final device capable of solving the two major challenges in point-of-care KS detection.

  2. Cancer angiogenesis induced by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is mediated by EZH2.

    PubMed

    He, Meilan; Zhang, Wei; Bakken, Thomas; Schutten, Melissa; Toth, Zsolt; Jung, Jae U; Gill, Parkash; Cannon, Mark; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2012-07-15

    EZH2 is a component of the epigenetic regulator PRC2 that suppresses gene expression. Elevated expression of EZH2 is common in human cancers and is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we show that EZH2 elevation is associated with epigenetic modifications of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic virus that promotes the development of Kaposi sarcoma and other malignancies that occur in patients with chronic HIV infections. KSHV induction of EZH2 expression was essential for KSHV-induced angiogenesis. High expression of EZH2 was observed in Kaposi sarcoma tumors. In cell culture, latent KSHV infection upregulated the expression of EZH2 in human endothelial cells through the expression of vFLIP and LANA, two KSHV-latent genes that activate the NF-κB pathway. KSHV-mediated upregulation of EZH2 was required for the induction of Ephrin-B2, an essential proangiogenic factor that drives endothelial cell tubule formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that KSHV regulates the host epigenetic modifier EZH2 to promote angiogenesis.

  3. Identification and Characterization of the Orf49 Protein of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    González, Carlos M.; Wong, Emily L.; Bowser, Brian S.; Hong, Gregory K.; Kenney, Shannon; Damania, Blossom

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common neoplasm among human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV is able to establish a predominantly latent, life-long infection in its host. The KSHV lytic cycle can be triggered by a number of stimuli that induce the expression of the key lytic switch protein, the replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by Orf50. The expression of Rta is necessary and sufficient to trigger the full lytic program resulting in the ordered expression of viral proteins, release of viral progeny, and host cell death. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, Orf49, which lies adjacent and in the opposite orientation to Orf50. Orf49 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle and shows early transcription kinetics. We have mapped the 5′ and 3′ ends of the unspliced Orf49 transcript, which encodes a 30-kDa protein that is localized to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we found that Orf49 was able to cooperate with Rta to activate several KSHV lytic promoters containing AP-1 sites. The Orf49-encoded protein was also able to induce transcriptional activation through c-Jun but not the ATF1, ATF2, or CREB transcription factor. We found that Orf49 could induce phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factor c-Jun, the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Our data suggest that Orf49 functions to activate the JNK and p38 pathways during the KSHV lytic cycle. PMID:16501115

  4. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes tumorigenesis by modulating the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Yu, F-X; Kim, Y C; Meng, Z; Naipauer, J; Looney, D J; Liu, X; Gutkind, J S; Mesri, E A; Guan, K-L

    2015-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus and the culprit behind the human disease Kaposi sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-defining malignancy. KSHV encodes a viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) critical for the initiation and progression of KS. In this study, we identified that YAP/TAZ, two homologous oncoproteins inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, are activated in KSHV-infected cells in vitro, KS-like mouse tumors and clinical human KS specimens. The KSHV-encoded vGPCR acts through Gq/11 and G12/13 to inhibit the Hippo pathway kinases Lats1/2, promoting the activation of YAP/TAZ. Furthermore, depletion of YAP/TAZ blocks vGPCR-induced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model. The vGPCR-transformed cells are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of YAP. Our study establishes a pivotal role of the Hippo pathway in mediating the oncogenic activity of KSHV and development of KS, and also suggests a potential of using YAP inhibitors for KS intervention.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the open reading frame 35 encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Masa, Shiri-Rivka; Lando, Revital; Sarid, Ronit

    2008-02-05

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae and is causally associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. The KSHV genome encodes over 85 genes; the function of some is entirely unknown. We have characterized the transcriptional regulation of a conserved and uncharacterized Gammaherpesvirinae open reading frame, orf35, which lies in a cluster of several overlapping genes, orf34 to orf38. We identified the transcription start site and analyzed upstream sequences. We found that expression of the KSHV lytic replication and transcription activator (RTA) strongly increased the orf35 promoter activity through a 46-nucleotide region which includes a conserved AP-1 binding site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated direct binding of cJUN and cFOS to the predicted AP-1 binding site. Finally, using a mutated promoter lacking the AP-1 site and dominant-negative cFOS, we established that the RTA-mediated orf35 transactivation is AP-1-dependent.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing in the Understanding of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Biology.

    PubMed

    Strahan, Roxanne; Uppal, Timsy; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-03-31

    Non-Sanger-based novel nucleic acid sequencing techniques, referred to as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), provide a rapid, reliable, high-throughput, and massively parallel sequencing methodology that has improved our understanding of human cancers and cancer-related viruses. NGS has become a quintessential research tool for more effective characterization of complex viral and host genomes through its ever-expanding repertoire, which consists of whole-genome sequencing, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and whole-epigenome sequencing. These new NGS platforms provide a comprehensive and systematic genome-wide analysis of genomic sequences and a full transcriptional profile at a single nucleotide resolution. When combined, these techniques help unlock the function of novel genes and the related pathways that contribute to the overall viral pathogenesis. Ongoing research in the field of virology endeavors to identify the role of various underlying mechanisms that control the regulation of the herpesvirus biphasic lifecycle in order to discover potential therapeutic targets and treatment strategies. In this review, we have complied the most recent findings about the application of NGS in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) biology, including identification of novel genomic features and whole-genome KSHV diversities, global gene regulatory network profiling for intricate transcriptome analyses, and surveying of epigenetic marks (DNA methylation, modified histones, and chromatin remodelers) during de novo, latent, and productive KSHV infections.

  7. Fluorescent Tagging and Cellular Distribution of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF45 Tegument Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergson, Shir; Kalt, Inna; Itzhak, Inbal; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), is a cancer-related human virus, classified as a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily. We report here the construction of a dual fluorescent-tagged KSHV genome (BAC16-mCherry-ORF45), which constitutively expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and contains the tegument multifunctional ORF45 protein as a fusion protein with monomeric Cherry fluorescent protein (mCherry). We confirmed that this virus is properly expressed and correctly replicates and that the mCherry-ORF45 protein is incorporated into the virions. Using this labeled virus, we describe the dynamics of mCherry-ORF45 expression and localization in newly infected cells as well as in latently infected cells undergoing lytic induction and show that mCherry can be used to monitor cells undergoing the lytic viral cycle. This virus is likely to enable future studies monitoring the dynamics of viral trafficking and tegumentation during viral ingress and egress. IMPORTANCE The present study describes the construction and characterization of a new recombinant KSHV genome BAC16 clone which expresses mCherry-tagged ORF45. This virus enables the tracking of cells undergoing lytic infection and can be used to address issues related to the trafficking and maturation pathways of KSHV virions. PMID:25165104

  8. Identification and characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 11 promotor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Open reading frame 11 (ORF11) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus belongs to a herpesviral homologous protein family shared by some members of the gamma- herpesvirus subfamily. Little is known about this ORF11 homologous protein family. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, ORF11, located adjacent and in the opposite orientation to a well-characterized viral IL-6 gene. Northern blot analysis reveals that ORF11 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle with delayed-early transcription kinetics. We have determined the 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated region of the unspliced ORF11 transcript and identified both the transcription start site and the transcription termination site. Core promoter region, representing ORF11 promoter activity, was mapped to a 159nt fragment 5{prime} most proximal to the transcription start site. A functional TATA box was identified in the core promoter region. Interestingly, we found that ORF11 transcriptional activation is not responsive to Rta, the KSHV lytic switch protein. We also discovered that part of the ORF11 promoter region, the 209nt fragment upstream of the transcription start site, was repressed by phorbol esters. Our data help to understand transcription regulation of ORF11 and to elucidate roles of ORF11 in KSHV pathogenesis and life cycle.

  9. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in non-AIDS related lymphomas occurring in body cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, E.; Nador, R. G.; Aozasa, K.; Delsol, G.; Said, J. W.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    DNA sequences belonging to the recently discovered Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), now provisionally designated human herpesvirus 8, have been previously identified in an uncommonly occurring subset of AIDS-related lymphomas, referred to as body-cavity-based lymphomas (BCBLs), which present as lymphomatous effusions. Pyothorax-associated lymphomas (PALS) are non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that arise in the pleural cavity after long-standing pleural inflammation resulting from therapeutic artificial pneumothorax or from tuberculosis pleuritis. Although PALs present as solid tumor masses, they are otherwise similar to BCBLs in that they also are B cell lymphomas, usually exhibit immunoblastic morphology, and contain Epstein-Barr virus. We investigated whether KSHV sequences are present in 2 BCBLs in patients without AIDS and 12 in Japanese and 2 French PALs. The 2 BCBLs were positive for KSHV sequences, whereaas all 14 PALs were KSHV negative. This finding strongly suggests that BCBLs and PALs are distinct clinicopathological entities and further strengthens the association between the presence of KSHV and an effusion phenotype. Based on these findings, we propose replacing the term body-cavity-based lymphoma with the term primary effusion lymphoma, which describes these non-Hodgkin's lymphomas more accurately and avoids confusion with other lymphomas that may occur in the body cavities, such as the PALs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8686762

  10. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  11. Control of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Reactivation Induced by Multiple Signals

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiaying; Li, Xudong; Liao, Chia Wei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Shamma, Jeff S.; Sun, Ren

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control cellular functions can bring about many developments in basic biological research and its applications. The presence of multiple signals, internal as well as externally imposed, introduces several challenges for controlling cellular functions. Additionally the lack of clear understanding of the cellular signaling network limits our ability to infer the responses to a number of signals. This work investigates the control of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reactivation upon treatment with a combination of multiple signals. We utilize mathematical model-based as well as experiment-based approaches to achieve the desired goals of maximizing virus reactivation. The results show that appropriately selected control signals can induce virus lytic gene expression about ten folds higher than a single drug; these results were validated by comparing the results of the two approaches, and experimentally using multiple assays. Additionally, we have quantitatively analyzed potential interactions between the used combinations of drugs. Some of these interactions were consistent with existing literature, and new interactions emerged and warrant further studies. The work presents a general method that can be used to quantitatively and systematically study multi-signal induced responses. It enables optimization of combinations to achieve desired responses. It also allows identifying critical nodes mediating the multi-signal induced responses. The concept and the approach used in this work will be directly applicable to other diseases such as AIDS and cancer. PMID:21904595

  12. Epidemiology of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in Asia: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Linding

    2017-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) also referred to as human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), is a gamma herpes virus and recently discovered human virus. Since its discovery, a myriad of studies has been conducted to explore its pathogenesis mechanisms. However, despite our consistently increasing understanding of KSHV biology and its clinical manifestations, only little progress has been made in understanding of its epidemiology characteristics which in turn hampered the management of KSHV-associated diseases and public health. Asia, the largest continent with a diversity of populations, has been thought to be with relative lower KSHV prevalence and diseases burden. The epidemiology of KSHV in this area is obscure either. The present review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to the epidemiology of KSHV across Asian countries. Studies available in the literature have shown a substantial variation in this region indicating the virus is not ubiquitous in Asia countries as is the case with other human herpes viruses. Also, the MSM has been reconfirmed to be at the highest risk of KSHV infection in Asia highlighting the need for an increased focus on this previously marginalized population. Because of the paucity of data available, the epidemiologic characteristics of KSHV are difficult to determine in Asian countries. Future systematic collection of data to inform KSHV prevention strategies in Asia is urgently needed. J. Med. Virol. 89:563-570, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CTCF Regulates Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Transcription by Nucleosome Displacement and RNA Polymerase Programming

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyosun; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2013-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in various aspects of viral and host chromatin organization and transcriptional control. We showed previously that CTCF binds to a cluster of three sites in the first intron of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) multicistronic latency-associated transcript that encodes latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), viral cyclin (vCyclin), vFLIP, viral microRNAs, and kaposin. We show here that these CTCF binding sites regulate mRNA production, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) programming, and nucleosome organization of the KSHV latency transcript control region. We also show that KSHV bacmids lacking these CTCF binding sites have elevated and altered ratios of spliced latency transcripts. CTCF binding site mutations altered RNAPII and RNAPII-accessory factor interactions with the latency control region. CTCF binding sites were required for the in vitro recruitment of RNAPII to the latency control region, suggesting that direct interactions between CTCF and RNAPII contribute to transcription regulation. Histone modifications in the latency control region were also altered by mutations in the CTCF binding sites. Finally, we show that CTCF binding alters the regular phasing of nucleosomes in the latency gene transcript and intron, suggesting that nucleosome positioning can be an underlying biochemical mechanism of CTCF function. We propose that RNAPII interactions and nucleosome displacement serve as a biochemical basis for programming RNAPII in the KSHV transcriptional control region. PMID:23192870

  14. Humanized-BLT mouse model of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Kang, Guobin; Kumar, Pankaj; Lu, Wuxun; Li, Yue; Zhou, You; Li, Qingsheng; Wood, Charles

    2014-02-25

    Lack of an effective small-animal model to study the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection in vivo has hampered studies on the pathogenesis and transmission of KSHV. The objective of our study was to determine whether the humanized BLT (bone marrow, liver, and thymus) mouse (hu-BLT) model generated from NOD/SCID/IL2rγ mice can be a useful model for studying KSHV infection. We have tested KSHV infection of hu-BLT mice via various routes of infection, including oral and intravaginal routes, to mimic natural routes of transmission, with recombinant KSHV over a 1- or 3-mo period. Infection was determined by measuring viral DNA, latent and lytic viral transcripts and antigens in various tissues by PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemical staining. KSHV DNA, as well as both latent and lytic viral transcripts and proteins, were detected in various tissues, via various routes of infection. Using double-labeled immune-fluorescence confocal microscopy, we found that KSHV can establish infection in human B cells and macrophages. Our results demonstrate that KSHV can establish a robust infection in the hu-BLT mice, via different routes of infection, including the oral mucosa which is the most common natural route of infection. This hu-BLT mouse not only will be a useful model for studying the pathogenesis of KSHV in vivo but can potentially be used to study the routes and spread of viral infection in the infected host.

  15. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature.

    PubMed

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A; Tekeste, Shewit S; Reczko, Martin; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Yarchoan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases.

  16. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Qiao, Jing; Nguyen, David; Struckhoff, Amanda P; Doyle, Lisa; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P; Renne, Rolf; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several malignancies, including Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients such as HIV+ subpopulation and lack effective therapeutic options. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported as an important regulator of endothelial cell cycle control, proliferation and angiogenesis. HO-1 has also been found to be highly expressed in KSHV-infected endothelial cells and oral AIDS-KS lesions. We previously demonstrate that the multifunctional glycoprotein CD147 is required for KSHV/LANA-induced endothelial cell invasiveness. During the identification of CD147 controlled downstream genes by microarray analysis, we found that the expression of HO-1 is significantly elevated in both CD147-overexpressing and KSHV-infected HUVEC cells when compared to control cells. In the current study, we further identify the regulation of HO-1 expression and mediated cellular functions by both CD147 and KSHV-encoded LANA proteins. Targeting HO-1 by either RNAi or the chemical inhibitor, SnPP, effectively induces cell death of KSHV-infected endothelial cells (the major cellular components of KS) through DNA damage and necrosis process. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that SnPP treatment significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the important role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenesis of KSHV-infected endothelial cells, the underlying regulatory mechanisms for HO-1 expression and targeting HO-1 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against KSHV-related malignancies.

  17. Peripheral Blood Endothelial Progenitors as Potential Reservoirs of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Della Bella, Silvia; Brambilla, Lucia; Bellinvia, Monica; Bergamo, Elisa; Clerici, Mario; Villa, Maria L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The cellular reservoirs of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and the exact nature of the putative KSHV-infected circulating precursor of spindle cells of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) still remain poorly defined. Because KS spindle cells are thought to be of endothelial origin, and because mature endothelial cells do not sustain persistent KSHV-infection, our attention was focalized on circulating hematopoietic precursors able to differentiate into endothelial lineage. Methods and Findings Late endothelial progenitor cells (late-EPCs) were cultured from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 16 patients with classic KS. The presence and load of KSHV genomes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in DNA extracted from cells and supernatants of late-EPC cultures obtained from 7 patients. Endothelial colonies cultured from the peripheral blood of KS patients were found to satisfy all requisites to be defined late-EPCs: they appeared from the CD14-negative fraction of adherent cells after 11–26 days of culture, could be serially expanded in vitro, expressed high levels of endothelial antigens but lacked leukocyte markers. Late-EPC cultures were found to harbor KSHV-DNA at variable levels and to retain the virus after multiple passages in cells as well as in supernatants, suggesting that a quote of KSHV lytic infection may spontaneously occur. Lytic phase induction or hypoxia could amplify virus release in supernatants. Conclusion Our results suggest that circulating endothelial progenitors from KS patients are KSHV-infected and support viral productive replication and may therefore represent potential virus reservoirs and putative precursors of KS spindle cells. PMID:18231605

  18. Latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes angiogenesis through targeting notch signaling effector Hey1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; He, Zhiheng; Xia, Tian; Li, Xiaofan; Liang, Deguang; Lin, Xianzhi; Wen, Hao; Lan, Ke

    2014-04-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma. Kaposi sarcoma is an angioproliferative neoplasm that originates from Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Previously, we showed that the KSHV LANA protein can stabilize intracellular Notch in KSHV-infected tumor cells and promote cell proliferation. However, whether Notch signaling functions in pathologic angiogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma remains largely unknown. Hey1, an essential downstream effector of the Notch signaling pathway, has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in vascular development. In the present study, we performed whole transcriptome, paired-end sequencing on three patient-matched clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens and their corresponding adjacent stroma samples, with an average depth of 42 million reads per sample. Dll4, Hey1, and HeyL displayed significant upregulation in Kaposi sarcoma. Further verification based on immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that Hey1 was indeed highly expressed in Kaposi sarcoma lesions. Using the Matrigel plug assay, we showed that downregulation of Hey1 and γ-secretase inhibitor treatment caused dramatic reduction in the formation of new blood vessels in mice. Interestingly, LANA was responsible for the elevated level of Hey1 through inhibition of its degradation. Importantly, Hey1 stabilized by LANA promoted the neoplastic vasculature. Taken together, our data suggest that hijacking of the proangiogenic property of Hey1 by LANA is an important strategy utilized by KSHV to achieve pathologic angiogenesis and that Hey1 is a potential therapeutic target in Kaposi sarcoma.

  19. Viral Bcl-2 Encoded by the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Is Vital for Virus Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Bergson, Shir; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) open reading frame 16 (orf16) encodes a viral Bcl-2 (vBcl-2) protein which shares sequence and functional homology with the Bcl-2 family. Like its cellular homologs, vBcl-2 protects various cell types from apoptosis and can also negatively regulate autophagy. vBcl-2 is transcribed during lytic infection; however, its exact function has not been determined to date. By using bacterial artificial chromosome 16 (BAC16) clone carrying the full-length KSHV genome, we have generated recombinant KSHV mutants that fail to express vBcl-2 or express mCherry-tagged vBcl-2. We show that the vBcl-2 protein is expressed at relatively low levels during lytic induction and that a lack of vBcl-2 largely reduces the efficiency of KSHV reactivation in terms of lytic gene expression, viral DNA replication, and production of infectious particles. In contrast, the establishment of latency was not affected by the absence of vBcl-2. Our findings suggest an important role for vBcl-2 during initial phases of lytic reactivation and/or during subsequent viral propagation. Given the known functions of vBcl-2 in regulating apoptosis and autophagy, which involve its direct interaction with cellular proteins and thus require high levels of protein expression, it appears that vBcl-2 may have additional regulatory functions that do not depend on high levels of protein expression. IMPORTANCE The present study shows for the first time the expression of endogenous vBcl-2 protein in KSHV-infected cell lines and demonstrates the importance of vBcl-2 during the initial phases of lytic reactivation and/or during its subsequent propagation. It is suggested that vBcl-2 has additional regulatory functions beyond apoptosis and autophagy repression that do not depend on high levels of protein expression. PMID:25740992

  20. The Crystal Structure of PF-8, the DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit from Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Jennifer L.; Filman, David J.; Ciustea, Mihai; Silverman, Janice Elaine Y.; Lautenschlager, Catherine L.; Coen, Donald M.; Ricciardi, Robert P.; Hogle, James M.

    2009-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an emerging pathogen whose mechanism of replication is poorly understood. PF-8, the presumed processivity factor of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA polymerase, acts in combination with the catalytic subunit, Pol-8, to synthesize viral DNA. We have solved the crystal structure of residues 1 to 304 of PF-8 at a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. This structure reveals that each monomer of PF-8 shares a fold common to processivity factors. Like human cytomegalovirus UL44, PF-8 forms a head-to-head dimer in the form of a C clamp, with its concave face containing a number of basic residues that are predicted to be important for DNA binding. However, there are several differences with related proteins, especially in loops that extend from each monomer into the center of the C clamp and in the loops that connect the two subdomains of each protein, which may be important for determining PF-8's mode of binding to DNA and to Pol-8. Using the crystal structures of PF-8, the herpes simplex virus catalytic subunit, and RB69 bacteriophage DNA polymerase in complex with DNA and initial experiments testing the effects of inhibition of PF-8-stimulated DNA synthesis by peptides derived from Pol-8, we suggest a model for how PF-8 might form a ternary complex with Pol-8 and DNA. The structure and the model suggest interesting similarities and differences in how PF-8 functions relative to structurally similar proteins.

  1. CD147 and downstream ADAMTSs promote the tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Chen, Yihan; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Ochoa, Augusto C; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Toole, Bryan P; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-26

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several human cancers, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients and lack effective therapeutic options. We have previously shown that KSHV or viral protein LANA up-regulates the glycoprotein CD147, thereby inducing primary endothelial cell invasiveness. In the current study, we identify the global network controlled by CD147 in KSHV-infected endothelial cells using Illumina microarray analysis. Among downstream genes, two specific metalloproteases, ADAMTS1 and 9, are strongly expressed in AIDS-KS tissues and contribute to KSHV-infected endothelial cell invasiveness through up-regulation of IL-6 and VEGF. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that targeting CD147 and downstream ADAMTSs significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, targeting CD147 and associated proteins may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against these KSHV-related malignancies.

  2. Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II to Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-22

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to the DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable pre-initiation complexes. Here we have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around KSHV genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescent labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate-early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At single cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed, would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories", which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular genes transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells.IMPORTANCE B-cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. 3D imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of these episomes following stimulation. The results showed

  3. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A. . E-mail: edward_berger@nih.gov

    2006-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor.

  4. The Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus orf35 gene product is required for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Shir; Itzhak, Inbal; Wasserman, Talya; Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Sarid, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the etiology of several human malignancies. KSHV open reading frame (orf) 35 encodes a conserved gammaherpesvirus protein with an, as yet, unknown function. Employing the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated a recombinant viral clone that fails to express ORF35 (BAC16-ORF35-stop) but preserves intact adjacent and overlapping reading frames. Using this construct, we studied the role of this previously uncharacterized gene product during lytic reactivation of KSHV. Upon lytic reactivation, the ORF35-stop recombinant virus displayed significantly reduced lytic viral gene expression, viral DNA replication, and progeny virus production as compared to control wild-type virus. Exogenous expression of ORF35-Flag reversed the effects of ORF35 deficiency. These results demonstrate that ORF35 is important for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

  5. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Wei, Fang; Gao, Shujun; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Tong, Yin; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV.

  6. Regulation and autoregulation of the promoter for the latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joseph H; Orvis, Joshua; Kim, Jong Wook; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Renne, Rolf; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2004-04-16

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 has been established as the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and certain AIDS-associated lymphomas. KSHV establishes latent infection in these tumors, invariably expressing high levels of the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein. LANA is necessary and sufficient to maintain the KSHV episome. It also modulates viral and cellular transcription and has been implicated directly in oncogenesis because of its ability to bind to the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor proteins. Previously, we identified the LANA promoter (LANAp) and showed that it was positively regulated by LANA itself. Here, we present a detailed mutational analysis and define cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors for the core LANAp. We found that a downstream promoter element, TATA box, and GC box/Sp1 site at -29 are all individually required for activity. This architecture places LANAp into the small and unusual group of eukaryotic promoters that contain both the downstream promoter element and TATA element but lack a defined initiation site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LANA regulates its own promoter via its C-terminal domain and does bind to a defined site within the core promoter.

  7. Cannabidiol inhibits growth and induces programmed cell death in kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected endothelium.

    PubMed

    Maor, Yehoshua; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Dezube, Bruce J; Zhang, Xuefeng; Groopman, Jerome E

    2012-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common neoplasm caused by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). It is prevalent among the elderly in the Mediterranean, inhabitants of sub-Saharan Africa, and immunocompromised individuals such as organ transplant recipients and AIDS patients. Current treatments for Kaposi sarcoma can inhibit tumor growth but are not able to eliminate KSHV from the host. When the host's immune system weakens, KSHV begins to replicate again, and active tumor growth ensues. New therapeutic approaches are needed. Cannabidiol (CBD), a plant-derived cannabinoid, exhibits promising antitumor effects without inducing psychoactive side effects. CBD is emerging as a novel therapeutic for various disorders, including cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of CBD both on the infection of endothelial cells (ECs) by KSHV and on the growth and apoptosis of KSHV-infected ECs, an in vitro model for the transformation of normal endothelium to Kaposi sarcoma. While CBD did not affect the efficiency with which KSHV infected ECs, it reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in those infected by the virus. CBD inhibited the expression of KSHV viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), its agonist, the chemokine growth-regulated protein α (GRO-α), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3), and the VEGFR-3 ligand, vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C). This suggests a potential mechanism by which CBD exerts its effects on KSHV-infected endothelium and supports the further examination of CBD as a novel targeted agent for the treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Increased prevalence of Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in the Kaposi΄s sarcoma-endemic area of western Kenya in 1981-2000.

    PubMed

    Senba, M; Buziba, N; Mori, N; Morimoto, K; Nakamura, T

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi΄s sarcoma (KS) had been endemic in Africa before the appearance of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) in 1985. Incidence of African KS has increased over the time and the risk of contracting KS become greater in HIV-positive as opposed to HIV-negative individuals. KS specimens were collected in 1981-2000 from 228 surgical cases originating from a KS-endemic area of Western Kenya and examined for Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) by an immunoperoxidase assay. The results showed that the specimens from 1981-1985 (before the HIV epidemic) were KSHV-positive in 10.3% in contrast to the KSHV positivity of 50.1-63.5% in 1986-2000. The linear increase of KSHV positivity in 1981-2000 was statistically significant. The most plausible explanation for the increased prevalence of KSHV in KS cases is that the endemic KS has changed to the epidemic one.

  9. Discovery of a Coregulatory Interaction between Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF45 and the Viral Protein Kinase ORF36

    PubMed Central

    Avey, Denis; Tepper, Sarah; Pifer, Benjamin; Bahga, Amritpal; Williams, Hunter; Gillen, Joseph; Li, Wenwei; Ogden, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of three human malignancies. KSHV ORF36 encodes a serine/threonine viral protein kinase, which is conserved throughout all herpesviruses. Although several studies have identified the viral and cellular substrates of conserved herpesvirus protein kinases (CHPKs), the precise functions of KSHV ORF36 during lytic replication remain elusive. Here, we report that ORF36 interacts with another lytic protein, ORF45, in a manner dependent on ORF36 kinase activity. We mapped the regions of ORF36 and ORF45 involved in the binding. Their association appears to be mediated by electrostatic interactions, since deletion of either the highly basic N terminus of ORF36 or an acidic patch of ORF45 abolished the binding. In addition, the dephosphorylation of ORF45 protein dramatically reduced its association with ORF36. Importantly, ORF45 enhances both the stability and kinase activity of ORF36. Consistent with previous studies of CHPK homologs, we detected ORF36 protein in extracellular virions. To investigate the roles of ORF36 in the context of KSHV lytic replication, we used bacterial artificial chromosome mutagenesis to engineer both ORF36-null and kinase-dead mutants. We found that ORF36-null/mutant virions are moderately defective in viral particle production and are further deficient in primary infection. In summary, our results uncover a functionally important interaction between ORF36 and ORF45 and indicate a significant role of ORF36 in the production of infectious progeny virions. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus with a significant public health burden. KSHV ORF36 encodes a serine/threonine viral protein kinase, whose functions throughout the viral life cycle have not been elucidated. Here, we report that ORF36 interacts with another KSHV protein, ORF45. We mapped the regions of ORF36 and ORF45 involved in their association and further

  10. Tissue Specificity of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Nuclear Antigen (LANA/orf73) Promoter in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joseph H.; Hines-Boykin, Rebecca; Ash, John D.; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) is a human-oncogenic herpesvirus. Cells from KSHV-associated tumors, such as Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), are of endothelial and B-cell origin, respectively. KSHV persists indefinitely in these cell lineages during latent infection. Indeed, cellular latency is a hallmark of all herpesviruses that is intimately linked to their pathogenesis. We previously characterized the promoter for the KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen LANA/orf73. LANA is required for latent episome maintenance and has also been implicated in oncogenesis. Hence, regulation of LANA expression is critical to KSHV persistence. We find that a region extending to bp −1299 upstream of the LANA transcription start site is able to drive lacZ-reporter gene expression in several lines of transgenic mice. In agreement with KSHV's natural tropism, we detected reporter gene expression in CD19-positive B cells but not in CD3-positive T cells. We also detected expression in the kidney and, at a lower level, in the liver. In contrast to KS tumors, transgene expression was localized to kidney tubular epithelium rather than vascular endothelial cells. This suggests that our promoter fragment contains all cis-regulatory elements sufficient for B-cell specificity but not those required for endothelial specificity. Alternatively, while the trans-acting factors required for LANA expression in B cells are evolutionarily conserved, those that regulate endothelial cell-specific expression are unique to humans. Our in vivo studies address a conundrum in KSHV biology: in culture, KSHV is able to infect a variety of cell types indiscriminately, while in healthy latent carriers KSHV is found in B lymphocytes. The transgenic-mouse experiments reported here suggest that tissue-restricted LANA gene expression could explain B-cell-specific viral persistence. PMID:12368345

  11. Parasite infection is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in Ugandan women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immune modulation by parasites may influence susceptibility to bacteria and viruses. We examined the association between current parasite infections, HIV and syphilis (measured in blood or stool samples using standard methods) and antibodies against Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), measured by ELISA, in 1915 stored plasma samples from pregnant women in Entebbe, Uganda. Results Seroprevalence of KSHV was higher in women with malaria parasitaemia (73% vs 60% p = 0.01), hookworm (67% vs 56% p = 0.001) and Mansonella perstans (69% vs 59% p = 0.05); seroprevalence increased with increasing intensity of hookworm infection (p < 0.001[trend]). No associations were found for HIV, five other parasites or active syphilis. These effects were not explained by socioeconomic status or education. Conclusions Specific parasite infections are associated with presence of antibodies against KSHV, perhaps mediated via their effect on immune function. PMID:21962023

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    SciTech Connect

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-07-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR.

  13. Identification of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of K1 transforming protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Guo, J; Li, M; Choi, J K; DeMaria, M; Rosenzweig, M; Jung, J U

    1998-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is consistently identified in Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma. KSHV encodes a transforming protein called K1 which is structurally similar to lymphocyte receptors. We have found that a highly conserved region of the cytoplasmic domain of K1 resembles the sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). To demonstrate the signal-transducing activity of K1, we constructed a chimeric protein in which the cytoplasmic tail of the human CD8alpha polypeptide was replaced with that of KSHV K1. Expression of the CD8-K1 chimera in B cells induced cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium mobilization upon stimulation with an anti-CD8 antibody. Mutational analyses showed that the putative ITAM of K1 was required for its signal-transducing activity. Furthermore, tyrosine residues of the putative ITAM of K1 were phosphorylated upon stimulation, and this allowed subsequent binding of SH2-containing proteins. These results demonstrate that the KSHV transforming protein K1 contains a functional ITAM in its cytoplasmic domain and that it can transduce signals to induce cellular activation.

  14. Identification of Novel Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Orf50 Transcripts: Discovery of New RTA Isoforms with Variable Transactivation Potential.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Brian S; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Speck, Samuel H

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gammaherpesvirus that has been associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, as well as its namesake Kaposi's sarcoma. As a gammaherpesvirus, KSHV is able to acutely replicate, enter latency, and reactivate from this latent state. A key protein involved in both acute replication and reactivation from latency is the replication and transcriptional activator (RTA) encoded by the gene Orf50 RTA is a known transactivator of multiple viral genes, allowing it to control the switch between latency and virus replication. We report here the identification of six alternatively spliced Orf50 transcripts that are generated from four distinct promoters. These newly identified promoters are shown to be transcriptionally active in 293T (embryonic kidney), Vero (African-green monkey kidney epithelial), 3T12 (mouse fibroblast), and RAW 264.7 (mouse macrophage) cell lines. Notably, the newly identified Orf50 transcripts are predicted to encode four different isoforms of the RTA which differ by 6 to 10 residues at the amino terminus of the protein. We show the global viral transactivation potential of all four RTA isoforms and demonstrate that all isoforms can transcriptionally activate an array of KSHV promoters to various levels. The pattern of transcriptional activation appears to support a transcriptional interference model within the Orf50 region, where silencing of previously expressed isoforms by transcription initiation from upstream Orf50 promoters has the potential to modulate the pattern of viral gene activation.

  15. Differential regulation of the overlapping Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus vGCR (orf74) and LANA (orf73) promoters.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J; Papin, J; Dittmer, D

    2001-02-01

    Similar to that of other herpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) lytic replication destroys the host cell, while the virus can persist in a latent state in synchrony with the host. During latency only a few genes are transcribed, and the question becomes one of what determines latent versus lytic gene expression. Here we undertake a detailed analysis of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA [orf73]) promoter (LANAp). We characterized a minimal region that is necessary and sufficient to maintain high-level transcription in all tissues tested, including primary endothelial cells and B cells, which are the suspected natural host for KSHV. We show that in transient-transfection assays LANAp mimics the expression pattern observed for the authentic promoter in the context of the KSHV episome. Unlike other KSHV promoters tested thus far, LANAp is not affected by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate or viral lytic cycle functions. It is, however, subject to control by LANA itself and cellular regulatory factors, such as p53. This is in contrast to the K14/vGCR (orf74) promoter, which overlaps LANAp and directs transcription on the opposite strand. We isolated a minimal cis-regulatory region sufficient for K14/vGCR promoter activity and show that it, too, mimics the regulation observed for the authentic viral promoter. In particular, we demonstrate that its activity is absolutely dependent on the immediate-early transactivator orf50, the KSHV homolog of the Epstein-Barr virus Rta transactivator.

  16. Charting Latency Transcripts in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus by Whole-Genome Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Farnaz D.; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2002-01-01

    The division into a latent or lytic life cycle is fundamental to all herpesviridae. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (human herpesvirus 8), latent genes have been implicated in cell autonomous transformation, while certain lytic genes procure a tumor friendly milieu through paracrine mechanism. To query KSHV transcription, we devised and validated a high-throughput, high-specificity, high-sensitivity, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR array. This novel methodology is applicable to many human pathogens. Its first use demonstrated that the mRNA levels for KSHV LANA, v-cyclin, and v-FLIP do not increase at any time after viral reactivation. The mRNA for LANA-2/vIRF-3 is similarly resistant to viral reactivation. In contrast, every other latent or lytic message was induced. Hence, LANA, v-FLIP, v-cyclin, and LANA-2 constitute a group of uniquely regulated transcripts in the KSHV genome. PMID:12021355

  17. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population. PMID:9060668

  18. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population.

  19. Quantitative determinations of anti-Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus antibody levels in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Gogineni, Emile; Marshall, Vickie; Miley, Wendell; Bayat, Ahmad; Whitby, Denise; Kovacs, Joseph A; Burbelo, Peter D

    2013-05-01

    Infection with Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also called human herpesvirus-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM). Here, quantitative anti-KSHV antibody levels were measured using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) in an MSM cohort with and without HIV from the NIH Clinical Center. Antibodies were detected using a mixture of 4 KSHV antigens in the MSM cohort and in Kaposi sarcoma (KS) patients. Along with HIV status, these results were compared with K8.1 and ORF73 ELISA, PCR virus detection, and additional LIPS testing. LIPS revealed that 25% (76/307) of the MSM cohort were KSHV seropositive, including 59 HIV+ and 17 HIV- subjects. The anti-KSHV antibody levels detected by LIPS were not statistically different between the KSHV+/HIV+ and KSHV+/HIV- subgroups but were lower than the KS patients (P < 0.0001). ELISA analysis of the MSM cohort detected a 35.5% frequency of KSHV infection and showed agreement with 81% of the samples evaluated by LIPS. Further LIPS testing with v-cyclin, a second ORF73 fragment and ORF38 reconciled some of the differences observed between LIPS and the ELISA immunoassays, and the revised LIPS seroprevalence in the MSM cohort was increased to 31%. Additional quantitative antibody analysis demonstrated statistically lower KSHV antibody levels in MSM compared to KS patients, but no difference was found between KSHV infected with and without HIV coinfection. These findings also suggest that antibodies against v-cyclin and ORF38 are useful for identifying patients with asymptomatic KSHV infection.

  20. New insights into the expression and functions of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus long noncoding PAN RNA.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Nicholas K

    2016-01-02

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a clinically relevant pathogen associated with several human diseases that primarily affect immunocompromised individuals. KSHV encodes a noncoding polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA that is essential for viral propagation and viral gene expression. PAN RNA is the most abundant viral transcript produced during lytic replication. The accumulation of PAN RNA depends on high levels of transcription driven by the Rta protein, a KSHV transcription factor necessary and sufficient for latent-to-lytic phase transition. In addition, KSHV uses several posttranscriptional mechanisms to stabilize PAN RNA. A cis-acting element, called the ENE, prevents PAN RNA decay by forming a triple helix with its poly(A) tail. The viral ORF57 and the cellular PABPC1 proteins further contribute to PAN RNA stability during lytic phase. PAN RNA functions are only beginning to be uncovered, but PAN RNA has been proposed to control gene expression by several different mechanisms. PAN RNA associates with the KSHV genome and may regulate gene expression by recruiting chromatin-modifying factors. Moreover, PAN RNA binds the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein and decreases its repressive activity by sequestering it from the viral genome. Surprisingly, PAN RNA was found to associate with translating ribosomes, so this noncoding RNA may be additionally used to produce viral peptides. In this review, I highlight the mechanisms of PAN RNA accumulation and describe recent insights into potential functions of PAN RNA.

  1. Promoter switching allows simultaneous transcription of LANA and K14/vGPCR of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Michelle R; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2006-06-20

    Latent transcription of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA/ORF73) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is driven by the LANAp-c. Complexity arises during lytic reactivation, however, as the bicistronic K14/vGPCR transcript initiates 32 bp downstream of LANAp-c in the opposite orientation. We identify an Rta/ORF50-inducible LANA promoter (LANAp-i) that is distinct from the LANAp-c. LANAp-c is unaffected by Rta/ORF50. Utilization of the second, downstream LANAp-i explains how LANA and K14/vGPCR are simultaneously transcribed during de novo infection or lytic reactivation. Transactivation of LANAp-i and K14/vGPCRp requires the C-terminal activation domain of Rta/ORF50 and is mediated by DNA-binding-dependent and -independent Rta/ORF50 mechanisms. Transcriptional profiling following viral reactivation support promoter reporter phenotypes. In sum, cis-elements within the LANAp were selected to ensure faithful expression of LANA and other genes regulated by LANAp during all stages of the KSHV lifecycle despite potential interference from K14/vGPCRp activity.

  2. Ribosomal Protein S6 Interacts with the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wuguo; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2011-01-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is central to the maintenance of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and to the survival of KSHV-carrying tumor cells. In an effort to identify interaction partners of LANA, we purified authentic high-molecular-weight complexes of LANA by conventional chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation from the BC-3 cell line. This is the first analysis of LANA-interacting partners that is not based on forced ectopic expression of LANA. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis identified many of the known LANA-interacting proteins. We confirmed LANA's interactions with histones. Three classes of proteins survived our stringent four-step purification procedure (size, heparin, anion, and immunoaffinity chromatography): two heat shock proteins (Hsp70 and Hsp96 precursor), signal recognition particle 72 (SRP72), and 10 different ribosomal proteins. These proteins are likely involved in structural interactions within LANA high-molecular-weight complexes. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) interacts with LANA. This interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain of LANA and does not require DNA or RNA. Depletion of RPS6 from primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells dramatically decreases the half-life of full-length LANA. The fact that RPS6 has a well-established nuclear function beyond its role in ribosome assembly suggests that RPS6 (and by extension other ribosomal proteins) contributes to the extraordinary stability of LANA. PMID:21734034

  3. Characterization of the bipartite nuclear localization signal of protein LANA2 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Nombela, Cesar; Arroyo, Javier; Rivas, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    LANA2 is a nuclear latent protein detected exclusively in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected B cells. The protein inhibits p53-dependent transactivation and apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. To explore the molecular mechanisms of its nuclear localization, fusion proteins of green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and deletion constructs of LANA2 were expressed in HeLa cells. Only the fragment comprising amino acid residues 355-440 of LANA2 localized in the cell nucleus. This fragment contains two closely located basic domains and forms a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). The putative LANA2 NLS was able to target EGFP to the nucleus consistently. Site-directed mutation analyses demonstrated that LANA2 contains a functional bipartite NLS between amino acid positions 367 and 384. In addition, analysis of cells transfected with a cytoplasmic LANA2 mutant revealed that an appropriate subcellular localization may be crucial to regulate p53 activity. PMID:12767255

  4. Expression of the Antisense-to-Latency Transcript Long Noncoding RNA in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Corcoran, Kathleen; Kelkar, Hemant; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2017-02-15

    The regulation of latency is central to herpesvirus biology. Recent transcriptome-wide surveys have uncovered evidence for promiscuous transcription across the entirety of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome and postulated the existence of multiple viral long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Next-generation sequencing studies are highly dependent on the specific experimental approach and particular algorithms of analysis and therefore benefit from independent confirmation of the results. The antisense-to-latency transcript (ALT) lncRNA was discovered by genome-tiling microarray (Chandriani et al., J Virol 86:7934-7942, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00645-10). To characterize ALT in detail, we physically isolated this lncRNA by a strand-specific hybrid capture assay and then employed transcriptome sequencing and novel reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to distinguish all RNA species in the KSHV latency region. These methods confirm that ALT initiates at positions 120739/121012 and encodes a single splice site, which is shared with the 3'-coterminal K14-vGPCR/ORF74 mRNA, terminating at 130873 (GenBank accession number GQ994935), resulting in an ∼10,000-nucleotide transcript. No shorter ALT isoforms were identified. This study also identified a novel intron within the LANA 5' untranslated region using a splice acceptor at 127888. In summary, ALT joins PAN/nut1/T1.1 as a bona fide lncRNA of KSHV with potentially important roles in viral gene regulation and pathogenesis.

  5. Differential Regulation of the Overlapping Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus vGCR (orf74) and LANA (orf73) Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joseph; Papin, James; Dittmer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    Similar to that of other herpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) lytic replication destroys the host cell, while the virus can persist in a latent state in synchrony with the host. During latency only a few genes are transcribed, and the question becomes one of what determines latent versus lytic gene expression. Here we undertake a detailed analysis of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA [orf73]) promoter (LANAp). We characterized a minimal region that is necessary and sufficient to maintain high-level transcription in all tissues tested, including primary endothelial cells and B cells, which are the suspected natural host for KSHV. We show that in transient-transfection assays LANAp mimics the expression pattern observed for the authentic promoter in the context of the KSHV episome. Unlike other KSHV promoters tested thus far, LANAp is not affected by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate or viral lytic cycle functions. It is, however, subject to control by LANA itself and cellular regulatory factors, such as p53. This is in contrast to the K14/vGCR (orf74) promoter, which overlaps LANAp and directs transcription on the opposite strand. We isolated a minimal cis-regulatory region sufficient for K14/vGCR promoter activity and show that it, too, mimics the regulation observed for the authentic viral promoter. In particular, we demonstrate that its activity is absolutely dependent on the immediate-early transactivator orf50, the KSHV homolog of the Epstein-Barr virus Rta transactivator. PMID:11160678

  6. Trends in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus antibodies prior to the development of HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Wakeham, Katie; Johnston, W Thomas; Nalwoga, Angela; Webb, Emily L; Mayanja, Billy N; Miley, Wendell; Elliott, Alison M; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a public health challenge in sub-Saharan Africa since both the causative agent, Kaposi's sarcoma associated-herpesvirus (KSHV), and the major risk factor, HIV, are prevalent. In a nested case-control study within a long-standing clinical cohort in rural Uganda, we used stored sera to examine the evolution of antibody titres against the KSHV antigens K8.1 and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) among 30 HIV-infected subjects who subsequently developed HIV-related KS (cases) and among 108 matched HIV/KSHV coinfected controls who did not develop KS. Throughout the 6 years prior to diagnosis, antibody titres to K8.1 and LANA were significantly higher among cases than controls (p < 0.0001), and titres increased prior to diagnosis in the cases. K8.1 titres differed more between KS cases and controls, compared to LANA titres. These differences in titre between cases and controls suggest a role for lytic viral replication in the pathogenesis of HIV-related KS in this setting. PMID:25395177

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-G protein-coupled receptor-expressing endothelial cells exhibit reduced migration and stimulated chemotaxis by chemokine inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Couty, Jean-Pierre; Lupu-Meiri, Monica; Oron, Yoram; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2009-06-01

    A constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus-8) (KSHV) is expressed in endothelial (spindle) cells of Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. In this study, we report novel effects of basal signaling by this receptor and of inverse agonist chemokines on migration of KSHV-GPCR-expressing mouse lung endothelial cells. We show that basal signaling by KSHV-GPCR inhibits migration of endothelial cells in two systems, movement through porous filters and in vitro wound closure. Naturally occurring chemokines, interferon gamma-inducible protein-10 and stromal-derived factor-1, which act as inverse agonists at KSHV-GPCR, abrogate the inhibition of migration and stimulate directed migration (or chemotaxis) of these cells. Thus, the expression of KSHV-GPCR may allow infected endothelial cells in situ to remain in a localized environment or to directionally migrate along a gradient of specific chemokines that are inverse agonists at KSHV-GPCR.

  8. Induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1: involvement of IL-10 and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Di; Zeng, Yi; Qian, Chao; Huang, Zan; Lv, Zhigang; Cheng, Lin; Yao, Shuihong; Tang, Qiao; Chen, Xiuying; Lu, Chun

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we identified that both human herpesvirus 6 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat were important cofactors that activated lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Here, we further investigated the potential of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to influence KSHV replication. We demonstrated that HSV-1 was a potentially important factor in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, as determined by production of lytic phase mRNA transcripts, viral proteins and infectious viral particles in BCBL-1 cells. These results were further confirmed by an RNA interference experiment using small interfering RNA targeting KSHV ORF50 and a luciferase reporter assay testing ORF50 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Finally, we discovered that production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-4 partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Our data present the first direct evidence that HSV-1 can activate KSHV lytic replication and suggest a role of HSV-1 in KSHV pathogenesis.

  9. Prevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection in sex workers and women from the general population in Spain.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Sílvia; Marshall, Vickie; Solà, Judit; Palacio, Virgilio; Almirall, Rosa; Goedert, James J; Bosch, F Xavier; Whitby, Denise

    2002-03-01

    Transmission routes of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the general population are poorly understood. Whereas sexual transmission appears to be common in homosexual men, the evidence for heterosexual transmission is less convincing. In our study, prevalence of KSHV infection was examined among women in the Spanish general population and among sex workers. Subjects consisted of 100 prostitutes and 100 women randomly sampled from the general population and age-matched to the prostitutes. Women had a personal interview and gynecologic examinations in which a blood sample, cervical cells and oral cells were obtained. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), oral and cervical samples were tested for KSHV DNA by quantitative real-time PCR. Sera were tested for antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ELISA and against KSHV by latent IFA and K8.1 ELISA. Women who were positive in either serologic assay or PCR were considered infected by KSHV. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical scrapes were evaluated using the Hybrid Capture System. The study population had an average age of 30 years and were HIV-negative. Women from the general population were largely of Spanish nationality, and 61% reported lifetime monogamy. The majority of the prostitutes (76%) were immigrants, primarily from South America. Sex workers were twice as likely to be infected with KSHV than women in the general population (16% vs. 8%, prevalence odds ratio [OR] = 2.2). KSHV was more prevalent among HPV DNA-positive women (OR = 2.5) and among women with an early age at first sexual intercourse (OR = 2.7, p < 0.05). KSHV DNA was detected by PCR in 3% of the oral cavity samples, in 2% of the cervical samples of the prostitutes and in 1% of the cervical samples of women in the general population. All PBMC samples were negative. These results suggest that in low-risk countries for KSHV, oral shedding and heterosexual contacts are potential pathways for KSHV transmission.

  10. Identification of Host-Chromosome Binding Sites and Candidate Gene Targets for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus LANA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Tsai, Kevin; Chen, Horng-Shen; Wikramasinghe, Priyankara; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Showe, Louise; Domsic, John; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    LANA is essential for tethering the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome to metaphase chromosomes and for modulating host-cell gene expression, but the binding sites in the host-chromosome remain unknown. Here, we use LANA-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to identify LANA binding sites in the viral and host-cell genomes of a latently infected pleural effusion lymphoma cell line BCBL1. LANA bound with high occupancy to the KSHV genome terminal repeats (TR) and to a few minor binding sites in the KSHV genome, including the LANA promoter region. We identified 256 putative LANA binding site peaks with P < 0.01 and overlap in two independent ChIP-Seq experiments. We validated several of the high-occupancy binding sites by conventional ChIP assays and quantitative PCR. Candidate cellular LANA binding motifs were identified and assayed for binding to purified recombinant LANA protein in vitro but bound with low affinity compared to the viral TR binding site. More than half of the LANA binding sites (170/256) could be mapped to within 2.5 kb of a cellular gene transcript. Pathways and Gene Ontogeny (GO) analysis revealed that LANA binds to genes within the p53 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) regulatory network. Further analysis revealed partial overlap of LANA and STAT1 binding sites in several gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-regulated genes. We show that ectopic expression of LANA can downmodulate IFN-γ-mediated activation of a subset of genes, including the TAP1 peptide transporter and proteasome subunit beta type 9 (PSMB9), both of which are required for class I antigen presentation. Our data provide a potential mechanism through which LANA may regulate several host cell pathways by direct binding to gene regulatory elements. PMID:22419807

  11. Activation of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Major Latency Locus by the Lytic Switch Protein RTA (ORF50)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Fujita, Yuriko; Gomez, Evan; Tanese, Naoko; Wilson, Angus C.

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains a latent infection in primary effusion lymphoma cells but can be induced to enter full lytic replication by exposure to a variety of chemical inducing agents or by expression of the KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein. During latency, only a few viral genes are expressed, and these include the three genes of the so-called latency transcript (LT) cluster: v-FLIP (open reading frame 71 [ORF71]), v-cyclin (ORF72), and latency-associated nuclear antigen (ORF73). During latency, all three open reading frames are transcribed from a common promoter as part of a multicistronic mRNA. Subsequent alternative mRNA splicing and internal ribosome entry allows for the expression of each protein. Here, we show that transcription of LT cassette mRNA can be induced by RTA through the activation of a second promoter (LTi) immediately downstream of the constitutively active promoter (LTc). We identified a minimal cis-regulatory region, which overlaps with the promoter for the bicistronic K14/v-GPCR delayed early gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. In addition to a TATA box at −30 relative to the LTi mRNA start sites, we identified three separate RTA response elements that are also utilized by the K14/v-GPCR promoter. Interestingly, LTi is unresponsive to sodium butyrate, a potent inducer of lytic replication. This suggests there is a previously unrecognized class of RTA-responsive promoters that respond to direct, but not indirect, induction of RTA. These studies highlight the fact that induction method can influence the precise program of viral gene expression during early events in reactivation and also suggest a mechanism by which RTA contributes to establishment of latency during de novo infections. PMID:15956592

  12. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Shie-Shan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-10-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490-535) and PARS-II (aa 590-650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50.

  13. Identification of the Essential Role of Viral Bcl-2 for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiming; Chang, Brian; Lee, Patrick; Brulois, Kevin F.; Ge, Jianning; Shi, Mude; Rodgers, Mary A.; Feng, Pinghui; Oh, Byung-Ha; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) evades host defenses through tight suppression of autophagy by targeting each step of its signal transduction: by viral Bcl-2 (vBcl-2) in vesicle nucleation, by viral FLIP (vFLIP) in vesicle elongation, and by K7 in vesicle maturation. By exploring the roles of KSHV autophagy-modulating genes, we found, surprisingly, that vBcl-2 is essential for KSHV lytic replication, whereas vFLIP and K7 are dispensable. Knocking out vBcl-2 from the KSHV genome resulted in decreased lytic gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels, a lower viral DNA copy number, and, consequently, a dramatic reduction in the amount of progeny infectious viruses, as also described in the accompanying article (A. Gelgor, I. Kalt, S. Bergson, K. F. Brulois, J. U. Jung, and R. Sarid, J Virol 89:5298–5307, 2015). More importantly, the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions of vBcl-2 were not required for KSHV lytic replication. Using a comprehensive mutagenesis analysis, we identified that glutamic acid 14 (E14) of vBcl-2 is critical for KSHV lytic replication. Mutating E14 to alanine totally blocked KSHV lytic replication but showed little or no effect on the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions of vBcl-2. Our study indicates that vBcl-2 harbors at least three important and genetically separable functions to modulate both cellular signaling and the virus life cycle. IMPORTANCE The present study shows for the first time that vBcl-2 is essential for KSHV lytic replication. Removal of the vBcl-2 gene results in a lower level of KSHV lytic gene expression, impaired viral DNA replication, and consequently, a dramatic reduction in the level of progeny production. More importantly, the role of vBcl-2 in KSHV lytic replication is genetically separated from its antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions, suggesting that the KSHV Bcl-2 carries a novel function in viral lytic replication. PMID:25740994

  14. A Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 ORF50 deletion mutant is defective for reactivation of latent virus and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; AuCoin, David P; Huete, Alicia Rodriguez; Cei, Sylvia A; Hanson, Lisa J; Pari, Gregory S

    2005-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (also called human herpesvirus type 8 [HHV8]) latently infects a number of cell types. Reactivation of latent virus can occur by treatment with the phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) or with the transfection of plasmids expressing the lytic switch activator protein K-Rta, the gene product of ORF50. K-Rta expression is sufficient for the activation of the entire lytic cycle and the transactivation of viral genes necessary for DNA replication. In addition, recent evidence has suggested that K-Rta may participate directly in the initiation of lytic DNA synthesis. We have now generated a recombinant HHV8 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with a large deletion within the ORF50 locus. This BAC, BAC36Delta50, failed to produce infectious virus upon treatment with TPA and was defective for DNA synthesis. Expression of K-Rta in trans in BAC36Delta50-containing cells was able to abolish both defects. Real-time PCR revealed that K-bZIP, ORF40/41, and K8.1 were not expressed when BAC36Delta50-containing cells were induced with TPA. However, the mRNA levels of ORF57 were over fivefold higher in TPA-treated BAC36Delta50-containing cells than those observed in similarly treated wild-type BAC-containing cells. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that while the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) was expressed in the mutant BAC-containing cells, ORF59 and K8.1 expression was not detected in TPA-induced BAC36Delta50-containing cells. These results showed that K-Rta is essential for lytic viral reactivation and transactivation of viral genes contributing to DNA replication.

