Science.gov

Sample records for karst aquifer estimates

  1. Evaluating Transmissivity Estimates from Well Hydrographs in Karst Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.g.; Shevenell, l

    1999-07-01

    Hydrograph recessions from rainfall events have previously been analyzed for discharge at springs and streams; however, relatively little quantitative research has been conducted with regard to hydrograph analysis of recessions from monitoring wells screened in karst aquifers. In previous work a quantitative hydrography analysis technique has been proposed born which matrix transmissivity (i.e., transmissivity of intergranular porosity) and specific yields of matrix, fracture, and conduit components of the aquifer may be determined from well hydrography. The technique has yielded realistic results at three sites tested by the authors thus far (Y-12, Oak Ridge, TN; Crane, IN, and Ft. Campbell, KY). Observed field data, as well as theoretical considerations, show that karst well hydrography are valid indicators of hydraulic properties of the associated karst aquifers. Results show matrix transmissivity (T) values to be in good agreement with values calculated using more traditional parameter estimation techniques such as aquifer pumping tests and slug tests in matrix dominated wells. While the hydrograph analysis technique shows promise for obtaining reliable estimates of karst aquifer T with a simple, relatively inexpensive and passive method, the utility of the technique is limited in its application depending on site-specific hydrologic conditions, which include shallow, submerged conduit systems located in areas with sufficient rainfall for water levels to respond to precipitation events.

  2. Comparison of Recharge Estimation Methods During a Wet Period in a Karst Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Durán Valsero, Juan José; Pedrera, Antonio; Jiménez-Gavilán, Pablo; Liñán Baena, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Management of water resources, implying their appropriate protection, calls for a sound evaluation of recharge. Such assessment is very complex in karst aquifers. Most methods are developed for application to detrital aquifers, without taking into account the extraordinary heterogeneity of porosity and permeability of karst systems. It is commonly recommended to estimate recharge using multiple methods; however, differences inherent to the diverse methods make it difficult to clarify the accuracy of each result. In this study, recharge was estimated in a karst aquifer working in a natural regime, in a Mediterranean-type climate, in the western part of the Sierra de las Nieves (southern Spain). Mediterranean climate regions are characterized by high inter-annual rainfall variability featuring long dry periods and short intense wet periods, the latter constituting the most important contribution to aquifer water input. This paper aims to identify the methods that provide the most plausible range of recharge rate during wet periods. Six methods were tested: the classical method of Thornthwaite-Mather, the Visual Balan code, the chloride balance method, and spatially distributed methods such as APLIS, a novel spatiotemporal estimation of recharge, and ZOODRM. The results help determine valid methods for application in the rest of the unit of study and in similar karst aquifers. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  3. Analysis of methods to estimate spring flows in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, N.

    2009-01-01

    Hydraulically and statistically based methods were analyzed to identify the most reliable method to predict spring flows in a karst aquifer. Measured water levels at nearby observation wells, measured spring pool altitudes, and the distance between observation wells and the spring pool were the parameters used to match measured spring flows. Measured spring flows at six Upper Floridan aquifer springs in central Florida were used to assess the reliability of these methods to predict spring flows. Hydraulically based methods involved the application of the Theis, Hantush-Jacob, and Darcy-Weisbach equations, whereas the statistically based methods were the multiple linear regressions and the technology of artificial neural networks (ANNs). Root mean square errors between measured and predicted spring flows using the Darcy-Weisbach method ranged between 5% and 15% of the measured flows, lower than the 7% to 27% range for the Theis or Hantush-Jacob methods. Flows at all springs were estimated to be turbulent based on the Reynolds number derived from the Darcy-Weisbach equation for conduit flow. The multiple linear regression and the Darcy-Weisbach methods had similar spring flow prediction capabilities. The ANNs provided the lowest residuals between measured and predicted spring flows, ranging from 1.6% to 5.3% of the measured flows. The model prediction efficiency criteria also indicated that the ANNs were the most accurate method predicting spring flows in a karst aquifer. ?? 2008 National Ground Water Association.

  4. Estimation of spatio-temporal recharge of aquifers in mountainous karst terrains: Application to Sierra de las Nieves (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, E.; Durán-Valsero, J. J.; Dowd, P. A.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Liñan-Baena, C.; Robledo-Ardila, P. A.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryWe describe a method for estimating the daily, spatially distributed recharge of aquifers in mountainous karst terrains using a water balance. Water recharge into an aquifer is a highly variable process over both time and space. Many methods have been developed to assess aquifer recharge although most have been applied to detrital aquifers. Many karst aquifers, especially in Mediterranean areas, occur in mountainous environments where rainfall and evapotranspiration can vary considerably over space and time and where there are usually few rainfall and temperature monitoring stations. We have used an advanced geostatistical method to estimate daily rainfall and temperature. The method involves kriging with an external drift using a climatological semi-variogram model inferred by modified maximum-likelihood. The depth of the soil-epikarst layer is estimated from remote sensing and terrain analysis data together with field observations and electrical resistivity tomography. Because of the karst nature of the mountainous terrain, concentrated infiltration is allowed for in some places. The parameters are calibrated against the cumulative discharge of various springs. The method is illustrated by a case study of the Sierra de las Nieves aquifer in the mountainous karst region of southern Spain.

  5. Estimation of transit times in a Karst Aquifer system using environmental tracers: Application on the Jeita Aquifer system-Lebanon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, Joanna; Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Estimating transit times is essential for the assessment of aquifer vulnerability to contaminants. Groundwater in karst aquifer is assumed to be relatively young due to fast preferential pathways; slow flow components are present in water stored in the fissured matrix. Furthermore, transit times are site specific as they depend on recharge rates, temperatures, elevation, and flow media; saturated and unsaturated zones. These differences create significant variation in the groundwater age in karst systems as the water sampled will be a mix of different water that has been transported through different flow pathways (fissured matrix and conduits). Several methods can be applied to estimate water transit time of an aquifer such as artificial tracers, which provide an estimate for fast flow velocities. In this study, groundwater residence times in the Jeita spring aquifer (Lebanon) were estimated using several environmental tracers such as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Helium-Tritium (3H, 3H- 3He). Additional stable isotope and major ion analysis was performed to characterize water types. Groundwater samples were collected from six different wells in the Jeita catchment area (Jurassic Kesrouane aquifer) as well as from the spring and cave itself. The results are reproducible for the Tritium-Helium method, unlike for the CFC/SF6 methods that yielded poor results due to sampling problems. Tritium concentrations in all groundwater samples show nearly the same concentration (~2.73 TU) except for one sample with relatively lower tritium concentration (~2.26 TU). Ages ranging from 0.07 ± 0.07 years to 23.59 ± 0.00 years were obtained. The youngest age is attributed to the spring/ cave while the oldest ages were obtained in wells tapping the fissured matrix. Neon in these samples showed considerable variations and high delta Ne in some samples indicating high excess air. Four (4) samples showed extreme excess air (Delta-Ne is greater than 70 %) and

  6. Analysis of well hydrographs in a karst aquifer: Estimates of specific yields and continuum transmissivities

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    Hydrograph analysis techniques have been well developed for hydrographs obtained from streams and springs, where data are cast in terms of total discharge. The data obtained from well hydrographs provide water level versus time; hence, a method of hydrograph analysis is required for situations in which only water level data are available. It is hypothesized here that three segments on a recession curve from wells in a karst aquifer represent drainage from three types of storage: conduit (C), fracture (F), and matrix (M). Hydrographs from several wells in a karst aquifer at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are used to estimate the specific yields (S{sub y}) associated with each portion of the aquifer (C, F, M), as well as continuum transmissivities (T). Data from three short injection tests at one well indicate continuum T at this well bore is {approximately} 5m{sup 2}/d, and tests at numerous other wells in the aquifer yield results between 1 and 7 M{sup 2}/d. The T estimated with well hydrographs from two storm events indicates a T of 9.8 m{sup 2}2/d. Well developed conduit systems in which water levels in wells show a flashy response typically show S{sub y} values of 1{times}10{sup -4}, 1{times}10{sup -3}, and 3{times}10{sup -3}, for C, F, and M. Less well developed conduit areas show more nearly equal S{sub y} values (8.6{times}10{sup -4}, 1.3{times}10{sup -3}, 3{times}10{sup -3}). Areas with no evidence for the presence of conduits have only one, or in some cases two, slopes on the recession curve. In these cases, water level responses are slow. Recession curves with a single slope represent drainage from only the lower T matrix. Those with two slopes have an additional, more rapid response, segment on the recession curve, which represents drainage from the higher T, lower S{sub y}, fractures in the system.

  7. Contrasting definitions for the term `karst aquifer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Stephen R. H.; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Alexander, E. Calvin; Davies, Gareth J.; Schindel, Geary M.

    2017-08-01

    It is generally considered that karst aquifers have distinctly different properties from other bedrock aquifers. A search of the literature found five definitions that have been proposed to differentiate karst aquifers from non-karstic aquifers. The five definitions are based upon the presence of solution channel networks, hydraulic conductivities >10-6 m/s, karst landscapes, channels with turbulent flow, and caves. The percentage of unconfined carbonate aquifers that would classify as `karst' ranges from <1 to >50%.

  8. A new Method to Estimate the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) for Porosity in Heterogeneous Karst Aquifers Using Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, M. R.; Manda, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    Karst limestones are characterized by solution-enhanced macropores and conduits that lead to exceptional heterogeneity at the aquifer scale. The interconnected network of solution cavities often results in a conduit flow regime that bypasses the less permeable rock matrix. Efforts to manage and protect karst aquifers, which are vital water resources in many parts of the world, will benefit from meaningful characterizations of the heterogeneity inherent in these formations. To this end, we propose a new method to estimate the representative elementary volume (REV) for macroporosity within karst aquifers using techniques borrowed from remote sensing and geospatial analysis. The REV represents a sampling window in which numerous measurements of a highly-variable property (e.g., porosity, hydraulic conductivity) can be averaged into a single representative value of statistical and physical significance. High-resolution borehole images are classified into binary images consisting of pixels designated as either rock matrix or pore space. A two-dimensional porosity is calculated by summing the total area occupied by pores within a rectangular sampling window placed over the binary image. Small sampling windows quantify the heterogeneous nature of porosity distribution in the aquifer, whereas large windows provide an estimate of overall porosity. Applying this procedure to imagery taken from the Biscayne aquifer of south Florida yields a macroporosity of ~40%, considerably higher than the ~28% porosity measured from recovered core samples. Geospatial analysis may provide the more reliable estimate because it incorporates large solution cavities and conduits captured by the borehole image. The REV is estimated by varying the size of sampling windows around prominent conduits and evaluating the change in porosity as a function of window size. Average porosities decrease systematically with increasing sampling size, eventually converging to a constant value and thus

  9. Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Time-of-travel transport estimation is employed to predict contaminant migration in karst aquifers. Estimation of time-of-travel transport is conditioned on the set of hydraulic-flow that occur within karst conduits. These parameters are applied to surface-water models to reflect time-of-travel flow and geometries are determined empirically through quantitative ground-water tracing studies. Quantitative ground-water tracing studies are based on a comprehensive tracer budget and numerical analysis of the tracer recovery curves for time-of-travel parameters that include mean residence time, mean flow velocity, longitudinal dispersivity, karst conduit volume, cross-sectional area, diameter, and hydraulic depth for use in surface-water models.

  10. A groundwater conceptual model and karst-related carbon sink for a glacierized alpine karst aquifer, Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Cheng; Liu, Zaihua; Yang, Jianwen; Yang, Rui

    2015-10-01

    In the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain (JDSM) region, Yunnan Province, SW China, an extensive hydrochemical and stable isotopic study of a glacierized alpine karst aquifer was conducted during the period, 2011-2014. The objectives of the study were: first, to establish a conceptual hydrogeological model of the karst groundwater system; second, to estimate the proportion of extra glacier melt water infiltrating the karst aquifer that is being induced by the regional climate warming; third, to calculate the karst-related flux of carbon into the karst aquifer. Knowledge of the local hydrogeological background from previous work was the starting point of the hydrochemical and stable isotopic study. Some representative spring waters and recharge waters (i.e. glacier melt water and rainwater) were investigated both spatially and temporally by hydrochemical and isotopic techniques, including analysis of major and some minor ions and O and H stable isotopes. A conceptual hydrogeological model of a fracture-diffuse flow karst groundwater aquifer was proposed. The proportion of glacier melt water infiltrating into the karst aquifer was estimated by using the karst spring as a natural pluviometer, and with stable isotope analysis. Results show that (1) the JDSM karst aquifer is a diffuse flow system; (2) it has a number of discharge areas, and the Jinsha River is the karst drainage base level; (3) the proportion of the glacier melt water penetrating the karst aquifer is 29%; and (4) the karst-related carbon sink is 26.67 ± 3.44 t km-2 a-1 (as CO2), which is lower than that in non-glacierized karst aquifers but over ten times larger than the carbon sink flux from silicate weathering in non-karst areas, showing the control of both climate and lithology on the rock weathering-related carbon sink and the significance of carbonate weathering in the global carbon cycle.

  11. Isotope supported recession analysis to assess hydraulic properties of karst aquifers across Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Brielmann, Heike

    2017-04-01

    Austria obtains almost half of its drinking water from karst aquifers. To manage karst aquifers in a sustainable way, reliable estimations of available karst water resources, their renewal rates and their hydrodynamics are of utmost importance. Hydrological models, which are a common tool for water resources assessment and planning, are difficult to apply at karst aquifers as their strong heterogeneity of hydraulic properties requires detailed measurements that are mostly not available. Here, we present the preliminary results of the first attempt to assess karst aquifer hydraulic properties at a national scale. Our approach uses karst specific recession analysis that is supported by water isotope measurements. We show for a subset of test sites that isotopic information results in a more realistic description of recession properties. Through this combined approach, we can approximate the degree of karstification by comparing the recession of the slow and diffuse parts of the aquifer and the recession of the fast and concentrated parts of the karst aquifers. In the future, we will use a much larger set of water isotope measurements (>7,000 water samples) at a large number of karst springs across Austria and apply landscape descriptors, such as river network density, to upscale the approximated degree of karstification from the karst springs to all karst areas in Austria.

  12. Research approach to teaching groundwater biodegradation in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, L.; Byl, T.; Painter, R.

    2006-01-01

    TSU in partnership with the USGS has conducted extensive research regarding biode??gradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This research resulted in the development of a numerical approach to modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers that is taught to environmental engineering students in several steps. First, environmental engineering students are taught chemical-reaction engineering principles relating to a wide variety of environmental fate and transport issues. Second, as part of TSU's engineering course curriculum, students use a non-ideal flow laboratory reactor system and run a tracer study to establish residence time distribution (RTD). Next, the students couple that formula to a first-order biodegradation rate and predict the removal of a biodegradable contaminant as a function of residence time. Following this, students are shown data collected from karst bedrock wells that suggest that karst aquifers are analogous to non-ideal flow reactors. The students are challenged to develop rates of biodegradation through lab studies and use their results to predict biodegradaton at an actual contaminated karst site. Field studies are also conducted to determine the accuracy of the students' predictions. This academic approach teaches biodegradation processes, rate-kinetic processes, hydraulic processes and numerical principles. The students are able to experience how chemical engineering principles can be applied to other situations, such as, modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This paper provides background on the chemical engineering principles and karst issues used in the research-enhanced curriculum. ?? American Society for Engineering Education, 2006.

