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Sample records for kappel propeller development

  1. New Propellant Formulation Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-30

    initiators, JA2 19-Perf Hex propellants and Hagedorn-Plastic manufactured Nitrocellulose with Alkohol - German manufacturer. STAR-ATO goal is to develop... propellants in the U.S. Army’s small, medium and large caliber munitions are all nitrocellulose -based. As the Army drives continuous improvement in both...understanding the influence of nitrocellulose properties on propellant performance. Projectiles are getting heavier, ammunition is being exposed to

  2. Navy LOVA propellant development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreatt, W. H.; Mitchell, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The progress realized on evaluation of inert binder, nitramine formulations is considered with respect to their development for use as low vulnerability ammunition (LOVA) propellants. Burning rate, plasticizers, crosslink agents, physical property and vulnerability studies are discussed and some preliminary conclusions presented.

  3. Soviet chemical propellant research and development

    SciTech Connect

    deButts, E.H.; Baum, K.; Beckstead, M.W.; Christe, K.O.; Hartman, K.O.; Jeffrey, W.A.

    1991-12-01

    In the second half of the 1980s, the Soviet Union had a strong and continuing research effort devoted to understanding the behavior of chemical propellants suitable to support development of advanced propellants for practical applications. Recent Soviet work concentrated on solid propellants, though liquid propellants powered the largest and most advanced deployed Soviet rockets. This assessment summarizes the Soviet state of the art in chemical propellants in the late 1980s and projects the trends of that period into the next decade. It is based on a broad and deep review of Soviet literature published in 1985--1991 and is presented in an unclassified report. Speculation about or prediction of the effects of recent political and social events on chemical propellant research and development in the old Soviet Union is outside the scope of this assessment, though the effects are likely to be profound.

  4. Shuttle propellant loading instrumenation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, J.

    1975-01-01

    A continuous capacitance sensor was developed and an analog signal conditioner was evaluated to demonstrate the acceptability of these items for use in the space shuttle propellant loading system. An existing basic sensor concept was redesigned to provide capability for cryogenic operation, to improve performance, and to minimize production costs. Sensor development verification consisted of evaluation of sensor linearity, cryogenic performance, and stability during vibration. The signal conditioner evaluation consisted mainly of establishing the effects of the variations in temperature and cable parameters and evaluating the stability. A sensor linearity of 0.04 in. was achieved over most of the sensor length. The sensor instability caused by vibration was 0.04 percent. The cryogenic performance data show a maximum instability of 0.19 percent at liquid hydrogen temperature; a theoretical calibration can be computed a within 1 percent. The signal conditioner evaluation showed that, with temperature compensation, all error sources typically contribute much less than 1 percent. An estimate of the accuracy achievable with the sensor and signal conditioner shows an rss estimate of 0.75 in. for liquid oxygen and 1.02 in. for liquid hydrogen. These are approximately four times better than the shuttle requirements. Comparison of continuous sensor and discrete sensor performance show the continuous sensor to be significantly better when there is surface activity due to sloshing, boiling, or other disturbances.

  5. Development of a Passively Varying Pitch Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzen, Stearns Beamon

    Small general aviation aircraft and unmanned aerial systems are often equipped with sophisticated navigation, control, and other avionics, but retain propulsion systems consisting of retrofitted radio control and ultralight equipment. Consequently, new high performance airframes often rely on relatively primitive propulsive technology. This trend is beginning to shift with recent advances in small turboprop engines, fuel injected reciprocating engines, and improved electric technologies. Although these systems are technologically advanced, they are often paired with standard fixed pitch propellers. To fully realize the potential of these aircraft and the new generation of engines, small propellers which can efficiently transmit power over wide flight envelopes and a variety of power settings must be developed. This work demonstrates a propeller which passively adjusts to incoming airflow at a low penalty to aircraft weight and complexity. This allows the propeller to operate in an efficient configuration over a wide flight envelope, and can prevent blade stall in low-velocity / highly-loaded thrust cases and over-speeding at high flight speeds. The propeller incorporates blades which pivot freely on a radial axis and are aerodynamically tailored to attain and maintain a pitch angle yielding favorable local blade angles of attack, matched to changing inflow conditions. This blade angle is achieved through the use of reflexed airfoils designed for a positive pitching moment, comparable to those used on many tailless flying wings. By setting the axis of rotation at a point forward of the blade aerodynamic center, the blades will naturally adjust to a predetermined positive lift 'trim' condition. Then, as inflow conditions change, the blade angle will automatically pivot to maintain the same angle with respect to incoming air. Computational, wind tunnel, and flight test results indicate that the extent of efficient propeller operation can be increased dramatically as

  6. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  7. Development and implementation of a propeller test capability for GL-10 "Greased Lightning" propeller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, Brian Edward

    Interest in small unmanned aerial vehicles has increased dramatically in recent years. Hybrid vehicles which allow forward flight as a fixed wing aircraft and a true vertical landing capability have always had applications. Management of the available energy and noise associated with electric propeller propulsion systems presents many challenges. NASA Langley has developed the Greased Lightning 10 (GL-10) vertical takeoff, unmanned aerial vehicle with ten individual motors and propellers. All are used for propulsion during takeoff and contribute to acoustic noise pollution which is an identified nuisance to the surrounding users. A propeller test capability was developed to gain an understanding of how the noise can be reduced while meeting minimum thrust requirements. The designed propeller test stand allowed for various commercially available propellers to be tested for potential direct replacement of the current GL-10 propellers and also supported testing of a newly designed propeller provided by the Georgia Institute of Technology. Results from the test program provided insight as to which factors affect the noise as well as performance characteristics. The outcome of the research effort showed that the current GL-10 propeller still represents the best choice of all the candidate propellers tested.

  8. ASRM propellant and igniter propellant development and process scale-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landers, L. C.; Booth, D. W.; Stanley, C. B.; Ricks, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    A program of formulation and process development for ANB-3652 motor propellant was conducted to validate design concepts and screen critical propellant composition and process parameters. Design experiments resulted in the selection of a less active grade of ferric oxide to provide better burning rate control, the establishment of AP fluidization conditions that minimized the adverse effects of particle attrition, and the selection of a higher mix temperature to improve mechanical properties. It is shown that the propellant can be formulated with AP and aluminum powder from various producers. An extended duration pilot plant run demonstrated stable equipment operation and excellent reproducibility of propellant properties. A similar program of formulation and process optimization culminating in large batch scaleup was conducted for ANB-3672 igniter propellant. The results for both ANB-3652 and ANB 37672 confirmed that their processing characteristics are compatible with full-scale production.

  9. The 1997 JANNAF Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee and Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee Joint Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Filliben, Jeff D. (Editor); Watson, Anne H. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    In the Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) meeting, topics included: the analysis, characterization, and processing of propellants and propellant ingredients; chemical reactivity; liquid propellants; test methods; rheology; surveillance and aging; and process engineering. In the Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee (S&EPS) meeting, topics covered included: hydrazine propellant vapor detection methods; toxicity of propellants and propellants; explosives safety; atmospheric modeling and risk assessment of toxic releases; reclamation, disposal, and demilitarization methods; and remediation of explosives or propellant contaminated sites.

  10. Development of a solvent processed insensitive propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trask, R.; Costa, E.; Beardell, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of low vulnerability propellants are studied which are distinguished by whether the binder is a rubber, such as polyurethane or CTBN, or a plasticizable polymer such as ethyl cellulose or cellulose acetate. The former propellants are made by a partial cure extrusion process while the latter are made by the conventional solvent process. Emphasis is given to a cellulose binder (plasticizer) RDX composition. The type of binder used, the particle size of the RDX and the presence of small quantities of nitrocellulose in the solvent processed compositions have important influences on the mechanical and combustion characteristics of the propellant. The low temperature combustion is of particular concern because of potential breakup of the grains that can lead to instability.

  11. Development of a solid propellant viscoelastic dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufferd, W. L.; Fitzgerald, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a one year study to develop a dynamic response model for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant are presented. An extensive literature survey was conducted, from which it was concluded that the only significant variables affecting the dynamic response of the SRM propellant are temperature and frequency. Based on this study, and experimental data on propellants related to the SRM propellant, a dynamic constitutive model was developed in the form of a simple power law with temperature incorporated in the form of a modified power law. A computer program was generated which performs a least-squares curve-fit of laboratory data to determine the model parameters and it calculates dynamic moduli at any desired temperature and frequency. Additional studies investigated dynamic scaling laws and the extent of coupling between the SRM propellant and motor cases. It was found, in agreement with other investigations, that the propellant provides all of the mass and damping characteristics whereas the case provides all of the stiffness.

  12. Recent Developments in Chemically Reactive Sensors for Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Mast, Dion J.; Baker, David L.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Propellant system leaks can pose a significant hazard in aerospace operations. For example, a leak in the hydrazine supply system of the shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) has resulted in hydrazine ignition and fire in the aft compartment of the shuttle. Sensors indicating the location of a leak could provide valuable information required for operational decisions. WSTF has developed a small, single-use sensor for detection of propellant leaks. The sensor is composed of a thermistor bead coated with a substance which is chemically reactive with the propellant. The reactive thermistor is one of a pair of closely located thermistors, the other being a reference. On exposure to the propellant, the reactive coating responds exothermically to it and increases the temperature of the coated-thermistor by several degrees. The temperature rise is sensed by a resistive bridge circuit, and an alarm is registered by data acquisition software. The concept is general and has been applied to sensors for hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsym-dimethylhydrazine, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and dinitrogen tetroxide. Responses of these sensors to humidity, propellant concentration, distance from the liquid leak, and ambient pressure levels arc presented. A multi-use sensor has also been developed for hydrazine based on its catalytic reactivity with noble metals.

  13. JANNAF 30th Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee Meeting. Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. L. (Editor); Becker, D. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 22 unclassified/unlimited technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 30th Propellant Development & Characterization Subcommittee Meeting, held on 18-21 March 2002 at the Sheraton Colorado Springs Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The papers presented herein reflect work performed in the areas of green energetic materials (GEM) development; liquid and gel propellant development; propellant surveillance and aging; and propellant chemistry test methods.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF VIBRATION RESISTANT PROPELLANTS FOR THE M91 PAD CARTRIDGE. INTEGRATED MOLDED CHARGE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A case bonded, integrated, molded propellant charge (consisting of RDX- cellulose acetate ) was developed which met the ballistic requirements for the...containing the nitrate ester single base propellant previously used and similar to the ammonium perchlorate- cellulose acetate (HES 5808.7) propellant

  15. Microreactor Development for Martian In-Situ Propellant Production

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Hu, Jianli; Sanders, J.; Baird, S.

    2007-01-30

    The second part of the Martian In-situ Propellant Production (MIPPS) system reviews the development of the Sabatier Reactor (SR). The microchannel SR had integrated cooling channels as well as reaction channels. It was <100cc in volume. The reactor utilized a proprietary catalyst. When operated at 400oC 70-80% CO2 conversion was achieved which enabled ~0.0125 kg CH4/hr production, or 1/8th the target mission. The modular design of the microchannel reactors would enable simple scale up to full scale production for the proposed mission.

  16. Recent propeller development and studies conducted at ONERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouaillec, F.

    Based on recent research, the common interests that exist between aeronautical and naval propeller design is presented. A review of aeronautical propeller evolution up to the introduction of unducted fan technology is offered, along with a history of the marine propeller. Specific areas covered include airflow calculation through Euler three-dimensional methodology, acoustic calculations for discrete-frequency noise of helicopter rotors, and vibration studies of aircraft and ship propellers. Similarity of test results and possible commonality applications for the two propeller types are discussed.

  17. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2005-09-01

    An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The

  18. Development of a short pulsed solid propellant plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The experimental results are summarized that were obtained in the development of a Teflon solid propellant pulsed plasma thruster. The feasibility was established of storing and feeding solid propellant in the form of an open circular loop into an operational thruster. This technique was verified to be practical by feeding over 20 inches of Teflon into a micro-thruster over an accumulated life test of 1858 hours. High energy density capacitors were evaluated under vacuum conditions when the capacitor is coupled directly to a plasma thruster. Numerous early capacitor failures were encountered. It was concluded that essentially all of the failures encountered in a vacuum environment are due to an internal electrical breakdown that will occur inside a capacitor that is not truly hermetically sealed. A steady input power significantly in excess of 130 watts can safely be tolerated if heat conduction can be provided to a sink whose temperature is about 16 C. A vacuum life test of the capacitor bank was carried out while discharging into a milli-lb. (milli-Newton) type pulsed plasma thruster. More than 1500 hours of vacuum testing of this milli-Newton type system has been accumulated without any capacitor problems. Recommendations are made for future capacitor designs.

  19. Development of HAN-based Liquid Propellant Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisatsune, K.; Izumi, J.; Tsutaya, H.; Furukawa, K.

    2004-10-01

    Many of propellants that are applied to the conventional spacecraft propulsion system are toxic propellants. Because of its toxicity, considering the environmental pollution or safety on handling, it will be necessary to apply the "green" propellant to the spacecraft propulsion system. The purpose of this study is to apply HAN based liquid propellant (LP1846) to mono propellant thruster. Compared to the hydrazine that is used in conventional mono propellant thruster, HAN based propellant is not only lower toxic but also can obtain higher specific impulse. Moreover, HAN based propellant can be decomposed by the catalyst. It means there are the possibility of applying to the mono propellant thruster that can leads to the high reliability of the propulsion system.[1],[2] However, there are two technical subjects, to apply HAN based propellant to the mono propellant thruster. One is the high combustion temperature. The catalyst will be damaged under high temperature condition. The other is the low catalytic activity. It is the serious problem on application of HAN based propellant to the mono propellant thruster that is used for attitude control of spacecraft. To improve the catalytic activity of HAN based propellant, it is necessary to screen the best catalyst for HAN based propellant. The adsorption analysis is conducted by Monte Carlo Simulation to screen the catalyst metal for HAN and TEAN. The result of analysis shows the Iridium is the best catalyst metal for HAN and TEAN. Iridium is the catalyst metal that is used at conventional mono propellant thruster catalyst Shell405. Then, to confirm the result of analysis, the reaction test about catalyst is conducted. The result of this test is the same as the result of adsorption analysis. That means the adsorption analysis is effective in screening the catalyst metal. At the evaluating test, the various types of carrier of catalyst are also compared to Shell 405 to improve catalytic activity. The test result shows the

  20. Propeller aeroacoustic methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, K. D.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The aspects related to propeller performance by means of a review of propeller methodologies are addressed. Preliminary wind tunnel propeller performance data are presented and the predominent limitations of existing propeller performance methodologies are discussed. Airfoil developments appropriate for propeller applications are also reviewed.

  1. Bismuth Propellant Feed System Development at NASA-MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA-MSFC has been developing liquid metal propellant feed systems capable of delivering molten bismuth at a prescribed mass flow rate to the vaporizer of an electric thruster. The first such system was delivered to NASA-JPL as part of the Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL) program. In this system, the components pictured were placed in a vacuum chamber and heated while the control electronics were located outside the chamber. The system was successfully operated at JPL in conjunction with a propellant vaporizer, and data was obtained demonstrating a new liquid bismuth flow sensing technique developed at MSFC. The present effort is aimed at producing a feed-system for use in conjunction with a bismuth-fed Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Developing this system is more ambitious, however, in that it is designed to self-contain all the control electronics inside the same vacuum chamber as an operating bismuth-fed thruster. Consequently, the entire system, including an on-board computer, DC-output power supplies, and a gas-pressurization electro-pneumatic regulator, must be designed to survive a vacuum environment and shielded to keep bismuth plasma from intruding on the electronics and causing a shortcircuit. In addition, the hot portions of the feed system must be thermally isolated from the electronics to avoid failure due to high heat loads. This is accomplished using a thermal protection system (TPS) consisting of multiple layers of aluminum foil. The only penetrations into the vacuum chamber are an electrically isolated (floating) 48 VDC line and a fiberoptic line. The 48 VDC provides power for operation of the power supplies and electronics co-located with the system in the vacuum chamber. The fiberoptic Ethernet connection is used to communicate user-input control commands to the on-board computer and transmit real-time data back to the external computer. The partially assembled second-generation system is shown. Before testing at Busek, a

  2. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit.

    PubMed

    Doerr, D F

    2001-01-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (<7000 kPa or approximately 1000 psi). A one hour prototype ECU was developed and tested to prove the feasibility of this concept. This was upgraded by the design of a larger supercritical dewar capable of holding 7 Kg of air, a supply which provides a 2 hour duration to the PHE. A third version is being developed to test the feasibility of replacing existing air cooling methodology with a liquid cooled garment for relief of heat stress in this warm Florida environment. Testing of the first one hour prototype yielded data comparable to the liquid air powered predecessor, but enjoyed advantages of attitude independence and oxygen level stability. Thermal data revealed heat stress relief at least as good as liquid air supplied units. The application of supercritical air technology to this whole body protective ensemble marked an

  3. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, DonaldF.

    2001-08-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (<7000 kPa or ˜1000 psi). A one hour prototype ECU was developed and tested to prove the feasibility of this concept. This was upgraded by the design of a larger supercritical dewar capable of holding 7 Kg of air, a supply which provides a 2 hour duration to the PHE. A third version is being developed to test the feasibility of replacing existing air cooling methodology with a liquid cooled garment for relief of heat stress in this warm Florida environment. Testing of the first one hour prototype yielded data comprobable to the liquid air powered predecessor, but enjoyed advantages of attitude independence and oxygen level stability. Thermal data revealed heat stress relief at least as good as liquid air supplied units. The application of supercritical air technology to this whole body protective ensemble marked an advancement in

  4. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (<7000 kPa or approximately 1000 psi). A one hour prototype ECU was developed and tested to prove the feasibility of this concept. This was upgraded by the design of a larger supercritical dewar capable of holding 7 Kg of air, a supply which provides a 2 hour duration to the PHE. A third version is being developed to test the feasibility of replacing existing air cooling methodology with a liquid cooled garment for relief of heat stress in this warm Florida environment. Testing of the first one hour prototype yielded data comparable to the liquid air powered predecessor, but enjoyed advantages of attitude independence and oxygen level stability. Thermal data revealed heat stress relief at least as good as liquid air supplied units. The application of supercritical air technology to this whole body protective ensemble marked an

  5. Development Activities on an Advanced Propellant Flow Control Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noci, G.; Siciliano, P.; Fallerini, L.; Kutufa, N.; Rivetti, A.; Galassi, C.; Bruschi, P.; Piotto, M.

    2004-10-01

    A new generation of propellant control equipment for electric propulsion systems is needed in order to improve performance and operating ranges, symplify h/w configuration, reduce mass and dimensions, eliminate mass flow ripple, reduce time response. In this frame, the development of key components, their assembly and experimental investigation/ validation is on-going at Alenia Spazio-Laben/Business Unit Proel Tecnologie ( Proel in the following ) in the frame of an ESA GSTP program. The new components shall support different EP technologies, future EP multi-tasking capability and wide operating ranges. This paper reports about the development effort, its achievements and perspectives. 1. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS BOL Beginning of Life CMBR Ceramic multilayer bender ring CTA Constant Temperature Anemometry. DUT Device under test EOL End of Life EP Electric Propulsion GEO Geosyncrhonous Earth Orbit GFCU Gas Flow Control Unit GIT Gridded ion thruster HET Hall Effect Thrusters LEO Low Earth Orbit LPC Low pressure capillary MEOP Maximum Expected Operating Pressure MFS Mass Flow rate Sensor NSSK North-South Station Keeping Pred Reduced pressure Ptank Tank pressure RMT Radiofrequency Magnetic Thruster RMTA Radiofrequency Magnetic Thruster Assembly ROOV Regulation and On-Off Valve SoW Statement of Work SPT Stationary Plasma Thruster.

  6. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kriston; Rassat, Scot; Hu, John; Stenkamp, Susie; Schlahta, Steve; Bontha, Jagan; Holladay, Jamie; Simon, Tom; Romig, Kris; Howard, Candice

    2006-01-01

    A microchannel-based system is being developed for NASA to produce propellants from atmospheric CO2 on Mars. This system will provide a means of reducing the earth-based launch mass for both sample return and human exploration missions. The atmospheric CO2 will be collected, separated, and compressed with a microchannel thermal swing adsorption system. It will be reacted with hydrogen that has either been electrolyzed from the available subsurface water or brought from earth. Methane and water will be produced by using microchannel Sabatier and Reverse Water Gas Shift reactors, respectively. The water will then separated with a microchannel condenser/phase separator and electrolyzed to produce oxygen and hydrogen. Feed gases will be separated from the products and recycled. The system design requirements will be presented in this paper. The design and fabrication methods of the microchannel CO2 sorption pump, reactors, and phase separators will be described, and the advantages of microchannel architecture will be delineated for each component. Estimates of system mass and volume will also be provided in comparison to conventional hardware. The testing and integration proposed during this project to meet NASA's Technology Readiness Level 5 will also be presented.

  7. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; Hu, Jianli; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Holladay, Jamie D.; Simon, Tom; Romig, Kris A.; Howard, Candice L.

    2006-04-12

    A microchannel-based system is being developed for NASA to produce propellants from atmospheric CO2 on Mars. This system will provide a means of reducing the earth-based launch mass for both sample return and human exploration missions. The atmospheric CO2 will be collected, separated, and compressed with a microchannel thermal swing adsorption system. It will be reacted with hydrogen that has either been electrolyzed from the available subsurface water or brought from earth. Methane and water will be produced by using microchannel Reverse Water Gas Shift and Sabatier reactors. The water will then separated with a microchannel condenser/phase separator and electrolyzed to produce oxygen and hydrogen. Feed gases will be separated from the products and recycled. The system design requirements will be presented in this paper. The design and fabrication methods of the microchannel CO2 sorption pump, reactors, and phase separators will be described, and the advantages of microchannel architecture will be delineated for each component. Estimates of system mass and volume will also be provided in comparison to conventional hardware. The testing and integration proposed during this project to meet NASA's Technology Readiness Level 5 will also be presented.

  8. JANNAF 28th Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee and 17th Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Mulder, Edwin J. (Editor); Gomez-Knight, Sylvia J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains 37 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers that were presented at the JANNAF 28th Propellant Development & Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) and 17th Safety & Environmental Protection Subcommittee (S&EPS) Joint Meeting, held 26-30 April 1999 at the Town & Country Hotel and the Naval Submarine Base, San Diego, California. Volume II contains 29 unclassified/limited-distribution papers that were presented at the 28th PDCS and 17th S&EPS Joint Meeting. Volume III contains a classified paper that was presented at the 28th PDCS Meeting on 27 April 1999. Topics covered in PDCS sessions include: solid propellant rheology; solid propellant surveillance and aging; propellant process engineering; new solid propellant ingredients and formulation development; reduced toxicity liquid propellants; characterization of hypergolic propellants; and solid propellant chemical analysis methods. Topics covered in S&EPS sessions include: space launch range safety; liquid propellant hazards; vapor detection methods for toxic propellant vapors and other hazardous gases; toxicity of propellants, ingredients, and propellant combustion products; personal protective equipment for toxic liquid propellants; and demilitarization/treatment of energetic material wastes.

  9. Development of Robotics Applications in a Solid Propellant Mixing Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    weighing and prebatching, ingredient addition, mixing, propellant casting and equipment cleanup. c) Implementation of a Laboratory Information Management System...Robot configuration and end-of-arm tooling d) Laboratory information management system integration Task 2: Identify Research Robotic and Automation...Physical Sensor Parameters - Physical properties - Collection medium - Frequency, deviation and rate of sampling, etc. c) Laboratory Information Management Systems

  10. Development of a miniature solid propellant rocket motor for use in plume simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baran, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A miniature solid propellant rocket motor has been developed to be used in a program to determine those parameters which must be duplicated in a cold gas flow to produce aerodynamic effects on an experimental model similar to those produced by hot, particle-laden exhaust plumes. Phenomena encountered during the testing of the miniature solid propellant motors included erosive propellant burning caused by high flow velocities parallel to the propellant surface, regressive propellant burning as a result of exposed propellant edges, the deposition of aluminum oxide on the nozzle surfaces sufficient to cause aerodynamic nozzle throat geometry changes, and thermal erosion of the nozzle throat at high chamber pressures. A series of tests was conducted to establish the stability of the rocket chamber pressure and the repeatibility of test conditions. Data are presented which define the tests selected to represent the final test matrix. Qualitative observations are also presented concerning the phenomena experienced based on the results of a large number or rocket tests not directly applicable to the final test matrix.

  11. Development of small centrifugal pumps for an electric propellant pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Göran; Bigert, Mikael

    Small centrifugal pumps with low specific speeds have been designed, manufactured and performance tested at Volvo Flygmotor AB under a contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) over the period mid-1985 to mid-1988. The development of the pumps is a part of the work carried out to develop an Electric Propellant Pump System (EPPS) for the storable propellant monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetraoxide (NTO). Supporting technology development has been funded by the Swedish Delegation for Space Activities (DFR) and Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) together with Volvo Flygmotor. The main advantages of a typical EPPS communication satellite application are weight and volume reduction of the propellant system compared with a pressure-fed system. Active engine mixture ratio control and improved propellant utilization are also possible. Refuelling in space is another potential application where EPPS can be used. The development work was focused on communication satellite apogee propulsion and used the MBB 3 kN engine as reference. This paper presents the pump design and analyses and the results from the test campaigns of three different pump configurations, carried out with water as test liquid. The head rise, efficiency and suction performance together with other characteristics are also given. The planned next development step is to demonstrate pump performance in the propellants and primarily in NTO. The step is funded by (DFR)/(SSC) together with Volvo Flygmotor.

  12. Green Propellant Infusion Mission Program Development and Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Christopher H.; Deininger, William D.; Joniatis, John; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Spores, Ronald A.; Deans, Matthew; Yim, John T.; Bury, Kristen; Martinez, Jonathan; Cardiff, Eric H.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) is comprised of a cross-cutting team of domestic spacecraft propulsion and storable green propellant technology experts. This TDM is led by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC), who will use their BCP- 100 spacecraft to carry a propulsion system payload consisting of one 22 N thruster for primary divert (DeltaV) maneuvers and four 1 N thrusters for attitude control, in a flight demonstration of the AF-M315E technology. The GPIM project has technology infusion team members from all three major market sectors: Industry, NASA, and the Department of Defense (DoD). The GPIM project team includes BATC, includes Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR), Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, Edwards AFB (AFRL), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). STMD programmatic and technology oversight is provided by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The GPIM project shall fly an operational AF-M315E green propulsion subsystem on a Ball-built BCP-100 spacecraft.

  13. Development and test of a liquid hydrogen propellant tank foam insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynski, Michael J.; Gagliani, John; Thorp, Vernon L.; Heim, Walter J.; Swanson, Neil J.

    An external bonded foam insulation system has been developed and tested for the Atlas II Centaur cryogenic upper stage pressure-stabilized hydrogen propellant tank. This bonded foam insulation system replaces the jettison panel system used on the Atlas I upper stage propellant tank since 1962. A closed-cell polyvinyl chloride foam bonded to the stainless steel tank wall with a modified epoxy adhesive was selected as the insulation system. Vehicle-level cryogenic tanking tests and supersonic aerodynamic wind tunnel heating tests were conducted to simulate the vehicle system environment and were successful in qualifying this system for flight.

  14. Development and Test of a Rocket Engine Using Environmentally Friendly Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Kristi

    2009-01-01

    Develop and test a rocket engine that operates on environmentally friendly propellants; Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Liquid Methane (LCH4). Due to modifications the rocket engine designed last summer (KJ_REX) is not the same rocket thruster tested this summer, but very similar. The new modified rocket thruster was built for NASA by Orion Propulsion Inc. (OPI), Huntsville, AL.

  15. On the history of the development of solid-propellant rockets in the Soviet Union

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pobedonostsev, Y. A.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-World War II Soviet solid-propellant rocket technology is reviewed. Research and development regarding solid composite preparations of pyroxyline TNT powder is described, as well as early work on rocket loading calculations, problems of flight stability, and aircraft rocket launching and ground rocket launching capabilities.

  16. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of the development and characteristics of thermal shock resistant hafnia ceramic material for use in solid propellant rocket nozzles are presented. The investigation of thermal shock resistance factors for hafnia based composites, and the preparation and analysis of a model of elastic materials containing more than one crack are reported.

  17. Development of an eco-friendly method to convert life expired composite propellant into liquid fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Mehilal; Dhabbe, K I; Kumari, Anjali; Manoj, V; Singh, P P; Bhattacharya, B

    2012-02-29

    Large quantity of composite propellants is produced as waste due to life expiry of missiles/rejection of propellant lots during manufacturing. The environmental protection agency does not allow the hazardous materials for open burning/open detonation. Therefore, a systematic study has been carried out to develop a method for the disposal of composite propellant into liquid fertilizer without affecting the environment. In this study, propellant compositions were digested in dilute nitric acid followed by neutralization with 5M KOH solution to get precipitated out aluminium as aluminium hydroxide and finally the obtained liquid was treated with orthophosphoric acid for further neutralization. The liquid fertilizer, thus, obtained was characterized for nitrate and phosphate content using ion chromatography while ICP-AES was used for the estimation of potassium, aluminium and other noxious metallic elements such as Pb, Cd, As, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn. The analyses data indicate that liquid fertilizer is free from aluminium and noxious metallic elements while ratio of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are close to the Indian NPK value.

  18. Aluminum Hydride Propellant Shelflife

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    PODE propellants, namely a model PCDE propellant processed at LPC using di-n-butylphthalate -: a chemically inert plasticizer, and a ballistically...prepolymer. The propellant processed at LPC used PCDE prepared by the Shell Development Company, while the Aerojet propellant was processed with PCDE...failures after 180 days storage at 40 and 60 0 C, nor was there any noticeable deformation of the elliptical tubes to suggest internal gas pressure

  19. Air Force Dynamic Mechanical Analysis of NATO Round Robin Propellant Testing for Development of AOP-4717

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-23

    Round Robin Propellant Testing for Development of AOP-4717 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...area code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 0 Air Force Dynamic Mechanical Analysis of NATO Round Robin ...the clamps are tight at the coldest temperature. • Long tests such as the frequency sweep sequences prescribed in this round robin may be

  20. Settled Cryogenic Propellant Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; Sakla, Steve; Wall, John; Hopkins, Josh; Saks, Greg; Duffey, Jack; Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant transfer can significantly benefit NASA s space exploration initiative. LMSSC parametric studies indicate that "Topping off" the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) in LEO with approx.20 mT of additional propellant using cryogenic propellant transfer increases the lunar delivered payload by 5 mT. Filling the EDS to capacity in LEO with 78 mT of propellants increases the delivered payload by 20 mT. Cryogenic propellant transfer is directly extensible to Mars exploration in that it provides propellant for the Mars Earth Departure stage and in-situ propellant utilization at Mars. To enable the significant performance increase provided by cryogenic propellant transfer, the reliability and robustness of the transfer process must be guaranteed. By utilizing low vehicle acceleration during the cryogenic transfer the operation is significantly simplified and enables the maximum use of existing, reliable, mature upper stage cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) techniques. Due to settling, large-scale propellant transfer becomes an engineering effort, and not the technology development endeavor required with zero-gravity propellant transfer. The following key CFM technologies are all currently implemented by settling on both the Centaur and Delta IV upper stages: propellant acquisition, hardware chilldown, pressure control, and mass gauging. The key remaining technology, autonomous rendezvous and docking, is already in use by the Russians, and must be perfected for NASA whether the use of propellant transfer is utilized or not.

  1. Engineering Model Propellant Feed System Development for an Iodine Hall Thruster Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2016-01-01

    CUBESATS are relatively new spacecraft platforms that are typically deployed from a launch vehicle as a secondary payload, providing low-cost access to space for a wide range of end-users. These satellites are comprised of building blocks having dimensions of 10x10x10 cu cm and a mass of 1.33 kg (a 1-U size). While providing low-cost access to space, a major operational limitation is the lack of a propulsion system that can fit within a CubeSat and is capable of executing high (Delta)v maneuvers. This makes it difficult to use CubeSats on missions requiring certain types of maneuvers (i.e. formation flying, spacecraft rendezvous). Recently, work has been performed investigating the use of iodine as a propellant for Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) 2 that could subsequently be used to provide a high specific impulse path to CubeSat propulsion. 3, 4 Iodine stores as a dense solid at very low pressures, making it acceptable as a propellant on a secondary payload. It has exceptionally high ?Isp (density times specific impulse), making it an enabling technology for small satellite near-term applications and providing the potential for systems-level advantages over mid-term high power electric propulsion options. Iodine flow can also be thermally regulated, subliming at relatively low temperature (< 100 C) to yield I2 vapor at or below 50 torr. At low power, the measured performance of an iodine-fed HET is very similar to that of a state-of-the-art xenon-fed thruster. Just as importantly, the current-voltage discharge characteristics of low power iodine-fed and xenon-fed thrusters are remarkably similar, potentially reducing development and qualifications costs by making it possible to use an already-qualified xenon-HET PPU in an iodine-fed system. Finally, a cold surface can be installed in a vacuum test chamber on which expended iodine propellant can deposit. In addition, the temperature doesn't have to be extremely cold to maintain a low vapor pressure in the vacuum

  2. Propellant Mass Gauging: Database of Vehicle Applications and Research and Development Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.

    2008-01-01

    Gauging the mass of propellants in a tank in low gravity is not a straightforward task because of the uncertainty of the liquid configuration in the tank and the possibility of there being more than one ullage bubble. Several concepts for such a low-gravity gauging system have been proposed, and breadboard or flight-like versions have been tested in normal gravity or even in low gravity, but at present, a flight-proven reliable gauging system is not available. NASA desired a database of the gauging techniques used in current and past vehicles during ascent or under settled conditions, and during short coasting (unpowered) periods, for both cryogenic and storable propellants. Past and current research and development efforts on gauging systems that are believed to be applicable in low-gravity conditions were also desired. This report documents the results of that survey.

  3. Air Force Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Testing of NATO Round Robin Propellant Testing for Development of AOP-4717

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    NATO Round Robin Propellant Testing for Development of AOP-4717 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...provided by Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD). The purpose of the tests was to participate in an international round robin that would...Analysis Testing of NATO Round Robin Propellant Testing for Development of AOP-4717 Timothy C. Miller, Air Force Research Laboratory Patrick N

  4. Amateur Gas-Propelled Rocket Engine Development and Advanced Rocket Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souverein, L. J.; Twigt, D. J.; Engelen, S.

    The paper describes the design and manufacturing of a gaseous propellant rocket engine. It is an undertaking of the authors, performed on project basis with fellow aerospace engineering students under auspices of DARE (Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering). This paper describes the requirements, the engine development, and the design considerations and calculations as they were performed. Furthermore, the plans for engine tests and the parameters that will have to be measured during those tests are covered. The design process converged to a 1800 N thrust gaseous oxygen/methane (GOX/CH4) engine made of electrolytic copper. GOX/CH4 was selected based on its relatively high specific impulse, its availability and because of its potential as a green propellant. A test engine was produced with a specific impulse of 287 s and a propellant mass flow of 637 g/s. From a point of view of strength, the focus was mainly on robustness rather than light weight. The main aim now is to perform tests with the current engine, based on which the performance can be verified and vital information for future design efforts can be acquired. The ultimate goal is to have an operational rocket and to attempt an amateur altitude record.

  5. Design and Development of a Two-Axis Thruster Gimbal with Xenon Propellant Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asadurian, Armond

    2010-01-01

    A Two-Axis Thruster Gimbal was developed for a two degree-of-freedom tip-tilt gimbal application. This light weight gimbal mechanism is equipped with flexible xenon propellant lines and features numerous thermal control features for all its critical components. Unique thermal profiles and operating environments have been the key design drivers for this mechanism which is fully tolerant of extreme space environmental conditions. Providing thermal controls that are compatible with flexible components and are also capable of surviving launch vibration within this gimbal mechanism has proven to be especially demanding, requiring creativity and significant development effort. Some of these features, design drivers, and lessons learned will be examined herein.

  6. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  7. Vortice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemon, Alain; Huberson, Serge

    1989-08-01

    The interactions between a ship's propeller blades and the boundary layer created by the ship are investigated. A finite element calculation method based on Navier-Stokes equation is developed. The application of an k-epsilon turbulence model for improving the analysis is considered. The flow azimuthal homogenization hypothesis is applied and leads to an accurate evaluation of the propeller performances. The unsteady effects generated by the interaction between the propeller blades and the vortices are analyzed.

  8. Thermal Structures Technology Development for Reusable Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Natividad, Roderick; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell

    1998-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center for investigating integrated cryogenic propellant tank systems for a Reusable Launch Vehicle are described. The cryogenic tanks are investigated as an integrated tank system. An integrated tank system includes the tank wall, cryogenic insulation, Thermal Protection System (TPS) attachment sub-structure, and TPS. Analysis codes are used to size the thicknesses of cryogenic insulation and TPS insulation for thermal loads, and to predict tank buckling strengths at various ring frame spacings. The unique test facilities developed for the testing of cryogenic tank components are described. Testing at cryogenic and high-temperatures verifies the integrity of materials, design concepts, manufacturing processes, and thermal/structural analyses. Test specimens ranging from the element level to the subcomponent level are subjected to projected vehicle operational mechanical loads and temperatures. The analytical and experimental studies described in this paper provide a portion of the basic information required for the development of light-weight reusable cryogenic propellant tanks.

  9. Thermal Structures Technology Development for Reusable Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Natividad, Roderick; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell W.

    2005-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies conducted at the NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) for investigating integrated cryogenic propellant tank systems for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) are described. The cryogenic tanks are investigated as an integrated tank system. An integrated tank system includes the tank wall, cryogenic insulation, thermal protection system (TPS) attachment sub-structure, and TPS. Analysis codes are used to size the thicknesses of cryogenic insulation and TPS insulation for thermal loads, and to predict tank buckling strengths at various ring frame spacings. The unique test facilities developed for the testing of cryogenic tank components are described. Testing at cryogenic and high-temperatures verifies the integrity of materials, design concepts, manufacturing processes, and thermal/structural analyses. Test specimens ranging from the element level to the subcomponent level are subjected to projected vehicle operational mechanical loads and temperatures. The analytical and experimental studies described in this paper provide a portion of the basic information required for the development of light-weight reusable cryogenic propellant tanks.

  10. Return of the propeller

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Resurrecting the propeller-driven airplane could help save fuel if there is another oil crisis like in the 1970s. This article discusses the new propeller engine, propfans, which are being developed for commercial airplanes. It discusses the three types of propfan engines and the advantages and disadvantages of each. It also tells about the propfan airplanes several companies are developing.

  11. Development of a computerized analysis for solid propellant combustion instability with turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-dimensional numerical model has been developed for the unsteady state oscillatory combustion of solid propellants subject to acoustic pressure disturbances. Including the gas phase unsteady effects, the assumption of uniform pressure across the flame zone, which has been conventionally used, is relaxed so that a higher frequency response in the long flame of a double-base propellant can be calculated. The formulation is based on a premixed, laminar flame with a one-step overall chemical reaction and the Arrhenius law of decomposition with no condensed phase reaction. In a given geometry, the Galerkin finite element solution shows the strong resonance and damping effect at the lower frequencies, similar to the result of Denison and Baum. Extended studies deal with the higher frequency region where the pressure varies in the flame thickness. The nonlinear system behavior is investigated by carrying out the second order expansion in wave amplitude when the acoustic pressure oscillations are finite in amplitude. Offset in the burning rate shows a negative sign in the whole frequency region considered, and it verifies the experimental results of Price. Finally, the velocity coupling in the two-dimensional model is discussed.