  15. Intracellular activated Notch1 is critical for proliferation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-associated B-lymphoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Murakami, Masanao; Kuppers, Daniel A; Robertson, Erle S

    2006-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus expressing latent antigens critical for pathogenesis. The mechanism by which KSHV mediates oncogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway controlling diverse events related to development, proliferation, and tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of Notch signaling has also been shown to be highly correlated with oncogenesis. Here we show that the activated intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN) is aberrantly accumulated in latently KSHV-infected pleural effusion lymphoma cells and results in increased proliferation. Specifically, growth of the infected cells was dramatically inhibited at the G(1) phase by treatment with a gamma-secretase inhibitor which specifically blocks the production of ICN. Increased ICN also up-regulated the cyclin D1 cell cycle regulator. Taken together, these studies define an important mechanism directly linking latent KSHV infection to induction of oncogenesis through dysregulation of the conserved Notch signaling pathway.

  16. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  17. SIAH-1 interacts with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF45 protein and promotes its ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Abada, Rinat; Dreyfuss-Grossman, Tsofia; Herman-Bachinsky, Yifat; Geva, Haim; Masa, Shiri-Rivka; Sarid, Ronit

    2008-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also referred to as human herpesvirus 8, is a potentially tumorigenic virus implicated in the etiology of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. The open reading frame 45 (ORF45) protein, encoded by the KSHV genome, is capable of inhibiting virus-dependent interferon induction and appears to be essential for both early and late stages of infection. In the present study, we show, both in yeast two-hybrid assays and in mammalian cells, that the ORF45 protein interacts with the cellular ubiquitin E3 ligase family designated seven in absentia homologue (SIAH). We provide evidence that SIAH-1 promotes the degradation of KSHV ORF45 through a RING domain-dependent mechanism and via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, our data indicate the involvement of SIAH-1 in the regulation of the expression of ORF45 in KSHV-infected cells. Since the availability of KSHV ORF45 is expected to influence the course of KSHV infection, our findings identify a novel biological role for SIAH proteins as modulators of virus infection.

  18. SIAH-1 Interacts with the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded ORF45 Protein and Promotes Its Ubiquitylation and Proteasomal Degradation▿

    PubMed Central

    Abada, Rinat; Dreyfuss-Grossman, Tsofia; Herman-Bachinsky, Yifat; Geva, Haim; Masa, Shiri-Rivka; Sarid, Ronit

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also referred to as human herpesvirus 8, is a potentially tumorigenic virus implicated in the etiology of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. The open reading frame 45 (ORF45) protein, encoded by the KSHV genome, is capable of inhibiting virus-dependent interferon induction and appears to be essential for both early and late stages of infection. In the present study, we show, both in yeast two-hybrid assays and in mammalian cells, that the ORF45 protein interacts with the cellular ubiquitin E3 ligase family designated seven in absentia homologue (SIAH). We provide evidence that SIAH-1 promotes the degradation of KSHV ORF45 through a RING domain-dependent mechanism and via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, our data indicate the involvement of SIAH-1 in the regulation of the expression of ORF45 in KSHV-infected cells. Since the availability of KSHV ORF45 is expected to influence the course of KSHV infection, our findings identify a novel biological role for SIAH proteins as modulators of virus infection. PMID:18077711

  19. Generation of high-titre virus stocks using BrK.219, a B-cell line infected stably with recombinant Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Kati, Semra; Hage, Elias; Mynarek, Martin; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Indenbirken, Daniela; Grundhoff, Adam; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gamma-2-lymphotropic human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV establishes latency soon after infection in vivo and in vitro. Consequently, it is technically difficult to generate high-titre virus stocks required for infection experiments in tissue culture. Currently used methods of KSHV stock production involve induction of the lytic/productive cycle in PEL cell lines or in adherent cell lines harbouring recombinant KSHV genomes. In this study, the BJAB-derived B-cell line BrK.219, which is infected latently with a recombinant KSHV (rKSHV.219), is used to produce high-titre virus stocks. BrK.219 cells enter the lytic KSHV replication cycle upon cross-linking of B-cell receptors (BCRs) with anti-IgM antibodies without the need for additional, potentially toxic chemical inducers. High cell concentrations can be cultured and induced easily in spinner flasks, saving time and resources. The established protocol allows the generation of KSHV virus stocks with titres of up to 10(6) IU/ml in unconcentrated culture supernatants, representing a 10(3)-10(4)-fold improvement compared to conventional methods.

  20. Selective killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytically infected cells with a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the viral gpK8.1A envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Deboeeta; Chandran, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) is etiologically associated with three neoplastic syndromes: Kaposi sarcoma and the uncommon HIV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The incidence of the latter B-cell pathology has been increasing in spite of antiretroviral therapy; its association with lytic virus replication has prompted interest in therapeutic strategies aimed at this phase of the virus life cycle. We designed and expressed a recombinant immunotoxin (2014-PE38) targeting the gpK8.1A viral glycoprotein expressed on the surface of the virion and infected cells. We show that this immunotoxin selectively kills KSHV-infected cells in dose-dependent fashion, resulting in major reductions of infectious virus release. The immunotoxin and ganciclovir, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication, showed marked reciprocal potentiation of antiviral activities. These results suggest that the immunotoxin, alone or in combination, may represent a new approach to treat diseases associated with KSHV lytic replication. PMID:22377676

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus polyadenylated nuclear RNA: a structural scaffold for nuclear, cytoplasmic and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Rausch, Jason W; Smith, Rodman; Miller, Jennifer T; Whitby, Denise; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2017-04-05

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA facilitates lytic infection, modulating the cellular immune response by interacting with viral and cellular proteins and DNA. Although a number nucleoprotein interactions involving PAN have been implicated, our understanding of binding partners and PAN RNA binding motifs remains incomplete. Herein, we used SHAPE-mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) to probe PAN in its nuclear, cytoplasmic or viral environments or following cell/virion lysis and removal of proteins. We thus characterized and put into context discrete RNA structural elements, including the cis-acting Mta responsive element and expression and nuclear retention element (1,2). By comparing mutational profiles in different biological contexts, we identified sites on PAN either protected from chemical modification by protein binding or characterized by a loss of structure. While some protein binding sites were selectively localized, others were occupied in all three biological contexts. Individual binding sites of select KSHV gene products on PAN RNA were also identified in in vitro experiments. This work constitutes the most extensive structural characterization of a viral lncRNA and interactions with its protein partners in discrete biological contexts, providing a broad framework for understanding the roles of PAN RNA in KSHV infection.

  2. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Mosbruger, Tim; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular genome by acting as

  3. High incidence of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection in HIV-related solid immunoblastic/plasmablastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Deloose, S T P; Smit, L A; Pals, F T; Kersten, M-J; van Noesel, C J M; Pals, S T

    2005-05-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to be associated with two distinct lymphoproliferative disorders: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD)/MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. We here report a high incidence of KSHV infection in solid HIV-associated immunoblastic/plasmablastic non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs), in patients lacking effusions and without evidence of (prior) MCD. Within a cohort of 99 HIV-related NHLs, 10 cases were found to be KSHV positive on the basis of immunostaining for KSHV LNA-1 as well as KSHV-specific polymerase chain reaction. All but one of the tumors coexpressed Epstein-Barr virus. Interestingly, all KSHV-positive cases belonged to a distinctive subgroup of 26 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas characterized by the expression of CD138 (syndecan-1) and plasmablastic/immunoblastic morphology. These KSHV-positive lymphomas were preceded by Kaposi sarcoma in 60% of the patients and involved the gastrointestinal tract in 80%. Our results indicate that KSHV infection is not restricted to PEL and MCD; it is also common (38%) in HIV-related solid immunoblastic/plasmablastic lymphomas.

  4. NEDDylation is essential for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency and lytic reactivation and represents a novel anti-KSHV target.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David J; Wood, Jennifer J; Jackson, Brian R; Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which are aggressive malignancies associated with immunocompromised patients. For many non-viral malignancies, therapeutically targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been successful. Likewise, laboratory studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the UPS might provide a promising avenue for the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. The largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases are the cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) that are activated by an additional ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8. We show that pharmacological inhibition of NEDDylation (using the small molecule inhibitor MLN4924) is cytotoxic to PEL cells by inhibiting NF-κB. We also show that CRL4B is a novel regulator of latency as its inhibition reactivated lytic gene expression. Furthermore, we uncovered a requirement for NEDDylation during the reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle. Intriguingly, inhibition prevented viral DNA replication but not lytic cycle-associated gene expression, highlighting a novel mechanism that uncouples these two features of KSHV biology. Mechanistically, we show that MLN4924 treatment precluded the recruitment of the viral pre-replication complex to the origin of lytic DNA replication (OriLyt). These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV latency and reactivation. Moreover, they demonstrate that inhibition of NEDDylation represents a novel approach for the treatment of KSHV-associated malignancies.

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral IFN regulatory factor 3 stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young C; Joo, Chul-Hyun; Gack, Michaela U; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jung, Jae U

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the master regulator of both developmental and pathologic angiogenesis, composed of an oxygen-sensitive alpha-subunit and a constitutively expressed beta-subunit. HIF-1 activity in tumors depends on the availability of the HIF-1 alpha subunit, the levels of which are increased under hypoxic conditions. Recent studies have shown that HIF-1 plays an important role in KSHV reactivation from latency and pathogenesis. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which KSHV activates HIF-1 activity. Specific interaction between KSHV viral IFN regulatory factor 3 (vIRF3) and the HIF-1 alpha subunit led to the HIF-1 alpha stabilization and transcriptional activation, which induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression and ultimately facilitated endothelial tube formation. Remarkably, the central domain of vIRF3, containing double alpha-helix motifs, was sufficient not only for binding to HIF-1 alpha but also for blocking its degradation in normoxic conditions. This indicates that KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to enhance HIF-1 alpha protein stability and transcriptional activity by incorporating a viral homologue of cellular IRF gene into its genome, which may contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  6. SIRT1-mediated downregulation of p27Kip1 is essential for overcoming contact inhibition of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus transformed cells.

    PubMed

    He, Meilan; Yuan, Hongfeng; Tan, Brandon; Bai, Rosemary; Kim, Heon Seok; Bae, Sangsu; Che, Lu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-11-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a malignancy commonly found in AIDS patients. Despite intensive studies in the last two decades, the mechanism of KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of SIRT1, a metabolic sensor, was upregulated in a variety of KSHV-infected cells. In a model of KSHV-induced cellular transformation, SIRT1 knockdown with shRNAs or knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar of KSHV-transformed cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and contact inhibition. SIRT1 knockdown or knockout induced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1). Consequently, p27 knockdown rescued the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 knockdown or knockout on cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of KSHV-transformed cells with a SIRT1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NAM), had the same effect as SIRT1 knockdown and knockout. NAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation in culture and colony formation in soft agar, and induced cell cycle arrest. Significantly, NAM inhibited the progression of tumors and extended the survival of mice in a KSHV-induced tumor model. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SIRT1 suppression of p27 is required for KSHV-induced tumorigenesis and identify a potential therapeutic target for KS.

  7. SIRT1-mediated downregulation of p27Kip1 is essential for overcoming contact inhibition of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Brandon; Bai, Rosemary; Kim, Heon Seok; Bae, Sangsu; Che, Lu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a malignancy commonly found in AIDS patients. Despite intensive studies in the last two decades, the mechanism of KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of SIRT1, a metabolic sensor, was upregulated in a variety of KSHV-infected cells. In a model of KSHV-induced cellular transformation, SIRT1 knockdown with shRNAs or knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar of KSHV-transformed cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and contact inhibition. SIRT1 knockdown or knockout induced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1). Consequently, p27 knockdown rescued the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 knockdown or knockout on cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of KSHV-transformed cells with a SIRT1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NAM), had the same effect as SIRT1 knockdown and knockout. NAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation in culture and colony formation in soft agar, and induced cell cycle arrest. Significantly, NAM inhibited the progression of tumors and extended the survival of mice in a KSHV-induced tumor model. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SIRT1 suppression of p27 is required for KSHV-induced tumorigenesis and identify a potential therapeutic target for KS. PMID:27708228

  8. KSHV 2.0: a comprehensive annotation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus genome using next-generation sequencing reveals novel genomic and functional features.

    PubMed

    Arias, Carolina; Weisburd, Ben; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Mercier, Alexandre; Madrid, Alexis S; Bellare, Priya; Holdorf, Meghan; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ganem, Don

    2014-01-01

    Productive herpesvirus infection requires a profound, time-controlled remodeling of the viral transcriptome and proteome. To gain insights into the genomic architecture and gene expression control in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), we performed a systematic genome-wide survey of viral transcriptional and translational activity throughout the lytic cycle. Using mRNA-sequencing and ribosome profiling, we found that transcripts encoding lytic genes are promptly bound by ribosomes upon lytic reactivation, suggesting their regulation is mainly transcriptional. Our approach also uncovered new genomic features such as ribosome occupancy of viral non-coding RNAs, numerous upstream and small open reading frames (ORFs), and unusual strategies to expand the virus coding repertoire that include alternative splicing, dynamic viral mRNA editing, and the use of alternative translation initiation codons. Furthermore, we provide a refined and expanded annotation of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, splice junctions, and initiation/termination codons of known and new viral features in the KSHV genomic space which we have termed KSHV 2.0. Our results represent a comprehensive genome-scale image of gene regulation during lytic KSHV infection that substantially expands our understanding of the genomic architecture and coding capacity of the virus.

  9. Protein kinase CK2 phosphorylation regulates the interaction of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulatory protein ORF57 with its multifunctional partner hnRNP K

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Poonam; Clements, J. Barklie

    2004-01-01

    ORF57 protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has a counterpart in all herpesvirus of mammals and birds and regulates gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. ORF57 was capable of self-interaction and bound a rapidly migrating form of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), a multifunctional cellular protein involved in gene expression. In virus infected cell extracts, ORF57 was present in a complex with hnRNP K that had protein kinase CK2 activity, and was phosphorylated by CK2. Different regions of ORF57 bound both catalytic α/α′ and regulatory β subunits of CK2. CK2 modification enhanced the ORF57–hnRNP K interaction, and may regulate the presence and activities of components in the complex. We suggest that ORF57 and hnRNP K interaction may modulate ORF57-mediated regulation of viral gene expression. Herpesviral ORF57 (Rhadinovirus) and ICP27 (Simplexvirus) proteins both interact with hnRNP K and CK2 implying that adaptation of the ancestral hnRNP K and CK2 to associate with viral regulatory ancestor protein likely pre-dates divergence of these Herpesviridae genera that occurred 200 million years ago. PMID:15486205

  10. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF34 Protein Binds to HIF-1α and Causes Its Degradation via the Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kousoulas, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761–6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  11. Latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) upregulates survivin expression in KSHV-Associated B-lymphoma cells and contributes to their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Kumar, Pankaj; Xiao, Bingyi; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-07-01

    Survivin is a master regulator of cell proliferation and cell viability and is highly expressed in most human tumors. The molecular network linked to survivin expression in tumors has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a multifunctional protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that is found in Kaposi's sarcoma tumors, upregulates survivin expression and increases the proliferation of KSHV-infected B cells. Analysis of pathway-specific gene arrays showed that survivin expression was highly upregulated in BJAB cells expressing LANA. The mRNA levels of survivin were also upregulated in HEK 293 and BJAB cells expressing LANA. Similarly, protein levels of survivin were significantly higher in LANA-expressing, as well as KSHV-infected, cells. Survivin promoter activity assays identified GC/Sp1 and p53 cis-acting elements within the core promoter region as being important for LANA activity. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that LANA forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to the GC/Sp1 box of the survivin promoter. In addition, a LANA/p53 complex bound to the p53 cis-acting element within the survivin promoter, indicating that upregulation of survivin expression can also occur through suppression of p53 function. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that survivin expression was upregulated in KSHV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma tissue, suggesting that LANA plays an important role in the upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-infected endothelial cells. Knockdown of survivin expression by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA resulted in loss of cell proliferation in KSHV-infected cells. Therefore, upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-associated human cells contributes to their proliferation.

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II HLA-DRα Is Downregulated by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Lytic Transactivator RTA and MARCH8

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Pei, Yong-gang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains two modes of life cycle, the latent and lytic phases. To evade the attack of the cell host's immune system, KSHV switches from the lytic to the latent phase, a phase in which only a few of viral proteins are expressed. The mechanism by which KSHV evades the attack of the immune system and establishes latency has not been fully understood. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are key components of the immune system defense mechanism against viral infections. Here we report that HLA-DRα, a member of the MHC-II molecules, was downregulated by the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein encoded by KSHV ORF50, an important regulator of the viral life cycle. RTA not only downregulated HLA-DRα at the protein level through direct binding and degradation through the proteasome pathway but also indirectly downregulated the protein level of HLA-DRα by enhancing the expression of MARCH8, a member of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins. Our findings indicate that KSHV RTA facilitates evasion of the virus from the immune system through manipulation of HLA-DRα. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causal role in a number of human cancers, and its persistence in infected cells is controlled by the host's immune system. The mechanism by which KSHV evades an attack by the immune system has not been well understood. This work represents studies which identify a novel mechanism by which the virus can facilitate evasion of an immune system. We now show that RTA, the replication and transcription activator encoded by KSHV (ORF50), can function as an E3 ligase to degrade HLA-DRα. It can directly bind and induce degradation of HLA-DRα through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In addition to the direct regulation of HLA-DRα, RTA can also indirectly downregulate the level of HLA-DRα protein by upregulating transcription of MARCH8

  13. Kaposi sarcoma associated with lipoedema.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, T R; Ayabakan, O; Sakiz, D; Koslu, A

    2005-05-01

    Lipoedema is a form of lipodistrophy, which consists of abnormal accumulation of fat in subcutaneous tissue of the lower limbs. It does not cause any disease and it has not been reported association with malignity. We describe a 63-year-old woman occurring of Kaposi sarcoma on the lipoedema base.

  14. Assay Development and High-Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus N-Terminal Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Binding to Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Chantal; Moerke, Nathan J; Faloon, Patrick; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies, especially in immunocompromised hosts. KSHV latently infects tumor cells and persists as an extrachromosomal episome (plasmid). KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates KSHV episome persistence. LANA binds specific KSHV sequence to replicate viral DNA. In addition, LANA tethers KSHV genomes to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to daughter nuclei after mitosis. N-terminal LANA (N-LANA) binds histones H2A and H2B to attach to chromosomes. Currently, there are no specific inhibitors of KSHV latent infection. To enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, here we develop, miniaturize, and validate a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay that detects fluorophore-labeled N-LANA peptide binding to nucleosomes. We also miniaturize a counterscreen to identify DNA intercalators that nonspecifically inhibit N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, and also develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess N-LANA binding to nucleosomes in the absence of fluorescence. HTS of libraries containing more than 350,000 compounds identified multiple compounds that inhibited N-LANA binding to nucleosomes. No compounds survived all counterscreens, however. More complex small-molecule libraries will likely be necessary to identify specific inhibitors of N-LANA binding to histones H2A and H2B; these assays should prove useful for future screens.

  15. Selective peptide inhibitors of antiapoptotic cellular and viral Bcl-2 proteins lead to cytochrome c release during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Burrer, Christine M; Foight, Glenna W; Keating, Amy E; Chan, Gary C

    2016-01-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas including primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV establishes latency within B cells by modulating or mimicking the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins to promote cell survival. Our previous BH3 profiling analysis, a functional assay that assesses the contribution of Bcl-2 proteins towards cellular survival, identified two Bcl-2 proteins, cellular Mcl-1 and viral KsBcl-2, as potential regulators of mitochondria polarization within a latently infected B-cell line, Bcbl-1. In this study, we used two novel peptide inhibitors identified in a peptide library screen that selectively bind KsBcl-2 (KL6-7_Y4eK) or KsBcl-2 and Mcl-1 (MS1) in order to decipher the relative contribution of Mcl-1 and KsBcl-2 in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential. We found treatment with KL6-7_Y4eK and MS1 stimulated a similar amount of cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from Bcbl-1 cells, indicating that inhibition of KsBcl-2 alone is sufficient for mitochondrial outer membrane permiabilzation (MOMP) and thus apoptosis during a latent B cell infection. In turn, this study also identified and provides a proof-of-concept for the further development of novel KsBcl-2 inhibitors for the treatment of KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas via the targeting of latently infected B cells.

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic switch protein stimulates DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL to activate the Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Bu, Wei; Palmeri, Diana; Spadavecchia, Sophia; Lynch, Stephen J; Marras, Salvatore A E; Tyagi, Sanjay; Lukac, David M

    2006-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) lytic switch protein, Rta, is a ligand-independent inducer of the Notch signal transduction pathway, and KSHV cannot reactivate from latency in cells null for the Notch target protein RBP-Jk. Here we show that Rta promotes DNA binding of RBP-Jk, a mechanism that is fundamentally different from that established for the RBP-Jk-activating proteins, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Epstein-Barr virus EBNA2. Although constitutively active RBP-Jk and NICD do not transactivate KSHV promoters independently, cotransfection of an Rta mutant lacking its transactivation domain robustly restores transcriptional activation. Cooperation requires intact DNA binding sites for Rta and RBP-Jk and trimeric complex formation between the three molecules in vitro. In infected cells, RBP-Jk is virtually undetectable on a series of viral and cellular promoters during KSHV latency but is significantly enriched following Rta expression during viral reactivation. Accordingly, Rta, but not EBNA2 and NICD, reactivates the complete viral lytic cycle.

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Open Reading Frame 50/Rta Protein Activates the Entire Viral Lytic Cycle in the HH-B2 Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Line†

    PubMed Central

    Gradoville, Lyndle; Gerlach, Jennifer; Grogan, Elizabeth; Shedd, Duane; Nikiforow, Sarah; Metroka, Craig; Miller, George

    2000-01-01

    Rta, the gene product of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encoded mainly in open reading frame 50 (ORF50), is capable of activating expression of viral lytic cycle genes. What was not demonstrated in previous studies was whether KSHV Rta was competent to initiate the entire viral lytic life cycle including lytic viral DNA replication, late-gene expression with appropriate kinetics, and virus release. In HH-B2, a newly established primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell line, KSHV ORF50 behaved as an immediate-early gene and autostimulated its own expression. Expression of late genes, ORF65, and K8.1 induced by KSHV Rta was eliminated by phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase. Transfection of KSHV Rta increased the production of encapsidated DNase-resistant viral DNA from HH-B2 cells. Thus, introduction of an ORF50 expression plasmid is sufficient to drive the lytic cycle to completion in cultured PEL cells. PMID:10846108

  18. Complex alternative cytoplasmic protein isoforms of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 generated through noncanonical translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Toptan, Tuna; Fonseca, Lidia; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) protein is constitutively expressed in all KSHV-infected cells, as well as in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA1 is a multifunctional KSHV oncoprotein containing multiple repeat sequences that is important for viral episome maintenance and the regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. We characterize here multiple LANA1 isoforms and show that ∼50% of LANA1 is naturally generated as N-terminally truncated shoulder proteins that are detected on SDS-PAGE as faster-migrating shoulder bands designated LANA1(S). Higher-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream at noncanonical sites within the N-terminal region, whereas lower-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream within the central repeat 1 domain. LANA1(S) proteins lack an N-terminal nuclear localization signal motif, and some isoforms differ from full-length, canonical LANA1 by localizing to perinuclear and cytoplasmic sites. Although LANA1 has until now been assumed to be solely active in the nucleus, this finding indicates that this major KSHV oncoprotein may have cytoplasmic activities as well. KSHV overcomes its limited genetic coding capacity by generating alternatively initiated protein isoforms that may have distinct biological functions.

  19. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  20. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei; Lan, Ke; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  1. Ets-1 is required for the activation of VEGFR3 during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Kimberley D; Morris, Valerie A; Wu, David; Barcy, Serge; Lagunoff, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), is present in the predominant tumor cells of KS, the spindle cells. Spindle cells express markers of lymphatic endothelium and, interestingly, KSHV infection of blood endothelial cells reprograms them to a lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. KSHV-induced reprogramming requires the activation of STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)/AKT through the activation of cellular receptor gp130. Importantly, KSHV-induced reprogramming is specific to endothelial cells, indicating that there are additional host genes that are differentially regulated during KSHV infection of endothelial cells that contribute to lymphatic reprogramming. We found that the transcription factor Ets-1 is highly expressed in KS spindle cells and is upregulated during KSHV infection of endothelial cells in culture. The KSHV latent vFLIP gene is sufficient to induce Ets-1 expression in an NF-κB-dependent fashion. Ets-1 is required for KSHV-induced expression of VEGFR3, a lymphatic endothelial-cell-specific receptor important for lymphangiogenesis, and Ets-1 activates the promoter of VEGFR3. Ets-1 knockdown does not alter the expression of another lymphatic-specific gene, the podoplanin gene, but does inhibit the expression of VEGFR3 in uninfected lymphatic endothelium, indicating that Ets-1 is a novel cellular regulator of VEGFR3 expression. Knockdown of Ets-1 affects the ability of KSHV-infected cells to display angiogenic phenotypes, indicating that Ets-1 plays a role in KSHV activation of endothelial cells during latent KSHV infection. Thus, Ets-1 is a novel regulator of VEGFR3 and is involved in the induction of angiogenic phenotypes by KSHV.

  2. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus MicroRNAs Target GADD45B To Protect Infected Cells from Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Happel, Christine; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M

    2017-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is one of the most common malignancies in HIV-infected individuals. The responsible agent, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; HHV8), expresses multiple microRNAs (miRNAs), but the targets and functions of these miRNAs are not completely understood. After infection in primary endothelial cells with KSHV, growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene 45 beta (GADD45B) is one of the most repressed genes using genomic expression profiling. GADD45B was also repressed in mRNA expression profiling experiments when KSHV miRNAs were introduced to uninfected cells. We hypothesized that KSHV miRNAs target human GADD45B to protect cells from consequences of DNA damage, which can be triggered by viral infection. Expression of GADD45B protein is induced by the p53 activator, Nutlin-3, and KSHV miRNA-K9 inhibits this induction. In addition, Nutlin-3 increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest based on flow cytometry assays. KSHV miR-K9 protected primary endothelial cells from apoptosis and cell cycle arrest following Nutlin-3 treatment. Similar protective phenotypes were seen for targeting GADD45B with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), as with miR-K9. KSHV miR-K9 also decreased the protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-7, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). In B lymphocytes latently infected with KSHV, specific inhibitors of KSHV miR-K9 led to increased GADD45B expression and apoptosis, indicating that miR-K9 is important for reducing apoptosis in infected cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of GADD45B in KSHV-infected cells promoted apoptosis. Together, these results identify a new miRNA target and demonstrate that KSHV miRNAs are important for protecting infected cells from DNA damage responses.

  3. Azidothymidine Sensitizes Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells to Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Specific CD4+ T Cell Control and Inhibits vIRF3 Function

    PubMed Central

    Stürzl, Michael; Sabbah, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked with the development of Kaposi sarcoma and the B lymphocyte disorders primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multi-centric Castleman disease. T cell immunity limits KSHV infection and disease, however the virus employs multiple mechanisms to inhibit efficient control by these effectors. Thus KSHV-specific CD4+ T cells poorly recognize most PEL cells and even where they can, they are unable to kill them. To make KSHV-infected cells more sensitive to T cell control we treated PEL cells with the thymidine analogue azidothymidine (AZT), which sensitizes PEL lines to Fas-ligand and TRAIL challenge; effector mechanisms which T cells use. PELs co-cultured with KSHV-specific CD4+ T cells in the absence of AZT showed no control of PEL outgrowth. However in the presence of AZT PEL outgrowth was controlled in an MHC-restricted manner. To investigate how AZT sensitizes PELs to immune control we first examined BJAB cells transduced with individual KSHV-latent genes for their ability to resist apoptosis mediated by stimuli delivered through Fas and TRAIL receptors. This showed that in addition to the previously described vFLIP protein, expression of vIRF3 also inhibited apoptosis delivered by these stimuli. Importantly vIRF3 mediated protection from these apoptotic stimuli was inhibited in the presence of AZT as was a second vIRF3 associated phenotype, the downregulation of surface MHC class II. Although both vFLIP and vIRF3 are expressed in PELs, we propose that inhibiting vIRF3 function with AZT may be sufficient to restore T cell control of these tumor cells. PMID:27893813

  4. Long-Term-Infected Telomerase-Immortalized Endothelial Cells: a Model for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency In Vitro and In Vivo†

    PubMed Central

    An, Feng-Qi; Folarin, Hope Merlene; Compitello, Nicole; Roth, Justin; Gerson, Stanton L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Fakhari, Farnaz D.; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Renne, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. Most KS tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV and are of endothelial origin. While PEL-derived cell lines maintain KSHV indefinitely, all KS tumor-derived cells to date have lost viral genomes upon ex vivo cultivation. To study KSHV latency and tumorigenesis in endothelial cells, we generated telomerase-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial (TIVE) cells. TIVE cells express all KSHV latent genes 48 h postinfection, and productive lytic replication could be induced by RTA/Orf50. Similar to prior models, infected cultures gradually lost viral episomes. However, we also obtained, for the first time, two endothelial cell lines in which KSHV episomes were maintained indefinitely in the absence of selection. Long-term KSHV maintenance correlated with loss of reactivation in response to RTA/Orf50 and complete oncogenic transformation. Long-term-infected TIVE cells (LTC) grew in soft agar and proliferated under reduced-serum conditions. LTC, but not parental TIVE cells, formed tumors in nude mice. These tumors expressed high levels of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) and expressed lymphatic endothelial specific antigens as found in KS (LYVE-1). Furthermore, host genes, like those encoding interleukin 6, vascular endothelial growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor, known to be highly expressed in KS lesions were also induced in LTC-derived tumors. KSHV-infected LTCs represent the first xenograft model for KS and should be of use to study KS pathogenesis and for the validation of anti-KS drug candidates. PMID:16641275

  5. A Structural Basis for BRD2/4-Mediated Host Chromatin Interaction and Oligomer Assembly of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Murine Gammaherpesvirus LANA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krausze, Joern; Richter, Ulrike; Adler, Heiko; Fedorov, Roman; Pietrek, Marcel; Rückert, Jessica; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a lifelong latent infection and causes several malignancies in humans. Murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a related γ2-herpesvirus frequently used as a model to study the biology of γ-herpesviruses in vivo. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) and the MHV68 mLANA (orf73) protein are required for latent viral replication and persistence. Latent episomal KSHV genomes and kLANA form nuclear microdomains, termed ‘LANA speckles’, which also contain cellular chromatin proteins, including BRD2 and BRD4, members of the BRD/BET family of chromatin modulators. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA binding domains (CTD) of kLANA and MHV-68 mLANA. While these structures share the overall fold with the EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus, they differ substantially in their surface characteristics. Opposite to the DNA binding site, both kLANA and mLANA CTD contain a characteristic lysine-rich positively charged surface patch, which appears to be a unique feature of γ2-herpesviral LANA proteins. Importantly, kLANA and mLANA CTD dimers undergo higher order oligomerization. Using NMR spectroscopy we identified a specific binding site for the ET domains of BRD2/4 on kLANA. Functional studies employing multiple kLANA mutants indicate that the oligomerization of native kLANA CTD dimers, the characteristic basic patch and the ET binding site on the kLANA surface are required for the formation of kLANA ‘nuclear speckles’ and latent replication. Similarly, the basic patch on mLANA contributes to the establishment of MHV-68 latency in spleen cells in vivo. In summary, our data provide a structural basis for the formation of higher order LANA oligomers, which is required for nuclear speckle formation, latent replication and viral persistence. PMID:24146614

  6. p130Cas Scaffolds the Signalosome To Direct Adaptor-Effector Cross Talk during Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Trafficking in Human Microvascular Dermal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules

  7. Convergence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reactivation with Epstein-Barr virus latency and cellular growth mediated by the notch signaling pathway in coinfected cells.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, Sophia; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Palmeri, Diana; Lukac, David M

    2010-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). All PEL cell lines are infected with KSHV, and 70% are coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). KSHV reactivation from latency requires promoter-specific transactivation by the KSHV Rta protein through interactions with RBP-Jk (CSL), the cellular DNA-binding component of the Notch signal transduction pathway. EBV transformation of primary B cells requires EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) to interact with RBP-Jk to direct the latent viral and cellular gene expression program. Although KSHV Rta and EBV EBNA-2 both require RBP-Jk for transactivation, previous studies have suggested that RBP-Jk-dependent transactivators do not function identically. We have found that the EBV latent protein LMP-1 is expressed in less than 5% of KSHV(+)/EBV(+) PEL cells but is induced in an Rta-dependent fashion when KSHV reactivates. KSHV Rta transactivates the EBV latency promoters in an RBP-Jk-dependent fashion and forms a ternary complex with RBP-Jk on the promoters. In B cells that are conditionally transformed by EBV alone, we show that KSHV Rta complements a short-term EBNA-2 growth deficiency in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Complementation of EBNA-2 deficiency by Rta depends on RBP-Jk and LMP-1, and Rta transactivation is required for optimal growth of KSHV(+)/EBV(+) PEL lines. Our data suggest that Rta can contribute to EBV-driven cellular growth by transactivating RBP-Jk-dependent EBV latency genes. However, our data also suggest that EBNA-2 and Rta induce distinct alterations in the cellular proteomes that contribute to the growth of infected cells.

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus microRNA single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in clinical samples can affect microRNA processing, level of expression, and silencing activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Soo-Jin; Marshall, Vickie; Barsov, Eugene; Quiñones, Octavio; Ray, Alex; Labo, Nazzarena; Trivett, Matthew; Ott, David; Renne, Rolf; Whitby, Denise

    2013-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs that can produce 25 KSHV mature microRNAs. We previously reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KSHV-encoded pre-microRNA and mature microRNA sequences from clinical samples (V. Marshall et al., J. Infect. Dis., 195:645-659, 2007). To determine whether microRNA SNPs affect pre-microRNA processing and, ultimately, mature microRNA expression levels, we performed a detailed comparative analysis of (i) mature microRNA expression levels, (ii) in vitro Drosha/Dicer processing, and (iii) RNA-induced silencing complex-dependent targeting of wild-type (wt) and variant microRNA genes. Expression of pairs of wt and variant pre-microRNAs from retroviral vectors and measurement of KSHV mature microRNA expression by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed differential expression levels that correlated with the presence of specific sequence polymorphisms. Measurement of KSHV mature microRNA expression in a panel of primary effusion lymphoma cell lines by real-time RT-PCR recapitulated some observed expression differences but suggested a more complex relationship between sequence differences and expression of mature microRNA. Furthermore, in vitro maturation assays demonstrated significant SNP-associated changes in Drosha/DGCR8 and/or Dicer processing. These data demonstrate that SNPs within KSHV-encoded pre-microRNAs are associated with differential microRNA expression levels. Given the multiple reports on the involvement of microRNAs in cancer, the biological significance of these phenotypic and genotypic variants merits further studies in patients with KSHV-associated malignancies.

  9. Two Subclasses of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle Promoters Distinguished by Open Reading Frame 50 Mutant Proteins That Are Deficient in Binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jκ in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jκ protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jκ cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein. PMID:15994769

  10. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K1 protein: effects on lytic viral replication.

    PubMed

    Lagunoff, M; Lukac, D M; Ganem, D

    2001-07-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) K1 gene encodes a polypeptide bearing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) that is constitutively active for ITAM-based signal transduction. Although ectopic overexpression of K1 in cultured fibroblasts can lead to growth transformation, in vivo this gene is primarily expressed in lymphoid cells undergoing lytic infection. Here we have examined function of K1 in the setting of lytic replication, through the study of K1 mutants lacking functional ITAMs. Expression of such mutants in BJAB cells cotransfected with wild-type K1 results in dramatic inhibition of K1 signal transduction, as judged by impaired activation of Syk kinase and phospholipase C-gamma2 as well as by diminished expression of a luciferase reporter gene dependent upon K1-induced calcium and Ras signaling. Thus, the mutants behave as dominantly acting inhibitors of K1 function. To assess the role of K1 in lytic replication, we introduced these K1 mutants into BCBL-1 cells, a B-cell lymphoma line latently infected with KSHV, and induced lytic replication by ectopic expression of the KSHV ORF50 transactivator. Expression of lytic cycle genes was diminished up to 80% in the presence of a K1 dominant negative mutant. These inhibitory effects could be overridden by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate treatment, indicating that inhibition was not due to irreversible cell injury and suggesting that other signaling events could bypass the block. We conclude that ITAM-dependent signaling by K1 is not absolutely required for lytic reactivation but functions to modestly augment lytic replication in B cells, the natural reservoir of KSHV.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 interacts with cellular RNA export cofactors RBM15 and OTT3 to promote expression of viral ORF59.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Uranishi, Hiroaki; Kruhlak, Michael; Pilkington, Guy R; Massimelli, Maria Julia; Bear, Jenifer; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes ORF57, which promotes the accumulation of specific KSHV mRNA targets, including ORF59 mRNA. We report that the cellular export NXF1 cofactors RBM15 and OTT3 participate in ORF57-enhanced expression of KSHV ORF59. We also found that ectopic expression of RBM15 or OTT3 augments ORF59 production in the absence of ORF57. While RBM15 promotes the accumulation of ORF59 RNA predominantly in the nucleus compared to the levels in the cytoplasm, we found that ORF57 shifted the nucleocytoplasmic balance by increasing ORF59 RNA accumulation in the cytoplasm more than in the nucleus. By promoting the accumulation of cytoplasmic ORF59 RNA, ORF57 offsets the nuclear RNA accumulation mediated by RBM15 by preventing nuclear ORF59 RNA from hyperpolyadenylation. ORF57 interacts directly with the RBM15 C-terminal portion containing the SPOC domain to reduce RBM15 binding to ORF59 RNA. Although ORF57 homologs Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EB2, herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP27, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE4/ORF4, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) UL69 also interact with RBM15 and OTT3, EBV EB2, which also promotes ORF59 expression, does not function like KSHV ORF57 to efficiently prevent RBM15-mediated nuclear accumulation of ORF59 RNA and RBM15's association with polyadenylated RNAs. Collectively, our data provide novel insight elucidating a molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes the expression of viral intronless genes.

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus MicroRNA Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Identified in Clinical Samples Can Affect MicroRNA Processing, Level of Expression, and Silencing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo-Jin; Marshall, Vickie; Barsov, Eugene; Quiñones, Octavio; Ray, Alex; Labo, Nazzarena; Trivett, Matthew; Ott, David; Renne, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs that can produce 25 KSHV mature microRNAs. We previously reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KSHV-encoded pre-microRNA and mature microRNA sequences from clinical samples (V. Marshall et al., J. Infect. Dis., 195:645–659, 2007). To determine whether microRNA SNPs affect pre-microRNA processing and, ultimately, mature microRNA expression levels, we performed a detailed comparative analysis of (i) mature microRNA expression levels, (ii) in vitro Drosha/Dicer processing, and (iii) RNA-induced silencing complex-dependent targeting of wild-type (wt) and variant microRNA genes. Expression of pairs of wt and variant pre-microRNAs from retroviral vectors and measurement of KSHV mature microRNA expression by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed differential expression levels that correlated with the presence of specific sequence polymorphisms. Measurement of KSHV mature microRNA expression in a panel of primary effusion lymphoma cell lines by real-time RT-PCR recapitulated some observed expression differences but suggested a more complex relationship between sequence differences and expression of mature microRNA. Furthermore, in vitro maturation assays demonstrated significant SNP-associated changes in Drosha/DGCR8 and/or Dicer processing. These data demonstrate that SNPs within KSHV-encoded pre-microRNAs are associated with differential microRNA expression levels. Given the multiple reports on the involvement of microRNAs in cancer, the biological significance of these phenotypic and genotypic variants merits further studies in patients with KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:24006441

  13. Two subclasses of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycle promoters distinguished by open reading frame 50 mutant proteins that are deficient in binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-07-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jkappa in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jkappa protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jkappa cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein.

  14. An Sp1 response element in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 50 promoter mediates lytic cycle induction by butyrate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjiang; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can be driven into the lytic cycle in vitro by phorbol esters and sodium butyrate. This report begins to analyze the process by which butyrate activates the promoter of KSHV open reading frame 50 (ORF50), the key viral regulator of the KSHV latency to lytic cycle switch. A short fragment of the promoter, 134 nucleotides upstream of the translational start of ORF50, retained basal uninduced activity and conferred maximal responsiveness to sodium butyrate. The butyrate response element was mapped to a consensus Sp1-binding site. By means of electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both Sp1 and Sp3 were shown to form complexes in vitro with the ORF50 promoter at the Sp1 site. Butyrate induced the formation of a group of novel complexes, including several Sp3-containing complexes, one Sp1-containing complex, and several other complexes that were not identified with antibodies to Sp1 or Sp3. Formation of all butyrate-induced DNA-protein complexes was mediated by the consensus Sp1 site. In insect and mammalian cell lines, Sp1 significantly activated the ORF50 promoter linked to luciferase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a PEL cell line showed that butyrate induced Sp1, CBP, and p300 binding to the ORF50 promoter in vivo in an on-off manner. The results suggest that induction of the KSHV lytic cycle by butyrate is mediated through interactions at the Sp1/Sp3 site located 103 to 112 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation of ORF50 presumably by enhancing the binding of Sp1 to this site.

  15. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4) Perturbs the G1-S Cell Cycle Progression via Deregulation of the cyclin D1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Mitra, Jaba; Lee, Stacy; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee; Ha, Taekjip; Jung, Jae U

    2015-10-21

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection modulates the host cell cycle to create an environment optimal for its viral-DNA replication during the lytic life cycle. We report here that KSHV vIRF4 targets the β-catenin/CBP cofactor and blocks its occupancy on the cyclin D1 promoter, suppressing the G1-S cell cycle progression and enhancing KSHV replication. This shows that KSHV vIRF4 suppresses host G1-S transition, possibly providing an intracellular milieu favorable for its replication.

  16. ORF33 and ORF38 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interact and Are Required for Optimal Production of Infectious Progeny Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-jun; Avey, Denis; Li, Wenwei; Gillen, Joseph; Fu, Bishi; Miley, Wendell; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently showed that the interaction between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) tegument proteins ORF33 and ORF45 is crucial for progeny virion production, but the exact functions of KSHV ORF33 during lytic replication were unknown (J. Gillen, W. Li, Q. Liang, D. Avey, J. Wu, F. Wu, J. Myoung, and F. Zhu, J Virol 89:4918–4931, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02925-14). Therefore, here we investigated the relationship between ORF33 and ORF38, whose counterparts in both alpha- and betaherpesviruses interact with each other. Using specific monoclonal antibodies, we found that both proteins are expressed during the late lytic cycle with similar kinetics and that both are present in mature virions as components of the tegument. Furthermore, we confirmed that ORF33 interacts with ORF38. Interestingly, we observed that ORF33 tightly associates with the capsid, whereas ORF38 associates with the envelope. We generated ORF33-null, ORF38-null, and double-null mutants and found that these mutants apparently have identical phenotypes: the mutations caused no apparent effect on viral gene expression but reduced the yield of progeny virion by about 10-fold. The progeny virions also lack certain virion component proteins, including ORF45. During viral lytic replication, the virions associate with cytoplasmic vesicles. We also observed that ORF38 associates with the membranes of vesicles and colocalizes with the Golgi membrane or early endosome membrane. Further analyses of ORF33/ORF38 mutants revealed the reduced production of virion-containing vesicles, suggesting that ORF33 and ORF38 are involved in the transport of newly assembled viral particles into cytoplasmic vesicles, a process important for viral maturation and egress. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus assembly is an essential step in virus propagation that leads to the generation of progeny virions. It is a complicated process that depends on the delicate regulation of interactions among virion

  17. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and response to antiretroviral therapy: A prospective study of HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Maskew, Mhairi; MacPhail, A Patrick; Whitby, Denise; Egger, Matthias; Fox, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible impact of co-infection with Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus on the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unknown. Prospective studies are rare, particularly in Africa. Methods We enrolled a prospective cohort of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa. Subjects were defined as seropositive to KSHV if reactive to either KSHV lytic K8.1 or latent Orf73 antigen or both. Subjects were followed from ART initiation until 18-months on treatment. HIV viral load and CD4 counts were tested 6 monthly. Linear generalized estimating and log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the effect of KSHV infection on immunologic recovery and response as well as HIV viral load suppression within 18-months after ART initiation. Results 385 subjects initiating ART from November 2008-March 2009 were eligible including 184 (48%) KSHV+. The KSHV+ group was similar to the KSHV− in terms of age, gender, initiating CD4 count, body mass index, tuberculosis and haemoglobin levels. The KSHV+ group gained a similar number of cells at 6- (difference of 10 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −11–31), 12- (3 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −19–25) and 18-months (24 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −13–61) compared to the KSHV− group. Adjusted relative risk of failure to suppress viral load to <400 copies/mL (1.03; 95% CI: 0.90–1.17) were similar for KSHV+ and KSHV− by 6-months on treatment. Conclusions In a population with a high KSHV prevalence, HIV-positive adults co-infected with KSHV achieved similar immunologic and virologic responses to ART early after treatment initiation compared to those KSHV−. PMID:23614996

  18. ESCRT-I Protein Tsg101 Plays a Role in the Post-macropinocytic Trafficking and Infection of Endothelial Cells by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) binding to the endothelial cell surface heparan sulfate is followed by sequential interactions with α3β1, αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins and Ephrin A2 receptor tyrosine kinase (EphA2R). These interactions activate host cell pre-existing FAK, Src, PI3-K and RhoGTPase signaling cascades, c-Cbl mediated ubiquitination of receptors, recruitment of CIB1, p130Cas and Crk adaptor molecules, and membrane bleb formation leading to lipid raft dependent macropinocytosis of KSHV into human microvascular dermal endothelial (HMVEC-d) cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT) proteins, ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and-III, play a central role in clathrin-mediated internalized ubiquitinated receptor endosomal trafficking and sorting. ESCRT proteins have also been shown to play roles in viral egress. We have recently shown that ESCRT-0 component Hrs protein associates with the plasma membrane during macropinocytosis and mediates KSHV entry via ROCK1 mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 and local membrane pH change. Here, we demonstrate that the ESCRT-I complex Tsg101 protein also participates in the macropinocytosis of KSHV and plays a role in KSHV trafficking. Knockdown of Tsg101 did not affect virus entry in HMVEC-d and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells but significantly inhibited the KSHV genome entry into the nucleus and consequently viral gene expression in these cells. Double and triple immunofluorescence, proximity ligation immunofluorescence and co-immuoprecipitation studies revealed the association of Tsg101 with the KSHV containing macropinosomes, and increased levels of Tsg101 association/interactions with EphA2R, c-Cbl, p130Cas and Crk signal molecules, as well as with upstream and downstream ESCRT components such as Hrs (ESCRT-0), EAP45 (ESCRT-II), CHMP6 (ESCRT-III) and CHMP5 (ESCRT-III) in the KSHV infected cells. Tsg101 was also associated with early (Rab5) and late endosomal (Rab7) stages of

  19. Primary B Lymphocytes Infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Can Be Expanded In Vitro and Are Recognized by LANA-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Samantha M.; Sabbah, Shereen; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.; Bell, Andrew I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has tropism for B lymphocytes, in which it establishes latency, and can also cause lymphoproliferative disorders of these cells manifesting as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). T cell immunity is vital for the control of KSHV infection and disease; however, few models of B lymphocyte infection exist to study immune recognition of such cells. Here, we developed a model of B lymphocyte infection with KSHV in which infected tonsillar B lymphocytes were expanded by providing mitogenic stimuli and then challenged with KSHV-specific CD4+ T cells. The infected cells expressed viral proteins found in PELs, namely, LANA and viral IRF3 (vIRF3), albeit at lower levels, with similar patterns of gene expression for the major latency, viral interleukin 6 (vIL-6), and vIRF3 transcripts. Despite low-level expression of open reading frame 50 (ORF50), transcripts for the immune evasion genes K3 and K5 were detected, with some downregulation of cell surface-expressed CD86 and ICAM. The vast majority of infected lymphocytes expressed IgM heavy chains with Igλ light chains, recapitulating the features seen in infected cells in MCD. We assessed the ability of the infected lymphocytes to be targeted by a panel of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-matched CD4+ T cells and found that LANA-specific T cells restricted to different epitopes recognized these infected cells. Given that at least some KSHV latent antigens are thought to be poor targets for CD8+ T cells, we suggest that CD4+ T cells are potentially important effectors for the in vivo control of KSHV-infected B lymphocytes. IMPORTANCE KSHV establishes a latent reservoir within B lymphocytes, but few models exist to study KSHV-infected B cells other than the transformed PEL cell lines, which have likely accrued mutations during the transformation process. We developed a model of KSHV-infected primary B lymphocytes that

  20. Activation and repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycles by short- and medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Gorres, Kelly L; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; Miller, George

    2014-07-01

    The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. Importance: Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota. Small

  1. Activated Nrf2 Interacts with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Protein LANA-1 and Host Protein KAP1 To Mediate Global Lytic Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Roy, Arunava; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We have previously shown that KSHV utilizes the host transcription factor Nrf2 to aid in infection of endothelial cells and oncogenesis. Here, we investigate the role of Nrf2 in PEL and PEL-derived cell lines and show that KSHV latency induces Nrf2 protein levels and transcriptional activity through the COX-2/PGE2/EP4/PKCζ axis. Next-generation sequencing of KSHV transcripts in the PEL-derived BCBL-1 cell line revealed that knockdown of this activated Nrf2 results in global elevation of lytic genes. Nrf2 inhibition by the chemical brusatol also induces lytic gene expression. Both Nrf2 knockdown and brusatol-mediated inhibition induced KSHV lytic reactivation in BCBL-1 cells. In a series of follow-up experiments, we characterized the mechanism of Nrf2-mediated regulation of KSHV lytic repression during latency. Biochemical assays showed that Nrf2 interacted with KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) and the host transcriptional repressor KAP1, which together have been shown to repress lytic gene expression. Promoter studies showed that although Nrf2 alone induces the open reading frame 50 (ORF50) promoter, its association with LANA-1 and KAP1 abrogates this effect. Interestingly, LANA-1 is crucial for efficient KAP1/Nrf2 association, while Nrf2 is essential for LANA-1 and KAP1 recruitment to the ORF50 promoter and its repression. Overall, these results suggest that activated Nrf2, LANA-1, and KAP1 assemble on the ORF50 promoter in a temporal fashion. Initially, Nrf2 binds to and activates the ORF50 promoter during early de novo infection, an effect that is exploited during latency by LANA-1-mediated recruitment of the host transcriptional repressor KAP1 on Nrf2. Cell death assays further showed that Nrf2 and KAP1 knockdown induce significant cell death in PEL cell lines

  2. A potential alpha-helix motif in the amino terminus of LANA encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is critical for nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha in normoxia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiliang; Murakami, Masanao; Si, Huaxin; Robertson, Erle S

    2007-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator involved in induction of numerous genes associated with angiogenesis and tumor growth. Kaposi's sarcoma, associated with increased angiogenesis, is a highly vascularized, endothelial cell-derived tumor. Previously, we have shown that the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) targets the HIF-1alpha suppressors von Hippel-Lindau protein and p53 for degradation via its suppressor of cytokine signaling-box motif, which recruits the EC5S ubiquitin complex. Here we further show that HIF-1alpha was aberrantly accumulated in KSHV latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, as well as HEK293 cells infected with KSHV, and also show that a potential alpha-helical amino-terminal domain of LANA was important for HIF-1alpha nuclear accumulation in normoxic conditions. Moreover, we have now determined that this association was dependent on the residues 46 to 89 of LANA and the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha. Introduction of specific small interfering RNA against LANA into PEL cells also resulted in a diminished nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha. Therefore, these data show that LANA can function not only as an inhibitor of HIF-1alpha suppressor proteins but can also induce nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha during KSHV latent infection.

  3. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K3 and K5 Ubiquitin E3 Ligases Have Stage-Specific Immune Evasion Roles during Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Brulois, Kevin; Toth, Zsolt; Wong, Lai-Yee; Feng, Pinghui; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Ensser, Armin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The downregulation of immune synapse components such as major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and ICAM-1 is a common viral immune evasion strategy that protects infected cells from targeted elimination by cytolytic effector functions of the immune system. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two membrane-bound ubiquitin E3 ligases, called K3 and K5, which share the ability to induce internalization and degradation of MHC-I molecules. Although individual functions of K3 and K5 outside the viral genome are well characterized, their roles during the KSHV life cycle are still unclear. In this study, we individually introduced the amino acid-coding sequences of K3 or K5 into a ΔK3 ΔK5 recombinant virus, at either original or interchanged genomic positions. Recombinants harboring coding sequences within the K5 locus showed higher K3 and K5 protein expression levels and more rapid surface receptor downregulation than cognate recombinants in which coding sequences were introduced into the K3 locus. To identify infected cells undergoing K3-mediated downregulation of MHC-I, we employed a novel reporter virus, called red-green-blue-BAC16 (RGB-BAC16), which was engineered to harbor three fluorescent protein expression cassettes: EF1α-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1), polyadenylated nuclear RNA promoter (pPAN)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and pK8.1-monomeric blue fluorescent protein (tagBFP), marking latent, immediate early, and late viral gene expression, respectively. Analysis of RGB-derived K3 and K5 deletion mutants showed that while the K5-mediated downregulation of MHC-I was concomitant with pPAN induction, the reduction of MHC-I surface expression by K3 was evident in cells that were enriched for pPAN-driven EGFPhigh and pK8.1-driven blue fluorescent protein-positive (BFP+) populations. These data support the notion that immunoreceptor downregulation occurs by a sequential process wherein K5 is critical

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) replication and transcription factor activates the K9 (vIRF) gene through two distinct cis elements by a non-DNA-binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keiji; Ishikawa, Kayo; Nishimura, Ken; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Do, Eunju; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8, a homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 or Rta, is a strong transactivator and inducer of lytic replication. RTA acting alone can induce lytic replication of KSHV in infected cell lines that originated from primary effusion lymphomas, leading to virus production. During the lytic replication process, RTA activates many kinds of genes, including polyadenylated nuclear RNA, K8, K9 (vIRF), ORF57, and so on. We focused here on the mechanism of how RTA upregulates the K9 (vIRF) promoter and identified two independent cis-acting elements in the K9 (vIRF) promoter that responded to RTA. These elements were finally confined to the sequence 5'-TCTGGGACAGTC-3' in responsive element (RE) I-2B and the sequence 5'-GTACTTAAAATA-3' in RE IIC-2, both of which did not share sequence homology. Multiple factors bound specifically with these elements, and their binding was correlated with the RTA-responsive activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with nuclear extract from infected cells and the N-terminal part of RTA expressed in Escherichia coli, however, did not show that RTA interacted directly with these elements, in contrast to the RTA responsive elements in the PAN/K12 promoter region, the ORF57/K8 promoter region. Thus, it was likely that RTA could transactivate several kinds of unique cis elements without directly binding to the responsive elements, probably through cooperation with other DNA-binding factors.