  13. Identification of the attenuation potential of a karst aquifer by an artificial dualtracer experiment with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2012-10-15

    Little is known with respect to the attenuation capacity of karst aquifers. Even less is known about the risk posed by emerging micropollutants in these systems. In order to identify the attenuation potential of karst aquifers in-situ and to estimate the risk posed by micropollutants, a dualtracer test was conducted in this study in order to investigate differential transport in the subsurface: The reactive compound caffeine was used as a tracer to indicate the attenuation capacity within the aquifer in-situ. Due to the low limit of quantification, only small amounts of caffeine needed to be injected. To calibrate a model and to visualize the attenuation of caffeine a conservative reference tracer (uranine) is injected simultaneously. The methodology is tested in a well-characterised karst system in southwest Germany. The results indicate a significantly higher attenuation rate than was expected for karst aquifers. The attenuation is decribed as a first-order process. The corresponding half-life is 104 h. This low half-life suggests that a generally assumed low natural attenuation capacity of karst aquifers is unjustified. The observed mass loss of caffeine illustrates the potential of caffeine to be used as reactive tracer for indicating in-situ attenuation capacity within highly hydraulically conductive systems, such as karst aquifers. Due to the high attenuation rate of caffeine it does not pose a threat as a long-time contaminant. In combination with a conservative reference tracer an economical and environmentally benign method is presented in this manuscript for the in-situ determination of the attenuation capacity of highly conductive aquifer systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unprotected karst resources in western Iran: the environmental impacts of intensive agricultural pumping on the covered karstic aquifer, a case in Kermanshah province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Kamal; Taheri, Milad; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Bare and covered karst areas, with developed karstic aquifers, cover 35 percent of the Kermanshah province in western Iran. These aquifers are the vital sources for drinking and agricultural water supplies. Over the past decade, intensive groundwater use (exploitation) for irrigation imposed a significant impact on the carbonate environments. The huge amount of groundwater over-exploitations has been carried out and still goes on by local farmers in the absence of appropriate governance monitoring control. Increasing in water demands, for more intense crop production, is an important driving force toward groundwater depletion in alluvial aquifers. Progressive groundwater over-exploitations from underlying carbonate rocks have led to dramatic drawdown in alluvial aquifers and deep karst water tables. Detecting new sources of groundwater extractions and prohibiting the karst water utilization for agricultural use could be the most effective strategy to manage the sustainability of covered karst aquifers. Anthropogenic pressures on covered karst aquifers have magnified the drought impacts and caused dryness of most of the karst springs and deep wells. In this study, the combination of geophysical and geological studies was used to estimate the most intensively exploited agricultural zones of Islam Abad plain in the southwestern Kermanshah province using GIS. The results show that in the past decade a great number of deep wells were drilled through the overburden alluvial aquifer and reached the deep karst water resources. However, the difficulties involved in monitoring deep wells in covered karst aquifer were the main cause of karst water depletion. Overexploitation from both alluvial and karst aquifers is the main reason for drying out the Arkawazi, Sharafshah, Gawrawani karst springs, and the karst drinking water wells 1, 3 and 5 of Islam Abad city. Karst spring landscape destructions, fresh water supply deficit for inhabitants, decreasing of tourism and

  15. Predictability, stationarity, and classification of hydraulic responses to recharge in two karst aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2012-08-01

    Karst aquifers, many of which are rapidly filled and depleted, are likely to be highly susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, and stream base flow) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model simulates nonstationary soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a nonstationary convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data was 4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and among aquifers. Combined principal component analysis and cluster analysis of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs separated those sites with IRFs having a large ratio of the mean response time to the system memory from those with large skewness and kurtosis. Classification of the IRF metrics indicate that there is a range of IRF characteristics for different site types (i.e., spring flow, groundwater level, base flow) within a karst system. Further, similar site types did not necessarily display similar IRFs. Results indicate that the differences existing within either aquifer are larger than the differences between the two aquifers and that the two aquifers are similar according to this classification. The use of multiple metrics to describe the IRFs provides a novel way to characterize and compare the way in which multiple sites respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for additional aquifers, they could contribute to an IRF

  16. Processes Affecting Nitrogen Speciation in a Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Musgrove, M.; Wong, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Like many karst aquifers, the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, in central Texas, is in an area undergoing rapid growth in population, and there is concern as to how increased amounts of wastewater might affect groundwater quality. We measured concentrations and estimated loads of nitrogen (N) species in recharge to and discharge from the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, central Texas, to evaluate processes affecting the transport and fate of N species in groundwater. Water samples were collected during 17 months (November 2008-March 2010) from five streams that contribute about 85% of recharge to the aquifer segment and from Barton Springs, the principal point of discharge from the segment. The sampling period spanned a range of climatic conditions from exceptional drought to above-normal rainfall. Samples were analyzed for N species (organic N + ammonia, ammonia, nitrate + nitrite, nitrite); loads of organic N and nitrate were estimated with LOADEST, a regression-based model that uses a time series of streamflow and measured constituent concentrations to estimate constituent loads. Concentrations of organic nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were higher and concentrations of nitrate were lower in surface water than in spring discharge, consistent with conversion of organic nitrogen to nitrate and associated consumption of dissolved oxygen in the aquifer. During the period of the study, the estimated load of organic N in recharge from streams (average daily load [adl] of 39 kg/d) was about 10 times that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 9.4 kg/d), whereas the estimated load of nitrate in recharge from streams (adl of 123 kg/d) was slightly less than that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 148 kg/d). The total average N load in recharge from streams and discharge from Barton Springs was not significantly different (adl of 162 and 157 kg/d, respectively), indicating that surface-water recharge can account for all of the N in Barton Springs

  17. [Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in karst aquifer systems].

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Zou, Sheng-Zhang; Xia, Ri-Yuan; Xu, Dan-Dan; Yao, Min

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nutrients have a unique way of producing, decomposing and storing in southwest karst water systems. To understand the biogeochemical cycle of DOM in karst aquifer systems, we investigated the behavioral changes of DOM fluorescence components in Zhaidi karst river system. Two humic-like components (C1 and C2), and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component (C4) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Compared with the traditional physical and chemical indicators, spatial heterogeneity of DOM was more obvious, which can reflect the subtle changes in groundwater system. Traditional indicators mainly reflect the regional characteristics of karst river system, while DOM fluorescence components reflect the attribute gaps of sampling types.

  18. Use of stable isotope-labeled Escherichia coli as a tracer in karst aquifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial contamination of karst aquifers is a large concern across the globe, yet bacterial transport in karst aquifers is not currently well understood. Groundwater tracers typically used in karst systems include fluorescent dyes and latex microspheres. Not only can these tracers can be cost-prohi...

  19. SWISSKARST Project - how to document the karst aquifers in Switzerland using the KARSYS approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, A.; Vouillamoz, J.; Jeannin, P.-Y.; Weber, E.; Eichenberger, U.

    2012-04-01

    Swiss karst aquifers are poorly documented although they represent a resource estimated to around 120 km3 of fresh water - which is comparable to the water volume of all Swiss lakes. Within the framework of the Swiss National Research Program 61 an opportunity was given to develop a systematic way to characterize karst aquifers and to describe their hydrological behaviour. The project aims at providing methodologies or guidelines to approach karst systems and to improve their management. This covers a large range of fields such as water supply, civil engineering, renewable energies, natural hazards, etc. In this context SISKA developed a dedicated approach named KARSYS for KARst SYStems characterization. It is based on iterations of 3D geological models combined with some basic hydraulic principles taking place in karst media. The main principles are: (i) The 3D geometry of the aquifer set the framework in which flow processes take place (ii) Aquifers are flooded below the level of the main perennial springs (iii) The expansion of the water table upstream of the main springs is lower than 1% (low water stage). High water gradients are simulated according to the elevation of temporary springs or observations in existing boreholes or caves. The approach explicitly shows through 3D visual that some groundwater bodies may be separated at low water stage and connected at high water. Such 3D views bring often explanations to the interpretation of "strange" or "not repeatable" dye tracer's results. A major input of KARSYS approach is to provide a systematic construction of a conceptual model for all hydrological karst systems. It also considers interactions between adjacent systems, providing new concepts on the delineation of karst systems. KARSYS approach can be applied in a quick and approximate way and improved along in order to reach a precision according to the question to be addressed. Results of KARSYS applications are: (i) The delineation of catchment areas of

  20. Heterotrophic prokaryotic production in ultraoligotrophic alpine karst aquifers and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Wilhartitz, Inés C; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Stadler, Hermann; Herndl, Gerhard J; Dietzel, Martin; Latal, Christine; Mach, Robert L; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Spring waters from alpine karst aquifers are important drinking water resources. To investigate in situ heterotrophic prokaryotic production and its controlling factors, two different alpine karst springs were studied over two annual cycles. Heterotrophic production in spring water, as determined by [(3)H]leucine incorporation, was extremely low ranging from 0.06 to 6.83 pmol C L(-1) h(-1) (DKAS1, dolomitic-karst-spring) and from 0.50 to 75.6 pmol C L(-1) h(-1) (LKAS2, limestone-karst-spring). Microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH showed that only about 7% of the picoplankton community took up [(3)H]leucine, resulting in generation times of 3-684 days. Principal component analysis, applying hydrological, chemical and biological parameters demonstrated that planktonic heterotrophic production in LKAS2 was governed by the respective hydrological conditions, whereas variations in DKAS1 changed seemingly independent from discharge. Measurements in sediments recovered from LKAS2, DKAS1 and similar alpine karst aquifers (n=12) revealed a 10(6)-fold higher heterotrophic production (average 19 micromol C dm(-3) h(-1)) with significantly lower generation times as compared with the planktonic fraction, highlighting the potential of surface-associated communities to add to self-purification processes. Estimates of the microbially mediated CO(2) in this compartment indicated a possible contribution to karstification.

  1. A transient hybrid model for karst aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, T.; Liedl, R.; Lankenau, L.; Geyer, T.; Sauter, M.; Dörfliger, N.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater flow in karst aquifers is focused mainly in the highly permeable conduit drainage network. For the investigation of karst systems on regional scale, different stimulus-response processes can be employed, e.g. natural recharge events affecting spring discharge, or artificially induced signals, e.g. massive pumping from a borehole intercepting a conduit (stimulus) and the corresponding response of groundwater head and/or spring discharge variation. For a process-based interpretation of such pumping tests, it is necessary to simulate the time and space dependent response of the hydraulic head in the karst conduit for turbulent flow conditions. Hence, we adapted the USGS code MODBRNCH (Swain & Wexler 1996), a coupling of the open channel flow modeling tool BRANCH with MODFLOW96, to account for flow conditions in karst aquifers. BRANCH solves the St. Venant equations for open channel flow. Modifications mainly comprise the implementation of variable time step, the introduction of the Preissmann slot for pressurized flow (Zhang & Lerner 2000) as well as the adaptation of the boundary condition. All modifications result in the code MODBRNCH adapted on conduits - short ModBraC. To verify the correct functioning of ModBraC, evaluation tests were performed in order to investigate: (1) pressurized flow, (2) water transfer between rock matrix and conduits, (3) wave propagation for open channel flow, and (4) transient storage in the conduits. If possible, the results were compared with current numerical modeling approaches not accounting for (3) and (4), e.g. MODFLOW-2005 CFP (Shoemaker et al. 2008), as well as with analytical solutions. The comparison between the analytical and the numerical solution shows the correct implementation of the open channel flow equations in ModBraC. Transient storage was investigated using the scenario of a stepwise dewatering pipe. The comparison with steady state modeling approaches based on the water balance shows a large difference

  2. Modelling karst aquifer evolution in fractured, porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2016-12-01

    The removal of material in soluble rocks by physical and chemical dissolution is an important process enhancing the secondary porosity of soluble rocks. Depending on the history of the soluble rock, dissolution can occur either along fractures and bedding partings of the rock in the case of a telogenetic origin, or within the interconnected pore space in the case of eogenetic origin. In soluble rocks characterised by both fractures and pore space, dissolution in both flow compartments is possible. We investigate the dissolution of calcite both along fractures and within the pore space of a limestone rock by numerical modelling. The limestone rock is treated as fractured, porous aquifer, in which the hydraulic conductivity increases with time both for the fractures and the pore spaces. We show that enlargement of pore space by dissolution will accelerate the development of a classical fracture-dominated telogenetic karst aquifer, breakthrough occurs faster. In the case of a pore-controlled aquifer as in eogenetic rocks, enlargement of pores results in a front of enlarged pore spaces migrating into the karst aquifer, with more homogeneous enlargement around this dissolution front, and later breakthrough.

  3. Heterotrophic prokaryotic production in ultra-oligotrophic alpine karst aquifers and ecological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wilhartitz, Inés C.; Kirschner, Alexander K.T.; Stadler, Hermann; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Dietzel, Martin; Latal, Christine; Mach, Robert L.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Spring waters from alpine karst aquifers are important drinking water resources. To investigate in situ prokaryotic heterotrophic production (HP) and its controlling factors, two alpine karst springs of contrasting hydrogeology but of nearby catchments were studied over two annual cycles. Heterotrophic production in spring water, as determined by [3H]leucine incorporation, was low but revealed strong seasonal variations ranging from 0.06 to 6.83 pmol C l−1 h−1 (DKAS1, dolomitic karst-spring) and from 0.50 to 75.6 pmol C l−1 h−1 (LKAS2, limestone karst-spring). Microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition - fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-CARD-FISH) showed that only about 7 % of the picoplankton community took up [3H]leucine resulting in generation times of 3 to 684 days. Principal component analysis, applying hydrological, chemical and biological parameters demonstrated that planktonic heterotrophic production in LKAS2 was strongly governed by hydrogeographical components (e.g. discharge), whereas variations in DKAS1 are also strongly influenced by changes within the aquifer itself. Measurements in sediments recovered from LKAS2, DKAS1 and similar alpine karst aquifers (n=12) revealed an 106-fold higher heterotrophic production (average 19 μmol C dm−3 h−1) with significantly lower generation times as compared to the planktonic fraction, highlighting the metabolic potential of surface associated endokarst communities to add to self-purification processes. Estimates of microbially mediated CO2 in this compartment indicated a possible contribution to karstification. PMID:19490127

  4. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Osborn, C.L.; Ryan, J.N.; Cunningham, K.J.; Landkamer, Lee L.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 ??m diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 ??m microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 ??m microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 ??m microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 ??m oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Renken, Robert A.; Osborn, Christina L.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Landkamer, Lee

    2008-08-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 μm diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 μm microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 μm microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 μm microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 μm oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account.