  12. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  13. β-Propeller phytases: Diversity, catalytic attributes, current developments and potential biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Yadav, Ajar Nath; Verma, Priyanka; Sangwan, Punesh; Saxena, Abhishake; Kumar, Krishan; Singh, Bijender

    2017-05-01

    Phytases are phosphatases which stepwise remove phosphates from phytic acid or its salts. β-Propeller phytase (BPPhy) belongs to a special class of microbial phytases that is regarded as most diverse, isolated and characterized from different microbes, mainly from Bacillus spp. BPPhy class is unique for its Ca(2+)-dependent catalytic activity, strict substrate specificity, active at neutral to alkaline pH and high thermostability. Numerous sequence and structure based studies have revealed unique attributes and catalytic properties of this class, as compared to other classes of phytases. Recent studies including cloning and expression and genetic engineering approaches have led to improvements in BPPhy which provide an opportunity for extended utilization of this class of phytases in improving animal nutrition, human health, plant growth promotion, and environmental protection, etc. This review describes the sources and diversity of BPPhy genes, biochemical properties, Ca(2+) dependence, current developments in structural elucidation, heterogeneous expression and catalytic improvements, and multifarious applications of BPPhy.

  14. Development of Non-Optimum Factors for Launch Vehicle Propellant Tank Bulkhead Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Wallace, Matthew L.; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-optimum factors are used during aerospace conceptual and preliminary design to account for the increased weights of as-built structures due to future manufacturing and design details. Use of higher-fidelity non-optimum factors in these early stages of vehicle design can result in more accurate predictions of a concept s actual weights and performance. To help achieve this objective, non-optimum factors are calculated for the aluminum-alloy gores that compose the ogive and ellipsoidal bulkheads of the Space Shuttle Super-Lightweight Tank propellant tanks. Minimum values for actual gore skin thicknesses and weld land dimensions are extracted from selected production drawings, and are used to predict reference gore weights. These actual skin thicknesses are also compared to skin thicknesses predicted using classical structural mechanics and tank proof-test pressures. Both coarse and refined weights models are developed for the gores. The coarse model is based on the proof pressure-sized skin thicknesses, and the refined model uses the actual gore skin thicknesses and design detail dimensions. To determine the gore non-optimum factors, these reference weights are then compared to flight hardware weights reported in a mass properties database. When manufacturing tolerance weight estimates are taken into account, the gore non-optimum factors computed using the coarse weights model range from 1.28 to 2.76, with an average non-optimum factor of 1.90. Application of the refined weights model yields non-optimum factors between 1.00 and 1.50, with an average non-optimum factor of 1.14. To demonstrate their use, these calculated non-optimum factors are used to predict heavier, more realistic gore weights for a proposed heavy-lift launch vehicle s propellant tank bulkheads. These results indicate that relatively simple models can be developed to better estimate the actual weights of large structures for future launch vehicles.

  15. Development and Optimized Design of Propeller Pump System & Structure with VFD in Low-head Pumping Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentian, Zhang; Honggeng, Zhu; Arnold, Jaap; Linbi, Yao

    2010-06-01

    Compared with vertical-installed pumps, the propeller (bulb tubular) pump systems can achieve higher hydraulic efficiencies, which are particularly suitable for low-head pumping stations. More than four propeller pumping stations are being, or will be built in the first stage of the S-to-N Water Diversion Project in China, diverting water from Yangtze River to the northern part of China to alleviate water-shortage problems and develop the economy. New structures of propeller pump have been developed for specified pumping stations in Jiangsu and Shandong Provinces respectively and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) are used in those pumping stations to regulate operating conditions. Based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the standard k-e turbulent model, numerical simulations of the flow field and performance prediction in the propeller pump system were conducted on the platform of commercial software CFX by using the SIMPLEC algorithm. Through optimal design of bulb dimensions and diffuser channel shape, the hydraulic system efficiency has improved evidently. Furthermore, the structures of propeller pumps have been optimized to for the introduction of conventional as well as permanent magnet motors. In order to improve the hydraulic efficiency of pumping systems, both the pump discharge and the motor diameter were optimized respectively. If a conventional motor is used, the diameter of the pump casing has to be increased to accommodate the motor installed inside. If using a permanent magnet motor, the diameter of motor casing can be decreased effectively without decreasing its output power, thus the cross-sectional area is enlarged and the velocity of flowing water decreased favorably to reduce hydraulic loss of discharge channel and thereby raising the pumping system efficiency. Witness model tests were conducted after numerical optimization on specific propeller pump systems, indicating that the model system hydraulic efficiencies can be improved by 0.5%˜3.7% in

  16. Development and Testing of a Green-Propellant Micro-Hybrid Thruster with Electrostatic Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Judson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    As early as 1937 German scientists at Peenemunde experimented with highly unstable fuel blends of nitrous oxide (N2O) and ethanol. These early tests mostly resulted in explosions and destroyed rocket engines. More recently several companies have developed experimental nitrous oxide fuel blends (NOFB) with Isp exceeding 300 sec. Although NOFBx has recently been cleared for tests on the International Space Station, this propellant remains highly experimental and has not been cleared for commercial transport by the US DOT. Recent work by Karabeyoglu et al. has raised concerns about the safety risks of mixing hydrocarbons with N2O. Liquid oxidizer/fuel blends are highly explosive and require extreme care in transport and servicing. By adding small amounts of a liquid organic fuel such as alcohol or a hydrocarbon, the odds of an explosive decomposition event are significantly increased.iv The proposed solution mitigates the explosion hazards of NOFB by separating the oxidizer from the hydrocarbon fuel formed as of a small cylindrical section of ABS thermoplastic. As N2O vapor flows across the grain segment, current enters a 1000 VDC high-tension lead in the ABS fuel grain and produces an inductive spark that vaporizes a small amount of the material. The ablated fuel vapor plus residual energy from the spark seed a localized exothermic N2O dissociation that produces sufficient heat to initiate combustion. The process is also effective when gaseous oxygen is used. A low TRL (2-3) prototype demonstrating the feasibility of controlled hydrocarbon-seeding was recently tested at Utah State University.v The unit features a miniature 2.5 cm ABS fuel grain fabricated using a Stratasys Dimension 3-D printer. The 9-N thruster was pulse-fired up to 27 consecutive times on a single ABS grain segment. Ignition was achieved by as little as 12-15 Joules energy input. This value is contrasted with the typical 30-minute pre-heat requirement for the ECAPS LMP-103S ADN-based monopropellant

  17. Results of an Advanced Development Zero Boil-Off Cryogenic Propellant Storage Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David

    2004-01-01

    A zero boil-off (ZBO) cryogenic propellant storage concept was recently tested in a thermally relevant low-earth orbit environment, an important development in the effort to apply this concept to flight projects. Previous efforts documented the benefits of ZBO for launch vehicle upper stages in a low-earth orbit (LEO). Central to that analysis is a ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool that estimates the performance of each component and the ZBO system. This test is essential to the validation of that tool, and was the first flight representative configuration tested in a thermally representative environment. The test article was comprised of a spherical 1.4 m diameter insulated propellant tank, with a submerged mixer, a cryogenic heat pipe, flight design cryocooler, and a radiator. All were enclosed in a thermal shroud and inserted into and tested in a vacuum chamber that simulated an LEO thermal environment. Thermal and pressure control tests were performed at sub-critical LN2 temperatures and approximately 2 atmospheres pressure. The cold side of the ZBO system performed well. In particular, the heat pipe performed better than expected, which suggests that the cryocooler could be located further from the tank than anticipated, i.e. on a spacecraft bus, while maintaining the desired efficiency. Also, the mixer added less heat than expected. The tank heating rate through the insulation was higher than expected; also the temperatures on the cryocooler hot side were higher than planned. This precluded the cryocooler from eliminating the boil-off. The results show the cryocooler was successful at removing 6.8 W of heat at approximately 75 K and 150 W of input power, with a heat rejection temperature of 311 K. The data generated on the ZBO components is essential for the upgrade of the ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool to more accurately apply the concept to future missions.

  18. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  19. Application of theory to propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. G.; Morgan, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various theories concerning propeller design are discussed. The use of digital computers to obtain specific blade shapes to meet appropriate flow conditions is emphasized. The development of lifting-line and lifting surface configurations is analyzed. Ship propulsive performance and basic propeller design considerations are investigated. The characteristics of supercavitating propellers are compared with those of subcavitating propellers.

  20. Nitramine smokeless propellant research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. P.

    1977-01-01

    A transient ballistics and combustion model is derived to represent the closed vessel experiment that is widely used to characterize propellants. A computer program is developed to solve the time-dependent equations, and is applied to explain aspects of closed vessel behavior. In the case of nitramine propellants the cratering of the burning surface associated with combustion above break-point pressures augments the effective burning rate as deduced from the closed vessel experiment. Low pressure combustion is significantly affected by the ignition process and, in the case of nitramine propellants, by the developing and changing surface structure. Thus, burning rates deduced from the closed vessel experiment may or may not agree with those measured in the equilibrium strand burner. Series of T burner experiments are performed to compare the combustion instability characteristics of nitramine (HMX) containing propellants and ammonium perchlorate (AP)propellants. Although ash produced by more fuel rich propellants could have provided mechanical suppression, results from clean-burning propellants permit the conclusion that HMX reduces the acoustic driving.

  1. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    1996-11-01

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and movements that the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull. The first part of the book is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections and wings, and to propellers in uniform flow, with guidance for design and pragmatic analysis of performance. The second part covers the development of unsteady forces arising from operation in nonuniform hull wakes. A final chapter discusses the optimization of efficiency of compound propulsors. Researchers in ocean technology and naval architecture will find this book appealing.

  2. Development of a Two-Stage Mars Ascent Vehicle Using In-Situ Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxton, Laurel; Vaughan, David

    2014-01-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) and Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) present two main challenges for the advancement of Mars science. MSR would demonstrate Mars lift-off capability, while ISRU would test the ability to produce fuel and oxidizer using Martian resources, a crucial step for future human missions. A two-stage Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) concept was developed to support sample return as well as in-situ propellant production. The MAV would be powered by a solid rocket first stage and a LOX-propane second stage. A liquid second-stage provides higher orbit insertion reliability than a solid second stage as well as a degree of complexity eventually required for manned missions. Propane in particular offers comparable performance to methane without requiring cryogenic storage. The total MAV mass would be 119.9 kg to carry an 11 kg payload to orbit. The feasibility of in-situ fuel and oxidizer production was also examined. Two potential schemes were evaluated for production capability, size and power requirements. The schemes examined utilize CO2 and water as starting blocks to produce LOX and a propane blend. The infrastructure required to fuel and launch the MAV was also explored.

  3. Nitramine smokeless propellant research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transient ballistics and combustion model was derived to represent the closed vessel experiment that is widely used to characterize propellants. The model incorporates the nitramine combustion mechanisms. A computer program was developed to solve the time dependent equations, and was applied to explain aspects of closed vessel behavior. It is found that the rate of pressurization in the closed vessel is insufficient at pressures of interest to augment the burning rate by time dependent processes. Series of T-burner experiments were performed to compare the combustion instability characteristics of nitramine (HMX) containing propellants and ammonium perchlorate (AP) propellants. It is found that the inclusion of HMX consistently renders the propellant more stable.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF FLEXIBLE POLYMERS AS THERMAL INSULATION IN SOLID-PROPELLANT ROCKET MOTORS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    insulation in solid-propellant rocket motors. During the report period, efforts were concentrated on: (1) the internal flexibilization of epoxy, melamine ...and furan resins , (2) the investigation of other fillers besides asbestos fibers, (3) mechanical testing of aged, externally plasticized epoxy resins ...4) oxyacetylene torch testing of filled epoxy resins , and (5) static motor testing of filled flexible phenolic resins . (Author)

  5. Educating Tomorrow's Aerrospace Engineers by Developing and Launching Liquid-Propelled Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnard, Eric; Garvey, John; Holleman, Tom; Mueller, Tom

    2002-01-01

    conducted at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), in which engineering students develop and launch liquid propelled rockets. The program is articulated around two main activities, each with specific objectives. The first component of CALVEIN is a systems integration laboratory where students develop/improve vehicle subsystems and integrate them into a vehicle (Prospector-2 - P-2 - for the 2001-02 academic year - AY). This component has three main objectives: (1) Develop hands- on skills for incoming students and expose them to aerospace hardware; (2) allow for upper division students who have been involved in the program to mentor incoming students and manage small teams; and (3) provide students from various disciplines within the College of Engineering - and other universities - with the chance to develop/improve subsystems on the vehicle. Among recent student projects conducted as part of this component are: a new 1000 lbf thrust engine using pintle injector technology, which was successfully tested on Dec. 1, 2001 and flown on Prospector-2 in Feb. 2002 (developed by CSULB Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering students); a digital flight telemetry package (developed by CSULB Electrical Engineering students); a new recovery system where a mechanical system replaces pyrotechnics for parachute release (developed by CSULB Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering students); and a 1-ft payload bay to accommodate experimental payloads (e.g. "CANSATS" developed by Stanford University students). The second component of CALVEIN is a formal Aerospace System Design curriculum. In the first-semester, from top-level system requirements, the students perform functional analysis, define the various subsystems and derive their requirements. These are presented at the Systems Functional and Requirement Reviews (SFR &SRR). The methods used for validation and verification are determined. Specifications and Interface Control Documents (ICD) are generated by the student team

  6. Environmentally Sound Processing Technology: JANNAF Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee and Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee Joint Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Lorri A. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Topics covered include: Risk assessment of hazardous materials, Automated systems for pollution prevention and hazardous materials elimination, Study design for the toxicity evaluation of ammonium perchlorate, Plasma sprayed bondable stainless surface coatings, Development of CFC-free cleaning processes, New fluorinated solvent alternatives to ozone depleting solvents, Cleaning with highly fluorinated liquids, Biotreatment of propyleneglycol nitrate by anoxic denitrification, Treatment of hazardous waste with white rot fungus, Hydrothermal oxidation as an environmentally benign treatment technology, Treatment of solid propellant manufacturing wastes by base hydrolysis, Design considerations for cleaning using supercritical fluid technology, and Centrifugal shear carbon dioxide cleaning.

  7. Development of a power-law crack growth model for a rocket motor propellant exhibiting nonlinear viscoelastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcher, Partricia Willice

    The focus of this work is the examination of the risk posed by the presence of a shear crack at the inhibitor bondline in a common rocket motor design using fracture mechanics. Cracks in propellant increase the available surface area for combustion, which may cause failure through over pressurization of the case. Although prediction of the onset of crack growth is important; prediction of the rate of crack growth is critical in the present application. A successful motor firing may still be achieved if the burning rate of the propellant exceeds the rate of the crack growth. The objective of this research is to develop a procedure to determine instantaneous crack lengths from test data so that coefficients for a power-law crack growth model could be determined. The power-law model relates effective crack speed to effective stress intensity factors. Once the crack growth power-law model is fit, conclusions regarding the effects of pressure and presence of a bondline on the resistance to crack growth were made. In many cases, such as when an environmental chamber is used, the crack length in fracture specimens cannot be directly observed, and therefore, an indirect method for determining crack length is needed. In the study described here, a series of Oblique Tension/Shear (OTS) fracture specimens were tested in tension. Samples were extracted from bulk and bondline sections of a dissected rocket motor propellant grain. An approach was developed to extract the softening effects due to distributed damage from the fracture test data such that softening related only to macro-crack growth remains for use in determination of instantaneous crack lengths. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted crack lengths and crack lengths extracted from video when the latter was available.

  8. The Development of an Interior Ballistic Model for Automated Continuous Propellant Production Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    t . Other requests for this document aust be referred to Director, USA Ballistic Research Laboratory, ATTN: DROAR-TSB...r PROPELLANT LINE HOLDING i t i 1 * ! CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL TESTS 1 1 s \\ PROCESS CONTROLLER 4 1 ._J j \\. ! * INTERIOR...X UJ —i < U CO >• BO ■ — CO CO LU U o UJ — V) — o QC a 3 i—i OC z o (J — a - X 1 F !/) a. CO — A 0 T ^ — UJ >■ e 1—

  9. Flight experiments and evolutionary development of a laser-propelled transatmospheric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Messitt, Donald G.

    1998-09-01

    In a series of spectacular experiments conducted at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), NM, using 13- to 15-cm diameter, 40- to 60-g vehicles designed to fly on the 10 kW PLVTS pulsed carbon dioxide laser (1 kJ pulses for 30 microsecond duration at 10 Hz), Prof. Leik Myrabo of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Dr. Franklin Mead of the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) Propulsion Directorate, have been successfully flying laser propelled Lightcraft under a joint Air Force/NASA flight demonstration program. The axisymmetric Lightcraft vehicles are propelled by airbreathing, pulsed- detonation engines with an infinite fuel specific impulse. Impulse coupling coefficients have been measured with ballistic pendulums as well as a piezoelectric load cell and fall in the range of 100 to 200 N/MW. Horizontal wire-guided flights up to 400 ft, using a unique laser beam pointing and tracking guidance system, have demonstrated up to 2.0 G's acceleration measured by a photo-optic array. Spin-stabilized free-flights with active tracking/beam control have been accomplished to altitudes of 15.25 meters. This paper will summarize the progress made to date on the Lightcraft Technology Demonstration flight test program, since the first 12 - 14 July 1996, experiments at HELSTF.

  10. Space shuttle seal material and design development for earth storable propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The results of a program to investigate and characterize seal materials suitable for space shuttle storable propellant systems are given. Two new elastomeric materials were identified as being potentially superior to existing state-of-the art materials for specific sealing applications. These materials were AF-E-124D and AF-E-411. AF-E-124D is a cured perfluorinated polymer suitable for use with dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizer, and hydrazine base fuels. AF-E-411 is an ethylene propylene terpolymer material for hydrazine base fuel service. Data are presented relative to low and high temperature characteristics as well as propellant exposure effects. Types of data included are: mechanical properties, stress strain curves, friction and wear characteristics, compression set and permeability. Sealing tests with a flat poppet-seal valve were conducted for verification of sealing capability. A bibliography includes over 200 references relating to seal design or materials and presents a concise tabulation of the more useful seal design data sources.

  11. Propellers in yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S

    1945-01-01

    It was realized as early as 1909 that a propeller in yaw develops a side force like that of a fin. In 1917, R. G. Harris expressed this force in terms of the torque coefficient for the unyawed propeller. Of several attempts to express the side force directly in terms of the shape of the blades, however, none has been completely satisfactory. An analysis that incorporates induction effects not adequately covered in previous work and that gives good agreement with experiment over a wide range of operating conditions is presented. The present analysis shows that the fin analogy may be extended to the form of the side-force expression and that the effective fin area may be taken as the projected side area of the propeller.

  12. Low acid producing solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    The potential environmental effects of the exhaust products of conventional rocket propellants have been assessed by various groups. Areas of concern have included stratospheric ozone, acid rain, toxicity, air quality and global warming. Some of the studies which have been performed on this subject have concluded that while the impacts of rocket use are extremely small, there are propellant development options which have the potential to reduce those impacts even further. This paper discusses the various solid propellant options which have been proposed as being more environmentally benign than current systems by reducing HCI emissions. These options include acid neutralized, acid scavenged, and nonchlorine propellants. An assessment of the acid reducing potential and the viability of each of these options is made, based on current information. Such an assessment is needed in order to judge whether the potential improvements justify the expenditures of developing the new propellant systems.

  13. Cryogenic Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, B.; Kemp, N. J.; Daney, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer model that has been developed for assessing the feasibility of low g cryogen propellant scavenging from the space shuttle External Tank (ET) is given. Either pump-assisted or pressure-induced propellant transfer may be selected. The program will accept a wide range of input variables, including the fuel to be transferred (LOX or LH2), heat leaks, tank temperatures, and piping and equipment specifications. The model has been parametrically analyzed to determine initial design specification for the system.

  14. Application of an optimization method to high performance propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. C.; Stefko, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The application of an optimization method to determine the propeller blade twist distribution which maximizes propeller efficiency is presented. The optimization employs a previously developed method which has been improved to include the effects of blade drag, camber and thickness. Before the optimization portion of the computer code is used, comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies and power coefficients are made with experimental data for one NACA propeller at Mach numbers in the range of 0.24 to 0.50 and another NACA propeller at a Mach number of 0.71 to validate the propeller aerodynamic analysis portion of the computer code. Then comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies for the optimized and the original propellers show the benefits of the optimization method in improving propeller performance. This method can be applied to the aerodynamic design of propellers having straight, swept, or nonplanar propeller blades.

  15. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  16. Variable pitch propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistolesi, Enrico

    1923-01-01

    The advantages of variable pitch propellers over constant pitch propellers is presented along with different methods of varying the pitch. The technique of varying the shape of the propeller is presented as the most efficient one.

  17. Hypergolic Propellant Safety Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, Kurt A.; Hornung, Stephen D.; Baker, David L.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the NASA Safety Training Center at the Johnson Space Center, a hypergolic propellant safety course has been developed. This is a 2-day course on guidelines for hypergolic propellant system design, materials selection, operations, storage, and transportation. Recognizing that numerous fuels and oxidizers can be hypergolic, this course is specific to the hydrazine family of fuels and nitrogen tetroxide and its variants. The objectives of the course are to enable the student to identify and evaluate the hazards of hypergolic propellants, and to understand the methods for controlling those hazards and responding to emergencies. The course covers properties and hazards of the hydrazines and oxidizers; design and operations in hypergolic facilities; materials selection for use in hypergol systems; storage vessels, piping, and component considerations; hypergol detection; fire fighting practices; operating and transportation principles and procedures; and emergency practices and considerations. A hazards analysis methodology is presented. Numerous references are provided and the applicability of certain regulatory documents is discussed. A brief overview of other propellants, including hydrogen peroxide, is given at the end of the course.

  18. Design of Propellers for Motorsoarers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed for the design of propellers of minimum induced loss matched to an arbitrary operating point characterized by disc loading (thrust or power), air density, shaft speed, flight speed, and number of blades. A consistent procedure is outlined to predict the performance of these propellers under off design conditions, or to predict the performance of propellers of general geometry. The examples discussed include a man powered airplane, a hang glider with a 7.5 kW (10 hp) 8,000 rpm engine, and an airplane-like motorsoarer.

  19. Development and Application of Tools to Characterize the Oxidative Degradation of AP/HTPB/Al Propellants in a Propellant Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celina, Mathew; Minier, Leanna; Assink, Roger

    2000-01-01

    The oxidative thermal aging of a crosslinked hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)/isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) polyurethane rubber was studied at temperatures between 25 C and 125 C. Changes in tensile elongation, mechanical hardening, polymer network properties, density, O2 permeation, and molecular chain dynamics were investigated as a function of age. The techniques used include solvent swelling, detailed modulus profiling, and NMR relaxation measurements. The Arrhenius methodology, which normally assumes a linear extrapolation of high temperature aging data, is critically evaluated by using extensive data superposition and highly sensitive oxygen consumption measurements. Significant curvature in the Arrhenius diagram of these oxidation rates is observed to be similar to previous results found for other rubber materials that have been evaluated by this technique. Preliminary gel/network properties suggest that crosslinking is the dominant process at higher temperatures. The effect on the oxidation rate of the binder when other constituents found in propellants are present, such as ammonium perchlorate, plasticizer and aluminum powder, is presented.

  20. Propellant thermal stratification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winstead, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    The term thermal stratification is used to express nonuniform heat distribution within the bulk propellant. The nonuniform distribution of heat results in significant temperature variations in booster propulsion propellants and causes an undesirable increase in the self-pressurization rate of cryogen storage systems. A semiempirical prediction method has been developed for high gravity environments and is adequate for design purposes; model accuracy is somewhat limited to similarity in tank geometries, and additional work is needed to extend the correlation range. Several low gravity environment models that cover a broad range of predicted results have been developed. There are no applicable data by which any of these models may be selected in preference over the others.

  1. Propeller aircraft interior noise model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft. The fuselage model is that of a cylinder with a structurally-integral floor. The cabin sidewall is stiffened by stringers and ring frames, and the floor by longitudinal beams. The cabin interior is covered with a sidewall treatments consisting of layers of porous material and an impervious trim septum. Representation of the propeller pressure field is utilized as input data in the form of the propeller noise signature at a series of locations on a grid over the fuselage structure. Results obtained from the analytical model are compared with test data measured by NASA in a scale model cylindrical fuselage excited by a model propeller.

  2. Lead-Free Propellant for Propellant Actuated Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, John L.

    2000-01-01

    Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division's CAD/PAD Department has been working to remove toxic compounds from our products for about a decade. In 1992, we embarked on an effort to develop a lead-free double base propellant to replace that of a foreign sole source. At the time there were availability concerns. In 1995, the department developed a strategic proposal to include a wider range of products. Efforts included such efforts as removing lead sheathing from linear explosives and replacing lead azide and lead styphnate compounds. This paper will discuss efforts specifically related to developing non-leaded double base propellant for use in various Propellant Actuated Devices (PADs) for aircrew escape systems. The propellants can replace their leaded counterparts, mitigating lead handling, processing, or toxic exposure to the environment and personnel. This work eliminates the use of leaded compounds, replacing them with a more environmentally benign metal-organic salt. Historically double-base propellants have held an advantage over other families of energetic materials through their relative insensitivity of the burning rate to changes in temperature and pressure. This desirable ballistic effect has been obtained with the use of a lead-organic salt alone or in a physical mixture with a copper-organic salt, or more recently with a lead-copper complex. These ballistic modifiers are typically added to the double-base 'paste' prior to gelatinization on heated calendars or one type or another. The effect of constant burning rate over a pressure range is called a 'plateau' while an even more beneficial effect of decreasing burning rate with increasing pressure is termed a 'mesa.' The latter effect results in very low temperature sensitivity of the propellant burning rate. Propellants with such effects are ideal tactical rocket motor propellants. The use of lead compounds poses a concern for the environment and personnel safety due to the metal's toxic

  3. Development of a quantitative LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of common propellant powder stabilizers in gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Laza, Désiré; Nys, Bart; Kinder, Jan De; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Moucheron, Cécile

    2007-07-01

    In traditional scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis of gunshot residue (GSR), one has to cope more and more frequently with limitations of this technique due to the use of lead-free ammunition or ammunition lacking heavy metals. New methods for the analysis of the organic components of common propellant powder stabilizers were developed based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A multiple reactions monitoring scanning method was created for the screening of akardite II, ethylcentralite, diphenylamine, methylcentralite, N-nitrosodiphenylamine, 2-nitrodiphenylamine, and 4-nitrodiphenylamine, present in standards mixtures. Five out of seven of these target compounds can be selectively identified and distinguished from the two others with a high accuracy. Samples from the hands of a shooter were collected by swabbing and underwent solid phase extraction prior to analysis. Detection limits ranging from 5 to 115 mug injected were achieved. Results from several firing trials show that the LC-MS/MS method is suitable for the detection of stabilizers in samples collected following the firing of 9 mm Para ammunitions.

  4. Aircraft propeller control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stanley G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In the invention, the speeds of both propellers in a counterrotating aircraft propeller pair are measured. Each speed is compared, using a feedback loop, with a demanded speed and, if actual speed does not equal demanded speed for either propeller, pitch of the proper propeller is changed in order to attain the demanded speed. A proportional/integral controller is used in the feedback loop. Further, phase of the propellers is measured and, if the phase does not equal a demanded phase, the speed of one propeller is changed, by changing pitch, until the proper phase is attained.

  5. Overview of Iodine Propellant Hall Thruster Development Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Benavides, Gabriel; Hickman, Tyler; Smith, Timothy; Williams, George; Myers, James; Polzin, Kurt; Dankanich, John; Byrne, Larry; Szabo, James; Lee, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    NASA is continuing to invest in advancing Hall thruster technologies for implementation in commercial and government missions. There have been several recent iodine Hall propulsion system development activities performed by the team of the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Busek Co. Inc. In particular, the work focused on qualification of the 200 W Busek BHT-200-I and the continued development of the 600 W BHT-600-I Hall thruster propulsion systems. This paper presents an overview of these development activities and also reports on the results of short duration tests that were performed on the engineering model BHT-200-I and the development model BHT-600-I Hall thrusters.

  6. Development of an innovative sandwich common bulkhead for cryogenic upper stage propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelinski, B.; Lange, H.; Röttger, C.; Sacher, H.; Weiland, S.; Zell, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the frame of the Future Launcher Preparatory Program (FLPP) investigating advancing technologies for the Next Generation of Launchers (NGL) a number of novel key technologies are presently under development for significantly improving vehicle performance in terms of payload capacity and mission versatility. As a respective ESA guided technology development program, Cryogenic Upper Stage Technologies (CUST) has been launched within FLPP that hosts among others the development of a common bulkhead to separate liquid hydrogen from the liquid oxygen compartment. In this context, MT Aerospace proposed an advanced sandwich design concept which is currently in the development phase reaching for TRL4 under MT Aerospace responsibility. Key components of this sandwich common bulkhead are a specific core material, situated in-between two thin aluminum face sheets, and an innovative thermal decoupling element at the equatorial region. The combination of these elements provides excellent thermal insulation capabilities and mechanical performance at a minimum weight, since mechanical and thermal functions are merged in the same component. This improvement is expressed by substantial performance figures of the proposed concept that include high resistance against reverse pressure, an optimized heat leak and minimized mass, involving the sandwich dome structure and the adjacent interface rings. The development of single sub-technologies, all contributing to maturate the sandwich common bulkhead towards the desired technology readiness level (TRL), is described in the context of the given design constraints as well as technical, functional and programmatic requirements, issued from the stage level. This includes the thermal and mechanical characterization of core materials, manufacturing issues as well as non-destructive testing and the thermal and structural analyses and dimensioning of the complete common bulkhead system. Dedicated TRL assessments in the Ariane 5 Mid

  7. Propulsion stability codes for liquid propellant propulsion systems developed for use on a PC computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III; Armstrong, Wilbur C.

    1991-01-01

    Research into component modeling and system synthesis leading to the analysis of the major types of propulsion system instabilities and the characterization of various components characteristics are presented. Last year, several programs designed to run on a PC were developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. These codes covered the low, intermediate, and high frequency modes of oscillation of a liquid rocket propulsion system. No graphics were built into these programs and only simple piping layouts were supported. This year's effort was to add run time graphics to the low and intermediate frequency codes, allow new types of piping elements (accumulators, pumps, and split pipes) in the low frequency code, and develop a new code for the PC to generate Nyquist plots.

  8. Asbestos Free Insulation Development for the Space Shuttle Solid Propellant Rocket Motor (RSRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Larry D.; Eddy, Norman F.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Asbestos has been used for many years as an ablation inhibitor in insulating materials. It has been a constituent of the AS/NBR insulation used to protect the steel case of the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) since its inception. This paper discusses the development of a potential replacement RSRM insulation design, several of the numerous design issues that were worked and processing problems that were resolved. The earlier design demonstration on FSM-5 (Flight Support Motor) of the selected 7% and 11% Kevlar(registered) filled EPDM (KF/EPDM) candidate materials was expanded. Full-scale process simulation articles were built and FSM-8 was manufactured using multiple Asbestos Free (AF) components and materials. Two major problems had to be overcome in developing the AF design. First, bondline corrosion, which occurred in the double-cured region of the aft dome, had to be eliminated. Second, KF/EPDM creates high levels of electrostatic energy (ESE), which does not readily dissipate from the insulation surface. An uncontrolled electrostatic discharge (ESD) of this surface energy during many phases of production could create serious safety hazards. Numerous processing changes were implemented and a conductive paint was developed to prevent exposed external insulation surfaces from generating ESE/ESD. Additionally, special internal instrumentation was incorporated into FSM-8 to record real-time internal motor environment data. These data included inhibitor insulation erosion rates and internal thermal environments. The FSM-8 static test was successfully conducted in February 2000 and much valuable data were obtained to characterize the AF insulation design.

  9. Development of a generic combustion stability code for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J. J.; Jones, Y. T.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical framework for a combustion stability analysis code is outlined. The goal for the code is to be general enough in problem treatment so that its validity and accuracy extend over a wide range of problem applications and that it lends the convenience for any future model improvement if necessary. An approach for modeling the combustion dynamics is devised to meet both requirements. An open-loop numerical procedure is also developed to mechanistically model various combustion processes for determining the stability parameters.

  10. Cryogenic propellant prestart conditioning for NLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, T. L.; Merlin, M. V.; Gautney, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of a candidate National Launch System (NLS) passive cryogenic propellant prestart conditioning system that offers a stable propellant thermal environment and minimum system complexity. A 2D, multinode model utilizing real fluid properties was developed. This model predicts flow recirculation due to thermal gradients by assuming vertical cold and warm opposing flow streams produced by density differential.

  11. Propeller Study. Part 1: Introduction and Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    A general aerodynamic-acoustic theory was developed for determining the acoustical design of propellers used on general aviation aircraft. Data from the theoretical investigation were applied in the design of a propeller whose thrust and torque were measured during a series of YO-3A aircraft flight tests.

  12. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  13. Counter-propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Caria, Ugo

    1931-01-01

    A counter-propeller is a fixed propeller smaller than the main propeller, mounted either fore or aft of the latter and performing the function of changing the direction of motion of the fluid filaments, which naturally tend to adopt a helicoidal form. This paper presents a consideration of the real advantage of counter-propellers on aircraft and the best shape of the blades. First, the author determines the possible energy absorption by the tangential increments. This process will be facilitated by the examination of the polygons of the relative velocities fore and aft of the generic section, of radius r, of one of the blades of the propeller.

  14. Liquid propellant rockets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipprey, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    A brief overview of the state of knowledge in liquid rocket technology is presented and examples are provided of instances where some fundamental principles of chemistry, fluid mechanics, and mathematics can be applied. A liquid propellant rocket classification is discussed together with rocket system performance, applications for liquid propellants, the effective exhaust velocity, aspects of simplified nozzle expansion, questions about theoretical propellant performance, the effect of chamber pressure on equilibrium performance, and the kinetic recombination in nozzles. Details of propellant combustion are examined, giving attention to propellant injection, evaporation-controlled combustion, combustion instability, and monopropellant decomposition.

  15. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  16. Tandem Air Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesley, E.P.

    1937-01-01

    Tests of 2-blade, adjustable-pitch, counterrotating tandem model propellers, adjusted to absorb equal power at maximum efficiency, were made at Stanford University. The characteristics, for 15 degrees, 25 degrees, 35 degrees, and 45 degrees pitch settings at 0.75 R of the forward propeller and for 8 1/2%, 15% and 30% diameter spacings, were compared with those of 2-blade and 4-blade propellers of the same blade form. The tests showed that the efficiency of the tandem propellers was from 0.5% to 4% greater than that of a 4-blade propeller and, at the high pitch settings, not appreciable inferior to that of a 2-blade propeller. It was found that the rear tandem propeller should be set at a pitch angle slightly less than that of the forward propeller to realize the condition of equal power at maximum efficiency. Under this condition the total power absorbed by the tandem propellers was from 3% to 9% more than that absorbed by the 4-blade propeller and about twice that absorbed by a 2-blade propeller.

  17. Propellant Technologies: A Persuasive Wave of Future Propulsion Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Ianovski, Leonid S.; Carrick, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Rocket propellant and propulsion technology improvements can be used to reduce the development time and operational costs of new space vehicle programs. Advanced propellant technologies can make the space vehicles safer, more operable, and higher performing. Five technology areas are described: Monopropellants, Alternative Hydrocarbons, Gelled Hydrogen, Metallized Gelled Propellants, and High Energy Density Materials. These propellants' benefits for future vehicles are outlined using mission study results and the technologies are briefly discussed.

  18. Modeling of impulsive propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Chato, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The impulsive propellant reorientation process is modeled using the (Energy Calculations for Liquid Propellants in a Space Environment (ECLIPSE) code. A brief description of the process and the computational model is presented. Code validation is documented via comparison to experimentally derived data for small scale tanks. Predictions of reorientation performance are presented for two tanks designed for use in flight experiments and for a proposed full scale OTV tank. A new dimensionless parameter is developed to correlate reorientation performance in geometrically similar tanks. Its success is demonstrated.

  19. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  20. Analysis of propellant feedline dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astleford, W. J.; Holster, J. L.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical model and computer program were developed for studying the disturbances of liquid propellants in engine feedline systems. It was found that the predominant effect of turbulence is to increase the spatial attenuation at low frequencies; at high frequencies the laminar and turbulent frequencies coincide. Recommendations for future work are included.

  1. The theory of the screw propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1922-01-01

    Given here is a brief review of the fundamental principles of the propeller slip-stream theory and its further development through later researches, which demonstrate the connection between the propeller slip-stream theory and Frounde's so-called 'propeller blade theory.' The propeller slip-stream theory, especially in its improved form, now gives us the basis for determining the mutual influence of the parts of the blade, so that, in calculating the shape of the blade, we can get along with certain section characteristics, which have been determined once and for all. It is argued that new theories present the possibility of investigating the phenomena in the vicinity of the propeller, allowing us to calculate its action on the basis of fewer experimental values.

  2. Considerations on propeller efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1928-01-01

    The propeller cannot be considered alone, but the mutual interference between propeller and airplane must be considered. These difficulties are so great when the joint action of propeller and airplane is considered, that the aerodynamic laboratory at Gottingen originally abandoned the idea of applying the efficiency conception of the test results. These difficulties and the methods by which they are overcome are outlined in this report.

  3. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  4. A preliminary study of a propeller powered by gas jets issuing from the blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Sanders, N D

    1946-01-01

    Computations are made of the performance of a propeller designed to develop 56 thrust horsepower at 100 miles per hour. The fuel consumption of the jet-operated propeller would be considerably higher than that of a reciprocating engine and a propeller. The lighter weight of the jet-operated propeller will result in a lighter weight of engine plus fuel for short-range flights. A theoretical analysis is made of a propeller powered by gas jets issuing from the blade tips. In the propeller considered, the air is drawn through the hub and passes through the hollow propeller blades to the tips, where propellers heat the air and expel it through the nozzles in the blade tips. The reaction of the tips rotates the propeller. For long range flights, the weight of the jet-operated propeller with its fuel would be greater than the weight of a reciprocating engine with its propeller and fuel.

  5. Computational modeling of magnetically actuated propellant orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    Unlike terrestrial applications where gravity positions liquid at the 'bottom' of the tank, the location of liquid propellant in spacecraft tanks is uncertain unless specific actions are taken or special features are built into the tank. Some mission events require knowledge of liquid position prior to a particular action: liquid must be positioned over the tank outlet prior to starting the main engines and must be moved away from the tank vent before vapor can be released overboard to reduce pressure. It may also be desirable to positively position liquid to improve propulsion system performance: moving liquid away from the tank walls will dramatically decrease the rate of heat transfer to the propellant, suppressing the boil-off rate, thereby reducing overall mission propellant requirements. The process of moving propellant to a desired position is referred to as propellant orientation or reorientation. Several techniques have been developed to positively position propellant in spacecraft tanks and each technique imposes additional requirements on vehicle design. Propulsive reorientation relies on small auxiliary thrusters to accelerate the tank. The inertia of the liquid causes it to collect in the aft-end of the tank if the acceleration is forward. This technique requires that additional thrusters be added to the vehicle, that additional propellant be carried in the vehicle, and that an additional operational maneuver be executed. Another technique uses Liquid Acquisition Devices (LAD's) to positively position propellants. These devices rely on surface tension to hold the liquid within special geometries (i.e. vanes, wire-mesh channels, start-baskets). While avoiding some of the penalties of propulsive orientation, this technique requires the addition of complicated hardware inside the propellant tank and performance for long duration missions is uncertain. The subject of the present research is an alternate technique for positively positioning liquid within

  6. SSME propellant path leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Roger; Shohadaee, Ahmad Ali

    1989-01-01

    The complicated high-pressure cycle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) propellant path provides many opportunities for external propellant path leaks while the engine is running. This mode of engine failure may be detected and analyzed with sufficient speed to save critical engine test hardware from destruction. The leaks indicate hardware failures which will damage or destroy an engine if undetected; therefore, detection of both cryogenic and hot gas leaks is the objective of this investigation. The primary objective of this phase of the investigation is the experimental validation of techniques for detecting and analyzing propellant path external leaks which have a high probability of occurring on the SSME. The selection of candidate detection methods requires a good analytic model for leak plumes which would develop from external leaks and an understanding of radiation transfer through the leak plume. One advanced propellant path leak detection technique is obtained by using state-of-the-art technology infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing, and expert systems for the engine protection. The feasibility of IR leak plume detection is evaluated on subscale simulated laboratory plumes to determine sensitivity, signal to noise, and general suitability for the application.