  5. Differences in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-specific and –nonspecific immune responses in classic Kaposi sarcoma cases and matched controls in Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Emanuele; Goedert, James J.; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Firenze, Alberto; Bonura, Filippa; Viviano, Enza; Romano, Nino; Luppi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Kaposi sarcoma (KS) may develop because of incompetent immune responses, both nonspecifically and specifically against the KS-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 15 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 13 KSHV seropositives (without KS), and 15 KSHV-seronegative controls were tested for interferon-γ T-cell (Elispot) responses to KSHV-LANA, KSHV-K8.1, and CMV/EBV peptide pools. The forearm and thigh of each participant also was tested for delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) against common recall antigens. Groups were compared with Fisher exact test and multinomial logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). KSHV Elispot response was detected in 10 (67%) classic KS cases, 11 (85%) KSHV seropositives (without KS), and 2 (13%) seronegative controls. All 4 cases with KSHV-LANA responses had current KS lesions, whereas 5 of 6 cases with KSHV-K8.1 responses had no lesions (P=0.048). No case responded to both LANA and K8.1. Compared to seronegative controls, risk for classic KS was inversely related to DTH in the thigh (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55–0.94, P=0.01), directly associated with DTH in the forearm (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02–1.80, P=0.04), and tended to be increased 5-fold per KSHV Elispot response (OR 5.13, 95% CI 0.86–30.77, P=0.07). Compared to KSHV seropositives (without KS), risk for classic KS, was reduced 5-fold (OR 0.20, CI 0.03–0.77, P=0.04) per KSHV response. CMV/EBV Elispot responses were irrelevant. Deficiency of both KSHV-specific and –nonspecific immunity is associated with classic KS. This may clarify why Kaposi sarcoma responds to immune reconstitution. PMID:21740480

  6. HIV-1 Vpr Inhibits Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication by Inducing MicroRNA miR-942-5p and Activating NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qin; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Jie; Li, Wan; Hu, Minmin; Lu, Hongmei; Qin, Di; Zhu, Jianzhong; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is required for the development of several AIDS-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The high incidence of AIDS-KS has been ascribed to the interaction of KSHV and HIV-1. We have previously shown that HIV-1-secreted proteins Tat and Nef regulate the KSHV life cycle and synergize with KSHV oncogenes to promote angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we examined the regulation of KSHV latency by HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr). We found that soluble Vpr inhibits the expression of KSHV lytic transcripts and proteins, as well as viral particle production by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. By analyzing the expression profiles of microRNAs combined with target search by bioinformatics and luciferase reporter analyses, we identified a Vpr-upregulated cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-942-5p, that directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved the expression of IκBα and reduced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication, while overexpression of miR-942-5p enhanced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication. Our findings collectively illustrate that, by activating NF-κB signaling through upregulating a cellular miRNA to target IκBα, internalized HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication. These results have demonstrated an essential role of Vpr in the life cycle of KSHV. IMPORTANCE Coinfection by HIV-1 promotes the aggressive growth of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). In this study, we have shown that soluble HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that a cellular microRNA upregulated by Vpr, miR-942-5p, directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved IκBα expression and reduced Vpr inhibition

  7. Lytic Replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Results in the Formation of Multiple Capsid Species: Isolation and Molecular Characterization of A, B, and C Capsids from a Gammaherpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, K.; Newcomb, W. W.; Pray, T. R.; Craik, C. S.; Brown, J. C.; Kedes, D. H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus more than 35 years ago, a thorough understanding of gammaherpesvirus capsid composition and structure has remained elusive. We approached this problem by purifying capsids from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the only other known human gammaherpesvirus. The results from our biochemical and imaging analyses demonstrate that KSHV capsids possess a typical herpesvirus icosahedral capsid shell composed of four structural proteins. The hexameric and pentameric capsomers are composed of the major capsid protein (MCP) encoded by open reading frame 25. The heterotrimeric complexes, forming the capsid floor between the hexons and pentons, are each composed of one molecule of ORF62 and two molecules of ORF26. Each of these proteins has significant amino acid sequence homology to capsid proteins in alpha- and betaherpesviruses. In contrast, the fourth protein, ORF65, lacks significant sequence homology to its structural counterparts from the other subfamilies. Nevertheless, this small, basic, and highly antigenic protein decorates the surface of the capsids, as does, for example, the even smaller basic capsid protein VP26 of herpes simplex virus type 1. We have also found that, as with the alpha- and betaherpesviruses, lytic replication of KSHV leads to the formation of at least three capsid species, A, B, and C, with masses of approximately 200, 230, and 300 MDa, respectively. A capsids are empty, B capsids contain an inner array of a fifth structural protein, ORF17.5, and C capsids contain the viral genome. PMID:11222712

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions with repetitive DNA elements in the Mta promoter to stimulate DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Diana; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Lukac, David M

    2011-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 [HHV-8]) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and lymphoproliferative diseases. We previously demonstrated that the KSHV lytic switch protein Rta stimulates DNA binding of the cellular RBP-Jk/CSL protein, the nuclear component of the Notch pathway, on Rta target promoters. In the current study, we define the promoter requirements for formation of transcriptionally productive Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. We show that highly pure Rta footprints 7 copies of a previously undescribed repetitive element in the promoter of the essential KSHV Mta gene. We have termed this element the "CANT repeat." CANT repeats are found on both strands of DNA and have a consensus sequence of ANTGTAACANT(A/T)(A/T)T. We demonstrate that Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions (i.e., nM) with 64 bp of the Mta promoter but not single CANT units. The number of CANT repeats, their presence in palindromes, and their positions relative to the RBP-Jk binding site determine the optimal target for Rta stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding and formation of ternary Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. DNA binding and tetramerization mutants of Rta fail to stimulate RBP-Jk DNA binding. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that RBP-Jk DNA binding is broadly, but selectively, stimulated across the entire KSHV genome during reactivation. We propose a model in which tetramerization of Rta allows it to straddle RBP-Jk and contact repeat units on both sides of RBP-Jk. Our study integrates high-affinity Rta DNA binding with the requirement for a cellular transcription factor in Rta transactivation.

  9. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in adaptive antiviral immunity by presenting viral peptides to CD4+ T cells. Due to their key role in adaptive immunity, many viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have evolved multiple strategies to inhibit the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. The expression of MHC-II, which is controlled mainly at the level of transcription, is strictly dependent upon the binding of the class II transactivator (CIITA) to the highly conserved promoters of all MHC-II genes. The recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters requires its direct interactions with a preassembled MHC-II enhanceosome consisting of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) complex and regulatory factor X (RFX) complex proteins. Here, we show that KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II enhanceosome by binding to the components of the RFX complex. Our data show that LANA is capable of binding to all three components of the RFX complex, RFX-associated protein (RFXAP), RFX5, and RFX-associated ankyrin-containing protein (RFXANK), in vivo but binds more strongly with the RFXAP component in in vitro binding assays. Levels of MHC-II proteins were significantly reduced in KSHV-infected as well as LANA-expressing B cells. Additionally, the expression of LANA in a luciferase promoter reporter assay showed reduced HLA-DRA promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LANA binds to the MHC-II promoter along with RFX proteins and that the overexpression of LANA disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II promoter. These assays led to the conclusion that the interaction of LANA with RFX proteins interferes with the recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters, resulting in an inhibition of MHC-II gene expression. Thus, the data presented here identify

  10. The central repeat domain 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) prevents cis MHC class I peptide presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Qin Huilian; Ferris, Robert L.; Tan Rusung; Chang Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2011-04-10

    KSHV LANA1, a latent protein expressed during chronic infection to maintain a viral genome, inhibits major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide presentation in cis as a means of immune evasion. Through deletional cloning, we localized this function to the LANA1 central repeat 1 (CR1) subregion. Other CR subregions retard LANA1 translation and proteasomal processing but do not markedly inhibit LANA1 peptide processing by MHC I. Inhibition of proteasomal processing ablates LANA1 peptide presentation. Direct expression of LANA1 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) overcomes CR1 inhibition suggesting that CR1 acts prior to translocation of cytoplasmic peptides into the ER. By physically separating CR1 from other subdomains, we show that LANA1 evades MHC I peptide processing by a mechanism distinct from other herpesviruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although LANA1 and EBV EBNA1 are functionally similar, they appear to use different mechanisms to evade host cytotoxic T lymphocyte surveillance.

  11. De novo protein synthesis is required for lytic cycle reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus, but not Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, in response to histone deacetylase inhibitors and protein kinase C agonists.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjiang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Daigle, Derek; Miller, George

    2007-09-01

    The oncogenic human gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), are latent in cultured lymphoma cells. We asked whether reactivation from latency of either virus requires de novo protein synthesis. Using Northern blotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, we measured the kinetics of expression of the lytic cycle activator genes and determined whether abundance of mRNAs encoding these genes from either virus was reduced by treatment with cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis. CHX blocked expression of mRNAs of EBV BZLF1 and BRLF1, the two EBV lytic cycle activator genes, when HH514-16 Burkitt lymphoma cells were treated with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, or a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine. CHX also inhibited EBV lytic cycle activation in B95-8 marmoset lymphoblastoid cells by phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA). EBV lytic cycle induction became resistant to CHX between 4 and 6 h after application of the inducing stimulus. KSHV lytic cycle activation, as assessed by ORF50 mRNA expression, was rapidly induced by the HDAC inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, in HH-B2 primary effusion lymphoma cells. In HH-B2 cells, CHX did not inhibit, but enhanced, expression of the KSHV lytic cycle activator gene, ORF50. In BC-1, a primary effusion lymphoma cell line that is dually infected with EBV and KSHV, CHX blocked EBV BRLF1 lytic gene expression induced by TPA and sodium butyrate; KSHV ORF50 mRNA induced simultaneously in the same cells by the same inducing stimuli was resistant to CHX. The experiments show, for the cell lines and inducing agents studied, that the EBV BZLF1 and BRLF1 genes do not behave with "immediate-early" kinetics upon reactivation from latency. KSHV ORF50 is a true "immediate-early" gene. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors and TPA induce lytic cycle

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Induces the Oncogenic miR-17-92 Cluster and Down-Regulates TGF-β Signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Seok; Jain, Vaibhav; Krueger, Brian; Marshall, Vickie; Kim, Chang Hee; Shisler, Joanna L; Whitby, Denise; Renne, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    KSHV is a DNA tumor virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma. Upon KSHV infection, only a limited number of latent genes are expressed. We know that KSHV infection regulates host gene expression, and hypothesized that latent genes also modulate the expression of host miRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression contributes to the development of many types of cancer. Array-based miRNA profiling revealed that all six miRNAs of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster are up-regulated in KSHV infected endothelial cells. Among candidate KSHV latent genes, we found that vFLIP and vCyclin were shown to activate the miR-17-92 promoter, using luciferase assay and western blot analysis. The miR-17-92 cluster was previously shown to target TGF-β signaling. We demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster to strongly inhibit the TGF-β signaling pathway by down-regulating SMAD2. Moreover, TGF-β activity and SMAD2 expression were fully restored when antagomirs (inhibitors) of miR-17-92 cluster were transfected into cells expressing either vFLIP or vCyclin. In addition, we utilized viral genetics to produce vFLIP or vCyclin knock-out viruses, and studied the effects in infected TIVE cells. Infection with wildtype KSHV abolished expression of SMAD2 protein in these endothelial cells. While single-knockout mutants still showed a marked reduction in SMAD2 expression, TIVE cells infected by a double-knockout mutant virus were fully restored for SMAD2 expression, compared to non-infected TIVE cells. Expression of either vFLIP or vCycIin was sufficient to downregulate SMAD2. In summary, our data demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster in endothelial cells and thereby interfere with the TGF-β signaling pathway. Manipulation of the TGF-β pathway via host miRNAs represents a novel mechanism that may be important for KSHV tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, a hallmark of KS.

  13. Constitutive activation of NF-kappa B and secretion of interleukin-8 induced by the G protein-coupled receptor of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus involve G alpha(13) and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Shepard, L W; Yang, M; Xie, P; Browning, D D; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, T; Kozasa, T; Ye, R D

    2001-12-07

    The Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) open reading frame 74 encodes a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for chemokines. Exogenous expression of this constitutively active GPCR leads to cell transformation and vascular overgrowth characteristic of Kaposi's sarcoma. We show here that expression of KSHV-GPCR in transfected cells results in constitutive transactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) and secretion of interleukin-8, and this response involves activation of G alpha(13) and RhoA. The induced expression of a NF-kappa B luciferase reporter was partially reduced by pertussis toxin and the G beta gamma scavenger transducin, and enhanced by co-expression of G alpha(13) and to a lesser extent, G alpha(q). These results indicate coupling of KSHV-GPCR to multiple G proteins for NF-kappa B activation. Expression of KSHV-GPCR led to stress fiber formation in NIH 3T3 cells. To examine the involvement of the G alpha(13)-RhoA pathway in KSHV-GPCR-mediated NF-kappa B activation, HeLa cells were transfected with KSHV-GPCR alone and in combination with the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) from p115RhoGEF or a dominant negative RhoA(T19N). Both constructs, as well as the C3 exoenzyme from Clostritium botulinum, partially reduced NF-kappa B activation by KSHV-GPCR, and by a constitutively active G alpha(13)(Q226L). KSHV-GPCR-induced NF-kappa B activation is accompanied by increased secretion of IL-8, a function mimicked by the activated G alpha(13) but not by an activated G alpha(q)(Q209L). These results suggest coupling of KSHV-GPCR to the G alpha(13)-RhoA pathway in addition to other G proteins.

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus microRNAs target IRAK1 and MYD88, two components of the toll-like receptor/interleukin-1R signaling cascade, to reduce inflammatory-cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Abend, Johanna R; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Kieffer-Kwon, Philippe; Uldrick, Thomas S; Yarchoan, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M

    2012-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of KS, an important AIDS-associated malignancy. KSHV expresses at least 18 different mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We identified interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) as a potential target of miR-K12-9 (miR-K9) in an array data set examining changes in cellular gene expression levels in the presence of KSHV miRNAs. Using 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) luciferase reporter assays, we confirmed that miR-K9 and other miRNAs inhibit IRAK1 expression. In addition, IRAK1 expression is downregulated in cells transfected with miR-K9 and during de novo KSHV infection. IRAK1 is an important component of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/IL-1R signaling cascade. The downregulation of IRAK1 by miR-K9 resulted in the decreased stimulation of NF-κB activity in endothelial cells treated with IL-1α and in B cells treated with a TLR7/8 agonist. Interestingly, miR-K9 had a greater effect on NF-κB activity than did a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IRAK1 despite the more efficient downregulation of IRAK1 expression with the siRNA. We hypothesized that KSHV miRNAs may also be regulating a second component of the TLR/IL-1R signaling cascade, resulting in a stronger phenotype. Reanalysis of the array data set identified myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MYD88) as an additional potential target. 3'UTR luciferase reporter assays and Western blot analysis confirmed the targeting of MYD88 by miR-K5. The presence of miR-K9 and miR-K5 inhibited the production of IL-6 and IL-8 upon the IL-1α stimulation of endothelial cells. These results demonstrate KSHV-encoded miRNAs regulating the TLR/IL-1R signaling cascade at two distinct points and suggest the importance of these pathways during viral infection.

  15. Association between malaria exposure and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seropositivity in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Angela; Cose, Stephen; Wakeham, Katie; Miley, Wendell; Ndibazza, Juliet; Drakeley, Christopher; Elliott, Alison; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unlike other herpes viruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is not ubiquitous worldwide and is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unclear. As part of a wider investigation of factors that facilitate transmission in Uganda, a high prevalence country, we examined the association between antimalaria antibodies and seropositivity against KSHV. Methods Antibodies against P. falciparum merozoite surface protein (PfMSP)-1, P. falciparum apical membrane antigen (PfAMA)-1 and KSHV antigens (ORF73 and K8.1) were measured in samples from 1164 mothers and 1227 children. Results Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seroprevalence was 69% among mothers and 15% children. Among mothers, KSHV seroprevalence increased with malaria antibody titres: from 60% to 82% and from 54% to 77%, comparing those with the lowest and highest titres for PfMSP-1 and PfAMA-1, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among children, only antibodies to PfAMA-1 were significantly associated with KSHV seropositivity, (P < 0.0001). In both mothers and children, anti-ORF73 antibodies were more strongly associated with malaria antibodies than anti-K8.1 antibodies. Conclusion The association between malaria exposure and KSHV seropositivity suggests that malaria is a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation. PMID:25611008

  16. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells.

  17. A viral gene that activates lytic cycle expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Yuan, Yan; Zhu, Fanxiu; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    Herpesviruses exist in two states, latency and a lytic productive cycle. Here we identify an immediate-early gene encoded by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus eight (HHV8) that activates lytic cycle gene expression from the latent viral genome. The gene is a homologue of Rta, a transcriptional activator encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). KSHV/Rta activated KSHV early lytic genes, including virus-encoded interleukin 6 and polyadenylated nuclear RNA, and a late gene, small viral capsid antigen. In cells dually infected with Epstein–Barr virus and KSHV, each Rta activated only autologous lytic cycle genes. Expression of viral cytokines under control of the KSHV/Rta gene is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:9724796

  18. Genipin Enhances Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kuwon; Park, Gyu Hwan; Jung, Jong-Wha; Shin, Yu Su; Seo, Taegun; Hyosun Cho; Kang, Hyojeung

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a Gammaherpesvirus that causes acute infection and establishes life-long latency. KSHV causes several human cancers, including Kaposi's sarcoma, an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genipin, an aglycone derived from geniposide found in Gardenia jasminoides, is known to be an excellent natural cross-linker, strong apoptosis inducer, and antiviral agent. Although evidence suggests antiviral activity of genipin in several in vitro viral infection systems, no inhibitory effect of genipin on KSHV infection has been reported. Thus, our aim was to determine, using the iSLK-BAC16 KSHV infection system, whether genipin has inhibitory effects on KSHV infection. For this purpose, we evaluated biological effects of genipin on KSHV infection and finally determined the underlying mechanisms responsible for the bioactive effects of genipin. A cytotoxicity assay revealed that genipin caused 50% cytotoxicity at 49.5 μM in iSLK-puro (KSHV-negative) cells and at 72.5 μM in iSLK-BAC16 (KSHV-positive) cells. Caspase 3/7 activities were slightly suppressed by genipin treatment in iSLK-BAC16 cells while significantly induced in iSLK-puro cells. Production of the KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), but not that of the R-transactivator (RTA) protein, was significantly induced by genipin treatment at lower concentration. Consistent with the LANA upregulation, KSHV LANA transcripts, but not RTA transcripts, were expressed at a higher level. Furthermore, KSHV intracellular copy numbers were slightly increased at lower concentration of genipin, while KSHV extracellular copy numbers were significantly increased at higher concentration of genipin. Interestingly, genipin treatment at a lower concentration did induce the expression of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1); however, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that the DNMT1 and LANA induced by genipin did not co

  19. Gender Difference of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus Infection in Population with Schistosomiasis in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bishi; Xia, Fan; Li, Baolin; Ouyang, Xinxing; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Yang, Rongge; Wang, Linding

    2012-01-01

    Summary Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causal agent of (KS), a common cancer in AIDS patients. The risk factors for KSHV infection have been extensively studied in Western countries but remain largely undefined in other parts of the World. Schistosomiasis caused by infection of Schistosoma japonicum is recently identified as a cofactor for KSHV infection in rural Egypt. In this study, we examined the seroprevalence of KSHV in a population with high incidence of Schistomasis along the Yangtze River in China. The seroprevalence of KSHV is slightly higher in subjects with than without Schistosomiasis but it is not statistically significant (8.4% vs 6.6%, p = 0.204). The seroprevalence of KSHV is significantly higher in female than male subjects (9.3% vs 5.9%, OR: 1.621, 95% CI: 1.084–2.425, p = 0.019). When adjusted for gender, the seroprevalence of KSHV is significantly higher in subjects with than without Schistosomiasis in male subjects (8.4% vs 2.8%, OR: 3.170, 95% CI: 1.501–6.694, p = 0.002). PMID:22814163

  20. The Chromatin Landscape of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Zsolt; Brulois, Kevin; Jung, Jae U.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that causes latent infection in humans. In cells, the viral genome adopts a highly organized chromatin structure, which is controlled by a wide variety of cellular and viral chromatin regulatory factors. In the past few years, interrogation of the chromatinized KSHV genome by whole genome-analyzing tools revealed that the complex chromatin landscape spanning the viral genome in infected cells has important regulatory roles during the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the most recent findings regarding the role of histone modifications, histone modifying enzymes, DNA methylation, microRNAs, non-coding RNAs and the nuclear organization of the KSHV epigenome in the regulation of latent and lytic viral gene expression programs as well as their connection to KSHV-associated pathogenesis. PMID:23698402

  1. The Ubiquitin System and Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Ashizawa, Akira; Higashi, Chizuka; Masuda, Kazuki; Ohga, Rie; Taira, Takahiro; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to lysine residues of target proteins. The ubiquitin system plays a key role in the regulation of protein degradation, which contributes to cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, apoptosis, and immune regulation. Bacterial and viral pathogens exploit the cellular ubiquitin system by encoding their own proteins to serve their survival and replication in infected cells. Recent studies have revealed that Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) manipulates the ubiquitin system of infected cells to facilitate cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and evasion from immunity. This review summarizes recent developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by KSHV to interact with the cellular ubiquitin machinery. PMID:22375140

  2. Kinetics of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Staskus, Katherine; Gradoville, Lyndle; Grogan, Elizabeth; Haase, Ashley; Miller, George

    1999-01-01

    Herpesvirus gene expression can be classified into four distinct kinetic stages: latent, immediate early, early, and late. Here we characterize the kinetic class of a group of 16 Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 genes in a cultured primary effusion cell line and examine the expression of a subset of these genes in KS biopsies. Expression of two latent genes, LANA and vFLIP, was constitutive and was not induced by chemicals that induce the lytic cycle in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines. An immediate-early gene, Rta (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]), was induced within 4 h of the addition of n-butyrate, and its 3.6-kb mRNA was resistant to inhibition by cycloheximide. Early genes, including K3 and K5 that are homologues of the “immediate-early” gene of bovine herpesvirus 4, K8 that is a positional homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, vMIP II, vIL-6, and polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, appeared 8 to 13 h after chemical induction. A second group of early genes that were slightly delayed in their appearance included viral DHFR, thymidylate synthase, vMIP I, G protein-coupled receptor, K12, vBcl2, and a lytic transcript that overlapped LANA. The transcript of sVCA (ORF65), a late gene whose expression was abolished by Phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of KSHV DNA replication, did not appear until 30 h after induction. Single-cell assays indicated that the induction of lytic cycle transcripts resulted from the recruitment of additional cells into the lytic cycle. In situ hybridization of KS biopsies showed that about 3% of spindle-shaped tumor cells expressed Rta, ORF K8, vIL-6, vMIP I, vBcl-2, PAN RNA, and sVCA. Our study shows that several KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular cytokines, chemokines, and antiapoptotic factors are expressed during the viral lytic cycle in PEL cell lines and in KS biopsies. The lytic cycle of KSHV, probably under the initial control of the KSHV/Rta gene, may directly contribute to tumor

  3. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengtao; Lee, Heuiran; Guo, Jie; Neipel, Frank; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ozato, Keiko; Jung, Jae U.

    1998-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of multifunctional cytokines with antiviral activities. The K9 open reading frame of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exhibits significant homology with cellular IFN regulatory factors (IRFs). We have investigated the functional consequence of K9 expression in IFN-mediated signal transduction. Expression of K9 dramatically repressed transcriptional activation induced by IFN-α, -β, and -γ. Further, it induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, resulting in morphologic changes, focus formation, and growth in reduced-serum conditions. The expression of antisense K9 in KSHV-infected BCBL-1 cells consistently increased IFN-mediated transcriptional activation but drastically decreased the expression of certain KSHV genes. Thus, the K9 gene of KSHV encodes the first virus-encoded IRF (v-IRF) which functions as a repressor for cellular IFN-mediated signal transduction. In addition, v-IRF likely plays an important role in regulating KSHV gene expression. These results suggest that KSHV employs an unique mechanism to antagonize IFN-mediated antiviral activity by harboring a functional v-IRF. PMID:9620998

  4. NEDDylation Is Essential for Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Lytic Reactivation and Represents a Novel Anti-KSHV Target

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David J.; Wood, Jennifer J.; Jackson, Brian R.; Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which are aggressive malignancies associated with immunocompromised patients. For many non-viral malignancies, therapeutically targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been successful. Likewise, laboratory studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the UPS might provide a promising avenue for the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. The largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases are the cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) that are activated by an additional ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8. We show that pharmacological inhibition of NEDDylation (using the small molecule inhibitor MLN4924) is cytotoxic to PEL cells by inhibiting NF-κB. We also show that CRL4B is a novel regulator of latency as its inhibition reactivated lytic gene expression. Furthermore, we uncovered a requirement for NEDDylation during the reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle. Intriguingly, inhibition prevented viral DNA replication but not lytic cycle-associated gene expression, highlighting a novel mechanism that uncouples these two features of KSHV biology. Mechanistically, we show that MLN4924 treatment precluded the recruitment of the viral pre-replication complex to the origin of lytic DNA replication (OriLyt). These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV latency and reactivation. Moreover, they demonstrate that inhibition of NEDDylation represents a novel approach for the treatment of KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:25794275

  5. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy. PMID:27538487

  6. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-03-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy.

  7. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma.

    PubMed

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Cortez, M Angelica; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-12-04

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation.

  8. Quantitative Determinations of Anti-Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Antibody Levels in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gogineni, Emile; Marshall, Vickie; Miley, Wendell; Bayat, Ahmad; Whitby, Denise; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM). Here quantitative anti-KSHV antibody levels were measured using Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS) in a MSM cohort with and without HIV from the NIH Clinical Center. Antibodies were detected using a mixture of four KSHV antigens in the MSM cohort and in Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) patients. Along with HIV status, these results were compared with K8.1 and ORF73 ELISA, PCR virus detection, and additional LIPS testing. LIPS revealed that 25% (76/307) of the MSM cohort were KSHV seropositive, including 59 HIV+ and 17 HIV− subjects. The anti-KSHV antibody levels detected by LIPS were not statistically different between the KSHV+/HIV+ and KSHV+/HIV− subgroups, but were lower than the KS patients (P<0.0001). ELISA analysis of the MSM cohort detected a 35.5% frequency of KSHV infection and showed agreement with 81% of the samples evaluated by LIPS. Further LIPS testing with v-cyclin, a second ORF73 fragment and ORF38 reconciled some of the differences observed between LIPS and the ELISA immunoassays and the revised LIPS seroprevalence in the MSM cohort was increased to 31%. Additional quantitative antibody analysis demonstrated statistically lower KSHV antibody levels in MSM compared to KS patients, but no difference was found between KSHV infected with and without HIV coinfection. These findings also suggest that antibodies against v-cyclin and ORF38 are useful for identifying patients with asymptomatic KSHV infection. PMID:23541691

  9. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing in the Understanding of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Biology

    PubMed Central

    Strahan, Roxanne; Uppal, Timsy; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Sanger-based novel nucleic acid sequencing techniques, referred to as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), provide a rapid, reliable, high-throughput, and massively parallel sequencing methodology that has improved our understanding of human cancers and cancer-related viruses. NGS has become a quintessential research tool for more effective characterization of complex viral and host genomes through its ever-expanding repertoire, which consists of whole-genome sequencing, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and whole-epigenome sequencing. These new NGS platforms provide a comprehensive and systematic genome-wide analysis of genomic sequences and a full transcriptional profile at a single nucleotide resolution. When combined, these techniques help unlock the function of novel genes and the related pathways that contribute to the overall viral pathogenesis. Ongoing research in the field of virology endeavors to identify the role of various underlying mechanisms that control the regulation of the herpesvirus biphasic lifecycle in order to discover potential therapeutic targets and treatment strategies. In this review, we have complied the most recent findings about the application of NGS in Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) biology, including identification of novel genomic features and whole-genome KSHV diversities, global gene regulatory network profiling for intricate transcriptome analyses, and surveying of epigenetic marks (DNA methylation, modified histones, and chromatin remodelers) during de novo, latent, and productive KSHV infections. PMID:27043613

  11. Antibodies against lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus antigens and lymphoma in the European EpiLymph case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Y; Mbisa, G; Labo, N; Casabonne, D; Becker, N; Maynadie, M; Foretova, L; Cocco, P L; Nieters, A; Staines, A; Bofetta, P; Brennan, P; Whitby, D; de Sanjosé, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus is associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. Methods: Seropositivity to lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antigens were examined in 2083 lymphomas and 2013 controls from six European countries. Results: Antibodies against KSHV latent and lytic antigens were detectable in 4.5% and 3.4% of controls, respectively, and 3.6% of cases (P>0.05). The KSHV seropositivity was associated with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (odds ratio (OR)=4.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.57–10.83) and multiple myeloma (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.11–0.85). Conclusion: The KSHV is unlikely to contribute importantly to lymphomagenesis among immunocompetent subjects. However, the observed association with SMZL may underline a chronic antigen mechanism in its aetiology. PMID:21952625

  12. Molecular and immunohistochemical detection of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8.

    PubMed

    Chadburn, Amy; Wilson, Janet; Wang, Y Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) is etiologically related to the development of several human diseases, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL)/extra-cavitary (EC) PEL, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and large B-cell lymphoma arising in KSHV/HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. Although serologic studies can identify persons infected with this virus, molecular genetics, specifically PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical techniques, are rapid, sensitive, and specific, and are able to more closely link KSHV/HHV-8 to a given disease process. As these KSHV/HHV-8-related diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals, the identification of the virus within lesional tissue will allow for more targeted therapy.

  13. Hsp70 Isoforms Are Essential for the Formation of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication and Transcription Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with various AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, multiple processes required for KSHV lytic replication, including viral transcription, viral DNA synthesis and capsid assembly occur in virus-induced intranuclear structures, termed replication and transcription compartments (RTCs). Here we utilised a novel methodology, combining subcellular fractionation and quantitative proteomics, to identify cellular proteins which are recruited to KSHV-induced RTCs and thus play a key role in KSHV lytic replication. We show that several isoforms of the HSP70 chaperone family, Hsc70 and iHsp70, are redistributed from the cytoplasm into the nucleus coinciding with the initial formation of KSHV-induced RTCs. We demonstrate that nuclear chaperone foci are dynamic, initially forming adjacent to newly formed KSHV RTCs, however during later time points the chaperones move within KSHV RTCs and completely co-localise with actively replicating viral DNA. The functional significance of Hsp70 isoforms recruitment into KSHV RTCs was also examined using the specific Hsp70 isoform small molecule inhibitor, VER-155008. Intriguingly, results highlight an essential role of Hsp70 isoforms in the KSHV replication cycle independent of protein stability and maturation. Notably, inhibition of Hsp70 isoforms precluded KSHV RTC formation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) relocalisation to the viral genome leading to the abolishment of global KSHV transcription and subsequent viral protein synthesis and DNA replication. These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV lytic replication and highlight the potential of HSP70 inhibitors as novel antiviral agents. PMID:26587836

  14. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus MicroRNAs Induce Metabolic Transformation of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yogev, Ohad; Lagos, Dimitris; Enver, Tariq; Boshoff, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Altered cell metabolism is inherently connected with pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). KS tumour cells display features of lymphatic endothelial differentiation and in their vast majority are latently infected with KSHV, while a small number are lytically infected, producing virions. Latently infected cells express only a subset of viral genes, mainly located within the latency-associated region, among them 12 microRNAs. Notably, the metabolic properties of KSHV-infected cells closely resemble the metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells. However, how and why KSHV alters host cell metabolism remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of KSHV infection on the metabolic profile of primary dermal microvascular lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and the functional relevance of this effect. We found that the KSHV microRNAs within the oncogenic cluster collaborate to decrease mitochondria biogenesis and to induce aerobic glycolysis in infected cells. KSHV microRNAs expression decreases oxygen consumption, increase lactate secretion and glucose uptake, stabilize HIF1α and decreases mitochondria copy number. Importantly this metabolic shift is important for latency maintenance and provides a growth advantage. Mechanistically we show that KSHV alters host cell energy metabolism through microRNA-mediated down regulation of EGLN2 and HSPA9. Our data suggest that the KSHV microRNAs induce a metabolic transformation by concurrent regulation of two independent pathways; transcriptional reprograming via HIF1 activation and reduction of mitochondria biogenesis through down regulation of the mitochondrial import machinery. These findings implicate viral microRNAs in the regulation of the cellular metabolism and highlight new potential avenues to inhibit viral latency. PMID:25255370

  15. Structural Analysis of Thymidylate Synthase from Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus with the Anticancer Drug Raltitrexed

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Mi; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Park, Young Woo; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a highly infectious human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi’s sarcoma. KSHV encodes functional thymidylate synthase, which is a target for anticancer drugs such as raltitrexed or 5-fluorouracil. Thymidylate synthase catalyzes the conversion of 2′-deoxyuridine-5′-monophosphate (dUMP) to thymidine-5′-monophosphate (dTMP) using 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (mTHF) as a co-substrate. The crystal structures of thymidylate synthase from KSHV (apo), complexes with dUMP (binary), and complexes with both dUMP and raltitrexed (ternary) were determined at 1.7 Å, 2.0 Å, and 2.4 Å, respectively. While the ternary complex structures of human thymidylate synthase and E. coli thymidylate synthase had a closed conformation, the ternary complex structure of KSHV thymidylate synthase was observed in an open conformation, similar to that of rat thymidylate synthase. The complex structures of KSHV thymidylate synthase did not have a covalent bond between the sulfhydryl group of Cys219 and C6 atom of dUMP, unlike the human thymidylate synthase. The catalytic Cys residue demonstrated a dual conformation in the apo structure, and its sulfhydryl group was oriented toward the C6 atom of dUMP with no covalent bond upon ligand binding in the complex structures. These structural data provide the potential use of antifolates such as raltitrexed as a viral induced anticancer drug and structural basis to design drugs for targeting the thymidylate synthase of KSHV. PMID:27936107

  16. Identification and Characterization of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K8.1 Virion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengtao; MacKey, John; Czajak, Susan C.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Jung, Jae U.

    1999-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been consistently identified in Kaposi’s sarcomas (KS), body cavity-based lymphomas (BCBL), and some forms of Castleman’s disease. Previous serological tests with KS patient sera have detected lytic-cycle polypeptides from KSHV-infected BCBL cells. We have found that these polypeptides are predominantly encoded by the K8.1 open reading frame, which is present in the same genomic position as virion envelope glycoproteins of other gammaherpesviruses. The cDNA of K8.1 from BCBL-1 cells was found to encode a glycosylated protein with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa. K8.1 was found to be expressed during lytic KSHV replication in BCBL-1 cells and was localized on the surface of cells and virions. The results of immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy suggest that KSHV acquires K8.1 protein on its virion surface during the process of budding at the plasma cell membrane. When KSHV K8.1 derived from mammalian cells was used as an antigen in immunoblot tests, antibodies to K8.1 were detected in 18 of 20 KS patients and in 0 of 10 KS-negative control subjects. These results demonstrate that the K8.1 gene encodes a KSHV virion-associated glycoprotein and suggest that antibodies to K8.1 may prove useful as contributory serological markers for infection by KSHV. PMID:9882339

  17. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-01-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490–535) and PARS-II (aa 590–650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50. PMID:27698494

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Ballestas, Mary E.; Komatsu, Takashi; Kaye, Kenneth M. . E-mail: kkaye@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes.

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen stabilizes intracellular activated Notch by targeting the Sel10 protein.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Verma, Subhash C; Murakami, Masanao; Bajaj, Bharat; Kaul, Rajeev; Robertson, Erle S

    2007-10-09

    Deregulation of the evolutionarily conserved Notch signaling is highly correlated with oncogenesis. Intracellular activated Notch (ICN) is a protooncogene linked to the transcription activation of a number of cellular genes involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and proliferation. Stability of ICN is tightly regulated by the Sel10-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Sel10 can function as a negative regulator of Notch and exhibits activities of a tumor-suppressor protein. This article shows that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) directly interacts with Sel10 and forms a complex in KSHV-infected cells. This results in suppression of ICN ubiquitination and degradation. The carboxyl terminus of LANA interacts with the F-box and WD40 domains of Sel10 and competes with ICN for binding to Sel10. This elevated level of ICN is also critical for maintaining the enhanced proliferation of KSHV-infected tumor cells. These findings describe a mechanism by which the KSHV-encoded LANA protein regulates ubiquitination of ICN mediated by the F-box component of the E3 ligase Sel10, leading to proliferation of the virus-infected cells.

  20. p120-catenin regulates VE-cadherin endocytosis and degradation induced by the Kaposi sarcoma-associated ubiquitin ligase K5.

    PubMed

    Nanes, Benjamin A; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M; Cadwell, Chantel M; Robinson, Brian S; Lowery, Anthony M; Vincent, Peter A; Mosunjac, Marina; Früh, Klaus; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin undergoes constitutive internalization driven by a unique endocytic motif that also serves as a p120-catenin (p120) binding site. p120 binding masks the motif, stabilizing the cadherin at cell junctions. This mechanism allows constitutive VE-cadherin endocytosis and recycling to contribute to adherens junction dynamics without resulting in junction disassembly. Here we identify an additional motif that drives VE-cadherin endocytosis and pathological junction disassembly associated with the endothelial-derived tumor Kaposi sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8, which causes Kaposi sarcoma, expresses the MARCH family ubiquitin ligase K5. We report that K5 targets two membrane-proximal VE-cadherin lysine residues for ubiquitination, driving endocytosis and down-regulation of the cadherin. K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis does not require the constitutive endocytic motif. However, K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis is associated with displacement of p120 from the cadherin, and p120 protects VE-cadherin from K5. Thus multiple context-dependent signals drive VE-cadherin endocytosis, but p120 binding to the cadherin juxtamembrane domain acts as a master regulator guarding cadherin stability.

  1. Deficient autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction in Kaposi's sarcoma associated with deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Safai, B

    1983-01-01

    Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) and T cell subsets defined with monoclonal antibodies were analyzed in the peripheral blood of homosexual males with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). All seven patients demonstrated decreased AMLR (P less than 0.001) when compared with age- and sex-matched simultaneously studied controls. These patients also showed decreased proportions of Leu-3+ (helper/inducer phenotype) and an increase in the proportion of Leu-2+ (suppressor/cytotoxic phenotype) T cells. Leu-3+ T cells were purified from two patients by depleting Leu-2+ T cells in complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Leu-3+ T cells from both patients demonstrated poor proliferative response in the AMLR. In allogeneic MLR, patients' T cells were poor responders and their non-T cells were poor stimulators against healthy controls. This study demonstrates deficiency of both AMLR and allogeneic MLR in patients with KS. The decreased AMLR is associated with qualitative and functional deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells. Whether the functional deficiency of Leu-3+ responder T cells in the AMLR is a general phenomena or a feature of a subset of patients with KS remains to be determined. PMID:6218186

  2. Piracy of prostaglandin E2/EP receptor-mediated signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (HHV-8) for latency gene expression: strategy of a successful pathogen.

    PubMed

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation-associated malignancy. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal PGE2 synthase, PGE2, and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists downregulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP, and c-Jun transcription factors seem to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor-induced LANA-1 promoter activity was downregulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that shows the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to use inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. These data also suggest that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions.

  3. Human herpesvirus 8 open reading frame 26 and open reading frame 65 sequences from multiple myeloma patients: a shared pattern not found in Kaposi's sarcoma or primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, H J; Sjak-Shie, N N; Vescio, R A; Kaminsky, M; Mikail, A; Pold, M; Parker, K; Beksac, M; Belson, D; Moss, T J; Wu, C H; Zhou, J; Zhang, L; Chen, G; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    2000-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), multicentric Castleman's disease, and recently multiple myeloma (MM). DNA sequence analyses of HHV-8 suggest that multiple HHV-8 strains exist. We extracted DNA from 24 patients with MM and 3 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and compared HHV-8 open reading frames (ORFs) 26 and 65 sequences with those derived from patients with KS, PEL, and two HHV-8-positive PEL cell lines KS-1 and BC-1. ORF26 sequence data suggest that MM patients are consistently carriers of HHV-8 strain subtype C3. All MM patients also consistently revealed either a single bp deletion or substitution at position 112197 in ORF65. This unique alteration is not present in patients with KS or PEL or in PEL cell lines. It occurs in the portion of ORF65 that is known to be responsible for a serological response to HHV-8.

  4. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Programming during the Early Stages of Primary Infection of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C.; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Mehta, Devan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The early period of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection involves the dynamic expression of viral genes, which are temporally and epigenetically regulated. KSHV can effectively infect and persist in endothelial as well as human B cells with different gene expression patterns. To understand the temporal epigenetic changes which occur when KSHV infects the lymphocytic compartment, we infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and comprehensively analyzed the changes which occurred at the binding sites of virally encoded lytic as well as latent proteins along with epigenetic modifications across the KSHV genome during early primary infection. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we showed that the KSHV genome acquires a uniquely distinct histone modification pattern of methylation (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3) and acetylation (H3Ac) during de novo infection of human PBMCs. This pattern showed that the epigenetic changes were temporally controlled. The binding profiles of KSHV latent protein LANA and the immediate early proteins RTA and K8 showed specific patterns at different times postinfection, which reflects the gene expression program. Further analysis demonstrated that KSHV can concurrently express lytic and latent genes which were associated with histone modifications at these specific regions on the viral genome. We identified three KSHV genes, K3, ORF49, and ORF64, which exhibited different profiles of histone modifications during the early stages of PBMC infection. These studies established a distinct pattern of epigenetic modification which correlates with viral gene expression temporally regulated during the first 7 days of PBMC infection and provides clues to the regulatory program required for successful infection by KSHV of human PBMCs. PMID:25516617

  5. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  6. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  7. ESCRT-I Protein Tsg101 Plays a Role in the Post-macropinocytic Trafficking and Infection of Endothelial Cells by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) binding to the endothelial cell surface heparan sulfate is followed by sequential interactions with α3β1, αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins and Ephrin A2 receptor tyrosine kinase (EphA2R). These interactions activate host cell pre-existing FAK, Src, PI3-K and RhoGTPase signaling cascades, c-Cbl mediated ubiquitination of receptors, recruitment of CIB1, p130Cas and Crk adaptor molecules, and membrane bleb formation leading to lipid raft dependent macropinocytosis of KSHV into human microvascular dermal endothelial (HMVEC-d) cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT) proteins, ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and–III, play a central role in clathrin-mediated internalized ubiquitinated receptor endosomal trafficking and sorting. ESCRT proteins have also been shown to play roles in viral egress. We have recently shown that ESCRT-0 component Hrs protein associates with the plasma membrane during macropinocytosis and mediates KSHV entry via ROCK1 mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 and local membrane pH change. Here, we demonstrate that the ESCRT-I complex Tsg101 protein also participates in the macropinocytosis of KSHV and plays a role in KSHV trafficking. Knockdown of Tsg101 did not affect virus entry in HMVEC-d and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells but significantly inhibited the KSHV genome entry into the nucleus and consequently viral gene expression in these cells. Double and triple immunofluorescence, proximity ligation immunofluorescence and co-immuoprecipitation studies revealed the association of Tsg101 with the KSHV containing macropinosomes, and increased levels of Tsg101 association/interactions with EphA2R, c-Cbl, p130Cas and Crk signal molecules, as well as with upstream and downstream ESCRT components such as Hrs (ESCRT-0), EAP45 (ESCRT-II), CHMP6 (ESCRT-III) and CHMP5 (ESCRT-III) in the KSHV infected cells. Tsg101 was also associated with early (Rab5) and late endosomal (Rab7) stages of

  8. Ser-634 and Ser-636 of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus RTA are Involved in Transactivation and are Potential Cdk9 Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wan-Hua; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Shu-Yu; Wu, I-Lin; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Lian; Li, Mengtao; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), K-RTA, is a lytic switch protein that moderates the reactivation process of KSHV latency. By mass spectrometric analysis of affinity purified K-RTA, we showed that Thr-513 or Thr-514 was the primary in vivo phosphorylation site. Thr-513 and Thr-514 are proximal to the nuclear localization signal (527KKRK530) and were previously hypothesized to be target sites of Ser/Thr kinase hKFC. However, substitutions of Thr with Ala at 513 and 514 had no effect on K-RTA subcellular localization or transactivation activity. By contrast, replacement of Ser with Ala at Ser-634 and Ser-636 located in a Ser/Pro-rich region of K-RTA, designated as S634A/S636A, produced a polypeptide with ∼10 kDa shorter in molecular weight and reduced transactivation in a luciferase reporter assay relative to the wild type. In contrast to prediction, the decrease in molecular weight was not due to lack of phosphorylation because the overall Ser and Thr phosphorylation state in K-RTA and S634A/S636A were similar, excluding that Ser-634 or Ser-636 motif served as docking sites for consecutive phosphorylation. Interestingly, S634A/S636A lost ∼30% immuno-reactivity to MPM2, an antibody specific to pSer/pThr-Pro motif, indicating that 634SPSP637 motif was in vivo phosphorylated. By in vitro kinase assay, we showed that K-RTA is a substrate of CDK9, a Pro-directed Ser/Thr kinase central to transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the capability of K-RTA in associating with endogenous CDK9 was reduced in S634A/S636A, which suggested that Ser-634 and Ser-636 may be involved in CDK9 recruitment. In agreement, S634A/S636A mutant exhibited ∼25% reduction in KSHV lytic cycle reactivation relative to that by the wild type K-RTA. Taken together, our data propose that Ser-634 and Ser-636 of K-RTA are phosphorylated by host transcriptional kinase CDK9 and such a process contributes to a full

  9. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin.

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus and HIV-1 seroprevalences in prostitutes in Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Grandadam, Marc; Flandre, Philippe; Nicand, Elisabeth; Milliancourt, Catherine; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Philippon, Michel; Teyssou, Remy; Agut, Henri; Dupin, Nicolas; Calvez, Vincent

    2002-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked causally to Kaposi's sarcoma. Epidemiological studies have shown that KSHV transmission can occur during sex among homosexual men, but heterosexual transmission seems to be very rare in KSHV low prevalence countries. A seroepidemiological study was conducted to determine whether KSHV is transmitted sexually between heterosexuals in an endemic country. Sera from 282 subjects of African origin living in Djibouti were tested for antibodies to KSHV and HIV-1. Among the 282 individuals, 43 were female prostitutes working in the streets (group 1), 123 were female prostitutes working in luxury bars (group 2), 41 were non-prostitute females (group 3), and 75 were non-prostitute males (group 4). KSHV seroprevalence was 26, 20, 17, and 36% in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The seroprevalence of KSHV is not different between street or bar prostitutes and non-prostitute females (OR = 1.67; P = 0.34 and OR = 1.18; P = 0.73). These results suggest that in this endemic country commercial sex work does not seem to be a risk factor for KSHV infection and provides evidence against heterosexual transmission of KSHV in the female population studied.

  11. Relationship between human herpesvirus 8 loads and disease stage in classic Kaposi sarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Abada, Rinat; Kra-Oz, Zipi; Sattinger, Judith; Perelman, Alex; Bergman, Reuven; Sarid, Ronit

    2007-04-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus, is causally implicated in all forms of KS, including the classic form. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between HHV-8 load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the stage of the disease in classic KS (CKS) patients. HHV-8 loads were measured in 41 PBMC samples from CKS patients with different Krigel-based classification stages using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Low HHV-8 DNA loads reaching a maximum of 75.5 copies/10(5) cells were detected in 73.2% of the patients. HHV-8 loads in patients with stages I and II were similarly distributed. An increased detection rate of HHV-8 DNA, although not statistically significant, was evident in patients diagnosed with CKS stages III and IV. We conclude that the measurements of HHV-8 load in PBMCs provide a limited correlation with the clinical stage of KS.

  12. Probing the Solution Structure of IκB Kinase (IKK) Subunit γ and Its Interaction with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus Flice-interacting Protein and IKK Subunit β by EPR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Bagnéris, Claire; Rogala, Kacper B.; Baratchian, Mehdi; Zamfir, Vlad; Kunze, Micha B. A.; Dagless, Selina; Pirker, Katharina F.; Collins, Mary K.; Hall, Benjamin A.; Barrett, Tracey E.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Viral flice-interacting protein (vFLIP), encoded by the oncogenic Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), constitutively activates the canonical nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway. This is achieved through subversion of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (or signalosome), which involves a physical interaction between vFLIP and the modulatory subunit IKKγ. Although this interaction has been examined both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism by which vFLIP activates the kinase remains to be determined. Because IKKγ functions as a scaffold, recruiting both vFLIP and the IKKα/β subunits, it has been proposed that binding of vFLIP could trigger a structural rearrangement in IKKγ conducive to activation. To investigate this hypothesis we engineered a series of mutants along the length of the IKKγ molecule that could be individually modified with nitroxide spin labels. Subsequent distance measurements using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy combined with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that IKKγ is a parallel coiled-coil whose response to binding of vFLIP or IKKβ is localized twisting/stiffening and not large-scale rearrangements. The coiled-coil comprises N- and C-terminal regions with distinct registers accommodated by a twist: this structural motif is exploited by vFLIP, allowing it to bind and subsequently activate the NF-κB pathway. In vivo assays confirm that NF-κB activation by vFLIP only requires the N-terminal region up to the transition between the registers, which is located directly C-terminal of the vFLIP binding site. PMID:25979343

  13. Probing the Solution Structure of IκB Kinase (IKK) Subunit γ and Its Interaction with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus Flice-interacting Protein and IKK Subunit β by EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Rogala, Kacper B; Baratchian, Mehdi; Zamfir, Vlad; Kunze, Micha B A; Dagless, Selina; Pirker, Katharina F; Collins, Mary K; Hall, Benjamin A; Barrett, Tracey E; Kay, Christopher W M

    2015-07-03

    Viral flice-interacting protein (vFLIP), encoded by the oncogenic Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), constitutively activates the canonical nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway. This is achieved through subversion of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (or signalosome), which involves a physical interaction between vFLIP and the modulatory subunit IKKγ. Although this interaction has been examined both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism by which vFLIP activates the kinase remains to be determined. Because IKKγ functions as a scaffold, recruiting both vFLIP and the IKKα/β subunits, it has been proposed that binding of vFLIP could trigger a structural rearrangement in IKKγ conducive to activation. To investigate this hypothesis we engineered a series of mutants along the length of the IKKγ molecule that could be individually modified with nitroxide spin labels. Subsequent distance measurements using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy combined with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that IKKγ is a parallel coiled-coil whose response to binding of vFLIP or IKKβ is localized twisting/stiffening and not large-scale rearrangements. The coiled-coil comprises N- and C-terminal regions with distinct registers accommodated by a twist: this structural motif is exploited by vFLIP, allowing it to bind and subsequently activate the NF-κB pathway. In vivo assays confirm that NF-κB activation by vFLIP only requires the N-terminal region up to the transition between the registers, which is located directly C-terminal of the vFLIP binding site.

  14. Risk Factors for Seropositivity to Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus Among Children in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Emily L.; Sebina, Ismail; Nalwoga, Angela; Muhangi, Lawrence; Miley, Wendell; Johnston, W. Thomas; Ndibazza, Juliet; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert; Elliott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Determinants of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) seropositivity among children living in sub-Saharan African populations where infection is endemic are not well understood. Local environmental factors, including other infectious agents, may be key. Methods: Within the context of a well-characterized birth cohort, we examined associations between various factors and antibodies against KSHV, measured in stored plasma samples from 1823 mother–child pairs in Entebbe, Uganda. Results: Seroprevalence increased with increasing age of the child (P = 0.0003) and was higher among those with KSHV seropositive mothers than in those without (12% vs 9%; odds ratio: 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.0). It was also higher among children with HIV infection (29% vs 10%; odds ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 8.3) or malaria parasitemia (30% vs 10%; odds ratio: 4.1, 95% confidence interval: 2.4 to 7.0) than in children without. These associations were not explained by socioeconomic status. Conclusions: The finding that KSHV serostatus is associated with malaria parasitemia in children is novel. In a country endemic for KSHV, malaria may be a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation among children. PMID:23403859

  15. Kaposi sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... between HIV, a weakened immune system, and the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). Kaposi sarcoma has been linked to the spread of HIV and HHV-8 through sexual activity. People who have kidney or other organ transplants are also at risk for Kaposi sarcoma. ...