  6. Water resources management in karst aquifers - concepts and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, M.; Schmidt, S.; Abusaada, M.; Reimann, T.; Liedl, R.; Kordilla, J.; Geyer, T.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources management schemes generally imply the availability of a spectrum of various sources of water with a variability of quantity and quality in space and time, and the availability and suitability of storage facilities to cover various demands of water consumers on quantity and quality. Aquifers are generally regarded as suitable reservoirs since large volumes of water can be stored in the subsurface, water is protected from contamination and evaporation and the underground passage assists in the removal of at least some groundwater contaminants. Favorable aquifer properties include high vertical hydraulic conductivities for infiltration, large storage coefficients and not too large hydraulic gradients / conductivities. The latter factors determine the degree of discharge, i.e. loss of groundwater. Considering the above criteria, fractured and karstified aquifers appear to not really fulfill the respective conditions for storage reservoirs. Although infiltration capacity is relatively high, due to low storativity and high hydraulic conductivities, the small quantity of water stored is rapidly discharged. However, for a number of specific conditions, even karst aquifers are suitable for groundwater management schemes. They can be subdivided into active and passive management strategies. Active management options include strategies such as overpumping, i.e. the depletion of the karst water resources below the spring outflow level, the construction of subsurface dams to prevent rapid discharge. Passive management options include the optimal use of the discharging groundwater under natural discharge conditions. System models that include the superposition of the effect of the different compartments soil zone, epikarst, vadose and phreatic zone assist in the optimal usage of the available groundwater resources, while taking into account the different water reservoirs. The elaboration and implementation of groundwater protection schemes employing well

  7. What Can We Learn About Karst Aquifer Heterogeneity From Pumping Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, J. C.; Dewandel, B.; Ladouche, B.; Fleury, P.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the complexity and duality of flows, well-test interpretation into karst systems constitutes a challenging task for hydrogeologists. This is especially true when the pumping well intersects karst heterogeneities such as the conduit network. The method of diagnostic plots, widely used in oil industry, can be applied to karst hydrogeology. In this paper, the classical response of a well-test into a karst conduit is described on a log-log drawdown derivative curve. It allows identifying successive flow regimes corresponding to the contribution of various karst aquifer subsystems (fractured matrix, karst conduit, main karst drainage network) to the pumped well. In heterogeneous karst systems, the log-log diagnostic plot of drawdown and its derivative in the pumping well can help identifying departures in flow-geometry from the classical homogeneous radial case. Classically, the diagnostic plot can be divided into several portions with: (a) early data used for identifying the karst conduit storage; (b) intermediate data for identifying the type of aquifer model that should be used (e.g. double porosity, anisotropy...); and (c) late data for identifying the possible boundaries. This is illustrated on three examples from Mediterranean karsts in southern France. A one-month duratio pumping test on a well intersecting the main karst drainage network of the Cent-Fonts karst system shows (i) a preliminary contribution of the karst conduit storage capacity followed by (ii) linear flows into the fractured matrix. A pumping test on a well intersecting a small karst conduit of the Corbières karst system shows the existence of (i) bi-linear flow within both the karst conduit and the fractured matrix at early times, followed by (ii) radial flows within the fractured matrix and (iii) finally the contribution of a major karst cavity. A two-months duration pumping test on a deep confined karst aquifer under low permeability rocks into the Gardanne basin shows the existence of

  8. Prediction, Time Variance, and Classification of Hydraulic Response to Recharge in Two Karst Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (springflow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  9. Prediction, Time Variance, and Classification of Hydraulic Response to Recharge in Two Karst Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Wang, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (springflow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  10. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  11. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  12. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-05-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  13. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  14. Anthropogenic contaminants as tracers in an urbanizing karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Barbara; Massei, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    Karst aquifers are uniquely vulnerable to contamination. In the Barton Springs segment of the karstic Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.), urban contaminants such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds frequently are detected in spring base flow. To determine whether contaminant concentrations change in response to storms, and if they therefore might act as tracers of focused recharge, samples were collected from Barton Springs at closely spaced intervals following three storms. Two herbicides (atrazine and simazine), two insecticides (carbaryl and diazinon), and a solvent (tetrachloroethene) described breakthrough curves over a 1-week period following one or more storms. The breakthrough curves were decomposed into two to five log-normal subcurves, which were interpreted as representing pulses of contaminants moving through the aquifer. Each subcurve could be used in the same way as an artificial tracer to determine travel time to and recovery at the spring. The contaminants have several advantages over artificial tracers: they represent the actual compounds of interest, they are injected essentially simultaneously at several points, and they are injected under those conditions when transport is of the most interest, i.e., following storms. The response of storm discharge, specific conductance, and contaminant loading at the spring depended on initial aquifer flow conditions, which varied from very low (spring discharge of 0.48 m3/s) to high (spring discharge of 2.7 m3/s): concentrations and recovery were the highest when initial aquifer flow conditions were low. This behavior provides information about aquifer structure and the influence of aquifer flow condition on transport properties.

  15. Anthropogenic contaminants as tracers in an urbanizing karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.; Massei, N.

    2007-01-01

    Karst aquifers are uniquely vulnerable to contamination. In the Barton Springs segment of the karstic Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.), urban contaminants such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds frequently are detected in spring base flow. To determine whether contaminant concentrations change in response to storms, and if they therefore might act as tracers of focused recharge, samples were collected from Barton Springs at closely spaced intervals following three storms. Two herbicides (atrazine and simazine), two insecticides (carbaryl and diazinon), and a solvent (tetrachloroethene) described breakthrough curves over a 1-week period following one or more storms. The breakthrough curves were decomposed into two to five log-normal subcurves, which were interpreted as representing pulses of contaminants moving through the aquifer. Each subcurve could be used in the same way as an artificial tracer to determine travel time to and recovery at the spring. The contaminants have several advantages over artificial tracers: they represent the actual compounds of interest, they are injected essentially simultaneously at several points, and they are injected under those conditions when transport is of the most interest, i.e., following storms. The response of storm discharge, specific conductance, and contaminant loading at the spring depended on initial aquifer flow conditions, which varied from very low (spring discharge of 0.48??m3/s) to high (spring discharge of 2.7??m3/s): concentrations and recovery were the highest when initial aquifer flow conditions were low. This behavior provides information about aquifer structure and the influence of aquifer flow condition on transport properties. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors Affecting Public-Supply Well Vulnerability in Two Karst Aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G; Fahlquist, Lynne S; Crandall, Christy A; Lindgren, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (<10 years) groundwater. Vulnerability was demonstrated by the frequent detection of similar constituents of concern in both aquifers (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management. PMID:24841501

  17. Factors affecting public-supply well vulnerability in two karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G.; Fahlquist, Lynne S.; Crandall, Christy A.; Lindgren, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (<10 years) groundwater. Vulnerability was demonstrated by the frequent detection of similar constituents of concern in both aquifers (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management.

  18. Transmissivity of Aquifer by Capture Zone Method: An Application in the Sete Lagoas Karst Aquifer, MG, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Paulo; Halihan, Todd; Hirata, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Transmissivity is an important hydraulic parameter to determine the amount of water passed horizontally across a given saturated thickness of an aquifer. The techniques to quantify this parameter, such as grain size analyses or pumping tests, can have limitations of time/spatial scale, viability, or economically. One technique that can be used, but little adopted, is the capture zone analysis. In this paper, capture zone analytical equations were used to estimate transmissivity values in order to verify the effectiveness of this methodology as alternative in situations where other traditional methods present implementation difficulties. The results were compared with field data estimated by aquifer tests conducted in the same region. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to identify possible discrepancies between the analytical and field data results. The aquifer studied was the Sete Lagoas Karst Aquifer in the urban region of the municipality of Sete Lagoas, Brazil. The method proved to be a viable and economical tool, where the analytical values compared to the aquifer tests showed similarities, being confirmed by a sensitivity analysis. However, a reliable potentiometric surface map, which enables the identification of the parameters for analytical capture zone equations, is needed.

  19. Updating an equivalent porous medium karst aquifer model using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, S. P.; Ronayne, M. J.; Long, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Karst conduits are commonly treated as high-conductivity zones in equivalent porous medium (EPM) models. In this study, an EPM model for a Paleozoic age carbonate aquifer was updated to include discrete conduits, and flow was simulated using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method. The modeled area, encompassing 2000 square km of the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota (USA), includes four karst springs with contributing conduit networks. The updated model considered the same observation data that were used to calibrate the EPM model: measured hydraulic heads at matrix observation wells and estimated springflow. Adjusted parameters included the conduit locations and hydraulic properties, as well as the matrix hydraulic conductivity distribution. Inferred karst pathways from environmental tracer analysis were used to guide the placement of conduits. The new coupled continuum pipe-flow model is characterized by a simpler conductivity distribution; extreme high-K values used in the EPM model are not necessary when conduit flow is explicitly simulated. Results are presented to illustrate the influence of conduits on simulated flow behavior.

  20. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 1. Revised conceptualization of groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.; Cunningham, K.J.; Shapiro, A.M.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.; Wacker, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Biscayne aquifer is a highly transmissive karst limestone that serves as the sole source of drinking water to over two million residents in south Florida. The aquifer is characterized by eogenetic karst, where the most transmissive void space can be an interconnected, touching-vug, biogenically influenced porosity of biogenic origin. Public supply wells in the aquifer are in close proximity to lakes established by surface mining. The mining of the limestone has occurred to the same depths as the production wells, which has raised concerns about pathogen and chemical transport from these surface water bodies. Hydraulic and forced gradient tracer tests were conducted to augment geologic and geophysical studies and to develop a hydrogeologic conceptual model of groundwater flow and chemical transport in the Biscayne aquifer. Geologic and geophysical data indicate multiple, areally extensive subhorizontal preferential flow zones of vuggy limestone separated by rock with a matrix pore system. The hydraulic response from an aquifer test suggests that the Biscayne aquifer behaves as a dual-porosity medium; however, the results of the tracer test showed rapid transport similar to other types of karst. The tracer test and concurrent temperature logging revealed that only one of the touching-vug flow zones dominates transport near the production wells. On the basis of the rising limb of the breakthrough curve, the dispersivity is estimated to be less than 3% of the tracer travel distance, which suggests that the fastest flow paths in the formation are likely to yield limited dilution of chemical constituents.

  1. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, Marylynn; Opsahl, Stephen P.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Herrington, Chris; Sample, Thomas; Banta, John (Ryan)

    2016-01-01

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3−) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3− in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008–12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3− stable isotopes (δ15N and δ18O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3− concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3− concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3− concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3−. These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3− contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008–10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3−than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously

  2. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  3. Water Flow in Karst Aquifer Considering Dynamically Variable Saturation Conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chaoqun; Hu, Bill X.

    2017-04-01

    The karst system is generally conceptualized as dual-porosity system, which is characterized by low conductivity and high storage continuum matrix and high conductivity and quick flow conduit networks. And so far, a common numerical model for simulating flow in karst aquifer is MODFLOW2005-CFP, which is released by USGS in 2008. However, the steady-state approach for conduit flow in CFP is physically impractical when simulating very dynamic hydraulics with variable saturation conduit. So, we adopt the method proposed by Reimann et al. (2011) to improve current model, in which Saint-Venant equations are used to model the flow in conduit. Considering the actual background that the conduit is very big and varies along flow path and the Dirichlet boundary varies with rainfall in our study area in Southwest China, we further investigate the influence of conduit diameter and outflow boundary on numerical model. And we also analyze the hydraulic process in multi-precipitation events. We find that the numerical model here corresponds well with CFP for saturated conduit, and it could depict the interaction between matrix and conduit during very dynamic hydraulics pretty well compare with CFP.

  4. Using nitrate to quantify quick flow in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Garner, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    In karst aquifers, contaminated recharge can degrade spring water quality, but quantifying the rapid recharge (quick flow) component of spring flow is challenging because of its temporal variability. Here, we investigate the use of nitrate in a two-endmember mixing model to quantify quick flow in Barton Springs, Austin, Texas. Historical nitrate data from recharging creeks and Barton Springs were evaluated to determine a representative nitrate concentration for the aquifer water endmember (1.5 mg/L) and the quick flow endmember (0.17 mg/L for nonstormflow conditions and 0.25 mg/L for stormflow conditions). Under nonstormflow conditions for 1990 to 2005, model results indicated that quick flow contributed from 0% to 55% of spring flow. The nitrate-based two-endmember model was applied to the response of Barton Springs to a storm and results compared to those produced using the same model with ??18O and specific conductance (SC) as tracers. Additionally, the mixing model was modified to allow endmember quick flow values to vary over time. Of the three tracers, nitrate appears to be the most advantageous because it is conservative and because the difference between the concentrations in the two endmembers is large relative to their variance. The ??18O- based model was very sensitive to variability within the quick flow endmember, and SC was not conservative over the timescale of the storm response. We conclude that a nitrate-based two-endmember mixing model might provide a useful approach for quantifying the temporally variable quick flow component of spring flow in some karst systems. ?? 2008 National Ground Water Association.

  5. Wellhead protection in confined, semi-confined, fractured and karst aquifer settings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Protection areas around wells producing from confined, fractured, and karst aquifers are, because of their complex hydrogeology, more difficult to define than protection areas for wells in porous media settings. The factsheet provides background information explaining the need to define protection areas for wells that draw public drinking water from several complex hydrogeologic settings: confined, semi-confined, fractured, and karst aquifers. These settings include aquifers in which the ground water is not open to the atmosphere, or the aquifer does not consist of unconsolidated porous media. Several figures illustrate these settings in a general way.

  6. Fate and Transport of TCE Solvents Through Saturated Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Carmona, M.; Anaya, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) are a group of organic compounds that have been a serious problem for groundwater pollution in karst. The industrial production and utilization of these chemicals spread since 1940, and are present at tens of thousands of contaminated sites worldwide. The physic-chemical properties of DNAPLs in conjunction with the hydraulic properties of the karst systems create the perfect condition for DNAPLs to penetrate the epikarst, reach the groundwater, and more within the karst system to zones of potential exposure, such as wells, streams and wetlands. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is the most common DNPAL found in the subsurface environment. This research studies the fate and transport of TCE DNAPL in a karstified limestone physical model (KLPM). Experiments are carried out in KLPM. The KLPM is an enclosed stainless steel tank packed with a rectangular limestone block (15cm x 15cm x 76cm) that simulates a saturated confine karst aquifer. DNAPL experiment involve the injection of 40 ml of pure TCE into steady groundwater flow at the upstream boundary of the KLPM model, while sampling spatially and temporally along the block. Samples are analyzed for TCE on the pure and dissolved phase. Pure TCE is analyzed volumetrically and dissolved phase concentrations are analyze using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). TCE data is used to construct temporal distributions curves (TDCs) at different spatial locations. Results show that pure TCE volumes are collected at the beginnings of the experiment in sampling ports located near the injection port and along preferential flow paths. TCE concentration TDCs show spatial variations related to the limestone block heterogeneously. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response and long tailing of TCE of TCE concentration are associated with diffusive transport in rock matrix and mass transport rates limitations. Bimodal distributions are

  7. Effects of precipitation events on colloids in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevenell, Lisa; McCarthy, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of precipitation events on colloid mobilization were evaluated during several storms from six wells in a karstic aquifer at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in eastern Tennessee (USA). Turbidity increases and rapidly recedes following rain events. Although the magnitude of the turbidity increases are relatively small (≤4.78 NTU), the increased turbidity suggests transient increases in colloid abundance during storm versus non-storm periods. During the larger storms (>19 mm), the increased turbidity is associated with increases in pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and temperature, and with decreases in dissolved oxygen (DO). These larger storms result in flushing of a greater proportion of higher pH, TOC (and lower DO) soil or matrix waters into the fractures and conduits than occurs during smaller storms. Smaller storms also result in increases in turbidity, but show increases in DO and decreases in pH reflecting less influence on the water chemistry from the longer residence time epikarst or and matrix waters, and greater impact from the more dilute, newly recharged waters. Due to the complexity of karst flow and temporal variations in flow and chemistry, controls on turbidity are not consistent through time and space at the wells. During smaller storms, recharge by lower ionic strength waters may promote colloid release and thus contribute to observed increases in turbidity. During larger storms, elevated turbidity may be more related to pH increases resulting from greater influx of matrix and soil waters into fractures and conduits. Chemical factors alone cannot account for the changes in turbidity observed during the various storms. Because of the complicated nature of flow and particle transport in karst aquifers, the presence of colloids during precipitation events is dictated by a complex interplay of chemical reactions and the effects of physical perturbations due to increased flow through the conduits and fractures. Simple trends in water quality

  8. Determination of pollution and recovery time of karst springs, an example from a carbonate aquifer in Israel.

    PubMed

    Magal, Einat; Arbel, Yuval; Caspi, Sarit; Glazman, Hilel; Greenbaum, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph

    2013-02-01

    This work combines the monitoring of two incidents of spring water pollution in the Western Galilee region of Israel, together with artificial tracer tests that provided valuable information regarding karst system connections and direct estimation of groundwater velocities. Almost simultaneous contamination of seven springs endangered the water supply for the region. The variations over time in contaminant concentration in the different springs were not similar, indicating more than one contamination source. Tracer tests revealed two different pollution sources that contributed to two different conduit pathways in the karst system. Breakthrough data for the tracers were modeled by a two-region non-equilibrium transport model, which provided the transport parameters of the karst conduit. Groundwater velocities in the conduits were found to be in a range of 2-3 km/day. The rapid response of the system was also demonstrated by the short recovery time of the springs, where, after the elimination of the pollution source, most water quality parameters reverted to their background concentrations in less than 3 months. The coexistence of highly polluted springs and uncontaminated groundwater in boreholes penetrating into the same aquifer demonstrates the complexity of groundwater flow in karst systems. In such systems, the fast groundwater flow in localized karst conduits seems to coexist with a slower flow within other portions of the aquifer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) Simulation of Groundwater Hydraulics and Contaminant Transport in Karst Aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Hellweger, Ferdi; Padilla, Ingrid; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy in their geologic and hydrogeologic properties which makes predicting their behavior difficult. This paper evaluates the application of the Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) approach to simulate groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport in karst aquifers using an example from the North Coast limestone aquifer system in Puerto Rico. The goal is to evaluate if the EPM approach, which approximates the karst features with a conceptualized, equivalent continuous medium, is feasible for an actual project, based on available data and the study scale and purpose. Existing National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data and previous hydrogeological U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies were used to define the model input parameters. Hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were estimated using measured groundwater heads over the study area and further calibrated against continuous water level data of three USGS observation wells. The water-table fluctuation results indicate that the model can practically reflect the steady-state groundwater hydraulics (normalized RMSE of 12.4%) and long-term variability (normalized RMSE of 3.0%) at regional and intermediate scales and can be applied to predict future water table behavior under different hydrogeological conditions. The application of the EPM approach to simulate transport is limited because it does not directly consider possible irregular conduit flow pathways. However, the results from the present study suggest that the EPM approach is capable to reproduce the spreading of a TCE plume at intermediate scales with sufficient accuracy (normalized RMSE of 8.45%) for groundwater resources management and the planning of contamination mitigation strategies. PMID:26422202

  10. Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) Simulation of Groundwater Hydraulics and Contaminant Transport in Karst Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Hellweger, Ferdi; Padilla, Ingrid; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy in their geologic and hydrogeologic properties which makes predicting their behavior difficult. This paper evaluates the application of the Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) approach to simulate groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport in karst aquifers using an example from the North Coast limestone aquifer system in Puerto Rico. The goal is to evaluate if the EPM approach, which approximates the karst features with a conceptualized, equivalent continuous medium, is feasible for an actual project, based on available data and the study scale and purpose. Existing National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data and previous hydrogeological U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies were used to define the model input parameters. Hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were estimated using measured groundwater heads over the study area and further calibrated against continuous water level data of three USGS observation wells. The water-table fluctuation results indicate that the model can practically reflect the steady-state groundwater hydraulics (normalized RMSE of 12.4%) and long-term variability (normalized RMSE of 3.0%) at regional and intermediate scales and can be applied to predict future water table behavior under different hydrogeological conditions. The application of the EPM approach to simulate transport is limited because it does not directly consider possible irregular conduit flow pathways. However, the results from the present study suggest that the EPM approach is capable to reproduce the spreading of a TCE plume at intermediate scales with sufficient accuracy (normalized RMSE of 8.45%) for groundwater resources management and the planning of contamination mitigation strategies.

  11. Estimating exposure to groundwater contaminants in karst areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, C.

    2012-12-01

    Large multidisciplinary projects investigate health effects and environmental impacts of contamination. Such multidisciplinary projects challenge groundwater hydrologist because they demand estimations of human or environmental exposure to groundwater contaminants. But especially in karst regions, groundwater quality is subject to rapid changes resulting from highly dynamic flow systems with rapid groundwater recharge and contaminant transport in karst conduits. There is a strong need for tools that allow the quantification of the risk of contaminant exposure via the karst groundwater and its temporal variation depending on rainfall events and overall hydrological conditions. A fact that makes the assessment of contaminant exposure even more difficult is that many contaminants behave differently in the subsurface than the groundwater, because they do not dissolve and exist as a separate phase. Important examples are particulate contaminants, such as bacteria, and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), such as many organic compounds. Both are ubiquitous in the environment and have large potential for health impacts. It is known from bacterial contamination of karst springs that such contamination is strongly related to flow conditions. Bacteria, which are present at the land surface, in the soil, rock matrix or the conduit system, are immobile during base flow conditions. During storm events however, they become mobilized and are rapidly transported through the conduit flow system from sources to areas of potential exposure. As a result, bacteria concentrations that most times are low at a spring can show a high peak during storm flow. Conceptual models exist that suggest that the transport of NAPLs in karst aquifers is, just like bacterial contamination, related to flow conditions. Light NAPLs that reach the saturated zone float and accumulate on the water table; and dense NAPLs sink downward in the aquifer until they are trapped in pores, fractures and conduits where

  12. Chemograph analysis of two herbicides in a German karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The dynamic of spring discharge of mature karst aquifers shows after strong precipitation events: Karst spring discharge increases rapidly and strongly, the chemical composition of the spring water is altered and contaminants may be transported from the land-surface towards the spring with the percolating rainwater. Contrary to rapid water transport, high travel times have been observed for parts of the spring discharge, employing stable isotopes as indicators. Monitoring the concentrations of Ca2+ and Cl- in spring water after a precipitation event one may observe the following: After a first increase, the concentrations of Ca2+ drop below the pre-event value, due to dilution with lowly mineralized rain water. On the other hand the concentrations of Cl- increase quickly and return to their background values nearly as fast. This difference in behavior arises from the different origins of these two inorganic ions. Ca2+ in spring water originates mainly from the dissolution of the carbonatic bedrock, while Cl- might be transported from the land-surface (e.g. from road salt) towards the spring. To investigate the dynamic of water in the Gallusquelle catchment in southwest Germany a one year sampling campaign was conducted, using different herbicides as indicator compounds. Depending on discharge conditions the sampling interval varied between 3 hours and several days. Among others, the currently applied and chemically unstable metazachlor was observed together with atrazine, which is prohibited since more than 20 years in Germany. While the detection frequency of atrazine in the spring water samples was nearly 100%, the concentrations ranged only up to 5.2 ng/L. On the other hand, the currently applied metazachlor was only detected in 30.7% of the samples, but its maximum concentration was 71.9 ng/L. An interesting feature was the different temporal concentration pattern of the two investigated herbicides: After precipitation events the concentration of metazachlor in

  13. Kinetic controls on early karst aquifer porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.G. ); Howard, A.D. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A series of simulations using the newly developed model KARST has been performed to investigate limiting kinetic controls on limestone dissolution during the earliest stages of karst aquifer porosity development. This FORTRAN model couples fluid flow within and dissolution of circular cross section conduits, and considers surface reaction rates (both far from and close to thermodynamic equilibrium), mass transfer rates of reaction products to the bulk fluid, and rates of homogeneous reactions associated with dissolution of CO[sub 2] gas in water. Mass transfer theory for both laminar and turbulent flow cases is included. Runs were made with a wide variety of initial conditions of passage geometry, head gradient, and initial PCO[sub 2]. Results show a consistent pattern of kinetic control that varies as functions of time as well as position along the conduit. Slow, higher order surface reaction rates (close to equilibrium), diffusion rates, and rapid, lower order reaction rates (far from equilibrium) are found to be limiting steps at various times and location. Under no conditions in the simulations did the rate of CO[sub 2] hydration limit dissolution. Thresholds between the various kinetic regimes were found to be associated with a critical distance from equilibrium, as well as the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As a result of interactions between flow and chemical conditions, passage growth (measure by fluid discharge rates) can be divided into an initial, slow period initiation and a more rapid one (enlargement). The onset of the enlargement phase was not found to coincide with any single kinetic event.

  14. Microbial diversity and impact on carbonate geochemistry across a changing geochemical gradient in a karst aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Cassie J; Engel, Annette S

    2013-01-01

    Although microbes are known to influence karst (carbonate) aquifer ecosystem-level processes, comparatively little information is available regarding the diversity of microbial activities that could influence water quality and geological modification. To assess microbial diversity in the context of aquifer geochemistry, we coupled 16S rRNA Sanger sequencing and 454 tag pyrosequencing to in situ microcosm experiments from wells that cross the transition from fresh to saline and sulfidic water in the Edwards Aquifer of central Texas, one of the largest karst aquifers in the United States. The distribution of microbial groups across the transition zone correlated with dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration, and significant variations in community composition were explained by local carbonate geochemistry, specifically calcium concentration and alkalinity. The waters were supersaturated with respect to prevalent aquifer minerals, calcite and dolomite, but in situ microcosm experiments containing these minerals revealed significant mass loss from dissolution when colonized by microbes. Despite differences in cell density on the experimental surfaces, carbonate loss was greater from freshwater wells than saline, sulfidic wells. However, as cell density increased, which was correlated to and controlled by local geochemistry, dissolution rates decreased. Surface colonization by metabolically active cells promotes dissolution by creating local disequilibria between bulk aquifer fluids and mineral surfaces, but this also controls rates of karst aquifer modification. These results expand our understanding of microbial diversity in karst aquifers and emphasize the importance of evaluating active microbial processes that could affect carbonate weathering in the subsurface. PMID:23151637

  15. Microbial diversity and impact on carbonate geochemistry across a changing geochemical gradient in a karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Gray, Cassie J; Engel, Annette S

    2013-02-01

    Although microbes are known to influence karst (carbonate) aquifer ecosystem-level processes, comparatively little information is available regarding the diversity of microbial activities that could influence water quality and geological modification. To assess microbial diversity in the context of aquifer geochemistry, we coupled 16S rRNA Sanger sequencing and 454 tag pyrosequencing to in situ microcosm experiments from wells that cross the transition from fresh to saline and sulfidic water in the Edwards Aquifer of central Texas, one of the largest karst aquifers in the United States. The distribution of microbial groups across the transition zone correlated with dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration, and significant variations in community composition were explained by local carbonate geochemistry, specifically calcium concentration and alkalinity. The waters were supersaturated with respect to prevalent aquifer minerals, calcite and dolomite, but in situ microcosm experiments containing these minerals revealed significant mass loss from dissolution when colonized by microbes. Despite differences in cell density on the experimental surfaces, carbonate loss was greater from freshwater wells than saline, sulfidic wells. However, as cell density increased, which was correlated to and controlled by local geochemistry, dissolution rates decreased. Surface colonization by metabolically active cells promotes dissolution by creating local disequilibria between bulk aquifer fluids and mineral surfaces, but this also controls rates of karst aquifer modification. These results expand our understanding of microbial diversity in karst aquifers and emphasize the importance of evaluating active microbial processes that could affect carbonate weathering in the subsurface.

  16. Transient deformation of karst aquifers due to seasonal and multiyear groundwater variations observed by GPS in southern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverii, Francesca; D'Agostino, Nicola; Métois, Marianne; Fiorillo, Francesco; Ventafridda, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    We present GPS, hydrological, and GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) observations in southern Apennines (Italy) pointing to a previously unnoticed response of the solid Earth to hydrological processes. Transient patterns in GPS horizontal time series near to large karst aquifers are controlled by seasonal and interannual phases of groundwater recharge/discharge of karst aquifers, modulating the extensional ˜3 mm/yr strain within the tectonically active Apennines. We suggest that transient signals are produced, below the saturation level of the aquifers and above a poorly constrained depth in the shallow crust, by time-dependent opening of subvertical, fluid-filled, conductive fractures. We ascribe this process to the immature karstification and intense tectonic fracturing, favoring slow groundwater circulation, and to multiyear variations of the water table elevation, influenced by variable seasonal recharge. The vertical component displays seasonal and multiyear signals more homogeneously distributed in space and closely correlated with estimates of total water storage from GRACE, reflecting the elastic response of the lithosphere to variations of surface water loads. The different sensitivities of vertical and horizontal components to the hydrologically induced deformation processes allow us to spatially and temporally resolve the different phases of the water cycle, from maximum hydrological loading at the surface to maximum hydrostatic pressure beneath karst aquifers. Finally, we suggest that transient deformation signals in the geodetic series of the Apennines are correlated to large-scale climatic patterns (Northern Atlantic Oscillation) through their influence on precipitation variability and trends at the regional scale.

  17. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination. PMID:23645996

  18. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2012-12-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination.

  19. Analysis of karst aquifer spring flows with a gray system decomposition model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yonghong; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J; Wang, Yanrong; Zhao, Ying

    2007-01-01

    There are approximately 470,000 km(2) of karst aquifers that feed many large springs in North China. Turbulent flow often exists in these karst aquifers, which means that the classical ground water model based on Darcy's law cannot be applied here. Ground water data are rare for these aquifers. As a consequence, it is difficult to quantitatively investigate ground water flow in these karst systems. The purpose of this study is to develop a parsimonious model that predicts karst spring discharge using gray system theory. In this theory, a white color denotes a system that is completely characterized and a black color represents a system that is totally unknown. A gray system thus describes a complex system whose characteristics are only partially known or known with uncertainty. Using this theory, we investigated the karst spring discharge time series over different time scales. First, we identified three specific components of spring discharge: the long-term trend, periodic variation, and random fluctuation. We then used the gray system model to simulate the long-term trend and obtain periodic variation and random fluctuation components. Subsequently, we developed a predictive model for karst spring discharge. Application of the model to Liulin Springs, a representative example of karst springs in northern China, shows that the model performs well. The predicted results suggest that the Liulin Springs discharge will likely decrease over time, with small fluctuations.

  20. Mobile sediment in an urbanizing karst aquifer: Implications for contaminant transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Lynch, L.; Bennett, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Here we investigate geochemical characteristics of sediment in different compartments of a karst aquifer and demonstrate that mobile sediments in a karst aquifer can exhibit a wide range of properties affecting their contaminant transport potential. Sediment samples were collected from surface streams, sinkholes, caves, wells, and springs of a karst aquifer (the Barton Springs portion of the Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) Aquifer, Central Texas) and their mineralogy, grain-size distribution, organic carbon content, and specific surface area analyzed. Statistical analysis of the sediments separated the sampling sites into three distinct groups: (1) streambeds, sinkholes, and small springs; (2) wells; and (3) caves. Sediments from the primary discharge spring were a mix of these three groups. High organic carbon content and increased potential to transport contaminants; the volume of these sediments is likely to increase with continued urbanization of the watershed.

  1. Factors affecting public-supply well vulnerability in two karst aquifers.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G; Fahlquist, Lynne S; Crandall, Christy A; Lindgren, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (<10 years) groundwater. Vulnerability was demonstrated by the frequent detection of similar constituents of concern in both aquifers (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management. © 2014 The Authors. Groundwater published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of National Ground Water Association.