  7. Development of improved LACV-30 propeller blade coatings for protection against sand and rain erosion and marine environment corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1983-05-01

    An investigation was conducted of candidate systems offering potential erosion and corrsion protection when applied as coatings to Aluminum 7075 alloy propeller blades used to propel air cushioned vehicles operating in severe environments such as offshore and marine beach logistics missions. Blade lifespans are significantly abbreviated by erosion from sand and water impingement. This work focused on special hard anodized and hard nickel electroplated coatings as candidate protective systems with sand/rain erosion testing to evaluate their merits. Results indicated that anodized coatings did not provide suitable erosion protection to Aluminum 7075 in sand/rain environments, even with dry film lubricant supplemental films. Electroplated hard nickel coatings, Vickers hardnesses in the range of 380 to 440, appeared better for combined sand/rain erosion resistance based on comparisons with prior work. Dilute phosphoric anodizing the aluminum substrates led to excellent bonds and improved corrosion resistance when subsequently plated with ductile nickel from a low pH bath, followed by hard nickel electroplate. Electrodeposited sacrificial corrosion coatings degraded the overall coating bond integrity.

  8. Development of a fiber optic chemical dosimeter network for use in the remote detection of hydrazine propellant vapor leaks at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimcak, Charles M.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Delcamp, Spencer B.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.; Moss, Steven C.

    1994-10-01

    Fiber optic chemical dosimeters are being developed for use in the remote detection of toxic rocket propellant vapors, (hydrazine and its derivatives, and nitrogen tetroxide) that are used at Air Force and civilian rocket launch sites. The dosimeters employ colorimetric indicators that react selectively and irreversibly with the propellant vapors to yield chemical compounds that absorb laser light launched into a fiber optic network. The dosimeters are fabricated by dispersing the reagent within either a porous cladding or a porous distal end coating, that is prepared by a low temperature sol-gel technique. Remote field- scale detection of hydrazine vapor in a few hundreds of ppb-min integrated dose regime has been demonstrated with a network that is approximately equals 1 kilometer in length and the use of a low power (10 mW) diode laser. We have also assembled a computer model of a multimode fiber optic dosimeter network for prediction of the operational capabilities of a multiplexed system containing 100 dosimeters. The model was encoded in both spreadsheet and BASIC formats. It was used to evaluate the performance of a field-scale, remote fiber optic detection system incorporating discrete chemical vapor dosimeters in serial, parallel, or hybrid serial/parallel topologies. Additionally, we have begun exploratory work utilizing chemical reagents that react reversibly with hydrazine vapor to develop hydrazine vapor concentration sensors that could be deployed in a similar fashion on a remote fiber optic network to detect hydrazine vapor in the ppb regime.

  9. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  10. Liquid propellant densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor); Petrilla, Steve P. (Inventor); Lozano, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Super cooling the cryogenic liquid propellant in a vehicle propellant tank densities the propellant allowing the vehicle propellant tank to carry more fuel in the same volume tank while lowering the vapor pressure and thus the tank operating pressure. Lowering the tank operating pressure reduces the stress and therefore allows the walls of the tank to be thinner. Both the smaller tank volume and thinner tank wall results in an overall smaller and lighter vehicle with increased payload capability. The cryogenic propellant can be supercooled well below the normal boiling point temperature level by transporting the liquid propellant from the vehicle tanks to a ground based cooling unit which utilizes a combination of heat exchanger and compressor. The compressor lowers the coolant fluid bath pressure resulting in a low temperature boiling liquid which is subsequently used to cool the recirculating liquid. The cooled propellant is then returned to the vehicle propellant tank. In addition to reducing the vehicle size and weight the invention also allows location of the vent valve on the ground, elimination of on-board recirculation pumps or bleed systems, smaller and lighter engine pumps and valves, lighter and more stable ullage gas, and significant reduction in tank fill operation. All of these mentioned attributes provide lower vehicle weight and cost.

  11. Runtime and Pressurization Analyses of Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chung P.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-element unstructured CFD has been utilized at NASA SSC to carry out analyses of propellant tank systems in different modes of operation. The three regimes of interest at SSC include (a) tank chill down (b) tank pressurization and (c) runtime propellant draw-down and purge. While tank chill down is an important event that is best addressed with long time-scale heat transfer calculations, CFD can play a critical role in the tank pressurization and runtime modes of operation. In these situations, problems with contamination of the propellant by inclusion of the pressurant gas from the ullage causes a deterioration of the quality of the propellant delivered to the test article. CFD can be used to help quantify the mixing and propellant degradation. During tank pressurization under some circumstances, rapid mixing of relatively warm pressurant gas with cryogenic propellant can lead to rapid densification of the gas and loss of pressure in the tank. This phenomenon can cause serious problems during testing because of the resulting decrease in propellant flow rate. With proper physical models implemented, CFD can model the coupling between the propellant and pressurant including heat transfer and phase change effects and accurately capture the complex physics in the evolving flowfields. This holds the promise of allowing the specification of operational conditions and procedures that could minimize the undesirable mixing and heat transfer inherent in propellant tank operation. It should be noted that traditional CFD modeling is inadequate for such simulations because the fluids in the tank are in a range of different sub-critical and supercritical states and elaborate phase change and mixing rules have to be developed to accurately model the interaction between the ullage gas and the propellant. We show a typical run-time simulation of a spherical propellant tank, containing RP-1 in this case, being pressurized with room-temperature nitrogen at 540 R. Nitrogen

  12. Experiments on propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosche, F. R.; Stiewitt, H.

    Propeller sound generation was investigated. Tests were performed at flow velocities up to 58 m/sec on 90 cm dia. four bladed propellers driven by an electric motor enclosed in a streamlined nacelle. Five models with different blade geometries were tested at helical tip Mach numbers up to 0.69. Nearfield blade tip measurements were made at 0.14 dia. by an in-flow microphone. The acoustic far field was measured by four microphones outside the wind tunnel flow 2.7 m from the propeller axis. An acoustic mirror telescope with three microphones was used to investigate sound generation from the upper, central and lower parts of the propeller. The spectrum in the propeller plane is dominated by the tonal components at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics. Tonal component amplitude is greatly reduced downstream. The blades radiate high frequency noise mainly in motion direction.

  13. Development of improved lacv-30 propeller blade coatings for protection against sand and rain erosion and marine environment corrosion. Final report 4 Jan 1982-4 Mar 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.

    1983-05-10

    An investigation was conducted of candidate systems offering potential erosion and corrosion protection when applied as coatings to Aluminum 7075 alloy propeller blades used to propel air cushioned vehicles operating in severe environments. This work focused on (1) special hard anodized and (2) hard nickel electroplated coatings as candidate protective systems with sand/rain erosion testing to evaluate their merits. Attributes of the coating systems developed and studied included: For (1) Ways and means to produce and control deposit hardness for optimum erosion resistance, methods of bonding to blades for high integrity adhesion, and inclusion of sacrificial corrosion protection electroplates in the coating systems (zinc and zinc-nickel alloy). For (2) Incorporation of dry film lubricant systems on sealed hardcoats of various anodic coating thicknesses to enhance erosion performance. Study results indicated that anodized coatings did not provide suitable erosion protection to Aluminum 7075 in sand/rain environments, even with dry film lubricant supplemental films. Electroplated hard nickel coatings, Vickers hardnesses in the range of 380 to 440, appeared better for combined sand/rain erosion resistance based on comparisons with prior work. Dilute phosphoric anodizing the aluminum substrates led to excellent bonds and improved corrosion resistance when subsequently plated with ductile nickel from a low pH bath, followed by hard nickel electroplate.

  14. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  15. The E-3 Test Facility at Stennis Space Center: Research and Development Testing for Cryogenic and Storable Propellant Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pazos, John T.; Chandler, Craig A.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader a broad overview of the current upgraded capabilities of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center E-3 Test Facility to perform testing for rocket engine combustion systems and components using liquid and gaseous oxygen, gaseous and liquid methane, gaseous hydrogen, hydrocarbon based fuels, hydrogen peroxide, high pressure water and various inert fluids. Details of propellant system capabilities will be highlighted as well as their application to recent test programs and accomplishments. Data acquisition and control, test monitoring, systems engineering and test processes will be discussed as part of the total capability of E-3 to provide affordable alternatives for subscale to full scale testing for many different requirements in the propulsion community.

  16. Analytic Modeling of Pressurization and Cryogenic Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Jeremy H.

    2010-01-01

    An analytic model for pressurization and cryogenic propellant conditions during all mission phases of any liquid rocket based vehicle has been developed and validated. The model assumes the propellant tanks to be divided into five nodes and also implements an empirical correlation for liquid stratification if desired. The five nodes include a tank wall node exposed to ullage gas, an ullage gas node, a saturated propellant vapor node at the liquid-vapor interface, a liquid node, and a tank wall node exposed to liquid. The conservation equations of mass and energy are then applied across all the node boundaries and, with the use of perfect gas assumptions, explicit solutions for ullage and liquid conditions are derived. All fluid properties are updated real time using NIST Refprop.1 Further, mass transfer at the liquid-vapor interface is included in the form of evaporation, bulk boiling of liquid propellant, and condensation given the appropriate conditions for each. Model validation has proven highly successful against previous analytic models and various Saturn era test data and reasonably successful against more recent LH2 tank self pressurization ground test data. Finally, this model has been applied to numerous design iterations for the Altair Lunar Lander, Ares V Core Stage, and Ares V Earth Departure Stage in order to characterize Helium and autogenous pressurant requirements, propellant lost to evaporation and thermodynamic venting to maintain propellant conditions, and non-uniform tank draining in configurations utilizing multiple LH2 or LO2 propellant tanks. In conclusion, this model provides an accurate and efficient means of analyzing multiple design configurations for any cryogenic propellant tank in launch, low-acceleration coast, or in-space maneuvering and supplies the user with pressurization requirements, unusable propellants from evaporation and liquid stratification, and general ullage gas, liquid, and tank wall conditions as functions of time.

  17. Summary of Air Force Research Laboratory Support for the NASA Green Propellant Infusion Mission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    operations, aging of propellant tank coupons to enable propellant tank flight qualification, materials compatability verification, and establishment of an...developed over decades and take advantage of the decreased hazards of AF-M315E where practical. The legacy hydrazine design relied on a pressurized...system to transfer propellant from a bulk propellant tank into a spacecraft tank. It also called for the transfer of propellant from a large transport

  18. Investigations Into Tank Venting for Propellant Resupply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, H. C.; Harrison, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Models and simulations have been developed and applied to the evaluation of propellant tank ullage venting, which is integral to one approach for propellant resupply. The analytical effort was instrumental in identifying issues associated with resupply objectives, and it was used to help develop an operational procedure to accomplish the desired propellant transfer for a particular storable bipropellant system. Work on the project was not completed, and several topics have been identified as requiring further study; these include the potential for liquid entrainment during the low-g and thermal/freezing effects in the vent line and orifice. Verification of the feasibility of this propellant venting and resupply approach still requires additional analyses as well as testing to investigate the fluid and thermodynamic phenomena involved.

  19. Microgravity liquid propellant management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement to settle or to position liquid fluid over the outlet end of a spacecraft propellant tank prior to main engine restart, poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. Resettlement or reorientation of liquid propellant can be accomplished by providing optimal acceleration to the spacecraft such that the propellant is reoriented over the tank outlet without any vapor entrainment, any excessive geysering, or any other undersirable fluid motion for the space fluid management under microgravity environment. The most efficient technique is studied for propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage and weight penalties. Both full scale and subscale liquid propellant tank of Space Transfer Vehicle were used to simulate flow profiles for liquid hydrogen reorientation over the tank outlet. In subscale simulation, both constant and impulsive resettling acceleration were used to simulate the liquid flow reorientation. Comparisons between the constant reverse gravity acceleration and impulsive reverse gravity acceleration to be used for activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive reverse gravity thrust is superior to constant reverse gravity thrust.

  20. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  1. Propeller tone bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  2. Automated Propellant Blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl W. (Inventor); Harrington, Douglas W. (Inventor); Dutton, Maureen L. (Inventor); Tipton, Billy Charles, Jr. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Salazar, Frank (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An automated propellant blending apparatus and method that uses closely metered addition of countersolvent to a binder solution with propellant particles dispersed therein to precisely control binder precipitation and particle aggregation is discussed. A profile of binder precipitation versus countersolvent-solvent ratio is established empirically and used in a computer algorithm to establish countersolvent addition parameters near the cloud point for controlling the transition of properties of the binder during agglomeration and finishing of the propellant composition particles. The system is remotely operated by computer for safety, reliability and improved product properties, and also increases product output.

  3. Automated Propellant Blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl W. (Inventor); Harrington, Douglas W. (Inventor); Dutton, Maureen L. (Inventor); Tipton, Billy Charles, Jr. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Salazar, Frank (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An automated propellant blending apparatus and method uses closely metered addition of countersolvent to a binder solution with propellant particles dispersed therein to precisely control binder precipitation and particle aggregation. A profile of binder precipitation versus countersolvent-solvent ratio is established empirically and used in a computer algorithm to establish countersolvent addition parameters near the cloud point for controlling the transition of properties of the binder during agglomeration and finishing of the propellant composition particles. The system is remotely operated by computer for safety, reliability and improved product properties, and also increases product output.

  4. Propellant variability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytula, Thomas P.; Schad, Kristin

    1991-01-01

    Efforts to determine whether rocket propellant density and modulus can be reliably measured using non-destructive ultrasonic techniques are reported. The objective was not achieved, primarily due to the approach taken.

  5. PROPELLANT STORABILITY IN SPACE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    other, thermal interactions between a cryogenic and an earth storable propellant combination will be studied. A final series of tests will be conducted...The design of the test tankage, meteorite shields, and support system was initiated.

  6. Solid Propellant Reclamation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    and Ethanol Amine (EA) NHC Recovery Process Flow Diagram Explosive Booster Process Flow’ Sheet Sol-Gel Extraction from Solid Propellant Chemical...Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, 1973-1975. e Leake, E. E., Recovery of HMX From Scrap PEX -9404 High Explosive. Silas Mason...ntly degraded by reacting ethanol - amlne (EA) with the urethane linkages In the binder MtwOrkt The propellent he studied was a polyurethane

  7. Liquid Propellant Guns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    GROUP SUB- GROUP 19. ABSTRAJ (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Liquid propellants have been the focus of periodic...The ignition system of the BLG , more so than in a solid propellant gun, is key to safe ballistic operation. The coupling (temporal and spatial) of...based monopropellant.’i’ This approach offers advantages for mechanical simplification during loading. Satisfactory performance in a five round group

  8. Experimental research on air propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, William F

    1918-01-01

    The purposes of the experimental investigation on the performance of air propellers described in this report are as follows: (1) the development of a series of design factors and coefficients drawn from model forms distributed with some regularity over the field of air-propeller design and intended to furnish a basis of check with similar work done in other aerodynamic laboratories, and as a point of departure for the further study of special or individual types and forms; (2) the establishment of a series of experimental values derived from models and intended for later use as a basis for comparison with similar results drawn from certain selected full-sized forms and tested in free flight.

  9. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  10. Advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1987-01-01

    Resent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single and counter-rotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA); and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating design used in the proof-of-concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortices are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from three-dimensional Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows, which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of three-dimensional unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at an angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies of the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined. Finally, advanced concepts involving swirl recovery vanes and ultra bypass ducted propellers are discussed.

  11. Propellant Readiness Level: A Methodological Approach to Propellant Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, John A.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2010-01-01

    A methodological approach to defining propellant characterization is presented. The method is based on the well-established Technology Readiness Level nomenclature. This approach establishes the Propellant Readiness Level as a metric for ascertaining the readiness of a propellant or a propellant combination by evaluating the following set of propellant characteristics: thermodynamic data, toxicity, applications, combustion data, heat transfer data, material compatibility, analytical prediction modeling, injector/chamber geometry, pressurization, ignition, combustion stability, system storability, qualification testing, and flight capability. The methodology is meant to be applicable to all propellants or propellant combinations; liquid, solid, and gaseous propellants as well as monopropellants and propellant combinations are equally served. The functionality of the proposed approach is tested through the evaluation and comparison of an example set of hydrocarbon fuels.

  12. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  13. Modelling the wash from a ship's propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, Paul Michael

    The characteristics of the velocity field produced by a ship's propeller were investigated using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software package. A CFD model of the propeller wash was developed using a sliding mesh technique to simulate the rotating blades of the propeller. Experimental measurements using Laser Doppler Anemometry and Pitot tube methods were used to validate the computational approach. Measurements and predictions of the axial and radial velocity fields for two propellers operating over a range of speeds were used in the validation. The results from the CFD simulation are in reasonable agreement. However, improvements to the approach used to model the turbulence in the flow may lead to a more accurate simulation. The validated CFD approach is used to investigate the propeller wash where an experimental study has been difficult or impossible to undertake. The velocity field close to the rotating blades was found to exhibit a pulsing behaviour. The characteristics of the pulsing are related to the speed of rotation and the geometrical characteristics of the rotating propeller. The tangential velocity field was found to be more prominent in the wash than the radial component of velocity. However, the axial component of velocity is the largest contributor to the resultant velocity field in the propeller wash. The formation of the tangential velocity field is related to the geometrical characteristics of the rotating blades. The diffusion characteristics of the tangential velocity field appear to be influenced by the behaviour of the axial velocity field. The maximum tangential velocity decays exponentially. The simulation of a full-size propeller was used to verify the scaling approach adopted for previous experimental investigations. The results indicated that scale effects due to viscosity were negligible, and the use of Froudian scaling for the experimental investigations was justified.

  14. Controlled expedient disposal of excess gun propellant.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M R; Thiboutot, S; Walsh, M E; Ampleman, G

    2012-06-15

    The expedient field disposal of excess gun propellants on the ground is an integral part of live-fire training in many countries. However, burning excess propellant in the field will leave significant quantities of energetic residues and heavy metals in the environment. Compounds such as dinitrotoluene and nitroglycerin and metals such as lead will leach into the soil column, eventually migrating to groundwater. Contamination of the environment will lead to high remediation costs and the possible loss of the training facility. After investigating the contamination at several propellant disposal sites, a portable propellant burn pan was developed and tested. The pan was transported to training sites where excess propellant was loaded and burned in a controlled manner. Up to 120 kg of excess single-base propellant charges have been burned during two series of tests at a consumption rate of greater than 99.9%. Less than 0.03% of the energetic material was recovered outside the burn pan. Recovered lead is largely contained within the pan. The turnover rate for burns is 15 min. The residues can be collected following cool-down for proper disposal.

  15. Designing Small Propellers for Optimum Efficiency and Low Noise Footprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-26

    developed by NREL. This program predicts the noise of individual airfoils. 17 • SolidWorks- the 3D CAD program created by DASSAULT SYSTEMS. BEARCONTROL...creates solid- modeling macros for use in the SolidWorks Application Programming Interface (API ) to automate the creation of the propeller 3D models...changed over the testing period. Initially the propellers were printed as one solid propeller oriented on the printer to minimize printing time (see

  16. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  17. Ignition and combustion of metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turns, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective is the development of a fundamental understanding of the ignition and combustion of aluminum-based slurry (or gel) propellant droplets using a combination of experiment and analysis. Specific objectives are the following: (1) The development and application of a burner/spray rig and single particle optical diagnosis to study the detailed ignition and combustion behavior of small droplets; (2) Understanding the role of surfactants and gellants (or other additives) in promoting or inhibiting secondary atomization of propellant droplets; and (3) The extension of previously developed analytical models and the development of new models to address the phenomena associated with microexplosions (secondary atomization).

  18. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  19. Advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single rotation and counterrotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) flight program; CRP-X1, the initial 5+5 Hamilton Standard counterrotating design; and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating G.E. design used in the proof of concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortexes are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from 3-D Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of 3-D unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined.

  20. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  1. Space Transportation System (STS) propellant scavenging system study. Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The technology effort required for the development of a propellant scavenging system is identified. For a cryogenic propellant system, the development tests identified are for a cryogenic capillary acquisition system for zero-g feedout capability and for definition of existing Space Transformation System (STS) performance capabilities. For a storable propellant system, the development tests identified are for three major components required in the system: a propellant pump, a helium compressor, and a zero leakage fluid disconnect.

  2. Solid rocket propellant waste disposal/ingredient recovery study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of facility and operating costs of alternate methods shows open burning to be the lowest cost incineration method of waste propellant disposal. The selection, development, and implementation of an acceptable alternate is recommended. The recovery of ingredients from waste propellant has the probability of being able to pay its way, and even show a profit, when large consistent quantities of composite propellant are available. Ingredients recovered from space shuttle waste propellant would be worth over $1.5 million. Open and controlled burning are both energy wasteful.

  3. Propeller pitch change mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, P.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes an aircraft propulsion system. It comprises: a first turbine carrying a first set of propeller blades; a second turbine carrying a second set of propeller blades; a gear system carried by the first turbine for changing pitch of the first set of propeller blades, which includes a pair of ring gears, both coaxial with the first turbine; a first set of planet gears which engage both ring gears and which induce pitch change when the planet gears rotate; a sun gear which drives the planet gears; a second set of planet gears which are carried by a planet gear carrier affixed to the second turbine and which drive the sun gear in order to change pitch by causing relative motion between the sung ear and the first turbine; and means for preventing a change in speed of the planet gear carrier from causing a change in pitch.

  4. Self-propelled droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Maass, Corinna C.

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled droplets are a special kind of self-propelled matter that are easily fabricated by standard microfluidic tools and locomote for a certain time without external sources of energy. The typical driving mechanism is a Marangoni flow due to gradients in the interfacial energy on the droplet interface. In this article we review the hydrodynamic prerequisites for self-sustained locomotion and present two examples to realize those conditions for emulsion droplets, i.e. droplets stabilized by a surfactant layer in a surrounding immiscible liquid. One possibility to achieve self-propelled motion relies on chemical reactions affecting the surface active properties of the surfactant molecules. The other relies on micellar solubilization of the droplet phase into the surrounding liquid phase. Remarkable cruising ranges can be achieved in both cases and the relative insensitivity to their own `exhausts' allows to additionally study collective phenomena.

  5. 78 FR 45052 - Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Propeller, Inc. Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... failures of the propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm and resulting engine oil leak. This AD requires replacement of the propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm. We are issuing this AD to prevent propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm rupture, loss of engine oil, damage to the engine, and loss of the...

  6. 78 FR 18255 - Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Propeller, Inc. Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    .... This proposed AD was prompted by failures of the propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm and resulting engine oil leak. This proposed AD would require replacement of the propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm. We are proposing this AD to prevent propeller hydraulic bladder diaphragm rupture, loss of engine...

  7. 78 FR 9005 - Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... Propellers R408/6-123-F/17 model propellers. The existing AD currently requires initial applications of...), and repetitive applications of sealant on all R408/6-123-F/17 model propellers. Since we issued that... procedures found in 14 CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal:...

  8. Advances in LO2 Propellant Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Gopal; Orth, Michael; Stone, William; Perry, Gretchen; Holt, Kimberly; Suter, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic testing and analysis that has recently been completed as part of a multi-year effort to develop a new, more robust and operable LO2 propellant conditioning system. Phase 1 of the program consisted of feasibility demonstrations ot four novel propellant conditioning concepts. A no-bleed, passive propellant conditioning option was shown for the first time to successfully provide desired propellant inlet conditions. The benefits of passive conditioning are reduced operations costs, decreased hardware costs, enhanced operability and increased reliability on future expendable launch vehicles In Phase 2 of the test program, effects of major design parameters were studied and design correlation for future vehicle design were developed. Simultaneously, analytical models were developed and validated. Over 100 tests were conducted with a full-scale feedline using LN2 as the test fluid. A circulation pump provided a range of pressure and flow conditions. The test results showed that the passive propellant conditioning system is insensitive to variations in many of the parameters. The test program provides the validation necessary to incorporate the passive conditioning system into the baseline of future vehicles. Modeling of these systems using computational fluid dynamics seems highly promising.

  9. Notes on propeller design III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1922-01-01

    The air flow and the air force created by all elements of the propeller blades lying in a ring located between two concentric circles around the propeller axis are independent of what happens in other rings.

  10. New test techniques and analytical procedures for understanding the behavior of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Bober, L. J.; Neumann, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical procedures and experimental techniques were developed to improve the capability to design advanced high speed propellers. Some results from the propeller lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are compared with propeller force data, probe data and laser velocimeter data. In general, the code comparisons with data indicate good qualitative agreement. A rotating propeller force balance demonstrated good accuracy and reduced test time by 50 percent. Results from three propeller flow visualization techniques are shown which illustrate some of the physical phenomena occurring on these propellers.

  11. Green Propellant Landing Demonstration at U.S. Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, Henry W.; Miller, Joseph T.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Loading Demonstration (GPLD) was conducted December 2015 at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), leveraging work performed over recent years to bring lower toxicity hydrazine replacement green propellants to flight missions. The objective of this collaboration between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), WFF, the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), and Ecological Advanced Propulsion Systems (ECAPS) was to successfully accept LMP-103S propellant at a U.S. Range, store the propellant, and perform a simulated flight vehicle propellant loading. NASA GSFC Propulsion (Code 597) managed all aspects of the operation, handling logistics, preparing the procedures, and implementing the demonstration. In addition to the partnership described above, Moog Inc. developed an LMP-103S propellant-compatible titanium rolling diaphragm flight development tank and loaned it to GSFC to act as the GPLD flight vessel. The flight development tank offered the GPLD an additional level of flight-like propellant handling process and procedures. Moog Inc. also provided a compatible latching isolation valve for remote propellant expulsion. The GPLD operation, in concert with Moog Inc. executed a flight development tank expulsion efficiency performance test using LMP-103S propellant. As part of the demonstration work, GSFC and WFF documented Range safety analyses and practices including all elements of shipping, storage, handling, operations, decontamination, and disposal. LMP-103S has not been previously handled at a U.S. Launch Range. Requisite for this activity was an LMP-103S Risk Analysis Report and Ground Safety Plan. GSFC and WFF safety offices jointly developed safety documentation for application into the GPLD operation. The GPLD along with the GSFC Propulsion historical hydrazine loading experiences offer direct comparison between handling green propellant versus safety intensive, highly toxic hydrazine propellant. These described motives initiated the GPLD operation

  12. Green Propellant Loading Demonstration at U.S. Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, Henry W.; Miller, Joseph T.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Loading Demonstration (GPLD) was conducted December 2015 at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), leveraging work performed over recent years to bring lower toxicity hydrazine replacement green propellants to flight missions. The objective of this collaboration between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), WFF, the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), and Ecological Advanced Propulsion Systems (ECAPS) was to successfully accept LMP-103S propellant at a U.S. Range, store the propellant, and perform a simulated flight vehicle propellant loading. NASA GSFC Propulsion (Code 597) managed all aspects of the operation, handling logistics, preparing the procedures, and implementing the demonstration. In addition to the partnership described above, Moog Inc. developed an LMP-103S propellant-compatible titanium rolling diaphragm flight development tank and loaned it to GSFC to act as the GPLD flight vessel. The flight development tank offered the GPLD an additional level of flight-like propellant handling process and procedures. Moog Inc. also provided a compatible latching isolation valve for remote propellant expulsion. The GPLD operation, in concert with Moog Inc. executed a flight development tank expulsion efficiency performance test using LMP-103S propellant. As part of the demonstration work, GSFC and WFF documented Range safety analyses and practices including all elements of shipping, storage, handling, operations, decontamination, and disposal. LMP-103S has not been previously handled at a U.S. Launch Range. Requisite for this activity was an LMP-103S Risk Analysis Report and Ground Safety Plan. GSFC and WFF safety offices jointly developed safety documentation for application into the GPLD operation. The GPLD along with the GSFC Propulsion historical hydrazine loading experiences offer direct comparison between handling green propellant versus safety intensive, highly toxic hydrazine propellant. These described motives initiated the GPLD operation

  13. In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Stepping Stone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; Mankins, John C.; Fikes, John C.

    2005-01-01

    An In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot (ISCPD) is an important stepping stone to provide the capability to preposition, store, manufacture, and later use the propellants for Earth-Neighborhood campaigns and beyond. An in-space propellant depot will provide affordable propellants and other similar consumables to support the development of sustainable and affordable exploration strategies as well as commercial space activities. An in-space propellant depot not only requires technology development in key areas such as zero boil-off storage and fluid transfer, but in other areas such as lightweight structures, highly reliable connectors, and autonomous operations. These technologies can be applicable to a broad range of propellant depot concepts or specific to a certain design. In addition, these technologies are required for spacecraft and orbit transfer vehicle propulsion and power systems, and space life support. Generally, applications of this technology require long-term storage, on-orbit fluid transfer and supply, cryogenic propellant production from water, unique instrumentation and autonomous operations. This paper discusses the reasons why such advances are important to future affordable and sustainable operations in space. This paper also discusses briefly R&D objectives comprising a promising approach to the systems planning and evolution into a meaningful stepping stone design, development, and implementation of an In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot. The success of a well-planned and orchestrated approach holds great promise for achieving innovation and revolutionary technology development for supporting future exploration and development of space.

  14. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-01-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  15. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-03-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  16. Low-g propellant gaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, George

    1987-01-01

    A program to develop and demonstrate technology for low gravity propellant gaging on future geostationary satellites is described. Evaluations were performed to select four gaging concepts for ground tests and low gravity tests in the NASA KC-135 aircraft. The selected concepts were: (1) an ultrasonic point sensor system, (2) a nucleonic gaging system, (3) an ultrasonic torsional wave guide, and (4) an ultrasonic flowmeter. As a result of successful ground and KC-135 tests, two concepts (the ultrasonic point sensor and the nucleonic systems) were selected for orbital test in a shuttle Get-Away-Special experiment.

  17. Analysis of propellant feedline dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holster, J. L.; Astleford, W. J.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical model and corresponding computer program for studying disturbances of liquid propellants in typical engine feedline systems were developed. The model includes the effects of steady turbulent mean flow, the influence of distributed compliances, the effects of local compliances, and various factors causing structural-hydraulic coupling. The computer program was set up such that the amplitude and phase of the terminal pressure/input excitation is calculated over any desired frequency range for an arbitrary assembly of various feedline components. A user's manual is included.

  18. Solid Propellant Flame Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Flame, Vol. 44, pp. 27-34, 1982. 49. Stufflebeam , J. H., Shirley, J. A., CARS Diagnostics of High Pressure Combustion- II, Report on Contract DAAG 29...83-C-0001, United Technologies Research Center, Hartford, CT, 1985. 50. Stufflebeam , J. H., Progress of CARS Applications to Solid Propellant

  19. Disposal of Liquid Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-13

    concentrate (formaldehydestrongly catalyzes the formation of nitrosamines from nitrite and secondary amines ). I ° Minimize concentrations of catalytically ...components, as interest in these compounds is relatively new. Therefore, methods for disposing of similar compounds such as triethanol- amine ...appears to have the greatest potential for accomplishing degradation of HAN- based liquid propellant residues in an economical, environmentally safe manner

  20. Propeller tests on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senouque, A

    1922-01-01

    In order to determine the efficiency of a propeller as accurately as possible, its revolution speed, thrust and power absorbed must be measured during flight. Unfortunately, these measurements can only be made with very complicated equipment. To surmount this problem the testers contented themselves with approximate results obtainable in two or three hours of flight.

  1. Heterogeneous propellant internal ballistics: criticism and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, R. L.

    2011-10-01

    Although heterogeneous propellant and its innately nondeterministic, chemically discrete morphology dominates applications, ballisticcharacterization deterministic time-mean burning rate and acoustic admittance measures' absence of explicit, nondeterministic information requires homogeneous propellant with a smooth, uniformly regressing burning surface: inadequate boundary conditions for heterogeneous propellant grained applications. The past age overcame this dichotomy with one-dimensional (1D) models and empirical knowledge from numerous, adequately supported motor developments and supplementary experiments. However, current cost and risk constraints inhibit this approach. Moreover, its fundamental science approach is more sensitive to incomplete boundary condition information (garbage-in still equals garbage-out) and more is expected. This work critiques this situation and sketches a path forward based on enhanced ballistic and motor characterizations in the workplace and approximate model and apparatus developments mentored by CSAR DNS capabilities (or equivalent).

  2. Summary of recent NASA propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelson, D. C.; Mitchell, G. A.; Bober, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced high-speed propellers offer large performance improvements for aircraft that cruise in the Mach 0.7 to 0.8 speed regime. At these speeds, studies indicate that there is a 15 to near 40 percent block fuel savings and associated operating cost benefits for advanced turboprops compared to equivalent technology turbofan powered aircraft. Recent wind tunnel results for five eight to ten blade advanced models are compared with analytical predictions. Test results show that blade sweep was important in achieving net efficiencies near 80 percent at Mach 0.8 and reducing nearfield cruise noise by about 6 dB. Lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are under development and some results are compared with propeller force and probe data. Also, analytical predictions are compared with some initial laser velocimeter measurements of the flow field velocities of an eightbladed 45 swept propeller. Experimental aeroelastic results indicate that cascade effects and blade sweep strongly affect propeller aeroelastic characteristics. Comparisons of propeller near-field noise data with linear acoustic theory indicate that the theory adequately predicts near-field noise for subsonic tip speeds but overpredicts the noise for supersonic tip speeds.

  3. Experimental and analytical study of cryogenic propellant boiloff to develop and verify alternate pressurization concepts for Space Shuttle external tank using a scaled down tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, K. M.; Jones, S.; Meredith, T.

    1993-01-01

    Self pressurization by propellant boiloff is experimentally studied as an alternate pressurization concept for the Space Shuttle external tank (ET). The experimental setup used in the study is an open flow system which is composed of a variable area test tank and a recovery tank. The vacuum jacketed test tank is geometrically similar to the external LOx tank for the Space Shuttle. It is equipped with instrumentation to measure the temperature and pressure histories within the liquid and vapor, and viewports to accommodate visual observations and Laser-Doppler Anemometry measurements of fluid velocities. A set of experiments were conducted using liquid Nitrogen to determine the temperature stratification in the liquid and vapor, and pressure histories of the vapor during sudden and continuous depressurization for various different boundary and initial conditions. The study also includes the development and calibration of a computer model to simulate the experiments. This model is a one-dimensional, multi-node type which assumes the liquid and the vapor to be under non-equilibrium conditions during the depressurization. It has been tested for a limited number of cases. The preliminary results indicate that the accuracy of the simulations is determined by the accuracy of the heat transfer coefficients for the vapor and the liquid at the interface which are taken to be the calibration parameters in the present model.

  4. Sensitivity Characterization of Low Vulnerability (LOVA) Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    1.987 cal K -1 g-mole-1 ) 4 n - gas volume (g-mole g-1 ) P = pressure (MPa) V = chamber volume (cm3 g-1) b - covolume (cm3g - ) 2 The thermochemical...Polyurethanes binders Covolume 21L AINITRAcr (contaum -sa,ermn oftlo fneoeemy md identify by block mnber) Low vulnerability (LOVA) propellants are being developed...with inert binders and plasticizers. Such propellants have higher igntion thresholds and reduced burning rates at low pressures and offer significant

  5. Injection dynamics of gelled propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changjin

    Gel propellants have been recognized as attractive candidates for future propulsion systems due to the reduced tendency to spill and the energy advantages over solid propellants. One of strong benefits emphasized in gel propellant applications is a throttling capability, but the accurate flow control is more complicated and difficult than with conventional Newtonian propellants because of the unique rheological behaviors of gels. This study is a computational effort directed to enhance understanding of the injector internal flow characteristics for gel propellants under rocket injection conditions. In simulations, the emphasized rheology is a shear-thinning which represents a viscosity decrease with increasing a shear rate. It is described by a generalized Newtonian fluid constitutive equation and Carreau-Yasuda model. Using this rheological model, two injection schemes are considered in the present study: axially-fed and cross-fed injection for single-element and multi-element impinging injectors, respectively. An axisymmetric model is developed to describe the axially-fed injector flows and fully three-dimensional model is utilized to simulate cross-fed injector flows. Under axially-fed injection conditions investigated, three distinct modes, an unsteady, steady, and hydraulic flip mode, are observed and mapped in terms of Reynolds number and orifice design. In an unsteady mode, quasi-periodic oscillations occur near the inlet lip leading mass pulsations and viscosity fluctuations at the orifice exit. This dynamic behavior is characterized using a time-averaged discharge coefficient, oscillation magnitude and frequency by a parametric study with respect to an orifice design, Reynolds number and rheology. As a result, orifice exit flows for gel propellants appear to be significantly influenced by a viscous damping and flow resistance due to a shear thinning behavior and these are observed in each factors considered. Under conditions driven by a manifold crossflow

  6. Nitramine Propellant Erosivity - III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    a semi-log plot of wear vs rt,tre or c: M-e for M30 , IP, M.1, and MS propellants where one sees 15 al o falls 1,)1’ 1IP consistently. it is uncertain...Aerospace lnginecring! ATTN: I. Krier l)i rector Urbana II, 61803 Lawrence L, ivermore Laboratory .V ’N : I . Kury Livermore, CA 94551) Aberdeen Proving

  7. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  8. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  9. Mars Propellant Production with Ionic Liquids Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Muscatello, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a single vessel for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and electrolysis for in situ Mars propellant production by eliminating several steps of CO2 processing, two cryocoolers, a high temperature reactor, a recycle pump, and a water condenser; thus greatly reducing mass, volume, and power.

  10. A study of liquid propellant autoignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. H.; Gibbs, A. G.; Lessor, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Data and theory pertinent to the autoignition of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants were reviewed. Physical models of the processes supporting or contributing to autoignition were developed. Emphasis was placed on the description of the physical environment and its relationship to the autoignition phenomenon.

  11. Tumbleweed: Wind-Propelled Measurements for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Behar, A.; Jones, J.; Coleman, M.; Boston, P.; McKay, C. P.; Rothschild, L. J.; Buehler, M. G.; Northup, D.; Choi, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Tumbleweed is a wind-propelled, long-range, autonomous vehicle based on well-developed airbag technology which will survey Mars for variations in habitability using the Mars exploration paradigm, “Follow the Water” or to survey for in-situ resources.