  16. The latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus induces B cell hyperplasia and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Farnaz D.; Jeong, Joseph H.; Kanan, Yogita; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human lymphotropic herpesvirus. It is implicated in B cell neoplasias such as primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease in AIDS patients. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is consistently expressed in all KSHV-associated tumor cells and was shown to bind the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and pRb. To test LANA’s contribution to lymphomagenesis in vivo we generated transgenic mice expressing LANA under the control of its own promoter, which is B cell specific. All of the transgenic mice developed splenic follicular hyperplasia due to an expansion of IgM+IgD+ B cells and showed increased germinal center formation. We also observed lymphomas, implying that LANA can activate B cells and provide the first step toward lymphomagenesis. PMID:16498502

  17. Seroprevalence of Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Shoja, Zabihollah; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Nategh, Rakhshandeh; Gharehbaghian, Ahmad

    2011-04-28

    Seroepidemiological surveys show that the prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection mostly varies in various geographical areas and reflects the local incidence of classic and endemic KS, being widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean countries and uncommon in the USA and Northern Europe. In the Middle East only few populations, such as Ashkenazi and Sephardic groups in Israel, have been adequately evaluated for HHV-8 seroprevalence. Among Iranian population a striking higher seroprevalence of HHV8 has been reported among haemodialysis (16.9%), renal transplant recipients (25%) and HIV (45.7%) patients compared to blood donors (2%). Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the rarest cancer in Iran, with an annual age-standardized incidence varying from 0.10 to 0.17 per 100,000 in males and from 0.06 to 0.08 per 100,000 in females. KS, however, is one of the most important malignancies in Iranian renal transplanted patients affecting up to 2.4% of organ recipients. The epidemiology of HHV8 and KS in Iran needs further evaluation. While the high prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in HIV positive and haemodialysis individuals may be attributed to high-risk sexual behavior and polytransfusions, respectively, unknown determinants may be responsible for high seroprevalence of HHV8 and high incidence of KS in solid organ recipients. A global survey on HHV8 seroprevalence in Iran is mandatory to define co-factors associated with HHV8 infection and KS risk in the general Iranian population and in specific patient groups.

  18. Seroprevalence of Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seroepidemiological surveys show that the prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection mostly varies in various geographical areas and reflects the local incidence of classic and endemic KS, being widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean countries and uncommon in the USA and Northern Europe. In the Middle East only few populations, such as Ashkenazi and Sephardic groups in Israel, have been adequately evaluated for HHV-8 seroprevalence. Among Iranian population a striking higher seroprevalence of HHV8 has been reported among haemodialysis (16.9%), renal transplant recipients (25%) and HIV (45.7%) patients compared to blood donors (2%). Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the rarest cancer in Iran, with an annual age-standardized incidence varying from 0.10 to 0.17 per 100,000 in males and from 0.06 to 0.08 per 100,000 in females. KS, however, is one of the most important malignancies in Iranian renal transplanted patients affecting up to 2.4% of organ recipients. The epidemiology of HHV8 and KS in Iran needs further evaluation. While the high prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in HIV positive and haemodialysis individuals may be attributed to high-risk sexual behavior and polytransfusions, respectively, unknown determinants may be responsible for high seroprevalence of HHV8 and high incidence of KS in solid organ recipients. A global survey on HHV8 seroprevalence in Iran is mandatory to define co-factors associated with HHV8 infection and KS risk in the general Iranian population and in specific patient groups. PMID:21527020

  19. Serologic association of human herpesvirus eight with posttransplant Kaposi's sarcoma in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Qunibi, W; Al-Furayh, O; Almeshari, K; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Ross, D; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1998-02-27

    In Saudi Arabia, Kaposi's sarcoma occurs in 4.1% of renal transplant recipients and accounts for 70% of malignancies in this group. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) has been identified in the DNA of many of these patients. The association between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma was investigated further in post-renal transplant Kaposi's sarcoma patients from a tertiary care hospital (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (n = 14), and non-Kaposi's sarcoma controls with renal transplant (n = 18), chronic renal failure (n = 14), other cancers that did not affect renal function (n = 15), and healthy volunteers (n = 15). The median time from transplant to Kaposi's sarcoma was 13 months. A serum sample was assumed to have antibodies to HHV8 if antibody to either p40 or sVCA was detected. The prevalence of HHV8 seroreactivity was 13/14 (93%) in cases, 5/18 (28%) in renal transplants without Kaposi's sarcoma, and 11/62 (18%) in the aggregate control group. HHV8 seroreactivity was significantly more common (p 0.001) among transplant patients with Kaposi's sarcoma than those without this cancer (odds ratio, 33.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.96-904). These findings suggest an etiologic link between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma presumably due to immunologic or cellular factors that influence host-virus interactions.

  20. High prevalence of antibodies to human herpesvirus 8 in relatives of patients with classic Kaposi's sarcoma from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, A; Heston, L; Uccini, S; Sirianni, M C; Cottoni, F; Masala, M V; Cerimele, D; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Rigsby, M; Faggioni, A; Miller, G

    1998-06-01

    A survey for antibodies to a recombinant small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) was conducted in Sardinia, one of the world's highest incidence areas for classic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Prevalence of antibodies to HHV-8 sVCA was greatest in patients with KS (95%), followed by family members (39%) and a Sardinian control population age- and sex-matched to the relatives (11%). Within families, prevalence of antibodies was about equal among spouses, children, and siblings of KS patients, a finding that raises the possibilities of intrafamilial person-to-person or vertical transmission. Antibodies were detected 2-3 times more frequently in males than in females. The data show that prevalence of antibodies to HHV-8 sVCA correlates with the distribution of classic KS in a high- incidence area. Clustering of seroprevalence within some families suggests the presence of familial risk factors for active HHV-8 infection.

  1. Fine-Tuning of the Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Life Cycle in Neighboring Cells through the RTA-JAG1-Notch Pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiheng; Liang, Deguang; Sun, Rui; Lan, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic pathogen that displays latent and lytic life cycles. In KS lesions, infiltrated immune cells, secreted viral and/or cellular cytokines, and hypoxia orchestrate a chronic pro-lytic microenvironment that can promote KSHV reactivation. However, only a small subset of viruses spontaneously undergoes lytic replication in this pro-lytic microenvironment while the majority remains in latency. Here, we show that the expression of the Notch ligand JAG1 is induced by KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA) during reactivation. JAG1 up-regulation activates Notch signaling in neighboring cells and prevents viral lytic replication. The suppression of JAG1 and Notch1 with inhibitors or small interfering RNA promotes lytic replication in the presence of RTA induction or under conditions of hypoxia. The underlying mechanism involves the Notch downstream effector hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), which directly binds lytic gene promoters and attenuates viral lytic gene expression. RTA interacts with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1), disrupts LEF1/Groucho/TLE suppressive complexes and releases LEF1 to activate JAG1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that cells with viral lytic replication can inhibit KSHV reactivation in neighboring cells through an RTA-JAG1-Notch pathway. These data provide insight into the mechanism by which the virus maintains the balance between lytic and latent infection in the pro-lytic tumor microenvironment. PMID:27760204

  2. Requirement of UAP56, URH49, RBM15, and OTT3 in the expression of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57

    SciTech Connect

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Deng, Merlyn; Zheng Zhiming

    2010-11-25

    Transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is mediated by cellular RNA export factors. In this report, we examined how RNA export factors UAP56 and URH49, and RNA export cofactors RBM15 and OTT3, function in modulating KSHV ORF57 expression. We found that knockdown of each factor by RNAi led to decreased ORF57 expression. Specifically, reduced expression of either UAP56 or RBM15 led to nuclear export deficiency of ORF57 RNA. In the context of the KSHV genome, the near absence of UAP56 or RBM15 reduced the expression of both ORF57 and ORF59 (an RNA target of ORF57), but not ORF50. Collectively, our data indicate that the expression of KSHV ORF57 is regulated by cellular RNA export factors and cofactors at the posttranscriptional level.

  3. Herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed Central

    Fickenscher, H; Fleckenstein, B

    2001-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (saimiriine herpesvirus 2) is the classical prototype of the gamma(2)-herpesviruses or rhadinoviruses, which also contains a human member, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The T-lymphotropic Herpesvirus saimiri establishes specific replicative and persistent conditions in different primate host species. Virtually all squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) are persistently infected with this virus. In its natural host, the virus does not cause disease, whereas it induces fatal acute T-cell lymphoma in other monkey species after experimental infection. The virus can be isolated by cocultivation of permissive epithelial cells with peripheral blood cells from naturally infected squirrel monkeys and from susceptible New World monkeys during the virus-induced disease. Tumour-derived and in vitro-transformed T-cell lines from New World monkeys release virus particles. Herpesvirus ateles is a closely related virus of spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) and has similar pathogenic properties to Herpesvirus saimiri in other New World primate species. Similar to other rhadinoviruses, the genome of Herpesvirus saimiri harbours a series of virus genes with pronounced homology to cellular counterparts including a D-type cyclin, a G-protein-coupled receptor, an interleukin-17, a superantigen homologue, and several inhibitors of the complement cascade and of different apoptosis pathways. Preserved function has been demonstrated for most of the homologues of cellular proteins. These viral functions are mostly dispensable for the transforming and pathogenic capability of the virus. However, they are considered relevant for the apathogenic persistence of Herpesvirus saimiri in its natural host. A terminal region of the non-repetitive coding part of the virus genome is essential for pathogenicity and T-cell transformation. Based on the pathogenic phenotypes and the different alleles of this variable region, the virus strains have been assigned to three subgroups

  4. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  5. Immune escape of γ-herpesviruses from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuting; Usherwood, Edward J

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two γ-herpesviruses identified in humans and are strongly associated with the development of malignancies. Murine γ-herpesvirus (MHV-68) is a naturally occurring rodent pathogen, representing a unique experimental model for dissecting γ-herpesvirus infection and the immune response. These γ-herpesviruses actively antagonize the innate and adaptive antiviral responses, thereby efficiently establishing latent or persistent infections and even promoting development of malignancies. In this review, we summarize immune evasion strategies of γ-herpesviruses. These include suppression of MHC-I-restricted and MHC-II-restricted antigen presentation, impairment of dendritic cell functions, downregulation of costimulatory molecules, activation of virus-specific regulatory T cells, and induction of inhibitory cytokines. There is a focus on how both γ-herpesvirus-derived and host-derived immunomodulators interfere with adaptive antiviral immunity. Understanding immune-evasive mechanisms is essential for developing future immunotherapies against EBV-driven and KSHV-driven tumors.

  6. Cytoplasmic isoforms of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA recruit and antagonize the innate immune DNA sensor cGAS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guigen; Chan, Baca; Samarina, Naira; Abere, Bizunesh; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Buch, Anna; Pich, Andreas; Brinkmann, Melanie M.; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is mainly localized and functions in the nucleus of latently infected cells, playing a pivotal role in the replication and maintenance of latent viral episomal DNA. In addition, N-terminally truncated cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA, resulting from internal translation initiation, have been reported, but their function is unknown. Using coimmunoprecipitation and MS, we found the cGMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), an innate immune DNA sensor, to be a cellular interaction partner of cytoplasmic LANA isoforms. By directly binding to cGAS, LANA, and particularly, a cytoplasmic isoform, inhibit the cGAS-STING–dependent phosphorylation of TBK1 and IRF3 and thereby antagonize the cGAS-mediated restriction of KSHV lytic replication. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic forms of LANA, whose expression increases during lytic replication, inhibit cGAS to promote the reactivation of the KSHV from latency. This observation points to a novel function of the cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA during lytic replication and extends the function of LANA from its role during latency to the lytic replication cycle. PMID:26811480

  7. Two Distinct Gamma-2 Herpesviruses in African Green Monkeys: a Second Gamma-2 Herpesvirus Lineage among Old World Primates?

    PubMed Central

    Greensill, Julie; Sheldon, Julie A.; Renwick, Neil M.; Beer, Brigitte E.; Norley, Steve; Goudsmit, Jaap; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2000-01-01

    Primate gamma-2 herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses) have so far been found in humans (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV], also called human herpesvirus 8), macaques (Macaca spp.) (rhesus rhadinovirus [RRV] and retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus [RFHV]), squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) (herpesvirus saimiri), and spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) (herpesvirus ateles). Using serological screening and degenerate consensus primer PCR for the viral DNA polymerase gene, we have detected sequences from two distinct gamma-2 herpesviruses, termed Chlorocebus rhadinovirus 1 (ChRV1) and ChRV2, in African green monkeys. ChRV1 is more closely related to KSHV and RFHV, whereas ChRV2 is closest to RRV. Our findings suggest the existence of two distinct rhadinovirus lineages, represented by the KSHV/RFHV/ChRV1 group and the RRV/ChRV2 group, respectively, in at least two Old World monkey species. Antibodies to members of the RRV/ChRV2 lineage may cross-react in an immunofluorescence assay for early and late KSHV antigens. PMID:10627572

  8. What Is Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endemic KS occurs in people living in Equatorial Africa and is sometimes called African KS . KSHV (Kaposi ... associated herpesvirus) infection is much more common in Africa than in other parts of the world, so ...

  9. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

    PubMed

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140).

  10. Human herpesvirus-8 infection and Kaposi's sarcoma after liver and kidney transplantation in different geographical areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Astudillo, Luis Alfonso; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2006-12-01

    Since data on human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection in Spain is not available, our purpose was to determine the prevalence of HHV-8 infection and the risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) among organ transplant recipients in different geographical areas of Spain. The study population consisted of 1019 liver and kidney transplant recipients recruited in four transplant units in Spain. Only post-transplant serum samples were available for all participants. IgG anti-HHV-8 latent and lytic antigens were detected by using an indirect immunofluorescence assay as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. In available samples, HHV-8 DNA genome was detected by using a nested polymerase chain reaction in sera, blood mononuclear cells and KS tissues. The prevalence of HHV-8 infection after transplantation was calculated. To determine risk factors for infection, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were also calculated. Of the 788 kidney transplants, 5 (0.6%) were HHV-8-positive shortly after transplantation. Of the 231 liver transplant individuals, 8 (3.4%) developed IgG anti-HHV-8 antibodies after transplantation. Thus, incidence of HHV-8 infection is significantly higher among liver transplant recipients in comparison with that in the control population (OR=6, 95% CI=1.2-28.5, p<0.05). In this series, HHV-8 prevalence in liver transplant recipients was higher in the northern (6.6-6.9%) than in the central (2.9%) or the southeastern (1.4%) areas of Spain. Four renal transplant recipients (0.5%) and five of the liver transplant recipients (2.16%) developed KS after transplantation. Time of KS diagnosis after transplant is significantly higher in kidney transplant patients (33.7 months) than in liver transplant recipients (10.4 months), indicating that the latter have a higher risk of developing KS.

  11. Human and viral interleukin-6 and other cytokines in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wang, Victoria; Aleman, Karen; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; O’Mahony, Deirdre; Whitby, Denise; Tosato, Giovanna; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a polyclonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Human (h) IL-6 and a KSHV-encoded homolog, viral IL-6, have been hypothesized to contribute to its pathogenesis, but their relative contributions to disease activity is not well understood. We prospectively characterized KSHV viral load (VL), viral (v) and hIL-6, and other cytokines during KSHV-MCD flare and remission in 21 patients with 34 flares and 20 remissions. KSHV-VL, vIL-6, hIL-6, IL-10, and to a lesser extent TNF-α, and IL-1β were each elevated during initial flares compared with remission. Flares fell into 3 distinct IL-6 profiles: those associated with elevations of vIL6-only (2 flares, 6%), hIL-6 elevations only (17 flares, 50%), and elevations in both hIL-6 and vIL-6 (13 flares, 38%). Compared with hIL-6–only flares, flares with elevated hIL-6 plus vIL-6 exhibited higher C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = .0009); worse hyponatremia (P = .02); higher KSHV VL (P = .016), and higher IL-10 (P = .012). This analysis shows vIL-6 and hIL-6 can independently or together lead to KSHV-MCD flares, and suggests that vIL-6 and hIL-6 may jointly contribute to disease severity. These findings have implications for the development of novel KSHV-MCD therapies targeting IL-6 and its downstream signaling. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT099073. PMID:24174627

  12. Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Radu, Oana; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade vascular tumor associated with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8) infection. Kaposi sarcoma lesions predominantly present at mucocutaneous sites, but may involve all organs and anatomic locations. Recognized epidemiologic-clinical forms of KS include classic, African (endemic), AIDS-associated (epidemic), and iatrogenic KS. New clinical manifestations have been described, such as antiretroviral therapy-related KS regression or flares. Kaposi sarcoma lesions evolve from early (patch stage) macules into plaques (plaque stage) that grow into larger nodules (tumor stage). Newer histologic variants include anaplastic, hyperkeratotic, lymphangioma-like, bullous, telangiectatic, ecchymotic, keloidal, pyogenic granuloma-like, micronodular, intravascular, glomeruloid and pigmented KS, as well as KS with sarcoidlike granulomas and KS with myoid nodules. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (HHV8) is the most specific immunohistochemical marker available to help distinguish KS from its mimics. Since KS remains one of the most common AIDS-defining malignancies, it is important that pathologists be able to recognize KS and its contemporary manifestations.

  13. Impact of HIV Infection and Kaposi Sarcoma on Human Herpesvirus-8 Mucosal Replication and Dissemination in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christine; Orem, Jackson; Okuku, Fred; Kalinaki, Mary; Saracino, Misty; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward; Ronald, Allan; McAdam, Keith; Huang, Meei-Li; Drolette, Linda; Selke, Stacy; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the leading cause of cancer in Uganda and occurs in people with and without HIV. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) replication is important both in transmission of HHV-8 and progression to KS. We characterized the sites and frequency of HHV-8 detection in Ugandans with and without HIV and KS. Methods Participants were enrolled into one of four groups on the basis of HIV and KS status (HIV negative/KS negative, HIV positive/KS negative, HIV negative/KS positive, and HIV positive/KS positive). Participants collected oral swabs daily and clinicians collected oral swabs, anogenital swabs, and plasma samples weekly over 4 weeks. HHV-8 DNA at each site was quantified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results 78 participants collected a total of 2063 orals swabs and 358 plasma samples. Of these, 428 (21%) oral swabs and 96 (27%) plasma samples had detectable HHV-8 DNA. HHV-8 was detected more frequently in both the oropharynx of persons with KS (24 (57%) of 42 persons with KS vs. 8 (22%) of 36 persons without, p = 0.002) and the peripheral blood (30 (71%) of 42 persons with KS vs. 8 (22%) of 36 persons without, p<0.001). In a multivariate model, HHV-8 viremia was more frequent among men (IRR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.7–6.2, p<0.001), persons with KS (IRR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.7–9.0, p = 0.001) and persons with HIV infection (IRR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.0–2.7, p = 0.03). Importantly, oral HHV-8 detection predicted the subsequent HHV-8 viremia. HHV-8 viremia was significantly more common when HHV-8 DNA was detected from the oropharynx during the week prior than when oral HHV-8 was not detected (RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.8–5.9 p<0.001). Genital HHV-8 detection was rare (9 (3%) of 272 swabs). Conclusions HHV-8 detection is frequent in the oropharynx and peripheral blood of Ugandans with endemic and epidemic KS. Replication at these sites is highly correlated, and viremia is increased in men and those with HIV. The

  14. A gamma-2 herpesvirus nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein interacts with importin alpha 1 and alpha 5.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, D J; Whitehouse, A

    2001-06-08

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is the prototype gamma-2 herpesvirus. This is an increasing important subfamily of herpesviruses due to the identification of the first human gamma-2 herpesvirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The HVS open reading frame (ORF) 57 protein is a multifunctional trans-regulatory protein homologous to genes identified in all classes of herpesviruses. Recent analysis has demonstrated that ORF 57 has the ability to bind viral RNA and to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and is required for efficient nuclear export of viral transcripts. Here we have investigated the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mechanism utilized by the ORF 57 protein. The yeast two-hybrid system was employed to identify interacting cellular proteins using ORF 57 as bait. We demonstrate that ORF 57 interacts with importin alpha isoforms 1 and 5. In addition, the binding of ORF 57 to importin alpha was mediated by the importin alpha hydrophobic internal armadillo repeats. An ORF 57 amino-terminal arginine-rich sequence, which functions as a nuclear localization sequence, was also required for this interaction. Furthermore, the ORF 57 protein is responsible for the redistribution of importin alpha into the nucleoli. These results identify novel cellular interactions essential for the functioning of this important herpesvirus regulatory protein.

  15. Sequence Analysis of Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) MicroRNAs in Patients with Multicentric Castleman Disease and KSHV-Associated Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Alex; Marshall, Vickie; Uldrick, Thomas; Leighty, Robert; Labo, Nazzarena; Wyvill, Kathy; Aleman, Karen; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert; Whitby, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs that yield 25 mature microRNAs. We previously reported phylogenetic analysis of the microRNA-coding region of KSHV from Kaposi sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) patients. We observed a high level of conservation for most sequences but also a divergent cluster of 5 KSHV sequences, including 2 from MCD patients. Methods KSHV microRNA sequences from 23 MCD patients and 7 patients with a newly described KSHV-associated inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) were examined by amplification, cloning, and sequencing of a 646-bp fragment of K12/T0.7 encoding microRNA-K12-10 and microRNA-K12-12 and a 2.8-kbp fragment containing the remaining 10 pre-microRNAs. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed a distinct variant cluster consisting exclusively of MCD and KICS patients in all trees. Pearson χ2 analysis revealed that 40 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at various loci were significantly associated with MCD and KICS risk. Cluster analysis of these SNPs generated several combinations of 3 SNPs as putative indicators of MCD and KICS risk. Conclusions These findings show that MCD and KICS patients frequently have unusual KSHV microRNA sequences and suggest an association between the observed sequence variation and risk of MCD and KICS. PMID:22448005

  16. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a transcription strategy for late genes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zoe H; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D; Krogan, Nevan J; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-01-22

    Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers, and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle.

  17. Kaposi sarcoma: review and medical management update.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved, the true nature of Kaposi sarcoma remains an enigma. Four clinical variants have been described for the disease, differing in natural history, site of predilection, and prognosis. All forms of Kaposi sarcoma may manifest in the oral cavity and Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus appears essential to development of all clinical variants. The spectrum of therapeutic strategies is broad and selection of appropriate intervention mandates a thorough understanding of disease spread and the patient's symptomatology, as well as risks and benefits of therapy. This article provides an overview of epidemiology, subtypes, clinical course, pathogenesis, and management strategies for Kaposi sarcoma.

  18. Mycosis fungoides and Kaposi’s sarcoma association in an HIV-negative patient*

    PubMed Central

    Bariani, Maria Carolina Prado Fleury; Fleury Júnior, Luiz Fernando Fróes; Ribeiro, Ana Maria Quinteiro; Carneiro, Siderley de Souza; Pereira, Tiago Arantes

    2016-01-01

    The association of mycosis fungoides and kaposi’s sarcoma in HIV-negative patients is a rare phenomenon. The presence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) – associated with all forms of Kaposi’s sarcoma – has also been recently identified in mycosis fungoides lesions. However, a causal association between HHV-8 and the onset of mycosis fungoides has not been established yet. The present case reports a patient who developed Kaposi’s sarcoma lesions after a two-year UVB phototherapy to treat a mycosis fungoides. Negative immunohistochemistry staining for Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in the initial mycosis fungoides lesions strengthens the absence of a link between Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and mycosis fungoides. Immunosuppression caused by the lymphoma and prolonged phototherapy were probably the contribut ing factors for the onset of Kaposi’s sarcoma. PMID:28300912

  19. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3–RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing. PMID:25234929

  20. High-dose zidovudine plus valganciclovir for Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease: a pilot study of virus-activated cytotoxic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Aleman, Karen; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Wang, Victoria; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; Steinberg, Seth M.; Tosato, Giovanna; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)–associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder most commonly observed in HIV-infected patients. It is characterized by KSHV-infected plasmablasts that frequently express lytic genes. Patients manifest inflammatory symptoms attributed to overproduction of KSHV viral IL-6, human IL-6, and human IL-6. There is no standard therapy and no established response criteria. We investigated an approach targeting 2 KSHV lytic genes, ORF36 and ORF21, the protein of which, respectively, phosphorylate ganciclovir and zidovudine to toxic moieties. In a pilot study, 14 HIV-infected patients with symptomatic KSHV-MCD received high-dose zidovudine (600 mg orally every 6 hours) and the oral prodrug, valganciclovir (900 mg orally every 12 hours). Responses were evaluated using new response criteria. A total of 86% of patients attained major clinical responses and 50% attained major biochemical responses. Median progression-free survival was 6 months. With 43 months of median follow-up, overall survival was 86% at 12 months and beyond. At the time of best response, the patients showed significant improvements in C-reactive protein, albumin, platelets, human IL-6, IL-10, and KSHV viral load. The most common toxicities were hematologic. These observations provide evidence that therapy designed to target cells with lytic KSHV replication has activity in KSHV-MCD. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00099073. PMID:21487108

  1. Host entry by gamma-herpesviruses--lessons from animal viruses?

    PubMed

    Gillet, Laurent; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-12-01

    The oncogenicity of gamma-herpesviruses (γHVs) motivates efforts to control them and their persistence makes early events key targets for intervention. Human γHVs are often assumed to enter naive hosts orally and infect B cells directly. However, neither assumption is supported by direct evidence, and vaccination with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gp350, to block virion binding to B cells, failed to reduce infection rates. Thus, there is a need to re-evaluate assumptions about γHV host entry. Given the difficulty of analysing early human infections, potentially much can be learned from animal models. Genomic comparisons argue that γHVs colonized mammals long before humans speciation, and so that human γHVs are unlikely to differ dramatically in behaviour from those of other mammals. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), which like EBV and the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) persists in memory B cells, enters new hosts via olfactory neurons and exploits myeloid cells to spread. Integrating these data with existing knowledge of human and veterinary γHVs suggests a new model of host entry, with potentially important implications for infection control.

  2. Three-Dimensional Structure of the Human Herpesvirus 8 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijun; Lo, Pierrette; Yu, Xuekui; Stoops, James K.; Forghani, B.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2000-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a gammaherpesvirus implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphomas. HHV-8 has been extensively characterized, both biochemically and immunologically, since its first description in 1994. However, its three-dimensional (3D) structure remained heretofore undetermined largely due to difficulties in viral purification. We have used log-phase cultures of body cavity-based lymphoma 1 cells induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to obtain HHV-8 capsids for electron cryomicroscopy and computer reconstruction. The 3D structure of the HHV-8 capsids revealed a capsid shell composed of 12 pentons, 150 hexons, and 320 triplexes arranged on a T=16 icosahedral lattice. This structure is similar to those of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which are prototypical members of alpha- and betaherpesviruses, respectively. The inner radius of the HHV-8 capsid is identical to that of the HSV-1 capsid but is smaller than that of the HCMV capsid, which is consistent with the relative sizes of the genomes they enclose. While the HHV-8 capsid exhibits many structural similarities to the HSV-1 capsid, our reconstruction shows two major differences: its hexons lack the “horn-shaped” VP26 densities bound to the HSV-1 hexon subunits, and the HHV-8 triplexes appear smaller and less elongated than those of HSV-1. These differences are in excellent agreement with our sequence comparisons of HHV-8 and HSV-1 capsid proteins. This gammaherpesvirus capsid structure complements previous structural studies on alpha- and betaherpesviruses in providing an account of structural similarities and differences among capsids representing all human herpesvirus subfamilies. PMID:11000237

  3. Vitamin D analogue TX 527 down-regulates the NF-κB pathway and controls the proliferation of endothelial cells transformed by Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    González-Pardo, V; Verstuyf, A; Boland, R; Russo de Boland, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus GPCR (vGPCR) is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of KS, where it increases NF-κB gene expression and activates the NF-κB pathway. We investigated whether the less calcemic vitamin D analogue TX 527 inhibited the proliferation of endothelial cells transformed by vGPCR by modulation of the NF-κB pathway. Experimental Approach Endothelial cells transformed by vGPCR (SVEC-vGPCR) were treated with TX 527. Proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) and cell cycle by flow cytometry. mRNA and protein levels were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis respectively. Key Results TX 527, similar to bortezomib (0.5 nM), a proteasome inhibitor that inhibits the activation of NF-κB, reduced proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in SVEC-vGPCR. TX 527 like 1α,25(OH)2D3, biological active form of vitamin D, decreased the activity of NF-κB comparable with the effect of bortezomib. Time-response studies showed that TX 527 significantly decreased NF-κB and increased IκBα mRNA and protein levels. The increase of IκBα was accompanied by a reduction in p65/NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. These responses were abolished when vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression was suppressed by stable transfection of shRNA against VDR. In parallel with NF-κB inhibition, there was a down-regulation of inflammatory genes such as IL-6, CCL2/MCP and CCL20/MIP3α. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that the anti-proliferative effects of the vitamin D analogue TX 527 in SVEC-vGPCR occur by modulation of the NF-κB pathway and are VDR dependent. PMID:23647513

  4. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in skin lesions of classic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mirna; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), which allows them to provide anti-viral resistance and to link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. pDCs are involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious [especially viral, such as Molluscum contagiosum (MC)], inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, systemic lympho-angioproliferative tumor associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Microscopy typically exhibits a chronic inflammatory lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in addition to the vascular changes and spindle cell proliferation. Despite the extensive research done on the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV, pDCs role in relation to KS has only rarely been investigated. Given this, we intend to investigate pDC occurrence and activity in the skin lesions of KS. Immunohistochemical staining for BDCA-2 (specific pDC marker) and MxA (surrogate marker for local type I IFN production) was performed on classic KS (n = 20) with the control group comprising inflamed MC (n = 20). As expected, BDCA-2+ pDCs were present in abundance with diffuse and intense MxA expression (indicative of local type I IFN production) in all inflamed MC cases (20 of 20, 100 %). Though present in all the KS cases, pDCs were significantly less abundant in KS than in inflamed MC cases, and MxA expression was patchy/weak in most KS cases. In summary, pDCs are part of the inflammatory host response in KS; however, they were generally low in number with decreased type I IFN production which is probably related to KSHV's ability to evade the immune system through the production of different viral proteins capable of suppressing IFN production as well as pDC function.

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma following immune suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Dion, Louise; Beauchesne, Claude; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur

    2003-03-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma and infection with human herpesvirus 8 is now well recognized. Immunologic impairment is associated with 2 forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, epidemic [associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] and iatrogenic (associated with immunosuppressive treatment); both forms have become more common during the last decade. We describe an HIV negative 54-year-old man who developed Kaposi's sarcoma 2 months after the beginning of immuno-suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). With tapering of medication, complete remission of Kaposi's sarcoma was achieved in one year. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with WG.

  6. Pomalidomide for Symptomatic Kaposi's Sarcoma in People With and Without HIV Infection: A Phase I/II Study.

    PubMed

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Wyvill, Kathleen M; Aleman, Karen; Peer, Cody J; Bevans, Margaret; Sereti, Irini; Maldarelli, Frank; Whitby, Denise; Marshall, Vickie; Goncalves, Priscila H; Khetani, Vikram; Figg, William D; Steinberg, Seth M; Zeldis, Jerome B; Yarchoan, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric tumor caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Unmet needs include therapies that are oral, anthracycline sparing, and deliverable in resource-limited settings. We evaluated pomalidomide, an oral immune modulatory agent, in patients with symptomatic KS. Methods The primary objectives were to assess tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and activity. Initial dosage level was 5 mg once per day for 21 days per 28-day cycle, with a de-escalated level of 3 mg if not tolerable, and aspirin 81 mg once per day thromboprophylaxis. HIV-infected patients required controlled viremia with either persistent KS despite 3 months of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or progressive KS despite 2 months of ART. Evaluations included tumor response and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Results Twenty-two patients were treated; 15 (68%) were HIV infected, 17 (77%) had advanced (T1) disease, and 19 (86%) previous KS therapy excluding ART. All were treated with 5 mg because no dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Over 156 cycles, the grade 3/4 adverse events possibly attributable to therapy were neutropenia (23 cycles, 10 patients), infection (1 cycle), and edema (1 cycle). Sixteen patients responded (73%; 95% CI, 50% to 89%): nine of 15 HIV-infected patients (60%; 95% CI, 32% to 84%) and all seven HIV-uninfected patients (100%; 95% CI, 59% to 100%). Median time to response was 4 weeks (range, 4 to 36 weeks). HRQL showed no impairment during therapy and improved satisfaction with appearance at end therapy ( P = .03). Significant increases in CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were seen in patients with and without HIV, together with a transient increase in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral load at week 4 ( P = .05). Conclusion Pomalidomide is well tolerated and active in KS regardless of HIV status. Responses were rapid, with improved self-reported outcomes, and occurred in advanced and heavily pretreated disease. Correlative studies

  7. Oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV Hijacks BMP-Smad1-Id signaling to promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Deguang; Hu, Hao; Li, Shasha; Dong, Jiazhen; Wang, Xing; Wang, Yuhan; He, Li; He, Zhiheng; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Lan, Ke

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a malignancy commonly found in AIDS patients. Whether KS is a true neoplasm or hyperplasia has been a subject of intensive debate until recently when KSHV is unequivocally shown to efficiently infect, immortalize and transform rat primary mesenchymal precursor cells (MM). Moreover, KSHV-transformed MM cells (KMM) efficiently induce tumors with hallmark features of KS when inoculated into nude mice. Here, we showed Smad1 as a novel binding protein of KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA interacted with and sustained BMP-activated p-Smad1 in the nucleus and enhanced its loading on the Id promoters. As a result, Ids were significantly up-regulated in KMM cells and abundantly expressed in human KS lesions. Strikingly, genetic and chemical inhibition of the BMP-Smad1-Id pathway blocked the oncogenic phenotype of KSHV-transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which a tumor virus hijacks and converts a developmental pathway into an indispensable oncogenic pathway for tumorigenesis. Importantly, our results demonstrate the efficacy of targeting the BMP-Smad1-Id pathway for inhibiting the growth of KSHV-induced tumors, and therefore identify the BMP pathway as a promising therapeutic target for KS.

  8. The First Endogenous Herpesvirus, Identified in the Tarsier Genome, and Novel Sequences from Primate Rhadinoviruses and Lymphocryptoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a diverse family of large and complex pathogens whose genomes are extremely difficult to sequence. This is particularly true for clinical samples, and if the virus, host, or both genomes are being sequenced for the first time. Although herpesviruses are known to occasionally integrate in host genomes, and can also be inherited in a Mendelian fashion, they are notably absent from the genomic fossil record comprised of endogenous viral elements (EVEs). Here, we combine paleovirological and metagenomic approaches to both explore the constituent viral diversity of mammalian genomes and search for endogenous herpesviruses. We describe the first endogenous herpesvirus from the genome of the Philippine tarsier, belonging to the Roseolovirus genus, and characterize its highly defective genome that is integrated and flanked by unambiguous host DNA. From a draft assembly of the aye-aye genome, we use bioinformatic tools to reveal over 100,000 bp of a novel rhadinovirus that is the first lemur gammaherpesvirus, closely related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus. We also identify 58 genes of Pan paniscus lymphocryptovirus 1, the bonobo equivalent of human Epstein-Barr virus. For each of the viruses, we postulate gene function via comparative analysis to known viral relatives. Most notably, the evidence from gene content and phylogenetics suggests that the aye-aye sequences represent the most basal known rhadinovirus, and indicates that tumorigenic herpesviruses have been infecting primates since their emergence in the late Cretaceous. Overall, these data show that a genomic fossil record of herpesviruses exists despite their extremely large genomes, and expands the known diversity of Herpesviridae, which will aid the characterization of pathogenesis. Our analytical approach illustrates the benefit of intersecting evolutionary approaches with metagenomics, genetics and paleovirology. PMID:24945689

  9. [Historical Review of Kaposi sarcoma in pre-HAART era: evolution with different chemotherapy schedules and remission with ganciclovir use].

    PubMed

    Volkow, Patricia; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Zinser, Juan W; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2016-10-01

    Ganciclovir has shown in vitro anti-human herpesvirus-8 activity, Kaposi sarcoma agent. We analyzed all Kaposi sarcoma patients from 1985 to 1996 pre-HAART era and identified Kaposi sarcoma/AIDS patients who achieved complete remission prior to HAART use.

  10. Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment of Human Herpesvirus 8-Associated, Body Cavity-Based Lymphoma with an Unusual Phenotype in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Celeste L.; Rudoy, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a gammaherpesvirus first detected in Kaposi's sarcoma tumor cells and subsequently in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PEL patients. PEL has been recognized as an individual nosologic entity based on its distinctive features and consistent association with HHV-8 infection. PEL is an unusual form of body cavity-based B-cell lymphoma (BCBL). It occurs predominantly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients but occasionally also in elderly HIV-negative patients. We describe a case of PEL, with ascites, bilateral pleural effusions, and a small axillary lymphadenopathy, in a 72-year-old HIV-negative man. PCR performed on a lymph node specimen and in liquid effusion was positive for HHV-8 and negative for Epstein-Barr virus. The immunophenotype of the neoplastic cells was B CD19+ CD20+ CD22+ with coexpression of CD10 and CD23 and with clonal kappa light chain rearrangement. The patient was treated with Rituximab, a chimeric (human-mouse) anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Thirteen months later, the patient continued in clinical remission. This is the first report of an HHV-8-associated BCBL in an HIV-negative patient in Argentina. PMID:11527816

  11. Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  12. Simultaneous quantification of human herpesvirus 8 DNA by real time PCR in different tissues of HIV infected cuban patients with Kaposi's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In Cuba, previous reports have shown an increase of epidemic KS, reaching a total of 120 cases by the end of 2007, despite the use of HAART. To evaluate and compare the role of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) viral loads in different compartments of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) patients real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the genome copy number of HHV-8 in plasma, saliva, tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 49 AIDS-KS patients. Overall, 98% of AIDS-KS patients harbored detectable HHV-8. HHV-8 could be detected in 91.6% of KS tissue lesions showing the highest viral load (median log = 3.14 copies/100 ng DNA) followed by saliva and PBMC which were positive in 78%, and 69.2%; respectively. In contrast, HHV-8 was detected in only 37% of plasma samples, which also showed lower viral loads. Men who had sex with men (MSM) were more likely to have three-times higher HHV-8 genome copies in KS lesions when compared with tissues from heterosexuals individuals (OR 3; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.5). These results emphasize the systemic nature of HHV-8-infection and demonstrate the possible role of saliva in HHV-8 transmission among MSM. PMID:21429238

  13. A Herpesvirus Protein Selectively Inhibits Cellular mRNA Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Gong, Danyang; Kim, Yong Hoon; Xiao, Yuchen; Du, Yushen; Xie, Yafang; Lee, Kevin K; Feng, Jun; Farhat, Nisar; Zhao, Dawei; Shu, Sara; Dai, Xinghong; Chanda, Sumit K; Rana, Tariq M; Krogan, Nevan J; Sun, Ren; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-11-09

    Nuclear mRNA export is highly regulated to ensure accurate cellular gene expression. Viral inhibition of cellular mRNA export can enhance viral access to the cellular translation machinery and prevent anti-viral protein production but is generally thought to be nonselective. We report that ORF10 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a nuclear DNA virus, inhibits mRNA export in a transcript-selective manner to control cellular gene expression. Nuclear export inhibition by ORF10 requires an interaction with an RNA export factor, Rae1. Genome-wide analysis reveals a subset of cellular mRNAs whose nuclear export is blocked by ORF10 with the 3' UTRs of ORF10-targeted transcripts conferring sensitivity to export inhibition. The ORF10-Rae1 interaction is important for the virus to express viral genes and produce infectious virions. These results suggest that a nuclear DNA virus can selectively interfere with RNA export to restrict host gene expression for optimal replication.

  14. Inhibition of cGAS DNA Sensing by a Herpesvirus Virion Protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-jun; Li, Wenwei; Shao, Yaming; Avey, Denis; Fu, Bishi; Gillen, Joseph; Hand, Travis; Ma, Siming; Liu, Xia; Miley, Wendell; Konrad, Andreas; Neipel, Frank; Stürzl, Michael; Whitby, Denise; Li, Hong; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2015-09-09

    Invading viral DNA can be recognized by the host cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), resulting in production of the second messenger cGAMP, which directs the adaptor protein STING to stimulate production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although several DNA viruses are sensed by cGAS, viral strategies targeting cGAS are virtually unknown. We report here that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF52, an abundant gammaherpesvirus-specific tegument protein, subverts cytosolic DNA sensing by directly inhibiting cGAS enzymatic activity through a mechanism involving both cGAS binding and DNA binding. Moreover, ORF52 homologs in other gammaherpesviruses also inhibit cGAS activity and similarly bind cGAS and DNA, suggesting conserved inhibitory mechanisms. Furthermore, KSHV infection evokes cGAS-dependent responses that can limit the infection, and an ORF52 null mutant exhibits increased cGAS signaling. Our findings reveal a mechanism through which gammaherpesviruses antagonize host cGAS DNA sensing.

  15. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  16. Profile of Exosomal and Intracellular microRNA in Gamma-Herpesvirus-Infected Lymphoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hoshina, Shiho; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hamada, Hiromichi; Kuroda, Makoto; Katano, Harutaka

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles released from cells, into which microRNAs (miRNA) are specifically sorted and accumulated. Two gamma-herpesviruses, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein—Barr virus (EBV), encode miRNAs in their genomes and express virus-encoded miRNAs in cells and exosomes. However, there is little information about the detailed distribution of virus-encoded miRNAs in cells and exosomes. In this study, we thus identified virus- and host-encoded miRNAs in exosomes released from KSHV- or EBV-infected lymphoma cell lines and compared them with intracellular miRNAs using a next-generation sequencer. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that 48% of the annotated miRNAs in the exosomes from KSHV-infected cells originated from KSHV. Human mir-10b-5p and mir-143-3p were much more highly concentrated in exosomes than in cells. Exosomes contained more nonexact mature miRNAs that did not exactly match those in miRBase than cells. Among the KSHV-encoded miRNAs, miRK12-3-5p was the most abundant exact mature miRNA in both cells and exosomes that exactly matched those in miRBase. Recently identified EXOmotifs, nucleotide motifs that control the loading of miRNAs into exosomes were frequently found within the sequences of KSHV-encoded miRNAs, and the presence of the EXOmotif CCCT or CCCG was associated with the localization of miRNA in exosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These observations suggest that specific virus-encoded miRNAs are sorted by EXOmotifs and accumulate in exosomes in virus-infected cells. PMID:27611973

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. KS is caused by infection with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). Most people infected with HHV-8 don't get KS. It usually happens in People with weak immune systems, due to HIV/AIDS, drugs taken after an organ transplant, or another disease Older men of Jewish ...

  18. Treatment Options for Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  20. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus latency associated nuclear antigen protein release the G2/M cell cycle blocks by modulating ATM/ATR mediated checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Maji, Santanu; Reddy, R Rajendra; Jha, Asutosh K; Goswami, Chandan; Kundu, Chanakya N; Rajasubramaniam, Shanmugam; Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects the human population and maintains latency stage of viral life cycle in a variety of cell types including cells of epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial origin. The establishment of latent infection by KSHV requires the expression of an unique repertoire of genes among which latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome. LANA regulates the transcription of a number of viral and cellular genes essential for the survival of the virus in the host cell. The present study demonstrates the disruption of the host G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation as an associated function of LANA. DNA profile of LANA expressing human B-cells demonstrated the ability of this nuclear antigen in relieving the drug (Nocodazole) induced G2/M checkpoint arrest. Caffeine suppressed nocodazole induced G2/M arrest indicating involvement of the ATM/ATR. Notably, we have also shown the direct interaction of LANA with Chk2, the ATM/ATR signalling effector and is responsible for the release of the G2/M cell cycle block.

  1. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-19

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community.

  2. Immunosuppressive Therapy-Related Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  3. Dissecting host-virus interaction in lytic replication of a model herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Feng, Pinghui

    2011-10-07

    In response to viral infection, a host develops various defensive responses, such as activating innate immune signaling pathways that lead to antiviral cytokine production. In order to colonize the host, viruses are obligate to evade host antiviral responses and manipulate signaling pathways. Unraveling the host-virus interaction will shed light on the development of novel therapeutic strategies against viral infection. Murine γHV68 is closely related to human oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epsten-Barr virus. γHV68 infection in laboratory mice provides a tractable small animal model to examine the entire course of host responses and viral infection in vivo, which are not available for human herpesviruses. In this protocol, we present a panel of methods for phenotypic characterization and molecular dissection of host signaling components in γHV68 lytic replication both in vivo and ex vivo. The availability of genetically modified mouse strains permits the interrogation of the roles of host signaling pathways during γHV68 acute infection in vivo. Additionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these deficient mouse strains can be used to further dissect roles of these molecules during γHV68 lytic replication ex vivo. Using virological and molecular biology assays, we can pinpoint the molecular mechanism of host-virus interactions and identify host and viral genes essential for viral lytic replication. Finally, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system facilitates the introduction of mutations into the viral factor(s) that specifically interrupt the host-virus interaction. Recombinant γHV68 carrying these mutations can be used to recapitulate the phenotypes of γHV68 lytic replication in MEFs deficient in key host signaling components. This protocol offers an excellent strategy to interrogate host-pathogen interaction at multiple levels of intervention in vivo and ex vivo. Recently, we have discovered that γHV68 usurps

  4. [Moritz Kaposi and his sarcoma].

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Anne; Quint, Koen D

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, Kaposi sarcoma is a multidisciplinary condition, not only observed by dermatologists. Since the HIV epidemic in the 80s and 90s of the last century, more insight into the aetiology of Kaposi sarcoma has been acquired. However, this sarcoma had already been described in 1872 by a Hungarian dermatologist named Moritz Kaposi (1832-1902). Kaposi described the entity as 'idiopathic multiple pigmented sarcoma of the skin'. This entity was an extraordinary diagnosis at that time, mostly observed in Jewish or Mediterranean men. In 1912, 10 years after the death of Moritz Kaposi, the entity name was changed to Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Kaposi sarcoma following postmastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Montero Pérez, Iria; Rodríguez-Pazos, Laura; Álvarez-Pérez, Adriana; Ferreirós, M Mercedes Pereiro; Aliste, Carlos; Suarez-Peñaranda, Jose Manuel; Toribio, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    Classical Kaposi sarcoma (KS) usually appears on lower extremities accompanied or preceded by local lymphedema. However, the development in areas of chronic lymphedema of the arms following mastectomy, mimicking a Stewart-Treves syndrome, has rarely been described. We report an 81-year-old woman who developed multiple, erythematous to purple tumors, located on areas of post mastectomy lymphedema. Histopathological examination evidenced several dermal nodules formed by spindle-shaped cells that delimitated slit-like vascular spaces with some red cell extravasation. Immunohistochemically, the human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) latent nuclear antigen-1 was detected in the nuclei of most tumoral cells confirming the diagnosis of KS. Lymphedema could promote the development of certain tumors by altering immunocompetence. Although angiosarcoma (AS) is the most frequent neoplasia arising in the setting of chronic lymphedema, other tumors such as benign lymphangiomatous papules (BLAP) or KS can also develop in lymphedematous limbs. It is important to establish the difference between AS and KS because their prognosis and treatment are very different. Identification by immunohistochemistry of HHV-8 is useful for the distinction between KS and AS or BLAP.

  6. Utilising proteomic approaches to understand oncogenic human herpesviruses (Review)

    PubMed Central

    OWEN, CHRISTOPHER B.; HUGHES, DAVID J.; BAQUERO-PEREZ, BELINDA; BERNDT, ANJA; SCHUMANN, SOPHIE; JACKSON, BRIAN R.; WHITEHOUSE, ADRIAN

    2014-01-01

    The γ-herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are successful pathogens, each infecting a large proportion of the human population. These viruses persist for the life of the host and may each contribute to a number of malignancies, for which there are currently no cures. Large-scale proteomic-based approaches provide an excellent means of increasing the collective understanding of the proteomes of these complex viruses and elucidating their numerous interactions within the infected host cell. These large-scale studies are important for the identification of the intricacies of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics against these two important pathogens. PMID:25279171

  7. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and ...

  8. Bilateral tonsillar and esophageal Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Ozbudak, Irem Hicran; Guney, Kenan; Mutlu, Derya; Gelen, Tekinalp; Ozbilim, Gulay

    2011-07-01

    Tonsillar involvement in Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only a few such cases have been reported; all but 1 of these previously reported cases occurred in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We describe what to the best of our knowledge is the first reported case of concurrent bilateral tonsillar and esophageal Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient. A 68-year-old man presented with sore throat and dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed the presence of bilateral and asymmetrical tonsillar masses, as well as generalized lymphadenopathy in the cervical chain. The masses were resected, and findings on histopathologic analysis were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. In addition, human herpesvirus 8 was demonstrated on a tonsil specimen by polymerase chain reaction, and microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma was also detected. Later, another Kaposi sarcoma lesion was detected in the lower third of the esophagus. We recommend that clinicians not discount the possibility of oral classic Kaposi sarcoma in the workup of an immunocompetent patient with oral vascular lesions.

  9. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Larry; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae) and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae). Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus) and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus). PMID:22163339

  11. Steroids are a risk factor for Kaposi's sarcoma-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and mortality in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Iglesias, María C.; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (KS-IRIS) and mortality, with the use of glucocorticoids in HIV-infected individuals. Design: Case–control study. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 145 individuals with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma receiving antiretroviral therapy. The association of different variables with KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality was explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. The main exposure of interest was the use of glucocorticoids. We also compared the time to KS-IRIS and the time to death of individuals treated with glucocorticoids vs. those nontreated with glucocorticoids, and the time to death of individuals with KS-IRIS vs. those without KS-IRIS by hazards regression. Results: Sixty of 145 individuals received glucocorticoids (41.4%) for the management or suspicion of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Fifty individuals had KS-IRIS (37%). The use of glucocorticoids was more frequent in individuals with KS-IRIS than in those without KS-IRIS (54.9 vs. 36.47%, P = 0.047). Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality occurred in 17 cases (11.7%), and glucocorticoid use was more frequent in this group (76.47 vs. 36.7%, P = 0.003). Glucocorticoid use was a risk factor for mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 4.719, 95% confidence interval = 1.383–16.103, P = 0.0132), and was associated with shorter periods to KS-IRIS (P = 0.03) and death (P = 0.0073). KS-IRIS was a risk factor for mortality (P = 0.049). Conclusion: In HIV-infected individuals, the use of glucocorticoids is a risk factor for KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated mortality. In addition, KS-IRIS is a risk factor for mortality. Therefore, glucocorticoid administration in this population requires careful consideration based on individualized risk–benefit analysis. PMID:26636923

  12. Skin Ultrasound in Kaposi Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, R; Alfageme, F; Roustán, G; Suarez, M D

    2016-05-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging has recently been increasing in numerous dermatologic diseases. This noninvasive technique provides additional details on the structure and vascularization of skin lesions. Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor that typically arises in the skin and mucosas. It can spread to lymph nodes and internal organs. We performed B-mode and color Doppler ultrasound studies in 3 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma confirmed by histological examination. We found differences in the ultrasound pattern between nodular and plaque lesions, in both B-mode and color Doppler. We believe that skin ultrasound imaging could be a useful technique for studying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma, providing additional information on the structural and vascular characteristics of the lesion.

  13. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA’s role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  14. What's New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What’s New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? A great ... once it has developed. Treatment Researchers are studying new and different ways to treat KS. Imiquimod (Aldara) ...

  15. What Are the Key Statistics about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What Are the Key Statistics About Kaposi Sarcoma? Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi ... and children. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  16. Iron: a target for the management of Kaposi's sarcoma?

    PubMed Central

    Simonart, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Background Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a mesenchymal tumour associated with human herpesvirus-8 infection. However, the incidence of human herpesvirus-8 infection is far higher than the prevalence of KS, suggesting that viral infection per se is not sufficient for the development of malignancy and that one or more additional cofactors are required. Discussion Epidemiological data suggest that iron may be one of the cofactors involved in the pathogenesis of KS. Iron is a well-known carcinogen and may favour KS growth through several pathways. Based on the apoptotic and antiproliferative effect of iron chelation on KS cells, it is suggested that iron withdrawal strategies could be developed for the management of KS. Studies using potent iron chelators in suitable KS animal models are critical to evaluate whether iron deprivation may be a useful anti-KS strategy. Summary It is suggested that iron may be one of non-viral co-factors involved of KS pathogenesis and that iron withdrawal strategies might interfere with tumour growth in patients with KS. PMID:14725718

  17. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    PubMed

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  18. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma in Italy, 1985–1998

    PubMed Central

    Dal Maso, L; Polesel, J; Ascoli, V; Zambon, P; Budroni, M; Ferretti, S; Tumino, R; Tagliabue, G; Patriarca, S; Federico, M; Vercelli, M; Giacomin, A; Vicario, G; Bellù, F; Falcini, F; Crocetti, E; De Lisi, V; Vitarelli, S; Piffer, S; Stracci, F; Serraino, D; Rezza, G; Franceschi, S

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate incidence rates (IRs) of classic Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS) in Italy after the spread of AIDS, we distinguished CKS from AIDS-related KS (AKS) using an ‘ad hoc' record linkage procedure between 15 Cancer Registries (CRs) (21% of the Italian population) and the national AIDS Registry. Between 1985 and 1998, 874 cases of CKS and 634 cases of AKS were diagnosed in the study areas. CKS accounted for 16 and 27% of KS cases below 55 years of age in men and women, respectively, but for 91 and 100% of those above age 55. The IRs for CKS were 1.0/ in men and 0.4/100 000 in women, but they varied between 0.3 in Umbria and 4.7 in Sassari in men, and between 0.1 in Parma and 1.7 in Sassari in women. IRs of CKS in both genders were stable between 1985–1987 and 1993–1998. In Northern and Central CRs the IR (adjusted for age and gender) for CKS was 0.5 in individuals born in the same area, but 1.6 in individuals born in Southern Italy or in the Islands (rate ratio=3.2) suggesting that KS-associated herpesvirus, the cause of KS, is acquired early in life. PMID:15570306

  19. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  20. Seroprevalence of antibodies against human herpesvirus 8 in a population of renal transplant recipients at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital.

    PubMed

    Delorme, S; Houde, I; Deschênes, L

    2003-11-01

    We conducted a seroepidemiologic study to determine the prevalence of anti-human herpesvirus 8 antibodies in a renal transplant population at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital. Testing for immunoglobulin G antibodies against lytic and latent antigens was performed on serum samples from 150 renal transplant patients. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with confirmed Kaposi's sarcoma were used as positive controls. None of the renal transplant patients tested positive.