  2. Reservoir properties inversion in a karst aquifer using absolute gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabrina, Deville; Thomas, Jacob; Jean, Chery; Roger, Bayer; Cedric, Champollion; Moigne Nicolas, Le

    2010-05-01

    Direct estimate of water storage and transfer in karst aquifers are difficult to obtain due to the extreme permeability variation of the medium. In this study, we aim to quantify water transfer properties in a karst aquifer of the Larzac plateau (South Massif Central, France) using absolute gravity monitoring. Our measurements are cutting edge as they directly measure the integrated water content below the gravimeter. We analyze monthly repeated FG5 absolute gravity measurements (1-2 microGal precision) over a three-year period at three sites on the karst aquifer. Important precipitation events lead to significant gravity increases which peak up to several weeks after the events depending on the site. Also, gravity decreases in a different manner at each site during drier periods. We consider the different gravity responses at each site to relate to water transfer properties between the surface and the unsaturated zone beneath. Within this scope, the gravity signal is used to invert for those water transfer properties. A simple two-tank reservoir model including a ‘soil' reservoir that feeds into a ‘subsurface' reservoir is used as the forward model in a Monte Carlo simulation. Reservoir discharge proceeds according to Maillet's law. Water levels within the reservoirs are converted into a gravity signal considering an infinite slab scaled by a factor that accounts for both the surrounding topographic effects and the water interception by the building where the measurements are made. Inverted parameters are the discharge constants and the scaling factors. Model input is rainfall measured with rain gauges at each site minus estimated evapotranspiration. The inversion leads to scaling factors much smaller than 1 for the attraction of the surface reservoir. The effects of the surrounding topography and those of the building on gravity are compared to the inversion result of the ‘surface reservoir' scaling factors. We discuss if the forward model and underlying

  3. Effects of hydrogeological and anthropogenic factors on the distribution of CVOCs in eogenetic karst aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Torres, N. I.; Padilla, I. Y.; Rivera, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eogenetic kart aquifers are characterized by well-developed conduit networks within a rock matrix having significant primary porosity and permeability. These aquifers are highly productive and serve as important source of water for multiple uses. As a consequence, eogenetic karst regions are attractive for industrial, urban, and agricultural development that can serve as contaminations sources for the aquifers. It is hypothesized that the distribution of contaminants in these aquifers are influenced by combined characteristics of source and hydrogeological features. This research assesses the spatio-temporal distribution of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the eogenetic karst aquifers of northern Puerto Rico (NPR) and studies the correlation between hydrogeological and anthropogenic variables and groundwater contamination using Geographic Information System and statistical methods. CVOCs, which are used as dry cleaning and industrial solvents, degreasers and paint or spot removers, are among the most commonly found groundwater contaminants in the world. The NPR karst aquifers have been heavily impacted by land development and groundwater contamination, particularly CVOCs, with Trichloroethylene, Tetrachloroethylene, and Carbon Tetrachloride among the most detected contaminants. The analysis shows that 62% of the samples and 78% of the sites sampled have presence of one or more CVOC, and that their concentrations vary with time. Detection and concentrations of certain CVOCs are associated with some sources of known contamination. Significant presence of CVOCs is also found near developed and agricultural land uses. The shallow aquifer shows greater presence of CVOCs (66%) than the confined aquifer (16%), with most detections occurring in areas of low and medium sinkholes coverage and medium hydraulic conductivities. Multivariate statistical analysis indicates that, indeed, the distribution of CVOCs in the karsts aquifers of NPR is influenced by a

  4. Studying the flow dynamics of a karst aquifer system with an equivalent porous medium model.

    PubMed

    Abusaada, Muath; Sauter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of groundwater flow in karst aquifers is a challenge due to the extreme heterogeneity of its hydraulic parameters and the duality in their discharge behavior, that is, rapid response of highly conductive karst conduits and delayed drainage of the low-permeability fractured matrix after recharge events. There are a number of different modeling approaches for the simulation of the karst groundwater dynamics, applicable to different aquifer as well as modeling problem types, ranging from continuum models to double continuum models to discrete and hybrid models. This study presents the application of an equivalent porous model approach (EPM, single continuum model) to construct a steady-state numerical flow model for an important karst aquifer, that is, the Western Mountain Aquifer Basin (WMAB), shared by Israel and the West-Bank, using MODFLOW2000. The WMAB was used as a catchment since it is a well-constrained catchment with well-defined recharge and discharge components and therefore allows a control on the modeling approach, a very rare opportunity for karst aquifer modeling. The model demonstrates the applicability of equivalent porous medium models for the simulation of karst systems, despite their large contrast in hydraulic conductivities. As long as the simulated saturated volume is large enough to average out the local influence of karst conduits and as long as transport velocities are not an issue, EPM models excellently simulate the observed head distribution. The model serves as a starting basis that will be used as a reference for developing a long-term dynamic model for the WMAB, starting from the pre-development period (i.e., 1940s) up to date. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  5. Linear model describing three components of flow in karst aquifers using 18O data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The stable isotope of oxygen, 18O, is used as a naturally occurring ground-water tracer. Time-series data for ??18O are analyzed to model the distinct responses and relative proportions of the conduit, intermediate, and diffuse flow components in karst aquifers. This analysis also describes mathematically the dynamics of the transient fluid interchange between conduits and diffusive networks. Conduit and intermediate flow are described by linear-systems methods, whereas diffuse flow is described by mass-balance methods. An automated optimization process estimates parameters of lognormal, Pearson type III, and gamma distributions, which are used as transfer functions in linear-systems analysis. Diffuse flow and mixing parameters also are estimated by these optimization methods. Results indicate the relative proximity of a well to a main conduit flowpath and can help to predict the movement and residence times of potential contaminants. The three-component linear model is applied to five wells, which respond to changes in the isotopic composition of point recharge water from a sinking stream in the Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Flow velocities as much as 540 m/d and system memories of as much as 71 years are estimated by this method. Also, the mean, median, and standard deviation of traveltimes; time to peak response; and the relative fraction of flow for each of the three components are determined for these wells. This analysis infers that flow may branch apart and rejoin as a result of an anastomotic (or channeled) karst network.

  6. A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Gilcrease, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers is presented as an alternative to two or three-dimensional distributed-parameter models, which are data intensive and require knowledge of conduit locations. This model can be applied for cases where water temperature in a well or spring receives all or part of its water from a phreatic conduit. Heat transport in the conduit is simulated by using a physically-based heat-transport equation that accounts for inflow of diffuse flow from smaller openings and fissures in the surrounding aquifer during periods of low recharge. Additional diffuse flow that is within the zone of influence of the well or spring but has not interacted with the conduit is accounted for with a binary mixing equation to proportion these different water sources. The estimation of this proportion through inverse modeling is useful for the assessment of contaminant vulnerability and well-head or spring protection. The model was applied to 7 months of continuous temperature data for a sinking stream that recharges a conduit and a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota. The simulated conduit-flow fraction to the well ranged from 2% to 31% of total flow, and simulated conduit velocity ranged from 44 to 353 m/d.

  7. Occurrence and dynamics of micropollutants in a karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Morasch, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    Karst systems represent important yet vulnerable drinking water resources. A wide spectrum of pollutants may be released into karst groundwater from agriculture, livestock farming, private households, and industry. This work provides an overview on the occurrence and dynamics of micropollutants in a karst system of the Swiss Jura. Ten months of intensive monitoring for micropollutants confirmed that the swallow hole draining an agricultural plain was the main entry path for pesticides into the karst system and the two connected springs. Elevated fungicide concentrations in winter and occasional quantification of pharmaceuticals suggested wood- or façade treatment and domestic sewer as additional sources of contamination. A continuous atrazine signal in the low ng/L range might affect the autochthonous endokarst microbial community and represents a potential risk for the human population through karst groundwater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-02

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  9. Karst spring real time monitoring to identify the groundwater circulation in the feeding aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Flavia; De Filippi, Francesco M.; Cardilo, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    About one quarter of the world's population is largely or entirely dependent on groundwater from karst systems. However, karst aquifers have specific hydraulic and hydrogeological characteristics that render them highly vulnerable to pollution from human activities. Intrinsic vulnerability of a karst aquifer takes account of the inherent geological, hydrological and hydrogeological characteristics of an area; however, it is independent of the nature of contaminants. Groundwater circulation is usually very rapidly as a function of high rainfall input. As consequence, in case of contamination, these systems are characterized by limited attenuation processes in the unsaturated zone. The analysis of karst spring responses to rainfall events, at the catchment scale, is one promising approach for groundwater flow characterization. Karst springs are, in fact, an important source of information in order to understand the circulation characteristics in such complex systems. The karst Pertuso Spring, located in the Upper Valley of Aniene River, is the main outlet of a large aquifer which is one of the most important water resource in the southeast part of Latium Region, Central Italy, used for drinking, agriculture and hydroelectric supplies. This paper deals with Pertuso Spring data collected from December 2014 to March 2016, using a multiparametric probe which directly interfaces with a data logger for real-time recording of hourly data. This instrument simultaneously measures up to 6 parameters (pH, groundwater level, temperature, electric conductivity, redox and dissolved oxygen). In particular, water temperature, electrical conductivity and rainfall data coming from meteorological stations have been studied to identify the groundwater circulation in the aquifer feeding Pertuso Spring. The study of the lag time between peak rainfall and peak of T and EC allow to highlight the seasonal vulnerability of this aquifer.

  10. Vulnerability assessment of karst aquifer feeding Pertuso Spring (Central Italy): comparison between different applications of COP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Flavia; Luciani, Giulia

    2016-04-01

    Vulnerability assessment of karst aquifers and vulnerability mapping are important tools for improved sustainable management and protection of karst groundwater resources. In this paper, to estimate the vulnerability degree of the karst aquifer feeding Pertuso Spring in Central Italy, two different implementations of COP method, supported by an open source GIS, were tested and a comparison of the vulnerability maps is proposed. The study area is a highly karstified carbonate aquifer located in the Upper Valley of the Aniene River, in the south-east part of Latium Region. The hydrogeological basin covers about 50 km2 and the karst aquifer provides a water supply of about 120.000 m3d-1. The well-developed karst features in this hydrogeological system is responsible of the fast infiltration of rainfall in the saturated zone and, consequently, of the high discharge rate of Pertuso Spring (up to 3 m3/s). Thus, in the aim of emphasizing the presence of these karst features, due to which, there are limited attenuation processes in the unsaturated zone, in this work COP method has been applied by the implementation of a new discretization methodology of the hydrogeological basin using polygonal layer. Therefore, the hydrogeological catchment basin has been divided into 52 polygonal layer, representative of outcropping lithology and karst features, to which COP method has been applied. The intrinsic vulnerability maps, produced using a GIS approach, has been examinated and compared with the maps obtained using traditional vulnerability assessment method, which provides the discretization of the study area generating a grid map to which associate the Vulnerability Indexes. The results of this study highlight vulnerability from low to very high. The maximum vulnerability degree is due to karstic features responsible of high recharge and high hydraulic conductivity. The new proposed discretization of the hydrogeological basin using polygonal layer raise four vulnerability

  11. Controlling Transport Processes in Groundwater Contamination in the North Coast Karst Aquifer of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Steele, K.

    2008-05-01

    The karst aquifer of the North Coast of Puerto Rico represents a significant source of water for drinking purposes, as well as ecosystem sustainability. The same characteristics making this aquifer the most productive in the island, fast infiltration and rapid flow in karst conduits, make the aquifers vulnerable highly vulnerable to contamination. Once in the ground water, organic contaminants move through the karst aquifers by complex pathways dictated by system characteristics and flow regimes. Ground water flow in karst aquifers is subscribed to two types of flow systems: conduit flow and diffuse flow. Transport in conduit-flow dominated systems tends to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge or point without much attenuation. Transport in diffuse- flow systems, on the other hand, causes significant solute retardation and serves as a long-term source of contamination. Although it is common to attribute one type of predominant flow regime, most carbonate aquifers are characterized by a mixture of both flow systems. The north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico has been impacted by a large number of contaminates sites. During the last 25 years, 10 Superfund sites have been declared in the zone and others are being evaluated for inclusion in the National Priority List. The work presented herein addresses the potential impact of these sites on the extent of contamination and discusses the transport mechanisms affecting the transport and persistence of organic contaminants in the north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico. Preliminary evaluation indicates that fate and transport of these contaminants is controlled by a combinations of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms, where conduits tend to concentrate water and contaminants and convey it rapidly or to "trapping" diffusive-flow zones of smaller pore-size zones.

  12. Numerical long-term assessment of managed aquifer recharge from a reservoir into a karst aquifer in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanke, Julian; Jourde, Hervé; Liesch, Tanja; Goldscheider, Nico

    2016-09-01

    In semi-arid regions with high seasonal variability of water availability, adaptive management strategies and technical measures are required to ensure the sustainable use of water resources. In this study, managed recharge of storm water into a karst aquifer and the water level fluctuations related to pumping in a nearby wellfield were simulated at Wadi Wala, Jordan. We used a numerical equivalent porous medium (EPM) approach with specific adaptations to account for the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the karst aquifer. The model domain was vertically projected along the wadi course, resulting in a 2-dimensional model, and subdivided into hydraulic zones representing the karst-specific flow pattern of fast flow and slow depletion. Results show satisfying agreement of measured and simulated groundwater tables from 2002 to 2012 and predict a lowering of the average groundwater table until 2022 of around 2.7 m in the immediate surroundings of the reservoir and an increased depletion towards the wellfield, mainly caused by sedimentation in the reservoir and an associated decrease in infiltration. Abstraction at the wellfield changed considerably over the regarded time period and strongly influences the groundwater fluctuations, which shows the need of improved pumping management and monitoring. The results can serve as a basis for decision makers regarding an optimization of water management at the reservoir and wellfield. Furthermore, the presented numerical approach can be transferred to karst regions with similar physio-geographical conditions to assess managed aquifer recharge.

  13. Regional-scale airborne electromagnetic surveying of the Yucatan karst aquifer (Mexico): geological and hydrogeological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondwe, Bibi R. N.; Ottowitz, David; Supper, Robert; Motschka, Klaus; Merediz-Alonso, Gonzalo; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Geometry and connectivity of high-permeability zones determine groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Efficient management of karst aquifers requires regional mapping of preferential flow paths. Remote-sensing technology provides tools to efficiently map the subsurface at such scales. Multi-spectral remote sensing imagery, shuttle radar topography data and frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey data were used to map karst-aquifer structure on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Anomalous AEM responses correlated with topographic features and anomalous spectral reflectance of the terrain. One known preferential flow path, the Holbox fracture zone, showed lower bulk electrical resistivity than its surroundings in the AEM surveys. Anomalous structures delineated inland were sealed above by a low-resistivity layer (resistivity: 1-5 Ωm, thickness: 5-6 m). This layer was interpreted as ejecta from the Chicxulub impact (Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary), based on similar resistivity signatures found in borehole logs. Due to limited sensitivity of the AEM survey, the subsurface configuration beneath the low-resistivity layer could not be unambiguously determined. AEM measurements combined with remote-sensing data analysis provide a potentially powerful multi-scale methodology for structural mapping in karst aquifers on the Yucatan Peninsula and beyond.