  12. Holographic Investigation of Solid Propellant Particulates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Science and Engineering Ii ABSTRACT This investigation completed the development process to establish a technique to obtain holographic recordings of...13 C. EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE --------------------------------- 20 0. DISCUSSION...conditions (pressure, etc.) to the behavior of the particulates within the propellant port and through the nozzle. Four experimental techniques are being

  13. Development of Forced Pulse Water Strip of HVOF Coatings and Chrome Plating on Aircraft, Landing Gear, Engine and Propeller Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    FRC-East and Southeast: Focus is Engine Inconel 718 substrates HVOF coatings are Cr-C and T-800 Agenda & Project Overview Objective Benefits...Status Boeing Test Booth Design Contact Information Questions Initial Parameter Development has been started for Cr-C and T-800 coated INC 718 flat

  14. On the calculation of ducted propeller performance in axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao de Campos, J. A. C.

    Some of the most important influences on the performance of ducted propellers in uniform and nonuniform axisymmetric flows are demonstrated. The viscous flow past an axisymmetric duct is analyzed for uniform axial flow and for the case when the flow can be regarded as being a part of the ducted propeller. The flow past an annular airfoil and a ducted propeller in axisymmetric shear flow is considered, and approximate numerical solutions of Euler's equation are given using a discrete vortex method. These methods are then applied to the interaction problem of a ducted propeller behind a body of revolution. The design of ducted propellers is discussed, and the results of the basic flow models developed in the paper are verified by correlation with experimental results.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of a Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    An unsteady finite volume procedure has been developed to predict the history of pressure, temperature and mass flow rate of the pressurant and propellant during the expulsion of the propellant from a tank. The time dependent mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are solved at the ullage space. The model accounts for the change in the ullage volume due to expulsion of the propellant. It also accounts for the heat transfer from the tank wall and propellant to the ullage gas. The procedure was incorporated in the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The results of several test cases were then compared with a published correlation of pressurant requirements for a given displacement of propellant. The agreement between the predictions and the correlation was found to be satisfactory.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of a Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady finite volume procedure has been developed to predict the history o pressure, temperature and mass flow rate of the pressurant and propellant during the expulsion of the propellant from a tan. The time dependent mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are solved at the ullage space. The model accounts for the change in the ullage volume due to expulsion of the propellant. It also accounts for the heat transfer from the tank wall and propellant to the ullage gas. The procedure was incorporated in the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The results of several test cases were then compared with a published correlation of pressurant requirements for a given displacement of propellant. The agreement between the predictions and the correlation was found to be satisfactory.

  17. Functional Design and Qualification of Surface Tension Propellant Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figus, C.; Haddad, D.; Ounougha, L.; Autric, J.

    2004-10-01

    During two decades, EADS Astrium has designed and qualified the surface tension device used in the propellant tanks equipping the Eurostar telecommunication satellites platforms. Recent re- orbiting phases of Eurostar E2000 satellites, have allowed to validate those designs and to graveyard the spacecraft with less than 1 kg of propellant left per tank. Moreover, with the emergence of new powerful satellites with full chemical or mixed chemical-plasma propulsion subsystems, EADS Astrium has designed a new larger and improved surface tension propellant tank. Such challenging performances require analyses, and tests in order to assess and confirm the predicted performances. The present article shows the recent development of a new enlarged Eurostar E3000 propellant tanks for Eurostar 3000 satellites and presents the main functional analyses and neutral buoyancy tests results obtained for this new propellant tank These last two years, have contributed to improve this background with the successful graveyard of the first Eurostar spacecraft with less than 1 kg of liquid propellant per tank at the end of the manoeuvre. Moreover, a new enlarged E3000 propellant tank has been designed and qualified in order to cope with the future 12 kW telecom spacecraft applications. This tank designed by EADS-ASTRIUM, is manufactured by EADS-Space transportation. This paper presents the performances and tests results obtained on this new propellant tank.

  18. Study of the supersonic propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabri, Jean; Siestrunck, Raymond

    1953-01-01

    In this paper a propeller having all sections operating at supersonic speeds is designated a supersonic propeller regardless of flight speed. Analyses assume subsonic flight speeds but very high rotational speeds. A very elementary analysis of the efficiency of a jet-propeller system is presented. A propeller analysis based on conventional vortex blade element theory is presented and reduced to a single point method which leads to an expression for optimum advance ratio in terms of hub-tip diameter ratio and airfoil fineness ratio. An expression for propeller efficiency in terms of advance ratio, hub-tip diameter ratio, and airfoil thickness ratio is also presented. Use is made of theoretical airfoil characteristics at supersonic speeds. A study of blade section interference, blade shock and expansion fields, at supersonic section speeds is presented. An example taken indicates that an efficiency of seventy percent can be obtained with a propeller having a tip Mach number of 2.3.

  19. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  20. Propellant Management and Conditioning within the X-34 Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. M.; McDonald, J. P.; Hedayat, A.; Knight, K. C.; Champion, R. H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34 hypersonic flight vehicle is currently under development by Orbital Sciences Corporation (Orbital). The Main Propulsion ystem as been designed around the liquid propellant Fastrac rocket engine currently under development at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper presents analyses of the MPS subsystems used to manage the liquid propellants. These subsystems include the propellant tanks, the tank vent/relief subsystem, and the dump/fill/drain subsystem. Analyses include LOX tank chill and fill time estimates, LOX boil-off estimates, propellant conditioning simulations, and transient propellant dump simulations.

  1. A numerical method for the design and analysis of counter-rotating propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Playle, S. C.; Korkan, K. D.; Von Lavante, E.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed using the techniques of Lock and Theodorsen as described by Davidson to design and analyze counter-rotating propellers. The design method develops the optimum propeller geometry by calculating the planform and twist distribution for each propeller disk through the use of specific inputs of engine shaft horsepower, diameter, and disk spacing. The analysis method calculates the performance of a given counter-rotating propeller system at any flight condition. Using the NACA four-digit airfoil family, the performance of a counter-rotating propeller design for a given flight condition was investigated in the design and analysis mode.

  2. Modeling of pulsed propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patag, A. E.; Hochstein, J. I.; Chato, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Optimization of the propellant reorientation process can provide increased payload capability and extend the service life of spacecraft. The use of pulsed propellant reorientation to optimize the reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code was validated for modeling the reorientation process and is used to study pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions for reorientation performance.

  3. 75 FR 51656 - Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers R408/6-123-F/17 Model Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers R408/6-123-F/17 Model Propellers AGENCY... Propellers R408/6-123-F/17 model propellers. These propellers are installed on, but not limited to... actions. (1) For R408/6-123-F/17 model propellers with a hub, actuator, and backplate assembly...

  4. Propeller Analysis from Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, George W; Crigler, John L

    1941-01-01

    The operation of the propeller is analyzed by the use of the distribution of forces along the radius, combined with theoretical equations. The data were obtained in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel on a 4-foot-diameter, two-blade propeller, operating in front of four body shapes, ranging from a small shaft to support the propeller to conventional NACA cowling. A method of estimating the axial and the rotational energy in the wake as a fractional part of the propeller power is given. A knowledge of the total thrust and torque is necessary for the estimation.

  5. Low noise propeller design using numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpert, Bryce

    The purpose of this study is to explore methods for reducing aircraft propeller noise with minimal losses in performance. Using numerical analysis, a standard two blade propeller configuration was taken from experiments conducted by Patrick, Finn, and Stich, and implemented into the numerical code XROTOR. The blade design modifications that were investigated to achieve the proposed goals include: increasing the number of blades, adjusting the chord length, beta distribution, radius of the blade, airfoil shape, and operating RPM. In order to determine the optimal blade design, a baseline case is first developed and the parameters listed earlier are then varied to create a new propeller design that reduces the sound pressure level (SPL) while maintaining performance levels within a predetermined range of the original specifications. From the analysis, the most significant improvements observed in lowering the acoustic signature are dominated by operating rpm and blade radius. A three-, four-, and five-blade configuration was developed that reduced the SPL generated by the propeller during cruise flight conditions. The optimum configuration that produced the greatest SPL reduction was the five-blade configuration. The resulting sound pressure level was reduced from the original 77 dB at 1000' ft above ground level (AGL), to 54 dB at 1000' AGL while remaining within 1.4% of the original thrust and efficiency.

  6. Circulation control propellers for general aviation, including a BASIC computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.; Braslow, A. L.; Butterfield, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of replacing variable pitch propeller mechanisms with circulation control (Coanada effect) propellers on general aviation airplanes was examined. The study used a specially developed computer program written in BASIC which could compare the aerodynamic performance of circulation control propellers with conventional propellers. The comparison of aerodynamic performance for circulation control, fixed pitch and variable pitch propellers is based upon the requirements for a 1600 kg (3600 lb) single engine general aviation aircraft. A circulation control propeller using a supercritical airfoil was shown feasible over a representative range of design conditions. At a design condition for high speed cruise, all three types of propellers showed approximately the same performance. At low speed, the performance of the circulation control propeller exceeded the performance for a fixed pitch propeller, but did not match the performance available from a variable pitch propeller. It appears feasible to consider circulation control propellers for single engine aircraft or multiengine aircraft which have their propellers on a common axis (tractor pusher). The economics of the replacement requires a study for each specific airplane application.

  7. An Overview of Combustion Mechanisms and Flame Structures for Advanced Solid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckstead, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) and cyclotretamethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are two solid ingredients often used in modern solid propellants. Although these two ingredients have very similar burning rates as monopropellants, they lead to significantly different characteristics when combined with binders to form propellants. Part of the purpose of this paper is to relate the observed combustion characteristics to the postulated flame structures and mechanisms for AP and HMX propellants that apparently lead to these similarities and differences. For AP composite, the primary diffusion flame is more energetic than the monopropellant flame, leading to an increase in burning rate over the monopropellant rate. In contrast the HMX primary diffusion flame is less energetic than the HMX monopropellant flame and ultimately leads to a propellant rate significantly less than the monopropellant rate in composite propellants. During the past decade the search for more energetic propellants and more environmentally acceptable propellants is leading to the development of propellants based on ingredients other than AP and HMX. The objective of this paper is to utilize the more familiar combustion characteristics of AP and HMX containing propellants to project the combustion characteristics of propellants made up of more advanced ingredients. The principal conclusion reached is that most advanced ingredients appear to burn by combustion mechanisms similar to HMX containing propellants rather than AP propellants.

  8. Velocity field measurements in the wake of a propeller model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, R.; Kumar, A. Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Turboprop configurations are being revisited for the modern-day regional transport aircrafts for their fuel efficiency. The use of laminar flow wings is an effort in this direction. One way to further improve their efficiency is by optimizing the flow over the wing in the propeller wake. Previous studies have focused on improving the gross aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. It is known that the propeller slipstream causes early transition of the boundary layer on the wing. However, an optimized design of the propeller and wing combination could delay this transition and decrease the skin friction drag. Such a wing design would require the detailed knowledge of the development of the slipstream in isolated conditions. There are very few studies in the literature addressing the requirements of transport aircraft having six-bladed propeller and cruising at a high propeller advance ratio. Low-speed wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on a powered propeller model in isolated conditions, measuring the velocity field in the vertical plane behind the propeller using two-component hot-wire anemometry. The data obtained clearly resolved the mean velocity, the turbulence, the ensemble phase averages and the structure and development of the tip vortex. The turbulence in the slipstream showed that transition could be close to the leading edge of the wing, making it a fine case for optimization. The development of the wake with distance shows some interesting flow features, and the data are valuable for flow computation and optimization.

  9. Propeller blade retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Simon, III, Victor H. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Butler, Lawrence (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention concerns the mounting of propeller blades to a ring-shaped rotor. The blades are of the variable pitch type, and the shank of each blade extends through a respective hole in the rotor. Each hole contains an annular shelf which is fastened to the wall of the hole and surrounds each shank. Each shank bears a pair of bearing races which sandwich the annular shelf in order to connect the blade to the rotor. Bearing rollers are positioned between the annular shelf and the bearing races.

  10. Saturn's ring "propellers": gravitational or granular?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Lawney, B. P.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2010-05-01

    Propeller-shaped brightness features observed in Saturn's A ring are density disturbances, usually thought to be induced by gravity. Embedded masses larger than tens of meters disturb the smooth Keplerian shear of typical small ring particles (cm to m in radius) sufficiently to be visible in Cassini images. Instead we investigate whether propeller formation could be solely a collisional phenomenon involving the collisional energy dissipation, moon-to-particle size ratio, and the initial areal fractional coverage. Our two-dimensional, event-driven molecular dynamics simulation, which is carried out within Hill's equations and ignores gravity between the moon and the particles, develops "propeller-like” structures. We argue that the relatively low agitation and density of ring material is responsible for a low sound speed, resulting in predominantly supersonic flow of ring particles relative to the moon. In this framework, "propellers” are viewed as the locus of a granular shock, analogous to shocks in compressible gases, across which the ring material experiences significant changes in density, velocity, pressure, and the analog of temperature. We model these changes analytically and through numerical simulations to determine the propeller's size. We anticipate that inferences about the embedded objects will change with this different model.

  11. Minuteman 3: Stage 3 propellant fire characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J C

    1994-06-20

    We have completed an experimental program to diagnose and characterize the thermal environment of a solid rocket propellant fire burning in ambient atmospheric conditions. This work has been conducted as part of the Defense Nuclear Agency`s probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of the Minuteman III (MMIII) weapon system. The goals of this study are two-fold; (1) to provide a description of a propellant fire in sufficient detail so as to allow system response models to predict the outcome of various hypothetical accident, scenarios and, (2) to identify diagnostics that could be used in a large-scale test fire of MMIII stage 3 motor. The study has been performed burning SRAM II and MMIII stage 3 propellant (ANB-3066), in chimneys ranging in size from 18 cm to 53 cm (twenty-one inches) in diameter. Several methods have been used to determine and confirm temperature measurements including thermometry, radiometry, and ultrasonic thermal sensing. Temperature profiles with peaks in excess of 2300{degree} C have been measured. Temperature measurements have been used in conjunction with inverse modeling to determine heat flux characteristics. The regression rate for ANB-3066 (under ambient conditions) has also been determined. Finally, at a very cursory level, we have studied the characteristics of aluminum oxide deposits as well as some materials responses to these fires. We have also addressed the initial efforts on development of diagnostics, problems encountered in controlling the burning of propellants, in taking radiometric measurements, and the survivability of materials in the fire.

  12. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  13. Propeller aircraft interior noise model: User's manual for computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, E. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program entitled PAIN (Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise) has been developed to permit calculation of the sound levels in the cabin of a propeller-driven airplane. The fuselage is modeled as a cylinder with a structurally integral floor, the cabin sidewall and floor being stiffened by ring frames, stringers and floor beams of arbitrary configurations. The cabin interior is covered with acoustic treatment and trim. The propeller noise consists of a series of tones at harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Input data required by the program include the mechanical and acoustical properties of the fuselage structure and sidewall trim. Also, the precise propeller noise signature must be defined on a grid that lies in the fuselage skin. The propeller data are generated with a propeller noise prediction program such as the NASA Langley ANOPP program. The program PAIN permits the calculation of the space-average interior sound levels for the first ten harmonics of a propeller rotating alongside the fuselage. User instructions for PAIN are given in the report. Development of the analytical model is presented in NASA CR 3813.

  14. Space Transportation Infrastructure Supported By Propellant Depots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    A space transportation infrastructure is described that utilizes propellant depot servicing platforms to support all foreseeable missions in the Earth-Moon vicinity and deep space out to Mars. The infrastructure utilizes current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) systems such as the Delta IV Heavy, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, for all crew, cargo, and propellant launches to orbit. Propellant launches are made to Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Depot and an Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 (L1) Depot to support a new reusable in-space transportation vehicles. The LEO Depot supports missions to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) for satellite servicing and to L1 for L1 Depot missions. The L1 Depot supports Lunar, Earth-Sun L2 (ESL2), Asteroid and Mars Missions. New vehicle design concepts are presented that can be launched on current 5 meter diameter ELV systems. These new reusable vehicle concepts include a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for crew transportation between the LEO Depot, L1 Depot and missions beyond L1; a new reusable lunar lander for crew transportation between the L1 Depot and the lunar surface; and Mars orbital Depot are based on International Space Station (ISS) heritage hardware. Data provided includes the number of launches required for each mission utilizing current ELV systems (Delta IV Heavy or equivalent) and the approximate vehicle masses and propellant requirements. Also included is a discussion on affordability with ideas on technologies that could reduce the number of launches required and thoughts on how this infrastructure include competitive bidding for ELV flights and propellant services, developments of new reusable in-space vehicles and development of a multiuse infrastructure that can support many government and commercial missions simultaneously.

  15. Propellant Chemistry for CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, Gary C.

    1996-01-01

    Current concepts for reusable launch vehicle design have created renewed interest in the use of RP-1 fuels for high pressure and tri-propellant propulsion systems. Such designs require the use of an analytical technology that accurately accounts for the effects of real fluid properties, combustion of large hydrocarbon fuel modules, and the possibility of soot formation. These effects are inadequately treated in current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes used for propulsion system analyses. The objective of this investigation is to provide an accurate analytical description of hydrocarbon combustion thermodynamics and kinetics that is sufficiently computationally efficient to be a practical design tool when used with CFD codes such as the FDNS code. A rigorous description of real fluid properties for RP-1 and its combustion products will be derived from the literature and from experiments conducted in this investigation. Upon the establishment of such a description, the fluid description will be simplified by using the minimum of empiricism necessary to maintain accurate combustion analyses and including such empirical models into an appropriate CFD code. An additional benefit of this approach is that the real fluid properties analysis simplifies the introduction of the effects of droplet sprays into the combustion model. Typical species compositions of RP-1 have been identified, surrogate fuels have been established for analyses, and combustion and sooting reaction kinetics models have been developed. Methods for predicting the necessary real fluid properties have been developed and essential experiments have been designed. Verification studies are in progress, and preliminary results from these studies will be presented. The approach has been determined to be feasible, and upon its completion the required methodology for accurate performance and heat transfer CFD analyses for high pressure, tri-propellant propulsion systems will be available.

  16. Aircraft propeller induced structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-based test apparatus employing components typical of aircraft construction was developed that would allow the study of structure-borne noise transmission due to propeller induced wake/vortex excitation of in-wake structural appendages. The test apparatus was employed to evaluate several aircraft installation effects (power plant placement, engine/nacelle mass loading, and wing/fuselage attachment methods) and several structural response modifications for structure-borne noise control (the use of wing blocking mass/fuel, wing damping treaments, and tuned mechanical dampers). Most important was the development of in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection techniques using a combination of ground-based frequency response function testing and in-flight structural response measurement. Propeller wake/vortex excitation simulation techniques for improved ground-based testing were also developed to support the in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection development.

  17. Atomic hydrogen propellants: Historical perspectives and future possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, a very high density free-radical propellant, is anticipated to generate a specific impulse of 600-1500 lb-f sec/lb-mass performance; this may facilitate the development of unique launch vehicles. A development status evaluation is presently given for atomic hydrogen investigations. It is noted that breakthroughs are required in the production, storage, and transfer of atomic hydrogen, before this fuel can become a viable rocket propellant.

  18. Characterizing high-energy-density propellants for space propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokan, Timothy

    There exists wide ranging research interest in high-energy-density matter (HEDM) propellants as a potential replacement for existing industry standard fuels for liquid rocket engines. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army Research Lab, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and the NASA Glenn Research Center each either recently concluded or currently has ongoing programs in the synthesis and development of these potential new propellants. In order to perform conceptual designs using these new propellants, most conceptual rocket engine powerhead design tools (e.g. NPSS, ROCETS, and REDTOP-2) require several thermophysical properties of a given propellant over a wide range of temperature and pressure. These properties include enthalpy, entropy, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. Very little thermophysical property data exists for most of these potential new HEDM propellants. Experimental testing of these properties is both expensive and time consuming and is impractical in a conceptual vehicle design environment. A new technique for determining these thermophysical properties of potential new rocket engine propellants is presented. The technique uses a combination of three different computational methods to determine these properties. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics are used to model new propellants at a molecular level in order to calculate density, enthalpy, and entropy. Additivity methods are used to calculate the kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of new propellants. This new technique is validated via a series of verification experiments of HEDM compounds. Results are provided for two HEDM propellants: quadricyclane and 2-azido-N,N-dimethylethanamine (DMAZ). In each case, the new technique does a better job than the best current computational methods at accurately matching the experimental data of the HEDM compounds of interest. A case study is provided to help quantify the vehicle level impacts of using HEDM

  19. Numerical Study of the Hull-Propeller-Rudder Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, Adrian; Pacuraru, Florin

    2009-09-01

    The paper describes the solution of a RANS solver coupled with a body force method as an attempt in investigating the flow features around a maneuvering containership equipped with a rotating propeller and rudder. A special focus is made on the propeller non-symmetrical inflow field, aimed at obtaining the necessary data for the propulsive performances evaluation as well as for the propeller final design. The reported work allows not only the performance evaluation for the overall performances of a hull, but also leads to the development, implementation and validation of new concepts in modeling the turbulent vortical flows, with direct connection to the ship propulsion problem.

  20. Characterisation of the dielectric properties of the propellants MON & MMH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    Future (commercial) satellites will require accurate propellant gauging systems, in order to meet the end-of-life reorbiting requirement and the need for replacement planning. A capacitive Gauging Sensor Unit is currently being developed for the Meteosat Second Generation spacecraft. Its measurement principle is based on the difference of the dielectric properties of the propellant liquid and vapour. To optimise the sensor accuracy, the dielectric properties of propellants need to be accurately known as a function of the temperature (and pressure). Therefore the dielectric properties of MON (Mixed Oxides of Nitrides) and MMH (Mono Methyl Hydrazine) were to be measured. The test setup and the test results are described in detail.

  1. Air propellers and their environmental problems on ACV's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soley, D. H.

    The development of ACV blade protection against erosion, both on the propeller blade faces and leading edge, is considered. Polyurethane spray coating is now the standard protection applied to all Dowty Rotol propellers, with thicknesses from 0.015-0.020 on aircraft, and up to 0.080 on the ACV. The bolt-on guard reduced leading edge replacement time by 50 percent, and makes possible replacement in all weather conditions. Typical damage and repairs to ACV blades are discussed, and the propeller installation on the LCAC craft being built for the U.S. Navy is addressed.

  2. In-space propellant logistics. Volume 4: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The prephase A conceptual project planning data as it pertains to the development of the selected logistics module configuration transported into earth orbit by the space shuttle orbiter. The data represents the test, implementation, and supporting research and technology requirements for attaining the propellant transfer operational capability for early 1985. The plan is based on a propellant module designed to support the space-based tug with cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen propellants. A logical sequence of activities that is required to define, design, develop, fabricate, test, launch, and flight test the propellant logistics module is described. Included are the facility and ground support equipment requirements. The schedule of activities are based on the evolution and relationship between the R and T, the development issues, and the resultant test program.

  3. A review of research in low earth orbit propellant collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lake A.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2015-05-01

    This comprehensive review examines the efforts of previous researchers to develop concepts for propellant-collecting spacecraft, estimate the performance of these systems, and understand the physics involved. Rocket propulsion requires the spacecraft to expend two fundamental quantities: energy and propellant mass. A growing number of spacecraft collect the energy they need to execute propulsive maneuvers in-situ with solar panels. In contrast, every spacecraft using rocket propulsion has carried all of the propellant mass needed for the mission from the ground, which limits the range and mission capabilities. Numerous researchers have explored the concept of collecting propellant mass while in space. These concepts have varied in scale and complexity from chemical ramjets to fusion-driven interstellar vessels. Research into propellant-collecting concepts occurred in distinct eras. During the Cold War, concepts tended to be large, complex, and nuclear powered. After the Cold War, concepts transitioned to solar power sources and more effort has been devoted to detailed analysis of specific components of the propellant-collecting architecture. By detailing the major contributions and limitations of previous work, this review concisely presents the state-of-the-art and outlines five areas for continued research. These areas include air-compatible cathode technology, techniques to improve propellant utilization on atmospheric species, in-space compressor and liquefaction technology, improved hypersonic and hyperthermal free molecular flow inlet designs, and improved understanding of how design parameters affect system performance.

  4. Analytical determination of propeller performance degradation due to ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which is capable of computing propeller performance for clean, glaze, or rime iced propeller configurations, thereby providing a mechanism for determining the degree of performance degradation which results from a given icing encounter. The inviscid, incompressible flow field at each specified propeller radial location is first computed using the Theodorsen transformation method of conformal mapping. A droplet trajectory computation then calculates droplet impingement points and airfoil collection efficiency for each radial location, at which point several user-selectable empirical correlations are available for determining the aerodynamic penalities which arise due to the ice accretion. Propeller performance is finally computed using strip analysis for either the clean or iced propeller. In the iced mode, the differential thrust and torque coefficient equations are modified by the drag and lift coefficient increments due to ice to obtain the appropriate iced values. Comparison with available experimental propeller icing data shows good agreement in several cases. The code's capability to properly predict iced thrust coefficient, power coefficient, and propeller efficiency is shown to be dependent on the choice of empirical correlation employed as well as proper specification of radial icing extent.

  5. Study of the pitting effects during the pre-ignition plasma-propellant interaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Yuhua; Li, Xingwen; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli; Zhao, Weiyu; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-02-01

    The propellant ignition mechanism has become a central issue in the electrothermal chemical (ETC) launch technology, and the pre-ignition plasma-propellant interactions are critical in determining the ignition characteristics. In this work, both an open-air ablation test and an interrupted burning test are conducted for three different propellants. A fused silica window, which is transparent in all relevant wavelengths, is utilized to investigate the role of the plasma radiation. Surface pitting of the propellants after interaction with the plasma is analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of pits on the plasma ignition is then studied and a possible formation mechanism of pits is proposed. The input heat flux and the surface temperature of the propellants are obtained by solving a pre-ignition plasma-propellant interaction model. The results shed light on the pre-ignition plasma ignition mechanisms and will assist in the development of propellants for an ETC launcher.

  6. New delivery systems and propellants.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, M

    1999-01-01

    The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countries of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth) of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada - Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jacob; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    We will discuss our ongoing work towards developing the capability to predict far field sound from the large-eddy simulation of propellers. A porous surface Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy, with a dynamic endcapping method (Nitzkorski and Mahesh, 2014) is developed for unstructured grids in a rotating frame of reference. The FW-H surface is generated automatically using Delaunay triangulation and is representative of the underlying volume mesh. The approach is validated for tonal trailing edge sound from a NACA 0012 airfoil. LES of flow around a propeller at design advance ratio is compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Results for the emitted far field sound will be discussed. This work is supported by ONR.

  8. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    Bele,:1t )"(vaiaable Copy AD AD-E4OI 102 TECMNICA._ REPORT ;RLCD-TR-83047 CARS SPECTROSCOPY Of PROPELLANT FLAMES L. E. HARRIS DTIC ii IELECTE0 "" NOV...4. TITLE (mid Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED CARS SPECTROSCOPY OF PROPELLANT FLAMES Final Ś. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a...ea•abo. Broadband CARS CARS spectra Spectroscopy Propellant *0AUINIACT (0w o roemtae 401 N uueedswr Mu $000tit? b7 61"k Auhee) Obtaining useful

  9. Space storable propellant acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Uney, P. E.; Anderson, J. E.; Fester, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Surface tension propellant acquisition concepts for an advanced spacecraft propulsion system having a 10-year mission capability were investigated. Surface tension systems were specified because they were shown to be the best propellant acquisition technique for various interplanetery spacecraft in a prior study. A variety of surface tension concepts for accomplishing propellant acquisition were formulated for the baseline space storable propulsion module and Jupiter Orbiter mission. Analyses and evaluations were then conducted on each candidate concept to assess fabricability, performance capability, and spacecraft compatibility. A comparative evaluation of the results showed the Fruhof-class of low-g surface tension systems to be preferred for these interplanetary applications.

  10. Casting propellant in rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, J. E.; Froehling, S. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for casting a solid propellant in the casing of a rocket engine having a continuous wall with a single opening which is formed by leaves of a material which melt at a temperature of the propellant and with curved edges concentric to the curvature of the spherical casing. The leaves are inserted into the spherical casing through the opening forming a core having a greater width than the width of the single opening and with curved peripheral edges. The cast propellant forms a solid mass and then heated to melt the leaves and provide a central opening with radial projecting flutes.

  11. Influence of fuselage on propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, Theodor

    1928-01-01

    In the present paper I shall not consider the problem of the best arrangement of airplane and propeller, but only a simple method for designing a propeller for a given arrangement of airplane parts. The inflow to the propeller and hence the efficiency of the propeller is affected most by the fuselage.

  12. Computational Modeling of Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    sufficient performance to support cryogenic propellant management tasks. In late 1992, NASA MSFC began a new investigation in this technology commencing with the design of the Magnetically-Actuated Propellant Orientation (MAPO) experiment. A mixture of ferrofluid and water is used to simulate the paramagnetic properties of LOX and the experiment is being flown on the KC-135 aircraft to provide a reduced gravity environment. The influence of a 0.4 Tesla ring magnet on flow into and out of a subscale Plexiglas tank is being recorded on video tape. The most efficient approach to evaluating the feasibility of MAPO is to compliment the experimental program with development of a computational tool to model the process of interest. The goal of the present research is to develop such a tool. Once confidence in its fidelity is established by comparison to data from the MAPO experiment, it can be used to assist in the design of future experiments and to study the parameter space of the process. Ultimately, it is hoped that the computational model can serve as a design tool for full-scale spacecraft applications.

  13. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  14. Investigation of propellant flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebman, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mechanical, electromechanical, and fluidic concepts were studied as propellant flow control system for oxygen/hydrogen attitude control thrusters. A mechanical flow controller was designed, fabricated, and tested with hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen over a range of inlet pressures and temperatures. Results of these tests are presented along with a discussion of a flight-weight design. Also presented are recommendations for further design and development. A detailed coverage of the fluidics investigation is included.

  15. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  16. Self-Propelled Hovercraft Based on Cold Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meng; Ji, Xing; Feng, Shangsheng; Yang, Qingzhen; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The Leidenfrost phenomenon of liquid droplets levitating and dancing when placed upon a hot plate due to propulsion of evaporative vapor has been extended to many self-propelled circumstances. However, such self-propelled Leidenfrost devices commonly need a high temperature for evaporation and a structured solid substrate for directional movements. Here we observed a “cold Leidenfrost phenomenon” when placing a dry ice device on the surface of room temperature water, based on which we developed a controllable self-propelled dry ice hovercraft. Due to the sublimated vapor, the hovercraft could float on water and move in a programmable manner through designed structures. As demonstrations, we showed that the hovercraft could be used as a cargo ship or a petroleum contamination collector without consuming external power. This phenomenon enables a novel way to utilize programmable self-propelled devices on top of room temperature water, holding great potential for applications in energy, chemical engineering and biology. PMID:27338595

  17. Simulation of hot fragment conductive ignition processes of solid propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, K.K.; Hsieh, W.H.; Hsieh, K.C.; Miller, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed for characterizing the degree of vulnerability of various solid propellants. The model simulates the hot fragment conductive ignition (HFCI) experiments, employing hot inert particles in direct contact with solid propellant samples. The effect of binder chemistry on the ignition process is considered by including the temperature-dependent endothermic decomposition reaction of the binder. The mathematical model consists of governing equations for the hot particles, the propellant, and the foam layer formed by the liquefaction, pyrolysis, and decomposition of the propellant. To validate the theoretical model in the absence of the necessary chemical kinetic data, an ice melting and evaporation experiment was designed and conducted. These experiments simulate the conductive heating, melting, and evaporating processes of the HFCI experiments except the chemical reactions. Calculated results compare well with experimental data in temperature-time traces, spall particle sinking velocity, and displacement.

  18. Self-Propelled Hovercraft Based on Cold Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meng; Ji, Xing; Feng, Shangsheng; Yang, Qingzhen; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    The Leidenfrost phenomenon of liquid droplets levitating and dancing when placed upon a hot plate due to propulsion of evaporative vapor has been extended to many self-propelled circumstances. However, such self-propelled Leidenfrost devices commonly need a high temperature for evaporation and a structured solid substrate for directional movements. Here we observed a “cold Leidenfrost phenomenon” when placing a dry ice device on the surface of room temperature water, based on which we developed a controllable self-propelled dry ice hovercraft. Due to the sublimated vapor, the hovercraft could float on water and move in a programmable manner through designed structures. As demonstrations, we showed that the hovercraft could be used as a cargo ship or a petroleum contamination collector without consuming external power. This phenomenon enables a novel way to utilize programmable self-propelled devices on top of room temperature water, holding great potential for applications in energy, chemical engineering and biology.

  19. The Minimum Energy Loss Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poliakhov, N.

    1945-01-01

    Various cases are presented of the solution of the problem ot the most efficient propeller, more general cases being considered than the one by Betz in 1919: namely, that of a propeller under a limiting light load, The problem is solved directly and also with the aid of the Ritz method which became readily applicable after the author proposed a method for the solution of the propeller problem, in general, with the aid of trigonometric series. The design of a propeller with the aid of this method is given and an analysis is made of the effect of the fuselage and of the viscosity coefficient mu on the character of the solution of the variational problem.

  20. Ion-thruster propellant utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    The evaluation and understanding of maximum propellant utilization, with mercury used as the propellant are presented. The primary-electron region in the ion chamber of a bombardment thruster is analyzed at maximum utilization. The results of this analysis, as well as experimental data from a range of ion-chamber configurations, show a nearly constant loss rate for unionized propellant at maximum utilization over a wide range of total propellant flow rate. The discharge loss level of 1000 eV/ion was used as a definition of maximum utilization, but the exact level of this definition has no effect on the qualitative results and little effect on the quantitative results. There are obvious design applications for the results of this investigation, but the results are particularly significant whenever efficient throttled operation is required.

  1. Computational prediction of propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs from a presentation on computational prediction of propellant reorientation are given. Information is given on code verification, test conditions, predictions for a one-quarter scale cryogenic tank, pulsed settling, and preliminary results.

  2. Propeller speed and phase sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collopy, Paul D. (Inventor); Bennett, George W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A speed and phase sensor counterrotates aircraft propellers. A toothed wheel is attached to each propeller, and the teeth trigger a sensor as they pass, producing a sequence of signals. From the sequence of signals, rotational speed of each propeller is computer based on time intervals between successive signals. The speed can be computed several times during one revolution, thus giving speed information which is highly up-to-date. Given that spacing between teeth may not be uniform, the signals produced may be nonuniform in time. Error coefficients are derived to correct for nonuniformities in the resulting signals, thus allowing accurate speed to be computed despite the spacing nonuniformities. Phase can be viewed as the relative rotational position of one propeller with respect to the other, but measured at a fixed time. Phase is computed from the signals.

  3. Rocket Propellants Engine Design/Operations/Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    2002-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Astronautics Operations (LMA) was competitively awarded a contract May 21, 2001 for next generation launch system architecture definition and technology maturation. The Second Generation Launch Vehicle Program objectives include reducing the technical and programmatic risk of proceeding to full scale development of the system by establishing requirements for the next generation launch system and maturing critical technologies needed by the system. LMA will conduct analyses and trades to optimize the architecture ETO elements including configuration, conceptual designs, and preliminary operations definition. To fully understand the engine and propellant trades were conducted by LMA to yield the optimized architecture system from the operability, reliability, safety, and cost perspectives. A government/industry team addressed the required trade studies, the parameters and weighting factors, and the most critical trades were addressed. This report summarizes the participation of JCM Consulting, Inc. in the propellant trade study.

  4. Ignition of a granular propellant bed

    SciTech Connect

    Wildegger-Gaissmaier, A.E.; Johnston, I.R.

    1996-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study is reported on the ignition process of a low vulnerability ammunition (LOVA) propellant bed in a 127-mm (5-in) bore gun charge. The theoretical investigation was with a two-phase flow interior ballistics code and the model predictions showed the marked influence the igniter system can have on pressure wave development, flame spreading, and the overall interior ballistics performance. A number of different igniter systems were investigated in an empty and propellant-filled gun simulator. Pressure, flame spreading, and high-speed film records were used to analyze the ignition/combustion event. The model predictions for flame spreading were confirmed qualitatively by the experimental data. Full-scale instrumented gun firings were conducted with the optimized igniter design. Pressure waves were not detected in the charge during the firings. Model predictions on overall interior ballistics performance agreed well with the firing data.

  5. Electromagnetic Pumps for Conductive-Propellant Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Polzin, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a recent, renewed interest in high-power electric thrusters for application in nuclear-electric propulsion systems. Two of the most promising thrusters utilize liquid metal propellants: the lithium-fed magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and the bismuth-fed Hall thruster. An important element of part of the maturation of these thrusters will be the development of compact, reliable conductive-propellant feed system components. In the present paper we provide design considerations and experimental calibration data for electromagnetic (EM) pumps. The role of an electromagnetic pump in a liquid metal feed system is to establish a pressure gradient between the propellant reservoir and the thruster - to establish the requisite mass flow rate. While EM pumps have previously been used to a limited extent in nuclear reactor cooling loops, they have never been implemented in electric propulsion (EP) systems. The potential benefit of using EM pumps for EP are reliability (no moving parts) and the ability to precisely meter the propellant flow rate. We have constructed and tested EM pumps that use gallium, lithium, and bismuth propellants. Design details, test results (pressure developed versus current), and material compatibility issues are reported. It is concluded that EM pumps are a viable technology for application in both laboratory and flight EP conductive-propellant feed systems.

  6. Prediction of span loading of straight-wing/propeller combinations up to stall. [propeller slipstreams and wing loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.; Gray, L.; Kisielowski, E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the spanwise lift distribution on straight-wing/propeller combinations. The method combines a modified form of the Prandtl wing theory with a realistic representation of the propeller slipstream distribution. The slipstream analysis permits calculations of the nonuniform axial and rotational slipstream velocity field of propeller/nacelle combinations. This nonuniform field was then used to calculate the wing lift distribution by means of the modified Prandtl wing theory. The theory was developed for any number of nonoverlapping propellers, on a wing with partial or full-span flaps, and is applicable throughout an aspect ratio range from 2.0 and higher. A computer program was used to calculate slipstream characteristics and wing span load distributions for a number of configurations for which experimental data are available, and favorable comparisons are demonstrated between the theoretical predictions and the existing data.

  7. 75 FR 67613 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Five-Blade Propeller Assemblies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... could cause failure of the propeller hub, blade separation, and loss of control of the airplane. DATES... propeller hubs, which could cause failure of the propeller hub, blade separation, and loss of control of...

  8. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R.; Peter, William H.

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  9. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of A Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and test data validation of the thermal model that is the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented to validate the model are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Centigrade of the thermal vacuum test data, and was found to be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed, however, to refine the thermal model to further improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank. Temperatures predictions in this portion were found to be 2-2.5 degrees Centigrade lower than the test data. A road map to apply the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  10. A Cryogenic Propellant Production Depot for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Seth D.; Henley, Mark W.; Gutierrez, Sonia; Fikes, John; Carrington, Connie; Smitherman, David; Gerry, Mark; Sutherlin, Steve; Beason, Phil; Howell, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cost of access to space beyond low Earth orbit can be lowered if vehicles can refuel in orbit. The power requirements for a propellant depot that electrolyzes water and stores cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen can be met using technology developed for space solar power. A propellant depot is described that will be deployed in a 400 km circular equatorial orbit, receive tanks of water launched into a lower orbit from Earth by gun launch or reusable launch vehicle, convert the water to liquid hydrogen and oxygen, and store up to 500 metric tonnes of cryogenic propellants. Orbital maneuvering vehicles will transfer the Earth-launched propellant tanks from the lower orbit to the depot orbit. The propellant stored in the depot can support transportation from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit, the Moon, LaGrange points, Mars, etc. The propellant tanks on the depot are modified versions of those used in the Delta IV-Heavy launch vehicle. The tanks are configured in an in-line gravity-gradient configuration to minimize drag and settle the propellant. Temperatures can be maintained by body-mounted radiators; these will also provide some shielding against orbital debris. Power is supplied by a pair of solar arrays mounted perpendicular to the orbital plane, which rotate once per orbit to track the Sun. The majority of the power will be used to run the electrolysis system. Technology needed for an orbiting propellant depot can be tested and demonstrated in the near-term on the ground, on a Shuttle-deployed free-flyer, and on the International Space Station. Further along, an orbital depot can be deployed that stores liquid hydrogen and oxygen launched from Earth, to be followed by a full conversion and storage depot.