  1. Pulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma: An Uncommon Cause of Respiratory Failure in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy—Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, Stefan; Paul, Yonette; Habtegebriel, Yordanis; Polk, Octavius

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) is the most common malignancy associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and is caused by Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8) or Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV). In about 90% of cases Kaposi Sarcoma is associated with cutaneous lesions; however visceral disease can occur in the absence of cutaneous involvement. In the era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), the incidence of KS has declined. Clinical features of pulmonary KS might be difficult to distinguish from pneumonia in the immunocompromised patients and could lead to diagnostic challenges. First-line treatment of KS is with HAART and the incidence has declined with its use. Systemic chemotherapy may play a role depending on the extent of the disease. We report the case of a young man who presented with pulmonary symptoms and was later found to have pulmonary KS. Interestingly this diagnosis was made in the absence of the classic skin lesions. His disease was complicated by progressive respiratory failure and he eventually died. PMID:27872774

  2. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Induces the Oncogenic miR-17-92 Cluster and Down-Regulates TGF-β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong Seok; Jain, Vaibhav; Krueger, Brian; Marshall, Vickie; Kim, Chang Hee; Shisler, Joanna L.; Whitby, Denise; Renne, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    KSHV is a DNA tumor virus that causes Kaposi’s sarcoma. Upon KSHV infection, only a limited number of latent genes are expressed. We know that KSHV infection regulates host gene expression, and hypothesized that latent genes also modulate the expression of host miRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression contributes to the development of many types of cancer. Array-based miRNA profiling revealed that all six miRNAs of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster are up-regulated in KSHV infected endothelial cells. Among candidate KSHV latent genes, we found that vFLIP and vCyclin were shown to activate the miR-17-92 promoter, using luciferase assay and western blot analysis. The miR-17-92 cluster was previously shown to target TGF-β signaling. We demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster to strongly inhibit the TGF-β signaling pathway by down-regulating SMAD2. Moreover, TGF-β activity and SMAD2 expression were fully restored when antagomirs (inhibitors) of miR-17-92 cluster were transfected into cells expressing either vFLIP or vCyclin. In addition, we utilized viral genetics to produce vFLIP or vCyclin knock-out viruses, and studied the effects in infected TIVE cells. Infection with wildtype KSHV abolished expression of SMAD2 protein in these endothelial cells. While single-knockout mutants still showed a marked reduction in SMAD2 expression, TIVE cells infected by a double-knockout mutant virus were fully restored for SMAD2 expression, compared to non-infected TIVE cells. Expression of either vFLIP or vCycIin was sufficient to downregulate SMAD2. In summary, our data demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster in endothelial cells and thereby interfere with the TGF-β signaling pathway. Manipulation of the TGF-β pathway via host miRNAs represents a novel mechanism that may be important for KSHV tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, a hallmark of KS. PMID:26545119

  3. Kaposi sarcoma secondary to endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mayor-Ibarguren, A; Roldán-Puchalt, M C; Sancho-Bueso, T; Pérez-López, C; Álvarez-Linera, J; Frutos, R; Álvarez-Escolá, C; Regojo-Zapata, R; Beato-Merino, M J; Herranz-Pinto, P; Lecumberri, B

    2016-06-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an angioproliferative tumour that develops as a result of an infection by human herpesvirus 8, which is considered a necessary cause but not sufficient. Other factors - genetic, immunological and environmental - might play a role in the development of the disease. We report a case of KS secondary to endogenous Cushing syndrome (ECS) due to a pituitary adenoma, an association that has been reported only once. We also conducted a search through the Medline and PubMed databases for cases involving KS and ECS, finding only three additional cases that shared common clinical and prognostic features with ours. ECS might favour the development of KS due to immunosuppression. Dermatologists and other clinicians should be aware of this association, as it might be an underdiagnosed condition. It also has an important impact on the management of KS, and based on this review it relies on a good prognosis when ECS is well controlled.

  4. Hepatic Kaposi sarcoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Van Leer-Greenberg, Brett; Kole, Abhisake; Chawla, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an aggressive cancer caused by human herpesvirus-8, primarily seen in immunocompromised patients. As opposed to the well-described cutaneous manifestations and pulmonary complications of KS, hepatic KS is rarely reported before death as most patients with hepatic KS do not manifest symptoms or evidence of liver injury. In patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, hepatic involvement of KS is present in 12%-24% of the population on incidental imaging and in approximately 35% of patients with cutaneous KS if an autopsy was completed after their death. Patients with clinically significant hepatic injury due to hepatic KS usually have an aggressive course of disease with hepatic failure often progressing to multi-organ failure and death. Here we report an unusual presentation of acute liver injury due to hepatic KS and briefly review the published literature on hepatic KS. PMID:28217255

  5. Incidentally Detected Kaposi Sarcoma of Adrenal Gland with Anaplastic Features in an HIV Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Murat; Sen, Erdem; Cebeci, Hakan; Ata, Ozlem; Yavas, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a vascular tumor caused by infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), is a systemic disease that can present with cutaneous lesions with or without visceral involvement. Very few cases of KS, most of which were associated with AIDS, have been reported in the adrenal gland. Anaplastic transformation of KS is a rare clinical presentation known as an aggressive disease with local recurrence and metastatic potential. We report here a 47-year-old HIV negative male presented with extra-adrenal symptoms and had an incidentally detected anaplastic adrenal KS exhibited aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of anaplastic primary adrenal KS without mucocutaneous involvement but subsequently developed other side adrenal metastases in an HIV negative patient. PMID:27747121

  6. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  7. Risk of classic Kaposi sarcoma with residential exposure to volcanic and related soils in Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Pelser, Colleen; Dazzi, Carmelo; Graubard, Barry I.; Lauria, Carmela; Vitale, Francesco; Goedert, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Before AIDS, endemic (African) Kaposi sarcoma (KS) was noted to occur in volcanic areas and was postulated to result from dirt chronically embedded in the skin of the lower extremities. The primary cause of all KS types is KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, but co-factors contribute to the neoplasia. We investigated whether residential exposure volcanic or related soils was associated with the risk of classic Kaposi sarcoma (cKS) in Sicily. Methods Risk of incident cKS (n=141) compared to population-based KSHV seropositive controls (n=123) was estimated for residential exposure to four types of soil, categorized with maps from the European Soil Database and direct surveying. Questionnaire data provided covariates. Results Residents in communities high in luvisols were approximately 2.7-times more likely to have cKS than those in communities with no luvisols. Risk was not specific for cKS on the limbs, but it was elevated approximately 4–5-fold with frequent bathing or tap water drinking in high luvisols communities. Risk was unrelated to communities high in andosols, tephra, or clay soils. Conclusions Iron and alumino-silicate clay, major components of luvisols, may increase cKS risk, but formal investigation and consideration of other soil types and exposures are needed. PMID:19576540

  8. Reactivation and role of HHV-8 in Kaposi's sarcoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Ensoli, B; Stürzl, M; Monini, P

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an angioproliferative disease occurring in several clinical-epidemio-logic forms but all associated with infection by the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). At least in early stages, KS is a reactive disease associated with a state of immune dysregulation characterized by CD8+ T-cell activation and production of Th1-type inflammatory cytokines (IC) that precedes lesion development. In fact, evidence indicates that IC can trigger lesion formation by inducing the activation of endothelial cells that leads to adhesion and tissue extravasation of lymphomonocytes, spindle cell formation, and angiogenesis, and HHV-8 reactivation that, in turn, leads to virus spread to all circulating cell types and virus dissemination into tissues. Due to virus escape mechanisms and deficient immune responses toward HHV-8, virus reactivation and spread are not controlled by the immune system but induce immune responses that may paradoxically exacerbate the reactive process. The virus is recruited into "activated" tissue sites where it finds an optimal environment for growth. In fact, viral load is very low in early lesions, whereas almost all spindle cells are infected in late-stage lesions. Although early KS is a reactive process of polyclonal nature that can regress, in time and in the presence of immunodeficiency, it can progress to a true sarcoma. This is likely due to the long-lasting expression of HHV-8 latency genes in spindle cells associated with the deregulated expression of oncogenes and oncosuppressor genes and, for AIDS-KS, with the effects of the HIV-1 Tat protein.

  9. Anguillid Herpesvirus 1 Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    van Beurden, Steven J.; Gatherer, Derek; Kerr, Karen; Galbraith, Julie; Herzyk, Pawel; Peeters, Ben P. H.; Rottier, Peter J. M.; Engelsma, Marc Y.

    2012-01-01

    We used deep sequencing of poly(A) RNA to characterize the transcriptome of an economically important eel virus, anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1), at a stage during the lytic life cycle when infectious virus was being produced. In contrast to the transcription of mammalian herpesviruses, the overall level of antisense transcription from the 248,526-bp genome was low, amounting to only 1.5% of transcription in predicted protein-coding regions, and no abundant, nonoverlapping, noncoding RNAs were identified. RNA splicing was found to be more common than had been anticipated previously. Counting the 10,634-bp terminal direct repeat once, 100 splice junctions were identified, of which 58 were considered likely to be involved in the expression of functional proteins because they represent splicing between protein-coding exons or between 5′ untranslated regions and protein-coding exons. Each of the 30 most highly represented of these 58 splice junctions was confirmed by RT-PCR. We also used deep sequencing to identify numerous putative 5′ and 3′ ends of AngHV1 transcripts, confirming some and adding others by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The findings prompted a revision of the AngHV1 genome map to include a total of 129 protein-coding genes, 5 of which are duplicated in the terminal direct repeat. Not counting duplicates, 11 genes contain integral, spliced protein-coding exons, and 9 contain 5′ untranslated exons or, because of alternative splicing, 5′ untranslated and 5′ translated exons. The results of this study sharpen our understanding of AngHV1 genomics and provide the first detailed view of a fish herpesvirus transcriptome. PMID:22787220

  10. Antiproliferative effects of Bortezomib in endothelial cells transformed by viral G protein-coupled receptor associated to Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Suares, A; Mori Sequeiros Garcia, M; Paz, C; González-Pardo, V

    2017-04-01

    The Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpes virus G Protein-Coupled Receptor (vGPCR) is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of Kaposi Sarcoma. We have previously demonstrated that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib inhibits NF-κB pathway, which is required for tumor maintenance in endothelial cells that express vGPCR (vGPCR cells). In this work, we further investigated Bortezomib anti-proliferative mechanism of action. We demonstrated that Bortezomib decreases vGPCR cell number in a dose-dependent manner and induces cell morphology changes. Bortezomib decreases ERK1/2 phosphorylation whereas induces the accumulation of MKP-3 - a specific ERK1/2 MAP kinase phosphatase - in time and concentration dependent manner (1.5-32h; 0.25-1nM). The transcription factor FOXO1 is activated by dephosphorylation and regulates p21 expression. Here, we demonstrated that Bortezomib increases FOXO1 protein and decreases its phosphorylation in a concentration dependent manner (0.25-1nM). Bortezomib (0.5nM, 24h) also increase nuclear FOXO1 protein, in line with FOXO1 dephosphorylation induced by the drug. Consistent with FOXO1 dephosphorylation/activation, p21 mRNA expression is increased by Bortezomib in a MKP-3-dependent way. Bortezomib (0.5nM, 24h) also decreases VEGF, an ERK1/2 -dependent effect. It is concluded that in vGPCR cells, Bortezomib decreases ERK1/2 and FOXO1 phosphorylation through MKP-3 accumulation, leading ERK1/2 deactivation and FOXO1 activation respectively and, consequently, to cell proliferation inhibition, p21 induction and VEGF repression. Taken together, all these events contribute to the anti-tumoral effect of Bortezomib.

  11. Risk factors for classical Kaposi sarcoma in a population-based case-control study in Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, LA; Lauria, C; Romano, N; Brown, EE; Whitby, D; Graubard, BI; Li, Y; Messina, A; Gafà, L; Vitale, F

    2009-01-01

    Background Classical Kaposi sarcoma (cKS) is a rare complication of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) infection. We conducted a population-based, frequency-matched case-control study in Sicily to further investigate the reported inverse relationship between smoking and cKS and to identify other factors associated with altered risk. Methods All incident, histologically confirmed, cKS cases in Sicily were eligible. A two-stage cluster sample design was applied to select population controls. KSHV seropositivity was determined using 4 antibody assays (K8.1 and orf73 enzyme immunoassays and 2 immunofluroescence assays). Using SAS-callable SUDAAN we compared the characteristics of cKS cases and KSHV seropositive controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are presented. Results In total, 142 cKS cases and 123 KSHV seropositive controls were recruited. Current cigarette smoking was associated with reduced risk of cKS (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.06-0.67). Edema was associated with cKS, but only when it presented on the lower extremities (OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.62-8.23). Irrespective of presentation site, diabetes and oral corticosteroid medications were associated with increased risk (ORs, 95% CIs: 4.73, 2.02-11.1 and 2.34, 1.23-4.45, respectively). Never smoking, diabetes and oral corticosteroid medication use were all independently associated with cKS risk. Discussion We confirmed previous reports that cigarette smoking was associated with a reduced risk of cKS, and we found that risk was lowest among current smokers. We also found that cKS risk was strongly and independently associated with oral corticosteroid use and diabetes. Corroboration of these observations and investigation of possible underlying mechanisms are warranted. PMID:19064559

  12. Bell's palsy and herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stan C

    2002-12-01

    A growing body of evidence links reactivation of herpesviruses (primarily varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus type 1) with the development of a large proportion of cases of acute peripheral facial palsy, a syndrome commonly known by its eponym, Bell's palsy. This article reviews the definition and natural history of the disease, its underlying anatomy and pathophysiology, the data linking herpetic reactivation with development of signs and symptoms, and therapeutic trials utilizing antiviral therapy. In addition, it poses the question, would earlier intervention with antivirals make a larger impact on outcomes?

  13. Kaposi's varicelliform eruption: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Bruno; Taliercio, Vanina; Luna, Paula; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's varicelliform eruption is a rare and potentially fatal viral infection caused mainly by reactivation of herpes simplex virus. It concomitantly occurs with pre-existing skin conditions, mostly atopic dermatitis, so it is predominately found in children. We present a case series that includes four adults, familial cases, and previously healthy patients. We also highlight clinical features, associations and therapeutic options. PMID:26753139

  14. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  15. The immunological relationship between canine herpesvirus and four other herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Manning, A; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R; Durham, J; Thompson, H

    1988-07-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) was compared with four other herpesviruses by several serological techniques. Cross-neutralization was demonstrated between CHV and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus. Non-neutralizing cross-reactions were found with these viruses and also with equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus. The data suggest that CHV is immunologically more closely related to herpes simplex virus than to the other viruses used in this study.

  16. [Classic and aggressive Kaposi sarcoma with bone involvement].

    PubMed

    Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; El Alaoui, Adil; El Bardai, Mohammed; Mezzani, Amine; Lahrach, Kamal; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Classic Kaposi sarcoma is a multifocal rare tumor originating from vascular endothelial cells with progressive evolution and little malignant predisposition. Although Kaposi sarcoma with extensive visceral involvement is sometimes observed among HIV-positive patients, tumor dissemination to visceral lymph nodes in classic SK remains very rare. We report a rare case of aggressive classic Kaposi sarcoma of the hand with a rapid and destructive development.

  17. Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Benjamin; Fournier, Guillaume; Lieffrig, François; Costes, Bérénice

    2010-01-01

    The recently designated cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is an emerging agent that causes fatal disease in common and koi carp. Since its emergence in the late 1990s, this highly contagious pathogen has caused severe financial losses in common and koi carp culture industries worldwide. In addition to its economic role, recent studies suggest that CyHV-3 may have a role in fundamental research. CyHV-3 has the largest genome among viruses in the order Herpesvirales and serves as a model for mutagenesis of large DNA viruses. Other studies suggest that the skin of teleost fish represents an efficient portal of entry for certain viruses. The effect of temperature on viral replication suggests that the body temperature of its poikilotherm host could regulate the outcome of the infection (replicative vs. nonreplicative). Recent advances with regard to CyHV-3 provide a role for this virus in fundamental and applied research. PMID:21122210

  18. Human herpesvirus 8-associated neoplasms: the roles of viral replication and antiviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this review, we highlight the importance of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) lytic replication and the potential for antiviral therapies to prevent or treat HHV-8-related neoplasms. Recent findings Dieases caused by HHV-8 infection include Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which occur primarily in patients with HIV infection. KS is the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. MCD and PEL occur less commonly but, like KS, are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Like all herpesviruses, HHV-8 is capable of either latent or lytic infection of cells. Although HHV-8 infection of tumor cells is predominately latent, accumulating data point to the importance of both lytic phase viral gene products and production of infectious virus. Antiviral agents that target herpesvirus DNA synthesis, such as ganciclovir, inhibit HHV-8 lytic replication and can prevent KS. Several HIV protease inhibitors may interfere with tumor growth and angiogenesis, and one PI, nelfinavir, directly inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro. Summary Controlled trials are indicated to determine the clinical utility of antiviral suppression of HHV-8 replication, and identify the optimal antiretroviral regimens, for the prevention and treatment of KS. PMID:21666458

  19. Lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Posada García, Celia; García-Cruz, Aranzazu; García-Doval, Ignacio; De La Torre, Carlos; Cruces, Manuel José

    2009-09-15

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal vascular disease with uncertain histogenesis. It is characterized by clinical and histologic polymorphism. The "lymphangioma-like" variant is very uncommon, accounting for less than 5% of all cases. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman, HIV negative, with a 4-year history of classic Kaposi sarcoma treated with cryotherapy who developed new bullous lesions on her lower extremities. Biopsy revealed histologic findings of lymphangioma-like KS (LLKS), together with areas of classic KS; HHV-8 staining was positive. Diagnosis of LLKS was made and the patient was proposed for radiotherapy. The lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare morphologic expression of KS characterized by dilated and bizarrely shaped vascular channels lined by flattened endothelium permeating the dermis. "Bulla-like" lesions have been considered as a clinical hallmark of this variant. Its histologic appearance suggests a lymphatic origin of KS and it may resemble other vascular tumors. Findings of areas of typical KS and positive staining for HHV-8 may help to make a definitive diagnosis.

  20. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of herpesviruses. Results We sequenced the genome of a neurotropic virus linked to a fatal ganglioneuritis devastating parts of a valuable wild abalone fishery in Australia. We show that the newly identified virus forms part of an ancient clade with its nearest relatives being a herpesvirus infecting bivalves (oyster) and, unexpectedly, one we identified, from published data, apparently integrated within the genome of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. Predicted protein sequences from the abalone virus genome have significant similarity to several herpesvirus proteins including the DNA packaging ATPase subunit of (putative) terminase and DNA polymerase. Conservation of amino acid sequences in the terminase across all herpesviruses and phylogenetic analysis using the DNA polymerase and terminase proteins demonstrate that the herpesviruses infecting the molluscs, oyster and abalone, are distantly related. The terminase and polymerase protein sequences from the putative amphioxus herpesvirus share more sequence similarity with those of the mollusc viruses than with sequences from any of the vertebrate herpesviruses analysed. Conclusions A family of mollusc herpesviruses, Malacoherpesviridae, that was based on a single virus infecting oyster can now be further established by including a distantly related herpesvirus infecting abalone, which, like many vertebrate viruses is neurotropic. The genome of Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus) provides evidence for the existence of a herpesvirus

  1. Parma wallaby herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Acland, H M

    1981-07-01

    Three Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) were inoculated with a herpesvirus recovered from a captive Parma wallaby with fatal naturally-occurring disease. Two intravenously inoculated animals died after 5 days and one animal infected via the conjunctiva and nasal mucosa was killed when moribund at 7 days. An additional two wallabies held in contact with the others became infected; they were killed at 11 days, when one was severely affected and one was mildly affected. All had small vesicles and ulcers of the skin of the upper and lower lips, eyelids, anogenital area and adjacent genital mucosa. Small vesicles and ulcers and large ulcers, with adherent necrotic epithelium and inflammatory debris, were present on the mucosa of the upper lips and adjacent gums and the conjunctiva. Numerous large basophilic or eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in the epithelial cells of these vesicles and ulcers and of adjacent hair follicles and sebaceous glands. There was a mild to moderately severe rhinitis. Keratitis was present in two wallabies. Liver lesions were present in two animals but were unlike those seen in herpesviral hepatitis in other species.

  2. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  3. Kaposi sarcoma incidence in Mozambique: national and regional estimates.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Paula; Albuquerque, Gabriela; Vieira, Mariana; Foia, Severiano; Ferro, Josefo; Carrilho, Carla; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is expressed in four clinical variants, all associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection, namely, classic, endemic, immunosuppression-related and AIDS-related. The latter currently accounts for most of the burden of Kaposi sarcoma in sub-Saharan Africa, reflecting the frequency of HIV infection and its management. We aimed to estimate the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique and in its provinces. We estimated the number of incident cases of Kaposi sarcoma by adding up the expected number of endemic and AIDS-related cases. The former were estimated from the rates observed in Kyandondo, Uganda (1960-1971). The latter were computed from the number of AIDS-related deaths in each region, assuming that the ratio between the AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma incident cases and the number of AIDS-related deaths observed in the city of Beira applies to all regions. A total of 3862 Kaposi sarcoma cases were estimated to have occurred in Mozambique in 2007, mostly AIDS-related, in the age group 25-49 years, and in provinces from South/Centre. The age-standardized incidence rates were 36.1/100 000 in men and 11.5/100 000 in women, with a more than three-fold variation across provinces. We estimated a high incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique, along with large regional differences. These results can be used to improve disease management and to sustain political decisions on health policies.

  4. A New Transgenic Approach to Target Tumor Vasculature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    H. E. (1993). A receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus is related to the low density lipoprotein receptor. Cell 74, 1043-51. Bautch, V. L...Montaner, S., Sodhi, A., Servitja, J. M., Ramsdell, A. K., Barac, A., Sawai, E. T. and Gutkind, J. S. (2004). The small GTPase Rac1 links the Kaposi ... sarcoma -associated herpesvirus vGPCR to cytokine secretion and paracrine neoplasia. Blood 104, 2903-11. Mukouyama, Y. S., Shin, D., Britsch, S

  5. AIDS-related primary Kaposi sarcoma of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Çelenk, Fatih; Yilmaz, Metin; Asal, Korhan; Ekinci, Özgür; Tokgöz, Nil

    2011-06-01

    Primary nasopharyngeal Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only 1 case has been previously reported in the literature. We report a new case, which occurred in a 37-year-old man with a known history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The patient presented with complaints of recurrent epistaxis and postnasal hemorrhage. Endoscopic examination detected a bluish, smooth, firm, nonpulsatile mass in the nasopharyngeal wall. Histopathologic findings on biopsy were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. The tumor was successfully treated with radiotherapy. Kaposi sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any AIDS patient who presents with recurrent unilateral nasal bleeding.

  6. Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma (acroangiodermatitis): occurring after bullous erysipelas.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Yardimci, Gürkan; Engin, Burhan; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Aydin, Övgü; Khatib, Rashid; Tuzun, Yalçın

    2015-05-18

    Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma is a benign reactive vascular proliferative disorder, which can be seen at any age. It occurs when the chronic venous pressure changes result in vascular proliferation in the upper and mid dermis. This disease is divided into two subtypes: the most frequent subtype is the Mali type and seen in early ages. The Mali type is seen in chronic venous insufficiency and in those patients with arteriovenous shunts. The rare subtype is the Stewart-Bluefarb type. This disease must be distinguished from Kaposi sarcoma because of their clinical resemblance. Herein, we present a patient with pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma, which developed after bullous erysipelas.

  7. Fatal Outcome of Multiple Clinical Presentations of Human Herpesvirus 8-related Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Wyss, Caroline; Meylan, Pascal; Bisig, Bettina; Letovanec, Igor; Manuel, Oriol; Pascual, Manuel; de Leval, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-related disease described after solid organ transplantation. Multicentric Castleman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome are other potential HHV-8-induced entities but are less frequently reported. We describe the case of a liver transplant recipient who presented with an acute febrile illness 1 year after transplantation with a rapidly fatal outcome. Autopsy revealed 3 distinct HHV-8-related entities: Kaposi sarcoma, HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease with microlymphomas and a severe hemophagocytic syndrome. Retrospective serologic tests suggested that HHV-8 was likely transmitted by the seropositive donor at the time of transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of copresentation of 3 clinical presentations of HHV-8-mediated human disease in the post-transplant setting. Considering the absence of systematic screening of organ donors/recipients for HHV-8 infection, HHV-8-related illness should be suspected in transplant recipients who present with acute febrile illness, systemic symptoms, lymphadenopathies, and/or multiorgan failure to rapidly document the diagnosis and provide timely an adequate treatment.

  8. Epigenotypes of latent herpesvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Minarovits, J

    2006-01-01

    Epigenotypes are modified cellular or viral genotypes which differ in transcriptional activity in spite of having an identical (or nearly identical) DNA sequence. Restricted expression of latent, episomal herpesvirus genomes is also due to epigenetic modifications. There is no virus production (lytic viral replication, associated with the expression of all viral genes) in tight latency. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DNA methylation could influence the activity of latent (and/or crucial lytic) promoters of prototype strains belonging to the three herpesvirus subfamilies (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-herpesviruses). In vivo, however, DNA methylation is not a major regulator of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, a human alpha-herpesvirus) latent gene expression in neurons of infected mice. In these cells, the promoter/enhancer region of latency-associated transcripts (LATs) is enriched with acetyl histone H3, suggesting that histone modifications may control HSV-1 latency in terminally differentiated, quiescent neurons. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a human gamma-herpesvirus) is associated with a series of neoplasms. Latent, episomal EBV genomes are subject to host cell-dependent epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation, binding of proteins and protein complexes, histone modifications). The distinct viral epigenotypes are associated with distinct EBV latency types, i.e., cell type-specific usage of latent EBV promoters controlling the expression of latent, growth transformation-associated EBV genes. The contribution of major epigenetic mechanisms to the regulation of latent EBV promoters is variable. DNA methylation contributes to silencing of Wp and Cp (alternative promoters for transcripts coding for the nuclear antigens EBNA 1-6) and LMP1p, LMP2Ap, and LMP2Bp (promoters for transcripts encoding transmembrane proteins). DNA methylation does not control, however, Qp (a promoter for EBNA1 transcripts only) in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), although in vitro

  9. Herpesvirus BACs: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Warden, Charles; Tang, Qiyi; Zhu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The herpesviridae are a large family of DNA viruses with large and complicated genomes. Genetic manipulation and the generation of recombinant viruses have been extremely difficult. However, herpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that were developed approximately 10 years ago have become useful and powerful genetic tools for generating recombinant viruses to study the biology and pathogenesis of herpesviruses. For example, BAC-directed deletion mutants are commonly used to determine the function and essentiality of viral genes. In this paper, we discuss the creation of herpesvirus BACs, functional analyses of herpesvirus mutants, and future applications for studies of herpesviruses. We describe commonly used methods to create and mutate herpesvirus BACs (such as site-directed mutagenesis and transposon mutagenesis). We also evaluate the potential future uses of viral BACs, including vaccine development and gene therapy.

  10. Clinical exuberance of classic Kaposi's sarcoma and response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Jeniffer Muñoz; Alves, Natália Ribeiro de Magalhães; Medeiros, Paula Mota; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; Alves, Maria de Fátima Guimarães Scotelaro; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric vascular neoplasm, with cutaneous and extracutaneous involvement. Different clinical and epidemiological variants have been identified. The classic form is manifested mainly in elderly men with indolent and long-term evolution, with lesions localized primarily in the lower extremities. We present two cases of classic Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS) in two female patients with extensive, exuberant skin involvement and rapid evolution, with good response to radiotherapy.

  11. Molecular Biology of Human Herpesvirus 8: Novel Functions and Virus–Host Interactions Implicated in Viral Pathogenesis and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of “accessory” genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus–host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein–coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus–host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease. PMID:24008302

  12. Inhibition of cGAS DNA Sensing by a Herpesvirus Virion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-jun; Li, Wenwei; Shao, Yaming; Avey, Denis; Fu, Bishi; Gillen, Joseph; Hand, Travis; Ma, Siming; Liu, Xia; Miley, Wendell; Konrad, Andreas; Neipel, Frank; Stürzl, Michael; Whitby, Denise; Li, Hong; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Invading viral DNA can be recognized by the host cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), resulting in production of the second messenger cGAMP, which directs the adaptor protein STING to stimulate production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although several DNA viruses are sensed by cGAS, viral strategies targeting cGAS are virtually unknown. We report here that Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF52, an abundant gammaherpesvirus-specific tegument protein, subverts cytosolic DNA sensing by directly inhibiting cGAS enzymatic activity through a mechanism involving both cGAS- and DNA-binding. Moreover, ORF52 homologues in other gammaherpesviruses also inhibit cGAS activity and similarly bind cGAS and DNA, suggesting conserved inhibitory mechanisms. Furthermore, KSHV infection evokes cGAS-dependent responses that can limit the infection, and an ORF52-null mutant exhibits increased cGAS signaling. Our findings reveal a mechanism through which gammaherpesviruses antagonize host cGAS DNA sensing. PMID:26320998

  13. Human herpesvirus infections: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C.; Roizman, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Molecular Biology of Latent HSV-1; Molecular Genetics of Antiviral Chemotherapy of Herpes Viruses; Molecular Basis of Foscarnet Action; Use of Vaccinia Virus as a Vector for Expression of Herpesvirus Genes; and Diagnosis of Herpesvirus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

  14. Production of a falcon herpesvirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wernery, U; Wernery, R; Kinne, J

    1999-09-01

    Ten common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus) were used for this falcon herpes vaccine experiment. Four kestrels were subcutaneously given 1 ml of an attenuated falcon herpesvirus that had originally been isolated from the liver of an American prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus). This virus was then passaged 100 times on chicken embryo fibroblast cells (CEF-cells). Another 4 kestrels were given subcutaneously an inactivated falcon herpesvirus vaccine derived from the same American field strain. This vaccine was concentrated, inactivated by heat and betapropiolactone and emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvans. Two further kestrels served as controls and were not vaccinated. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all 10 kestrels were challenged with passage 3 of the American falcon herpesvirus. The 2 control kestrels died 6 days after challenge and 3 of those given the inactivated herpes vaccine died 9 days after challenge, with typical lesions of herpesvirus inclusion body hepatitis. Before the vaccination experiment, all 10 kestrels were free of serum neutralising antibodies to the falcon herpesvirus. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all 4 kestrels vaccinated with the attenuated vaccine, and one vaccinated with the killed vaccine, had seroconverted, having shown no symptoms to the challenge with a low passage virulent American herpesvirus strain. Following the challenge their antibody titres to falcon herpesvirus increased. No herpesvirus was isolated from any of the cloacal swabs taken during this experiment, indicating that there is no danger for any other birds from the attenuated herpesvirus vaccine. This experiment clearly shows that an attenuated falcon herpesvirus vaccine can protect kestrels from fatal inclusion body hepatitis.

  15. Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma: correlation between imaging and pathology.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Zanetti, Gláucia; Vianna, Alberto Domingues; Santos, Alair A S M D; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2009-07-14

    Kaposi sarcoma is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four variants of this disease, each presenting a different clinical manifestation: classic or sporadic, African or endemic, organ transplant-related or iatrogenic, and AIDS-related or epidemic. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common tumor among patients with HIV infection, occurring predominantly in homosexual or bisexual men. The pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma occurs commonly in critically immunosupressed patients who commonly have had preceding mucocutaneous or digestive involvement.The etiology of Kaposi sarcoma is not precisely established; genetic, hormonal, and immune factors, as well as infectious agents, have all been implicated. There is evidence from epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular studies that Kaposi sarcoma is associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection. The disease starts as a reactive polyclonal angioproliferative response towards this virus, in which polyclonal cells change to form oligoclonal cell populations that expand and undergo malignant transformation.The diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma usually can be made by a combination of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, together with the results of bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy. Chest high-resolution computed tomography scans commonly reveal peribronchovascular and interlobular septal thickening, bilateral and symmetric ill-defined nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution, fissural nodularity, mediastinal adenopathies, and pleural effusions. Correlation between the high-resolution computed tomography findings and the pathology revealed by histopathological analysis demonstrate that the areas of central peribronchovascular infiltration represent tumor growth involving the bronchovascular bundles, with nodules corresponding to proliferations of neoplastic cells into the pulmonary parenchyma. The interlobular septal thickening may represent

  16. Hidden Pictures of Kaposi's Sarcoma in Psoriatic Lesions: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jisook; Jo, Mingyul; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Kwang-Hyun; Park, Hyang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal proliferative vascular tumor involving the skin and other organ and psoriasis is a chronic cutaneous disease with papules and plaques with white scale. Development of Kaposi's sarcoma in psoriasis patients has been reported rarely. A 71-year-old man presented with multiple brownish to violaceous plaques on both feet and arms which were found 4 months ago. The biopsy confirmed Kaposi's sarcoma. The patient was diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris 10 years ago and Kaposi's sarcoma lesions developed between psoriatic plaques. We herein report a rare case of simultaneous occurrence of Kaposi's sarcoma and psoriasis vulgaris which need quite different treatment. PMID:27904275

  17. p120-catenin regulates VE-cadherin endocytosis and degradation induced by the Kaposi sarcoma–associated ubiquitin ligase K5

    PubMed Central

    Nanes, Benjamin A.; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M.; Cadwell, Chantel M.; Robinson, Brian S.; Lowery, Anthony M.; Vincent, Peter A.; Mosunjac, Marina; Früh, Klaus; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin undergoes constitutive internalization driven by a unique endocytic motif that also serves as a p120-catenin (p120) binding site. p120 binding masks the motif, stabilizing the cadherin at cell junctions. This mechanism allows constitutive VE-cadherin endocytosis and recycling to contribute to adherens junction dynamics without resulting in junction disassembly. Here we identify an additional motif that drives VE-cadherin endocytosis and pathological junction disassembly associated with the endothelial-derived tumor Kaposi sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8, which causes Kaposi sarcoma, expresses the MARCH family ubiquitin ligase K5. We report that K5 targets two membrane-proximal VE-cadherin lysine residues for ubiquitination, driving endocytosis and down-regulation of the cadherin. K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis does not require the constitutive endocytic motif. However, K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis is associated with displacement of p120 from the cadherin, and p120 protects VE-cadherin from K5. Thus multiple context-dependent signals drive VE-cadherin endocytosis, but p120 binding to the cadherin juxtamembrane domain acts as a master regulator guarding cadherin stability. PMID:27798235

  18. [Oral lesions in Kaposi sarcoma: clinical and radiotherapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Barberis, M; Brenna Betti, N; Lauritano, D; Sangiani, L; Spadari, F; Villa, S

    1996-01-01

    The epidemic form of Kaposi's sarcoma is the most frequent tumor in sieropositive patients. Every part of the body including oral cavity is affected by these lesions. According to modern acknowledgement in treating oropharynge carcinoma, radiotherapy is used for management of oral Kaposi's sarcoma. This paper reports a study of 10 patients suffering from Kaposi's sarcoma correlated to AIDS (EKS) treated with radiotherapy and chemiotherapy, achieving good results, at the Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori of Milan (Divisone di Radioterapia C) from 1988 to 1992. Treatment has been performed using linear accelerator (6 Mev) or Co 60 unity in order to reach the deepest layer of mucosa lesions. Radiotherapy schedule consisted of 150-200 cGy daily fractions given 5 times/week (w) for 4-5 w in split-course.

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma in Uganda: Geographic and Ethnic Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. F.; Smith, P. G.; Bull, Diana; Pike, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Over the quinquennium 1964-68 the crude annual incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Uganda per million of the population was 7·9 overall, 14·6 for males and 1·1 for females. Statistical analysis indicates that the disease is most prevalent in highland areas to the west and among the indigenous Bantu tribes. There was no correlation with the distribution of squamous cell carcinoma of the lower leg, and Kaposi's sarcoma was not seen in an Indian or European during the period under review. PMID:4647399

  20. Rapamycin with Antiretroviral Therapy in AIDS-Associated Kaposi Sarcoma: An AIDS Malignancy Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Krown, Susan E.; Roy, Debasmita; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Reid, Erin G.; Venkataramanan, Raman; Han, Kelong; Cesarman, Ethel; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is activated in Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and its inhibitor, rapamycin, has induced KS regression in transplant-associated KS. This study aimed to evaluate rapamycin's safety and toxicity in HIV-infected individuals with KS receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), investigate rapamycin interactions with both protease inhibitor (PI)-containing and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing ART regimens, and assess clinical and biological endpoints including KS response and mTOR-dependent signaling. Methods Seven participants, 4 on PI-based and 3 on NNRTI-based ART, had rapamycin titrated to achieve trough concentrations of 5-10 ng/mL. Patients were monitored for safety and KS response. KS biopsies were evaluated for changes in phospho-Ribosomal S6 protein (pRPS6), and phospho-Akt expression. Interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, HIV and KS-associated herpesvirus viral loads, and CD4 counts were monitored. Results Despite pharmacokinetic interactions resulting in >200-fold differences in cumulative weekly rapamycin doses between participants on PI-containing and NNRTI-containing regimens, treatment was well tolerated. There were no significant changes in viral loads or cytokine levels; modest initial decreases in CD4 counts occurred in some patients. Three participants, all on PI-containing regimens and with higher rapamycin exposure, showed partial KS responses. Three of four subjects whose biopsies were studied at ≥day 50 showed decreased pRPS6 staining. Conclusions Rapamycin appears safe in HIV-infected individuals with KS and can, in some cases, induce tumor regression and affect its molecular targets. Significant pharmacokinetic interactions require careful titration to achieve target drug trough concentrations, but may be exploited to achieve therapeutic benefit. PMID:22067664

  1. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Allograft Kaposi Sarcoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Nazarena; Rebusso, Alessandro; Lunardi, Francesca; Loy, Monica; Calabrese, Francesca; Battistella, Lucia; Schiavon, Marco; Rea, Federico; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-01-14

    Solid-organ transplant recipients are at high risk of developing malignancies. A greater risk of Kaposi sarcoma has been reported in lung recipients in our country, particularly in those from Southern Italy, probably due to the high prevalence of Human herpes virus 8 infection. Kaposi sarcoma affecting only the lung allograft is extremely rare. We describe a case of a lung recipient who developed Kaposi sarcoma only in the graft, 22 months after transplant. The patient, a 65-year-old man from Southern Italy, underwent bilateral lung transplant for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in January 2009. He developed mild/moderate acute cellular rejection (≥A2) in 4 of 6 scheduled transbronchial biopsies thus was treated with increased immunosuppressive therapy, shifting from cyclosporine to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In July 2010, a high-resolution computed tomography scan showed small bilateral lung nodules, despite a generally good condition. After 2 months, his condition worsened with a severe weight loss. A positron emission tomography scan showed mild metabolic activity in the lesions with no other localizations. In October 2010, a lung biopsy was performed, with results showing typical histologic and immunohistochemical features of Kaposi sarcoma. Molecular tissue evaluations and serologic analyses were positive for Human herpes virus 8. The patient's immunosuppressive therapy was suspended, and he started liposomal doxorubicin treatment; however, after the first cycle, he developed severe respiratory dysfunction. The patient died 27 months after lung transplant for neoplasm. Our report highlights the importance of considering Kaposi sarcoma in the differential diagnosis for lung nodules in lung transplant recipients, even in the absence of any initial specific symptom or cutaneous lesion.

  2. KS-Detect - Validation of Solar Thermal PCR for the Diagnosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma Using Pseudo-Biopsy Samples.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Jiang, Li; Fu, Cheng; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    Resource-limited settings present unique engineering challenges for medical diagnostics. Diagnosis is often needed for those unable to reach central healthcare systems, making portability and independence from traditional energy infrastructure essential device parameters. In 2014, our group presented a microfluidic device that performed a solar-powered variant of the polymerase chain reaction, which we called solar thermal PCR. In this work, we expand on our previous effort by presenting an integrated, portable, solar thermal PCR system targeted towards the diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma. We call this system KS-Detect, and we now report the system's performance as a diagnostic tool using pseudo-biopsy samples made from varying concentrations of human lymphoma cell lines positive for the KS herpesvirus (KSHV). KS-Detect achieved 83% sensitivity and 70% specificity at high (≥ 10%) KSHV+ cell concentrations when diagnosing pseudo-biopsy samples by smartphone image. Using histology, we confirm that our prepared pseudo-biopsies contain similar KSHV+ cell concentrations as human biopsies positive for KS. Through our testing of samples derived from human cell lines, we validate KS-Detect as a viable, portable KS diagnostic tool, and we identify critical engineering considerations for future solar-thermal PCR devices.

  3. A case of Kaposi sarcoma in an immunocompetent, heterosexual Irish man: a discussion of etiology and viral transmission.

    PubMed

    Florek, Aleksandra G; Eilers, David; Armstrong, April W

    2015-10-16

    Four types of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) have been described, all of which are caused by human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8).  The incidence of KS in the United States is highest among HIV-positive homosexual men and elderly men of Eastern European, Jewish, or Mediterranean descent. However, few reports describe KS in HIV-negative, immunocompetent heterosexual men in the United States. HHV-8 is transmitted largely via saliva and close sexual contact, whereas there are only a handful of reports of transmission via blood and blood products. We report a case of an HIV-negative, immunocompetent heterosexual man who acquired KS via blood transfusion. A 77-year-old immunocompetent, monogamously heterosexual, HIV-negative Irish man presented with a biopsy-proven KS lesion on the right thigh. Past surgical history included a coronary artery bypass graft, during which he received a blood transfusion from an unknown donor source.  His ecchymotic KS lesions progressed while on doxycycline, intralesional vinblastine, and topical anti-angiogenic medications.  The patient eventually achieved stabilization of KS lesions with acitretin. Our case report emphasizes the need to characterize the phenotype and transmission route of HHV-8 in heterosexual, immunocompetent patients in geographic regions with low HHV-8 seroprevalence.

  4. Isolated Kaposi sarcoma of the finger pulp in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Aïm, F; Rosier, L; Dumontier, C

    2012-02-01

    A 63-year-old woman with long-standing AIDS and previous Kaposi sarcomas of the lower limb presented to our consultation complaining of a painful left ring finger with pulp enlargement. X-rays revealed an osteolytic lesion of the distal phalanx. We suspected an isolated osseous Kaposi sarcoma and at surgery we found a hemorrhagic lesion with bone extension into the phalanx. Bone involvement is rare in Kaposi sarcoma and even rarer in patients without a cutaneous location.

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma in an elderly man with Wegener's granulomatosis treated with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Erban, S B; Sokas, R K

    1988-05-01

    The association of Kaposi's sarcoma with malignant lymphoreticular diseases and immunosuppressive therapy is well documented. This report describes an elderly man who presented with fulminant Wegener's granulomatosis that responded to treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids. Rapidly progressing cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma developed ten weeks after the start of immunosuppressive therapy yet regressed on discontinuation of the corticosteroid therapy, despite continuation of cyclophosphamide therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Kaposi's sarcoma occurring in association with Wegener's granulomatosis. The literature on Kaposi's sarcoma in immunosuppressed patients is reviewed.

  6. Tonsillar Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis on immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Brahim, Nabeel; Zaki, Ashraf H; El-Merhi, Khaled; Ahmad, Mahmoud S

    2013-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a malignant vascular neoplasm uncommonly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Herein we report an unusual case of tonsillar Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis treated with prednisolone and cyclosporine. The patient presented after 10 months of starting the treatment with a tonsillar mass. Histological examination was typical of monomorphic spindle cell proliferation with slit-like vascular channels. The tumor cells expressed CD34, D2-40 and positive nuclear stain for HHV-8. Kaposi sarcoma is associated with immunosuppression and rarely occurs in the tonsil. Clinicians should be aware of this rare presentation of Kaposi sarcoma.

  7. Herpesvirus infections in xenotransplantation: pathogenesis and approaches.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-11-01

    Infectious risk remains an important consideration in the clinical application of xenotransplantation. Vascularized xenografts create unique immunological niches in which bidirectional transmission of pathogens between donor and recipient may occur. Enhanced replication of many pathogens is stimulated by the immune responses induced by transplantation and by the immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection. Herpesviruses are the prototype viruses that are activated during immunosuppression. Quantitative diagnostic molecular assays have been developed for the known herpesviruses causing infection in pigs. Recent data suggest that some herpesviral infections, such as porcine cytomegalovirus, may be excluded from swine used as source animals by careful breeding, while others will require novel strategies for control. This review focuses on porcine and baboon herpesviruses in pig-to-non-human primate solid organ xenotransplantation including direct effects (tissue damage), indirect effects (coagulopathy, rejection), and possible approaches to these infections.

  8. Primary structure of the herpesvirus saimiri genome.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, J C; Nicholas, J; Biller, D; Cameron, K R; Biesinger, B; Newman, C; Wittmann, S; Craxton, M A; Coleman, H; Fleckenstein, B

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of herpesvirus saimiri, the prototype of gammaherpesvirus subgroup 2 (rhadinoviruses). The unique low-G + C-content DNA region has 112,930 bp with an average base composition of 34.5% G + C and is flanked by about 35 noncoding high-G + C-content DNA repeats of 1,444 bp (70.8% G + C) in tandem orientation. We identified 76 major open reading frames and a set of seven U-RNA genes for a total of 83 potential genes. The genes are closely arranged, with only a few regions of sizable noncoding sequences. For 60 of the predicted proteins, homologous sequences are found in other herpesviruses. Genes conserved between herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus (gammaherpesvirus subgroup 1) show that their genomes are generally collinear, although conserved gene blocks are separated by unique genes that appear to determine the particular phenotype of these viruses. Several deduced protein sequences of herpesvirus saimiri without counterparts in most of the other sequenced herpesviruses exhibited significant homology with cellular proteins of known function. These include thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, complement control proteins, the cell surface antigen CD59, cyclins, and G protein-coupled receptors. Searching for functional protein motifs revealed that the virus may encode a cytosine-specific methylase and a tyrosine-specific protein kinase. Several herpesvirus saimiri genes are potential candidates to cooperate with the gene for saimiri transformation-associated protein of subgroup A (STP-A) in T-lymphocyte growth stimulation. PMID:1321287

  9. Disseminated Kaposi sarcoma in a HIV negative patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoshu; Wang, Hongyan; Fan, Xing; Li, Hui; Wang, Zaixing; Lin, Da; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a neoplasm of the endothelial cells. It often manifests with multiple vascular nodules on the skin and other organs. It is a systemic, malignant and multifactor disease and has a variable course. We describe an elderly Chinese man who had a rapidly growing maroon nodule on his right foot, both arms and cheekbones. KS in HIV-negative patients has only been reported sporadically.

  10. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  11. Risk of Kaposi's sarcoma and of other cancers in Italian renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Serraino, D; Piselli, P; Angeletti, C; Minetti, E; Pozzetto, A; Civati, G; Bellelli, S; Farchi, F; Citterio, F; Rezza, G; Franceschi, S; Busnach, G

    2005-01-01

    A follow-up study of 1844 renal transplant patients in Italy showed a 113-fold increased risk for Kaposi's sarcoma. Kaposi's sarcoma risk was higher in persons born in southern than in northern Italy. Significant increases were also observed for cancers of the lip, liver, kidney and for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:15668710

  12. Peginterferon alfa-2a for AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma: experience with 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Rokx, Casper; van der Ende, Marchina E; Verbon, Annelies; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2013-11-01

    In this observational cohort study, 10 patients with extensive or treatment-refractory AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma were treated with peginterferon alfa-2a. Tumor responses were observed in 9 patients with a median progression-free survival of 645 days. Peginterferon alfa-2a could be an effective therapy for extensive or treatment-resistant Kaposi sarcoma.

  13. Herpes virus-like sequences are specifically found in Kaposi sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E; Henson, T H; Ghorbani, A J; Land, M A; Webber, B L; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To detect the prevalence of herpes virus-like DNA sequences in AIDS associated Kaposi sarcoma (KSHV) lesions and normal tissue. METHODS: KSHV detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using four different sets of primers. PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and analysed. RESULTS: All of four biopsies of Kaposi sarcoma lesions and all of three paraffin embedded Kaposi sarcoma tissues were positive for KSHV, while normal tissue from the same patients was negative. Sequence analysis of amplification products revealed polymorphisms that result in amino acid changes of the predicted sequence. CONCLUSIONS: KSHV is prevalent in tissues from Kaposi sarcoma, suggesting a role in the development of the tumour. On this basis, anti-herpes virus agents should be considered to control Kaposi sarcoma. Images PMID:8655706

  14. [Kaposi sarcoma and HHV-8: a model of cutaneous cancer in immunosuppressed patients].

    PubMed

    Dupin, Nicolas; Deleuze, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The virus HHV-8 will celebrate its twentieth birthday by the end of this year and its relationships with Kaposi sarcoma are not completely elucidated. HHV-8 is an enigmatic virus, with an inhomogeneous distribution, a salivary transmission while it is not an ubiquitous virus, at least in western countries. However, HHV-8 has a unique genetic equipment rending is role in Kaposi sarcoma more than plausible. While the virus is necessary, it appears that it is not sufficient as the development of Kaposi sarcoma is frequently associated with immunosuppression whatever the cause (iatrogenic, viral, age-related). Kaposi sarcoma should be more considered as an opportunistic tumour than a viral-induced cancer and the best treatment for Kaposi sarcoma is immune restoration at least when it is possible.

  15. Myasthenia gravis developing in an HIV-negative patient with Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Mascolo, Maria; Bandettini di Poggio, Monica; Caponnetto, Claudia; Pardini, Matteo

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission caused by autoimmune mechanisms. We reported a possible association between seropositive myasthenia gravis and Kaposi's sarcoma in a HIV-negative subject and the observed interactions between the treatment regimen for these two conditions. A 62-year-old man came to our attention for ocular myasthenia gravis. He suffered from a classic form of Kaposi's sarcoma since about 1 year. When myasthenic symptoms worsened, the patient was started on prednisone and azathioprine. The patient had a significant worsening of Kaposi's sarcoma, so prednisone and azathioprine were reduced and he was treated with vinblastine, with improvement both in dermatologic than in neurological symptomatology. We propose some considerations: the potential correlation between Kaposi's sarcoma and myasthenia gravis through immunological mechanism; myasthenia gravis as a paraneoplastic manifestation of Kaposi's sarcoma, and the role of an antitumoral agent as a treatment for both the conditions.

  16. Usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in a case of Kaposi sarcoma with an unexpected bone lesion.

    PubMed

    Morooka, Miyako; Ito, Kimiteru; Kubota, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Teruya, Katsuji; Hasuo, Kahehiro; Shida, Yoshitaka; Minamimoto, Rhogo; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2011-03-01

    Bone lesions of Kaposi sarcoma are rare. A 56-year-old man who was HIV positive and was diagnosed with Kaposi sarcoma on the basis of the results of a biopsy of skin lesions, underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT scan for detecting Kaposi sarcoma lesions and other AIDS-related diseases. An abnormal uptake was observed in the lumbar spine. MRI showed a diffuse enhanced spine lesion, and Ga-67 and ²⁰¹Tl scanning were negative. As a result, the lesion was considered to be a Kaposi sarcoma, and the shrinkage of the lesion was noted after the therapy for Kaposi sarcoma.

  17. New hosts for equine herpesvirus 9.

    PubMed

    Schrenzel, Mark D; Tucker, Tammy A; Donovan, Taryn A; Busch, Martin D M; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K; Kiupel, Matti

    2008-10-01

    Equine herpesvirus 9 was detected in a polar bear with progressive encephalitis; the source was traced to 2 members of a potential equid reservoir species, Grevy's zebras. The virus was also found in an aborted Persian onager. Thus, the natural host range is extended to 6 species in 3 mammalian orders.

  18. New Hosts for Equine Herpesvirus 9

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tammy A.; Donovan, Taryn A.; Busch, Martin D.M.; Wise, Annabel G.; Maes, Roger K.; Kiupel, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus 9 was detected in a polar bear with progressive encephalitis; the source was traced to 2 members of a potential equid reservoir species, Grevy’s zebras. The virus was also found in an aborted Persian onager. Thus, the natural host range is extended to 6 species in 3 mammalian orders. PMID:18826828

  19. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  20. Risk of classic Kaposi sarcoma with exposures to plants and soils in Sicily

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ecologic and in vitro studies suggest that exposures to plants or soil may influence risk of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). Methods In a population-based study of Sicily, we analyzed data on contact with 20 plants and residential exposure to 17 soils reported by 122 classic KS cases and 840 sex- and age-matched controls. With 88 KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) seropositive controls as the referent group, novel correlates of KS risk were sought, along with factors distinguishing seronegatives, in multinomial logistic regression models that included matching variables and known KS cofactors - smoking, cortisone use, and diabetes history. All plants were summed for cumulative exposure. Factor and cluster analyses were used to obtain scores and groups, respectively. Individual plants and soils in three levels of exposure with Ptrend ≤ 0.15 were retained in a backward elimination regression model. Results Adjusted for known cofactors, KS was not related to cumulative exposures to 20 plants [per quartile adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 - 1.25, Ptrend = 0.87], nor was it related to any factor scores or cluster of plants (P = 0.11 to 0.81). In the elimination regression model, KS risk was associated with five plants (Ptrend = 0.02 to 0.10) and with residential exposure to six soils (Ptrend = 0.01 to 0.13), including three soils (eutric regosol, chromic/pellic vertisol) used to cultivate durum wheat. None of the KS-associated plants and only one soil was also associated with KSHV serostatus. Diabetes was associated with KSHV seronegativity (ORadj 4.69, 95% CI 1.97 - 11.17), but the plant and soil associations had little effect on previous findings that KS risk was elevated for diabetics (ORadj 7.47, 95% CI 3.04 - 18.35) and lower for current and former smokers (ORadj 0.26 and 0.47, respectively, Ptrend = 0.05). Conclusions KS risk was associated with exposure to a few plants and soils, but these may merely be due to chance. Study of

  1. Three Novel Herpesviruses of Endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Ossiboff, Robert J.; Raphael, Bonnie L.; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D.; Seimon, Tracie A.; Newton, Alisa L.; Chang, Tylis Y.; Zarate, Brian; Whitlock, Alison L.; McAloose, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The rich diversity of the world’s reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta) and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata) turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204) and smaller numbers of positive wood (5) and spotted (1) turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts. PMID

  2. Three novel herpesviruses of endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys turtles.

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Newton, Alisa L; Chang, Tylis Y; Zarate, Brian; Whitlock, Alison L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The rich diversity of the world's reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta) and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata) turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204) and smaller numbers of positive wood (5) and spotted (1) turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts.