  14. Ultra-Wideband GPR Imaging of the Vaucluse Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvignac, J.; Fortino, N.; Sénéchal, G.; Cresp, A.; Yedlin, M.; Gaffet, S.; Rousset, D.; Pichot, C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we present the validation of an Ultra Wide band measurement system which is the first experimental step of the French MAXWELL Research Project devoted to the survey of the karst aquifer located in the Vaucluse in Provence. This radar system employs Exponentially Tapered Slot Antennas (ETSA), with a usable bandwidth from 100 MHz to 2.5 GHz. The antenna is driven by a .01- 26.5 GHz Agilent vector network analyzer (VNA), with a noise floor of -120dB under test conditions and a noise floor of -100 dB in a field setting. A synthetic pulse is applied to the antenna by using a classical step frequency sweeping. The recorded amplitudes and phases of the reflection coefficient (S11 parameter) are filtered and inverse Fourier transformed to obtain the time-domain data. In principal, due to the flat radiation characteristic of the frequency generator, appropriate synthetic pulses can be generated for analysis. The advantages of this approach are mainly, 1) a large depth resolution due to increased bandwidth, 2) a wider dynamic range for detection of weak late underground echoes, 3) a low signal distortion due to absence of pulse deconvolution post-processing. The foregoing system was deployed inside a tunnel in the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB) located in Rustrel (France) which allows the use of low power radiation. Minimization of noise interference was accomplished by : 1) using low noise and low-loss cables, 2) using a PVC structure covered with absorbers to shield the ETSA from unwanted tunnel wall reflections and from radiation from the vector network analyzer, 3) an effective calibration of long cables to the antenna connector with careful cable unwinding to reduce phase errors, 4) a power level fixed at 8 dBm in the frequency band of interest to avoid distortion in the mixer of the VNA. Monostatic or multistatic data, were collected by moving manually the antennas along the PVC frame, in 5 cm increments over a length of 6 m. Both parallel and

  15. Performance and complementarity of two systemic models (reservoir and neural networks) used to simulate spring discharge and piezometry for a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong-A-Siou, Line; Fleury, Perrine; Johannet, Anne; Borrell Estupina, Valérie; Pistre, Séverin; Dörfliger, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    Karst aquifers can provide previously untapped freshwater resources and have thus generated considerable interest among stakeholders involved in the water supply sector. Here we compare the capacity of two systemic models to simulate the discharge and piezometry of a karst aquifer. Systemic models have the advantage of allowing the study of heterogeneous, complex karst systems without relying on extensive geographical and meteorological datasets. The effectiveness and complementarity of the two models are evaluated for a range of hydrologic conditions and for three methods to estimate evapotranspiration (Monteith, a priori ET, and effective rainfall). The first model is a reservoir model (referred to as VENSIM, after the software used), which is designed with just one reservoir so as to be as parsimonious as possible. The second model is a neural network (NN) model. The models are designed to simulate the rainfall-runoff and rainfall-water level relations in a karst conduit. The Lez aquifer, a karst aquifer located near the city of Montpellier in southern France and a critical water resource, was chosen to compare the two models. Simulated discharge and water level were compared after completing model design and calibration. The results suggest that the NN model is more effective at incorporating the nonlinearity of the karst spring for extreme events (extreme low and high water levels), whereas VENSIM provides a better representation of intermediate-amplitude water level fluctuations. VENSIM is sensitive to the method used to estimate evapotranspiration, whereas the NN model is not. Given that the NN model performs better for extreme events, it is better for operational applications (predicting floods or determining water pumping height). VENSIM, on the other hand, seems more appropriate for representing the hydrologic state of the basin during intermediate periods, when several effects are at work: rain, evapotranspiration, development of vegetation, etc. A

  16. Adaptations of indigenous bacteria to fuel contamination in karst aquifers in south-central Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byl, Thomas D.; Metge, David W.; Agymang, Daniel T.; Bradley, Michael W.; Hileman, Gregg; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The karst aquifer systems in southern Kentucky can be dynamic and quick to change. Microorganisms that live in these unpredictable aquifers are constantly faced with environmental changes. Their survival depends upon adaptations to changes in water chemistry, taking advantage of positive stimuli and avoiding negative environmental conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2001 to determine the capability of bacteria to adapt in two distinct regions of water quality in a karst aquifer, an area of clean, oxygenated groundwater and an area where the groundwater was oxygen depleted and contaminated by jet fuel. Water samples containing bacteria were collected from one clean well and two jet fuel contaminated wells in a conduit-dominated karst aquifer. Bacterial concentrations, enumerated through direct count, ranged from 500,000 to 2.7 million bacteria per mL in the clean portion of the aquifer, and 200,000 to 3.2 million bacteria per mL in the contaminated portion of the aquifer over a twelve month period. Bacteria from the clean well ranged in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm, whereas bacteria from one fuel-contaminated well were generally larger, ranging in size from 0.2 to 3.9 mm. Also, bacteria collected from the clean well had a higher density and, consequently, were more inclined to sink than bacteria collected from contaminated wells. Bacteria collected from the clean portion of the karst aquifer were predominantly (,95%) Gram-negative and more likely to have flagella present than bacteria collected from the contaminated wells, which included a substantial fraction (,30%) of Gram-positive varieties. The ability of the bacteria from the clean portion of the karst aquifer to biodegrade benzene and toluene was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in laboratory microcosms. The rate of fuel biodegradation in laboratory studies was approximately 50 times faster under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic, sulfur-reducing conditions. The

  17. Natural and Artificial (fluorescent) Tracers to Characterise Hydrogeological Functioning and to Protect Karst Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, B.; Mudarra, M.; Marin, A. I.; Barberá, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogeological functioning and response of karst aquifers can be determined by the joint use of natural hydrogeochemical tracers, especially total organic carbon (TOC) and intrinsic fluorescence of water, together with artificial (fluorescent) tracers, under the same hydrodynamic conditions. Sharp and rapid variations in discharge, temperature, electrical conductivity and water chemistry, particularly of natural tracers of infiltration (TOC, intrinsic fluorescence and NO3-) recorded in karst spring water, confirm the existence of well developed karst conduits in the sector of the aquifer being drained, with rapid flows and very short water transit times from the surface to the springs (Mudarra et al., 2011). This is in agreement with the evidence obtained from breakthrough curves of fluorescent dye tracers (uranine, eosine, etc.). However, time lags between maximum concentrations of natural (especially TOC and intrinsic fluorescence) and artificial tracers show that the global system response is faster than that produced from a recharge concentrated at a point on the surface, even in karst sinkholes. Response and transit times of water through the karst can be calculated using both natural and artificial tracers, but flow velocities can really only be quantified using artificial tracers. Analysis of the responses obtained by natural tracers of infiltration (global system response) and artificial tracers (single response) in karst waters has revealed the usefulness and complementarity of both techniques for characterising the hydrogeological functioning of karst aquifers and, even more important, for validating contamination vulnerability mapping in these medium (Zwahlen, 2004; Andreo et al., 2006). In recent decades, several methods have been developed for such vulnerability mapping, but little progress has been made in validating their results. This validation is essential for the adequate protection of water resources in karst media, as has been shown in

  18. Hydrological role of karst in the Chalk aquifer of Upper Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, Sanae; Dupont, Jean-Paul; Massei, Nicolas; Slimani, Smail; Dörfliger, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The role of karst on large-scale groundwater flow is defined for the Chalk aquifer of Upper Normandy (western Paris Basin), France. In the regional context, chalk plateaus occupy the greater part of watersheds and are the main sites of groundwater recharge. Previous studies focused on karstic output systems in the valleys and less on water-level variations in the recharge zones upstream. This study assesses the relevant hydrogeological processes using time-series data (boreholes and springs) recorded along a down-gradient hydrologeological cross-section in two selected watersheds. These hydrological data are interpreted in the framework of previous descriptions of the morphological organization of the study area's karst network. The results highlight the hydrological role of (1) the input karst (vertical conduits) which drains recharging water, (2) the output karst (sub-horizontal conduits widely developed in the vicinity of valleys in the surface watersheds) which drains the output flows, and (3) the connections between these two (input and output) networks, which control the upstream water levels and allow quick transfer to springs, particularly after strong rainfall events. A conceptual model of the hydrological functioning of this covered karst aquifer is established, which should serve for the structuring and parameterization of a numerical model.

  19. Linking climate change and karst hydrology to evaluate species vulnerability: The Edwards and Madison aquifers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Long, A. J.; Stamm, J. F.; Poteet, M.; Symstad, A.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers present an extreme case of flow along structurally variable pathways, making them highly dynamic systems and therefore likely to respond rapidly to climate change. In turn, many biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst are sensitive to hydrologic changes. We explored how three sites in the Edwards aquifer (Texas) and two sites in the Madison aquifer (South Dakota) might respond to projected climate change from 2011 to 2050. Ecosystems associated with these karst aquifers support federally listed endangered and threatened species and state-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. The vulnerability of selected species associated with projected climate change was assessed. The Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate projected climate at a 36-km grid spacing for three weather stations near the study sites, using boundary and initial conditions from the global climate model Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and an A2 emissions scenario. Daily temperature and precipitation projections from the WRF model were used as input for the hydrologic Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow (RRAWFLOW) model and the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) model. RRAWFLOW is a lumped-parameter model that simulates hydrologic response at a single site, combining the responses of quick and slow flow that commonly characterize karst aquifers. CCVI uses historical and projected climate and hydrologic metrics to determine the vulnerability of selected species on the basis of species exposure to climate change, sensitivity to factors associated with climate change, and capacity to adapt to climate change. An upward trend in temperature was projected for 2011-2050 at all three weather stations; there was a trend (downward) in annual precipitation only for the weather station in Texas. A downward trend in mean annual spring flow or groundwater level was projected for

  20. Joining direct and indirect inverse calibration methods to characterize karst, coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Foglia, Laura; Giudici, Mauro; Mehl, Steffen; Margiotta, Stefano; Negri, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Parameter estimation is extremely relevant for accurate simulation of groundwater flow. Parameter values for models of large-scale catchments are usually derived from a limited set of field observations, which can rarely be obtained in a straightforward way from field tests or laboratory measurements on samples, due to a number of factors, including measurement errors and inadequate sampling density. Indeed, a wide gap exists between the local scale, at which most of the observations are taken, and the regional or basin scale, at which the planning and management decisions are usually made. For this reason, the use of geologic information and field data is generally made by zoning the parameter fields. However, pure zoning does not perform well in the case of fairly complex aquifers and this is particularly true for karst aquifers. In fact, the support of the hydraulic conductivity measured in the field is normally much smaller than the cell size of the numerical model, so it should be upscaled to a scale consistent with that of the numerical model discretization. Automatic inverse calibration is a valuable procedure to identify model parameter values by conditioning on observed, available data, limiting the subjective evaluations introduced with the trial-and-error technique. Many approaches have been proposed to solve the inverse problem. Generally speaking, inverse methods fall into two groups: direct and indirect methods. Direct methods allow determination of hydraulic conductivities from the groundwater flow equations which relate the conductivity and head fields. Indirect methods, instead, can handle any type of parameters, independently from the mathematical equations that govern the process, and condition parameter values and model construction on measurements of model output quantities, compared with the available observation data, through the minimization of an objective function. Both approaches have pros and cons, depending also on model complexity. For

  1. Assessing the vulnerability of a municipal well field to contamination in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.; Cunningham, K.J.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Wacker, M.A.; Shapiro, A.M.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Osborn, C.L.; Ryan, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    Proposed expansion of extractive lime-rock mines near the Miami-Dade County Northwest well field and Everglades wetland areas has garnered intense scrutiny by government, public, environmental stakeholders, and the media because of concern that mining will increase the risk of pathogen contamination. Rock mines are excavated to the same depth as the well field's primary producing zone. The underlying karst Biscayne aquifer is a triple-porosity system characterized by (1) a matrix of interparticle porosity and separate vug porosity; (2) touching-vug porosity that forms preferred, stratiform passageways; and, less commonly, (3) conduit porosity formed by thin solution pipes, bedding-plane vugs, and cavernous vugs. Existing ground-water flow and particle tracking models do not provide adequate information regarding the ability the aquifer to limit the advective movement of pathogens and other contaminants. Chemical transport and colloidal mobility properties have been delineated using conservative and microsphere-surrogate tracers for Cryptosporidium parvum. Forced-gradient tests were executed by introducing conservative tracers into injection wells located 100 m (328 ft) from a municipal-supply well. Apparent mean advective velocity between the wells is one to two orders of magnitude greater than previously measured. Touching-vug, stratiform flow zones are efficient pathways for tracer movement at the well field. The effective porosity for a continuum model between the point of injection and tracer recovery ranges from 2 to 4 percent and is an order of magnitude smaller than previously assumed. Existing well-field protection zones were established using porosity estimates based on specific yield. The effective, or kinematic, porosity of a Biscayne aquifer continuum model is lower than the total porosity, because high velocities occur along preferential flow paths that result in faster times of travel than can be represented with the ground-water flow equation. Tracer

  2. Multitracer experiment to evaluate the attenuation of selected organic micropollutants in a karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Sauter, Martin; Licha, Tobias

    2015-02-15

    The increasing pressure on drinking water resources necessitates an efficient management of potential and actual drinking water resources. Karst aquifers play a key role in the supply of the world's population with drinking water. Around one quarter of all drinking water is produced from these types of aquifers. Unfortunately due to the aquifer characteristics with extremely high hydraulic conductivities and short residence times, these systems are vulnerable to contamination. For successful management, a fundamental understanding of mass transport and attenuation processes with respect to potential contaminants is vital. In this study, a multitracer experiment was performed in a karst aquifer in SW-Germany for determining the attenuation capacity of a karst environment by assessing the environmental fate of selected relevant micropollutants. Uranine, acesulfame and carbamazepine were injected into a sinkhole as reference tracers together with the reactive compounds atenolol, caffeine, cyclamate, ibuprofen and paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen). The breakthrough of the tracers was monitored at a karst spring at a distance of ca. 3 km. The breakthrough curves of the reactive compounds were interpreted relative to the reference substances. No significant retardation was found for any of the investigated micropollutants. The determined half-lives of the reactive compounds range from 38 to 1,400 h (i.e. persistent within the investigation period) in the following order (from high to no observed attenuation): paracetamol>atenolol≈ibuprofen>caffeine≫cyclamate. The attenuation rates are generally in agreement with studies from other environmental compartments. The occurrence of the biotransformation product atenolol acid served as evidence for in-situ biodegradation within the aquifer system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intrinsic vulnerability, hazard and risk mapping for karst aquifers: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimi, Ziad A.; Assi, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    SummaryGroundwater from karst aquifers is among the most important resources of drinking water supply of the worldwide population. The European COST action 620 proposed a comprehensive approach to karst groundwater protection, comprising methods of intrinsic and specific vulnerability mapping, hazard and risk mapping. This paper presents the first application of all components of this European approach to the groundwater underlying the Ramallah district, a karst hydrogeology system in Palestine. The vulnerability maps which were developed can assist in the implementation of groundwater management strategies to prevent degradation of groundwater quality. Large areas in the case study area can be classified as low or very low risk area corresponding to the pollution sources due to the absence of hazards and also due to low vulnerabilities. These areas could consequently be interesting for future development as they are preferable in view of ground water protection.

  4. Bacterial dynamics in spring water of alpine karst aquifers indicates the presence of stable autochthonous microbial endokarst communities.

    PubMed

    Farnleitner, Andreas H; Wilhartitz, Ines; Ryzinska, Gabriela; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Stadler, Hermann; Burtscher, Martina M; Hornek, Romana; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Herndl, Gerhard; Mach, Robert L

    2005-08-01

    Spring water of two alpine karst aquifers differing in hydrogeology but of nearby catchments were investigated for their bacterial population dynamics. Dolomite karst aquifer spring 1 (DKAS 1) represents a dolomitic-limestone karst aquifer spring showing high average water residence time and relative constant flow. Limestone karst aquifer spring 2 (LKAS 2) constitutes a typical limestone karst aquifer spring with a dynamic hydrological regime and discharge. Dolomite karst aquifer spring 1 yielded constantly lower cell counts and biomasses (median of 15 x 10(6) cells l(-1) and 0.22 microg C l(-1)) as the LKAS 2 (median of 63 x 10(6) cells l(-1) and 1.1 microg C l(-1)) and distribution of morphotypes and mean cell volumes was also different between the considered systems, indicating the influence of hydrogeology on microbial spring water quality. Molecular bacterial V3 16S-rDNA profiles revealed remarkable constancy within each spring water throughout the investigation period. Time course analysis of a flood event in LKAS 2 further supported the trend of the temporal constancy of the microbial community. Except for one case, retrieval of partial and full length 16S rDNA gene sequences from the relative constant DKAS 1 revealed similarities to presently known sequences between 80% to 96%, supporting the discreteness of the microbial populations. The gathered results provide first evidence for the presence of autochthonous microbial endokarst communities (AMEC). Recovery of AMEC may be considered of relevance for the understanding of alpine karst aquifer biogeochemistry and ecology, which is of interest as many alpine and mountainous karst springs are important water resources throughout the world.