  11. A Cryogenic Propellant Production Depot for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Seth D.; Henley, Mark; Guitierrez, Sonia; Fikes, John; Carrington, Connie; Smitherman, David; Gerry, Mark; Sutherlin, Steve; Beason, Phil; Howell, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cost of access to space beyond low Earth orbit can be lowered if vehicles can refuel in orbit. The power requirements for a propellant depot that electrolyzes water and stores cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen can be met using technology developed for space solar power. A propellant depot is described that will be deployed in a 400 km circular equatorial orbit, receive tanks of water launched into a lower orbit from Earth by gun launch or reusable launch vehicle, convert the water to liquid hydrogen and oxygen, and store Lip to 500 metric tonnes of cryogenic propellants. The propellant stored in the depot can support transportation from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit, the Moon, LaGrange points, Mars, etc. The tanks are configured in an inline gravity-gradient configuration to minimize drag and settle the propellant. Temperatures can be maintained by body-mounted radiators; these will also provide some shielding against orbital debris. Power is supplied by a pair of solar arrays mounted perpendicular to the orbital plane, which rotate once per orbit to track the Sun. In the longer term, cryogenic propellant production technology can be applied to a larger LEO depot, as well as to the use of lunar water resources at a similar depot elsewhere.

  12. Experimental Performance of a Novel Trochoidal Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, Bernard; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In the quest for energy efficiency in marine transportation, a promising marine propulsor concept is the trochoidal propeller. We have designed and tested a novel trochoidal propeller using a sinusoidal blade pitch function. The main results presented are measurements of thrust and torque, as well as the calculated efficiency, for a range of advance coefficients. The experimental data show narrow 95% confidence bounds, demonstrating high accuracy and repeatability in the experimental methods. We compare our sinusoidal-pitch trochoidal propeller with prior cross-flow propellers, as well as a representative screw propeller. While the efficiency of our propeller exceeds that of the cycloidal-pitch trochoidal propeller, it is slightly lower than the efficiencies of the other propellers considered. We also present a theoretical model that can be used to further explore and optimize such trochoidal propellers, leading to new avenues for improvements in marine propulsion systems.

  13. Optimal Propellant Maneuver Flight Demonstrations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Sagar; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Longacre, Kenneth; Nguyen, Louis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, first ever flight demonstrations of Optimal Propellant Maneuver (OPM), a method of propulsive rotational state transition for spacecraft controlled using thrusters, is presented for the International Space Station (ISS). On August 1, 2012, two ISS reorientations of about 180deg each were performed using OPMs. These maneuvers were in preparation for the same-day launch and rendezvous of a Progress vehicle, also a first for ISS visiting vehicles. The first maneuver used 9.7 kg of propellant, whereas the second used 10.2 kg. Identical maneuvers performed without using OPMs would have used approximately 151.1kg and 150.9kg respectively. The OPM method is to use a pre-planned attitude command trajectory to accomplish a rotational state transition. The trajectory is designed to take advantage of the complete nonlinear system dynamics. The trajectory choice directly influences the cost of the maneuver, in this case, propellant. For example, while an eigenaxis maneuver is kinematically the shortest path between two orientations, following that path requires overcoming the nonlinear system dynamics, thereby increasing the cost of the maneuver. The eigenaxis path is used for ISS maneuvers using thrusters. By considering a longer angular path, the path dependence of the system dynamics can be exploited to reduce the cost. The benefits of OPM for the ISS include not only reduced lifetime propellant use, but also reduced loads, erosion, and contamination from thrusters due to fewer firings. Another advantage of the OPM is that it does not require ISS flight software modifications since it is a set of commands tailored to the specific attitude control architecture. The OPM takes advantage of the existing ISS control system architecture for propulsive rotation called USTO control mode1. USTO was originally developed to provide ISS Orbiter stack attitude control capability for a contingency tile-repair scenario, where the Orbiter is maneuvered using its robotic

  14. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  15. Nanotechnology Propellant Health Monitoring Sensors; Success Through Multi-Stakeholder Interests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: “The Propellant Health Monitoring (PHM) Challenge” 4 “Development of innovative systems to allow real-time health monitoring of solid ...Distribution Unlimited Propellant Health Monitoring (PHM): Thermal Aging Challenges Mechanical, chemical , and physical properties of composite and NC base...Mechanical, physical, or chemical condition of the propellant which indicates “living on borrowed time”. • This line (increasing failure rate) Moves

  16. Development of a system for the numerical simulation of Euler flows, with results of preliminary 3-D propeller-slipstream/exhaust-jet calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a computer program system for the numerical simulation of Euler flows is presented. Preliminary test calculation results are shown. They concern the three-dimensional flow around a wing-nacelle-propeller-outlet configuration. The system is constructed to execute four major tasks: block decomposition of the flow domain around given, possibly complex, three-dimensional aerodynamic surfaces; grid generation on the blocked flow domain; Euler-flow simulation on the blocked grid; and graphical visualization of the computed flow on the blocked grid, and postprocessing. The system consists of about 20 codes interfaced by files. Most of the required tasks can be executed. The geometry of complex aerodynamic surfaces in three-dimensional space can be handled. The validation test showed that the system must be improved to increase the speed of the grid generation process.

  17. Self-propelled vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.D.

    1986-03-04

    A self-propelled vehicle is described which includes a body and a set of four internal-force generating devices, each device having a central axis about which internal portions thereof rotate, the four devices being configured as two opposed pairs, the two devices of one pair having parallel axes, but turning in opposite directions, the two devices of the other pair also having parallel axes but turning in opposite directions the axes of the one pair being at right angles to the axes of the other pair. Each device consists of: stationary frame means, a stationary sun gear on the frame means, the sun gear being coaxial with the central axis of its respective device, a rotor pivoted about the axis of the sun gear, three crankshafts carried by the rotor at substantially 120/sup 0/ intervals, each having an eccentric portion, for each crankshaft a cylinder in the rotor, a piston mounted for riciprocation in each cylinder, and a connecting rod from the piston to the eccentric portion of the crankshaft, each crankshaft being fixed to rotate with a respective planetary gear, all planetary gears meshing with the sun gear and having the same pitch diameter as the sun gear, whereby any point on the pitch circle of a planetary gear describes a cardioid as the planetary gear rotates around the sun gear once, the crankshaft eccentricity being substantially 1/3 of the pitch radius of a planetary gear, fuel metering means for providing a combustible mixture for the cylinder, ignition means to ignite the combustible mixture in each cylinder, and valve means for admitting the combustible mixture to, and exhausting combustion gases from, each cylinder.

  18. New high energetic composite propellants for space applications: refrigerated solid propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franson, C.; Orlandi, O.; Perut, C.; Fouin, G.; Chauveau, C.; Gökalp, I.; Calabro, M.

    2009-09-01

    Cryogenic solid propellants (CSP) are a new kind of chemical propellants that use frozen products to ensure the mechanical resistance of the grain. The objective is to combine the high performances of liquid propulsion and the simplicity of solid propulsion. The CSP concept has few disadvantages. Storability is limited by the need of permanent cooling between motor loading and firing. It needs insulations that increase the dry mass. It is possible to limit significantly these drawbacks by using a cooling temperature near the ambient one. It will permit not to change the motor materials and to minimize the supplementary dry mass due to insulator. The designation "Refrigerated Solid Propellant" (RPS) is in that case more appropriate as "Cryogenic Solid Propellant." SNPE Matériaux Energétiques is developing new concept of composition e e with cooling temperature as near the ambient temperature as possible. They are homogeneous and the main ingredients are hydrogen peroxide, polymer and metal or metal hydride, they are called "HydroxalaneTM." This concept allows reaching a high energy level. The expected specific impulse is between 355 and 375 s against 315 s for hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) / ammonium perchlorate (AP) / Al composition. However, the density is lower than for current propellants, between 1377 and 1462 kg/m3 compared to around 1800 kg/m3 . This is an handicap only for volume-limited application. Works have been carried out at laboratory scale to define the quality of the raw materials and the manufacturing process to realize sample and small grain in a safer manner. To assess the process, a small grain with an internal bore had been realized with a composition based on aluminum and water. This grain had shown very good quality, without any defect, and good bonding properties on the insulator.

  19. A theoretical evaluation of aluminum gel propellant two-phase flow losses on vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Donn C.; Turns, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a hydrocarbon/Al/O2(gaseous) fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed to study secondary atomization effects on propellant combustion. This chamber model was coupled with a two dimensional, two-phase flow nozzle code to estimate the two-phase flow losses associated with solid combustion products. Results indicate that moderate secondary atomization significantly reduces propellant burnout distance and Al2O3 particle size; however, secondary atomization provides only moderate decreases in two-phase flow induced I(sub sp) losses. Despite these two-phase flow losses, a simple mission study indicates that aluminum gel propellants may permit a greater maximum payload than the hydrocarbon/O2 bi-propellant combination for a vehicle of fixed propellant volume. Secondary atomization was also found to reduce radiation losses from the solid combustion products to the chamber walls, primarily through reductions in propellant burnout distance.

  20. Assay of potentially contaminated propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Williams, H.E. III; Scott, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    One of the decontamination and decommissioning projects within DOD is demilitarization of an aging stockpile of munitions. A large portion of the stockpile contains depleted uranium (DU) as an armor piercing core and so these munitions must be assayed for the presence of uranium in other components. The assay method must be fast and preferably easy to implement. Presence of DU is indicated by its alpha decay. The alpha particles in turn produce ions in the ambient air. If a significant fraction of these ions can escape the quantity of propellant, the ions can be detected instead of the alpha particles. As a test of the feasibility of detecting alpha emissions from DU somewhere within a cartridge of propellant, the transmission of ions through layers of real propellant was measured. The propellant is in the form of graphite-coated cylindrical pellets. A 105nun cartridge was modified for use as a pellet chamber. A check source served as an ion source. The ion detector consisted of a grid held at 300V coupled to an ammeter. Results confirm that this is a promising technique for testing the propellant for the presence of DU quickly yet with sensitivity.

  1. Research on propeller dynamic load simulation system of electric propulsion ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Shen, Ai-di; Chu, Jian-xin

    2013-04-01

    A dynamic marine propeller simulation system was developed, which is utilized for meeting the experimental requirement of theory research and engineering design of marine electric propulsion system. By applying an actual ship parameter and its accurate propeller J' ˜ K T' and J' ˜ K P' curve data, functional experiments based on the simulation system were carried out. The experiment results showed that the system can correctly emulate the propeller characteristics, produce the dynamic and steady performances of the propeller under different navigation modes, and present actual load torque for electric propulsion motor.

  2. Propeller propulsion integration, phase 1. [conducted in langley 30 by 60 foot full scale wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G.; Koenig, K.; Miley, S. J.; Mcwhorter, J.; Wells, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliography was compiled of all readily available sources of propeller analytical and experimental studies conducted during the 1930 through 1960 period. A propeller test stand was developed for the measurement of thrust and torque characteristics of full scale general aviation propellers and installed in the LaRC 30 x 60 foot full scale wind tunnel. A tunnel entry was made during the January through February 1980 period. Several propellers were tested, but unforseen difficulties with the shaft thrust torque balance severely degraded the data quality.

  3. Marine propellers: the latest topics.

    PubMed

    Kubo, H

    1996-02-01

    The impeller of the axial flow blood pump in an artificial heart is essentially based on the same principle as a marine propeller. Impellers designed for artificial hearts and marine propellers have a number of points in common. Decreased cavitation and relieved fluctuation load are only representative of them. As for a distinct concept of pressure distribution, the inverse method could be very useful. Skew may led to a more mild and natural character in the blood. Highly skewed blades and super elastic blades have the potential to decrease the burden on the entire circulatory system. This paper will address the main points and latest issues in propeller design concluding with a discussion of the implications of these issues for blood pump impellers.

  4. Wave energy propelling marine ship

    SciTech Connect

    Kitabayashi, S.

    1982-06-29

    A wave energy propelling marine ship comprises a cylindrical ship body having a hollow space therein for transporting fluid material therewithin, a ship body disposed in or on the sea; a propeller attached to the ship body for the purpose of propelling the marine ship for sailing; a rudder for controlling the moving direction of the marine ship; at least one rotary device which includes a plurality of compartments which are each partitioned into a plurality of water chambers by a plurality of radial plates, and a plurality of water charge and/or discharge ports, wherein wave energy is converted into mechanical energy; and device for adjusting buoyancy of the marine ship so that the rotary device is positioned advantageously on the sea surface.

  5. Combustion chemistry of solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, A. D.; Ryan, N. W.

    1974-01-01

    Several studies are described of the chemistry of solid propellant combustion which employed a fast-scanning optical spectrometer. Expanded abstracts are presented for four of the studies which were previously reported. One study of the ignition of composite propellants yielded data which suggested early ammonium perchlorate decomposition and reaction. The results of a study of the spatial distribution of molecular species in flames from uncatalyzed and copper or lead catalyzed double-based propellants support previously published conclusions concerning the site of action of these metal catalysts. A study of the ammonium-perchlorate-polymeric-fuel-binder reaction in thin films, made by use of infrared absorption spectrometry, yielded a characterization of a rapid condensed-phase reaction which is likely important during the ignition transient and the burning process.

  6. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 1: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer program, the Propeller Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction Analysis (PANPER), was developed for the prediction and analysis of the performance and airflow of propeller-nacelle configurations operating over a forward speed range inclusive of high speed flight typical of recent propfan designs. A propeller lifting line, wake program was combined with a compressible, viscous center body interaction program, originally developed for diffusers, to compute the propeller-nacelle flow field, blade loading distribution, propeller performance, and the nacelle forebody pressure and viscous drag distributions. The computer analysis is applicable to single and coaxial counterrotating propellers. The blade geometries can include spanwise variations in sweep, droop, taper, thickness, and airfoil section type. In the coaxial mode of operation the analysis can treat both equal and unequal blade number and rotational speeds on the propeller disks. The nacelle portion of the analysis can treat both free air and tunnel wall configurations including wall bleed. The analysis was applied to many different sets of flight conditions using selected aerodynamic modeling options. The influence of different propeller nacelle-tunnel wall configurations was studied. Comparisons with available test data for both single and coaxial propeller configurations are presented along with a discussion of the results.

  7. Suppressants for lowering propellant binder burning rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    Addition of boron compound to lower burning rate of solid propellant binder is reported. Chemical reactions involved in propellant binder modification are described. Advantages of method for lowering burning rate are analyzed.

  8. Characteristics of Five Propellers in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Mixson, R E

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was made for the purpose of determining the characteristics of five full-scale propellers in flight. The equipment consisted of five propellers in conjunction with a VE-7 airplane and a Wright E-2 engine. The propellers were of the same diameter and aspect ratio. Four of them differed uniformly in thickness and pitch and the fifth propeller was identical with one of the other four with exception of a change of the airfoil section. The propeller efficiencies measured in flight are found to be consistently lower than those obtained in model tests. It is probable that this is mainly a result of the higher tip speeds used in the full-scale tests. The results show also that because of differences in propeller deflections it is difficult to obtain accurate comparisons of propeller characteristics. From this it is concluded that for accurate comparisons it is necessary to know the propeller pitch angles under actual operating conditions. (author)

  9. Orbiting propellant depot safety. Volume 3: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Appendices to support the findings of the Orbiting Propellant Depot Safety study are presented. The subjects discussed are ullage control subsystems, evaluation of methods, propellant transfer, and baseline subsystem selection.

  10. Note on the Effects of First-Order Aerodynamic Loads on Propeller Shaft Loads with Emphasis on Counterrotating Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, Vernon L.; McCloud, John L., III; Yaggy, Paul F.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation of the 1XP excitation of inclined single-rotation propellers has indicated a new concept for determining propeller shaft forces and moments of an inclined propeller. This report presents preliminary results, in particular to the counterrotating propeller.

  11. 14 CFR 35.23 - Propeller control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... hazardous propeller effect. (3) The loss of normal propeller pitch control does not cause a hazardous... shared across propellers does not cause a hazardous propeller effect. (c) Electronic propeller control... effect. (2) Failures or malfunctions directly affecting the propeller control system in a...

  12. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration For Long Duration In-Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Kortes, Trudy F.; Taylor, William J.; McRight, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    The high specific impulse of cryogenic propellants can provide a significant performance advantage for in-space transfer vehicles. The upper stages of the Saturn V and various commercial expendable launch vehicles have used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellants; however, the application of cryogenic propellants has been limited to relatively short duration missions due to the propensity of cryogens to absorb environmental heat resulting in fluid losses. Utilizing advanced cryogenic propellant technologies can enable the efficient use of high performance propellants for long duration missions. Crewed mission architectures for beyond low Earth orbit exploration can significantly benefit from this capability by developing realistic launch spacing for multiple launch missions, by prepositioning stages and by staging propellants at an in-space depot. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Office of the Chief Technologist is formulating a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission to mitigate the technical and programmatic risks of infusing these advanced technologies into the development of future cryogenic propellant stages or in-space propellant depots. NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. This mission will test and validate key cryogenic technological capabilities and has the objectives of demonstrating advanced thermal control technologies to minimize propellant loss during loiter, demonstrating robust operation in a microgravity environment, and demonstrating efficient propellant transfer on orbit. The status of the demonstration mission concept development, technology demonstration planning and technology maturation activities in preparation for flight system development are described.

  13. Equations for Composite-Propellant Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.

    1983-01-01

    Reported study of composite-propellant burning summarizes recent advances in understanding behavior of propellant formulations based on ammonium perchlorate (AOP), binder, and aluminum in various proportions and particle size distributions. Approach presented incorporates adapted version of earlier model for monopropellant AP. Objective is to predict burning-rate characteristics of composite propellants at high pressure.

  14. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for which the propeller is certificated. (c) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21, 35.23, 35.42 and 35.43 of this chapter. (d) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event a propeller blade fails or is released by a hub...

  15. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for which the propeller is certificated. (c) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21, 35.23, 35.42 and 35.43 of this chapter. (d) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event a propeller blade fails or is released by a hub...

  16. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., an airplane with an aft mounted propeller must be designed such that the propeller will not contact...) Structural clearance. There must be— (1) At least one inch radial clearance between the blade tips and the... least one-half inch longitudinal clearance between the propeller blades or cuffs and stationary parts...

  17. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... for which the propeller is certificated. (c) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21, 35.23, 35.42 and 35.43 of this chapter. (d) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event a propeller blade fails or is released by a hub...

  18. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., an airplane with an aft mounted propeller must be designed such that the propeller will not contact...) Structural clearance. There must be— (1) At least one inch radial clearance between the blade tips and the... least one-half inch longitudinal clearance between the propeller blades or cuffs and stationary parts...

  19. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., an airplane with an aft mounted propeller must be designed such that the propeller will not contact...) Structural clearance. There must be— (1) At least one inch radial clearance between the blade tips and the... least one-half inch longitudinal clearance between the propeller blades or cuffs and stationary parts...

  20. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for which the propeller is certificated. (c) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21, 35.23, 35.42 and 35.43 of this chapter. (d) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event a propeller blade fails or is released by a hub...

  1. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., an airplane with an aft mounted propeller must be designed such that the propeller will not contact...) Structural clearance. There must be— (1) At least one inch radial clearance between the blade tips and the... least one-half inch longitudinal clearance between the propeller blades or cuffs and stationary parts...

  2. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for which the propeller is certificated. (c) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21, 35.23, 35.42 and 35.43 of this chapter. (d) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event a propeller blade fails or is released by a hub...

  3. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  4. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1993-01-01

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  5. 21 CFR 189.191 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 189.191 Section... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.191 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human food as propellants in self-pressurized containers is...

  6. 21 CFR 189.191 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 189.191 Section... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.191 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human food as propellants in self-pressurized containers is...

  7. 21 CFR 300.100 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 300.100 Section 300.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human drugs as propellants in...

  8. 21 CFR 801.417 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 801.417 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for Specific Devices § 801.417 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbon in devices as propellants in self-pressurized containers...

  9. 21 CFR 300.100 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 300.100 Section 300.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human drugs as propellants in...

  10. 21 CFR 189.191 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 189.191 Section 189... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.191 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human food as propellants in self-pressurized containers is...

  11. 21 CFR 801.417 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 801.417 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for Specific Devices § 801.417 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbon in devices as propellants in self-pressurized containers...

  12. 21 CFR 700.23 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 700.23 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.23 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in cosmetics as propellants in self-pressurized containers is prohibited...

  13. 21 CFR 700.23 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 700.23 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.23 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in cosmetics as propellants in self-pressurized containers is prohibited...

  14. 21 CFR 700.23 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 700.23 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.23 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in cosmetics as propellants in self-pressurized containers is prohibited...

  15. 21 CFR 300.100 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 300.100 Section 300.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human drugs as propellants in...

  16. 21 CFR 189.191 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 189.191 Section... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.191 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human food as propellants in self-pressurized containers is...

  17. 21 CFR 700.23 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 700.23 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.23 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in cosmetics as propellants in self-pressurized containers is prohibited...

  18. 21 CFR 300.100 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 300.100 Section 300.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human drugs as propellants in...

  19. 21 CFR 801.417 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 801.417 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for Specific Devices § 801.417 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbon in devices as propellants in self-pressurized containers...

  20. 21 CFR 300.100 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 300.100 Section 300.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in human drugs as propellants in...

  1. 21 CFR 700.23 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 700.23 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.23 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons in cosmetics as propellants in self-pressurized containers is prohibited...

  2. 21 CFR 801.417 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 801.417 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for Specific Devices § 801.417 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbon in devices as propellants in self-pressurized containers...

  3. 21 CFR 801.417 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 801.417 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for Specific Devices § 801.417 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbon in devices as propellants in self-pressurized containers...

  4. 14 CFR 35.2 - Propeller configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller configuration. 35.2 Section 35.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS General § 35.2 Propeller configuration. The applicant must provide a list of all...

  5. Micarta Propellers II : Method of Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, F W; Clay, N S

    1924-01-01

    The methods used in manufacturing Micarta propellers differ considerably from those employed with wood propellers on account of the hardness of the materials. The propellers must be formed accurately to size in a mold and afterwards balanced without the customary trimming of the material from the tips. Described here are the pressing and molding processes, filing, boring, balancing, and curing.

  6. Compact and Integrated Liquid Bismuth Propellant Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, Boris; Korman, Valentin; Gross, Jeffrey T.

    2007-01-01

    Operation of Hall thrusters with bismuth propellant has been shown to be a promising path toward high-power, high-performance, long-lifetime electric propulsion for spaceflight missions [1]. There has been considerable effort in the past three years aimed at resuscitating this promising technology and validating earlier experimental results indicating the advantages of a bismuth-fed Hall thruster. A critical element of the present effort is the precise metering of propellant to the thruster, since performance cannot be accurately assessed without an accurate accounting of mass flow rate. Earlier work used a pre./post-test propellant weighing scheme that did not provide any real-time measurement of mass flow rate while the thruster was firing, and makes subsequent performance calculations difficult. The motivation of the present work is to develop a precision liquid bismuth Propellant Management System (PMS) that provides hot, molten bismuth to the thruster while simultaneously monitoring in real-time the propellant mass flow rate. The system is a derivative of our previous propellant feed system [2], but the present system represents a more compact design. In addition, all control electronics are integrated into a single unit and designed to reside on a thrust stand and operate in the relevant vacuum environment where the thruster is operating, significantly increasing the present technology readiness level of liquid metal propellant feed systems. The design of various critical components in a bismuth PMS are described. These include the bismuth reservoir and pressurization system, 'hotspot' flow sensor, power system and integrated control system. Particular emphasis is given to selection of the electronics employed in this system and the methods that were used to isolate the power and control systems from the high-temperature portions of the feed system and thruster. Open loop calibration test results from the 'hotspot' flow sensor are reported, and results of

  7. Testing of Densified Liquid Hydrogen Stratification in a Scale Model Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Propellant densification has been identified as a critical technology in the development of a single stage to orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle. The densification of cryogenic propellant through sub-cooling allows more propellant to be stored in a given volume. This allows for higher propellant mass fractions than would otherwise be possible with conventional, normal boiling point, cryogenic fluids. One critical step in determining the viability of densified propellant technology for launch vehicles is to perform the sequential process necessary to load a propellant tank with densified propellants. This paper describes a test program that was conducted at NASA to demonstrate the ability to load densified LH2 into a sub-scale propellant rank. This work was done through a collaborative effort between NASA Lewis Research Center and the Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS). The tank, is made from composite materials similar to that to be used on X-33, is formed from two lobes with a center seprum. Test results are shown for data that was collected on filling the sub-scale tank with densified liquid hydrogen propellant that was produced at the NASA Plum Brook Station. Data is compared to analytical predictions.

  8. A Practical, Affordable Cryogenic Propellant Depot Based on ULA's Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; O'Neil, Gary; Pitchford, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Mankind is embarking on the next step in the journey of human exploration. We are returning to the moon and eventually moving to Mars and beyond. The current Exploration architecture seeks a balance between the need for a robust infrastructure on the lunar surface, and the performance limitations of Ares I and V. The ability to refuel or top-off propellant tanks from orbital propellant depots offers NASA the opportunity to cost effectively and reliably satisfy these opposing requirements. The ability to cache large orbital quantities of propellant is also an enabling capability for missions to Mars and beyond. This paper describes an option for a propellant depot that enables orbital refueling supporting Exploration, national security, science and other space endeavors. This proposed concept is launched using a single EELV medium class rocket and thus does not require any orbital assembly. The propellant depot provides cryogenic propellant storage that utilizes flight proven technologies augmented with technologies currently under development. The propellant depot system, propellant management, flight experience, and key technologies are also discussed. Options for refueling the propellant depot along with an overview of Exploration architecture impacts are also presented.

  9. Inverted Outflow Ground Testing of Cryogenic Propellant Liquid Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Hartwig, Jason W.; Rame, Enrique; McQuillen, John B.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing propulsion system concepts for human exploration. These propulsion concepts will require the vapor free acquisition and delivery of the cryogenic propellants stored in the propulsion tanks during periods of microgravity to the exploration vehicles engines. Propellant management devices (PMDs), such as screen channel capillary liquid acquisition devices (LADs), vanes and sponges have been used for earth storable propellants in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and other spacecraft propulsion systems, but only very limited propellant management capability currently exists for cryogenic propellants. NASA is developing PMD technology as a part of their cryogenic fluid management (CFM) project. System concept studies have looked at the key factors that dictate the size and shape of PMD devices and established screen channel LADs as an important component of PMD design. Modeling validated by normal gravity experiments is examining the behavior of the flow in the LAD channel assemblies (as opposed to only prior testing of screen samples) at the flow rates representative of actual engine service (similar in size to current launch vehicle upper stage engines). Recently testing of rectangular LAD channels has included inverted outflow in liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper will report the results of liquid oxygen testing compare and contrast them with the recently published hydrogen results; and identify the sensitivity these results to flow rate and tank internal pressure.

  10. Inverted Outflow Ground Testing of Cryogenic Propellant Liquid Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Hartwig, Jason W.; Rame, Enrique; McQuillen, John B.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing propulsion system concepts for human exploration. These propulsion concepts will require the vapor free acquisition and delivery of the cryogenic propellants stored in the propulsion tanks during periods of microgravity to the exploration vehicles engines. Propellant management devices (PMD's), such as screen channel capillary liquid acquisition devices (LAD's), vanes and sponges have been used for earth storable propellants in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and other spacecraft propulsion systems, but only very limited propellant management capability currently exists for cryogenic propellants. NASA is developing PMD technology as a part of their cryogenic fluid management (CFM) project. System concept studies have looked at the key factors that dictate the size and shape of PMD devices and established screen channel LADs as an important component of PMD design. Modeling validated by normal gravity experiments is examining the behavior of the flow in the LAD channel assemblies (as opposed to only prior testing of screen samples) at the flow rates representative of actual engine service (similar in size to current launch vehicle upper stage engines). Recently testing of rectangular LAD channels has included inverted outflow in liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper will report the results of liquid oxygen testing compare and contrast them with the recently published hydrogen results; and identify the sensitivity of these results to flow rate and tank internal pressure.

  11. Pressure Oscillations in a Liquid Propellant Gun - Possible Dependence on Propellant Burning Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    associated with a fundamental property of the combustion of the propellants used. The HAN-based propellants, in general, are aqueous, homogeneous mixtures...gun propellants. A number of physical and chemical properties must be considered in selecting propellant components (Klein 1988) and HAN is easily the...ions in HAN strongly influences the physical properties of the propellant mixture and primarily involves the hydrogen of the OH group (Klein and Wong

  12. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Demchak, L. J.; Tegart, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to develop an analytical model capable of predicting the dynamic interaction forces on the Shuttle External Tank, due to large amplitude propellant slosh during RTLS separation. The report details low-g drop tower and KC-135 test programs that were conducted to investigate propellant reorientation during RTLS. In addition, the development of a nonlinear finite element slosh model (LAMPS2, two dimensional, and one LAMPS3, three dimensional) is presented. Correlation between the model and test data is presented as a verification of the modeling approach.

  13. Structure-borne noise control for propeller aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory test apparatus was developed which would allow the study and development of propeller wake/vortex-induced structure-borne interior noise control measures. Various methods of wing structural modification, including blocking masses, surface damping treatments, and tuned mechanical absorbers, were evaluated relative to reduced interior noise levels. Inboard wing fuel was found to act as an effective blocking mass. Wing panel add-on damping treatment in the form of a single, constrained layer was not an effective control measure, except in the area of the propeller wake. However, highly damped, tuned mechanical absorbers were found to be the most efficient structure-borne noise (SBN) control measure.

  14. Profile design for wings and propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quast, A.; Horstmann, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    It has now become customary to develop profiles for wings and propellers for a given employment of the aircraft. This is possible because methods and computers are available to study an entire series of variants in comparatively short time. The basic viewpoints for profile design are presented. It is shown that laminarization has its advantages in almost all cases, including the design of a turbine blade and the design of the profile of an airliner. The requirements which profiles have to satisfy are discussed along with the possibilities for increasing lift on profiles.

  15. Propellant Analysis and Distillation Unit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle H.; Spangler, Cindy; Barrera, Louis K.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) routinely operates hypergolic propulsion systems. Some of the onsite activities include performing long duration studies on the operational life of these systems. A few of them have been in use for over twenty years. During this span of time contamination has built up in the propellant and some of the distribution infrastructure. This study investigated the nature of this contamination, the pathology of its generation, and developed a process for removal of the contamination that was cost efficient with minimal waste generation.

  16. Computing Instability In Combustion Of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed for use in design analyses of flow instabilities associated with combustion of sprayed liquid propellants in rocket engines. Code also contributes to design of improved commercial sprayed-fuel combustors in furnaces and jet engines. Proves robust, user-friendly software tool with comprehensive analysis capability. Enables characterization of stability or instability of engine in terms of such physically meaningful parameters as initial conditions of spray, spatial distribution of ratio between concentrations of fuel and oxidizer at injector faces, geometry of combustor, and configurations of baffles.

  17. A miniature solid propellant rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Hagan, M.; Mulligan, E.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, an XMC4397, employing a semiconductor bridge was used to ignite the rocket motor. The rocket motor was ground-tested in a vacuum tank to verify predicted space performance and successfully flown in a Sandia National Laboratories flight vehicle program.

  18. PHM Enabled Autonomous Propellant Loading Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) software capability applied to Autonomous Operations (AO) remains an active research area within aerospace applications. The ability to gain insight into which assets and subsystems are functioning properly, along with the derivation of confident predictions concerning future ability, reliability, and availability, are important enablers for making sound mission planning decisions. When coupled with software that fully supports mission planning and execution, an integrated solution can be developed that leverages state assessment and estimation for the purposes of delivering autonomous operations. The authors have been applying this integrated, model-based approach to the autonomous loading of cryogenic spacecraft propellants at Kennedy Space Center.

  19. The Propeller and the Frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene

    2010-10-01

    "Propellers" in planetary rings are disturbances in ring material excited by moonlets that open only partial gaps. We describe a new type of co-orbital resonance that can explain the observed non-Keplerian motions of propellers. The resonance is between the moonlet underlying the propeller and co-orbiting ring particles downstream of the moonlet where the gap closes. The moonlet librates within the gap about an equilibrium point established by co-orbiting material and stabilized by the Coriolis force. In the limit of small libration amplitude, the libration period scales linearly with the gap azimuthal width and inversely as the square root of the co-orbital mass. The new resonance recalls but is distinct from conventional horseshoe and tadpole orbits; we call it the "frog" resonance, after the relevant term in equine hoof anatomy. For a ring surface density and gap geometry appropriate for the propeller Blériot in Saturn's A ring, our theory predicts a libration period of ~4 years, similar to the ~3.7 year period over which Blériot's orbital longitude is observed to vary. These librations should be subtracted from the longitude data before any inferences about moonlet migration are made.

  20. THE PROPELLER AND THE FROG

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene

    2010-10-20

    'Propellers' in planetary rings are disturbances in ring material excited by moonlets that open only partial gaps. We describe a new type of co-orbital resonance that can explain the observed non-Keplerian motions of propellers. The resonance is between the moonlet underlying the propeller and co-orbiting ring particles downstream of the moonlet where the gap closes. The moonlet librates within the gap about an equilibrium point established by co-orbiting material and stabilized by the Coriolis force. In the limit of small libration amplitude, the libration period scales linearly with the gap azimuthal width and inversely as the square root of the co-orbital mass. The new resonance recalls but is distinct from conventional horseshoe and tadpole orbits; we call it the 'frog' resonance, after the relevant term in equine hoof anatomy. For a ring surface density and gap geometry appropriate for the propeller Bleriot in Saturn's A ring, our theory predicts a libration period of {approx}4 years, similar to the {approx}3.7 year period over which Bleriot's orbital longitude is observed to vary. These librations should be subtracted from the longitude data before any inferences about moonlet migration are made.

  1. Numerical modelling of cryogenic propellant behavior in low-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    A partial survey is presented of recent research, sponsored by the NASA Lewis Research Center, into the computational modelling of cryogenic propellant behavior in a low gravity environment. This presentation is intended to provide insight into some of the specific problems being studied and into how these studies are part of an integrated plan to develop predictive capabilities. A brief description of the computational models developed to analyze jet induced mixing in cryogenic propellant tankage is presented along with representative results. Similar information is presented for a recent examination of on-orbit self-pressurization. A study of propellant reorientation has recently been initiated and preliminary results are included. The presentation concludes with a list of ongoing efforts and projected goals.

  2. Bi-Propellant Propulsion System Improvement for Exported Telecommunication Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, P.; Jamin, A..

    2004-10-01

    The past few years have allowed ALCATEL SPACE to design, develop and qualify complete chemical bi-propellant and electric propulsion systems for use on commercial telecommunication satellites ordered by major satellite operators [1]. Taking into consideration the continuous increase of satellite international competition with respect to price, performances, and adaptation to customer constraints, it was decided to improve the Bi-Propellant Chemical Propulsion System, on the basis of the generic Spacebus 4000 UPS. The improvements are mainly focussed on: -Apogee Boost Motor performance increase for spacecraft mass saving / lifetime increase -Qualification of Attitude Control Thrusters with new thruster valve, for better market flexibility -Pressure Regulation Module and Propellant Regulation Module qualified at system level with use of new components from European suppliers, for better market flexibility linked to exportation contraints. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and qualification status of this improved Propulsion System.

  3. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  4. High-Speed Propeller for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Gatzen, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    Engine efficiency increased. Propeller blades required to be quite thin and highly swept to minimize compressibility losses and propeller noise during high-speed cruise. Use of 8 or 10 blades with highpropeller-power loading allows overall propeller diameter to be kept relatively small. Area-ruled spinner and integrated nacelle shape reduce compressibility losses in propeller hub region. Finally, large modern turboshaft engine and gearbox provide power to advanced propeller. Fuel savings of 30 to 50 percent over present systems anticipated. Propfan system adaptable to number of applications, such as highspeed (subsonic) business and general-aviation aircraft, and military aircraft including V/STOL.

  5. Theoretical solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAmis, R. W.; Le, T. V.

    1992-07-01

    Theoretical methods for calculating solid-propellant rocket motor (SRM) internal ballistic performance were investigated and demonstrated through application to a full-scale Minuteman III Stage III motor (MM III SIII). The propellant grain burning surface location as a function of time and internal ballistic performance were calculated and compared to experimental data previously acquired at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). Propellant burning surface location as a function of time was calculated using the theoretical code RECESS and compared within 1 sec of previously obtained real-time radiographic data of the propellant burning surface location. Ballistic performance, calculated using the theoretical code VOLFIL, compared within 8 percent of experimental data obtained from the MM III SIII motor test. Both codes provide a firm basis for evaluating nominal SRM performance. Ballistic calculations can be improved simply by coupling ballistics to grain burnback allowing burn rate to vary with pressure. Future work will incorporate coupled solutions among the case and propellant structural response, grain burnback, and ballistics.

  6. Cryogenic thermal system analysis for orbital propellant depot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Wilhite, Alan W.

    2014-09-01

    In any manned mission architecture, upwards of seventy percent of all payload delivered to orbit is propellant, and propellant mass fraction dominates almost all transportation segments of any mission requiring a heavy lift launch system like the Saturn V. To mitigate this, the use of an orbital propellant depot has been extensively studied. In this paper, a thermal model of an orbital propellant depot is used to examine the effects of passive and active thermal management strategies. Results show that an all passive thermal management strategy results in significant boil-off for both hydrogen and oxygen. At current launch vehicle prices, these boil-offs equate to millions of dollars lost per month. Zero boil-off of propellant is achievable with the use of active cryocoolers; however, the cooling power required to produce zero-boil-off is an order of magnitude higher than current state-of-the-art cryocoolers. This study shows a zero-boil-off cryocooler minimum power requirement of 80-100 W at 80 K for liquid oxygen, and 100-120 W at 20 K for liquid hydrogen for a representative Near-Earth Object mission. Research and development effort is required to improve the state-of-the-arts in-space cryogenic thermal management.

  7. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  8. Electromagnetic Pumps for Conductive-Propellant Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas E.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dehoyos, Amado

    2005-01-01

    Prototype electromagnetic pumps for use with lithium and bismuth propellants were constructed and tested. Such pumps may be used to pressurize future electric propulsion liquid metal feed systems, with the primary advantages being the compactness and simplicity versus alternative pressurization technologies. Design details for two different pumps are described: the first was designed to withstand (highly corrosive) lithium propellant, and t he second was designed to tolerate the high temperature required to pump liquid bismuth. Both qualitative and quantitative test results are presented. Open-loop tests demonstrated the capability of each device to electromagnetically pump its design propellant (lithium or bismuth). A second set of tests accurately quantified the pump pressure developed as a function of current. These experiments, which utilized a more easily handled material (gallium), demonstrated continuously-adjustable pump pressure levels ranging from 0-100 Torr for corresponding input current levels of 0-75 A. While the analysis and testing in this study specifically targeted lithium and bismuth propellants, the underlying design principles should be useful in implementing liquid metal pumps in any conductive-propellant feed system.