  3. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  4. Toll-like receptor sensing of human herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Gregory, Sean M.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved pathogen sensors that constitute the first line of defense in the human immune system. Herpesviruses are prevalent throughout the world and cause significant disease in the human population. Sensing of herpesviruses via TLRs has only been documented in the last 10 years and our understanding of the relationship between these sentinels of the immune system and herpesvirus infection has already provided great insight into how the host cell responds to viral infection. This report will summarize the activation and modulation of TLR signaling in the context of human herpesvirus infections. PMID:23061052

  5. Recurrent and self-healing cutaneous monoclonal plasmablastic infiltrates in a patient with AIDS and Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gilaberte, M; Gallardo, F; Bellosillo, B; Saballs, P; Barranco, C; Serrano, S; Pujol, R M

    2005-10-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases the risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare variant of diffuse large cell lymphoma that often involves the oral cavity of HIV+ patients. It is characterized by immunoblastic morphology and plasma cell phenotype. Cutaneous involvement in PBL appears to be rare. We report a 44-year-old man with AIDS and Kaposi sarcoma (KS) previously treated with doxorubicin who, following treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy, developed an erythematous infiltrated nodule on the right arm. Histology showed subcutaneous fat necrosis and clusters of atypical large plasma cells (plasmablastic cells). Immunohistochemistry revealed lambda light chain restriction. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization within the plasmablastic cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification with specific primers for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) performed on the skin biopsy specimen detected a specific band. A complete screening (bone marrow biopsy, computed tomographic scan, radiological survey) disclosed no abnormalities. The lesion resolved spontaneously after 3 months. Two years later an infiltrated plaque developed on the abdominal wall. The clinical and histopathological features of this new lesion were similar to those observed 2 years previously. No evidence of extracutaneous involvement was detected. The lesion again resolved spontaneously after 25 days. PBL may be seen in patients with transplants or receiving chemotherapy, but is usually observed in patients with advanced AIDS. The observation of recurrent self-healing EBV- and HHV-8-associated cutaneous monoclonal plasmablastic infiltrates, in a patient with AIDS and KS, expands the clinical spectrum of AIDS-associated plasmablastic lymphoproliferative disorders.

  6. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Janna M; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2016-09-29

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area.

  7. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area. PMID:27482898

  8. Molecular piracy of chemokine receptors by herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P M

    1994-01-01

    To succeed as a biological entity, viruses must exploit normal cellular functions and elude the host immune system; they often do so by molecular mimicry. One way that mimicry may occur is when viruses copy and modify host genes. The best studied examples of this are the oncogenes of RNA retroviruses, but a growing number of examples are also known for DNA viruses. So far they all come from just two groups of DNA viruses, the herpesviruses and poxviruses, and the majority of examples are for genes whose products regulate immune responses, such as cytokines, cytokine receptors, and complement control proteins. This review will focus on human and herpesvirus receptors for chemokines, a family of leukocyte chemoattractant and activating factors that are thought to be important mediators of inflammation. Although the biological roles of the viral chemokine receptor homologues are currently unknown, their connection to specific sets of chemokines has suggested a number of possible functions.

  9. Characterization of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Filipa B.; Colaco, Susanna; May, Janet S.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) glycoprotein B (gB) was identified in purified virions by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy. It was synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor in infected cells and cleaved into 65-kDa and 55-kDa disulfide-linked subunits close to the time of virion release. The N-linked glycans on the cleaved, virion gB remained partially endoglycosidase H sensitive. The processing of MHV-68 gB therefore appears similar to that of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gB and human cytomegalovirus gB. PMID:15542690

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus, and Risk Factors in HIV-infected Patients in Tehran, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Keyvani, Hossein; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Jahanbakhsh Sefidi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) remains the most common malignancy among HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus type-8 (HHV-8) is regarded as the infectious etiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KSHV). Diagnostic procedures associated with KSHV are not routinely performed in HIV-infected subjects. Objectives The main objective of this study is to obtain information on KSHV epidemiology in Iranian HIV-infected individuals. Patients and Methods In the present cross-sectional study, 109 patients with established HIV infection, who visited a governmental and referral center for HIV screening in Tehran (Tehran west health center (TWHC)) between May 2014 and July 2015 were enrolled according to the convenience sample strategy. After peripheral blood collection, isolation of plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) compartments, DNA extraction was performed. KSHV DNA was analyzed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) using primers from ORF-26 (virus minor capsid). Results Among all 109 HIV-infected patients, 67 (61.5%) were male, with an age range of 2 - 64 years (mean ± standard deviation 35.8 ± 13.3). KSHV DNA was found in PBMC and plasma samples of six (5.5%) and four (3.6%) patients, respectively. Conclusions This study revealed a considerable prevalence of KSHV DNA, during latent and lytic phases, among HIV-infected patients. Risk factors for KSHV infection acquisition and concurrent. 0+infection with HIV were also evaluated. Diagnosis of KSHV in the group could be helpful for prognosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma and clinical management. PMID:28191343

  11. Comparative full genome sequence analysis of columbid herpesvirus-1 and falconid herpesvirus-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columbid herpesvirus type 1 (CoHV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus in the genus Mardivirus that infect pigeons and causes fatal disseminated infections in birds of prey: owls, falcons and hawks. A common feature of captive raptures that have succumbed to CoHV-1 infection is that they all have been fed pige...

  12. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with elastic stockings and outpatient follow-up of a 90-year-old patient*

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Flavia; Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Alves, Celia Antonia Xavier de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifactorial angioproliferative disorder. The herpes virus 8 human contributes to its pathogenesis, but it is uncertain whether these lesions are only reactive hyperplasia to the virus or neoplasia. Four clinical types are described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma has no standard staging or treatment protocols. Some studies have shown the use of compression stockings in the treatment of lymphedema associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. We report the case of a 90 year-old patient with classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with compression stockings who showed a satisfactory response. PMID:24346919

  13. Use of plasma human herpesvirus-8 viral load measurement: evaluation of practice in three UK HIV treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Nugent, D B; Webster, D; Mabayoje, D; Chung, E; El Bouzidi, K; O'Sullivan, A; Ainsworth, J; Miller, R F

    2017-02-01

    A retrospective audit of plasma human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) viral load testing was performed in three HIV treatment centres over 24 months. Reasons for testing (360 tests) were: symptoms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (fever, lymphadenopathy and raised inflammatory markers); monitoring in known HHV-8 pathology other than Kaposi sarcoma (KS); investigation of known/suspected KS, and other/no reason. Of patients with multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), 14/16 (88%) had detectable plasma HHV-8, as did 27/45 (60%) with biopsy proven or clinically confirmed KS, and 6/19 (32%) with lymphoma. Neither of the two patients with MCD and no detectable HHV-8 had SIRS symptoms at the time of the test. There was wide variation between centres in the indications prompting HHV-8 testing, with a more conservative approach resulting in a higher proportion of positive results. Measuring plasma HHV-8 in the absence of SIRS symptoms, established HHV-8 disease monitoring, or confirmed/suspected KS is unlikely to yield detectable HHV-8 thus allowing potential cost savings.

  14. Clinical challenge: cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erika L; Pierpont, Yvonne N; Donate, Guillermo; Hiro, Mattew H; Mannari, Rudolph J; Strickland, Theodore J; Robson, Martin C; Payne, Wyatt G

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) typically presents as multiple bilateral cutaneous patches or plaques of the lower extremities. This malignancy, however, can evolve with atypical presentation masquerading as a chronic wound. Lesions can mimic venous stasis ulcers, arterial insufficiency, vascular ulcers or chronic-infected wounds. With acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated KS, lesions are even more widespread, and can affect the respiratory tract, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, spleen, liver and, rarely, bone. As the initial diagnosis of KS is generally determined clinically, a high index of suspicion is necessary for all patients with a known or suspected history of HIV/AIDS. Tissue biopsy with histological analysis is essential for all wound types in this patient subset, regardless of wound presentation. The purpose of this report is to review the pathogenesis as well as the typical and atypical presentations of KS with an example of a diagnostic dilemma.

  15. Analysis of the genome of leporid herpesvirus 4

    PubMed Central

    Babra, Bobby; Watson, Gregory; Xu, Wayne; Jeffrey, Brendan; Xu, Jia-Rong; Rockey, Dan; Rohrmann, George; Jin, Ling

    2012-01-01

    The genome of a herpesvirus highly pathogenic to rabbits, leporid herpesvirus 4 (LHV-4), was analyzed using high-throughput DNA sequencing technology and primer walking. The assembled DNA sequences were further verified by restriction endonuclease digestion and Southern blot analyses. The total length of the LHV-4 genome was determined to be about 124 kb. Genes encoded in the LHV-4 genome are most closely related to herpesvirus of the Simplexvirus genus, including human herpesviruses (HHV -1 and HHV-2), monkey herpesviruses including cercopithicine (CeHV-2 and CeHV-16), macacine (McHV-1), bovine herpesvirus 2 (BHV-2), and a lineage of wallaby (macropodid) herpesviruses (MaHV -1 and -2). Similar to other simplexvirus genomes, LHV-4 has a high overall G+C content of 65%-70% in the unique regions and 75–77% in the inverted repeat regions. Orthologs of ICP34.5 and US5 were not identified in the LHV-4 genome. This study shows that LHV-4 has the smallest simplexvirus genome characterized to date. PMID:22921533

  16. Cavernous hemangioma-like kaposi sarcoma: histomorphologic features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Onak Kandemir, Nilüfer; Barut, Figen; Doğan Gün, Banu; Solak Tekin, Nilgün; Hallaç Keser, Sevinç; Oğuz Özdamar, Sükrü

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare morphologic type of Kaposi sarcoma. So far there are no cases in the literature defining the histological features of this morphologic spectrum in detail. In this study we presented two classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma cases with histologic findings resembling cavernous hemangioma in company with clinical and histopathological data. Cases. One hundred and eighty-five classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma lesions in 79 patients were assessed retrospectively in terms of histopathological features. Findings of two cases showing features of cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma whose clinical data could be accessed were presented in accompany with the literature data. Both cases were detected to have bluish-purple, protruded, irregularly bordered cutaneous lesions. Histopathological examination revealed a lesion formed by cavernous hemangioma-like vascular structures organized in a lobular pattern that became dilated and filled with blood. Typical histological findings of early-stage KS, consisting of mononuclear inflammation, extravasated erythrocytes, and a few immature vascular structures in superficial dermis, were observed. All cases were serologically HIV-1 negative. A positive reaction with HHV-8, CD31, CD34, and D2-40 monoclonal antibodies was identified at both cavernous hemangioma-like areas and in immature vascular structures. Results. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare Kaposi sarcoma variant presenting with diagnostic challenges, that may be confused with hemangioma. As characteristic morphological features may not be observed in every case, it is important for diagnostic purposes to show immunohistochemical HHV-8 positivity in this variant.

  17. Discovery of herpesviruses in Canadian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Chimoné S; van de Rakt, Karen; Fahlman, Åsa; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen; Neuhaus, Peter; Popko, Richard; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank

    2017-02-01

    Herpesviruses (HVs) have a wide range of hosts in the animal kingdom. The result of infection with HVs can vary from asymptomatic to fatal diseases depending on subtype, strain, and host. To date, little is known about HVs naturally circulating in wildlife species and the impact of these viruses on other species. In our study, we used genetic and comparative approaches to increase our understanding of circulating HVs in Canadian wildlife. Using nested polymerase chain reaction targeting a conserved region of the HV DNA polymerase gene, we analyzed material derived from wildlife of western and northern Canada collected between February 2009 and Sept 2014. For classification of new virus sequences, we compared our viral sequences with published sequences in GenBank to identify conserved residues and motifs that are unique to each subfamily, alongside phylogenetic analysis. All alphaherpesviruses shared a conserved tryptophan (W856) and tyrosine (Y880), betaherpesviruses all shared a serine (S836), and gammaherpesviruses had a conserved glutamic acid (E835). Most of our wildlife HV sequences grouped together with HVs from taxonomically related host species. From Martes americana, we detected previously uncharacterized alpha- and beta-herpesviruses.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a herpesvirus from feral pigeons in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Ma, Jian; Guo, Ying; Tian, Li; Guo, Guangyang; Zhang, Kexin; Xing, Mingwei

    2015-12-01

    A herpesvirus was isolated during a diagnostic investigation of severe cases of conjunctivitis in feral pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica). Isolates of the virus were recovered from throat swabs of the pigeons followed by inoculation of the swab samples in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Pigeons inoculated with the isolated virus had similar clinical signs to those observed in naturally infected birds. Transmission electron microscopy revealed viral structures with typical herpesvirus morphology. Polymerase chain reaction amplification, using herpesvirus-identifying primers resulted in an amplicon of the expected size for herpesvirus. Sequencing of these amplicons and database comparisons identified the herpesvirus UL30 homologue. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggested that the isolated herpesvirus belongs to the Mardivirus genus of Alphaherpesvirinae. Using the current herpesvirus nomenclature conventions, the authors propose that the herpesvirus be named Columbid herpesvirus-1 Heilongjiang.

  19. In vivo pharmacokinetic analysis for fluorescently labeled RGD peptide targeted to the αvβ3 integrin in Kaposi"s sarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Ke, Shi; Houston, Jessica P.; Wang, Wei; Wu, Qingping; Li, Chun; Sevick Muraca, Eva M.

    2005-04-01

    The dose dependence of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent labeled RGD peptide targeted to the αvβ3 integrin was assessed from xenografts bearing a subcutaneous human Kaposi"s sarcoma (KS1767) with dynamic NIR fluorescence optical imaging. The three-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model was used to determine PK parameters from fluorescence images acquired with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) system. Dynamic imaging of Kaposi"s sarcoma bearing animals was conducted with i.v. administration of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) at doses of 0.75 to 6 nmol/animal and at the doses of 300 or 600 nmol of c(KRGDf) administered 1 hour before the injection of 3 nmol dose of the conjugate. The results show early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), which was mediated by the administration of c(KRGDf) 1 hour before administration at the conjugate agent. From the results we found a linear increase in PK uptake rates at doses of 0.75 to 1.5 nmol, reflecting unsaturated binding to the integrin receptor. However, the results show the dose independence at large dose amounts from 3 to 6 nmol per animal. The effects of cancer treatments as well as diagnostics may be evaluated by in vivo PK analysis with NIR fluorescence optical imaging.

  20. Beral et al's 1990 paper on Kaposi's sarcoma among persons with AIDS: demonstrating the power of descriptive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert; Whitby, Denise

    2016-10-01

    Here we discuss the impact of Beral et al's 1990 paper "Kaposi's sarcoma among persons with AIDS: a sexually transmitted infection?" Not only did this paper galvanise research into the underlying infectious cause of Kaposi's sarcoma, it also demonstrated the power of observational epidemiology in pointing the way towards major discoveries.

  1. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Kaposi sarcoma in the liver manifesting as acute obstructive hepatitis: another potential role for montelukast?

    PubMed

    Read, P J; Lucas, S; Morris, S; Kulasegaram, R

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been described in Kaposi sarcoma, but does not usually manifest as acute hepatitis. We describe a case of rapid obstructive jaundice after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, in which the liver biopsy confirmed hepatic Kaposi sarcoma, and the clinical course was altered by the addition of montelukast.

  2. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  3. Convergent capture of retroviral superantigens by mammalian herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer from retroviruses to mammals is well documented and extensive, but is rare between unrelated viruses with distinct genome types. Three herpesviruses encode a gene with similarity to a retroviral superantigen gene (sag) of the unrelated mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). We uncover ancient retroviral sags in over 20 mammals to reconstruct their shared history with herpesviral sags, revealing that the acquisition is a convergent evolutionary event. A retrovirus circulating in South American primates over 10 million years ago was the source of sag in two monkey herpesviruses, and a different retrovirus was the source of sag in a Peruvian rodent herpesvirus. We further show through a timescaled phylogenetic analysis that a cross-species transmission of monkey herpesviruses occurred after the acquisition of sag. These results reveal that a diverse range of ancient sag-containing retroviruses independently donated sag twice from two separate lineages that are distinct from MMTV. PMID:26400439

  4. Genome Sequences of Equid Herpesviruses 2 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Kerr, Karen; Stewart, James P.; Studdert, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the genome of equid herpesvirus 2 (EHV2) strain 86/67 and sequenced the genomes of EHV2 strain G9/92 and equid herpesvirus 5 (EHV5) strain 2-141/67. The most prominent genetic differences are the dissimilar locations of the interleukin-10 (IL-10)-like genes and the presence of an OX-2-like gene in EHV5 only. PMID:25767243

  5. Modulatory effects on dendritic cells by human herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Rasmus; Svensson, Mattias; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B are β-herpesviruses approaching 100% seroprevalance worldwide. These viruses are involved in several clinical syndromes and have important immunomodulatory effects. Dendritic cells (DC) are key players in innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly, DC are implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including infections. In this review the effects of HHV-6 infection on DC will be discussed. PMID:25983728

  6. Human herpesvirus 8 – A novel human pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Daniel C

    2005-01-01

    In 1994, Chang and Moore reported on the latest of the gammaherpesviruses to infect humans, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) [1]. This novel herpesvirus has and continues to present challenges to define its scope of involvement in human disease. In this review, aspects of HHV-8 infection are discussed, such as, the human immune response, viral pathogenesis and transmission, viral disease entities, and the virus's epidemiology with an emphasis on HHV-8 diagnostics. PMID:16138925

  7. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    Mouse models of human herpesvirus infections The human roseoloviruses HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with Roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T-cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By Next Generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174Kb genome sequence encoding 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7, than another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV6A/HHV6B/HHV7.Importance: Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  8. Herpesviruses and Newcastle disease viruses in white storks (Ciconia ciconia).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Kummerfeld, N

    1983-01-01

    Three herpesviruses were isolated from white storks (Ciconia ciconia). All isolates reacted in cross-neutralisation tests with homologous antisera and with sera prepared against a herpesvirus from a black stork (Ciconia nigra). These data indicate serologic relatedness of the herpesviruses from both stork species. Antisera prepared against herpesviruses from the domestic chicken (viruses of Marek's disease and infectious laryngotracheitis), turkey, duck and pigeon as well as from the blue-fronted amazon (Amazona aestiva), prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus), eagle owl (Bubo bubo), Lake Victoria cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos), bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) and desmoiselle crane (Anthropoides virgo) did not react with the stork herpesviruses. Neutralising antibodies against stork herpesvirus were detected in the majority of 72 blood samples from white and black storks. In addition, three Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) could be isolated from white storks. One isolate was highly virulent the two others were avirulent for the chicken. Haemagglutination inhibition tests have shown that some storks have antibodies against Paramyxovirus- (PMV)-1 (NDV), PMV-2 and PMV-3. No antibodies could be detected in stork sera against PMV-4, -6 and -7.

  9. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  10. An unusual case of posttransplant peritoneal primary effusion lymphoma with T-cell phenotype in a HIV-negative female, not associated with HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Venizelos, Ioannis; Tamiolakis, Demetrio; Lambropoulou, Maria; Nikolaidou, Sylva; Bolioti, Sophia; Papadopoulos, Hlias; Papadopoulos, Nikolas

    2005-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a recently individualized form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (WHO classification) that mainly develops in HIV infected males, more frequently in homosexuals and advanced stages of the disease (total CD4+ lymphocyte count below 100-200/microL). Occasionally, it appears in other immunodepressive states (such as solid organs transplant period) and even, although very rarely, in immunocompetent patients. From a pathogenetic point of view, PEL has been related to Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpes virus (also named human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8), an etiological factor of Kaposi's sarcoma. The relative infrequency of this disease, the absence of wide casuistics allowing a better characterization, and its unfavorable outcome support the need of a deeper knowledge. We present here the clinical-biological findings of a patient, HIV seronegative, who was diagnosed with peritoneal PEL of T-cell origin, and not HHV-8-associated, five years after renal transplantation.

  11. Anorectal Herpesvirus hominis infection in men.

    PubMed

    Waugh, M A

    1976-12-01

    Thirteen cases of anorectal Herpesivirus hominis infection in male homosexuals are described. Symptoms included pruitus ani in 11 cases, while 7 noticed intense and pain. Change of bowel habits and anal discharge were not presenting symptoms in the majority. None had generalized complications. Inguinal lymphadenopathy, a vesicular eruption, and superficial ulceration around the anal margin were commonly found. Some developed vesicular spread to the natal cleft. Treatment with cotrimoxazole to prevent masking of possible coexistent syphilis, though satisfactory in preventing secondary infection seemed to have little effect on early resolution of the lesions. Relapse occurred in over one third of the patients. Infection with Herpesvirus hominis seems an uncommon but increasingly recognized hazard for the passive homosexual and should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions presenting at the anus.

  12. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma as the initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Tasnim F.; Al-Khateeb, Ziyaad; Jung, Jin; Peters, Stephen; Dever, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually presents in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions that may advance to extensive visceral disease. There have been only a few documented cases in which the initial presentation of Kaposi's sarcoma involved the bronchopulmonary system. We describe a newly diagnosed patient who presented with pulmonary KS as his initial presentation of the disease. Our report is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness that pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma should be considered in HIV-infected patients who present with respiratory symptoms, even if they do not manifest the typical mucocutaneous manifestations of KS or have low CD4 counts. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential in improving outcomes as this condition carries a high mortality. PMID:26839780

  13. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma as the initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Imran, Tasnim F; Al-Khateeb, Ziyaad; Jung, Jin; Peters, Stephen; Dever, Lisa L

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually presents in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions that may advance to extensive visceral disease. There have been only a few documented cases in which the initial presentation of Kaposi's sarcoma involved the bronchopulmonary system. We describe a newly diagnosed patient who presented with pulmonary KS as his initial presentation of the disease. Our report is intended to increase clinicians' awareness that pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma should be considered in HIV-infected patients who present with respiratory symptoms, even if they do not manifest the typical mucocutaneous manifestations of KS or have low CD4 counts. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential in improving outcomes as this condition carries a high mortality.

  14. Kaposi sarcoma of the ureter after liver transplant: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhao, Liang; Qiu, Shao-peng; He, Xiao-shun

    2012-02-01

    Kaposi sarcoma after an organ transplant is rare and infrequently involves internal organs. There are 2 reported cases in the English literature of Kaposi sarcoma originating from the transplant ureter after kidney transplant. We report a case of Kaposi sarcoma that occurred in the native ureter of the liver transplant recipient. Initially, the patient refused any further investigation and management and 2 years subsequent, had to undergo a left radical nephroureterectomy owing to the loss of renal function and distending pain. He recovered very well and no recurrence was detected at 47 months' follow-up. To our knowledge, it is the first report in English. We review the literature on this topic and explore the therapeutic principles and histologic features of this sarcoma.

  15. Kaposi Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland Resembling Epithelioid Angiosarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Huwait, Hassan; Meneghetti, Adam; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection are known to have increased risk of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, which classically involves the skin and mucosal locations. The anaplastic variant of Kaposi sarcoma is rare and poorly documented in the literature. It is characterised clinically by a more aggressive behaviour and increased metastatic potential, and histologically by increased cellularity, mitotic rate, and rarely by epithelioid angiosarcoma-like morphology. We report herein a 64-year-old man with a long-standing history of human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed a right adrenal tumor with a high-grade anaplastic angiosarcoma-like morphology. Immunohistochemistry for human herpes virus-8 was strongly positive in the tumor cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma in the adrenal gland. PMID:21845069

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma in Italy before and after the AIDS epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, M.; Franceschi, S.; Barchielli, A.; Falcini, F.; Carli, S.; Cocconi, G.; Conti, E.; Crosignani, P.; Gafà, L.; Giarelli, L.

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in 1976-90 was assessed in Italy, taking advantage of a network of nine population-based cancer registries covering, at its maximum, approximately 5.6 million subjects. The first examined period (1976-84) substantially reflects the epidemiology of KS prior to the AIDS epidemic in the registration areas. Elevated incidence rates, standardised to the Italian population of 1981, of 1.05/100,000 men and 0.27/100,000 women emerged in 1976-84 (i.e. from two- to threefold higher than in the USA and Sweden, more than tenfold higher than in England and Wales). These high rates, especially remarkable in the Registry from the south of Italy (i.e. Ragusa, 3.01/100,000 men and 0.54/100,000 women) suggest that the prevalence of the still unknown causative agent for KS was high, at least in some parts of Italy, prior to the AIDS epidemic. In the most recent period (1985-90), an approximately twofold increase in KS incidence rates in Italian men below age 50 was observed (from 0.15 in 1976-84 to 0.47 in 1985-90). Conversely, declines in KS incidence were recorded in older men. PMID:8297730

  17. Recapitulation of acquired immuno deficiency syndrome associated Kaposi's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is one of the clinical forms of KS. KS is caused by human herpes viruses 8 or KS associated herpes virus (KSHV). In India, till now, only 16 cases of AIDS associated KS was reported. Of all the clinical forms of KS, AIDS associated KS is distinct in many ways viz.; cutaneous manifestations commonly affects face and trunk rather than lower limbs, more mucosal lesions, rapidly progressive, and early systemic involvement. When human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is co-infected with KSHV, in addition to the other pathogenic factors for the development of KS, HIV Tat protein promotes the proliferation of cytokine-activated endothelial cells and stimulates KS. Moreover, actions of HIV Tat lead to the aggressive course of KS in patients with AIDS, compared with the more confined behavior of KS in HIV-negative persons. Similarly, latency-associated nuclear antigen of KSHV would enhance HIV replication by activating the long terminal repeats of HIV-1 through its association with Tat. Effective antiretroviral treatment in AIDS associated KS results in reduction of the incidence of AIDS-related KS and regression of the existing lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment of AIDS associated KS would definitely increase the life span and quality of the patients. PMID:27890943

  18. Cutaneous colesional acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated Kaposi sarcoma and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Subrayan, Sumeshini; Calonje, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 4 AIDS patients with cutaneous colesional Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and cryptococcosis, a rare phenomenon, are described. Biopsies from 3 patients who were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naive demonstrated predominant KS with a conspicuous spindle cell component and small aggregates of cryptococcal yeasts in 2 biopsies and predominant gelatinous cryptococcosis with attenuated KS spindle cells in 1 biopsy. One patient was HAART exposed. He had childhood pulmonary tuberculosis, was treated for disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis 18 months earlier and presented with cutaneous lesions, odynophagia and massive cervical lymphadenopathy in the eighth week of HAART, after achieving viral suppression and a CD4 cell increase from 28 to 184 cells/μL. His skin biopsy demonstrated a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, neutrophils, and granulomas with admixed aggregates and single Cryptococcus neoformans and focal aggregation of human herpes virus 8-immunopositive spindle cells. Acid fast bacilli were not identified and mycobacterial molecular studies were negative. The features were compatible with cutaneous cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. His nodal and oropharyngeal biopsies demonstrated dense mixed, including granulomatous, inflammation with few cryptococcal yeasts and acid fast bacilli, confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction testing, without KS. These features were also compatible with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, but the exact role of each infection in the extracutaneous sites was unconfirmed. Colesional KS and cryptococcosis served as the sentinel lesion of AIDS in 3 patients and of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in 1 patient.

  19. Concomitant Kaposi sarcoma and multicentric Castleman's disease in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Bishburg, Eliahu; Zucker, Mark; Tsang, Patricia; Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Sabnani, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant human herpes virus -8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection is associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are the most common HHV-8-associated neoplastic complications described in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients. Concurrent KS and MCD have been previously described after transplantation only twice - once after liver transplantation and once after renal transplantation. We describe a unique heart transplant patient who also developed concurrent KS and MCD. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of a heart transplant recipient presenting with these two HHV-8-mediated complications at the same time.

  20. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Kaposi sarcoma as initial presentation of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara A; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A; Forbes, Rachel C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Lindsey, David E

    2013-12-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management.

  1. Antibodies to gp41 and nef in otherwise HIV-negative homosexual man with Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bowden, F J; McPhee, D A; Deacon, N J; Cumming, S A; Doherty, R R; Sonza, S; Lucas, C R; Crowe, S M

    1991-06-01

    A homosexual man with histologically confirmed Kaposi's sarcoma remained seronegative for HIV-1, HIV-2, and HTLV-1 on conventional tests over a 4-year period. HIV cultures were also negative on thirteen separate occasions. However, serum antibodies to synthetic peptide analogues of the gp41 and nef regions of HIV-1 were consistently detected on an enzyme immunoassay. Tests with the polymerase chain reaction with primers directed to the gag and env regions were negative. The antigens to which the antibodies were produced might have come from a defective HIV mutant, another retrovirus, or a hitherto unknown "agent of Kaposi's sarcoma" with similar antigenic epitopes.

  2. Identification of a novel herpesvirus in captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    PubMed

    Sim, Richard R; Norton, Terry M; Bronson, Ellen; Allender, Matthew C; Stedman, Nancy; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-02-25

    Herpesviruses are significant pathogens of chelonians which most commonly cause upper respiratory tract disease and necrotizing stomatitis. Herpesvirus infection was identified in two populations of captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) using histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA sequencing. Necrotizing lesions with eosinophilic to amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were identified in the tissues of one hatch-year individual in January 2013, which was herpesvirus positive by PCR. A separate captive group of adults had an observed herpesvirus prevalence of 58% using PCR in July 2011. In these cases, a novel herpesvirus, Terrapene herpesvirus 1 (TerHV1), was identified and serves as the first herpesvirus sequenced in the genus Terrapene. Similar to the other herpesviruses of the Order Testudines, TerHV1 clusters with the genus Scutavirus of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae.

  3. A novel herpesvirus of the proposed genus Chelonivirus from an asymptomatic bowsprit tortoise (Chersina angulata).

    PubMed

    Bicknese, Elizabeth J; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2010-06-01

    A wild-caught Bowsprit tortoise (Chersina angulata) was received into quarantine and appeared clinically normal. Oral swabs for consensus herpesvirus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were obtained during routine quarantine, and a novel herpesvirus was identified. Comparative sequence analysis shows that this virus is a member of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae in the proposed genus Chelonivirus. Host/virus co-evolution appears to be common amongst herpesviruses and their hosts, and the most significant disease is typically seen when herpesviruses jump to related host species. Previous studies have found some diversity of herpesviruses in tortoises. This report expands the number of known herpesviruses of tortoises. It is reasonable to expect that there will be significantly different clinical consequences of different tortoise herpesviruses in different species, and that identification of host/virus relationships will aid in clinical management of tortoise collections. Further work is needed to determine the clinical implications of this and other tortoise herpesviruses in different tortoise species.

  4. Is murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) a suitable immunotoxicological model for examining immunomodulatory drug-associated viral recrudescence?

    PubMed

    Aligo, Jason; Walker, Mindi; Bugelski, Peter; Weinstock, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), and psoriasis, as well as for prevention of tissue rejection after organ transplantation. Recrudescence of herpesvirus infections, and increased risk of carcinogenesis from herpesvirus-associated tumors are related with immunosuppressive therapy in humans. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a condition characterized by development of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-associated B-lymphocyte lymphoma, and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), a dermal tumor associated with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV), may develop in solid organ transplant patients. KS also occurs in immunosuppressed Acquired Immunodeficiency (AIDS) patients. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV) is a herpes virus genetically related to EBV. Murine gammaherpes-virus-68 (MHV-68) is proposed as a mouse model of gammaherpesvirus infection and recrudescence and may potentially have relevance for herpesvirus-associated neoplasia. The pathogenesis of MHV-68 infection in mice mimics EBV/KSHV infection in humans with acute lytic viral replication followed by dissemination and establishment of persistent latency. MHV-68-infected mice may develop lymphoproliferative disease that is accelerated by disruption of the immune system. This manuscript first presents an overview of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis and immunology as well as factors involved in viral recrudescence. A description of different types of immunodeficiency then follows, with particular focus on viral association with lymphomagenesis after immunosuppression. Finally, this review discusses different gammaherpesvirus animal models and describes a proposed MHV-68 model to further examine the interplay of immunomodulatory agents and gammaherpesvirus-associated neoplasia.

  5. HERPESVIRUSES INCLUDING NOVEL GAMMAHERPESVIRUSES ARE WIDESPREAD AMONG PHOCID SEAL SPECIES IN CANADA.

    PubMed

    Bellehumeur, Christian; Nielsen, Ole; Measures, Lena; Harwood, Lois; Goldstein, Tracey; Boyle, Brian; Gagnon, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesviruses in Canadian pinnipeds. We measured prevalence of antibodies to herpesviruses in the sera from Canadian phocid seals by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Wild harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and captive harbor seals were positive for antibodies to Phocid herpesvirus 1 (PhoHV-1) at prevalences of 91% and 100%, respectively. Sera from wild hooded seals (Cystophora cristata), harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandica), and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) were positive for antibodies to PhoHV-1 antigenically related herpesvirus antigens at 73%, 79%, and 96%, respectively. We isolated new herpesviruses in cell culture from two hunter-harvested ringed seals (Pusa hispida) in poor body condition from Ulukhaktok, Northwest Territories, Canada; one lethargic hooded seal from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada; and one captive, asymptomatic harp seal from the Magdalen Islands, Québec. Partial sequencing of the herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene revealed that all four virus isolates were closely related to PhoHV-2, a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily, with nucleotide similarity ranging between 92.8% and 95.3%. The new seal herpesviruses were genetically related to other known pinniped herpesviruses, such as PhoHV-1, Otariid herpesvirus 3, Hawaiian monk (Monachus schauinslandi) seal herpesvirus, and Phocid herpesvirus 5 with 47-48%, 55%, 77%, and 70-77% nucleotide similarities, respectively. The harp seal herpesvirus and both ringed seal herpesviruses were almost identical to each other, whereas the hooded seal herpesvirus was genetically different from the three others (92.8% nucleotide similarity), indicating detection of at least two novel seal herpesviruses. These findings are the first isolation, partial genome sequencing, and identification of seal gammaherpesviruses in three species of Canadian phocid seals; two species of which were suspected of exposure to one or more antigenically related herpesviruses based on

  6. Conservation of gene organization in the lymphotropic herpesviruses herpesvirus Saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gompels, U A; Craxton, M A; Honess, R W

    1988-01-01

    By analyses of short DNA sequences, we have deduced the overall arrangement of genes in the (A + T)-rich coding sequences of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) relative to the arrangements of homologous genes in the (G + C)-rich coding sequences of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome and the (A + T)-rich sequences of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome. Fragments of HVS DNA from 13 separate sites within the 111 kilobase pairs of the light DNA coding sequences of the genome were subcloned into M13 vectors, and sequences of up to 350 bases were determined from each of these sites. Amino acid sequences predicted for fragments of open reading frames defined by these sequences were compared with a library of the protein sequences of major open reading frames predicted from the complete DNA sequences of VZV and EBV. Of the 13 short amino acid sequences obtained from HVS, only 3 were recognizably homologous to proteins encoded by VZV, but all 13 HVS sequences were unambiguously homologous to gene products encoded by EBV. The HVS reading frames identified by this method included homologs of the major capsid polypeptides, glycoprotein H, the major nonstructural DNA-binding protein, thymidine kinase, and the homolog of the regulatory gene product of the BMLF1 reading frame of EBV. Locally as well as globally, the order and relative orientation of these genes resembled that of their homologs on the EBV genome. Despite the major differences in their nucleotide compositions and in the nature and arrangements of reiterated DNA sequences, the genomes of the lymphotropic herpesviruses HVS and EBV encode closely related proteins, and they share a common organization of these coding sequences which differs from that of the neurotropic herpesviruses, VZV and herpes simplex virus. PMID:2828671

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Herpesvirus anguillae Strain HVA980811 Isolated in Chiayi, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping-Chung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesvirus anguillae (HVA), also known as anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1), is one of the relevant viruses in wild and cultured anguillid eels. Here, the complete genome sequence of strain HVA980811, isolated in Chiayi, Taiwan, is reported. The genotype of the eel herpesviruses in Taiwan is supposed to be identical to the Japanese AngHV1. PMID:28232450

  8. L'atteinte osseuse dans le sarcome de Kaposi classique et agressif: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; El Alaoui, Adil; El Bardai, Mohammed; Mezzani, Amine; Lahrach, Kamal; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Le sarcome de Kaposi classique est une tumeur rare multifocale d'origine des cellules endothéliales vasculaires à caractère évolutif progressif et peu maligne. L'atteinte viscérale dans le sarcome de kaposi est parfois observée chez les patients VIH positif par contre la dissémination tumorale dans les ganglions lymphatiques viscérales dans le SK classique reste très rare. On rapporte un cas rare de sarcome de kaposi classique agressif de la main avec une évolution rapide et destructive. PMID:27347285

  9. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, James J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. Methods. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). Conclusions. KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. PMID:26268853

  10. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus–Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease: Correlation With Activity, Severity, Inflammatory and Virologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Millo, Corina; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Aleman, Karen; Whatley, Millie; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative inflammatory disorder commonly associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Its presentation may be difficult to distinguish from HIV and its complications, including lymphoma. Novel imaging strategies could address these problems. Methods. We prospectively characterized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) findings in 27 patients with KSHV-MCD. Patients were imaged with disease activity and at remission with scans evaluated blind to clinical status. Symptoms, C-reactive protein level, and HIV and KSHV loads were assessed in relation to imaging findings. Results. KSHV-MCD activity was associated with hypermetabolic symmetric lymphadenopathy (median maximal standardized uptake value [SUVmax], 6.0; range, 2.0–8.0) and splenomegaly (3.4; 1.2–11.0), with increased metabolism also noted in the marrow (2.1; range, 1.0–3.5) and salivary glands (3.0; range, 2.0–6.0). The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET abnormalities improved at remission, with significant SUVmax decreases in the lymph nodes (P = .004), spleen (P = .008), marrow (P = .004), and salivary glands (P = .004). Nodal SUVmax correlated with symptom severity (P = .005), C-reactive protein level (R = 0.62; P = .004), and KSHV load (R = 0.54; P = .02) but not HIV load (P = .52). Conclusions. KSHV-MCD activity is associated with 18F-FDG PET abnormalities of the lymph nodes, spleen, marrow, and salivary glands. These findings have clinical implications for the diagnosis and monitoring of KSHV-MCD and shed light on its pathobiologic mechanism. PMID:25828248

  11. A new herpesvirus isolated from black storks (Ciconia nigra).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Mikami, T; Marschall, H J; Heffels, U; Heidenreich, M; Stiburek, B

    1980-07-01

    An infectious agent was isolated from livers, spleens and bone marrow of two black storks (Ciconia nigra L.) originating from the same source. Pathological lesions consisted of small whitish focal areas in livers, spleens and bone marrow. The isolated agent was sensitive to chloroform and its multiplication was inhibited by 5-iodine-2-deoxy-uridine. It passed filters with a pore diameter of 220 nm and greater but not 100 nm filters. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous nucleocapsids with hollow capsomeres and few enveloped particles in the supernatant fluids of infected cultures. The nucleocapsids were calculated to have 162 capsomeres on their surface. Using the plaque reduction method for neutralisation tests no serological cross reactions could be detected between the stork herpesvirus and sera against Marek's disease virus, turkey herpesvirus, and the Lake Victoria cormorant, amazon parrot, eagle owl, and pigeon herpesviruses. It is concluded that the isolated virus is a member of the avian herpesvirus group and it is proposed to tentatively term it herpesvirus ciconiae (ciconia lat. stork).

  12. Successful treatment of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma by the 585-nm pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Marchell, N; Alster, T S

    1997-10-01

    The clinical appearance of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) can cause significant disfigurement and lead to functional impairment, particularly if the lesions ulcerate and become secondarily infected. We describe a patient with a KS plaque on the face that was successfully treated with 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) therapy. No recurrence of the tumor was noted 12 months after the final laser treatment.

  13. A randomized prospective trial of radiation therapy for AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, K.J.; Griffin, T.W. )

    1993-12-01

    The optimal dose of radiation in the treatment of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma has been controversial based on previous nonrandomized retrospective studies. Seventy-one cutaneous AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 radiation dose regimens--8 Gy in 1 fraction, 20 Gy in 10 fractions, and 40 Gy in 20 fractions. Lesions were measured prior to and following treatment. Complete resolution of palpable tumor was considered a complete response, regardless of residual purple pigmentation. Reduction in palpable tumor to less than 50% of pretreatment area was considered an objective response. Less than 50% reduction in tumor size was considered a nonresponse. Complete response was higher (p = .04) with 40 Gy (83%) and 20 Gy (79%) than with 8 Gy (50%). Absence of residual purple pigmentation was greater (p = .005) with 40 Gy (43%) than with 20 Gy (8%) or 8 Gy (8%). Lesion failure was lower (p = .03) with 40 Gy (52%) than with 20 Gy (67%) or 8 Gy (88%). Median time to failure was 43 weeks with 40 Gy, 26 weeks with 20 Gy, and 13 weeks with 8 Gy (p = .003). Fractionated radiotherapy to higher total doses resulted in improved response and control of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. This dose-dependence should be considered in determining the optimal radiotherapeutic regimen for individual patients treated for epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Primary Kaposi's sarcoma in lymph nodes concurrent with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weshler, Z; Leviatan, A; Krasnokuki, D; Kopolovitch, J

    1979-02-01

    Both Kaposi's sarcoma and chronic lymphatic leukemia affect the lymph nodes, and not infrequently, the same patient. The authors describe the occurrence of both diseases in the same lymph node. The rarity of this finding suggests different histopathogenic origins of the two diseases.

  15. Regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Combs, Joseph A; Morris, Cindy A; Sullivan, Deborah E

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is instrumental in successful differentiation and proliferation of mammalian cells. It is therefore not surprising that the herpesvirus family has developed mechanisms to interact with and manipulate this pathway. Successful coexistence with the host requires that herpesviruses establish a lifelong infection that includes periods of latency and reactivation or persistence. Many herpesviruses establish latency in progenitor cells and viral reactivation is linked to host-cell proliferation and differentiation status. Importantly, Wnt/β-catenin is tightly connected to stem/progenitor cell maintenance and differentiation. Numerous studies have linked Wnt/β-catenin signaling to a variety of cancers, emphasizing the importance of Wnt/β-catenin pathways in development, tissue homeostasis and disease. This review details how the alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses interact and manipulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to promote a virus-centric agenda. PMID:27878101

  16. Characterization of the DNA polymerase gene of human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Teo, I A; Griffin, B E; Jones, M D

    1991-01-01

    The construction of a recombinant bacteriophage lambda library containing overlapping clones covering 155 kbp of the 161-kbp genome of the Ugandan U1102 isolate of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is described. The use of degenerate-primer polymerase chain reaction allowed the isolation of a DNA probe for the DNA polymerase gene of HHV-6, which was subsequently used to isolate and position the pol gene on the physical map of the viral genome. A 4.4-kbp EcoRI DNA restriction fragment containing the pol gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frames flanking the pol gene code for the HHV-6 glycoprotein B gene and the human cytomegalovirus UL53 homolog. This arrangement is different from that seen in the alpha and gamma herpesvirus families, lending further support to the notion that HHV-6 is a member of the beta herpesvirus group. Images PMID:1651403

  17. The spindle-shaped cells in cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologic simulators include factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Griffiths, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a neoplasm that develops as multifocal lesions, often involving the skin, characterized by a complex histologic picture including numerous vascular spaces, perivascular and interstitial spindle-shaped cells, and extravasated erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Using an antibody against factor XIIIa, which identifies dermal dendrocytes, numerous factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were detected among the spindle-shaped cells in 12 acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated, and five non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were also increased in histologic simulators of Kaposi's sarcoma such as dermatofibroma, angiomatoid malignant fibrous histiocytoma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing, but were absent in keloids. The increased number of dermal dendrocytes, which are often in an angiocentric configuration and which also express CD4, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and Leu M3 in Kaposi's sarcoma, may be important to the angioproliferative response. The results suggested that the spindle-shaped cells that are present in a variety of cutaneous lesions are dermal dendrocytes and belong to the reticuloendothelial system, unlike other mesenchymal cell types such as the endothelial cell. Apparently a diverse array of stimuli, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and trauma, can stimulate the accumulation of factor XIIIa expressing dermal dendrocytes in the skin. These cells can then participate in different stages of a variety of cutaneous alterations including Kaposi's sarcoma, dermatofibroma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing. Thus, the factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocyte is a common cellular denominator among diverse clinical entities that share some histologic features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p797-a PMID:2573283

  18. Differences in androgens of HIV positive patients with and without Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Christeff, N; Winter, C; Gharakhanian, S; Thobie, N; Wirbel, E; Costagliola, D; Nunez, E A; Rozenbaum, W

    1995-01-01

    AIM--Since most forms of Kaposi sarcoma are much more common in men than in women, the aim of this study was to examine serum concentrations of sex steroids in HIV positive men with and without Kaposi sarcoma. METHODS--Blood samples from 34 HIV positive men without Kaposi sarcoma (KS-) and 28 with Kaposi sarcoma (KS+) and from 35 HIV negative men (controls) were analysed for adrenal and gonadal steroids. Further analysis was done in subgroups classified by CD4 lymphocyte counts. RESULTS--KS+ patients had significantly higher serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone concentrations than the KS- patients, and their DHEA, DHEA sulphate, testosterone, and androstenedione values were higher than in the controls. The KS+ patients with more than 500 CD4 lymphocytes per mm3 had significantly higher serum DHEA, DHEA sulphate, and testosterone than the KS- patients with the same CD4 counts; those with 500-200 CD4 cells/mm3 had higher serum DHEA and testosterone than the equivalent KS- men; and those with < 200 CD4 cells/mm3 had raised DHEA only compared with KS- men. Both KS+ and KS- men had higher serum progesterone and oestradiol than the controls. Glucocorticoids were not significantly altered. CONCLUSIONS--The high androgen levels in KS+ patients, particularly in the early stages of the disease (> 500 CD4 cells/mm3), may affect the immune system by inducing an abnormal cytokine profile, or by increasing T8 proliferation and activation, or both. This raises the question of the relationship between androgens and Kaposi sarcoma. PMID:7665693

  19. [Gangrene with pyocyanic infection and osteitis in a patient presenting endemic Kaposi's sarcoma: case report from Benin].

    PubMed

    Atadokpede, F; Gnangnon, T A; Lawson, M; Adegbidi, H; Yedomon, H; Co-Ango-Padonou, F

    2006-10-01

    Infectious complications involving chronic skin ulcers have been well document but superinfection of ulcerated Kaposi's sarcoma nodules by multiresistant germs has rarely been reported. The purpose of this report is to describe a case in a 57-year-old HIV-negative black African man. Kaposi's sarcoma nodules appeared suddenly and spread rapidly on the right leg with pain and fever. Onset was associated with a laboratory-documented inflammatory syndrome and two metatarsal bone defects. Amputation of the leg was required due to the presence of multiresistant germs: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, multiresistant Staphylococus aureus and Candida albicans. Occurrence of bone lesions beneath superinfected Kaposi's sarcoma nodules poses a challenge for differential diagnosis of the underlying cause, i.e. either Kaposi's sarcoma or infectious osteitis. Since etiologic diagnosis of bone defects requires facilities that are rarely available in an African hospital, surgical treatment is the only alternative if antimicrobial therapy fails.

  20. Primary pulmonary hypertension, Castleman's disease and human herpesvirus-8.

    PubMed

    Bull, T M; Cool, C D; Serls, A E; Rai, P R; Parr, J; Neid, J M; Geraci, M W; Campbell, T B; Voelkel, N F; Badesch, D B

    2003-09-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and Castleman's disease (CD) are rare conditions infrequently encountered in clinical practice. In this paper, two patients diagnosed with both of these diseases are reported. The authors speculate that rather than being a chance occurrence, these conditions are linked by a common angio-proliferative mechanism. Therefore, an association between infection with the human herpesvirus-8 and the diseases of PPH and CD was sought. Evidence of human herpesvirus-8 infection was found in the lung tissue and, specifically, in the plexiform lesions from one of the patients.

  1. The eminent dermatologist Moriz Kaposi (1837-1902) and the first description of idiopathic multiple pigmented sarcoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Antoniou, C; Stratigos, A J; Saridaki, Z; Androutsos, G

    2013-01-01

    In 1872, the Hungarian born dermatologist Moriz Kaposi that was practicing in Vienna first described a rare endemic disease that bears his name, among elderly persons of Central European or Mediterranean origin named "idiopathic multiple pigmented sarcoma of the skin". Ten years later the Italian dermatologist Tommaso de Amicis confirms Kaposi's findings. For more than a century the disease was known as a rare low grade malignancy till the 1980s AIDS epidemic.

  2. Human herpesvirus 6 in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenetic roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 in lymphoproliferative diseases have been of continued interest. Many molecular studies have tried to establish a pathogenic role for HHV-6 in lymphoid malignancies. However, whether HHV-6 plays a role in these pathologies remains unclear, as positive polymerase chain reaction results for HHV-6 in those studies may reflect latent infection or reactivation rather than presence of HHV-6 in neoplastic cells. A small number of studies have investigated HHV-6 antigen expression in pathologic specimens. As a result, the lack of HHV-6 antigen expression on neoplastic cells argues against any major pathogenic role of HHV-6. The role of HHV-6 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has also been of interest but remains controversial, with 2 studies documenting higher levels of HHV-6 antibody in ALL patients, and another 2 large-scale studies finding no significant differences in HHV-6 seroprevalences between ALL patients and controls. Alternatively, HHV-6 is increasingly recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen. HHV-6 reactivation is common among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and is linked to various clinical manifestations. In particular, HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be significant, life-threatening complication. Most HHV-6 encephalitis develops in patients receiving transplant from an unrelated donor, particularly cord blood, typically around the time of engraftment. Symptoms are characterized by short-term memory loss and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Prognosis for HHV-6 encephalitis is poor, but appropriate prophylactic measures have not been established. Establishment of preventive strategies against HHV-6 encephalitis represents an important challenge for physicians involved with SCT.

  3. Divergence and genotyping of human alpha-herpesviruses: an overview.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly disseminated among animals. Of the eight herpesviruses identified in humans, three are classified into the alpha-herpesvirus subfamily: herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), which are typically associated with mucocutaneous lesions, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which is the cause of chicken pox and herpes zoster. All three viruses establish lifelong infections and may also induce more severe symptoms, such as neurological manifestations and fatal neonatal infections. Despite thorough investigation of the genetic variability among circulating strains of each virus in recent decades, little is known about possible associations between the genetic setups of the viruses and clinical manifestations in human hosts. This review focuses mainly on evolutionary studies of and genotyping strategies for these three human alpha-herpesviruses, emphasizing the ambiguities induced by a high frequency of circulating recombinant strains. It also aims to shed light on the challenges of establishing a uniform genotyping strategy for all three viruses.

  4. The Sordid Affair Between Human Herpesvirus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Massanella, Marta; Wertheim, Joel O; Smith, Davey M

    2015-09-15

    Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human herpesvirus (HHV) infections persist lifelong, and almost all individuals infected with HIV are also infected with ≥1 HHV. These coinfections are not independent processes or benign. In this review, we discuss how HHVs, and cytomegalovirus in particular, interact with concurrent HIV infection, and we describe the next steps necessary to understand and address these connections.

  5. Human herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis after trigeminal neuralgia surgery.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Benito, Natividad; Montes, Guillermo; Pomar, Virginia; Molet, Joan; Rabella, Núria

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) meningoencephalitis in a patient who underwent trigeminal neuralgia surgery. Although this surgery has been reported to increase the risk of mucocutaneous HHV-1 recurrence, to our knowledge, an association between trigeminal surgery and HHV-1 encephalitis has not been previously described.

  6. The development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and sensitive detection of abalone herpesvirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, M H; Kuo, S T; Renault, T; Chang, P H

    2014-02-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for the detection of abalone herpesvirus DNA. Two pairs of primers were designed, based on the sequence of the DNA polymerase gene of abalone herpesvirus. The reaction temperature and time were optimized to 63°C and 60min, respectively. LAMP amplicons were analyzed by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis or by visual inspection of a colour change emitted by fluorescent dye. The method developed was specific for the detection of abalone herpesvirus, without cross-reactions with other tested herpesviruses including ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1), European eel herpesvirus, koi herpesvirus (KHV) and an avian herpesvirus. The LAMP assay was 100 folds more sensitive than a conventional PCR and 10 folds less sensitive than a SYBR Green PCR. These results indicate that the developed LAMP assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, specific and reliable technique for the detection of abalone herpesvirus.

  7. A novel class of herpesvirus with bivalve hosts.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J; Trus, Benes L; Cheng, Naiqian; Steven, Alasdair C; Watson, Moira S; Cunningham, Charles; Le Deuff, Rose-Marie; Renault, Tristan

    2005-01-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is the only member of the Herpesviridae that has an invertebrate host and is associated with sporadic mortality in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species. Cryo-electron microscopy of purified capsids revealed the distinctive T=16 icosahedral structure characteristic of herpesviruses, although the preparations examined lacked pentons. The gross genome organization of OsHV-1 was similar to that of certain mammalian herpesviruses (including herpes simplex virus and human cytomegalovirus), consisting of two invertible unique regions (U(L), 167.8 kbp; U(S), 3.4 kbp) each flanked by inverted repeats (TR(L)/IR(L), 7.6 kbp; TR(S)/IR(S), 9.8 kbp), with an additional unique sequence (X, 1.5 kbp) between IR(L) and IR(S). Of the 124 unique genes predicted from the 207 439 bp genome sequence, 38 were members of 12 families of related genes and encoded products related to helicases, inhibitors of apoptosis, deoxyuridine triphosphatase and RING-finger proteins, in addition to membrane-associated proteins. Eight genes in three of the families appeared to be fragmented. Other genes that did not belong to the families were predicted to encode DNA polymerase, the two subunits of ribonucleotide reductase, a helicase, a primase, the ATPase subunit of terminase, a RecB-like protein, additional RING-like proteins, an ion channel and several other membrane-associated proteins. Sequence comparisons showed that OsHV-1 is at best tenuously related to the two classes of vertebrate herpesviruses (those associated with mammals, birds and reptiles, and those associated with bony fish and amphibians). OsHV-1 thus represents a third major class of the herpesviruses.

  8. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1997. Marek's disease herpesvirus: oncogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Biggs, P M

    1997-12-29

    There are a number of neoplasias for which a herpesvirus is an essential part of the aetiology. Of these, Marek's disease is the most common and provides excellent opportunities for the study of a herpesvirus-induced tumour both experimentally and under natural conditions in the field. Marek's disease is caused by an alpha herpesvirus; it differs from the other oncogenic herpesviruses which are gamma herpesviruses. It is a ubiquitous virus in poultry populations of the world and is highly cell-associated and contagious, yet only a proportion of infected fowl develop tumours. Evidence is presented to suggest that at least one of the reasons for a wide variation in the incidence of the disease is a temporal interplay between virulent viruses and viruses of low or no virulence. The viral genes associated with the oncogenicity of Marek's disease virus (MDV) are discussed and it is concluded that it is likely that several genes are involved. Finally, a brief history of vaccination to control Marek's disease is given and mode of action discussed. It is concluded that the mechanism of protection is mainly through an antiviral cell mediated immune response, resulting in a lowered challenge virus burden. Marek's disease viruses over the past 40 years have been evolving greater oncogenicity, some of which are not adequately controlled by the vaccines that are currently available. It is suggested that for MDV to produce tumours, there is a need for the cytolytic infection phase and that infection must be with an MDV which possesses a functional gC, ICP4 for maintaining latency which allows the expression of at least the 1.8 kb family, pp38, meq, and possibly pp14 genes, for maintaining the tumour state and possibly initiating this state. Intervention in this process reduces the chance of tumour formation and incidence in a population which can occur through natural or man-mediated infection with non-pathogenic MDVs.