  5. Reduction of the ambiguity of karst aquifer modeling through pattern matching of groundwater flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, Sandra; Geyer, Tobias; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Distributive numerical simulations are an effective, process-based method for predicting groundwater resources and quality. They are based on conceptual hydrogeological models that characterize the properties of the catchment area and aquifer. Karst systems play an important role in water supply worldwide. Conceptual models are however difficult to build because of the highly developed heterogeneity of the systems. The geometry and properties of highly conductive karst conduits are generally unknown and difficult to characterize with field experiments. Due to these uncertainties numerical models of karst areas usually cannot simulate the hydraulic head distribution in the area, spring discharge and tracer breakthrough curves simultaneously on catchment scale. Especially in complex hydrogeological systems, this approach would reduce model ambiguity, which is prerequisite to predict groundwater resources and pollution risks. In this work, a distributive numerical groundwater flow and transport model was built for a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer in south-western Germany. For this aim, a solute transport interface for one-dimensional pipes was implemented in the software Comsol Multiphysics® and coupled to the standard three-dimensional solute transport interface for domains. The model was calibrated and hydraulic parameters could be obtained. The simulation was matched to the steady-state hydraulic head distribution in the model area, the spring discharge of several springs and the transport velocities of two tracer tests. Furthermore, other measured parameters such as hydraulic conductivity of the fissured matrix and the maximal karst conduit volume were available for model calibration. Parameter studies were performed for several karst conduit geometries to analyze their influence in a large-scale heterogeneous karst system. Results show that it is not only possible to derive a consistent flow and transport model for a 150 km2 karst area to be employed as a

  6. Understanding changes in the hydrological behaviour within a karst aquifer (Lurbach system, Austria).

    PubMed

    Mayaud, Cyril; Wagner, Thomas; Benischke, Ralf; Birk, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    A thorough data analysis combined with groundwater modelling was conducted in an Austrian binary karst aquifer to better understand changes in the hydrological behaviour observed at a karst spring. During a period of 4 years after a major flood event the spring hydrograph appears to be more damped with lower peak flow and higher baseflow than in the years before. The analysis of the hydrograph recession suggests that the observed hydrological change is caused by changes within the karst system rather than by varying hydro-meteorological conditions. The functioning of the aquifer and potential causes of the observed changes are further examined using the groundwater flow model MODFLOW. The simulation results suggest that a modification of hydraulic conductivity and storage within the conduit network, e.g. due to the plugging of the drainage conduits with sediments, may be the cause of the different behaviour. MODFLOW was able to reproduce the observed dynamics of spring flow, although it does not account for turbulent flow within karst conduits. Using a simplified model scenario it is demonstrated that the damping of the hydrograph is much stronger if turbulent conduit flow is taken into account. Thus, a turbulent flow model is needed to assess potential changes in the storage properties quantitatively.

  7. Karst connections between unconfined aquifers and the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Georgia: geophysical evidence and hydrogeological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieme, D. M.; Denizman, C.

    2011-12-01

    Buried karst features in sedimentary rocks of the south Georgia Coastal Plain present a challenge for hydrogeological models of recharge and confined flow within the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The Withlacoochee River, the trunk stream for the area, frequently disappears into subsurface caverns as it makes its way south to join the Suwannee River in northern Florida. The Withlacoochee also receives inputs from small ponds and bays which in turn receive spring and seep groundwater inputs. We have mapped karst topography at the "top of rock" using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Up to seven meters of relief is indicated for the paleotopography on Miocene to Pliocene rocks, contrasting with the more subdued relief of the modern landscape. Current stratigraphic and hydrogeological reconstructions do not incorporate this amount of relief or lateral variation in the confining beds. One "pipe" which is approximately four meters in diameter is being mapped in detail. We have field evidence at this location for rapid movement of surficial pond and river water with a meteoric signature through several separate strata of sedimentary rock into an aquifer in the Hawthorn formation. We use our geophysical and hydrological field evidence to constrain quantitative hydrogeological models for the flow rates into and out of both this upper aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer, which is generally considered to be confined by the clays of the Hawthorn.

  8. Effects of karst and geologic structure on the circulation of water and permeability in carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stringfield, V.T.; Rapp, J.R.; Anders, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the natural processes caused by solution and leaching of limestone, dolomite, gypsum, salt and other soluble rocks, is known as karst. Development of karst is commonly known as karstification, which may have a pronounced effect on the topography, hydrology and environment, especially where such karst features as sinkholes and vertical solution shafts extend below the land surface and intersect lateral solution passages, cavities, caverns and other karst features in carbonate rocks. Karst features may be divided into two groups: (1) surficial features that do not extend far below the surface; and (2) karst features such as sinkholes that extend below the surface and affect the circulation of water below. The permeability of the most productive carbonate aquifers is due chiefly to enlargement of fractures and other openings by circulation of water. Important controlling factors responsible for the development of karst and permeability in carbonate aquifers include: (1) climate, topography, and presence of soluble rocks; (2) geologic structure; (3) nature of underground circulation; and (4) base level. Another important factor is the condition of the surface of the carbonate rocks at the time they are exposed to meteoric water. A carbonate rock surface, with soil or relatively permeable, less soluble cover, is more favorable for initiation of karstification and solution than bare rocks. Water percolates downward through the cover to the underlying carbonate rocks instead of running off on the surface. Also, the water becomes more corrosive as it percolates through the permeable cover to the underlying carbonate rocks. Where there is no cover or the cover has been removed, the carbonate rocks become case hardened and resistant to erosion. However, in regions underlain not only by carbonate rocks but also by beds of anhydrite, gypsum and salt, such as the Hueco Plateau in southeastern New Mexico, subsurface solution may occur where water without natural

  9. HISTORICAL CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER RESOURCES IN THE NORTH COAST KARST AQUIFERS OF PUERTO RICO

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Steele, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The North Coast Karst Aquifer System of Puerto Rico is the island’s most productive aquifer. The characteristics that make it highly productive also make it vulnerable to contamination. This research, which addresses the historical contamination of groundwater resources in the northern karst region was conducted through integration of spatial hydrogeologic and contaminant concentration data in the La Plata-Arecibo area. The study used GIS technologies and focused on phthalates and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and phthalates due to their ubiquitous presence in the environment as well as their presence in listed and potential superfund sites in Puerto Rico and U.S. and potential for exposure and health impacts. Results show an extensive historical contamination of the groundwater resources in the northern karst aquifers. Long-term contamination indicates the aquifers’ large capacity for storing and releasing contaminants and reflects a long-term potential for exposure. The degradation of this important water resource has resulted in a subsequent reduction of the extraction capacity and an increase in the cost of use. PMID:24772197

  10. An integrated approach for catchment delineation and conduit-network modeling in karst aquifers: application to a site in the Swiss tabular Jura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Vouillamoz, Jonathan; Weber, Eric

    2015-11-01

    An essential issue in karst hydrology is the characterization of the hydrogeological flow systems, i.e., the delineation of catchment areas and the organization of the main flow paths (conduit network) feeding one or several outlets. The proposed approach provides an explicit way to sketch catchment areas, and to generate karst conduits on the basis of a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of the aquifer (KARSYS approach). The approach follows three main principles: (1) conduits develop according to the hydraulic gradient, which depends on the aquifer zonation, (2) conduits are guided by preferential guidance features (or inception horizons) prevailing in the unsaturated and saturated zones of the aquifer, and (3) conduits initiate on a regular basis below the autogenic zone of the catchment area. This approach was applied to a site in the Swiss Jura as a base for the assessment of flood-hazard risks. The resulting model proposes a new delineation of the system catchment area and appears fairer regarding hydrological measurements than previous interpretations, which under-estimated the catchment area by about 20 %. Furthermore, the proposed conduit network for the whole aquifer is also consistent with local cave surveys and dye-tracing observations. These interesting results demonstrate that the combination of this approach with the KARSYS 3D model provides an integrated and effective way for the characterization of karst-flow systems.

  11. Modeling the groundwater recharge in karst aquifers by using a reservoir model.

    PubMed

    Ke, Tingting; Shu, Longcang; Chen, Xunhong

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of the groundwater recharge in a karstic system becomes an important challenge due to the great hydrodynamic variability in both time and space. This paper proposes a two reservoir conceptual model to simulate inflow into both the conduit system and the fissure network system based on the analysis of the spring hydrograph. The structure of the model and the governing equations are proposed on the basis of the physical considerations, with the assumption that flow at the outlet of the reservoirs obeys a linear threshold function. The model is applied on the Houzhai karstic underground river basin where it successfully reflects the temporal recharge distribution. The simulated accumulation recharge is 34.29 mm, which is reasonable in relation to the actual rainfall of 92.8 mm. The variations of water volume in two reservoirs represent the storage and transform characteristics of the karst aquifer system. However, this model is particularly well suited to simulate the recharge event after intensive rainfall.

  12. Transport of road salt contamination in karst aquifers and soils over multiple timescales.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Heather K; Hasenmueller, Elizabeth A

    2017-12-15

    Road deicing has caused widespread environmental Na(+) and Cl(-) release for decades, yet the transport and retention of these contaminants in karst aquifers and soils are poorly understood. We examined the transport dynamics of Na(+) and Cl(-) from road salt in shallow groundwater during flooding and over seasonal timescales by intensively monitoring an urban and a rural karst spring over approximately 2 years. Furthermore, we used a 20-year dataset for the rural spring to determine how salt retention affected long-term geochemical trends in the shallow groundwater. Salt transport was governed by hydrologic pathways through karst aquifers: during winter and early spring floods, flow through preferential pathways rapidly transported salty meltwater or stormwater over hours to days, while the remaining salt-contaminated water moved diffusely through the rock matrix on timescales of months to years. Flood hydrograph separations revealed that event water constituted 61.2% of stormflow on average at the urban spring, leading to more extreme variability in salt concentrations during flooding and throughout the year. This variability indicates that baseflow contributions to urban streams overlying karst aquifers with preferential flowpaths are likely less effective at buffering salt concentrations. In contrast, salt concentrations were less variable in the baseflow-dominated rural spring (28.7% event water). Furthermore, salt was episodically released from soils to shallow groundwater throughout the year during first flush events. A Cl(-) mass balance indicates that Cl(-) applied during previous winters persists within the springs' recharge basins for more than a year, raising baseline concentrations as road salt is introduced faster than it can be flushed from the basin. Inter-annual salt retention by soils or slow groundwater movement likely caused significant Cl(-) and specific conductivity (SpC) increases at the rural spring from 1996 to 2016. Accumulation of salt in

  13. Effects of dynamically variable saturation and matrix-conduit coupling of flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Geyer, T.; Shoemaker, W.B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2011-01-01

    Well-developed karst aquifers consist of highly conductive conduits and a relatively low permeability fractured and/or porous rock matrix and therefore behave as a dual-hydraulic system. Groundwater flow within highly permeable strata is rapid and transient and depends on local flow conditions, i.e., pressurized or nonpressurized flow. The characterization of karst aquifers is a necessary and challenging task because information about hydraulic and spatial conduit properties is poorly defined or unknown. To investigate karst aquifers, hydraulic stresses such as large recharge events can be simulated with hybrid (coupled discrete continuum) models. Since existing hybrid models are simplifications of the system dynamics, a new karst model (ModBraC) is presented that accounts for unsteady and nonuniform discrete flow in variably saturated conduits employing the Saint-Venant equations. Model performance tests indicate that ModBraC is able to simulate (1) unsteady and nonuniform flow in variably filled conduits, (2) draining and refilling of conduits with stable transition between free-surface and pressurized flow and correct storage representation, (3) water exchange between matrix and variably filled conduits, and (4) discharge routing through branched and intermeshed conduit networks. Subsequently, ModBraC is applied to an idealized catchment to investigate the significance of free-surface flow representation. A parameter study is conducted with two different initial conditions: (1) pressurized flow and (2) free-surface flow. If free-surface flow prevails, the systems is characterized by (1) a time lag for signal transmission, (2) a typical spring discharge pattern representing the transition from pressurized to free-surface flow, and (3) a reduced conduit-matrix interaction during free-surface flow. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Resilience of Groundwater Impacted by Land Use and Climate Change in a Karst Aquifer, South China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Jiang, Guanghui; Polk, Jason S; Huang, Xiufeng; Huang, Siyu

    2015-11-01

    Changes of groundwater flow and quality were investigated in a subtropical karst aquifer to determine the driving mechanism. Decreases in groundwater flow are more distinct in discharge zones than those in recharge and runoff zones. Long-term measurement of the represented regional groundwater outlet reveals that groundwater discharge decrease by nearly 50% during the dry season. The hydrochemistry of groundwater in the runoff and discharge zones is of poorer quality than in the recharge zone. Indications of intensive land resource exploitation and changes in land use patterns were attributed to changes in groundwater conditions since 1990, but the influence of climate change was likely from 2001, because the water temperature exhibited increasing trends at a mean rate of 0.02 °C/yr even though groundwater depth was high in the aquifer. These conclusions imply the need for further groundwater monitoring and reevaluation to understand the resilience of aquifer during urbanization and development.

  15. Tracing Recharge from Sinking Streams over Spatial Dimensions of Kilometers in a Karst Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen were used to trace the sources of recharge from sinking streams to wells and springs several kilometers downgradient in the karst Madison aquifer near Rapid City, South Dakota. Temporal sampling of streamflow above the swallets identified a distinct isotopic signature that was used to define the spatial dimensions of recharge to the aquifer. When more than one sinking stream was determined to be recharging a well or spring, the proportions were approximated using a two-component mixing model. From the isotopic analysis, it is possible to link sinking stream recharge to individual wells or springs in the Rapid City area and illustrate there is significant lateral movement of ground water across surface drainage basins. These results emphasize that well-head protection strategies developed for carbonate aquifers that provide industrial and municipal water supplies need to consider lateral movement of ground-water flow from adjacent surface drainage basins.

  16. Enhanced recharge and karst, Edwards aquifer, south central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, W.W. Jr. . Center for Water Research)

    1993-02-01

    Enhanced recharge is a water management strategy which can add significant quantities of ground water to the available water resources of the San Antonio region by utilizing the immense storage capacity of the unconfined zone of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer presently is the sole source of water for a population of over 1,200,000, meeting public supply, industrial, and irrigation demands over a wide area of south central Texas. Valdina Farms Sinkhole is located adjacent to Seco Creek in Medina County and is in the recharge zone of the aquifer. Initial studies indicated that the sinkholes was capable of taking flood flows from Seco Creek and functioning as a recharge structure. Stream channels in the cavern system associated with Valdina Farms Sinkhole were incised into cave deposits and flood debris was present in the caverns at some distance from the sinkhole. Chemical analyses of samples of water from the cave and from nearby wells showed nitrate concentrations that decreased with distance from the cavern. Gradient of the potentiometric surface in the vicinity of the cave was very low, indicating high values of hydraulic conductivity for the aquifer. Based on evidence from these field studies a dam was constructed in 1982 on Seco Creek and a flood diversion channel was excavated to the sinkhole. Reservoir capacity is 2 acre-feet and design recharge rate is 3.8-6.7 m[sup 3]/sec. Annual recharge at the sinkhole has varied from 0 during periods of low runoff to 12,915 acre-feet.

  17. Saltwater wedge variation in a non-anthropogenic coastal karst aquifer influenced by a strong tidal range (Burren, Ireland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriquet, Marie; Leonardi, Véronique; Henry, Tiernan; Jourde, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in saltwater wedges in coastal karst aquifers are still poorly understood, largely due to complex mixing processes in these heterogeneous environments, but also due to anthropogenic forcing such as pumping, which commonly affect natural variations in wedges. The purpose of this study was first to characterize the hydrodynamic functioning of a karst aquifer in an oceanic temperate climate with little anthropogenic pressure but strongly influenced by a high tidal range and second, to evaluate the extent and movements of a saltwater wedge influenced by both the tide and the natural recharge of the aquifer. Variations in specific conductivity combined with water chemistry results from six boreholes and two lakes located in the Bell Harbour catchment (western Ireland) enabled us to assess the extent of the intrusion of the saltwater wedge into the aquifer as a function of both karst recharge and tidal movements at high/low and neap/spring tidal cycles. The marked spatial disparity of the saltwater wedge was analysed as a function of both the hydrodynamic and the structural properties of the karst aquifer. Results showed that the extent of the saltwater wedge depended not only on the intrinsic properties of the aquifer but also on the relative influence of the recharge and the tide on groundwater levels, which have opposite effects. Recharge in the Burren area throughout the year is large enough to prevent saltwater intruding more than about one kilometre from the shore. A strong tidal amplitude seems to be the motor of sudden saltwater intrusion observed in the aquifer near the shore while the position of the groundwater level seems to influence the intensity of the salinity increase. Competition between recharge and the tide thus controls the seawater inputs, hence explaining temporal and spatial changes in the saltwater wedge in this coastal karst aquifer.