  9. Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles: A Small Business Innovation Research Topic and Its Commercial Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1997-01-01

    Under its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (and with NASA Headquarters support), the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a topic entitled "Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles." The aim of this project would be to assist in demonstrating and then commercializing new rocket propellants that are safer and more environmentally sound and that make space operations easier. Soon it will be possible to commercialize many new propellants and their related component technologies because of the large investments being made throughout the Government in rocket propellants and the technologies for using them. This article discusses the commercial vision for these fuels and propellants, the potential for these propellants to reduce space access costs, the options for commercial development, and the benefits to nonaerospace industries. This SBIR topic is designed to foster the development of propellants that provide improved safety, less environmental impact, higher density, higher I(sub sp), and simpler vehicle operations. In the development of aeronautics and space technology, there have been limits to vehicle performance imposed by traditionally used propellants and fuels. Increases in performance are possible with either increased propellant specific impulse, increased density, or both. Flight system safety will also be increased by the use of denser, more viscous propellants and fuels.

  10. Flow measurement around a model ship with propeller and rudder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van, S. H.; Kim, W. J.; Yoon, H. S.; Lee, Y. Y.; Park, I. R.

    2006-04-01

    For the design of hull forms with better resistance and propulsive performance, it is essential to understand flow characteristics, such as wave and wake development, around a ship. Experimental data detailing the local flow characteristics are invaluable for the validation of the physical and numerical modeling of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, which are recently gaining attention as efficient tools for hull form evaluation. This paper describes velocity and wave profiles measured in the towing tank for the KRISO 138,000 m3 LNG carrier model with propeller and rudder. The effects of propeller and rudder on the wake and wave profiles in the stern region are clearly identified. The results contained in this paper can provide an opportunity to explore integrated flow phenomena around a model ship in the self-propelled condition, and can be added to the International Towing Tank Conference benchmark data for CFD validation as the previous KCS and KVLCC cases.

  11. Surface tension propellant control for Viking 75 Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hise, R. E.; Peterson, R. G.; Debrock, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the selection, development and qualification of the surface tension system and includes results of low-g drop tower tests of scale models, 1-g simulation tests of low-g large ullage settling and liquid withdrawal, structural qualification tests, and propellant surface tension/contact angle studies. Subscale testing and analyses were used to evaluate the ability of the system to maintain or recover the desired propellant orientation following possible disturbances during the Viking mission. This effort included drop tower tests to demonstrate that valid wick paths exist for moving any displaced propellant back over the tank outlet. Variations in surface tension resulting from aging, temperature, and lubricant contamination were studied and the effects of surface finish, referee fluid exposure, aging, and lubricant contamination on contact angle were assessed. Results of movies of typical subscale drop tower tests and full scale slosh tests are discussed.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Spacecraft Propellant Slosh Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Powers, Joseph F.; Yang, Hong Q.

    2015-01-01

    A scalable computational approach to the simulation of propellant tank sloshing dynamics in microgravity is presented. In this work, we use the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to approximate the behavior of two-phase, single-component isothermal flows at very low Bond numbers. Through the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state and a modified multiple relaxation time (MRT) collision operator, the proposed method can simulate thermodynamically consistent phase transitions at temperatures and density ratios consistent with typical spacecraft cryogenic propellants, for example, liquid oxygen. Determination of the tank forces and moments relies upon the global momentum conservation of the fluid domain, and a parametric wall wetting model allows tuning of the free surface contact angle. Development of the interface is implicit and no interface tracking approach is required. Numerical examples illustrate the method's application to predicting bulk fluid motion including lateral propellant slosh in low-g conditions.

  13. Aeroelastic analysis for propellers - mathematical formulations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.; Johnson, S. A.; Chi, R. M.; Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for a specialized propeller dedicated version of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis. The G400PROP analysis simulates aeroelastic characteristics particular to propellers such as structural sweep, aerodynamic sweep and high subsonic unsteady airloads (both stalled and unstalled). Formulations are presented for these expanded propeller related methodologies. Results of limited application of the analysis to realistic blade configurations and operating conditions which include stable and unstable stall flutter test conditions are given. Sections included for enhanced program user efficiency and expanded utilization include descriptions of: (1) the structuring of the G400PROP FORTRAN coding; (2) the required input data; and (3) the output results. General information to facilitate operation and improve efficiency is also provided.

  14. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  15. A model for the burning rates of composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical model of the steady-state burning of composite solid propellants is presented. An improved burning rate model is achieved by incorporating an improved AP monopropellant model, a separate energy balance for the binder in which a portion of the diffusion flame is used to heat the binder, proper use of the binder regression rate in the model, and a model for the combustion of the energetic binder component of CMDB propellants. Also, an improved correlation and model of aluminum agglomeration is developed which properly describes compositional trends.

  16. Advantages of the use of lunar and Mars propellant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney

    1991-01-01

    The use of nonterrestrial resources is discussed in the context of facilitating the transport of space-vehicle propellant to be used for lunar and/or Mars missions. A cost-benefit analysis is conducted to determine the feasibility and efficiency of developing propellant-production facilities in space for future mission support. The analysis suggests that after 2-3 years a break-even point is possible for return-on-investment mass, and technological hurdles are described that include systems for automation, mining, and processing.

  17. Review of recent research of interior noise of propeller aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Powell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Publications on the topics of propeller source noise, airborne noise transmission, and passenger comfort response to noise and vibration are reviewed. Of the 187 publications referenced, 140 have appeared since 1978. Examples of research accomplishments are presented to illustrate the state of the art. Emphasis is on comparisons of theoretical and measured results, but the description of the theories is left to the references. This review shows that substantial progress has been made in understanding the characteristics of propeller noise, airborne noise, and passenger response, and in the development of prediction methods. Application of the technology to cabin noise control and possible future research directions are discussed.

  18. Propellant Densification Ground Testing Conducted for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has taken the lead in the development of practical densified cryogenic propellants for launch vehicle applications. The technology of subcooling cryogenic propellants below their normal boiling point to produce a denser fluid is one of the key process technologies necessary to meet the challenge of single-stage-to-orbit and reusable launch vehicles. Densified propellants are critical to lowering launch costs because they enable more propellant to be packed into a given unit volume, thus improving the performance by reducing the overall size and weight of the launch vehicle. This two-pronged research and test program has evolved into (1) conducting tank loading tests using densified liquid hydrogen and (2) developing two large-scale propellant densification systems that will be performance tested next year at Glenn. The propellant-loading test program was undertaken at Glenn in coordination with Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems. In this testing, the liquid hydrogen recirculation and densification process was simulated, and the thermal stratification of the densified propellant was recorded throughout the tank. The test article was a flight-weight tank constructed from composite materials similar to those to be used on the X-33 launch vehicle. The tank geometry as designed by Lockheed Martin had two cylindrical lobes with a center septum. Liquid hydrogen flow rate, pressure data, and temperature data plotted over time were collected while the subscale tank was filled with 27 R (15 K) densified liquid hydrogen propellant. This testing has validated mathematical models and demonstrated the readiness of densified propellant technology for near-term use. It marks the first time that such a process has been carried out with a multiple-lobe, flight-similar tank. Glenn researchers have also been working on providing a process and critical test data for the continuous production of densified liquid hydrogen (LH2) and

  19. Conceptual Launch Vehicles Using Metallic Hydrogen Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, John W.; Silvera, Isaac F.; Foote, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Solid molecular hydrogen is predicted to transform into an atomic solid with metallic properties under pressures >4.5 Mbar. Atomic metallic hydrogen is predicted to be metastable, limited by some critical temperature and pressure, and to store very large amounts of energy. Experiments may soon determine the critical temperature, critical pressure, and specific energy availability. It is useful to consider the feasibility of using metastable atomic hydrogen as a rocket propellant. If one assumes that metallic hydrogen is stable at usable temperatures and pressures, and that it can be affordably produced, handled, and stored, then it may be a useful rocket propellant. Assuming further that the available specific energy can be determined from the recombination of the atoms into molecules (216 MJ/kg), then conceptual engines and launch vehicle concepts can be developed. Under these assumptions, metallic hydrogen would be a revolutionary new rocket fuel with a theoretical specific impulse of 1700 s at a chamber pressure of 100 atm. A practical problem that arises is that rocket chamber temperatures may be too high for the use of this pure fuel. This paper examines an engine concept that uses liquid hydrogen or water as a diluent coolant for the metallic hydrogen to reduce the chamber temperature to usable values. Several launch vehicles are then conceptually developed. Results indicate that if metallic hydrogen is experimentally found to have the properties assumed in this analysis, then there are significant benefits. These benefits become more attractive as the chamber temperatures increase.

  20. High Power Flex-Propellant Arcjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    implied nearly frozen flow in the nozzle and yielded performance ranges of 800-1100 sec for hydrogen and 400-600 sec for ammonia. Inferred thrust-to-power ratios were in the range of 30-10 lbf/MWe for hydrogen and 60-20 lbf/MWe for ammonia. Successful completion of this test series represents a fundamental milestone in the progression of high power arcjet technology, and it is hoped that the results may serve as a reliable touchstone for the future development of MW-class regeneratively-cooled flex-propellant plasma rockets.

  1. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  2. High performance N2O4/amine elements. [propellant tests of hypergolic rocket propellants used in Space Shuttle Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falk, A. Y.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was conducted to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that cause reactive stream separation, commonly called blowapart, for hypergolic propellants. The investigation was limited to a N2O4/MMH propellant combination and to a range of engine-operating conditions applicable to the space tug and space shuttle attitude control and orbital maneuvering engines. Primary test variables were: chamber pressure (1 to 20 atm), fuel injection temperature (283 to 400 K)m and propellant injection velocity (9 to 50 m/s). The injector configuration studied was the unlike doublet. The reactive stream separation experiments were conducted using special combustors designed to permit photography of the near-injector spray combustion flow field. Analysis of color motion pictures provided the means of determining the occurrence of reactive stream separation.

  3. Propeller Study. Part 2: the Design of Propellers for Minimum Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Woan, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The design of propellers which are efficient and yet produce minimum noise requires accurate determinations of both the flow over the propeller. Topics discussed in relating aerodynamic propeller design and propeller acoustics include the necessary approximations and assumptions involved, the coordinate systems and their transformations, the geometry of the propeller blade, and the problem formulations including the induced velocity, required in the determination of mean lines of blade sections, and the optimization of propeller noise. The numerical formulation for the lifting-line model are given. Some applications and numerical results are included.

  4. Multi-propeller drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenger, Robert V.

    1995-05-01

    A multipropeller drive system having a single input shaft for connection to an engine system, a differential gear assembly for dividing the driving force from the input drive shaft between a pair of output shafts, and a pair of laterally spaced propellers driven by the output shafts of the differential gear assembly is disclosed. The differential gear assembly operates in a manner wherein one output shaft, if required, is permitted to revolve at a different rate than the other output shaft. A pair of brake mechanisms acting on the output shafts of the differential gear assembly enable an operator to control the rotational speed of the respective propellers without modifying the engine speed or transmission settings.

  5. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  6. Alternate propellant program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A.; West, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    Candidate propellant systems for the shuttle booster solid rocket motor (SRM), which would eliminate, or greatly reduce, the amount of HCl produced in the exhaust of the shuttle SRM were investigated. Ammonium nitrate was selected for consideration as the main oxidizer, with ammonium perchlorate and the nitramine, cyclo-tetramethylene-tetranitramine as secondary oxidizers. The amount of ammonium perchlorate used was limited to an amount which would produce an exhaust containing no more than 3% HCl.

  7. Subsonic and transonic propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Gounet, H.

    Models for the noise levels from propellers are discussed, with results compared to in-flight measurements. Methods originally applied to noise from light aircraft are modified and extended to high speed passenger aircraft. Noise emitted from propellers has three components: a monopolar emission due to the air displaced by a blade; a bipolar form from average and fluctuating forces exerted by the blades; and a quadripolar component produced by deformation of the streamlines around the blade profile and defined by the Lighthill tensor. The latter is not a factor in the subsonic regime and can be neglected. Attention is given to a formalism which accounts for the sound level along each band, the frequency harmonics at each blade passage, the number of blades, and the rotation rate. The measured directivities of the two components are described. It is found that the radiated noise levels can be reduced in slow aircraft by lowering the peripheral velocity while keeping the same power with more blades. Calculations including the quadripolar term are necessary for modeling noise levels in transonic propellers.

  8. Hall-Effect Thruster Utilizing Bismuth as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James; Gasdaska, Charles; Hruby, Vlad; Robin, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-model Hall-effect spacecraft thruster was developed that utilizes bismuth as the propellant. Xenon was used in most prior Hall-effect thrusters. Bismuth is an attractive alternative because it has a larger atomic mass, a larger electron-impact-ionization cross-section, and is cheaper and more plentiful.

  9. Advanced propeller noise prediction in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Spence, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The time domain code ASSPIN gives acousticians a powerful technique of advanced propeller noise prediction. Except for nonlinear effects, the code uses exact solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with exact blade geometry and kinematics. By including nonaxial inflow, periodic loading noise, and adaptive time steps to accelerate computer execution, the development of this code becomes complete.

  10. Numerical prediction of marine propeller noise in non-uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-cun; Zhang, Huai-xin

    2013-03-01

    A numerical study on the acoustic radiation of a propeller interacting with non-uniform inflow has been conducted. Real geometry of a marine propeller DTMB 4118 is used in the calculation, and sliding mesh technique is adopted to deal with the rotational motion of the propeller. The performance of the DES (Detached Eddy Simulation) approach at capturing the unsteady forces and moments on the propeller is compared with experiment. Far-field sound radiation is predicted by the formation 1A developed by Farassat, an integral solution of FW-H (Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings) equation in time domain. The sound pressure and directivity patterns of the propeller operating in two specific velocity distributions are discussed.

  11. Thermodynamic Vent System Applied as Propellant Delivery System for Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Responding to a request from the Air Force, NASA Lewis Research Center engineers designed a combination pressure control and propellant delivery system based on thermodynamic vent system (TVS) technology. The Air Force is designing a new type of orbit transfer vehicle that uses energy from sunlight to both propel and power the vehicle. Because this vehicle uses propellant at a substantially slower rate than higher-energy rockets, it needed the Lewis-developed TVS technology for long-duration storage of cryogen propellants. Lewis engineers, in conjunction with industry partners, showed how this TVS technology could also be used to deliver propellant to the thruster. The Air Force has now begun the ground test demonstration phase. After successful completion of ground testing, the Air Force plans to use this technology in a space flight as early as 1999.

  12. Summary and recent results from the NASA advanced High Speed Propeller Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Mikkelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced high-speed propellers offer large performance improvements for aircraft that cruise in the Mach 0.7 to 0.8 speed regime. The current status of the NASA research program on high-speed propeller aerodynamics, acoustics, and aeroelastics is described. Recent wind tunnel results for five 8- to 10-blade advanced models are compared with analytical predictions. Test results show that blade sweep was important in achieving net efficiencies near 80 percent at Mach 0.8 and reducing near-field cruise noise by dB. Lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are under development and some initial lifting line results are compared with propeller force and probe data. Some initial laser velocimeter measurements of the flow field velocities of an 8-bladed 45 deg swept propeller are shown. Experimental aeroelastic results indicate that cascade effects and blade sweep strongly affect propeller aeroelastic characteristics. Comparisons of propeller near-field noise data with linear acoustic theory indicate that the theory adequate predicts near-field noise for subsonic tip speeds but overpredicts the noise for supersonic tip speeds. Potential large gains in propeller efficiency of 7 to 11 percent at Mach 0.8 may be possible with advanced counter-rotation propellers.

  13. A Text-Messaging and Pedometer Program to Promote Physical Activity in People at High Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: The Development of the PROPELS Follow-On Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Katie; Sutton, Stephen; Hardeman, Wendy; Troughton, Jacqui; Yates, Tom; Griffin, Simon; Davies, Melanie; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies for health (mHealth) represent a promising strategy for reducing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) risk. The PROPELS trial investigates whether structured group-based education alone or supplemented with a follow-on support program combining self-monitoring with pedometers and tailored text-messaging is effective in promoting and maintaining physical activity among people at high risk of T2DM. Objective This paper describes the iterative development of the PROPELS follow-on support program and presents evidence on its acceptability and feasibility. Methods We used a modified mHealth development framework with four phases: (1) conceptualization of the follow-on support program using theory and evidence, (2) formative research including focus groups (n=15, ages 39-79 years), (3) pre-testing focus groups using a think aloud protocol (n=20, ages 52-78 years), and (4) piloting (n=11). Analysis was informed by the constant comparative approach, with findings from each phase informing subsequent phases. Results The first three phases informed the structure, nature, and content of the follow-on support program, including the frequency of text messages, the need for tailored content and two-way interaction, the importance of motivational messages based on encouragement and reinforcement of affective benefits (eg, enjoyment) with minimal messages about weight and T2DM risk, and the need for appropriate language. The refined program is personalized and tailored to the individual’s perceived confidence, previous activity levels, and physical activity goals. The pilot phase indicated that the program appeared to fit well with everyday routines and was easy to use by older adults. Conclusions We developed a feasible and innovative text messaging and pedometer program based on evidence and behavior change theory and grounded in the experiences, views, and needs of people at high diabetes risk. A large scale trial is testing the effectiveness of this 4-year

  14. Manned Mars missions using propellant from space

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.C.; Olson, T.S. ); Redd, L.R. )

    1993-01-10

    .A recent discovery (8/14/92) of a near-earth object containing materials potentially useful for space activities could perhaps change the entire way humans access and operate in space. A near-Earth object ([number sign]4015, 1979 VA, comet Wilson-Harrington) contains water ice that could be used for space propulsion. In addition, this type of object may contain structural and lifesustaining materials (complex hydrocarbons, ammonia and/or bound nitrogen compounds) for space structures, manned planetary bases, or planetary surface terraforming. The retrieval and utilization of rocket propellant from near-Earth objects, for manned Mars missions in particular, has been investigated and the benefits of this scenario to over performing a Mars mission with terrestrial propellants have been documented. The results show water extracted from these objects and retrieved to Earth orbit for use in going to Mars may actually enable manned Mars exploration by reducing the number of Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) flights or eliminating the need for HLLV's altogether. The mission can perhaps be supported with existing launch vehicles and not required heavy lift capability. Also, the development of a nuclear thermal rocket for this alternate approach may be simplified substantially by reducing the operating temperature required.

  15. Ignition and combustion characteristics of metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turns, S. R.; Mueller, D. C.; Scott, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Research designed to develop detailed knowledge of the secondary atomization and ignition characteristics of aluminum slurry propellants was started. These processes are studied because they are the controlling factors limiting the combustion efficiency of aluminum slurry propellants in rocket applications. A burner and spray rig system allowing the study of individual slurry droplets having diameters from about 10 to 100 microns was designed and fabricated. The burner generates a near uniform high temperature environment from the merging of 72 small laminar diffusion flames above a honeycomb matrix. This design permits essentially adiabatic operation over a wide range of stoichiometries without danger of flashback. A single particle sizing system and velocimeter also were designed and assembled. Light scattered from a focused laser beam is related to the particle (droplet) size, while the particle velocity is determined by its transit time through the focal volume. Light from the combustion of aluminum is also sensed to determine if ignition was achieved. These size and velocity measurements will allow the determination of disruption and ignition times as functions of drop sizes and ambient conditions.

  16. The History of Solid-Propellant Rocketry: What We Do and Do Not Know

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunley, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Contributions to the evolution of solid-propellant rocketry have come from a variety of sources. World War II research on large solids enabled one company to capitalize on work in the area of castable double-base propellants. Separate development of castable composite propellants led to production of Polaris and Minuteman powerplants. Pivotal to the development of these missiles were Edward Hall's advocacy of the Minuteman missile within the Air Force and contract funding to resolve problems. The discovery that adding large amounts of aluminum significantly increased the specific impulse of a castable composite propellant further aided large-missile technology. These separate lines of research led to the development of large solid-propellant motors and boosters. Many more discoveries went into the development of large solid-propellant motors. Ammonium perchlorate replaced potassium perchlorate as an oxidizer in the late 1940's, and binders were developed. Discoveries important in the evolution of large solid-propellant motors appear to have resulted from innovators' education and skills, an exposure to contemporary problems, an awareness of theory but a willingness not to let it dictate empirical investigations, and proper empirical techniques. Other important contributions are the adequate funding and exchange of information. However, many questions remain about these and other innovations.

  17. A Computational Investigation for Determining the Natural Frequencies and Damping Effects of Diaphragm-Implemented Spacecraft Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahen, Brian; Bernier, Adrien; Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marsell, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Spin-stabilization maneuvers are typically performed by spacecraft entering low-earth orbit to maintain attitude stability. These maneuvers induce periodic fluid movement inside the spacecraft's propellant tank known as fuel slosh, which is responsible for creating forces and moments on the sidewalls of the propellant tank. These forces and moments adversely affect spin-stabilization and risk jeopardizing the mission of the spacecraft. Therefore, propellant tanks are designed with propellant management devices (PMD's) such as barnes or diaphragms which work to counteract the forces and moments associated with fuel slosh. However, despite the presence of PMD's, the threat of spin-stabilization interference still exists should the propellant tank be excited at its natural frequency. When the fluid is excited at its natural frequency, the forces and moments acting on the propellant tank are amplified and may result in destabilizing the spacecraft. Thus, a computational analysis is conducted concerning diaphragm-implemented propellant tanks excited at their natural frequencies. Using multi-disciplinary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, computational models are developed to reflect potential scenarios that spacecraft propellant tanks could experience. By simulating the propellant tank under a wide array of parameters and variables including fill-level, gravity and diaphragm material and shape, a better understanding is gained as to how these parameters individually and collectively affect liquid propellant tanks and ultimately, spacecraft attitude dynamics.

  18. Aeroacoustic wind tunnel measurements on propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosche, F. R.; Stiewitt, H.

    1985-02-01

    Model tests were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel to determine the sound radiation of 5 propellers with different blade designs including variations of thickness ratios, blade profiles, blade planforms and blade tip configurations. The diameter of the propellers was 0.9 m, the propeller speed was kept constant. The tip Mach number was M sub I = 0.66 and the helical tip Mach number varied between 0.66 and 0.69. The main objectives were to investigate the effects of blade geometry on near field and far field noise and to locate the dominant sound sources in the propeller plane, radiating to the observer, by means of a highly directional microphone system. The results include: (1) comparisons of noise spectra of different propeller configurations; (2) near field sound pressures as function of axial distance from the propeller plane; and (3) directivity of sound radiation from the moving blades.

  19. Crack Propagation in Double-Base Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    propagation tests were conducted on a composite modified double- base ( CMDB ) propellant with the use of center-cracked strip biaxial specimens...double-base ( CMDB ) propellant. He performed a stress analysis of small, precracked, subscale STV motors formulated in terms of stress intensity factors...assumed for Solithane 113. The present program was aimed at evaluating the Schapery theory when it was applied to a CMDB propellant under similar loading

  20. The Influence of Airfold Shape, Tip Geometry, Reynolds Number and Chord Strength on Small Propeller Performance and Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-26

    launched UASs has been conducted. This investigation has included wind tunnel performance comparisons of both off-the-shelf and custom designed propellers...at realistic thrust and freestream velocities. A propeller design program has been developed that gives a user the ability to quickly design a...propeller, predict its performance, and then create a 3D model in SolidWorks for fabrication using an SLA printer. This computer code was used to design

  1. Catalytic ignitor for regenerative propellant gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Ferraro, Ned W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ignitor initiates combustion of liquid propellant in a gun by utilizing a heated catalyst onto which the liquid propellant is sprayed in a manner which mitigates the occurrence of undesirable combustion chamber oscillations. The heater heats the catalyst sufficiently to provide the activation necessary to initiate combustion of the liquid propellant sprayed thereonto. Two embodiments of the ignitor and three alternative mountings thereof within the combustion chamber are disclosed. The ignitor may also be utilized to dispose of contaminated, excess, or waste liquid propellant in a safe, controlled, simple, and reliable manner.

  2. Catalytic Ignitor for Regenerative Propellant Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Ferraro, Ned W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An ignitor initiates combustion of liquid propellant in a gun by utilizing a heated catalyst onto which the liquid propellant is sprayed in a manner which mitigates the occurrence of undesirable combustion chamber oscillations. The heater heats the catalyst sufficiently to provide the activation necessary to initiate combustion of the liquid propellant sprayed thereonto. Two embodiments of the igniter and three alternative mountings thereof within the combustion chamber are disclosed. The ignitor may also be utilized to dispose of contaminated, excess, or waste liquid propellant in a safe, controlled, simple, and reliable manner.

  3. Low speed propellers: Impact of advanced technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitivity studies performed to evaluate the potential of several advanced technological elements on propeller performance, noise, weight, and cost for general aviation aircraft are discussed. Studies indicate that the application of advanced technologies to general aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft an average of ten percent, meeting current regulatory noise limits. Through the use of composite blade construction, up to 25 percent propeller weight reduction can be achieved. This weight reduction in addition to seven percent propeller efficiency improvements through application of advanced technologies result in four percent reduction in direct operating costs, ten percent reduction in aircraft acquisition cost, and seven percent lower gross weight for general aviation aircraft.

  4. Application of Theodorsen's Theory to Propeller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crigler, John L

    1948-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for obtaining by use of Theodorsen's propeller theory the load distribution along a propeller radius to give the optimum propeller efficiency for any design condition.The efficiencies realized by designing for the optimum load distribution are given in graphs, and the optimum efficiency for any design condition may be read directly from the graph without any laborious calculations. Examples are included to illustrate the method of obtaining the optimum load distributions for both single-rotating and dual-rotating propellers.

  5. Application of Theodorsen's theory to propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crigler, John L

    1949-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for obtaining, by use of Theodorsen's propeller theory, the load distribution along a propeller radius to give the optimum propeller efficiency for any design condition. The efficiencies realized by designing for the optimum load distribution are given in graphs, and the optimum efficiency for any design condition may be read directly from the graph without any laborious calculations. Examples are included to illustrate the method of obtaining the optimum load distributions for both single-rotating and dual-rotating propellers.

  6. Combustion of Gas-Permeable Gun Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuxiang; Yang, Weitao; Ying, Sanjiu; Peng, Jinhua

    2015-07-01

    Foamed propellants prepared by supercritical fluid foaming show considerably high burning rates due to their porous structures. To further investigate combustion of foamed propellants, quenched combustion experiments and closed-vessel experiments were carried out, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also used to observe their porous morphology. The SEM images show that foamed propellant grains exhibit a porous core and compact skin. The research results show that the porous core is first burned out and the compact skin is burned out at the later burning stage. The results also demonstrate that pore size exerts an important effect on the burning behaviors of foamed propellants.

  7. Deflection of Propeller Blades While Running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzmayr, R

    1922-01-01

    The forces acting on the blades of a propeller proceed from the mass of the propeller and the resistance of the surrounding medium. The magnitude, direction and point of application of the resultant to the propeller blade is of prime importance for the strength calculation. Since it was obviously impracticable to bring any kind of testing device near the revolving propeller, not so much on account of the element of danger as on account of the resulting considerable disturbance of the air flow, the deflection in both cases was photographically recorded and subsequently measured at leisure.

  8. Environmentally Compliant Disposal Method for Heavy Metal Containing Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. W.; Erickson, E. D.; Byrd, E. R.; Crispin, K. W. R.; Ferguson, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT An environmentally friendly, cost effective technology has been developed and demonstrated by a team of Naval Air Warfare Center and Lockheed Martin personnel to dispose of Shillelagh solid rocket motor propellants. The Shillelagh is a surface to surface anti-tank weapon approaching the end of its service life. The current demilitarization process employs open detonation, but the presence of lead stearate in the N5 propellant grain motivated the need for the development of an environmentally friendly disposal method. Contained burning of the propellant followed by propellant exhaust processing was chosen as the disposal methodology. The developmental test bed, completed in February 1998, is inexpensive and transportable. Contained burning of Shillelagh propellants posed two technical hurdles: 1) removal of the sub micron lead and cadmium particulate generated during combustion, and 2) secondary combustion of the significant quantifies of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. A firing chamber with a stepped nozzle, air injection, and active ignition was developed to combust the carbon monoxide and hydrogen in real time. The hot gases and particulates from the combustion process are completely contained within a gas holder. The gases are subsequently cooled and routed through a treatment facility to remove the heavy metal particulate. Results indicate that the lead and cadmium particulates are removed below their respective detection limits (2 micro-g/cu m & 0.2 micro-g/cu m) of the analytical procedures employed and that the carbon monoxide and hydrogen levels have been reduced well below the lower flammability limits. Organic concentrations, principally benzene, are I ppm or less. A semi-automated machine has been developed which can rapidly prepare Shillelagh missiles for the contained burn facility. This machine allows the contained burn technology to be more competitive with current open bum open detonation disposal rates.

  9. Studies on an aerial propellant transfer space plane (APTSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayan, N.; Biju Kumar, K. S.; Gupta, Anish Kumar; Kashyap, Akhilesh Kumar; Venkatraman, Kartik; Mathew, Joseph; Mukunda, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents a study of a fully reusable earth-to-orbit launch vehicle concept with horizontal take-off and landing, employing a turbojet engine for low speed, and a rocket for high-speed acceleration and space operations. This concept uses existing technology to the maximum possible extent, thereby reducing development time, cost and effort. It uses the experience in aerial filling of military aircrafts for propellant filling at an altitude of 13 km at a flight speed of M=0.85. Aerial filling of propellant reduces the take-off weight significantly thereby minimizing the structural weight of the vehicle. The vehicle takes off horizontally and uses turbojet engines till the end of the propellant filling operation. The rocket engines provide thrust for the next phase till the injection of a satellite at LEO. A sensitivity analysis of the mission with respect to rocket engine specific impulse and overall vehicle structural factor is also presented in this paper. A conceptual design of space plane with a payload capability of 10 ton to LEO is carried out. The study shows that the realization of an aerial propellant transfer space plane is possible with limited development of new technology thus reducing the demands on the finances required for achieving the objectives.

  10. Aerodynamic Design of a Propeller for High-Altitude Balloon Trajectory Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Richard; Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a propeller for the trajectory control of a high-altitude, scientific balloon has been performed using theoretical methods developed especially for such applications. The methods are described. Optimum, nonlinear chord and twist distributions have been developed in conjunction with the design of a family of airfoils, the SE403, SE404, and SE405, for the propeller. The very low Reynolds numbers along the propeller blade fall in a range that has yet to be rigorously investigated, either experimentally or theoretically.

  11. Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS). Volume 2: Computer program user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, L.; Crawford, D. R.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Swigart, R. J.; Wong, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Generalized Advanced Propeller Analysis System (GAPAS) computer code is described. GAPAS was developed to analyze advanced technology multi-bladed propellers which operate on aircraft with speeds up to Mach 0.8 and altitudes up to 40,000 feet. GAPAS includes technology for analyzing aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic performance of propellers. The computer code was developed for the CDC 7600 computer and is currently available for industrial use on the NASA Langley computer. A description of all the analytical models incorporated in GAPAS is included. Sample calculations are also described as well as users requirements for modifying the analysis system. Computer system core requirements and running times are also discussed.

  12. 78 FR 45052 - Critical Parts for Airplane Propellers; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 35 RIN 2120-AJ88 Critical Parts for Airplane... analysis to identify a propeller critical part. Manufacturers would identify propeller critical parts, and establish engineering, manufacturing, and maintenance processes for propeller critical parts....

  13. High-Temperature Solid Propellant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-08-24

    aluminum matrix are 0.1 ta 0.25 in./sec, depending upon the compaction pressure with the polymer in a finely ground state (pass 230-mesh sieve). SThis...ptessure was reached, constant pressure was maintained for 1 min before the pressure was released. The " compacted pellet was removed from the mold...closed vessel can be written 2 .2 P (V + + C = C T (1) 0 M. where P is the partial pressure of the propellant , • • •gases V is the initial volume

  14. Light metal explosives and propellants

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.; Viecelli, James A.

    2005-04-05

    Disclosed herein are light metal explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants (LME&Ps) comprising a light metal component such as Li, B, Be or their hydrides or intermetallic compounds and alloys containing them and an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a non-explosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 .mu.m to 1000 .mu.m.

  15. Fluorinated Desensitizing Ingredients for Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-24

    Entered) 19. KEY WORDS (Continued) 20 ABSTRACT (Continued) Compound Structure 3-Fluoro-1,2- propanediol dinitrate FCH2CH(ONO2 )CH2ONO2 FDNP 3,3,3...Trifluoro-1,2- propanediol dinitrate F3 CCH(ONO2 )CH2ONO2 TFDNP 4,4,4-Trifluoro-l,2,3-butanetriol F3CCH(ONO 2 )CH(ONO2)CH2ONO 2 Trinitrate TFBTTN Preliminary...are potentially useful propellant ingredients. When compared with 1,2- propanediol dinitrate (DNP), which is currently used in Otto Fuel II, FDNP has a

  16. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Unit Ground Tested With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Tank for the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    Propellant densification has been identified as a critical technology in the development of single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles. Technology to create supercooled high-density liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key means to lowering launch vehicle costs. The densification of cryogenic propellants through subcooling allows 8 to 10 percent more propellant mass to be stored in a given unit volume, thereby improving the launch vehicle's overall performance. This allows for higher propellant mass fractions than would be possible with conventional normal boiling point cryogenic propellants, considering the normal boiling point of LO2 and LH2.

  17. Effects of propellant composition variables on acceleration-induced burning-rate augmentation of solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    This work was conducted to define further the effects of propellant composition variables on the acceleration-induced burning rate augmentation of solid propellants. The rate augmentation at a given acceleration was found to be a nonlinear inverse function of the reference burning rate and not controlled by binder or catalyst type at a given reference rate. A nonaluminized propellant and a low rate double-base propellant exhibited strong transient rate augmentation due to surface pitting resulting from the retention of hot particles on the propellant surface.

  18. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  19. A Cis-Lunar Propellant Infrastructure for Flexible Path Exploration and Space Commerce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a space infrastructure concept that exploits lunar water for propellant production and delivers it to users in cis-lunar space. The goal is to provide responsive economical space transportation to destinations beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) and enable in-space commerce. This is a game changing concept that could fundamentally affect future space operations, provide greater access to space beyond LEO, and broaden participation in space exploration. The challenge is to minimize infrastructure development cost while achieving a low operational cost. This study discusses the evolutionary development of the infrastructure from a very modest robotic operation to one that is capable of supporting human operations. The cis-lunar infrastructure involves a mix of technologies including cryogenic propellant production, reusable lunar landers, propellant tankers, orbital transfer vehicles, aerobraking technologies, and electric propulsion. This cislunar propellant infrastructure replaces Earth-launched propellants for missions beyond LEO. It enables users to reach destinations with smaller launchers or effectively multiplies the user s existing payload capacity. Users can exploit the expanded capacity to launch logistics material that can then be traded with the infrastructure for propellants. This mutually beneficial trade between the cis-lunar infrastructure and propellant users forms the basis of in-space commerce.

  20. Supplier's Status for Critical Solid Propellants, Explosive, and Pyrotechnic Ingredients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, B. L.; Painter, C. R.; Nauflett, G. W.; Cramer, R. J.; Mulder, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1970's a program was initiated at the Naval Surface Warfare Center/Indian Head Division (NSWC/IHDIV) to address the well-known problems associated with availability and suppliers of critical ingredients. These critical ingredients are necessary for preparation of solid propellants and explosives manufactured by the Navy. The objective of the program was to identify primary and secondary (or back-up) vendor information for these critical ingredients, and to develop suitable alternative materials if an ingredient is unavailable. In 1992 NSWC/IHDIV funded Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) under a Technical Area Task (TAT) to expedite the task of creating a database listing critical ingredients used to manufacture Navy propellant and explosives based on known formulation quantities. Under this task CPIA provided employees that were 100 percent dedicated to the task of obtaining critical ingredient suppliers information, selecting the software and designing the interface between the computer program and the database users. TAT objectives included creating the Explosive Ingredients Source Database (EISD) for Propellant, Explosive and Pyrotechnic (PEP) critical elements. The goal was to create a readily accessible database, to provide users a quick-view summary of critical ingredient supplier's information and create a centralized archive that CPIA would update and distribute. EISD funding ended in 1996. At that time, the database entries included 53 formulations and 108 critical used to manufacture Navy propellant and explosives. CPIA turned the database tasking back over to NSWC/IHDIV to maintain and distribute at their discretion. Due to significant interest in propellant/explosives critical ingredients suppliers' status, the Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) approached the JANNAF Executive committee (EC) for authorization to continue the critical ingredient database work. In 1999, JANNAF EC approved the PDCS panel

  1. Propeller aircraft noise legislation—A comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Hanno H.

    After a brief historical review of the development of propeller aircraft noise certification by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), this paper describes in detail the pertinent ICAO-document-the ‘ANNEX 16’-which contains ‘Standards and Recommended Practices’ for the noise certification of propeller-driven aeorplanes either above, or not exceeding, a certificated take-off mass of 5700 kg. Direct experience in the ‘day to day’ practice of conducting aircraft flyover noise measurements for purposes of noise certification is revealed, potential pit-falls, ‘loop-holes’, and present uncertainties in the various procedures are described, and the efforts of the ICAO-Committee on Aircraft Noise (CAN), and its successor organization, the ICAO-Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) to resolve ensuing problems, are given extensive space. The continuing development, as well as the frequently necessary consolidations, of noise certification methods and procedures requires substantial research effort, both in terms of actual dedicated flight testing and wind tunnel testing. This work is dealt with in fair detail and where necessary explained with illustrations, often directly out of research reports. This should give the reader an impression of the enormous complexity of noise certificating propeller aircraft, which after all entails not only legislative aspects, but also basic and applied aerocoustic research. However, in addition to discussing the current state of propeller-aeroplane noise certification, there are sections which go back in time to elaborate on the thoughts and the sometimes dead-end streets which were penetrated in the numerous attempts to improve noise certification. Other sections still look into the future to present changes in propeller aircraft noise legislation that are expected to be agreed upon either in the near- or medium-term.

  2. Preventing Growth Of Barnacles On Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Kemp L.

    1993-01-01

    Possible to prevent barnacles and other marine life from obtaining firm bonds on propellers and other metal parts by coating parts with NEDOX (or equivalent) cavitation-resistant material. Available in several forms; one that works best is mold-release coating. Also provides improved surface hardness, protection against electrolysis, better resistance to abrasion, and less friction between propellers and water.

  3. Recovery of aluminum from composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, G. C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Aluminum was recovered from solid rocket propellant containing a small amount of oxidizer by depolymerizing and dissolving propellant binders (containing functional or hydrolyzable groups in a solution of sodium methoxide) in an alcohol solvent optionally containing an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon co-solvent. The solution was filtered to recover substantially all the aluminum in active form.

  4. 21 CFR 189.191 - Chlorofluorocarbon propellants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. 189.191 Section 189.191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... or Use as Human Food § 189.191 Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. The use of chlorofluorocarbons...

  5. 14 CFR 21.129 - Tests: propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests: propellers. 21.129 Section 21.129... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate Only § 21.129 Tests: propellers. Each... acceptable functional test to determine if it operates properly throughout the normal range of operation....