  9. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  10. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  11. Inital observations of the effect of radiotherapy on epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. [Acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.; Laubenstein, L.J.

    1984-08-17

    Fifteen patients who had Kaposi's sarcoma in conjunction with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) received radiotherapy to a total of 17 selected lesions. All tumors exhibited at least partial regression, and the majority responded completely. The radiosensitivity of these lesions is similar to that observed in the classic form of the disease. The authors conclude that in appropriately selected cases radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice.

  12. Descriptive epidemiology of Kaposi sarcoma in Europe. Report from the RARECARE project.

    PubMed

    Stiller, C A; Trama, A; Brewster, D H; Verne, J; Bouchardy, C; Navarro, C; Chirlaque, M D; Marcos-Gragera, R; Visser, O; Serraino, D; Weiderpass, E; Dei Tos, A P; Ascoli, V

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a virus-related malignancy which most frequently arises in skin, though visceral sites can also be involved. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV or HHV-8) is required for development of KS. Nowadays, most cases worldwide occur in persons who are immunosuppressed, usually because of HIV infection or as a result of therapy to combat rejection of a transplanted organ, but classic Kaposi sarcoma is predominantly a disease of the elderly without apparent immunosuppression. We analyzed 2667 KS incident cases diagnosed during 1995-2002 and registered by 75 population-based European cancer registries contributing to the RARECARE project. Total crude and age-standardized incidence rate was 0.3 per 100,000 per year with an estimated 1642 new cases per year in the EU27 countries. Age-standardized incidence rate was 0.8 per 100,000 in Southern Europe but below 0.3 per 100,000 in all other regions. The elevated rate in southern Europe was attributable to a combination of classic Kaposi sarcoma in some Mediterranean countries and the relatively high incidence of AIDS in several countries. Five-year relative survival for 2000-2002 by the period method was 75%. More than 10,000 persons were estimated to be alive in Europe at the beginning of 2008 with a past diagnosis of KS. The aetiological link with suppressed immunity means that many people alive following diagnosis of KS suffer comorbidity from a pre-existing condition. While KS is a rare cancer, it has a relatively good prognosis and so the number of people affected by it is quite large. Thus it provides a notable example of the importance of networking in diagnosis, therapy and research for rare cancers.

  13. (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings in a case with HIV (-) Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, E; Poyraz, N Y; Keskin, M; Kandemir, Z; Turkolmez, S

    2014-01-01

    Although mucocutaneous sites are the most frequently encountered sites of involvement, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) may also occasionally involve the breast and the skeletal, endocrine, urinary and nervous systems.. Various imaging modalities may be used to delineate the extent of the disease by detecting unexpected sites of involvement. Herein, we report a case of classical type KS, in whom staging with (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging disclosed widespread disease and unexpected findings of bone and salivary gland involvement.

  14. [Kaposi's sarcoma and opportunistic infections in young patients without antecedents liable to involve immunodepression].

    PubMed

    1983-11-05

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is characterized by the occurrence, in a subject under 60, of Kaposi's sarcoma and/or severe opportunistic infection due to deficiency of the normal cell-mediated immune defence mechanism against the causative agents. In a number of patients, AIDS is preceded by fever, weight loss, profuse sweating, polyadenopathy or diarrhoea. In an epidemiological study conducted by a French multidisciplinary group from March to December, 1982, 25 cases were collected, including 11 cases of isolated Kaposi's sarcoma, 3 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma plus opportunistic infection, and 15 cases of single or multiple opportunistic infection. From this study and international studies, several points of interest have emerged, viz: (1) AIDS is present in France under multiple clinical aspects; (2) a focus of endemic AIDS has been discovered first in Haiti, then in Equatorial Africa; (3) the cause of AIDS is unknown, though presumed to be a virus (retrovirus?); (4) the disease is characterized by selective deficiency of T4 ("helper") lymphocytes; (5) the subjects at risk are male homosexuals, especially those with several partners, but not as much in France as in the USA; (6) none of the French patients was a drug-addict or a haemophiliac.

  15. Speculations on the viral etiology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Conant, M A

    1984-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) appeared in the United States in late 1978 and has spread at an epidemic rate through the four major coastal cities of this country. The disease appears to show the same epidemiologic distribution as hepatitis B virus infection, and for this reason, most investigators feel that this new disease is caused by a blood-borne sexually transmitted virus. A number of viral agents have been suggested as the cause of AIDS, but to date, no virus has been consistently isolated. The most likely candidate is a retrovirus that has recently been introduced into the human population and has found its way into two extremely high-risk groups, namely, promiscuous male homosexuals and intravenous drug abusers. The relationship between Kaposi's sarcoma and cytomegalovirus is still unclear, but evidence is mounting that cytomegalovirus may be the agent that initiates this multifocal malignancy. Multiple factors must be involved in this process. It is known that some immunosuppressed individuals develop Kaposi's sarcoma, which completely resolves when the immunosuppression is reversed; however, in individuals with classical Kaposi's sarcoma, the profound degree of helper T-cell depression that characterizes the acquired immune deficiency syndrome is not seen.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of AIDS-related mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, Phase I/II studies have demonstrated the successfulness of hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of various malignancies of the skin, eye, bladder, lung, and head and neck. Moreover, in 1981 two cases of traditional Western cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (TKS) have been treated with photodynamic therapy with both early and late complete response. To date, attempts to cure and palliation of the more aggressive AIDS-related oral Kaposi's sarcoma with conventional radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy, or surgical excision have been limited and often associated with debilitating mucositis and further immunosuppression. Certain aspects of photodynamic therapy may be efficacious for treatment of mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma: (1) the selective retention of hematoporphyrin derivative by neoplastic lesions (endothelial cell tumors); (2) a tumor- specific cytotoxic agent (i.e., free oxygen radical); (3) absence of systemic toxicity from immunosuppression; (4) the potential for retreatment without increasing side effects; and (5) porphyrin-mediated photoinactivation of enveloped viruses. Herein presented are seven cases of AIDS-related KS (EKS) with diffuse, superficial, and nodular mucocutaneous lesions treated with dihematoporphyrin derivative and photodynamic therapy with subsequent dramatic early partial and complete responses.

  17. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Darr, Umar; Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Moslim, Maitham A; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods.

  18. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods. PMID:28261507

  19. Integrated systems biology analysis of KSHV latent infection reveals viral induction and reliance on peroxisome mediated lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sychev, Zoi E; Hu, Alex; DiMaio, Terri A; Gitter, Anthony; Camp, Nathan D; Noble, William S; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic, human gamma-herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma the most common tumor of AIDS patients world-wide. KSHV is predominantly latent in the main KS tumor cell, the spindle cell, a cell of endothelial origin. KSHV modulates numerous host cell-signaling pathways to activate endothelial cells including major metabolic pathways involved in lipid metabolism. To identify the underlying cellular mechanisms of KSHV alteration of host signaling and endothelial cell activation, we identified changes in the host proteome, phosphoproteome and transcriptome landscape following KSHV infection of endothelial cells. A Steiner forest algorithm was used to integrate the global data sets and, together with transcriptome based predicted transcription factor activity, cellular networks altered by latent KSHV were predicted. Several interesting pathways were identified, including peroxisome biogenesis. To validate the predictions, we showed that KSHV latent infection increases the number of peroxisomes per cell. Additionally, proteins involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, including ABCD3 and ACOX1, are required for the survival of latently infected cells. In summary, novel cellular pathways altered during herpesvirus latency that could not be predicted by a single systems biology platform, were identified by integrated proteomics and transcriptomics data analysis and when correlated with our metabolomics data revealed that peroxisome lipid metabolism is essential for KSHV latent infection of endothelial cells.

  20. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1.

  1. Herpesvirus-associated papillomatosis in a green lizard.

    PubMed

    Literak, I; Robesova, B; Majlathova, V; Majlath, I; Kulich, P; Fabian, P; Roubalova, E

    2010-01-01

    Papillomatous skin lesions from a green lizard (Lacerta viridis) were examined histologically, using electron microscopy and DNA was isolated from the lesions for herpes-viral DNA detection. Histology confirmed the lesions to be squamous epithelial papillomas. Using electron microscopy, no virus particles were detected. The specific sequence of herpesviral DNA-directed DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7) was amplified using degenerate primers in a nested format. The 235-base-pair (bp) sequence was sequenced and compared with previously published DNA-directed DNA polymerase sequences from various reptile herpesviruses. The sequence from the green lizard showed significant similarity with sequence of fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesviruses from sea turtles.

  2. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

    SciTech Connect

    Gozalo, Alfonso S.; Montoya, Enrique J.; Weller, Richard E.

    2008-08-16

    Abstract Dyscoria was observed in a female owl monkey and her two offspring. A third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two males paired with the female died, one of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all three animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly, H. simplex or H. saimiri-1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing animals into breeding or research colonies that were previously kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is observed in nonhuman primates.

  3. Herpesvirus Glycoproteins Undergo Multiple Antigenic Changes before Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) entry machinery—gB, gH/gL and gp150—changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion. PMID:22253913

  4. Dyscoria Associated with Herpesvirus Infection in Owl Monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Alfonso S; Montoya, Enrique J; Weller, Richard E

    2008-01-01

    Dyscoria was noted in a female owl monkey and 2 of her offspring. The third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two male monkeys paired with the female died, 1 of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all 3 animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by ELISA. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly H. simplex or H. saimiri 1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing into breeding or research colonies animals that previously were kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is noted in nonhuman primates. PMID:18702455

  5. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae).

    PubMed

    Gozalo, Alfonso S; Montoya, Enrique J; Weller, Richard E

    2008-07-01

    "Dyscoria was noted in a female owl monkey and 2 of her offspring. The third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two male monkeys paired with the female died, 1 of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all 3 animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by ELISA. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly H. simplex or H. saimiri 1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing into breeding or research colonies animals that previously were kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is noted in nonhuman primates."

  6. Role of microRNAs in herpesvirus latency and persistence.

    PubMed

    Grey, Finn

    2015-04-01

    The identification of virally encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) has had a major impact on the field of herpes virology. Given their ability to target cellular and viral transcripts, and the lack of immune response to small RNAs, miRNAs represent an ideal mechanism of gene regulation during viral latency and persistence. In this review, we discuss the role of miRNAs in virus latency and persistence, specifically focusing on herpesviruses. We cover the current knowledge on miRNAs in establishing and maintaining virus latency and promoting survival of infected cells through targeting of both viral and cellular transcripts, highlighting key publications in the field. We also discuss potential areas of future research and how novel technologies may aid in determining how miRNAs shape virus latency in the context of herpesvirus infections.

  7. Herpesvirus saimiri-induced lymphoproliferative disease in howler monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rangan, S R; Martin, L N; Enright, F M; Abee, C R

    1977-07-01

    Four of 5 howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) experimentally infected with Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) developed a rapidly fatal malignant lymphoma accompanied by peripheral T-cell lymphocytosis. HVS was isolated from fresh and tissue cultured blood and tissue lymphocytes and from cell cultures derived from nonlymphoid organs. Humoral antibodies against HVS-induced antigens were detected in the sera of the animals. The in vitro response of the peripheral blood lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulants was depressed following HVS infection.

  8. Identification of Human Herpesvirus 6 Latency-Associated Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Kazuya; Sashihara, Junji; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    Four kinds of latency-associated transcripts of human herpesvirus 6 were identified which were detected only in latently infected cells. Although they were oriented in the same direction as the immediate-early 1 and 2 (IE1/IE2) genes and shared their protein-coding region with IE1/IE2, their transcription start sites and exon(s) were latency associated. PMID:11907257

  9. Structure and sequence of the saimiriine herpesvirus 1 genome.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Shaun; Severini, Alberto; Black, Darla; Walker, Matthew; Eberle, R

    2011-02-05

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the squirrel monkey α-herpesvirus saimiriine herpesvirus 1 (HVS1). Unlike the simplexviruses of other primate species, only the unique short region of the HVS1 genome is bounded by inverted repeats. While all Old World simian simplexviruses characterized to date lack the herpes simplex virus RL1 (γ34.5) gene, HVS1 has an RL1 gene. HVS1 lacks several genes that are present in other primate simplexviruses (US8.5, US10-12, UL43/43.5 and UL49A). Although the overall genome structure appears more like that of varicelloviruses, the encoded HVS1 proteins are most closely related to homologous proteins of the primate simplexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that HVS1 is a simplexvirus. Limited comparison of two HVS1 strains revealed a very low degree of sequence variation more typical of varicelloviruses. HVS1 is thus unique among the primate α-herpesviruses in that its genome has properties of both simplexviruses and varicelloviruses.

  10. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Kathryn; Vaz, Paola K; Gilkerson, James R; Baker, Rupert; Whiteley, Pam; Ficorilli, Nino; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Portas, Timothy; Skogvold, Kim; Anderson, Garry A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis), a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius). In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses) were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 22.6-32.2%), but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1-63.7%) in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2) were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1-55.9%) of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0-99.0%) in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1-297.8). Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research.

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Kathryn; Vaz, Paola K.; Gilkerson, James R.; Baker, Rupert; Whiteley, Pam; Ficorilli, Nino; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Portas, Timothy; Skogvold, Kim; Anderson, Garry A.; Devlin, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis), a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius). In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses) were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 22.6–32.2%), but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1–63.7%) in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2) were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1–55.9%) of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0–99.0%) in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1–297.8). Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research. PMID:26222660

  12. Acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing pneumonia, splenitis, and dermatitis in a pet rabbit caused by a novel herpesvirus (leporid herpesvirus-4)

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Marina L.; Nagy, Éva; Pei, Yanlong; Carman, Susy; Emery, Susan; Smith, Alec E.; Turner, Patricia V.

    2010-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old female rabbit (doe) was presented with a 3-day history of lethargy, anorexia, and mild facial swelling. The animal died shortly after examination and severe, acute hemorrhagic pneumonia was noted grossly. An alphaherpesvirus consistent with leporid herpesvirus-4 was isolated and characterized from this animal. This is the first confirmed report of the disease in Canada. PMID:21358932

  13. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 marker vaccine induces cross-protection against bubaline herpesvirus type 1 in water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Montagnaro, Serena; De Martinis, Claudio; Iovane, Valentina; Ciarcia, Roberto; Damiano, Sara; Nizza, Sandra; De Martino, Luisa; Iovane, Giuseppe; Pagnini, Ugo

    2014-09-01

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) are susceptible to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) and a species-specific herpesvirus, bubaline herpesvirus type 1 (BuHV-1). In this study, an attenuated marker BoHV-1 based vaccine against BuHV-1 challenge was evaluated to determine whether it induces protection from viral replication. One group of water buffalo calves was immunized with an attenuated BoHV-1 marker vaccine. A second group was not vaccinated and used as the control. During the post-vaccination period, we monitored the humoral immune response. The efficacy of the vaccine was tested after intranasal challenge of the calves with a BuHV-1 strain. The experiment showed that after vaccination, BuHV-1 replication was significantly reduced by approximately three titer points compared to the controls. The control animals showed high levels of viral shedding and mild signs associated with BuHV-1 infection. Therefore, our study provides evidence for the existence of cross-protection between BoHV-1 and BuHV-1 in buffalo calves.

  14. Herpesviral inclusion body disease in owls and falcons is caused by the pigeon herpesvirus (columbid herpesvirus 1).

    PubMed

    Gailbreath, Katherine L; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2008-04-01

    A herpesviral disease of Rock Pigeons (Columba livia), called "inclusion body disease" or "inclusion body hepatitis," was first described in the 1940s. The disease involves hepatic and splenic necrosis with associated intranuclear inclusion bodies and occurs primarily in young squabs. A similar herpesviral disease occurs in falcons and owls. Serologic and restriction endonuclease digestion studies indicate that herpesviruses from pigeons, falcons, and owls are very closely related and that most reported cases of disease in falcons and owls involve prior documented or possible ingestion of pigeons. These findings led to the hypothesis that an endemic herpesvirus of pigeons may be causing disease in falcons and owls. In order to test this hypothesis, we sequenced a fragment of the herpesviral DNA polymerase gene from naturally infected owls, falcons, and pigeons with inclusion body disease collected between 1991 and 2006. Sequences from all three sources were almost identical, and we therefore propose that the usual agent of inclusion body hepatitis in owls and falcons is columbid herpesvirus 1.

  15. A codon-shuffling method to prevent reversion during production of replication-defective herpesvirus stocks: Implications for herpesvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ward, Charles; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Skiena, Steven; Krug, Laurie T; Forrest, J Craig

    2017-03-13

    Herpesviruses establish life-long chronic infections that place infected hosts at risk for severe disease. Herpesvirus genomes readily undergo homologous recombination (HR) during productive replication, often leading to wild-type (WT) reversion during complementation of replication-defective and attenuated viruses via HR with the helper gene provided in trans. To overcome this barrier, we developed a synthetic-biology approach based on a technique known as codon shuffling. Computer-assisted algorithms redistribute codons in a helper gene, thereby eliminating regions of homology, while enabling manipulation of factors such as codon-pair bias and CpG content to effectively titrate helper-gene protein levels. We apply this technique to rescue the replication of a murine gammaherpesvirus engineered with a mutation in the major immediate-early transactivator protein RTA. Complementation with codon-shuffled RTA constructs did not yield any WT revertant virus, a sharp contrast to WT virus contamination frequently observed during complementation with an unmodified helper gene. We further demonstrate the importance of eliminating WT virus contamination in an animal model of gammaherpesvirus lethality. We propose complementation by codon shuffling as a means to produce replication-defective or attenuated viruses. This method has immediate utility for investigating roles of essential genes in viral replication and will better enable future development of herpesvirus vaccines.

  16. A codon-shuffling method to prevent reversion during production of replication-defective herpesvirus stocks: Implications for herpesvirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ward, Charles; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Skiena, Steven; Krug, Laurie T.; Forrest, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses establish life-long chronic infections that place infected hosts at risk for severe disease. Herpesvirus genomes readily undergo homologous recombination (HR) during productive replication, often leading to wild-type (WT) reversion during complementation of replication-defective and attenuated viruses via HR with the helper gene provided in trans. To overcome this barrier, we developed a synthetic-biology approach based on a technique known as codon shuffling. Computer-assisted algorithms redistribute codons in a helper gene, thereby eliminating regions of homology, while enabling manipulation of factors such as codon-pair bias and CpG content to effectively titrate helper-gene protein levels. We apply this technique to rescue the replication of a murine gammaherpesvirus engineered with a mutation in the major immediate-early transactivator protein RTA. Complementation with codon-shuffled RTA constructs did not yield any WT revertant virus, a sharp contrast to WT virus contamination frequently observed during complementation with an unmodified helper gene. We further demonstrate the importance of eliminating WT virus contamination in an animal model of gammaherpesvirus lethality. We propose complementation by codon shuffling as a means to produce replication-defective or attenuated viruses. This method has immediate utility for investigating roles of essential genes in viral replication and will better enable future development of herpesvirus vaccines. PMID:28287622

  17. Identification and characterization of the genomic termini and cleavage/packaging signals of gallid herpesvirus 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpesvirus replication within host cells produces concatameric genomic DNA which is cleaved into unit-length genomes and packaged into the capsid by a complex of proteins. The sites of cleavage have been identified for many herpesviruses and conserved signaling sequences involved in cleavage and p...

  18. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Glenna F; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry.

  19. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Glenna F.; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry. PMID:26834264

  20. Research note: isolation of a herpesvirus from a bald eagle nestling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Romaine, R.I.; Knight, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Cloacal swabs collected from wild bald eagle nestlings (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were tested for viruses. A virus isolated from one of these samples had a lipid coat and contained DNA. Electron microscopy confirmed that it was a herpesvirus. This appears to be the first report of a herpesvirus isolation from a wild bald eagle.

  1. [Investigation of human herpesvirus-8 seroprevalence in blood donors and HIV-positive patients admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Altuğlu, İmre; Yolcu, Ayfer; Öcek, Zeliha Aslı; Yazan Sertöz, Rüçhan; Gökengin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), classified in Herpesviridae family, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. In contrast to the other herpesviruses, HHV-8 seroprevalence is low in general populations; however, the higher prevalence observed in individuals with immunodeficiencies such as AIDS poses an increased risk for KS. The global distribution of HHV-8 shows great variations, with the highest seroprevalence seen in Africa. The number of studies on the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in Turkey are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the HHV-8 seroprevalences in healthy blood donors and HIV-positive patients, that will contribute HHV-8 seroepidemiological data in our country. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. A total of 551 healthy donors (76 female, 475 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Blood Center for blood donation between December 2013-January 2014, and 173 HIV-positive patients (30 female, 143 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to infectious diseases outpatient clinic between October 2013-January 2014, were included in the study. A commercial ELISA method (KSHV/HHV-8 IgG ELISA Kit, Advanced Biotechnologies Inc, USA) was used for the detection of IgG antibodies that were structured against HHV-8 lytic antigens. In the study, 29 (29/551, 5.3%) of blood donors and 44 (44/173, 25.4%) of HIV-positive patients, with a total of 73 (73/724, 10.1%) cases were found as HHV-8 seropositive. The difference between blood donors and HIV-positive patients in terms of HHV-8 seropositivity rates was statistically significant (5.3% versus 25.4%; p< 0.05). In both of the study groups, no statistically significant difference was detected between HHV-8 seropositivity with gender and age. When considering HIV-positive patients, no statistically significant difference was observed between HHV-8 seropositivity with the duration of anti

  2. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  3. Association of genetic variations in miR-146a rs2910164 and miR-149 rs11614913 with the development of classic Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Lu, Q L; Wu, X J; Ma, H Y; Qu, Y Y; Zhang, D Z; Pu, X M

    2016-11-03

    Classic Kaposi sarcoma is a type of vascular proliferative inflammatory disease. Previous studies have reported significant associations between microRNAs expression and the development of classic Kaposi sarcoma. Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between miR-146a and miR-149 genetic polymorphisms and risk of classic Kaposi sarcoma in a Chinese population. Both classic Kaposi sarcoma patients and healthy controls were recruited between December 2013 and October 2015. Genotyping of miR-146a and miR-149 was performed by polymerase chain reaction-coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results showed that the GG genotype of miR-146a was associated with increased risk to classic Kaposi sarcoma (OR = 6.00, 95%CI = 1.19-30.12), as compared with the CC genotype. In the recessive model, we found that the GG genotype carried a 4.55-fold increased risk to classic Kaposi sarcoma as compared with the CC + CG genotype (OR = 2.06, 95%CI = 1.04-20.29). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-146a, but not miR-149 polymorphism, is associated with risk to classic Kaposi sarcoma in the Chinese population.

  4. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8.

  5. Kaposi sarcoma in a fingolimod-treated patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Susan; Brew, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a vascular tumour of endothelial cell origin, associated with human herpes virus 8. It develops in one of four clinical settings, one of which is iatrogenic immunosuppression. We present the case of a 46year-old man with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who developed KS in the context of fingolimod use. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of KS in a fingolimod-treated individual. This case highlights potential risks associated with immunosuppression with this medicine and ongoing need for vigilance in assessing for such complications.

  6. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV‐8

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Mark A.; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean‐Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus‐8 (HHV‐8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single‐gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV‐8. PMID:26469702

  7. Maladie de kaposi classique botriomycome-like: un piège diagnostic

    PubMed Central

    Bouzidi, Hanae; Gallouj, Salim; Amraoui, Nissrine; Mernissi, Fatima Zahra; Harmouch, Taoufiq

    2014-01-01

    La maladie de kaposi (MK) botriomycome-like et une variante clinique et anatomopathologique rare de la MK, rapportée aussi bien dans la forme classique et épidémique de la MK. C'est une entité difficile à diagnostiquer car ses caractéristiques cliniques et histologiques englobent à la fois celles du botriomycome et de la MK. En plus du contexte clinique l’étude histologique et immunohistochimique restent primordiales pour établir son diagnostic. Nous rapportons un cas de MK botriomycome-like assez particulier pas sa localisation et son siège unique. PMID:25317231

  8. Lichen Planus-like Keratosis: Another Differential Diagnosis for Kaposi Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Clavellina-Miller, Marcela; Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma is a common finding among HIV/AIDS patients that are not under antiretroviral treatment, and sometimes it is the first sign of the disease. However, it can be seen even in patients with undetectable viral load and high CD 4 cell count. Under these circumstances, the clinical presentation can be atypical in location or number. For this reason, the number of differential diagnosis is increased and biopsy of the suspicious lesions is essential for an accurate diagnosis and further apropiate treatment. PMID:26538737

  9. High incidence of classic Kaposi's sarcoma in Mantua, Po Valley, Northern Italy (1989–1998)

    PubMed Central

    Ascoli, V; Belli, S; Benedetti, M; Trinca, S; Ricci, P; Comba, P

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of classic Kaposi's sarcoma was estimated in the province of Mantua, Po Valley, Northern Italy, yielding age-standardized rates of 2.5/100 000 men and 0.7/100 000 women (1989–98). Elevated rates in the rural zone of Viadana/Sabbioneta (5.0/100 000 men and 2.8/100 000 women) are among the highest so far reported for Italian communities. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487269

  10. Mucocutaneous presentation of Kaposi sarcoma in an asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-positive man.

    PubMed

    Martorano, Lisa M; Cannella, Jonathan D; Lloyd, Jenifer R

    2015-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a malignant proliferation of endothelial cells within the skin. The clinical presentation is characterized by clusters of violaceous macules and papules that often appear on the distal extremities or trunk with or without oral mucosal involvement. Mucocutaneous lesions are present at onset of diagnosis in a minority of cases. The lesions can evolve to include the mucous membranes of the gastric mucosa and the lungs. We present a unique case of KS in a 45-year-old, asymptomatic, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive man with mucocutaneous involvement to highlight the importance of recognizing KS in immunocompromised patients.

  11. Coinfection with Human Herpesvirus 8 Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation and Immune Activation in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Robledano, Catalina; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; Antequera, Pedro; Lumbreras, Blanca; Hernández, Ildefonso; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Infection with co-pathogens is one of the postulated factors contributing to persistent inflammation and non-AIDS events in virologically-suppressed HIV-infected patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), a vasculotropic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients. Methods Prospective study including virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. Several blood biomarkers (highly-sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, malondialdehyde, plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1], D-dimer, sCD14, sCD163, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR), serological tests for HHV-8 and the majority of herpesviruses, carotid intima-media thickness, and endothelial function through flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery were measured. Results A total of 136 patients were included, 34.6% of them infected with HHV-8. HHV-8-infected patients were more frequently co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (P<0.001), and less frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (P = 0.045), and tended to be older (P = 0.086). HHV-8-infected patients had higher levels of hsCRP (median [interquartile range], 3.63 [1.32–7.54] vs 2.08 [0.89–4.11] mg/L, P = 0.009), CD4/CD38/HLA-DR (7.67% [4.10–11.86]% vs 3.86% [2.51–7.42]%, P = 0.035) and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR (8.02% [4.98–14.09]% vs 5.02% [3.66–6.96]%, P = 0.018). After adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HCV and HSV-2 infection, the associations remained significant: adjusted difference between HHV-8 positive and negative patients (95% confidence interval) for hsCRP, 74.19% (16.65–160.13)%; for CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, 89.65% (14.34–214.87)%; and for CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, 58.41% (12.30–123.22)%. Flow

  12. Koi herpesvirus encodes and expresses a functional interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Sunarto, Agus; Liongue, Clifford; McColl, Kenneth A; Adams, Mathew M; Bulach, Dieter; Crane, Mark St J; Schat, Karel A; Slobedman, Barry; Barnes, Andrew C; Ward, Alister C; Walker, Peter J

    2012-11-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) (species Cyprinid herpesvirus 3) ORF134 was shown to transcribe a spliced transcript encoding a 179-amino-acid (aa) interleukin-10 (IL-10) homolog (khvIL-10) in koi fin (KF-1) cells. Pairwise sequence alignment indicated that the expressed product shares 25% identity with carp IL-10, 22 to 24% identity with mammalian (including primate) IL-10s, and 19.1% identity with European eel herpesvirus IL-10 (ahvIL-10). In phylogenetic analyses, khvIL-10 fell in a divergent position from all host IL-10 sequences, indicating extensive structural divergence following capture from the host. In KHV-infected fish, khvIL-10 transcripts were observed to be highly expressed during the acute and reactivation phases but to be expressed at very low levels during low-temperature-induced persistence. Similarly, KHV early (helicase [Hel] and DNA polymerase [DNAP]) and late (intercapsomeric triplex protein [ITP] and major capsid protein [MCP]) genes were also expressed at high levels during the acute and reactivation phases, but only low-level expression of the ITP gene was detected during the persistent phase. Injection of khvIL-10 mRNA into zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos increased the number of lysozyme-positive cells to a similar degree as zebrafish IL-10. Downregulation of the IL-10 receptor long chain (IL-10R1) using a specific morpholino abrogated the response to both khvIL-10 and zebrafish IL-10 transcripts, indicating that, despite the structural divergence, khvIL-10 functions via this receptor. This is the first report describing the characteristics of a functional viral IL-10 gene in the Alloherpesviridae.

  13. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in a Patient with HIV (-) Kaposi Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Arzu; Şavk, Ekin; Tataroğlu, Canten; Yürekli, Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a vascular neoplasm that often manifests with multiple vascular nodules on the skin and other organs. Various imaging modalities can be used to display disease extent. Herein we present a 65-year-old female patient with human immunodeficiency virus negative KS along with her whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging findings. PMID:27751977

  14. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome and primary human herpesvirus 7 infection.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Ihira, Masaru; Okumura, Akihisa; Morishima, Tsuneo; Hayakawa, Fumio

    2004-09-01

    We report a case of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia (HH) syndrome. An 18-month-old female infant had a hemiconvulsion followed by left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging immediately after the onset of hemiplegia showed high intensity in the right hemisphere in diffusion-weighted images (DWI), while T1- and T2-weighted images were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography showed hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere in the acute phase. Virological analyses proved primary human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) infection. DWI are useful for the early evaluation of HH syndrome. Vascular disorders due to HHV-7 infection may have been related to the development of HH syndrome in this patient.

  15. Identification and Function of MicroRNAs Encoded by Herpesviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhi-Qiang; Lei, Xiu-Fen; Wang, Lin-Ding; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in eukaryotes, plants and some viruses. It is increasingly clear that miRNAs-encoded by viruses can affect the viral life cycle and host physiology. Viral miRNAs could repress the innate and adaptive host immunity, modulate cellular signaling pathways, and regulate the expression of cellular and viral genes. These functions facilitate viral acute and persistent infections, and have profound effects on the host cell survival and disease progression. Here, we discuss the miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses, and their regulatory roles involved in virus-host interactions. PMID:20084183

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcripts identified in HIV-related psoriasis and Kaposi's sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, S E; Duvic, M; Nickoloff, B J; Minshall, M; Smith, L C; Griffiths, C E; Paddock, S W; Lewis, D E

    1991-01-01

    Persons with HIV infection sometimes develop aggressive psoriasis or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) not usually seen in other immunosuppressed patients. However, a specific and direct pathophysiological role for HIV-1 in these AIDS-associated disorders remains unclear since HIV has not been easily detected in these skin lesions. By combining in situ hybridization with the sensitive detection technique of confocal laser scanning microscopy, we have demonstrated HIV RNA transcripts in 5 of 15 lesional skin biopsies from HIV-infected psoriasis patients, and in 3 of 8 Kaposi's sarcoma biopsies from HIV-infected patients. HIV transcripts were not detected in normal appearing skin from HIV-infected patients or in psoriatic and normal skin biopsies from uninfected individuals (P = 0.006). Although previous attempts to demonstrate viral sequences in psoriasis and KS lesions have been unsuccessful, in situ hybridization with confocal microscopy has shown the presence of HIV RNA transcripts predominantly within CD4+, Factor XIIIa positive dermal dendrocytes. HIV or cytokines produced by infected cells in skin lesions may therefore play a direct role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated psoriasis and KS. Images PMID:1676036

  17. Role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in post-transplant Kaposi sarcoma staging.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sierra, Astrid; Rovira, Jordi; Petit, Anna; Moya-Rull, Daniel; Mazuecos, María Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Fructuoso, Ana Isabel; Errasti, Pedro; Idoate, Miguel Ángel; Cruzado, Josep María; Vidal, August; Diekmann, Fritz; Oppenheimer, Federico; Campistol, Josep M; Revuelta, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is one of the most frequent transplant related tumors. Several pathways are involved; however, the impact of the molecular phenotype associated to the tumor stage and the behavior-depending resultant therapy is still unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in tumor stages of skin KS after renal transplantation. Twelve renal transplant recipients with cutaneous KS from five transplant centers (1980-2007) under reduction of immunosuppression or conversion to mTOR inhibitor were included. The expression of HHV-8, PTEN, TGFβ, VEGF, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-P70S6K in tumoral tissue was analyzed. KS lesions were classified as patch, plaque, and nodule state. HHV-8 infection was found in all tissue samples. KS lesions showed high activation of VEGF, p-mTOR and p-P70S6K, low PTEN, and null TGFβ expression. The only pathway activated in a staging-dependent manner was mTOR with higher p-mTOR and p-P70S6K expression in nodule versus patch stage. KS lesions disappeared after 5.24 months in all converted patients without any recurrence in 14.05 years of mean follow-up. The activation of mTOR pathway according to KS stages supports the rational of the mTOR inhibitor in post-transplant Kaposi.

  18. Langerhans cells in anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma with a paucivascular phenotype: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Naicker, Shaun; Calonje, Eduardo; Sewram, Vikash; Singh, Bhugwan

    2011-04-01

    Anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma (AKS), a rare variant of Kaposi sarcoma, has a poorly recognized histomorphologic spectrum, including a paucivascular phenotype, that mimics a range of undifferentiated malignancies. This study, that highlights the hitherto undocumented phenomenon of S100-protein-positive Langerhans cells (SLCs) as a potential diagnostic pitfall in paucivascular AKS, involved review of nine such AKS that required diagnostic immunohistochemical (IHC) work-up. All biopsies had a predominant or exclusive spindle or epithelioid cell infiltrate. The first three tumors were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (2) and metastatic melanoma (1), based on S100-protein immunopositivity. Biopsy of a co-existent pigmented sole lesion (patient 3) demonstrated nodular KS. Subsequent IHC investigation of these three tumors demonstrated an endothelial phenotype and HHV8 immunopositivity, confirming AKS. CD1a and langerin staining of the S100-protein-positive cells confirmed Langerhans cells as the cause of the diagnostic pitfall. Subsequently, six further paucivascular AKS with intratumoral SLCs were recognized on histomorphological and IHC appraisal. In conclusion, heightened awareness of the histomorphologic spectrum, appropriate IHC investigation, and informed appraisal thereof, are critical to the diagnosis of AKS with an undifferentiated phenotype, and the avoidance of IHC pitfalls, such as those caused by under-recognition and misinterpretation of bystander SLCs in AKS.

  19. Combination of Arsenic and Interferon-α Inhibits Expression of KSHV Latent Transcripts and Synergistically Improves Survival of Mice with Primary Effusion Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Hiba; Ali, Jihane; Ghantous, Akram; Hodroj, Dana; Daher, Ahmad; Zibara, Kazem; Journo, Chloé; Otrock, Zaher; Zaatari, Ghazi; Mahieux, Renaud; El Sabban, Marwan; Bazarbachi, Ali; Abou Merhi, Raghida

    2013-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of primary effusion lymphomas (PEL). PEL cell lines infected with KSHV, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus have a tumorigenic potential in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice and result in efficient engraftment and formation of malignant ascites with notable abdominal distension, consistent with the clinical manifestations of PEL in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Using this preclinical mouse model, we demonstrate that the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha (IFN) inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and downregulates the latent viral transcripts LANA-1, v-FLIP and v-Cyc in PEL cells derived from malignant ascites. Furthermore, this combination decreases the peritoneal volume and synergistically increases survival of PEL mice. Conclusion/Significance These results provide a promising rationale for the therapeutic use of arsenic/IFN in PEL patients. PMID:24250827

  20. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  1. The UBAP1 Subunit of ESCRT-I Interacts with Ubiquitin via a SOUBA Domain

    PubMed Central

    Agromayor, Monica; Soler, Nicolas; Caballe, Anna; Kueck, Tonya; Freund, Stefan M.; Allen, Mark D.; Bycroft, Mark; Perisic, Olga; Ye, Yu; McDonald, Bethan; Scheel, Hartmut; Hofmann, Kay; Neil, Stuart J.D.; Martin-Serrano, Juan; Williams, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) facilitate endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated cargo, MVB biogenesis, late stages of cytokinesis, and retroviral budding. Here we show that ubiquitin associated protein 1 (UBAP1), a subunit of human ESCRT-I, coassembles in a stable 1:1:1:1 complex with Vps23/TSG101, VPS28, and VPS37. The X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal region of UBAP1 reveals a domain that we describe as a solenoid of overlapping UBAs (SOUBA). NMR analysis shows that each of the three rigidly arranged overlapping UBAs making up the SOUBA interact with ubiquitin. We demonstrate that UBAP1-containing ESCRT-I is essential for degradation of antiviral cell-surface proteins, such as tetherin (BST-2/CD317), by viral countermeasures, namely, the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ubiquitin ligase K5. PMID:22405001

  2. Viral Inhibition of PRR-Mediated Innate Immune Response: Learning from KSHV Evasion Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Choi, Un Yung; Hwang, Sung-Woo; Kim, Stephanie; Jung, Jae U

    2016-11-30

    The innate immune system has evolved to detect and destroy invading pathogens before they can establish systemic infection. To successfully eradicate pathogens, including viruses, host innate immunity is activated through diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) which detect conserved viral signatures and trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) and pro-inflammatory cytokines to mediate viral clearance. Viral persistence requires that viruses co-opt cellular pathways and activities for their benefit. In particular, due to the potent antiviral activities of IFN and cytokines, viruses have developed various strategies to meticulously modulate intracellular innate immune sensing mechanisms to facilitate efficient viral replication and persistence. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of viral immune evasion strategies with a specific focus on how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) effectively targets host PRR signaling pathways.

  3. Two New Bioactive α-Pyrones from Hypericum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linzhen; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jinwen; Lu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaiping; Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-04-19

    Hypericum japonicum (Guttiferae), a type of annual or perennial herb, has been historically applied to cure infectious hepatitis, acute and chronic hepatitis, gastrointestinal disorder, and internal hemorrhage. In our successive studies on the genus Hypericum, two new α-pyrones termed japopyrones A and B (1 and 2) were isolated from H. japonicum. Their structures and absolute configurations were established by the comprehensive analyses of spectroscopic data, the application of the Single-crystal X-ray diffraction structural analysis, and the experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. Bioactivity screenings suggested that compound 2 possessed the potential inhibition efficacy on lytic replication of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) with an IC50 29.46 μM and a selective index of higher than 6.79, respectively.

  4. Alternative RNA splicing of KSHV ORF57 produces two different RNA isoforms.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In lytically infected B cells Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 gene encodes two RNA isoforms by alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, which contains a small, constitutive intron in its 5' half and a large, suboptimal intron in its 3's half. The RNA1 isoform encodes full-length ORF57 and is a major isoform derived from splicing of the constitutive small intron, but retaining the suboptimal large intron as the coding region. A small fraction (<5%) of ORF57 RNA undergoes double splicing to produce a smaller non-coding RNA2 due to lack of a translational termination codon. Both RNAs are cleaved and polyadenylated at the same cleavage site CS83636. The insertion of ORF57 RNA1 into a restriction cutting site in certain mammalian expression vectors activates splicing of the subopitmal intron and produces a truncated ORF57 protein.

  5. PRICE: software for the targeted assembly of components of (Meta) genomic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ruby, J Graham; Bellare, Priya; Derisi, Joseph L

    2013-05-20

    Low-cost DNA sequencing technologies have expanded the role for direct nucleic acid sequencing in the analysis of genomes, transcriptomes, and the metagenomes of whole ecosystems. Human and machine comprehension of such large datasets can be simplified via synthesis of sequence fragments into long, contiguous blocks of sequence (contigs), but most of the progress in the field of assembly has focused on genomes in isolation rather than metagenomes. Here, we present software for paired-read iterative contig extension (PRICE), a strategy for focused assembly of particular nucleic acid species using complex metagenomic data as input. We describe the assembly strategy implemented by PRICE and provide examples of its application to the sequence of particular genes, transcripts, and virus genomes from complex multicomponent datasets, including an assembly of the BCBL-1 strain of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. PRICE is open-source and available for free download (derisilab.ucsf.edu/software/price/ or sourceforge.net/projects/pricedenovo/).

  6. Targeting HGF/c-MET induces cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis for primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Cao, Yueyu; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Del Valle, Luis; Whitby, Denise; Parsons, Chris; Reiss, Krzysztof; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-24

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a principal causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) with a poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. However, it still lacks effective treatment which urgently requires the identification of novel therapeutic targets for PEL. Here, we report that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET pathway is highly activated by KSHV in vitro and in vivo. The selective c-MET inhibitor, PF-2341066, can induce PEL apoptosis through cell cycle arrest and DNA damage, and suppress tumor progression in a xenograft murine model. By using microarray analysis, we identify many novel genes that are potentially controlled by HGF/c-MET within PEL cells. One of the downstream candidates, ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase subunit M2 (RRM2), also displays the promising therapeutic value for PEL treatment. Our findings provide the framework for development of HGF/c-MET-focused therapy and implementation of clinical trials for PEL patients.

  7. Antiviral activity of tumor-suppressor pathways: clues from molecular piracy by KSHV.

    PubMed

    Moore, P S; Chang, Y

    1998-04-01

    A common feature of many tumor viruses is that they possess genes that produce specific proteins to inhibit major cellular tumor-suppressor pathways. Despite intensive studies, the reasons why these diverse and unrelated viruses have independently evolved oncogenes remains obscure. Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV8) has pirated a number of recognizable cellular genes that are key to cell survival and proliferation. In this review, we provide an overview of the known activities of these viral genes and show that many of these pirated proteins affect the same cellular pathways targeted by other, unrelated tumor viruses. We speculate that tumor-suppressor pathways are used by the cell as a primary defense against persistent virus infection, in addition to their well-known activity in regulating cell proliferation.

  8. Prevalence of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in patients with human herpesvirus 6-central nervous system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joshua A; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Zerr, Danielle M; Huang, Meei-Li; Yeung, Cecilia; Myerson, David; Jerome, Keith R; Boeckh, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    We identified 37 hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) central nervous system dysfunction and tested donor-recipient pairs for chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). One patient had ciHHV-6A with possible HHV-6A reactivation and encephalitis. There was no ciHHV-6 enrichment in this group, but larger studies are needed to determine if patients with ciHHV-6 are at increased risk for HHV-6-associated diseases or other complications.

  9. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-O; Brown, R A; Razonable, R R

    2012-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is unique among human herpesviruses because of its ability to integrate into chromosomes. This entity, termed chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (CIHHV-6), is often mistaken for active infection and treated unnecessarily. The clinical significance of CIHHV-6 in transplant recipients is not defined. Herein, the clinical characteristics of 7 liver transplant patients with CIHHV-6 from our recent study, together with 14 other published cases of CIHHV-6 were reviewed. Of the 21 cases, CIHHV-6B was reported most commonly among solid organ transplant recipients, while CIHHV-6A was mostly seen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients. None of the 21 patients developed clinical symptoms related to HHV-6 after transplantation. However, antiviral therapy was administered to 5 asymptomatic patients mistaken to have HHV-6 infection because of their very high HHV-6 DNA levels, 3 who developed symptomatic cytomegalovirus disease, and 1 with graft-versus-host disease that was mistaken for HHV-6 infection. In patients who received antiviral therapy, there was no apparent decline in HHV-6 DNA load, although change in viral kinetics is difficult to discern in the setting of high baseline HHV-6 DNA load. Clinicians should be aware of this entity of CIHHV-6 so that antiviral therapy can be considered in the proper clinical context.

  10. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-20

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies.

  11. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with human herpesvirus-6 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sarita, S; Arunkumar, G; Sabeena, S; Manikoth, Neeraj; Sivakumar, C P

    2012-01-01

    A 45-year-old man, on carbamazepine for the past 3 months, was referred as a case of atypical measles. On examination, he had high-grade fever, generalized itchy rash, cough, vomiting and jaundice. A provisional diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity syndrome to carbamazepine was made with a differential diagnosis of viral exanthema with systemic complications. Laboratory investigations revealed leukocytosis with eosnophilia and elevated liver enzymes. Real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on throat swab and blood was suggestive of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6). Measles was ruled out by PCR and serology. The diagnosis of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) was confirmed, which could explain all the features manifested by the patient. HHV-6 infects almost all humans by age 2 years. It infects and replicates in CD4 T lymphocytes and establishes latency in human peripheral blood monocytes or macrophages and early bone marrow progenitors. In DIHS, allergic reaction to the causative drug stimulates T cells, which leads to reactivation of the herpesvirus genome. DIHS is treated by withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids. Our patient responded well to steroids and HHV-6 was negative on repeat real-time multiplex PCR at the end of treatment.

  12. An Epstein–Barr-related herpesvirus from marmoset lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Gyu; Ramer, Jan; Rivailler, Pierre; Quink, Carol; Garber, Richard L.; Beier, David R.; Wang, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is implicated in the development of human B cell lymphomas and carcinomas. Although related oncogenic herpesviruses were believed to be endemic only in Old World primate species, we now find these viruses to be endemic in New World primates. We have isolated a transforming, EBV-related virus from spontaneous B cell lymphomas of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Sequencing of two-thirds of the genome reveals considerable divergence from the genomes of EBV and Old World primate EBV-related viruses, including differences in genes important for virus-induced cell growth transformation and pathogenesis. DNA related to the C. jacchus herpesvirus is frequently detected in squirrel monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that persistent infection with EBV-related viruses is prevalent in both New World primate families. Understanding how these more divergent EBV-related viruses achieve similar biologic outcomes in their natural host is likely to provide important insights into EBV infection, B cell growth transformation, and oncogenesis. PMID:11158621

  13. p53 inhibition by the LANA protein of KSHV protects against cell death.

    PubMed

    Friborg, J; Kong, W; Hottiger, M O; Nabel, G J

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8, has been implicated in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and several B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Most cells in lesions derived from these malignancies are latently infected, and different viral gene products have been identified in association with lytic or latent infection by KSHV. The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), encoded by open reading frame 73 of the KSHV genome, is a highly immunogenic protein that is expressed predominantly during viral latency, in most KS spindle cells and in cell lines established from body-cavity-based lymphomas. Antibodies to LANA can be detected in a high percentage of HIV-infected individuals who subsequently develop KS, although its role in disease pathogenesis is not completely understood. p53 is a potent transcriptional regulator of cell growth whose induction leads either to cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. Loss of p53 function correlates with cell transformation and oncogenesis, and several viral oncoproteins interact with p53 and modulate its biological activity. Here we show that LANA interacts with the tumour suppressor protein p53 and represses its transcriptional activity. This viral gene product further inhibits the ability of p53 to induce cell death. We propose that LANA contributes to viral persistence and oncogenesis in KS through its ability to promote cell survival by altering p53 function.

  14. Emydid herpesvirus 1 infection in northern map turtles (Graptemys geographica) and painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Newton, Alisa L; Seimon, Tracie A; Moore, Robert P; McAloose, Denise

    2015-05-01

    A captive, juvenile, female northern map turtle (Graptemys geographica) was found dead following a brief period of weakness and nasal discharge. Postmortem examination identified pneumonia with necrosis and numerous epithelial, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies, consistent with herpesviral pneumonia. Similar intranuclear inclusions were also associated with foci of hepatocellular and splenic necrosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of fresh, frozen liver for the herpesviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene yielded an amplicon with 99.2% similarity to recently described emydid herpesvirus 1 (EmyHV-1). Molecular screening of turtles housed in enclosures that shared a common circulation system with the affected map turtle identified 4 asymptomatic, EmyHV-1 PCR-positive painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and 1 asymptomatic northern map turtle. Herpesvirus transmission between painted and map turtles has been previously suggested, and our report provides the molecular characterization of a herpesvirus in asymptomatic painted turtles that can cause fatal herpesvirus-associated disease in northern map turtles.

  15. Mustelid herpesvirus-2, a novel herpes infection in northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni).

    PubMed

    Tseng, Marion; Fleetwood, Michelle; Reed, Aimee; Gill, Verena A; Harris, R Keith; Moeller, Robert B; Lipscomb, Thomas P; Mazet, Jonna A K; Goldstein, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    Oral ulcerations and plaques with epithelial eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions were observed in northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) that died or were admitted for rehabilitation after the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Alaska, USA. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of herpesviral virions. Additionally, a serologic study from 2004 to 2005 found a high prevalence of exposure to a herpesvirus in live-captured otters. Tissues from 29 otters after the EVOS and nasal swabs from 83 live-captured otters in the Kodiak Archipelago were tested for herpesviral DNA. Analysis identified a novel herpesvirus in the gamma subfamily, most closely related to Mustelid herpesvirus-1 from badgers. Results indicated that this herpesvirus is associated with ulcerative lesions but is also commonly found in secretions of healthy northern sea otters.

  16. In vitro inhibition of caprine herpesvirus 1 by acyclovir and mizoribine.

    PubMed

    Elia, G; Camero, M; Decaro, N; Lovero, A; Martella, V; Tempesta, M; Buonavoglia, C; Crescenzo, G

    2015-04-01

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats induces genital vesicular-ulcerative lesions that strictly resemble the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in the human host. The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) was found to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was characterized. When applied alone at non-toxic concentrations, ACV had a slight effect on CpHV-1 replication while in combination with MIZ a dose-dependent inhibition of the virus yield was observed with an IC50 of ACV of 28.5 µM. These findings suggest that combined therapy of ACV and MIZ is potentially exploitable in the treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain MD-2, Isolated from a Contaminated Turkey Herpesvirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junping; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Qihong; Li, Huijiao; Xia, Yecai; Liu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genomic sequence of a reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolated from a contaminated turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine. This report will be helpful for epidemiological studies on REV infection in avian flocks. PMID:24092783

  18. Enhancement of the antiviral activity against caprine herpesvirus type 1 of Acyclovir in association with Mizoribine.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Lucente, Maria Stella; Losurdo, Michele; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Trerotoli, Paolo; Casalino, Elisabetta; Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabriella; Tempesta, Maria

    2017-02-16

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats is responsible for genital lesions resembling the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in humans (HHV-2). The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) is able to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was evaluated. ACV (100μg/ml) displayed an antiviral effect on CpHV-1 replication. This inhibitory effect was higher when ACV (100μg/ml) was used in association with MIZ (20μg/ml). Other combinations of ACV and MIZ in various concentrations were not as effective as ACV 100μg/ml/MIZ 20μg/ml. These findings suggest that the association of ACV and MIZ is potentially useful for treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses.

  19. Concurrent oral shedding of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    PubMed

    Lommer, M J; Verstraete, F J M

    2003-04-01

    Oral mucosal salivary samples were collected from 25 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 24 cats with periodontal disease. Viral culture and isolation of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 were performed. Eighty-eight per cent of cats with chronic gingivostomatitis were shedding both viruses, compared to 21% of cats without chronic oral inflammatory disease. Cats with chronic gingivostomatitis are significantly more likely to concurrently shed both feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 than are cats with classical periodontal disease.

  20. A Challenging Case of Rapid Progressive Kaposi Sarcoma After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Vrachimis, Alexis; Huss, Sebastian; Wardelmann, Eva; Weckesser, Mathias; Pavenstädt, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract De-novo malignancy is a serious posttransplant complication. While the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is low, the time for its diagnosis is early after renal transplantation. Typically, it can be identified because of the classical skin lesion. We herein report an unusual case of rapid progressive KS without skin lesions in a 52-year-old patient leading to death within 8 months after kidney transplantation. This striking case illustrates the usefulness of [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for demonstrating the cause of unexplained deterioration of patient’s condition. Early identification of KS is critical because early (modification of) therapy can substantially improve patient’s prognosis. PMID:25192485

  1. Disseminated Kaposi's Sarcoma in an HIV-Positive Patient: A Rare Entity in an Indian Patient.

    PubMed

    Behera, Biswanath; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Toi, Pampa Ch; Vinod, Kolar Vishwanath

    2016-01-01

    AIDS-associated disseminated Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a rare entity, especially in India due to the low prevalence of human herpes virus-8 infections in Indian population. Due to its rapid and progressive nature, early diagnosis and institution of highly active antiretroviral therapy is crucial in AIDS-associated KS, with a view to achieving favorable prognosis. We report a case of disseminated KS in an HIV-1 positive patient, who presented with two months history of multiple violaceous patches and plaques over the trunk, bilateral upper limbs, lower limbs, and hard palate. The patient died of recurrent massive pleural effusion before starting antiretroviral therapy. This case is being reported due to the paucity of KS in the Indian literature, especially the disseminated type and to highlight its rapidly progressive course which can be fatal.

  2. Disseminated Kaposi's Sarcoma in an HIV-Positive Patient: A Rare Entity in an Indian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Biswanath; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Toi, Pampa Ch; Vinod, Kolar Vishwanath

    2016-01-01

    AIDS-associated disseminated Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a rare entity, especially in India due to the low prevalence of human herpes virus-8 infections in Indian population. Due to its rapid and progressive nature, early diagnosis and institution of highly active antiretroviral therapy is crucial in AIDS-associated KS, with a view to achieving favorable prognosis. We report a case of disseminated KS in an HIV-1 positive patient, who presented with two months history of multiple violaceous patches and plaques over the trunk, bilateral upper limbs, lower limbs, and hard palate. The patient died of recurrent massive pleural effusion before starting antiretroviral therapy. This case is being reported due to the paucity of KS in the Indian literature, especially the disseminated type and to highlight its rapidly progressive course which can be fatal. PMID:27293276

  3. Auricular involvement of a multifocal non-AIDS Kaposi's sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Busi, M; Altieri, E; Ciorba, A; Aimoni, C

    2014-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric, malignant neoplastic vascular disease, mainly involving skin and mucosae, characterised by the proliferation of endothelial cells. The aetiology of KS still is unknown. Nonetheless, it has been reported that several epidemiological and environmental factors may play a role in its pathogenesis. Viral factors (i.e. human herpes virus 8, HHV-8) have also been claimed to play a role in the onset of KS. Four main clinical presentations of KS have been described: classic (sporadic), African (endemic), iatrogenic (immunosuppression-associated) and AIDS-associated (epidemic). The authors present a case of KS involving the external ear of a HIVnegative patient with a history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and tuberculosis.

  4. [The laryngeal involvement in Kaposi's sarcoma in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olmo, A; Vilaseca, I; Moragas, M; Pérez, J; Blanch, J L; Avellaneda, R; Traserra, J

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a malignant vascular neoplasm characterized, in its classical form, by a slow evolutive course, beginning in the lower extremities. Lately have been reported more and more cases of this entity associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), running much more aggressively. In ENT-pathology are not uncommon this kind of neoplasm in the oral cavity and oropharynx. However at larynx's level such descriptions till now had been sporadic. The AA. present a KS case sitting in the epiglottis of an AIDS patient. They emphasize the importance of a throughout ENT-examination of these patients and also remark the necessity of performing various and deep biopsies in order to gain a diagnosis that can be relied on. Finally, they review the updated management alternatives for this sort of pathology.

  5. Kaposi sarcoma in an patient with atopic dermatitis treated with ciclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Dmitri; McMenamin, Mairín; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Irvine, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    There are four clinical subtypes of Kaposi sarcoma (KS): classic, endemic, epidemic and iatrogenic. The geographical prevalence of the endemic variant matches areas of human herpes virus type 8 (HHV8) seroprevalence. The iatrogenic variant, seen in immunosuppressed patients, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This is the first report of KS described in the context of atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with ciclosporin (CSA). We report a case of KS in an HHV8 seropositive Congolese patient following immunosuppression with CSA for AD. Treatment has been challenging, protracted and associated with significant morbidity. Immunosuppressive therapies are increasingly used for inflammatory dermatological conditions, including AD. This case highlights the importance of HHV8 screening of patients from endemic regions or those with other risk factors. It also highlights the importance of early recognition of a condition associated with significant morbidity and even mortality to facilitate appropriate treatment. PMID:24265347

  6. A multiplex panel of plasma markers of immunity and inflammation in classical kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Aka, Peter V; Kemp, Troy J; Rabkin, Charles S; Shiels, Meredith S; Polizzotto, Mark N; Lauria, Carmela; Vitale, Francesco; Pinto, Ligia A; Goedert, James J

    2015-01-15

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) risk is affected by perturbed immunity. Herein, we compared plasma from 15 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative classic KS cases to plasma from 29 matched controls, using a multiplex panel of immunity markers. Of 70 markers, CXCL10 (IP-10), sIL-1RII, sIL-2RA, and CCL3 (MIP-1A) were strongly and significantly associated with KS, after adjustment for age and smoking status. These and previous observations are consistent with a tumor-promoting role for these cytokines, particularly CXCL10, but the small sample size and case-control design preclude firm conclusions on KS risk or pathogenesis. Larger, well-designed prospective studies are needed to better assess the association of these markers with KS.

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma of the head and neck in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patow, C A; Steis, R; Longo, D L; Reichert, C M; Findlay, P A; Potter, D; Masur, H; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S; Macher, A M

    1984-06-01

    Since 1981 a new syndrome of acquired immune deficiency (AIDS) has been recognized. Male homosexuals, male and female intravenous drug abusers, and recipients of blood products (i.e., hemophiliacs) appear to be the populations at risk. The syndrome has been manifested by community-acquired opportunistic infections and/or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Otolaryngologic manifestations of AIDS are not infrequent. Thirteen AIDS patients at the National Institutes of Health with KS of the head and neck region are presented. All 13 patients were homosexual or bisexual males. Nine initially presented with KS, five with KS of the head or neck. As a group the patients demonstrated lesions involving the oropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and gastrointestinal regions. Their clinical course and complications are presented in detail. The mortality rate in this subgroup of AIDS patients is extraordinarily high (62%), with an average longevity of 11 months following initial diagnosis.

  8. Relationship between oral Kaposi 's sarcoma and HAART: contribution of two case reports.

    PubMed

    Campo-Trapero, Julián; Del Romero-Guerrero, Jorge; Cano-Sánchez, Jorge; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmen; Martínez-González, José Ma; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Two HIV infected patients not receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) presented with epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity. One patient initially refused HAART, but when the lesion became large enough to be noticeable he agreed to HAART associated with excision of the intraoral lesion by CO2 laser. The other patient developed KS and progressed to AIDS at two years after ceasing HAART due to adverse effects; he was referred to hospital for renewed administration of HAART. In both cases, the lesions observed in the oral cavity were the first clinical manifestation of AIDS. These reports underline the close relationship between the use of HAART and the control of KS lesions, highlighting the important role of the dentist in the identification and early diagnosis of these oral lesions.

  9. CRISPR/Cas9, a powerful tool to target human herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    van Diemen, Ferdy R; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2017-02-01

    Over 90% of the adult population is infected with one or multiple herpesviruses. These viruses are characterized by their ability to establish latency, where the host is unable to clear the invader from infected cells resulting in a lifelong infection. Herpesviruses cause a wide variety of (recurrent) diseases such as cold sores, shingles, congenital defects and several malignancies. Although the productive phase of a herpesvirus infection can often be efficiently limited by nucleoside analogs, these drugs are ineffective during a latent herpesvirus infection and are therefore unable to clear herpesviruses from the human host. Advances in genome engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 facilitates virus research and may hold potential to treat or cure previously incurable herpesvirus infections by directly targeting these viruses within infected cells. Here, we review recent applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for herpesviral research and discuss the therapeutic potential of the system to treat, or even cure, productive and latent herpesviral infections.

  10. Feline herpesvirus 1-associated facial and nasal dermatitis and stomatitis in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Hargis, A M; Ginn, P E

    1999-11-01

    Feline herpesvirus-associated dermatitis has rarely been reported. Recently we documented a unique ulcerative and often persistent facial dermatitis or stomatitis syndrome associated with feline herpesvirus 1. We believe this syndrome is relatively common, with the 10 cases in our series diagnosed between 1996 and 1997. The syndrome is associated with epithelial cell necrosis, eosinophilic inflammation, and intraepithelial herpesvirus inclusion bodies. The prevalence of eosinophilic inflammation and low number of inclusion bodies may lead to the misdiagnosis of allergic dermatitis or a lesion within the eosinophilic granuloma complex group of disorders. Feline herpesvirus 1 can be identified in lesional tissue by PCR methodology. Most of our cases developed under circumstances suggesting reactivation of latent herpesvirus infection, and previous glucocorticoid therapy or stress from overcrowding may have played a role in lesion development. Cats with ulcerative dermatitis, especially of the face and nose, and cats with stomatitis should be evaluated for the presence of feline herpesvirus. Treatment options include surgical excision, topical or systemic antibiotic therapy to treat secondary bacterial infection, and oral alpha interferon.

  11. Liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil): an effective new treatment for Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS.

    PubMed

    James, N D; Coker, R J; Tomlinson, D; Harris, J R; Gompels, M; Pinching, A J; Stewart, J S

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of a novel Stealth liposomal encapsulated formulation of doxorubicin (Doxil). A Phase I/II dose escalation study was carried out in a specialist HIV oncology unit in a teaching hospital (predominantly in an outpatient department). Fifteen patients with HIV related, biopsy confirmed, cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma, with or without visceral involvement of sufficient severity to require systemic chemotherapy, were treated. Most patients had poor prognosis disease as assessed by the Tumour/Immune status/Systemic symptoms (TIS) system and Karnofsky indices; six patients had previously received combination chemotherapy. Primary treatment consisted of a dose of Doxil 10 mg/m2, repeated after 2 weeks. If the Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) responded and the treatment was tolerated, the patient began maintenance therapy at the same dose every 2 weeks. If there was no clinical response, the dose was increased to 20 mg/m2 for the further two cycles, before proceeding to maintenance therapy. Treatment continued until other intercurrent disease, lack of further response, patient preference, or toxicity precluded further treatment. Tumour response was assessed 2 weeks after completion of at least two cycles of chemotherapy. Toxicity was assessed for each cycle. Doxil was well tolerated, and toxicity was manageable, the principal toxicity being haematological. A partial response rate of 11/15 (73%) was achieved, with disease stabilization in the remaining patients. We conclude that Doxil is an effective palliative treatment for epidemic KS in a patient group with a poor predicted outcome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. A novel herpesvirus in 3 species of pheasants: mountain peacock pheasant (Polyplectron inopinatum), Malayan peacock pheasant (Polyplectron malacense), and Congo peafowl (Afropavo congensis).

    PubMed

    Seimon, T A; McAloose, D; Raphael, B; Honkavuori, K S; Chang, T; Hirschberg, D L; Lipkin, W I

    2012-05-01

    The mountain peacock pheasant (Polyplectron inopinatum), the Malayan peacock pheasant (Polyplectron malacense), and the Congo peafowl (Afropavo congensis) are all listed as vulnerable to extinction under the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species. Here the authors report fatal infection with a novel herpesvirus in all 3 species of birds. DNA was extracted from the livers of birds with hepatocellular necrosis and intranuclear eosinophilic inclusions consistent with herpesvirus infection. Based on degenerate herpesvirus primers and polymerase chain reaction, 220- and 519-base pair products of the herpes DNA polymerase and DNA terminase genes, respectively, were amplified. Sequence analysis revealed that all birds were likely infected with the same virus. At the nucleotide level, the pheasant herpesvirus had 92% identity with gallid herpesvirus 3 and 77.7% identity with gallid herpesvirus 2. At the amino acid level, the herpes virus had 93.8% identity with gallid herpesvirus 3 and 89.4% identity with gallid herpesvirus 2. These findings indicate that the closest relative to this novel herpesvirus is gallid herpesvirus 3, a nonpathogenic virus used widely in a vaccine against Marek's disease. In situ hybridization using probes specific to the peacock pheasant herpesvirus DNA polymerase revealed strong intranuclear staining in the necrotic liver lesions of an infected Malayan peacock pheasant but no staining in normal liver from an uninfected bird. The phasianid herpesvirus reported here is a novel member of the genus Mardivirus of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae and is distinct from other galliform herpesviruses.

  13. Equine herpesvirus-1 myeloencephalopathy: a review of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; David Wilson, W; Madigan, John E; Ferraro, Gregory L

    2009-06-01

    Equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM), although a relatively uncommon manifestation of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) infection, can cause devastating losses on individual farms or boarding stables. Although outbreaks of EHM have been recognized for centuries in domestic horse populations, many aspects of this disease remained poorly characterized. In recent years, an improved understanding of EHM has emerged from experimental studies and from data collected during field outbreaks at riding schools, racetracks and veterinary hospitals throughout North America and Europe. These outbreaks have highlighted the contagious nature of EHV-1 and have prompted a re-evaluation of diagnostic procedures, treatment modalities, preventative measures and biosecurity protocols for the disease. This review concentrates on these and other selected, clinically relevant aspects of EHM.

  14. Detection of cyprinid herpesvirus-3 DNA in lake plankton.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Honjo, Mie N; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itayama, Tomoaki; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2011-06-01

    The disease caused by cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) severely impacts the natural freshwater ecosystem and damages carp and koi farming, however, the pathway of CyHV-3 transmission remains unclear. It is possible that the virus adheres to plankton, which then facilitate viral movement and transmission, and therefore, it is hypothesised that plankton are involved in the disease dynamics. In this study, plankton were collected at eight sites in the Iba-naiko lagoon; we detected and quantified CyHV-3 DNA from plankton samples. The results of the correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between CyHV-3 copies and the number of Rotifera, suggesting that CyHV-3 binds to and/or is concentrated by Rotifera. Our results suggest that plankton affect viral ecology in the natural environment.

  15. The alpha-herpesviruses: molecular pathfinders in nervous system circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Mats I.; Enquist, L.W.; Pomeranz, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Several neuroinvasive viruses can be used to study the mammalian nervous system. In particular, infection by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an α-herpesvirus with broad host range, reveals chains of functionally connected neurons in the nervous systems of a variety of mammals. The specificity of PRV trans-neuronal spread has been established in several systems. One attenuated strain, PRV-Bartha, causes a reduced inflammatory response and also spreads only from infected post- to pre-synaptic neurons. We review the basics of PRV tracing and then discuss new developments and novel approaches that have enabled a more detailed understanding of the architecture of the nervous system. As questions and techniques evolve in the field of neuroscience, advances in PRV tracing will certainly follow. PMID:18280208

  16. Transmission of caprine herpesvirus 2 in domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Keller, Janice; Knowles, Donald P; Taus, Naomi S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Crawford, Timothy B

    2005-04-25

    Caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2) is a recently recognized gammaherpesvirus that is endemic in domestic goats and has been observed to cause clinical malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in certain species of deer. In this study, transmission of CpHV-2 in goats was examined. A total of 30 kids born to a CpHV-2 positive goat herd were selected and divided into two groups: group 1 (n=16) remained in the positive herd; group 2 (n=14) was separated from the herd at 1 week of age after obtaining colostrum. Peripheral blood samples from each kid were examined regularly by competitive ELISA for MCF viral antibody and by PCR for CpHV-2 DNA. Fifteen out of 16 goats (94%) that remained with the positive herd seroconverted and became PCR-positive for CpHV-2 by 10 months of age. In contrast, all kids (100%) that were separated from the positive herd at 1 week of age remained negative until termination of the experiment at 1 year of age. Additional transmission experiments revealed that all CpHV-2-free adult goats were susceptible to CpHV-2 or ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) infection. The data indicate that the transmission pattern of CpHV-2 in goats is similar to the pattern of OvHV-2 in sheep and that CpHV-2-free goats can be established by early separation of kids from positive herds, which has significant implications for MCF control programs.

  17. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Simon Y.; Latimer, Erin M.; Hayward, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses—EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7—found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  18. Melissa officinalis oil affects infectivity of enveloped herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Schuhmacher, A; Astani, A; Reichling, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils of medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel drugs of antimicrobial and antiviral agents, since herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral agents. Melissa officinalis essential oil was phytochemically examined by GC-MS analysis, its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b and citronellal. The antiviral effect of lemon balm oil, the essential oil of Melissa officinalis, on herpes simplex virus was examined. The inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of balm oil for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at high dilutions of 0.0004% and 0.00008% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. At noncytotoxic concentrations of the oil,plaque formation was significantly reduced by 98.8% for HSV-1 and 97.2% for HSV-2, higher concentrations of lemon balm oil abolished viral infectivity nearly completely. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of this essential oil, time-on-addition assays were performed. Both herpesviruses were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with balm oil prior to infection of cells. These results indicate that Melissa oil affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, thus lemon balm oil is capable of exerting a direct antiviral effect on herpesviruses. Considering the lipophilic nature of lemon balm essential oil, which enables it to penetrate the skin, and a high selectivity index, Melissa officinalis oil might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections.

  19. Tales from the crypt and coral reef: the successes and challenges of identifying new herpesviruses using metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are ubiquitous double-stranded DNA viruses infecting many animals, with the capacity to cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Different herpesviruses have different cell tropisms, and have been detected in a diverse range of tissues and sample types. Metagenomics—encompassing viromics—analyses the nucleic acid of a tissue or other sample in an unbiased manner, making few or no prior assumptions about which viruses may be present in a sample. This approach has successfully discovered a number of novel herpesviruses. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis can identify herpesviruses with high degrees of sequence divergence from known herpesviruses and does not rely upon culturing large quantities of viral material. Metagenomics has had success in two areas of herpesvirus sequencing: firstly, the discovery of novel exogenous and endogenous herpesviruses in primates, bats and cnidarians; and secondly, in characterizing large areas of the genomes of herpesviruses previously only known from small fragments, revealing unexpected diversity. This review will discuss the successes and challenges of using metagenomics to identify novel herpesviruses, and future directions within the field. PMID:25821447

  20. Kaposi sarcoma in association with molluscum contagiosum: an uncommon diagnosis in a single biopsy and potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Prasad Busarla, Satya Vara; Sayed, Shahin; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Gimbel, Devon C; Moloo, Zahir; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2012-02-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a cutaneous poxviral infection that is rarely associated with other skin diseases, such as cutaneous neoplasms. Such associations are likely to be coincidental, except in immunocompromised patients. Kaposi sarcoma, an angioproliferative neoplasm derived from lymphatic endothelium, is mediated by human herpes virus-8 infection and occurs with increased frequency in immunocompromised individuals. We report an unusual case of molluscum contagiosum with underlying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed in a single skin biopsy of a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient. Our case highlights the importance of adequate sampling to avoid missing secondary diagnoses in histopathologic sections and alerts pathologists and dermatologists to the possibility of coinfection in high-risk patients by 2 virally-mediated skin conditions.

  1. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject. PMID:22481952

  2. A Murine Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptor Expressed in CHO Cells is Activated by Basic FGF and Kaposi FGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansukhani, Alka; Moscatelli, David; Talarico, Daniela; Levytska, Vera; Basilico, Claudio

    1990-06-01

    We have cloned a murine cDNA encoding a tyrosine kinase receptor with about 90% similarity to the chicken fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor and the human fms-like gene (FLG) tyrosine kinase. This mouse receptor lacks 88 amino acids in the extracellular portion, leaving only two immunoglobulin-like domains compared to three in the chicken FGF receptor. The cDNA was cloned into an expression vector and transfected into receptor-negative CHO cells. We show that cells expressing the receptor can bind both basic FGF and Kaposi FGF. Although the receptor binds basic FGF with a 15- to 20-fold higher affinity, Kaposi FGF is able to induce down-regulation of the receptor to the same extent as basic FGF. The receptor is phosphorylated upon stimulation with both FGFs, DNA synthesis is stimulated, and a proliferative response is produced in cells expressing the receptor, whereas cells expressing the cDNA in the antisense orientation show none of these responses to basic FGF or Kaposi FGF. Thus this receptor can functionally interact with two growth factors of the FGF family.

  3. Maladie de Kaposi à localisation broncho-pulmonaire révélant une infection VIH

    PubMed Central

    Sebbar, Amal; Zaghba, Nahid; Benjelloun, Hanane; Bakhatar, Abdelaziz; Yassine, Najiba

    2015-01-01

    La maladie de Kaposi (MK) associée au VIH, forme dite épidémique, a été décrite la 1ère fois en 1981 par Hymmes. C'est l'affection maligne la plus fréquente au cours du SIDA. La MK est à l'origine de 10% des atteintes pleuropulmonaires au cours de l'infection par le VIH et 40% des pneumopathies en cas de MK cutanéomuqueuse. Les localisations pulmonaires occupent la deuxième place des atteintes viscérales après la forme digestive. Le diagnostic repose sur des arguments épidémiologiques, cliniques, radiologiques, biologiques, endoscopiques et histologiques. Nous rapportons un cas de MK broncho-pulmonaire compliquant une infection VIH chez un patient présentant une maladie de Kaposi cutanée de découverte fortuite au cours de l'atteinte pulmonaire. Le diagnostic a été retenu après avoir éliminé les maladies opportunistes à tropisme pulmonaire. Le Kaposi pulmonaire constitue l'atteinte la plus grave de la MK-sida et la survie après le diagnostic est courte malgré les thérapeutiques agressives. PMID:26958142

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are nodular and infiltrating. While it can have aggressive skin involvement the internal involvement is usually mild. ... the age of 10 years. It has an aggressive nature and its victims usually die within 2 ...

  5. Replacement of glycoprotein B in alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 by its ovine herpesvirus 2 homolog: implications in vaccine development for sheep associated-malignant catarrhal fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine development is a top priority in malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) research. In the case of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF), caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), progress towards this objective has been hindered by the absence of methods to attenuate or modify the virus, since it cannot be pr...

  6. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation.

  7. Gene organization in the UL region and inverted repeats of the canine herpesvirus genome.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M; Sheldrick, P; Lebreton, F; Nardeux, P; Foulon, T

    1996-01-01

    Restriction mapping and the determination of scattered nucleotide sequences have permitted a description of the global structure and evolutionary affinities of the canine herpesvirus (CHV) genome. The global structure closely resembles that of the totally sequenced genomes of varicella-zoster virus and equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) in having a 37 bp inverted repeat flanking a long unique region (UL) of approximately 100,000 bp, and a 10,100-10,700 bp inverted repeat flanking a short unique region (U8) of roughly 7,400-8,600 bp. On the basis of the sequences obtained, 35 homologues to previously identified herpesvirus gene products were found in UL and the major inverted repeat, and the level of the similarities indicated that CHV belongs to the genus Varicellovirus. Within the genus, CHV appears to be most closely related to EHV-1, pseudorabies virus and feline herpesvirus. Surprisingly, genes for both subunits of the viral ribonucleotide reductase were found to be missing from their equivalent place in other herpesvirus genomes. Either they have been translocated to another position in the CHV genome or, we think more likely, they have been lost.

  8. A gamma-herpesvirus glycoprotein complex manipulates actin to promote viral spread.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michael B; Edgar, Rachel; May, Janet S; Stevenson, Philip G

    2008-03-19

    Viruses lack self-propulsion. To move in multi-cellular hosts they must therefore manipulate infected cells. Herpesviruses provide an archetype for many aspects of host manipulation, but only for alpha-herpesviruses in is there much information about they move. Other herpesviruses are not necessarily the same. Here we show that Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) induces the outgrowth of long, branched plasma membrane fronds to create an intercellular network for virion traffic. The fronds were actin-based and RhoA-dependent. Time-lapse imaging showed that the infected cell surface became highly motile and that virions moved on the fronds. This plasma membrane remodelling was driven by the cytoplasmic tail of gp48, a MHV-68 glycoprotein previously implicated in intercellular viral spread. The MHV-68 ORF58 was also required, but its role was simply transporting gp48 to the plasma membrane, since a gp48 mutant exported without ORF58 did not require ORF58 to form membrane fronds either. Together, gp48/ORF58 were sufficient to induce fronds in transfected cells, as were the homologous BDLF2/BMRF2 of Epstein-Barr virus. Gp48/ORF58 therefore represents a conserved module by which gamma-herpesviruses rearrange cellular actin to increase intercellular contacts and thereby promote their spread.

  9. The Role of PI3K/Akt in Human Herpesvirus Infection: from the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Liu, XueQiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway regulates several key cellular functions including protein synthesis, cell growth, glucose metabolism, and inflammation. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to manipulate this signaling pathway to ensure successful virus replication. The human herpesviruses undergo both latent and lytic infection, but differ in cell tropism, growth kinetics, and disease manifestations. Herpesviruses express multiple proteins that target the PI3K/Akt cell signaling pathway during the course of their life cycle to facilitate viral infection, replication, latency, and reactivation. Rare human genetic disorders with mutations in either the catalytic or regulatory subunit of PI3K that result in constitutive activation of the protein predispose to severe herpesvirus infections as well as to virus-associated malignancies. Inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway or its downstream proteins using drugs already approved for other diseases can block herpesvirus lytic infection and may reduce malignancies associated with latent herpesvirus infections. PMID:25798530

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma cells express the macrophage-associated antigen mannose receptor and develop in peripheral blood cultures of Kaposi's sarcoma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Uccini, S.; Sirianni, M. C.; Vincenzi, L.; Topino, S.; Stoppacciaro, A.; Lesnoni La Parola, I.; Capuano, M.; Masini, C.; Cerimele, D.; Cella, M.; Lanzavecchia, A.; Allavena, P.; Mantovani, A.; Baroni, C. D.; Ruco, L. P.

    1997-01-01

    The mannose receptor (MR) is a surface 175-kd C-type lectin expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells. MR is involved in removal of effete cells, phagocytosis of mannose-coated particles, pinocytosis, and antigen presentation. Expression of MR was investigated in 17 biopsies of Kaposi's sarcoma (3 AIDS KS, 13 classical KS, and 1 transplant-associated KS) using three anti-MR monoclonal antibodies (3.29, D547, and PAM1). Immunostaining for MR was detected in 94 +/- 7% KS cells with spindle morphology. In normal tissues, MR was expressed by sinus-lining cells of spleen and lymph nodes, but it was not detected in endothelial cells lining normal hematic and lymphatic vessels, hemangioma, hemangioendothelioma, and lymphangioma. Expression of MR in KS cells prompted us to investigate the possibility that they derive from a circulating precursor cell. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 16 patients with KS (10 classical, 1 transplanted, and 5 AIDS) were cultured in PHA-conditioned medium for 10 to 14 days. Confluent monolayers of adherent spindle cells were detected in 8 of 11 classical KS, in 5 of 5 AIDS KS patients, and in 0 of 34 control patients. Peripheral-blood-derived KS-like cells were characterized by co-expression of macrophage and endothelial antigens being positive for CD45 (60%), CD68 (98%), MR (70%), CD14 (25%), VE-cadherin (70%), and von Willebrand factor (10%). When the immunophenotype of peripheral-blood-derived adherent cells was compared with that of KS spindle cells of tissue biopsies, it was found that both cell types are VE-cadherin+/MR+/CD68+, that peripheral-blood-derived spindle cells are CD34- and are less frequently stained for CD31 and von Willebrand factor, and that lesional KS cells do not express the leukocyte markers CD45 and CD18. Our findings are consistent with the possibility that KS lesions derive from tissue accumulation and local proliferation of a special subset of macrophages with endothelial features the normal counterpart

  11. High prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Hannachi, Neila; El Kissi, Yousri; Samoud, Samar; Nakhli, Jaafar; Letaief, Leila; Gaabout, Samia; Ali, Bechir Ben Hadj; Boukadida, Jalel

    2014-05-15

    Many studies have reported an association between Herpes family viruses and an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the role of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) has never been investigated. This study aimed to assess HHV8 prevalence in schizophrenic patients as well as the possible association between HHV8 infection and schizophrenia clinical features. We consecutively enrolled 108 patients meeting fourth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria of schizophrenia and 108 age and sex matched controls. Data about a number of demographic characteristics and potential HHV8 risk factors of infection were collected. Standardized psychopathology measures, disease severity and functioning level were obtained using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) and Global Assessment of functioning (GAF). The presence of anti-HHV8 antibodies was analyzed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. A higher prevalence of HHV8 infection in schizophrenic patients than in controls was found. Marital status, having children, sexual behavior and risk factors of blood transmission were not associated with HHV8 prevalence. However, among schizophrenic patients, HHV8 prevalence was statically associated with positive symptoms. To our knowledge, this would be the first report of a possible role of HHV8 in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. To prove this hypothesis, further investigation of HHV8 in schizophrenia with larger samples is needed.

  12. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J; Simard, Jacques; Velásquez-García, Héctor A; Spinelli, John J; Flamand, Louis

    2017-03-01

    Background: Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (iciHHV-6) is a condition observed in approximately 1% of the population. Whether such a genetic alteration predisposes to cancer development in currently unknown. Two studies were conducted to determine whether iciHHV-6 is associated with cancer development.Methods: First, a screen of 19,597 people from the province of Quebec (Canada) was conducted. A replication test, using data from a population-based case-control study of 1,090 women with incident breast cancer and 1,053 controls from British Columbia and Ontario (Canada) was conducted. DNA samples were analyzed by qPCR and droplet digital PCR to identify iciHHV-6(+) carriers.Results: In the initial study, a potential association between iciHHV-6 positivity and breast cancer was identified [OR = 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.95-7.44]. In the replication dataset, no association was found between iciHHV-6 positivity in women and breast cancer (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.35-2.15).Conclusions: We found no statistically significant associations between inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 and breast cancer in women.Impact: These results do not provide evidence to suggest that iciHHV-6 is a risk factor for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 425-7. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Genotypic characterization of psittacid herpesvirus isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Luppi, Marcela Miranda; Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira Franco; Coelho, Fabiana Magalhães; Ecco, Roselene; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Resende, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-six isolates of psittacid herpesvirus (PsHV), obtained from 12 different species of psittacids in Brazil, were genotypically characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and PCR amplification. RFLP analysis with the PstI enzyme revealed four distinct restriction patterns (A1, X, W and Y), of which only A1 (corresponding to PsHV-1) had previously been described. To study PCR amplification patterns, six pairs of primers were used. Using this method, six variants were identified, of which, variants 10, 8, and 9 (in this order) were most prevalent, followed by variants 1, 4, and 5. It was not possible to correlate the PCR and RFLP patterns. Twenty-nine of the 36 isolates were shown to contain a 419bp fragment of the UL16 gene, displaying high similarity to the PsHV-1 sequences available in GenBank. Comparison of the results with the literature data suggests that the 36 Brazilian isolates from this study belong to genotype 1 and serotype 1.

  14. Genotypic characterization of psittacid herpesvirus isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Marcela Miranda; Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira Franco; Coelho, Fabiana Magalhães; Ecco, Roselene; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Resende, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-six isolates of psittacid herpesvirus (PsHV), obtained from 12 different species of psittacids in Brazil, were genotypically characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and PCR amplification. RFLP analysis with the PstI enzyme revealed four distinct restriction patterns (A1, X, W and Y), of which only A1 (corresponding to PsHV-1) had previously been described. To study PCR amplification patterns, six pairs of primers were used. Using this method, six variants were identified, of which, variants 10, 8, and 9 (in this order) were most prevalent, followed by variants 1, 4, and 5. It was not possible to correlate the PCR and RFLP patterns. Twenty-nine of the 36 isolates were shown to contain a 419 bp fragment of the UL16 gene, displaying high similarity to the PsHV-1 sequences available in GenBank. Comparison of the results with the literature data suggests that the 36 Brazilian isolates from this study belong to genotype 1 and serotype 1. PMID:26887248

  15. Nationwide Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 contamination in natural rivers of Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Honjo, Mie N; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Uchii, Kimiko; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2012-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) disease is a significant threat for common and koi carp cultivators and for freshwater ecosystems. To determine the prevalence of CyHV-3 in Japanese rivers, a nationwide survey of all national class-A rivers was undertaken in the Summer of 2008. The virus was concentrated from river water samples using the cation-coated filter method. CyHV-3 DNA was detected in 90 rivers, representing 90% of 103 successfully analysed rivers. More than 100,000 copies of CyHV-3 DNA per litre of sample were detected in four rivers, higher than that reported during the Yura River outbreak in 2007. For CyHV-3-positive rivers, the log CyHV-3 density was negatively correlated with the water temperature on the sampling date and positively correlated with the suspended solids and dissolved oxygen, which are annually averaged for each river. Our results demonstrate that virus detection using molecular biology techniques is a powerful tool for monitoring the presence of CyHV-3 in natural environments.

  16. Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3: An Archetype of Fish Alloherpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Rakus, Krzysztof; Jazowiecka-Rakus, Joanna; Vancsok, Catherine; Morvan, Léa; Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Stone, David M; Way, Keith; van Beurden, Steven J; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The order Herpesvirales encompasses viruses that share structural, genetic, and biological properties. However, members of this order infect hosts ranging from molluscs to humans. It is currently divided into three phylogenetically related families. The Alloherpesviridae family contains viruses infecting fish and amphibians. There are 12 alloherpesviruses described to date, 10 of which infect fish. Over the last decade, cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) infecting common and koi carp has emerged as the archetype of fish alloherpesviruses. Since its first description in the late 1990s, this virus has induced important economic losses in common and koi carp worldwide. It has also had negative environmental implications by affecting wild carp populations. These negative impacts and the importance of the host species have stimulated studies aimed at developing diagnostic and prophylactic tools. Unexpectedly, the data generated by these applied studies have stimulated interest in CyHV-3 as a model for fundamental research. This review intends to provide a complete overview of the knowledge currently available on CyHV-3.

  17. [Human herpesvirus-6 associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B is a relatively common occurrence after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and it is associated with the development of various post-transplant complications. HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be a significant, life-threatening complication caused by HHV-6B reactivation. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops 2-6 weeks after SCT, and the symptoms are characterized by memory loss, seizures, and consciousness loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Recent large-scale studies and a prospective study showed a similar incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis development, with 7.9-9.9% in cord blood transplant recipients and 0.5-1.2% in bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients. Epidemiological studies suggest that post-transplant immune reactions such as GVHD, pre-engraftment immune reaction, or engraftment syndrome play important roles in the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. The mortality rate remains high, and even among survivors, many patients are left with serious neurological impairments, such as memory disturbance and seizures. Elucidation of the pathophysiology and establishment of appropriate prophylactic measures are necessary to overcome this serious complication. Besides encephalitis, associations between HHV-6 and various post-transplant complications have been reported, including pneumonitis, gastroenterocolitis, hepatitis, bone marrow suppression, and GVHD. Further investigations are needed to determine the role of HHV-6 in these complications.

  18. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B.; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R.; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D’Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of ‘quiescent’ HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Pathogenic and Attenuated Alcelaphine Herpesvirus 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Dry, Inga; Haig, David M.; Inglis, Neil F.; Imrie, Lisa; Stewart, James P.; Russell, George C.

    2008-01-01

    The gammaherpesvirus alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) causes malignant catarrhal fever in susceptible ungulates but infects its natural host, wildebeest, without obvious clinical signs. In tissue culture, AlHV-1 is initially predominantly cell associated and virulent but on extended culture becomes cell-free and attenuated. We wanted to determine what changes in protein composition had taken place during the transition from virulent to attenuated virus in culture. Purified virus preparations were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Peptides were identified in serial gel slices by using MASCOT software to interrogate virus-specific and nonredundant sequence databases. Twenty-three AlHV-1-encoded proteins and six cellular proteins were identified in the attenuated and virulent viruses. Two polypeptides were detected in only the virulent virus preparations, while one other protein was found in only the attenuated virus. Two of these virus-specific proteins were identified by a single peptide, suggesting that these may be low-abundance virion proteins rather than markers of attenuation or pathogenesis. The results suggest that attenuation of AlHV-1 is not the result of gross changes in the composition of the virus particle but probably due to altered viral gene expression in the infected cell. PMID:18353942

  20. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  1. Fatal Canid herpesvirus 1 infection in an adult dog.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Barbie J; Maes, Roger K; Wise, Annabel G; Kiupel, Matti; Langohr, Ingeborg M

    2012-05-01

    Canid herpesvirus 1 (CaHV-1) is a well-known cause of fatal hepatic and renal necrosis in neonatal puppies. In adult dogs infected with CaHV-1, papulovesicular genital lesions may be observed. CaHV-1 infection during pregnancy can lead to embryonic resorption, abortion, and stillbirth. In high-density dog populations, CaHV-1 can also contribute to kennel cough. Furthermore, recent literature has clearly documented that CaHV-1 can induce ocular disease in immature and adult dogs. The current study describes a case of fatal CaHV-1 infection in a 9-year-old spayed female Bichon Frise dog. Following a history of vomiting and diarrhea, the dog deteriorated and subsequently died. The main lesions were multifocal areas of necrosis with intranuclear inclusion bodies in the liver, adrenal gland, and small intestine, similar to the lesions observed in CaHV-1-infected puppies. Infection with CaHV-1 was confirmed on samples of liver by polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. There was no indication of immunosuppression in this dog. Based on the results presented herein, CaHV-1 should be included in the list of differential diagnoses of hepatic necrosis in adult dogs.

  2. Terminal repetitive sequences in herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA.

    PubMed

    Bankier, A T; Dietrich, W; Baer, R; Barrell, B G; Colbère-Garapin, F; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1985-07-01

    The H-DNA repeat unit of Herpesvirus saimiri strain 11 was cloned in plasmid vector pAGO, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. One unit of repetitive DNA has 1,444 base pairs with 70.8% G+C content. The structural features of repeat DNA sequences at the termini of intact virion M-DNA (160 kilobases) and orientation of reiterated DNA were analyzed by radioactive end labeling of M-DNA, followed by cleavage of the end fragments with restriction endonucleases. The termini appeared to be blunt ended with a 5'-phosphate group, probably generated during encapsidation by cleavage in the immediate vicinity of the single ApaI recognition site in the H-DNA repeat unit. The sequence did not reveal sizeable open reading frames, the longest hypothetical peptide from H-DNA being 85 amino acids. There was no evidence for an mRNA promoter or terminator element, and H-DNA-specific transcription could not be found in productively infected cells.

  3. Lymphoid follicular cloacal inflammation associated with a novel herpesvirus in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Govett, Pamela D; Harms, Craig A; Johnson, April J; Latimer, Kenneth S; Wellehan, James F X; Fatzinger, Michael H; Christian, L Shane; Kelly, Terra R; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2005-09-01

    Multifocal hyperemic nodules and plaques associated with the cloacal mucosa of juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at a public aquarium were investigated. Grossly, pale pink to dark red multifocal, circular lesions of varying degrees of severity were identified on the cloacal and, in males, phallus mucosa. Cloacal mucosa biopsies were obtained from 2 of the alligators. These samples were examined histologically and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using consensus primers targeting a conserved region of the herpesvirus polymerase gene. Microscopically, the lesions were characterized as submucosal lymphoid follicles with hyperemia and hemorrhage. No inclusion bodies were observed. Minimal to no anisokaryosis was present, and no etiologic agents were identified. Through PCR, a band consistent in size with herpesvirus was observed. Tissues showing similar clinical, histopathologic, and PCR findings were collected from animals at an alligator farm several months later. Sequencing of the PCR amplicon resulted in a 180-base pair sequence that shared 85% sequence identity with tortoise herpesvirus-1.

  4. Haematopoietic necrosis in a goldfish (Carassius auratus) associated with an agent morphologically similar to herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Stephens, F J; Raidal, S R; Jones, B

    2004-03-01

    One of 14 goldfish (Carassius auratus) died 4 weeks after purchase and was investigated by necropsy and histological examination. Routine formalin fixation of the goldfish was followed by histopathology. Formalin fixed spleen and kidney from the fish was further processed by embedding in epoxy resin and examined by transmission electron microscopy (EM). Severe, diffuse necrosis of haematopoietic tissue in the spleen, thymus and kidney and severe, diffuse hyperplasia in the gill epithelial cells were seen. In the spleen there was severe, diffuse necrosis of lymphocytes and many nuclei with marginated chromatin and intranuclear inclusions were scattered throughout the necrotic tissue. EM of affected tissues demonstrated intranuclear particles morphologically similar to herpesvirus. The presence of an agent similar to a herpesvirus in a goldfish with severe haematopoietic necrosis suggests that the herpesvirus responsible for haematopoietic necrosis in cyprinid species throughout the world has entered the goldfish population in Australia.

  5. Replication of Bovine Herpesvirus Type 4 in Human Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Egyed, László

    1998-01-01

    A reference strain (Movár 33/63) of bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) was inoculated into 14 different human cell lines and five primary cell cultures representing various human tissues. BHV-4 replicated in two embryonic lung cell lines, MRC-5 and Wistar-38, and in a giant-cell glioblastoma cell culture. Cytopathic effect and intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in these cells. PCR detected a 10,000-times-higher level of BHV-4 DNA. Titration of the supernatant indicated a 100-fold increase of infectious particles. Since this is the first bovine (human herpesvirus 8 and Epstein-Barr virus related) herpesvirus which replicates on human cells in vitro, the danger of possible human BHV-4 infection should not be ignored. PMID:9650976

  6. Meningoencephalitis in a polar bear caused by equine herpesvirus 9 (EHV-9).

    PubMed

    Donovan, T A; Schrenzel, M D; Tucker, T; Pessier, A P; Bicknese, B; Busch, M D M; Wise, A G; Maes, R; Kiupel, M; McKnight, C; Nordhausen, R W

    2009-11-01

    A 12-year-old female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) developed a sudden onset of muscle tremors, erratic circling, increased blinking, head shaking, and ptyalism, which progressed to partial and generalized seizures. Ancillary diagnostic tests were inconclusive, and the only significant laboratory finding was nonsuppurative pleocytosis of cerebrospinal fluid. Euthanasia was elected. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated multifocal, random nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis involving most prominently the rostral cerebral cortex, as well as the thalamus, midbrain, and rostral medulla. Lesions consisted of inflammation, neuronal necrosis, gliosis, and both neuronal and glial basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody reactive to several equine herpesviruses was positive within affected areas of the brain, and polymerase chain reaction conclusively demonstrated the presence of only equine herpesvirus 9. The clinical and morphologic features of this case resemble other fatal herpesvirus encephalitides derived from interspecies transmission and underscore the need for extreme caution when managing wild or captive equids.

  7. Remodeling nuclear architecture allows efficient transport of herpesvirus capsids by diffusion.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Jens B; Hogue, Ian B; Feric, Marina; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Sodeik, Beate; Brangwynne, Clifford P; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-10-20

    The nuclear chromatin structure confines the movement of large macromolecular complexes to interchromatin corrals. Herpesvirus capsids of approximately 125 nm assemble in the nucleoplasm and must reach the nuclear membranes for egress. Previous studies concluded that nuclear herpesvirus capsid motility is active, directed, and based on nuclear filamentous actin, suggesting that large nuclear complexes need metabolic energy to escape nuclear entrapment. However, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Commonly used microscopy techniques do not allow the imaging of rapid nuclear particle motility with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we use a rotating, oblique light sheet, which we dubbed a ring-sheet, to image and track viral capsids with high temporal and spatial resolution. We do not find any evidence for directed transport. Instead, infection with different herpesviruses induced an enlargement of interchromatin domains and allowed particles to diffuse unrestricted over longer distances, thereby facilitating nuclear egress for a larger fraction of capsids.

  8. Columbid herpesvirus-1 in two Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) with fatal inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Marie E; Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Childress, April L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kinsel, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    We report two separate naturally occurring cases of fatal herpesviral disease in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii). Gross lesions included splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with diffuse pale mottling or scattered small white foci. Histologic lesions included splenic and hepatic necrosis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies characteristic of herpesvirus. In one case, necrosis and inclusions were also noted in bone marrow, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, ceca, and the enteric system. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated viral particles typical of herpesvirus within hepatocyte nuclei and budding from the nuclear membrane. Herpesviral DNA was amplified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of paraffin-embedded liver and spleen, and sequence data were consistent with columbid herpesvirus-1, an alphaherpesvirus of Rock Pigeons (Columba livia). PCR results provide evidence that this disease is transmitted to raptors via Rock Pigeons, most likely through ingestion of Rock Pigeons as prey.

  9. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  10. Clinical and immunological responses of cats to feline herpesvirus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tham, K M; Studdert, M J

    1987-04-04

    Cats which were challenged with feline herpesvirus type 1 developed clinical signs typical of feline viral rhinotracheitis whether or not they had been vaccinated against the disease. However, the clinical disease was less severe and of shorter duration in the vaccinated cats. After challenge, feline herpesvirus type 1 was recovered from the nostrils, oropharynx and peripheral blood leucocytes. Leucocytosis, primarily a neutrophilia, occurred initially in all the cats and was followed after clinical recovery by a mild lymphocytosis. Intradermal skin testing with feline herpesvirus type 1 and cell control antigens produced a positive delayed type skin reaction. Histology of the affected skin 72 hours after injection showed cellular infiltration, predominantly with eosinophils and neutrophils. The severity of the reaction was greater and more prolonged in the skin of the ear than in the skin of the abdomen.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient.

  12. Inherited human OX40 deficiency underlying classic Kaposi sarcoma of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cindy S.; Akçay, Arzu; Pedergnana, Vincent; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Myoung, Jinjong; Avery, Danielle T.; Liu, Yifang; Abhyankar, Avinash; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Schmidt, Monika; Lim, Hye Kyung; Cassar, Olivier; Migaud, Melanie; Rozenberg, Flore; Canpolat, Nur; Aydoğan, Gönül; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Cesarman, Ethel; Olivier, Martin; Gros, Philippe; Abel, Laurent; Croft, Michael; Tangye, Stuart G.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8; also called KSHV)–induced endothelial tumor, develops only in a small fraction of individuals infected with HHV-8. We hypothesized that inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 might underlie the exceedingly rare development of classic KS in childhood. We report here autosomal recessive OX40 deficiency in an otherwise healthy adult with childhood-onset classic KS. OX40 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on activated T cells. Its ligand, OX40L, is expressed on various cell types, including endothelial cells. We found OX40L was abundantly expressed in KS lesions. The mutant OX40 protein was poorly expressed on the cell surface and failed to bind OX40L, resulting in complete functional OX40 deficiency. The patient had a low proportion of effector memory CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood, consistent with impaired CD4+ T cell responses to recall antigens in vitro. The proportion of effector memory CD8+ T cells was less diminished. The proportion of circulating memory B cells was low, but the antibody response in vivo was intact, including the response to a vaccine boost. Together, these findings suggest that human OX40 is necessary for robust CD4+ T cell memory and confers apparently selective protective immunity against HHV-8 infection in endothelial cells. PMID:23897980

  13. Treatment strategies for Kaposi sarcoma in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Krown, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize recent published literature on treatment of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common HIV-associated malignancy and a leading cancer diagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and to highlight the challenges faced in treating KS in this resource-limited environment. Recent findings There are few prospective clinical trials for KS treatment in SSA, along with a relatively poor cancer treatment infrastructure, leading to late diagnosis and poor access to therapy. The only prospectively-randomized trial of chemotherapy compared antiretroviral therapy (HAART) alone to HAART with combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin and vincristine (ABV), and documented a significantly higher rate of tumor regression for the combination along with improvement in quality of life and no adverse effects on HIV control. Other studies suggest that gemcitabine may be an active second-line chemotherapeutic agent after failure of HAART and ABV and suggest that AIDS-associated KS in children may respond well to HAART with chemotherapy. There are also (primarily retrospective) data suggesting a beneficial effect of HAART on KS, but some evidence for KS as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Summary Opportunities and need exist for prospective research to establish evidence-based guidelines for the most effective treatments for KS in SSA. PMID:21681092

  14. Recreational drug use and risk of Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV- and HHV-8-coinfected homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun; Jacobson, Lisa P; Jenkins, Frank J; Tashkin, Donald; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Roth, Michael D; Ng, Leslie; Margolick, Joseph B; Chmiel, Joan S; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Detels, Roger

    2009-02-01

    Experimental data suggested that exposure to recreational drugs might adversely affect antitumor immunity, which led us to examine the hypothesis that use of marijuana, cocaine, poppers, and amphetamines might increase the risk of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in HIV- and HHV-8-coinfected homosexual men. We analyzed data prospectively collected from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) between 1984 and 2002. Among the 1335 HIV- and HHV-8-coinfected white men, 401 KS cases were identified. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate the effects of time-varying recreational drug use on KS risk adjusting for potential confounders. The effects of both recent use (6 months prior) of recreational drugs and lagged exposure (i.e., use from 3 and 5 years prior) were examined. We did not observe any clear association with KS for recent use of any of the four drugs. In the analyses using lagged exposures, KS risk was associated with use of poppers 3-5 years prior [hazard ratio (HR)(3 years prior) = 1.27, 95% CI (0.97-1.67), HR(5 years prior) = 1.46 (1.01-2.13)]. However, no clear dose-response relationship was observed. These findings do not support a biological association between use of these substances and KS development in HIV- and HHV-8-coinfected homosexual men.

  15. Maladie de kaposi classique avec atteinte surrénalienne: un nouveau cas

    PubMed Central

    Bouzidi, Hanae; Gallouj, Salim; Krich, Sanae; Mernissi, Fatima Zahra

    2014-01-01

    La maladie de kaposi est une pathologie connue généralement dans sa forme épidémique associée au sida ou celle endémique présente dans l'Afrique subsaharienne. La forme classique de cette maladie ou dite également méditerranéenne n'est pas bien connue étant assez rare. Elle touche les hommes âgés HIV séronégatifs originaires de l'Europe centrale, l'Europe de l'Est et les méditerranéens. Elle se manifeste essentiellement par une atteinte cutanée, éventuellement muqueuse mais l'atteinte viscérale reste moins fréquente, dominée par l'atteinte osseuse, pulmonaire et gastrique. La localisation surrénalienne est inhabituelle et très rare. Nous rapportons ce nouveau cas pour mettre le point sur cette pathologie rare et signaler cette localisation atypique. PMID:25170378

  16. Pharyngolaryngeal location of Kaposi's sarcoma with airway obstruction in an HIV-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Torretta, Sara; Gaffuri, Michele; Recalcati, Sebastiano; Marzano, Angelo Valerio; Cantarella, Giovanna; Iofrida, Elisabetta; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8)-associated angioproliferative disorder, and its occurrence may be favored by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and iatrogenic immunosuppression. It has also been postulated that a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin can pave the way to its development. KS generally involves mucosal and cutaneous sites, including the head and neck. An oropharyngeal location is quite common, but laryngeal involvement with possible upper airway obstruction and respiratory distress requiring tracheotomy is rare, and no hypopharyngeal locations have yet been reported. We describe the case of a 68-year-old male patient who developed KS after immunosuppressive treatment for pemphigus vulgaris, an autoimmune bullous disease presenting with blisters and erosions on the skin and the oral mucosa. KS was initially localized to the oral cavity and oropharynx, but subsequent involvement of the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tract led to acute airway obstruction and the need for tracheotomy. This unique case of pharyngolaryngeal KS suggests that clinicians faced with purple nodular lesions should consider a differential diagnosis of KS in immunocompromised patients, even if they are HIV negative, and should carefully manage the patency of the upper airways.

  17. Cytokine signaling through the novel tyrosine kinase RAFTK in Kaposi's sarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z Y; Ganju, R K; Wang, J F; Ona, M A; Hatch, W C; Zheng, T; Avraham, S; Gill, P; Groopman, J E

    1997-01-01

    A number of cytokines, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oncostatin M (OSM), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), have been postulated to have a role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The proliferative effects of bFGF and OSM may be via their reported activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in KS cells. We now report that KS cells express a recently identified focal adhesion kinase termed RAFTK which appears in other cell systems to coordinate surface signals between cytokine and integrin receptors and the cytoskeleton as well as act downstream to modulate JNK activation. We also report that the tyrosine kinase receptor FLT-4, present on normal lymphatic endothelium, is robustly expressed in KS cells. Treatment of KS cells with VEGF-related protein (VRP), the ligand for the FLT-4 receptor, as well as with the cytokines bFGF, OSM, IL-6, VEGF, or TNF-alpha resulted in phosphorylation and activation of RAFTK. Following its activation, there was an enhanced association of RAFTK with the cytoskeletal protein paxillin. This association was mediated by the hydrophobic COOH-terminal domain of the kinase. Furthermore, JNK activity was increased in KS cells after VEGF or VRP stimulation. We postulate that in these tumor cells RAFTK may be activated by a diverse group of stimulatory cytokines and facilitate signal transduction to the cytoskeleton and downstream to the growth promoting JNK pathway. PMID:9120025

  18. Effects of triterpene derivatives from Maytenus rigida on VEGF-induced Kaposi's sarcoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Martucciello, Stefania; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Felice, Francesca; Estevam, Charles dos Santos; Sant'Ana, Antonio Euzébio Goulart; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2010-02-12

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a naturally occurring lupane-type triterpene which exhibits a variety of biological activities including potent cytotoxic properties. On the basis of the structural similarity to BA, two lupane derivatives namely lup-20(29)-ene-3beta,30-diol (1) and lup-20(29)-ene-3beta,28-diol (2), along with two friedelane derivatives, namely friedelan-3-one (3) and friedelan-3beta-ol (4), isolated from the Brazilian plant Maytenus rigida, have been evaluated for their anti-proliferative effect. Similarly to BA, compounds 1 and 3 at 1 microM concentration significantly inhibited the VEGF-induced Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) cell proliferation by 50%. In contrast, this effect was not found in control endothelial cells (EC). Moreover, compounds 1 and 3 showed a dose-dependent effect on the apoptotic cell death, as detected by FACS analysis and caspase-3 assay. Specifically, at 10 microM concentration, apoptosis was significantly induced (from 45% to 55% of hypodiploid cells vs control cells) and showed the same potency order observed for the anti-proliferative effect at 1 microM, i.e., compound 3>BA>compound 1. Taking into account the interest given rise by BA as anticancer agent, the comparable anti-proliferative activity shown by compounds 1 and 3 and BA, can give an impulse to further investigate lupane and friedelane derivatives as cytotoxic agents.

  19. Inherited human OX40 deficiency underlying classic Kaposi sarcoma of childhood.

    PubMed

    Byun, Minji; Ma, Cindy S; Akçay, Arzu; Pedergnana, Vincent; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Myoung, Jinjong; Avery, Danielle T; Liu, Yifang; Abhyankar, Avinash; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Schmidt, Monika; Lim, Hye Kyung; Cassar, Olivier; Migaud, Melanie; Rozenberg, Flore; Canpolat, Nur; Aydogan, Gönül; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Cesarman, Ethel; Olivier, Martin; Gros, Philippe; Abel, Laurent; Croft, Michael; Tangye, Stuart G; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-08-26

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8; also called KSHV)-induced endothelial tumor, develops only in a small fraction of individuals infected with HHV-8. We hypothesized that inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 might underlie the exceedingly rare development of classic KS in childhood. We report here autosomal recessive OX40 deficiency in an otherwise healthy adult with childhood-onset classic KS. OX40 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on activated T cells. Its ligand, OX40L, is expressed on various cell types, including endothelial cells. We found OX40L was abundantly expressed in KS lesions. The mutant OX40 protein was poorly expressed on the cell surface and failed to bind OX40L, resulting in complete functional OX40 deficiency. The patient had a low proportion of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the peripheral blood, consistent with impaired CD4(+) T cell responses to recall antigens in vitro. The proportion of effector memory CD8(+) T cells was less diminished. The proportion of circulating memory B cells was low, but the antibody response in vivo was intact, including the response to a vaccine boost. Together, these findings suggest that human OX40 is necessary for robust CD4(+) T cell memory and confers apparently selective protective immunity against HHV-8 infection in endothelial cells.

  20. MDM2 gene polymorphisms and risk of classic Kaposi's sarcoma among Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Varmazyar, Sajad; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi; Shoja, Zabihollah; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Safaie-Naraghi, Zahra; Jalilvand, Somayeh

    2017-04-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of MDM2 (SNP309T>G, rs2279744) has been shown to increase the expression of the MDM2 protein in various cancer types. However, only one study has analyzed the role of the MDM2 polymorphism in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The association of MDM2 SNP309 with classic KS risk was evaluated in 79 Iranian patients with classic KS and 123 healthy controls. The MDM2 SNP309 was genotyped using PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. No significant correlation was found between the SNP309 polymorphism in MDM2 promoter and classic KS risk. There was no significant correlation between gender and disease stage. However, a significant association was found between SNP309 GG genotype and younger age (≤50 years) (odds ratio 9.5, 95% confidence intervals 1.5-60, p = 0.03). Our findings support no major role for the MDM2 SNP309 in KS development although it might influence the clinical outcome of KS in younger patients.