  6. 14 CFR 21.129 - Tests: propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tests: propellers. 21.129 Section 21.129... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.129 Tests: propellers. Each person... functional test to determine if it operates properly throughout the normal range of operation....

  7. 14 CFR 21.129 - Tests: propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tests: propellers. 21.129 Section 21.129... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.129 Tests: propellers. Each person... functional test to determine if it operates properly throughout the normal range of operation....

  8. Composite Solid Propellant Predictability and Quality Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    Reports are presented at the meeting at the University of Arizona on the study of predictable and reliable solid rocket motors. The following subject areas were covered: present state and trends in the research of solid propellants; the University of Arizona program in solid propellants, particularly in mixing (experimental and analytical results are presented).

  9. Materials characterization of propellants using ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Jones, David

    1993-01-01

    Propellant characteristics for solid rocket motors were not completely determined for its use as a processing variable in today's production facilities. A major effort to determine propellant characteristics obtainable through ultrasonic measurement techniques was performed in this task. The information obtained was then used to determine the uniformity of manufacturing methods and/or the ability to determine non-uniformity in processes.

  10. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For...

  11. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For...

  12. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For...

  13. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For...

  14. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For...

  15. Crusader solid propellant best technical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.; Bader, G.; Dolecki, M.; Krupski, S.; Zangrando, R.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Solid Propellant Resupply Team is to develop Crusader system concepts capable of automatically handling 155mm projectiles and Modular Artillery Charges (MACs) based on system requirements. The system encompasses all aspects of handling from initial input into a resupply vehicle (RSV) to the final loading into the breech of the self-propelled howitzer (SPH). The team, comprised of persons from military and other government organizations, developed concepts for the overall vehicles as well as their interior handling components. An intermediate review was conducted on those components, and revised concepts were completed in May 1995. A concept evaluation was conducted on the finalized concepts, from both a systems level and a component level. The team`s Best Technical Approach (BTA) concept was selected from that evaluation. Both vehicles in the BTA have a front-engine configuration with the crew situated behind the engine-low in the vehicles. The SPH concept utilizes an automated reload port at the rear of the vehicle, centered high. The RSV transfer boom will dock with this port to allow automated ammunition transfer. The SPH rearm system utilizes fully redundant dual loaders. Active magazines are used for both projectiles and MACs. The SPH also uses a nonconventional tilted ring turret configuration to maximize the available interior volume in the vehicle. This configuration can be rearmed at any elevation angle but only at 0{degree} azimuth. The RSV configuration is similar to that of the SPH. The RSV utilizes passive storage racks with a pick-and-place manipulator for handling the projectiles and active magazines for the MACs. A telescoping transfer boom extends out the front of the vehicle over the crew and engine.

  16. ISRU Propellant Selection for Space Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical propulsion remains the only viable solution as technically matured technology for the near term human space transportation to Lunar and Mars. Current mode of space travel requires us to "take everything we will need", including propellant for the return trip. Forcing the mission designers to carry propellant for the return trip limits payload mass available for mission operations and results in a large and costly (and often unaffordable) design. Producing propellant via In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) will enable missions with chemical propulsion by the "refueling" of return-trip propellant. It will reduce vehicle propellant mass carrying requirement by over 50%. This mass reduction can translates into increased payload to enhance greater mission capability, reduces vehicle size, weight and cost. It will also reduce size of launch vehicle fairing size as well as number of launches for a given space mission and enables exploration missions with existing chemical propulsion. Mars remains the ultimate destination for Human Space Exploration within the Solar System. The Mars atmospheric consist of 95% carbon dioxide (CO2) and the presence of Ice (water) was detected on Mars surfaces. This presents a basic chemical building block for the ISRU propellant manufacturing. However, the rationale for the right propellant to produce via ISRU appears to be limited to the perception of "what we can produce" as oppose to "what is the right propellant". Methane (CH4) is often quoted as a logical choice for Mars ISRU propellant, however; it is believed that there are better alternatives available that can result in a better space transportation architecture. A system analysis is needed to determine on what is the right propellant choice for the exploration vehicle. This paper examines the propellant selection for production via ISRU method on Mars surfaces. It will examine propellant trades for the exploration vehicle with resulting impact on vehicle performance, size

  17. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  18. Annoyance caused by propeller airplane flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, D. A.; Powell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide information on quantifying the annoyance response of people to propeller airplane noise. The items of interest were current noise metrics, tone corrections, duration corrections, critical band corrections, and the effects of engine type, operation type, maximum takeoff weight, blade passage frequency, and blade tip speed. In each experiment, 64 subjects judged the annoyance of recordings of propeller and jet airplane operations presented at d-weighted sound pressure levels of 70, 80, and 90 dB in a testing room which simulates the outdoor acoustic environment. The first experiment examined 11 propeller airplanes with maximum takeoff weights greater than or equal to 5700 kg. The second experiment examined 14 propeller airplanes weighting 5700 kg or less. Five jet airplanes were included in each experiment. For both the heavy and light propeller airplanes, perceived noise level and perceived level (Stevens Mark VII procedure) predicted annoyance better than other current noise metrics.

  19. AP reclamation and reuse in RSRM propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miks, Kathryn F.; Harris, Stacey A.

    1995-01-01

    A solid propellant ingredient reclamation pilot plant has been evaluated at the Strategic Operations of Thiokol Corporation, located in Brigham City, Utah. The plant produces AP wet cake (95 percent AP, 5 percent water) for recycling at AP vendors. AP has been obtained from two standard propellant binder systems (PBAN and HTPB). Analytical work conducted at Thiokol indicates that the vendor-recrystallized AP meets Space Shuttle propellant specification requirements. Thiokol has processed 1-, 5-, and 600-gallon propellant mixes with the recrystallized AP. Processing, cast, cure, ballistic, mechanical, and safety properties have been evaluated. Phillips Laboratory static-test-fired 70-pound and 800-pound BATES motors. The data indicate that propellant processed with reclaimed AP has nominal properties.

  20. Handbook on Hypergolic Propellant Discharges and Disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, T. E.; Sivik, H. E.; Thomas, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficiency of all treatment methods formerly or currently used in treating chemical wastes is assessed with emphasis on the disposal of hypergolic propellants. Maximum focus is on the space shuttle propellants MMH and N2O4. Except for hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, all the propellants are nitrogen based and can be potentially reduced to valuable plant nutrients. In theory, all the propellants can be reduced to carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, except of fuming nitric acid which contains a small amount of fluorine. Appendices cover: (1) a general design criteria for disposal ponds; (2) thermal aspects of reaction in dilute solution; (3) gas bubble growth, detachment, and rise (4) absorption scrubber fundamentals and descriptions; (5) separation of a propellant vapor from a helium stream by permeation; and (6) atmospheric emission limits.

  1. Interaction Between Air Propellers and Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F

    1927-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the character and amount of interaction between air propellers as usually mounted on airplanes and the adjacent parts of the airplane structure - or, more specifically, those parts of the airplane structure within the wash of the propeller, and capable of producing any significant effect on propeller performance. In report no. 177 such interaction between air propellers and certain simple geometrical forms was made the subject of investigation and report. The present investigation aims to carry this general study one stage further by substituting actual airplane structures for the simple geometrical forms. From the point of view of the present investigation, the airplane structures, viewed as an obstruction in the wake of the propeller, must also be viewed as a necessary part of the airplane and not as an appendage which might be installed or removed at will. (author)

  2. Local modes analysis of a rotating marine ship propeller with higher order harmonic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chen; Yong, Chen; Hongxing, Hua

    2016-09-01

    An annular harmonic finite element for the computation of the local modes of a pretwisted ship propeller is developed. The elements take into account both the gyroscopic effect and centrifugal stiffening of the propeller blades. The displacement field is expressed by a truncated Fourier series along the angle and by polynomial shape functions in the radial direction. As an example, the dynamic behaviour, i.e. the nature frequency and local modes, of a ship propeller is studied, and compared with ANSYS, both of which have good consistency.

  3. Flight test evaluation of a method to determine the level flight performance propeller-driven aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, E. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure is developed for deriving the level flight drag and propulsive efficiency of propeller-driven aircraft. This is a method in which the overall drag of the aircraft is expressed in terms of the measured increment of power required to overcome a corresponding known increment of drag. The aircraft is flown in unaccelerated, straight and level flight, and thus includes the effects of the propeller drag and slipstream. Propeller efficiency and airplane drag are computed on the basis of data obtained during flight test and do not rely on the analytical calculations of inadequate theory.

  4. Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auziasdeturenne, J.; Beall, M.; Burianek, J.; Cinniger, A.; Dunmire, B.; Haberman, E.; Iwamoto, J.; Johnson, S.; Mccracken, S.; Miller, M.

    1989-01-01

    At the University of Washington, three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars-support missions have been investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: a solar radiation absorption (SRA) system, a solar-pumped laser (SPL) system, and a solar powered mangetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process developed at the University of Washington. A solar concentrator focuses sunlight into an absorption chamber. A mixture of hydrogen and potassium vapor absorbs the incident radiation and is heated to approximately 3700 K. The hot propellant gas exhausts through a nozzle to produce thrust. The SRA has an I(sub sp) of approximately 1000 sec and produces a thrust of 2940 N using two thrust chambers. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sun-synchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The laser beams are transmitted to the spacecraft via laser relay satellites. The laser energy heats the hydrogen propellant through a plasma breakdown process in the center of an absorption chamber. Propellant flowing through the chamber, heated by the plasma core, expands through a nozzle to produce thrust. The SPL has an I(sub sp) of 1285 sec and produces a thrust of 1200 N using two thrust chambers. The MPD system uses indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. In this system, the argon propellant is ionized and electromagnetically accelerated by a magnetoplasmadynamic arc to produce thrust. The MPD spacecraft has an I(sub sp) of 2490 sec and produces a thrust of 100 N. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary

  5. Design and Experiments of a Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Using Liquid Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakami, Akira; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    A Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) is one of the most attractive propulsion devices for stationkeeping, attitude control and main thrusters of small satellites, because it is compact and light. On the other hand, thrust efficiency is generally low among electric propulsion systems, mainly owing to poor propellant utilization. In this study, a Liquid Propellant PPT (LP-PPT) is designed to develop a microthruster that controls mass flow rate to enhance thrust efficiency. Liquid is suitable for propellant, since a LP-PPT would be more compact and lighter than a PPT with gas propellant, which requires a high-pressure reservoir. A LP-PPT has an intermittent injector to supply liquid propellant to an interelectrode region. A PPT with pulsed feeding of liquid propellant has never been studied. With a designed thruster, it was checked that discharge is initiated with methanol propellant of 3.9μg at a capacitor stored energy of 13.5 J. Thrust-stand measurements yield an impulse bit of 57μNs, corresponding to a specific impulse of 1500 seconds and a thrust efficiency of 3.1%.

  6. Propellant isolation shutoff valve program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis and design effort directed to advancing the state-of-the-art of space storable isolation valves for control of flow of the propellants liquid fluorine/hydrazine and Flox/monomethylhydrazine is discussed. Emphasis is on achieving zero liquid leakage and capability of withstanding missions up to 10 years in interplanetary space. Included is a study of all-metal poppet sealing theory, an evaluation of candidate seal configurations, a valve actuator trade-off study and design description of a pneumo-thermally actuated soft metal poppet seal valve. The concepts and analysis leading to the soft seal approach are documented. A theoretical evaluation of seal leakage versus seal loading, related finishes and yield strengths of various materials is provided. Application of a confined soft aluminum seal loaded to 2 to 3 times yield strength is recommended. Use of either an electro-mechanical or pneumatic actuator appears to be feasible for the application.

  7. Cryogenic Propellant Management Device: Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollen, Mark; Merino, Fred; Schuster, John; Newton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Concepts of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) were designed for lunar descent stage reaction control system (RCS) and lunar ascent stage (main and RCS propulsion) missions using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). Study ground rules set a maximum of 19 days from launch to lunar touchdown, and an additional 210 days on the lunar surface before liftoff. Two PMDs were conceptually designed for each of the descent stage RCS propellant tanks, and two designs for each of the ascent stage main propellant tanks. One of the two PMD types is a traditional partial four-screen channel device. The other type is a novel, expanding volume device which uses a stretched, flexing screen. It was found that several unique design features simplified the PMD designs. These features are (1) high propellant tank operating pressures, (2) aluminum tanks for propellant storage, and (3) stringent insulation requirements. Consequently, it was possible to treat LO2 and LCH4 as if they were equivalent to Earth-storable propellants because they would remain substantially subcooled during the lunar mission. In fact, prelaunch procedures are simplified with cryogens, because any trapped vapor will condense once the propellant tanks are pressurized in space.

  8. Advances in Green Cryogenic Solid Propellant Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, R. E.; Adirim, H.; Poller, S.; Glaeser, S.; Schoeyer, H.; Caramelli, F.

    2004-10-01

    The combustion of hydrocarbons with hydrogen peroxide or oxygen based oxidizers is known as the best possible realization of green bipropellants in the realm of conventional propellants. By the nature of these constituents, corresponding rocket motors are either hybrids or bi-liquids. This is advantageous in all applications requiring the merits of these categories, such as variations of the thrust - time profile (throttle-ability up to shut down and restart), or variable propellant loading and mixture ratio variation in liquid bipropellants. However, when it comes to thriving on the simplicity and reliability of solid propellant technology, it takes cryogenic solid propulsion (CSP) as enabling technology to make these normally liquid propellants available for many solid propellant applications, in particular for high thrust Earth-to-orbit boosting. It is obvious that proper CSP propellant selection yields solids that are as "green" as any chemical propellant combination can be. The paper describes recent advances in CSP technology related investigations sponsored by the German Aerospace Centre DLR and the European Space Agency ESA at AI/ICT.

  9. Launch vehicle performance using metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.; Powell, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Metallized propellant propulsion systems are considered as replacements for the solid rocket boosters and liquid sustainer stages on the current launch vehicles: both the Space Transportation System (STS) and the Titan 4. Liquid rocket boosters for the STS were analyzed as replacements for current solid rocket boosters. These boosters can provide a liquid propulsion system within the volume constraints of a solid rocket booster. A replacement for the Space Shuttle Main Engines using metallized O2/H2/Al was studied. The liquid stages of the Titan 4 were also investigated; the Aerozine-50 (A-50) fuel was replaced with metallized storable A-50/Al. A metallized propellant is similar to a traditional liquid propellant. However, it has metal particles, such as aluminum, that are suspended in a gelled fuel, such as hydrogen, RP-1, A-50 or monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The fuels then undergo combustion with liquid oxygen or nitrogen tetroxide (NTO). These propellants provide options for increasing the performance of existing launch vehicle chemical propulsion systems by increasing fuel density or specific impulse or both. These increases in density and specific impulse can significantly reduce the propulsion system liftoff weight and allow a liquid rocket booster to fit into the same volume as an existing solid rocket booster. Also, because gelled fuels are akin to liquid propellants, metallized systems can provide enhanced controllability over solid propulsion systems. Gelling of the propellant also reduces the sensitivity to impacts and consequently reduces the propellant explosion hazard.

  10. Liquid Methane/Liquid Oxygen Propellant Conditioning Feed System (PCFS) Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skaff, A.; Grasl, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hockenberry S.; Schubert, J.; Arrington, L.; Vasek, T.

    2008-01-01

    As part of their Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) program, NASA has embarked upon an effort to develop chemical rocket engines which utilize non-toxic, cryogenic propellants such as liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). This effort includes the development and testing of a 100 lbf Reaction Control Engine (RCE) that will be used to evaluate the performance of a LO2/LCH4 rocket engine over a broad range of propellant temperatures and pressures. This testing will take place at NASA-Glenn Research Center's (GRC) Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) test facility in Cleveland, OH, and is currently scheduled to begin in late 2008. While the initial tests will be performed at sea level, follow-on testing will be performed at NASA-GRC's Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) for altitude testing. In support of these tests, Sierra Lobo, Inc. (SLI) has designed, developed, and fabricated two separate portable propellant feed systems under the Propellant Conditioning and Feed System (PCFS) task: one system for LCH4, and one for LO2. These systems will be capable of supplying propellants over a large range of conditions from highly densified to several hundred pounds per square inch (psi) saturated. This paper presents the details of the PCFS design and explores the full capability of these propellant feed systems.

  11. Development of life prediction capabilities for liquid propellant rocket engines. Post-fire diagnostic system for the SSME system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Mark; Dehoff, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    This system architecture task (1) analyzed the current process used to make an assessment of engine and component health after each test or flight firing of an SSME, (2) developed an approach and a specific set of objectives and requirements for automated diagnostics during post fire health assessment, and (3) listed and described the software applications required to implement this system. The diagnostic system described is a distributed system with a database management system to store diagnostic information and test data, a CAE package for visual data analysis and preparation of plots of hot-fire data, a set of procedural applications for routine anomaly detection, and an expert system for the advanced anomaly detection and evaluation.

  12. Conceptual design of an orbital propellant transfer experiment. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, G. L.; Bassett, C. E.; Merino, F.; Siden, L. E.; Bradley, R. E.; Carr, E. J.; Parker, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The OTV configurations, operations and requirements planned for the period from the 1980's to the 1990's were reviewed and a propellant transfer experiment was designed that would support the needs of these advanced OTV operational concepts. An overall integrated propellant management technology plan for all NASA centers was developed. The preliminary cost estimate (for planning purposes only) is $56.7 M, of which approximately $31.8 M is for shuttle user costs.

  13. Propellant grain dynamics in aft attach ring of shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical technique for implementing simultaneously the temperature, dynamic strain, real modulus, and frequency properties of solid propellant in an unsymmetrical vibrating ring mode is presented. All dynamic parameters and sources are defined for a free vibrating ring-grain structure with initial displacement and related to a forced vibrating system to determine the change in real modulus. Propellant test data application is discussed. The technique was developed to determine the aft attach ring stiffness of the shuttle booster at lift-off.

  14. High-pressure burning rate studies of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. I.; Ford, K. P.; Wheeler, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    Increased rocket motor performance is a major driver in the development of solid rocket propellant formulations for chemical propulsion systems. The use of increased operating pressure is an option to improve performance potentially without the cost of reformulation. A technique has been developed to obtain burning rate data across a range of pressures from ambient to 345 MPa. The technique combines the use of a low loading density combustion bomb with a high loading density closed bomb technique. A series of nine ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellants were used to demonstrate the use of the technique, and the results were compared to the neat AP burning rate "barrier". The effect of plasticizer, oxidizer particle size, catalyst, and binder type were investigated.

  15. Tethered propellant resupply technique for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, K. R.

    1984-01-01

    One of the primary functions of the space station is related to the propellant resupply of orbital transfer vehicles, orbital maneuvering vehicles, and satellites. Difficulties arise in the case of an acquisition of cryogenic propellants by means of a use of zero-gravity techniques. The use of the 'tethered propellant resupply technique' is, therefore, considered. A study is being conducted to determine the feasibility, design requirements, and operational limitations of this technique. Attention is given to aspects of gravity feed, transfer method selection, requirements related to the orbital transfer vehicle, hazard clearance, attitude control, depot operations, end mass velocity, the microgravity laboratory, and concept evaluation activities.

  16. Cryogenic Size Reduction of Solid Propellant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    investigatedl: Hazard Class 1. 1 composite modified double base ( CMDB ), Hazard Class 1.1 cross-linked double base (XLDB), and Hazard Class 1.3 hydroxl...Three propellant types were investigated: Class 1.1 composite modified double base ( CMDB ), Class 1.1 cross linked double base (XLDB), and Class 1.3...Removal for HTPB (QDT) Propellant During Task 2B ...... 48 17 Mass Removal for XLDB (WAY) Propellant During Task 2B ..... 49 18 Mass Removal for CMDB

  17. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  18. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  19. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  20. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  1. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  2. 14 CFR 35.43 - Propeller hydraulic components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller hydraulic components. 35.43... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.43 Propeller hydraulic components. Applicants must show by test, validated analysis, or both, that propeller components that contain...

  3. 14 CFR 35.43 - Propeller hydraulic components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller hydraulic components. 35.43... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.43 Propeller hydraulic components. Applicants must show by test, validated analysis, or both, that propeller components that contain...

  4. 14 CFR 35.43 - Propeller hydraulic components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller hydraulic components. 35.43... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.43 Propeller hydraulic components. Applicants must show by test, validated analysis, or both, that propeller components that contain...

  5. 14 CFR 35.43 - Propeller hydraulic components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller hydraulic components. 35.43... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.43 Propeller hydraulic components. Applicants must show by test, validated analysis, or both, that propeller components that contain...

  6. 76 FR 74749 - Critical Parts for Airplane Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... propeller critical parts by requiring a system of processes to identify and manage these parts throughout... propellers. Overview of Proposed Rule Part 35 does not specifically define the term propeller critical part... numerical terms. Propeller Critical Parts (New Sec. 35.16) Our proposed Sec. 35.16 would require...

  7. 14 CFR 35.5 - Propeller ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS General § 35.5 Propeller ratings and operating limitations. (a) Propeller ratings and operating limitations must: (1) Be established by the applicant and approved by the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller ratings and operating...

  8. Dissolution Rate of Propellant Energetics from Nitrocellulose Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Engineer Research and Development Center 72 Lyme Road Hanover, NH 03755 Katerina Dontsova Biosphere 2 Earthscience, University of Arizona 845 N...ER D C/ CR R EL T R -1 2 -9 ER-1691 Dissolution Rate of Propellant Energetics from Nitrocellulose Matrices C ol d R eg io n s R es ea...transformation rates measured. As a result, no 2 ,-4-DNT was detected in column outflow. NG experienced both adsorption and transformation in the soils

  9. Space Resource Requirements for Future In-Space Propellant Production Depots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; Fikes, John; Roy, Stephanie; Henley, Mark W.; Potter, Seth D.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 studies were conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on the technical requirements and commercial potential for propellant production depots in low Earth orbit (LEO) to support future commercial, NASA, and other Agency missions. Results indicate that propellant production depots appear to be technically feasible given continued technology development, and there is a substantial growing market that depots could support. Systems studies showed that the most expensive part of transferring payloads to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is the fuel. A cryogenic propellant production and storage depot stationed in LEO could lower the cost of missions to GEO and beyond. Propellant production separates water into hydrogen and oxygen through electrolysis. This process utilizes large amounts of power, therefore a depot derived from advanced space solar power technology was defined. Results indicate that in the coming decades there could be a significant demand for water-based propellants from Earth, moon, or asteroid resources if in-space transfer vehicles (upper stages) transitioned to reusable systems using water based propellants. This type of strategic planning move could create a substantial commercial market for space resources development, and ultimately lead toward significant commercial infrastructure development within the Earth-Moon system.

  10. Thermal Optimization and Assessment of a Long Duration Cryogenic Propellant Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honour, Ryan; Kwas, Robert; O'Neil, Gary; Kutter, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    A Cryogenic Propellant Depot (CPD) operating in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) could provide many near term benefits to NASA space exploration efforts. These benefits include elongation/extension of spacecraft missions and reduction of launch vehicle up-mass requirements. Some of the challenges include controlling cryogenic propellant evaporation and managing the high costs and long schedules associated with new spacecraft hardware development. This paper describes a conceptual CPD design that is thermally optimized to achieve extremely low propellant boil-off rates. The CPD design is based on existing launch vehicle architecture, and its thermal optimization is achieved using current passive thermal control technology. Results from an integrated thermal model are presented showing that this conceptual CPD design can achieve propellant boil-off rates well under 0.05% per day, even when subjected to the LEO thermal environment.

  11. Thermal Optimization of an On-Orbit Long Duration Cryogenic Propellant Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honour, Ryan; Kwas, Robert; O'Neil, Gary; Kutter, Gary

    2012-01-01

    A Cryogenic Propellant Depot (CPD) operating in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) could provide many near term benefits to NASA's space exploration efforts. These benefits include elongation/extension of spacecraft missions and requirement reduction of launch vehicle up-mass. Some of the challenges include controlling cryogenic propellant evaporation and managing the high costs and long schedules associated with the new development of spacecraft hardware. This paper describes a conceptual CPD design that is thermally optimized to achieve extremely low propellant boil-off rates. The CPD design is based on existing launch vehicle architecture, and its thermal optimization is achieved using current passive thermal control technology. Results from an integrated thermal model are presented showing that this conceptual CPD design can achieve propellant boil-off rates well under 0.05% per day, even when subjected to the LEO thermal environment.

  12. Users' manual for the Langley high speed propeller noise prediction program (DFP-ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of the Dunn-Farassat-Padula Advanced Technology Propeller (DFP-ATP) noise prediction program which computes the periodic acoustic pressure signature and spectrum generated by propellers moving with supersonic helical tip speeds is described. The program has the capacity of predicting noise produced by a single-rotation propeller (SRP) or a counter-rotation propeller (CRP) system with steady or unsteady blade loading. The computational method is based on two theoretical formulations developed by Farassat. One formulation is appropriate for subsonic sources, and the other for transonic or supersonic sources. Detailed descriptions of user input, program output, and two test cases are presented, as well as brief discussions of the theoretical formulations and computational algorithms employed.

  13. Deformable Self-Propelled Micro-Object Comprising Underwater Oil Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Taisuke; Asami, Arisa; Ueno, Naoko; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Koyano, Yuki; Asakura, Kouichi; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    The self-propelled motion with deformation of micrometer-sized soft matter in water has potential application not only for underwater carriers or probes in very narrow spaces but also for understanding cell locomotion in terms of non-equilibrium physics. As far as we know, there have been no reports about micrometer-sized self-propelled soft matter mimicking amoeboid motion underwater. Here, we report an artificial molecular system of underwater oil droplets exhibiting self-propelled motion with deformation as an initial experimental model. We describe the heterogeneity in a deformable self-propelled oil droplet system in aqueous and oil phases and at their interface based on the behavior and interaction of surfactant and oil molecules. The current results have great importance for scientific frontiers such as developing deformable micro-swimmers and exploring the emergence of self-locomotion of oil droplet-type protocells. PMID:27503336

  14. Deformable Self-Propelled Micro-Object Comprising Underwater Oil Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banno, Taisuke; Asami, Arisa; Ueno, Naoko; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Koyano, Yuki; Asakura, Kouichi; Toyota, Taro

    2016-08-01

    The self-propelled motion with deformation of micrometer-sized soft matter in water has potential application not only for underwater carriers or probes in very narrow spaces but also for understanding cell locomotion in terms of non-equilibrium physics. As far as we know, there have been no reports about micrometer-sized self-propelled soft matter mimicking amoeboid motion underwater. Here, we report an artificial molecular system of underwater oil droplets exhibiting self-propelled motion with deformation as an initial experimental model. We describe the heterogeneity in a deformable self-propelled oil droplet system in aqueous and oil phases and at their interface based on the behavior and interaction of surfactant and oil molecules. The current results have great importance for scientific frontiers such as developing deformable micro-swimmers and exploring the emergence of self-locomotion of oil droplet-type protocells.

  15. Parametric Optimization of Ares I Propellant Slosh Characteristics Using Frequency Response Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique for developing propellant slosh damping requirements with respect to the stability characteristics of large flexible launch vehicles is presented. A numerical algorithm is devised which allows an automated software program to rapidly converge to pseudo-optimal solutions that minimize required propellant slosh damping for multiple tanks while maintaining constraints on the frequency response characteristics of a particular open-loop plant transfer function. An implementation of the algorithm using a high-order linear model of the Ares I plant dynamics considers all relevant dynamic interactions of flexible body modes, propellant slosh, and nozzle inertia effects. A high-resolution propellant damping requirements table is produced that can be used for baffle design. The method is demonstrated to provide exceptional speed and accuracy when compared with the alternative human-in-the-loop approach.

  16. Investigation on Sound Field Model of Propeller AIRCRAFT—THE Effect of Rigid Fuselage Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. Q.; Zhou, S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved sound field model with multiple propeller noise sources and finite fuselage boundary has been developed for the prediction of propeller aircraft noise by using the acoustic analogy method. It involves the effects of fuselage boundary with arbitrary shape and coupling of multiple propeller sources. It is also applicable to solving the interaction between any known boundary and harmonic sound source. The model has been used to calculate the sound field of propeller aircraft Y12 with rigid fuselage boundary and the sound field of rigid sphere in planar harmonic sound wave. The latter has an analytical solution which could be used to check the present method. The calculation results show that the model is reasonable and valuable.

  17. Deformable Self-Propelled Micro-Object Comprising Underwater Oil Droplets.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Asami, Arisa; Ueno, Naoko; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Koyano, Yuki; Asakura, Kouichi; Toyota, Taro

    2016-08-09

    The self-propelled motion with deformation of micrometer-sized soft matter in water has potential application not only for underwater carriers or probes in very narrow spaces but also for understanding cell locomotion in terms of non-equilibrium physics. As far as we know, there have been no reports about micrometer-sized self-propelled soft matter mimicking amoeboid motion underwater. Here, we report an artificial molecular system of underwater oil droplets exhibiting self-propelled motion with deformation as an initial experimental model. We describe the heterogeneity in a deformable self-propelled oil droplet system in aqueous and oil phases and at their interface based on the behavior and interaction of surfactant and oil molecules. The current results have great importance for scientific frontiers such as developing deformable micro-swimmers and exploring the emergence of self-locomotion of oil droplet-type protocells.

  18. Portable propellant cutting assembly, and method of cutting propellant with assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, Roger A. (Inventor); Hoskins, Shawn W. (Inventor); Payne, Brett D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A propellant cutting assembly and method of using the assembly to cut samples of solid propellant in a repeatable and consistent manner is disclosed. The cutting assembly utilizes two parallel extension beams which are shorter than the diameter of a central bore of an annular solid propellant grain and can be loaded into the central bore. The assembly is equipped with retaining heads at its respective ends and an adjustment mechanism to position and wedge the assembly within the central bore. One end of the assembly is equipped with a cutting blade apparatus which can be extended beyond the end of the extension beams to cut into the solid propellant.

  19. DDT Behavior of Porous Propellant Models and Porous Samples of Commercial Propellants,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-13

    base ( CMDB ) propellant and is also referred to as a cross-linked double base (XLDB) propellant. EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTATION AND PROCEDURES The...binary AP mixtures that might be expected in composite or CMDB propellants. Each of the three charges was 80% AP. AP/wax was fired at 56.6 and 67.0% TMD...either a CMDB or a composite propellant to which RDX has been added. The Ak content was 9 or 20% and each composition was tested at 70 and 90% TMD; all

  20. Propellers of Minimum Induced Loss, and Water Tunnel Tests of Such a Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    The fundamental vortex theory for a single rotation propeller with a finite number of blades is reviewed. The theory leads to the specification of a radial distribution of bound circulation on each blade for minimum induced loss, analogous to the elliptic spanwise distribution of bound circulation on a wing for minimum induced drag. A propeller designed in accord with this theory has been tested in a water tunnel where it exhibited high efficiency in spite of localized cavitating flow. A knowledge of the flow field for an optimum propeller is of value to the airframe designer seeking to maximize the performance of the airplane-propeller combination.

  1. Lead-Free Double-Base Propellant for the 2.75 Inch Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magill, B. T.; Nauflett, G. W.; Furrow, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The current MK 66 2.75 inch Rocket Motor double-base propellant contains the lead-based ballistic modifier LC-12-15 to achieve the desired plateau and mesa burning rate characteristics. The use of lead compounds poses a concern for the environment and for personal safety due to the metal's toxic nature when introduced into the atmosphere by propellant manufacture, rocket motor firing, and disposal. Copper beta-resorcylate (copper 2,4-di-hydroxy-benzoate) was successfully used in propellant as a simple modifier in the mid 1970's. This and other compounds have also been mixed with lead salts to obtain more beneficial ballistic results. Synthesized complexes of lead and copper compounds soon replaced the mixtures. The complexes incorporate the lead, copper lack of organic liquids, which allows for easier propellant processing. About ten years ago, the Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), initiated an effort to develop a lead-free propellant for use in missile systems. Several lead-free propellant candidate formulations were developed. About five years ago, NSWC, in conjunction with Alliant Techsystems, Radford Army Ammunition Plant, continued ballistic modifier investigations. A four component ballistic modifier system without lead for double-base propellants that provide adequate plateau and mesa burn rate characteristics was developed and patented. The ballistic modifier's system contains bismuth subsalicylate, 1.5 percent; copper salicylate, 1.0 percent, copper stannate, 0.77 percent; and carbon black, 0.1 percent. Action time and impulse data obtained through multiple static firings indicate that the new lead-free double-base propellant, while not a match for NOSIH-AA-2, will be a very suitable replacement in the 2.75 inch Rocket Motor. Accelerated aging of the double-base propellant containing the lead-free ballistic modifier showed that it had a much higher rate of stabilizer depletion than the AA-2. A comprehensive study showed that an

  2. Combustion characteristics of a solid propellant with a charring binder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udlock, D. E.; Strand, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A brief investigation of the combustion characteristics of a solid propellant containing a binder which chars, as opposed to melting or volatizing, has been made. The burning rate of the propellant with the charring binder was significantly higher than similar propellants containing non-charring binders. High speed motion pictures of the burning propellant showed that the aluminum burned on the regressing surface, rather than a short distance from it as is typical with composite propellants.

  3. An asymptotic theory of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1992-05-01

    A theory for predicting the noise field of supersonic propellers with realistic blade geometries is presented. The theory, which utilizes a large-blade-count approximation, provides an efficient formula for predicting the radiation of sound from all three sources of propeller noise. Comparisons with a full numerical integration indicate that the levels predicted by this formula are quite accurate. Calculations also show that, for high speed propellers, the noise radiated by the Lighthill quadrupole source is rather substantial when compared with the noise radiated by the blade thickness and loading sources. Results from a preliminary application of the theory indicate that the peak noise level generated by a supersonic propeller initially increases with increasing tip helical Mach number, but is eventually reaches a plateau and does not increase further. The predicted trend shows qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. An asymptotic theory of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Envia, Edmane

    A theory for predicting the noise field of a propeller with a realistic blade geometry is presented. The theory, which utilizes a large blade count approximation, provides an efficient formula for predicting the radiation of sound from all three sources of propeller noise. Comparisons with full numerical integration indicate that the noise levels predicted by this formula are quite accurate. Calculations based on this method also show that the radiation from the Lighthill quadrupole source is rather substantial when compared with thickness and loading noise for high speed propellers. A preliminary application of the theory to the problem of the sensitivity of the peak noise levels generated by a supersonic propeller to the variations in its tip helical Mach number has produced a trend that is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... attitude, whichever is most critical. In addition, there must be positive clearance between the propeller and the ground when in the level takeoff attitude with the critical tire(s) completely deflated...

  6. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  7. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must have a means to unfeather it in flight. (d) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the..., and other removable items must be designed to ensure that they will not separate from the airplane...

  8. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must have a means to unfeather it in flight. (d) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the..., and other removable items must be designed to ensure that they will not separate from the airplane...

  9. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must have a means to unfeather it in flight. (d) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the..., and other removable items must be designed to ensure that they will not separate from the airplane...

  10. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... must have a means to unfeather it in flight. (d) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the..., and other removable items must be designed to ensure that they will not separate from the airplane...

  11. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... must have a means to unfeather it in flight. (d) The propeller blade pitch control system must meet the..., and other removable items must be designed to ensure that they will not separate from the airplane...

  12. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous Martian propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers a novel concept for a Martian descent and ascent vehicle, called NIMF (for nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel), the propulsion for which will be provided by a nuclear thermal reactor which will heat an indigenous Martian propellant gas to form a high-thrust rocket exhaust. The performance of each of the candidate Martian propellants, which include CO2, H2O, CH4, N2, CO, and Ar, is assessed, and the methods of propellant acquisition are examined. Attention is also given to the issues of chemical compatibility between candidate propellants and reactor fuel and cladding materials, and the potential of winged Mars supersonic aircraft driven by this type of engine. It is shown that, by utilizing the nuclear landing craft in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear thermal interplanetary vehicle and a heavy lift booster, it is possible to achieve a manned Mars mission in one launch. 6 refs.

  13. An asymptotic theory of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1992-01-01

    A theory for predicting the noise field of a propeller with a realistic blade geometry is presented. The theory, which utilizes a large blade count approximation, provides an efficient formula for predicting the radiation of sound from all three sources of propeller noise. Comparisons with full numerical integration indicate that the noise levels predicted by this formula are quite accurate. Calculations based on this method also show that the radiation from the Lighthill quadrupole source is rather substantial when compared with thickness and loading noise for high speed propellers. A preliminary application of the theory to the problem of the sensitivity of the peak noise levels generated by a supersonic propeller to the variations in its tip helical Mach number has produced a trend that is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Welcome to the Saclay Propeller Testing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The history, organization, purpose, and activities of the Saclay Propeller Testing Center is described. A list is provided of all facilities, current and planned, and the types of tests done in each facility are summarized.

  15. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  16. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  17. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  18. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  19. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intended to feather from all flight conditions, taking into account expected wear and leakage. Any... control systems that use engine oil to feather must incorporate a method to allow the propeller to...

  20. Active cooling requirements for propellant storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent NASA and DOD mission models have indicated future needs for orbital cryogenic storage and supply systems. Two thermal control systems which show the greatest promise for improving propellant storage life were evaluated. One system was an open cycle thermodynamic vent type with a refrigeration system for partial hydrogen reliquefaction located at the LH2 tank and a vapor cooled shield for integrated and non-integrated tank designs to reduce boiloff. The other was a closed system with direct refrigeration at the LH2 tank. A reversed Brayton cycle unit was baselined for the propellant processor. It is concluded that: (1) reliquefaction systems are not attractive for minimizing propellant boiloff; (2) open cycle systems may not be economically attractive for long term storage; (3) a number of refrigeration systems are available to assist in the long term storage of cryogenic propellants; and (4) shields can significantly improve the performance of mechanical coolers.

  1. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  2. Propellers in Saturn A and B rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, Glen R.; Albers, Nicole; Esposito, Larry W.

    2014-11-01

    Propellers are gravitational signatures of small embedded moonlets within Saturn's rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each body creates a much larger "S" shaped undulation on the rings. In this paper we present new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. In 2008 we obtained a UVIS occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. Using simple model of the induced moonlet wakes we obtain that the size of the embedded body is about 400m, consistent with other estimates. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. This result has been confirmed in another UVIS occultation from 2012.One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon driven librations. We adopted HNbody numerical integrator and checked forpossible influence of Saturnian satellites. We found that some of A ring propellers indeed respond to the satellites. Earhart and Sikorsky are strongly perturbed by 415:416 and 293:294 mean longitude resonances with Pan and propellers close to the Keeler gap are allperturbed by Daphnis.While the A ring propellers are not far from the Roche zone limit, propellers within the B ring come as a surprise. Simple expectation has been that the strong shear rate in the inner rings would tear bodies apart, which in turn requires stronger evidence for the B ring propellers. In B ring we discovered 12 propellers in 21 ISS NAC images (both

  3. Ignition and combustion characteristics of metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turns, Stephen R.; Mueller, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations focusing on secondary atomization and ignition characteristics of aluminum/liquid hydrocarbon slurry propellants were conducted. Experimental efforts included the application of a laser-based, two-color, forward-scatter technique to simultaneously measure free-flying slurry droplet diameters and velocities for droplet diameters in the range of 10-200 microns. A multi-diffusion flame burner was used to create a high-temperature environment into which a dilute stream of slurry droplets could be introduced. Narrowband measurements of radiant emission were used to determine if ignition of the aluminum in the slurry droplet had occurred. Models of slurry droplet shell formation were applied to aluminum/liquid hydrocarbon propellants and used to ascertain the effects of solids loading and ultimate particle size on the minimum droplet diameter that will permit secondary atomization. For a 60 weight-percent Al slurry, the limiting critical diameter was predicted to be 34.7 microns which is somewhat greater than the 20-25 micron limiting diameters determined in the experiments. A previously developed model of aluminum ignition in a slurry droplet was applied to the present experiments and found to predict ignition times in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. A model was also developed that predicts the mechanical stress in the droplet shell and a parametric study was conducted. A one-dimensional model of a slurry-fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed. This model includes the processes of liquid hydrocarbon burnout, secondary atomization, aluminum ignition, and aluminum combustion. Also included is a model for radiant heat transfer from the hot aluminum oxide particles to the chamber walls. Exercising this model shows that only a modest amount of secondary atomization is required to reduce residence times for aluminum burnout, and thereby maintain relatively short chamber lengths. The model also predicts

  4. Workshop on Explosive and Propellant Combustion Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    REFERENCES; 1. J. H. Stufflebeam and A. C Eckbreth, "CARS Diagnostics of Solid Propellant Combustion at Elevated Pressure", Combustion Science and...Paper Number ATAA-89-0060, 1989; J. H. Stufflebeam , "Temperature and Multiple Species CARS Measurements of Solid Propellant Flames", 26th JANNAF...those of Stufflebeam (UTRC), Edwards (AFAL), Vanderhoff (BRL), Lengelle (ONERA, France), and other groups in the US, Netherlands, and Soviet Union

  5. Composite Propellant combustion and Transition to Detonation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    I combustion BYU Brigham Young University I CMDB Composite-modified double-base propellant CPIA Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (at Johns...incorporate a model of active binder combustion and apply the model to composite-modified double-base ( CMDB ) propellants. The porous burner apparatus...Hercules composite-modified double-base ( CMDB ) pro- pellants, containing AP or HMX, but not containing aluminum. Qualita- tive effects of composition and

  6. Propeller/fan-pitch feathering apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, Jan C. (Inventor); Adamson, Arthur P. (Inventor); Bathori, Julius (Inventor); Walker, Neil (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A pitch feathering system for a gas turbine driven aircraft propeller having multiple variable pitch blades utilizes a counter-weight linked to the blades. The weight is constrained to move, when effecting a pitch change, only in a radial plane and about an axis which rotates about the propeller axis. The system includes a linkage allowing the weight to move through a larger angle than the associated pitch change of the blade.

  7. Propellant for the NASA Standard Initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl; Tipton, Bill, Jr.; Dutton, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses processes employed in manufacturing zirconium-potassium perchlorate propellant for the NASA standard initiator. It provides both a historical background on the NSI device-detailing problem areas and their resolution--and on propellant blending techniques. Emphasis is placed on the precipitation blending method. The findings on mixing equipment, processing, and raw materials are described. Also detailed are findings on the bridgewire slurry operation, one of the critical steps in the production of the NASA standard initiator.

  8. Combustion Instability in Solid Propellant Rockets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-21

    pressure oscillations. Unless the combustor is specially designed for such conditions, it can be destroyed by pressure excesses, severe heating , or...double base propellant charges that were ejected during nozzle release (due to over-pressure) were found to be heated in a way not attributable to any...Propellants are generally very poor heat conductors. Therefore, they can be heated rapidly to a surface temperature that leads to chemical reaction and flame at

  9. Microgravity Propellant Tank Geyser Analysis and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Randall J.; Hochstein, John I.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An established correlation for geyser height prediction of an axial jet inflow into a microgravity propellant tank was analyzed and an effort to develop an improved correlation was made. The original correlation, developed using data from ethanol flow in small-scale drop tower tests, uses the jet-Weber number and the jet-Bond number to predict geyser height. A new correlation was developed from the same set of experimental data using the jet-Weber number and both the jet-Bond number and tank-Bond number to describe the geyser formation. The resulting correlation produced nearly a 40% reduction in geyser height predictive error compared to the original correlation with experimental data. Two additional tanks were computationally modeled in addition to the small-scale tank used in the drop tower testing. One of these tanks was a 50% enlarged small-scale tank and the other a full-scale 2 m radius tank. Simulations were also run for liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. Results indicated that the new correlation outperformed the original correlation in geyser height prediction under most circumstances. The new correlation has also shown a superior ability to recognize the difference between flow patterns II (geyser formation only) and III (pooling at opposite end of tank from the bulk fluid region).

  10. Liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Testing of a simplified LO2 propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles is discussed. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and He bubbling. A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from an LO2 turbopump, is to be tested at the Cold Flow Facility of the Marshall Space Flight Center West Test Area. Work to date includes: design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test articles.

  11. Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jemish; Ma, Xing; Katuri, Jaideep; Simmchen, Juliane; Stanton, Morgan M; Trichet-Paredes, Carolina; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors. PMID:27877745

  12. Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Jemish; Ma, Xing; Katuri, Jaideep; Simmchen, Juliane; Stanton, Morgan M.; Trichet-Paredes, Carolina; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

  13. Statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics of self-propelled hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Benjamin; Baskaran, Aparna

    2017-03-01

    Starting from a microscopic model of self-propelled hard spheres we use tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and the kinetic theory of hard spheres to derive a Smoluchowski equation for interacting Active Brownian particles. We illustrate the utility of the statistical mechanics framework developed with two applications. First, we derive the steady state pressure of the hard sphere active fluid in terms of the microscopic parameters and second, we identify the critical density for the onset of motility-induced phase separation in this system. We show that both these quantities agree well with overdamped simulations of active Brownian particles with excluded volume interactions given by steeply repulsive potentials. The results presented here can be used to incorporate excluded volume effects in diverse models of self-propelled particles.

  14. Photographic Combustion Characterization of LOX/Hydrocarbon Type Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using high speed photography to identify potential combustion anomalies (pops, fuel freezing, reactive stream separation (RSS), carbon formation) were demonstrated. Combustion evaluation criteria were developed for evaluating, characterizing, and screening promising low cost propellant combination(s) and injector element(s) for long life, reusable engine systems. Carbon formation and RSS mechanisms and trends were identified by using high speed color photography at speeds up to 6000 frames/sec. Single element injectors were tested with LOX/RP-1, LOX/Propane, LOX/Methane and LOX/Ammonia propellants. Tests were conducted using seven separate injector elements. Five different conventionally machined elements were tested: OFO Triplet; Rectangular Unlike Doublet (RUD); Unlike Doublet (UD); Like on Lke Doublet (LOL-EDM); and Slit Triplet.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Spacecraft Propellant Slosh Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Powers, Joseph F.; Yang, Hong Q

    2015-01-01

    A scalable computational approach to the simulation of propellant tank sloshing dynamics in microgravity is presented. In this work, we use the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to approximate the behavior of two-phase, single-component isothermal flows at very low Bond numbers. Through the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state and a modified multiple relaxation time (MRT) collision operator, the proposed method can simulate thermodynamically consistent phase transitions at temperatures and density ratios consistent with typical spacecraft cryogenic propellants, for example, liquid oxygen. Determination of the tank forces and moments is based upon a novel approach that relies on the global momentum conservation of the closed fluid domain, and a parametric wall wetting model allows tuning of the free surface contact angle. Development of the interface is implicit and no interface tracking approach is required. A numerical example illustrates the method's application to prediction of bulk fluid behavior during a spacecraft ullage settling maneuver.

  16. Laser ignition of elastomer-modified cast double-base (EMCDB) propellant using a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreros, Dulcie N.; Fang, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate laser ignition using a diode laser for elastomer-modified cast double-base (EMCDB) propellant in order to develop more liable and greener laser ignitors for direct initiation of the propellant. Samples of the propellant were ignited using a 974 nm near-infrared diode laser. Laser beam parameters including laser power, beam width and pulse width were investigated to determine their effects on the ignition performance in terms of delay time, rise time and burn time of the propellant which was arranged in several different configurations. The results have shown that the smaller beam widths, longer pulse widths and higher laser powers resulted in shorter ignition delay times and overall burn times, however, there came a point at which increasing the amount of laser energy transferred to the material resulted in no significant reduction in either delay time or overall burn time. The propellant tested responded well to laser ignition, a discovery which supports continued research into the development of laser-based propellant ignitors.

  17. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  18. Space shuttle propellant constitutive law verification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Propellants Task (Task 2.0) on the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP), a database of material properties was generated for the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) PBAN-based propellant. A parallel effort on the Propellants Task was the generation of an improved constitutive theory for the PBAN propellant suitable for use in a finite element analysis (FEA) of the RSRM. The outcome of an analysis with the improved constitutive theory would be more reliable prediction of structural margins of safety. The work described in this report was performed by Materials Laboratory personnel at Thiokol Corporation/Huntsville Division under NASA contract NAS8-39619, Mod. 3. The report documents the test procedures for the refinement and verification tests for the improved Space Shuttle RSRM propellant material model, and summarizes the resulting test data. TP-H1148 propellant obtained from mix E660411 (manufactured February 1989) which had experienced ambient igloo storage in Huntsville, Alabama since January 1990, was used for these tests.

  19. Development of Assay Methods for Liquid Propellants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    alkon ol amines . This indicatLes that th,, i V mile- erU xidati.vely st.bl.,’ At these detector conditions...hydroxylamine coiu(c-tration. t :.u, hydrochlorides was 50 ppm, while the hydroxylamine in the Li I .’ 86.9 ppm (as the free amine ). The limited level...triethanolammonium nitrate, monoethanol - ammonium nitrate, and diethanolammonium nitrate can be cleanly separated in LP 1845 by MPIC with a

  20. Heat sterilizable solid-propellant development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    The binders tested were polyurethanes made from two hydroxy-terminated polybutadienes, R-45 and Butarez HT, one hydroxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer, Hycar 1300X 17, and a hydroxy-terminated prepolymer, Esterdiol 560, made from the dimerized fatty acid Empol 1010. The isocyanates used most extensively were isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and a polymeric diisocyanate, DDI. Stress relaxation was used to examine the chemical changes that took place in the binder when subjected to the sterilization temperatures. The thermal stability of the oxidizer, ammonium perchlorate (AP), was tested by thermogravimetry in the isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The effect of particle size, recrystallization, moisture content, and doping on the heat stability of AP could be evaluated by this method. The volatile degradation products, obtained when AP samples were aged at 135 C for prolonged periods, were analyzed by mass spectroscopy.

  1. Computation of the tip vortex flowfield for advanced aircraft propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Tommy M.; Dejong, Frederick J.; Levy, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    The tip vortex flowfield plays a significant role in the performance of advanced aircraft propellers. The flowfield in the tip region is complex, three-dimensional and viscous with large secondary velocities. An analysis is presented using an approximate set of equations which contains the physics required by the tip vortex flowfield, but which does not require the resources of the full Navier-Stokes equations. A computer code was developed to predict the tip vortex flowfield of advanced aircraft propellers. A grid generation package was developed to allow specification of a variety of advanced aircraft propeller shapes. Calculations of the tip vortex generation on an SR3 type blade at high Reynolds numbers were made using this code and a parametric study was performed to show the effect of tip thickness on tip vortex intensity. In addition, calculations of the tip vortex generation on a NACA 0012 type blade were made, including the flowfield downstream of the blade trailing edge. Comparison of flowfield calculations with experimental data from an F4 blade was made. A user's manual was also prepared for the computer code (NASA CR-182178).

  2. Applications for Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der List, M.; van Vliet, L. D.; Sanders, H. M.; Put, P. A. G.; Elst, J. W. E. C.

    2004-10-01

    In 2002 and 2003, Bradford Engineering B.V. conducted, in corporation with the Dutch research institute TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory (PML) a SME study for ESA-ESTEC for the identification of spaceflight applications and on-ground demonstration of Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology. This innovative technology has been developed by TNO-PML while Bradford Engineering also brought in its experience in spaceflight hardware development and manufacturing. The Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology allows for pure gas generation at ambient temperatures, as opposed to conventional solid propellant gas generators. This makes the SPCGG technology interesting for a wide range of terrestrial spaceflight applications. During the first part of the study, a variety of potential applications have been identified and three applications were selected for a more detailed quantitative study. In the third phase a ground demonstration was performed successfully for a cold gas propulsion system application. During the actual demonstration test, 10 cool gas generators were mounted and all operated successfully in sequence, demonstrating good repeatability of the produced amount of gas and pressure.

  3. Performance of propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortman, A.

    1983-12-01

    Presented herein is a parametric study of the performance of propeller wind turbines with realistic drag/lift ratios. Calculations were made using the complete Glauert vortex blade element theory in annular streamtube elements, with the complete turbine performance being the sum of the elemental results up to a specified tip speed ratio. The objective here is to exhibit a new computational technique which yields performance directly when tangential speed ratio and section aerodynamic characteristics are specified. It was found that for a tip speed ratio of 4, turbines with drag/lift ratios of 0.00 and 0.01 had power coefficients of 0.575 and 0.55, respectively. The off-design performance of the finite drag/lift was far better than that of their zero drag counterparts, except in a + or - 20-percent region about the design conditions. Tolerance to off-design operation increased with decreasing tip speed ratios so that the annual energy capture for tip speed ratios between 2 and 4 was about 87 percent of the ideal turbine value. The results are intended to provide a basis for re-evaluation of the power range classes of fixed pitch turbines and design tip speed ratios.

  4. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  5. A Method for Incorporating Changing Structural Characteristics Due to Propellant Mass Usage in a Launch Vehicle Ascent Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Launch vehicles consume large quantities of propellant quickly, causing the mass properties and structural dynamics of the vehicle to change dramatically. Currently, structural load assessments account for this change with a large collection of structural models representing various propellant fill levels. This creates a large database of models complicating the delivery of reduced models and requiring extensive work for model changes. Presented here is a method to account for these mass changes in a more efficient manner. The method allows for the subtraction of propellant mass as the propellant is used in the simulation. This subtraction is done in the modal domain of the vehicle generalized model. Additional computation required is primarily for constructing the used propellant mass matrix from an initial propellant model and further matrix multiplications and subtractions. An additional eigenvalue solution is required to uncouple the new equations of motion; however, this is a much simplier calculation starting from a system that is already substantially uncoupled. The method was successfully tested in a simulation of Saturn V loads. Results from the method are compared to results from separate structural models for several propellant levels, showing excellent agreement. Further development to encompass more complicated propellant models, including slosh dynamics, is possible.

  6. Structural and acoustic responses of a submarine hull due to propeller forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Sascha; Kinns, Roger; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2009-08-01

    The low frequency structural and acoustic responses of a simplified axisymmetric submarine model to fluctuating propeller forces along the submarine axis are investigated. The forces arise from a hydrodynamic mechanism and are transmitted from the propeller to the submarine hull through both the shaft and the fluid. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the strongly coupled structure-fluid interaction of a submerged vessel in the frequency domain. The structure is modelled using the finite element method, so that more complex features such as ring-stiffeners, bulkheads and the propulsion system can be taken into account. A simple, passive vibration attenuation system known as a resonance changer is included in the model of the propeller/shafting system. The surrounding fluid is modelled using the boundary element method. The influence and importance of model parameters such as structural stiffness and fluid loading effects are investigated. Due to the fluctuating propeller forces, the hull is excited by axial structural forces transmitted through the propeller/shafting system as well as by acoustic dipoles, where the dipoles are correlated to the structural forces in strength and direction. The acoustic dipole at the propeller also radiates sound directly to the far field of the surrounding fluid. It is demonstrated that the performance of the RC is negatively influenced at frequencies above the fundamental axial resonance of the hull by the effect of forces transmitted through the fluid. Another problem arises due to increased axial movement of the propeller, when the RC is optimised to minimise excitation of the hull via the propeller shaft. This results in an additional sound field that excites the submarine hull in a similar manner to the fluid forces that arise directly from the hydrodynamic mechanism.

  7. Mission demonstration concept for the long-duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, C.; Deininger, W.; Ingram, K.; Schweickart, R.; Unruh, B.

    This paper describes an experimental platform that will demonstrate the major technologies required for the handling and storage of cryogenic propellants in a low-to-zero-g environment. In order to develop a cost-effective, high value-added demonstration mission, a review of the complete mission concept of operations (CONOPS) was performed. The overall cost of such a mission is driven not only by the spacecraft platform and on-orbit experiments themselves, but also by the complexities of handling cryogenic propellants during ground-processing operations. On-orbit storage methodologies were looked at for both passive and active systems. Passive systems rely purely on isolation of the stored propellant from environmental thermal loads, while active cooling employs cryocooler technologies. The benefit trade between active and passive systems is mission-dependent due to the mass, power, and system-level penalties associated with active cooling systems. The experimental platform described in this paper is capable of demonstrating multiple advanced micro-g cryogenic propellant management technologies. In addition to the requirements of demonstrating these technologies, the methodology of propellant transfer must be evaluated. The handling of multiphase liquids in micro-g is discussed using flight-heritage micro-g propellant management device technologies as well as accelerated tank stratification for access to vapor-free or liquid-free propellants. The mission concept presented shows the extensibility of the experimental platform to demonstrate advanced cryogenic components and technologies, propellant transfer methodologies, as well as the validation of thermal and fluidic models, from subscale tankage to an operational architecture.

  8. A Design Tool for Matching UAV Propeller and Power Plant Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangio, Arion L.

    A large body of knowledge is available for matching propellers to engines for large propeller driven aircraft. Small UAV's and model airplanes operate at much lower Reynolds numbers and use fixed pitch propellers so the information for large aircraft is not directly applicable. A design tool is needed that takes into account Reynolds number effects, allows for gear reduction, and the selection of a propeller optimized for the airframe. The tool developed in this thesis does this using propeller performance data generated from vortex theory or wind tunnel experiments and combines that data with an engine power curve. The thrust, steady state power, RPM, and tip Mach number vs. velocity curves are generated. The Reynolds number vs. non dimensional radial station at an operating point is also found. The tool is then used to design a geared power plant for the SAE Aero Design competition. To measure the power plant performance, a purpose built engine test stand was built. The characteristics of the engine test stand are also presented. The engine test stand was then used to characterize the geared power plant. The power plant uses a 26x16 propeller, 100/13 gear ratio, and an LRP 0.30 cubic inch engine turning at 28,000 RPM and producing 2.2 HP. Lastly, the measured power plant performance is presented. An important result is that 17 lbf of static thrust is produced.

  9. A Mechanistic Study of Delayed Detonation in Impact Damaged Solid Rocket Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, E. R.; Rosenberg, J. T.

    2002-07-01

    One method of hazard assessment for mass detonable solid rocket propellants consists of impacting right circular cylinders of propellant end-on into thick steel witness plates at varying impact velocities. A detonation that occurs within one shock traversal of the cylinder length is termed a prompt detonation or a shock-to-detonation transition (SDT). At lower velocities, some propellants detonate at times later than one shock transit, typically 1-5 shock transits. Because no mechanism for delayed detonation has been fully confirmed and accepted by the detonation physics community, these low-velocity detonations are referred to as unknown-to-detonation transitions (XDTs). A leading theory, however, is that prior to detonation mechanically induced damage sensitizes the material through the formation of internal porosity which provides new mechanical reaction initiation sites (hot spots) and enhanced internal burn surface. To study this phenomenology, we have developed the Coupled Damage and Reaction (CDAR) model, implemented it in the CTH shock physics code, and simulated propellant impact experiments. The CDAR model fully couples viscoelastic-viscoplastic deformation, tensile damage, porosity evolution, reaction initiation, and grain burning to model the increased reactivity of the propellant. In this paper, CDAR simulations of propellant damage in spall and Taylor impact tests are presented and compared to experiment. An XDT experiment is also simulated, and implications regarding damage mechanisms and hydrodynamic processes leading to XDT are discussed.

  10. Modeling and simulation of a class of liquid propellant engine pressurization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, H.; Nassirharand, Amir; Mohseni, M.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a new approach for modeling a class of pressurization systems for liquid propellant engines is presented. High pressure gas stored in special capsules is injected in a controlled way onto the gas volume on top of the propellant tanks. Instantaneous pressure and temperature values of propellant tanks and the capsules are computed. The computed constitutive values are compared with experimental results. The modeling approach accounts for variations of pressure and density of the pressurant inside the capsules and propellant tanks. It also accounts for heat transfer between pressurant and its surroundings. Equations for determination of the pressurant shut-down time are developed. Similarly, equations for determination of the propellant pump inlet pressure are also derived. The final governing equations are in terms of a set of differential equations that are numerically solved using the modified Euler method. The primary application of this research is to determine the pressurization system exit pressure. In case of turbo-pump feed systems, this work may be used to detect the occurrence of the cavitation phenomenon in the pumps. The method is limited to: (1) thermally insulated propellant tanks and (2) use of several storage capsules that are made of insulating composite material (i.e., exit mass flow rate is small, pressurant is stored at high pressure and low volume, temperature variations are small, and pressure drop in the capsules is not appreciable).

  11. A MEMS-based solid propellant microthruster array for space and military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaalane, A.; Chemam, R.; Houabes, M.; Yahiaoui, R.; Metatla, A.; Ouari, B.; Metatla, N.; Mahi, D.; Dkhissi, A.; Esteve, D.

    2015-12-01

    Since combustion is an easy way to achieve large quantities of energy from a small volume, we developed a MEMS based solid propellant microthruster array for small spacecraft and micro-air-vehicle applications. A thruster is composed of a fuel chamber layer, a top-side igniter with a micromachined nozzle in the same silicon layer. Layers are assembled by adhesive bonding to give final MEMS array. The thrust force is generated by the combustion of propellant stored in a few millimeter cube chamber. The micro-igniter is a polysilicon resistor deposited on a low stress SiO2/SiNx thin membrane to ensure a good heat transfer to the propellant and thus a low electric power consumption. A large range of thrust force is obtained simply by varying chamber and nozzle geometry parameters in one step of Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Experimental tests of ignition and combustion employing home made (DB+x%BP) propellant composed of a DoubleBase and Black-Powder. A temperature of 250 °C, enough to propellant initiation, is reached for 40 mW of electric power. A combustion rate of about 3.4 mm/s is measured for DB+20%BP propellant and thrust ranges between 0.1 and 3,5 mN are obtained for BP ratio between 10% and 30% using a microthruster of 100 μm of throat wide.

  12. Propeller design IV : a simple method for determining the strength of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E

    1926-01-01

    The object of this report, the last of a series of four on propeller design, is to describe a simple method for determining whether the strength of a propeller of a standard form is sufficient for safe operation. An approximate method of stress analysis is also given.

  13. 75 FR 7934 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems 1A103/TCM Series Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... inspections of steel reinforcement plates and gaskets. This AD results from 16 reports received of propeller..., inspections of steel reinforcement plates and gaskets, removal from service of propellers with cracks that do... not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of...

  14. 75 FR 34390 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Five-Blade Propeller Assemblies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... 2005-NE-35-AD RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems Five-Blade Propeller...). SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain McCauley... technical contents of McCauley Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) No. ASB250A, dated February 12, 2010. This...

  15. Design issues for propulsion systems using metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Rapp, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants that contain metal particles. These particles are suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Aluminum is used as the metal additive. The addition of metal to conventional propellants can increase their specific impulse and their density over conventional propellants, and consequently, the payload delivered on Mars and lunar transportation vehicles, Earth-to-Orbit vehicles and upper stages for robotic planetary missions. Gelled fuels also provide increased safety during accidental propellant leakage or spills. To take full advantage of these potential performance increases, there are changes that must be made to the vehicle design. The differences are discussed between metallized propellant and traditional liquid propellants and their effect on the propulsion system design. These differences include the propellant density, mixture ratio, engine performance, and propellant rheology. Missions related to the Space Exploration Initiative are considered as design examples to illustrate these issues.

  16. The PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Mission and Connecting to the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian; Bilen, Sven; Hoyt, Rob; Stone,Nobie; Vaughn, Jason; Fuhrhop, Keith; Krause, Linda; Khazanov, George; Johnson, Les

    2012-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size.and cost.with delta-V makes missions that require large total impulse cost prohibitive. Led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, a team from government, industry, and academia has developed a flight demonstration mission concept of an integrated electrodynamic (ED) tethered satellite system called PROPEL: "Propulsion using Electrodynamics". The PROPEL Mission is focused on demonstrating a versatile configuration of an ED tether to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation, enable new classes of missions currently unaffordable or infeasible, and significantly advance the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to an operational level. We are also focused on establishing a far deeper understanding of critical processes and technologies to be able to scale and improve tether systems in the future. Here, we provide an overview of the proposed PROPEL mission. One of the critical processes for efficient ED tether operation is the ability to inject current to and collect current from the ionosphere. Because the PROPEL mission is planned to have both boost and deboost capability using a single tether, the tether current must be capable of flowing in both directions and at levels well over 1 A. Given the greater mobility of electrons over that of ions, this generally requires that both ends of the ED tether system can both collect and emit electrons. For example, hollow cathode plasma contactors (HCPCs) generally are viewed as state-of-the-art and high TRL devices; however, for ED tether applications important questions remain of how efficiently they can operate as both electron collectors and emitters. Other technologies will be highlighted that are being investigated as possible alternatives to the HCPC such as Solex that generates a plasma cloud from a solid material (Teflon) and electron emission (only) technologies such as cold-cathode electron field emission or photo-electron beam generation (PEBG) techniques.

  17. Self-propelled droplet behavior during condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bei; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-01

    Self-propelled droplet motion has applications in various engineering fields such as self-cleaning surfaces, heat transfer enhancement, and anti-icing methods. A superhydrophobic surface was fabricated using two simultaneous chemical reactions with droplet condensation experiments performed on the horizontal superhydrophobic surface to characterize the droplet behavior. The droplet behavior is classified into three types based on their motion features and leftover marks as immobile droplet coalescence, self-propelled droplet jumping, and self-propelled droplet sweeping. This study focuses on the droplet sweeping that occurs due to the ultra-small rolling angle of the superhydrophobic surface, where the resulting droplet sweeps along the surface, merging with all the droplets it meets and leaving a long, narrow, clear track with a large droplet at the end of the track. An easy method is developed to predict the droplet sweeping direction based on the relative positions of the droplets just before coalescence. The droplet sweeping always absorbs dozens of droplets and is not limited by the surface structures; thus, this sweeping has many useful applications. In addition, the relationships between the droplet behavior and the number of participating droplets are also analyzed statistically.

  18. Mathematical Modelling of Thermal Stratification in a Cryogenic Propellant Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Gagan; Joseph, Jeswin; Agarwal, Deepak; Pisharady, J. C.; Kumar, S. Sunil

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic tanks used for space applications are filled with sub-cooled cryogenic propellants, whose liquid-vapor interface remains undisturbed for long periods of time prior to launch. During this period, substantial amount of heat leaks into the tank from external sources such as solar and ambient convective fluxes, even though the tank is well insulated. This results in thermal stratification near the liquid vapour interface. A transient, two-phase, thermodynamic model of stratification in a cryogenic tank is developed, considering propellant boundary layer flow due to natural convection close to tank wall. Continuity, momentum, energy and mass transfer equations are solved using finite difference-based formulations of SINDA/FLUINT simulator. The analytical model is validated with test results reported in literature. Subsequently, studies are carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sub-cooling in propellant tank on stratified mass and liquid temperature profile. The study shows that sub-cooling of cryogenic tank leads to significant increase in stratified mass.

  19. Calculation of the distributed loads on the blades of individual multiblade propellers in axial flow using linear and nonlinear lifting surface theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesetskaya, N. N.; Timofeev, I. YA.; Shipilov, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been given to the development of methods and programs for the calculation of the aerodynamic characteristics of multiblade, saber-shaped air propellers. Most existing methods are based on the theory of lifting lines. Elsewhere, the theory of a lifting surface is used to calculate screw and lifting propellers. In this work, methods of discrete eddies are described for the calculation of the aerodynamic characteristics of propellers using the linear and nonlinear theories of lifting surfaces.

  20. A Detailed Historical Review of Propellant Management Devices for Low Gravity Propellant Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive background and historical review of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) used throughout spaceflight history. The purpose of a PMD is to separate liquid and gas phases within a propellant tank and to transfer vapor-free propellant from a storage tank to a transfer line en route to either an engine or receiver depot tank, in any gravitational or thermal environment. The design concept, basic flow physics, and principle of operation are presented for each type of PMD. The three primary capillary driven PMD types of vanes, sponges, and screen channel liquid acquisition devices are compared and contrasted. For each PMD type, a detailed review of previous applications using storable propellants is given, which include space experiments as well as space missions and vehicles. Examples of previous cryogenic propellant management are also presented.

  1. On-Orbit Propellant Motion Resulting from an Impulsive Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low-gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity has been suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  2. Integrated Liquid Bismuth Propellant Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype bismuth propellant feed and control system was constructed and tested. An electromagnetic pump was used in this system to provide fine control of the hydrostatic pressure, and a new type of in-line flow sensor was developed to provide an accurate, real-time measurement of the mass flow rate. High-temperature material compatibility was a driving design requirement for the pump and flow sensor, leading to the selection of macor for the main body of both components. Post-test inspections of both components revealed no cracks or leaking in either. In separate proof-of-concept experiments, the pump produced a linear pressure rise as a function of current that compared favorably with theoretical pump pressure predictions, with a pressure of 10 kPa at 30 A. Flow sensing was successfully demonstrated in a bench-top test using gallium as a substitute liquid metal. A real-time controller was successfully used to control the entire system, simultaneously monitoring all power supplies and performing data acquisition duties.

  3. Energy production with a tubular propeller turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samora, I.; Hasmatuchi, V.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.; Ramos, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    Micro-hydropower is a way of improving the energetic efficiency of existent water systems. In the particular case of drinking water systems, several studies have showed that pressure reducing valves can be by-passed with turbines in order to recover the dissipated hydraulic energy to produce electricity. As conventional turbines are not always cost-effective for power under 20 kW, a new energy converter is studied. A five blade tubular propeller (5BTP), assessed through laboratorial tests on a reduced model with a diameter of 85 mm diameter and a maximal output power of 300 W, is addressed in this work. Having showed promising potential for further development, since global efficiencies of around 60% were observed, the turbine has been further used to estimate the potential for energy production in a real case study. A sub-grid of the drinking water system of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland, has been used to obtain an annual energy production through hourly simulations with several turbines.

  4. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  5. Noise generated by a propeller in a wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Propeller performance and noise were measured on two model scale propellers operating in an anechoic flow environment with and without a wake. Wake thickness of one and three propeller chords were generated by an airfoil which spanned the full diameter of the propeller. Noise measurements were made in the relative near field of the propeller at three streamwise and three azimuthal positions. The data show that as much as 10 dB increase in the OASPL results when a wake is introduced into an operating propeller. Performance data are also presented for completeness.

  6. In-Space Propellant Production Using Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William; Johnson, Wesley; Swanger, Adam; McQuade, William

    2012-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Manned exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space, and larger science mission directorate payloads can be delivered using cryogenic propulsion stages. Several architecture studies have shown that in-space cryogenic propulsion depots offer benefits including lower launch costs, smaller launch vehicles, and enhanced mission flexibility. NASA is currently planning a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) technology demonstration mission that will use existing technology to demonstrate long duration storage, acquisition, mass gauging, and transfer of liquid hydrogen in low Earth orbit. This mission will demonstrate key technologies, but the CPST architecture is not designed for optimal mission operations for a true propellant depot. This paper will consider cryogenic propellant depots that are designed for operability. The operability principles considered are reusability, commonality, designing for the unique environment of space, and use of active control systems, both thermal and fluid. After considering these operability principles, a proposed depot architecture will be presented that uses water launch and on orbit electrolysis and liquefaction. This could serve as the first true space factory. Critical technologies needed for this depot architecture, including on orbit electrolysis, zero-g liquefaction and storage, rendezvous and docking, and propellant transfer, will be discussed and a developmental path forward will be presented. Finally, use of the depot to support the NASA Science Mission Directorate exploration goals will be presented.

  7. Light-activated self-propelled colloids

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, J.; Sacanna, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yi, G.-R.; Pine, D. J.; Chaikin, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (α-Fe2O3 and TiO2), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self-propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form ‘living crystals’ which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles. PMID:25332383

  8. Using Drained Spacecraft Propellant Tanks for Habitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Andrew S. W.

    2009-01-01

    A document proposes that future spacecraft for planetary and space exploration be designed to enable reuse of drained propellant tanks for occupancy by humans. This proposal would enable utilization of volume and mass that would otherwise be unavailable and, in some cases, discarded. Such utilization could enable reductions in cost, initial launch mass, and number of launches needed to build up a habitable outpost in orbit about, or on the surface of, a planet or moon. According to the proposal, the large propellant tanks of a spacecraft would be configured to enable crews to gain access to their interiors. The spacecraft would incorporate hatchways, between a tank and the crew volume, that would remain sealed while the tank contained propellant and could be opened after the tank was purged by venting to outer space and then refilled with air. The interior of the tank would be pre-fitted with some habitation fixtures that were compatible with the propellant environment. Electrical feed-throughs, used originally for gauging propellants, could be reused to supply electric power to equipment installed in the newly occupied space. After a small amount of work, the tank would be ready for long-term use as a habitation module.

  9. Energetic residues from field disposal of gun propellants.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Hewitt, Alan D

    2010-01-15

    Military training with howitzers and mortars produces excess propellant that is burned on the training range and can result in point sources containing high concentrations of unreacted propellant constituents. Propellants contain energetic compounds such as nitroglycerin (NG) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), both of which are found at firing positions and propellant disposal areas. To quantify the mass of residue remaining from the field-expedient disposal of propellants, two mortar propellants and one howitzer propellant were burned under different field conditions. These conditions included burning on a snow pack, at the bottom of a snow pit, and in a pan surrounded by snow for the mortar propellants and on dry and wet sand for the howitzer propellant. For the mortar propellant, the energetics (NG) remaining after burning in the bowl, on frozen ground, and on snow were 0.21%, 5.2% and 18%, respectively. For the howitzer propellant, the difference in energetics (2,4-DNT) remaining after disposal on wet and dry sand was <0.1%, with the overall residue rate of around 1%, similar to that for the mortar propellant burned in an open container. These tests demonstrate that environmental factors, especially in winter, can play a significant role in the effectiveness of field-expedient disposal of propellants.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  11. Pulsed thrust propellant reorientation - Concept and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Korakianitis, T. P.; Chato, David J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of pulsed thrust to optimize the propellant reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code is used to study the performance of pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions of reorientation performance. Based on the results obtained from this study, it is concluded that pulsed thrust reorientation seems to be a feasible technique for optimizing the propellant reorientation process across a wide range of spacecraft, for a variety of missions, for the entire duration of a mission, and with a minimum of hardware design and qualification.

  12. Alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments performed in the United States in the 1960s and early 1970s and in the Soviet Union with alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters indicate performance levels substantially better than those achieved with gaseous propellants. Cathode wear appears to be less in engines with alkali metal propellants also. A critical review of the available data indicates that the data are consistent and reliable. An analysis of testing and systems-level considerations shows that pumping requirements for testing are substantially decreased and reductions in tankage fraction can be expected. In addition, while care must be exercised in handling the alkali metals, it is not prohibitively difficult or hazardous. The greatest disadvantage seems to be the potential for spacecraft contamination, but there appear to be viable strategies for minimizing the impact of propellant deposition on spacecraft surfaces. Renewed examination of alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters for ambitious SEI missions is recommended.

  13. APEX 3D Propeller Test Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    A low Reynolds number, high subsonic mach number flight regime is fairly uncommon in aeronautics. Most flight vehicles do not fly under these aerodynamic conditions. However, recently there have been a number of proposed aircraft applications (such as high altitude observation platforms and Mars aircraft) that require flight within this regime. One of the main obstacles to flight under these conditions is the ability to reliably generate sufficient thrust for the aircraft. For a conventional propulsion system, the operation and design of the propeller is the key aspect to its operation. Due to the difficulty in experimentally modeling the flight conditions in ground-based facilities, it has been proposed to conduct propeller experiments from a high altitude gliding platform (APEX). A preliminary design of a propeller experiment under the low Reynolds number, high mach number flight conditions has been devised. The details of the design are described as well as the potential data that will be collected.

  14. Propelling Exploration to the Moon and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As the Constellation Program enters its fourth year, the Ares Projects have made substantial progress toward sending human explorers beyond Earth orbit. The Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will take six astronauts or cargo to the International Space Station or four astronauts to rendezvous with Ares V for missions to the Moon, is the first human-rated vehicle NASA has developed in over 30 years. Since the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005, the Ares Projects have completed a successful system requirements review, system definition review, and preliminary design review for the Ares I crew launch vehicle. The Ares I elements are well into development, beginning with the Shuttle-derived, five-segment solid rocket motor that will provide first-stage propulsion. The first stage team has poured its first production simulation article motor and will be pouring and firing the first five-segment development motor in 2009. Large-scale tooling has been installed and tested to produce propellant tanks for the liquid-fuel upper stage at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama. The initial upper stage units and main propulsion test article will be manufactured and tested at MSFC before transferring to Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana. The upper stage engine team has completed powerpack testing using Apollo J-2 heritage hardware and begun construction of a new altitude test stand at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The flight and integrated testing group has designed and built hardware for the Ares I-X test flight scheduled for 2009, as well as begun refurbishing existing infrastructure to support ground testing. Additionally, a base configuration has been selected for the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which will send the Altair lunar lander and Orion to the Moon. Today, the Ares Projects are well on the way to building America s next generation of exploration-capable launch vehicles.

  15. A shock wave approach to the noise of supersonic propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Rice, E. J.

    1981-12-01

    To model propeller noise expected for a turboprop aircraft, the pressure ratio across the shock at the propeller tip was calculated and compared with noise data from three propellers. At helical tip Mach numbers over 1.0, using only the tip shock wave, the model gave a fairly good prediction of the noise for a bladed propeller and for a propeller swept for aerodynamic purposes. However for another propeller, which was highly swept and designed to have noise cancellations from the inboard propeller sections, the shock strength from the tip over predicted the noise. In general the good agreement indicates that shock theory is a viable method for predicting the noise from these supersonic propellers but that the shock strengths from all of the blade sections need to be properly included.

  16. Propellants and Life Support SCAPE Suit and ECU Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetzfried, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This presentation outlines the details for a conference booth that exhibits the Propellant Handlers Ensemble (PHE) and the Environmental Control Unit (ECU) for personnel loading propellants. A demonstration of the ECU Loading will be performed at the conference.

  17. Coating Composition and Method for Improving Propellant Tear Strength.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the hydroxyl to isocyanate ratios of the coating and the propellant. The coating is particularly useful on XLDB (cross-linked, composite-modified double base) and on CMDB (Composite-modified double-base) propellants. (Author)

  18. Process for the leaching of AP from propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, G. C.; Mcintosh, M. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method for the recovery of ammonium perchlorate from waste solid rocket propellant is described wherein shredded particles of the propellant are leached with an aqueous leach solution containing a low concentration of surface active agent while stirring the suspension.

  19. AEROSOL INDUSTRY SUCCESS IN REDUCING CFC PROPELLANT USAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part I of this report discusses the U.S. aerosol industry's experience in converting from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants to alternative aerosol formulations. Detailed examples of non-CFC formulations are provided for 28 categories of aerosol products. ydrocarbon propellants...

  20. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... For each propeller whose pitch cannot be controlled in flight— (1) During takeoff and initial climb at the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...