  18. Existence of both culturable and viable but non culturable (VNC) E. coli populations with distinct settling velocities in karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Massei, N.; Lafite, R.; Clermont, O.; Denamur, E.; Berthe, T.

    2012-12-01

    The karst aquifers are particularly vulnerable to contamination by faecal pathogens mainly during rainfall event. In groundwater, the fate of E. coli is dependent on their ability to overcome environmental stresses and on their association with particles. Moreover, some strains can survive leading to the emergence of a sub-population of E. coli which failed to grow on laboratory media, while they were still alive thus designated as viable but non culturable (VNC). The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the structure of culturable E. coli population based on the survival ability, the distribution in four main phylo-groups (A, B1, B2, D) and the phenotypic characteristics; and, (ii) the fate of culturable and VNC E. coli, according to their settling velocities. This work was carried out on a karstic workshop-site for which the microbial quality of water was impaired related to livestock density and septic tanks overflows. Particles characterisation was performed by estimation of their settling velocities combined with electronic microscopy observation, and solid phase cytometry (ChemScan®RDI) was carried out to quantify the viable E. coli, and thus VNC E. coli. In the karst, different populations of E. coli were coexisting related to their survival, their culturability, and their association to particles. At the sinkhole, during a rainfall event with pasture, E. coli rapidly losing their culturability after 2 days have been more frequently isolated. These isolates are mainly multiresistant to antibiotics and harbor several virulence factors. In the same time, a population of VNC E. coli (79%), associated to the "non settleable particles" (settling velocities ranging between 10-5 to 10-2 mm.s-1), mainly corresponding to colloids and organic or organo-mineral microflocs was injected in the karst system, probably corresponding to the runoff of attached-bacteria originating from cowpats. Once in the karst, the relative contribution of culturable and VNC E. coli

  19. Reducing the ambiguity of karst aquifer models by pattern matching of flow and transport on catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, S.; Geyer, T.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2015-02-01

    Assessing the hydraulic parameters of karst aquifers is a challenge due to their high degree of heterogeneity. The unknown parameter field generally leads to a high ambiguity for flow and transport calibration in numerical models of karst aquifers. In this study, a distributed numerical model was built for the simulation of groundwater flow and solute transport in a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer in south-western Germany. Therefore, an interface for the simulation of solute transport in one-dimensional pipes was implemented into the software COMSOL Multiphysics® and coupled to the three-dimensional solute transport interface for continuum domains. For reducing model ambiguity, the simulation was matched for steady-state conditions to the hydraulic head distribution in the model area, the spring discharge of several springs and the transport velocities of two tracer tests. Furthermore, other measured parameters such as the hydraulic conductivity of the fissured matrix and the maximal karst conduit volume were available for model calibration. Parameter studies were performed for several karst conduit geometries to analyse the influence of the respective geometric and hydraulic parameters and develop a calibration approach in a large-scale heterogeneous karst system. Results show that it is possible not only to derive a consistent flow and transport model for a 150 km2 karst area but also to combine the use of groundwater flow and transport parameters thereby greatly reducing model ambiguity. The approach provides basic information about the conduit network not accessible for direct geometric measurements. The conduit network volume for the main karst spring in the study area could be narrowed down to approximately 100 000 m3.

  20. Convolution modeling of two-domain, nonlinear water-level responses in karst aquifers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Convolution modeling is a useful method for simulating the hydraulic response of water levels to sinking streamflow or precipitation infiltration at the macro scale. This approach is particularly useful in karst aquifers, where the complex geometry of the conduit and pore network is not well characterized but can be represented approximately by a parametric impulse-response function (IRF) with very few parameters. For many applications, one-dimensional convolution models can be equally effective as complex two- or three-dimensional models for analyzing water-level responses to recharge. Moreover, convolution models are well suited for identifying and characterizing the distinct domains of quick flow and slow flow (e.g., conduit flow and diffuse flow). Two superposed lognormal functions were used in the IRF to approximate the impulses of the two flow domains. Nonlinear response characteristics of the flow domains were assessed by observing temporal changes in the IRFs. Precipitation infiltration was simulated by filtering the daily rainfall record with a backward-in-time exponential function that weights each day’s rainfall with the rainfall of previous days and thus accounts for the effects of soil moisture on aquifer infiltration. The model was applied to the Edwards aquifer in Texas and the Madison aquifer in South Dakota. Simulations of both aquifers showed similar characteristics, including a separation on the order of years between the quick-flow and slow-flow IRF peaks and temporal changes in the IRF shapes when water levels increased and empty pore spaces became saturated.

  1. A quantitative comparison of moldic and vuggy porosity structure in karst aquifers using image and geospatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpepper, A. R.; Manda, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Limestone aquifers are vital sources of groundwater for domestic and industrial use throughout the world. To sustain rising population throughout the southeastern United States, aquifers are increasingly exploited to provide the populace clean and reliable water resources. The moldic Castle Hayne and the vuggy Biscayne aquifer systems are two highly productive aquifers that provide critical water resources to millions of citizens in eastern North Carolina and southeastern Florida, respectively. In order to better understand karst aquifers and evaluate the potential for contaminant transport, detailed investigation of 2D porosity and pore geometry using image and geospatial analysis were undertaken. The objective of this study is to compare and contrast the porosity structure of moldic and vuggy karst aquifers by quantifying 2D porosity and pore geometry from images of slabbed core samples and optical televiewer images. Televiewer images and images of painted core samples from the Spring Garden Member of the Castle Hayne aquifer and Miami Limestone Formation of the Biscayne aquifer were acquired for analysis of porosity structure. The procedure for converting images of slabbed core and televiewer images to a GIS useable format consisted of rectification, calibration, image enhancement, classification, recoding and filtering. In GIS, raster or vector formats were used to assess pore attributes (e.g., area and perimeter) and structure. Preliminary results show that both pore area and perimeter for the Spring Garden Member of the Castle Hayne and Miami Limestone Formation of the Biscayne aquifers can be described by exponential distributions. In both sets of slabbed core images the relatively small pores have the highest occurrence, whereas larger pores occur less frequently. However, the moldic Spring Garden Member of the Castle Hayne aquifer has larger pore sizes derived from cores images than the vuggy Miami Limestone Formation of Biscayne aquifer. Total porosity

  2. Hydrological response and thermal effect of karst springs linked to aquifer geometry and recharge processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Han, Zhaofeng

    2017-09-01

    To be better understand the hydrological and thermal behavior of karst systems in South China, seasonal variations in flow, hydrochemistry and stable isotope ratios of five karst springs were used to delineate flow paths and recharge processes, and to interpret their thermal response. Isotopic data suggest that mean recharge elevations are 200-820 m above spring outlets. Springs that originate from high elevations have lower NO3 - concentrations than those originating from lower areas that have more agricultural activity. Measured Sr2+ concentrations reflect the strontium contents of the host carbonate aquifer and help delineate the spring catchment's saturated zone. Seasonal variations of NO3 - and Sr2+ concentrations are inversely correlated, because the former correlates with event water and the latter with baseflow. The mean annual water temperatures of springs were only slightly lower than the local mean annual surface temperature at the outlet elevations. These mean spring temperatures suggest a vertical gradient of 6 °C/vertical km, which resembles the adiabatic lapse rate of the Earth's stable atmosphere. Seasonal temperature variations in the springs are in phase with surface air temperatures, except for Heilongquan (HLQ) spring. Event-scale variations of thermal response are dramatically controlled by the circulation depth of karst systems, which determines the effectiveness of heat exchange. HLQ spring undergoes the deepest circulation depth of 820 m, and its thermal responses are determined by the thermally effective regulation processes at higher elevations and the mixing processes associated with thermally ineffective responses at lower elevations.

  3. Quantification of karst aquifer discharge components during storm events through end-member mixing analysis using natural chemistry and stable isotopes as tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, D.H.; Alexander, E.C.; Petric, M.; Kogovsek, J.; Urbanc, J.; Lojen, S.; Stichler, W.

    2006-01-01

    Karst aquifer components that contribute to the discharge of a water supply well in the Classical Karst (Kras) region (Italy/Slovenia) were quantitatively estimated during storm events. Results show that water released from storage within the epikarst may comprise as much as two-thirds of conduit flow in a karst aquifer following rainfall. Principal components analysis (PCA) and end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) were performed using major ion chemistry and the stable isotopes of water (??18O, ??2H) and of dissolved inorganic carbon (??13CDIC) to estimate mixing proportions among three sources: (1) allogenic river recharge, (2) autogenic recharge, and (3) an anthropogenic component stored within the epikarst. The sinking river most influences the chemical composition of the water-supply well under low-flow conditions; however, this proportion changes rapidly during recharge events. Autogenic recharge water, released from shallow storage in the epikarst, displaces the river water and is observed at the well within hours after the onset of precipitation. The autogenic recharge end member is the second largest component of the well chemistry, and its contribution increases with higher flow. An anthropogenic component derived from epikarstic storage also impacts the well under conditions of elevated hydraulic head, accounting for the majority of the chemical response at the well during the wettest conditions. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  4. Insights into quick flow in a karst aquifer: Usefulness of infrequently collected geochemical data from wells

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    Highly variable chemical characteristics (e.g., hardness) can indicate that a portion of a karst aquifer sampled by a well is subject to a quickflow component where water flow is rapid and water quality changes rapidly in response to precipitation events. Typically, karst aquifer monitoring for both water level and geochemistry is conducted at frequent intervals (hourly, daily) due to the nature of rapid geochemical and hydrologic changes in association with storm events. Quarterly monitoring data are available at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN, and these data are evaluated to identify quickflow portions of the aquifer. Values of P{sub CO{sub 2}} near atmospheric suggest rapid recharge of fluids, and 12 of 99 well waters exhibited P{sub CO{sub 2}} near atmospheric. Waters saturated with respect to dolomite must have relatively long residence times because attainment of saturation requires tens to hundreds of years. Repeat sampling of waters shows that both supersaturation and undersaturation with respect to dolomite occurs in 46 wells, indicating that relatively old waters diffusing from the rock matrix into conduits during baseflow experience periodic flushing by more rapidly recharged waters. Undersaturation with respect to calcite indicates active dissolution and may suggest short residence times because calcite saturation can be expected to occur on the order of days. Evaluation of a{sub Mg}/a{sub Ca} ratios in the waters allows identification of portions of the aquifer where flow occurs from a dolomite to a limestone, and vice versa. In addition, 30 well waters exhibited coefficients of variation of hardness >10%. Hence, quickflow was identified in association with numerous well waters even though only quarterly monitoring data were available.

  5. Nutrient dynamics as indicators of karst processes: comparison of the Chalk aquifer (Normandy, France) and the Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.).

    PubMed

    Mahler, B J; Valdes, D; Musgrove, M; Massei, N

    2008-05-26

    Karst aquifers display a range of geologic and geomorphic characteristics in a wide range of climatic and land-use settings; identification of transport dynamics representative of karst aquifers in general could help advance our understanding of these complex systems. To this end, nutrient, turbidity, and major ion dynamics in response to storms were compared at multiple sites in two karst aquifers with contrasting characteristics and settings: the Chalk aquifer (Eure Department, Normandy, France) and the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.). The Chalk aquifer is typified by high matrix porosity, thick surficial deposits (up to 30 m thick), and agricultural land use; the Barton Springs segment is typified by low matrix porosity, outcropping limestone, and urban land use. Following one to three storms, from 5 to 16 samples from springs and wells were analyzed for major ions, and specific conductance and turbidity were monitored continuously. Comparison of the chemographs indicated some generalized responses, including an increase in turbidity and potassium concentrations and a decrease in major ion and nitrate concentrations with infiltrating storm runoff. Factor analysis of major ions and turbidity revealed strikingly similar behavior of the chemical variables for the two aquifers: The first two factors, explaining more than 75% of the variability, illustrate that dynamics of most major ions (including nitrate) are opposed to those of turbidity and of potassium. The results demonstrate that potassium and nitrate are effective tracers of infiltrating storm runoff and resident ground water, respectively, and the similar results for these two highly contrasting aquifers suggest that the dynamics identified might be applicable to karst systems in general.

  6. Nutrient dynamics as indicators of karst processes: Comparison of the Chalk aquifer (Normandy, France) and the Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Valdes, D.; Musgrove, M.; Massei, N.

    2008-05-01

    Karst aquifers display a range of geologic and geomorphic characteristics in a wide range of climatic and land-use settings; identification of transport dynamics representative of karst aquifers in general could help advance our understanding of these complex systems. To this end, nutrient, turbidity, and major ion dynamics in response to storms were compared at multiple sites in two karst aquifers with contrasting characteristics and settings: the Chalk aquifer (Eure Department, Normandy, France) and the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.). The Chalk aquifer is typified by high matrix porosity, thick surficial deposits (up to 30 m thick), and agricultural land use; the Barton Springs segment is typified by low matrix porosity, outcropping limestone, and urban land use. Following one to three storms, from 5 to 16 samples from springs and wells were analyzed for major ions, and specific conductance and turbidity were monitored continuously. Comparison of the chemographs indicated some generalized responses, including an increase in turbidity and potassium concentrations and a decrease in major ion and nitrate concentrations with infiltrating storm runoff. Factor analysis of major ions and turbidity revealed strikingly similar behavior of the chemical variables for the two aquifers: The first two factors, explaining more than 75% of the variability, illustrate that dynamics of most major ions (including nitrate) are opposed to those of turbidity and of potassium. The results demonstrate that potassium and nitrate are effective tracers of infiltrating storm runoff and resident ground water, respectively, and the similar results for these two highly contrasting aquifers suggest that the dynamics identified might be applicable to karst systems in general.

  7. Post-seismic permeability change in a shallow fractured aquifer following a ML 5.1 earthquake (Fourbanne karst aquifer, Jura outermost thrust unit, eastern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmoille, A.; Fabbri, O.; Mudry, J.; Guglielmi, Y.; Bertrand, C.

    2005-09-01

    Following a ML 5.1 earthquake in eastern France, a post-seismic 12-day long electrical conductivity increase was recorded in the water discharging from a karst aquifer located 3 km from the epicentre. We attribute this to a permeability enhancement which allowed long-residence time water from low-permeability fractures located in the saturated zone to be expelled. The permeability enhancement shows that shallow aquifers can be significantly deformed for several days by moderate magnitude earthquakes.

  8. Nutrient dynamics as indicators of karst processes: Comparison of the Chalk aquifer (Normandy, France) and the Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Valdes, D.; Musgrove, M.; Massei, N.

    2008-01-01

    Karst aquifers display a range of geologic and geomorphic characteristics in a wide range of climatic and land-use settings; identification of transport dynamics representative of karst aquifers in general could help advance our understanding of these complex systems. To this end, nutrient, turbidity, and major ion dynamics in response to storms were compared at multiple sites in two karst aquifers with contrasting characteristics and settings: the Chalk aquifer (Eure Department, Normandy, France) and the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.). The Chalk aquifer is typified by high matrix porosity, thick surficial deposits (up to 30??m thick), and agricultural land use; the Barton Springs segment is typified by low matrix porosity, outcropping limestone, and urban land use. Following one to three storms, from 5 to 16 samples from springs and wells were analyzed for major ions, and specific conductance and turbidity were monitored continuously. Comparison of the chemographs indicated some generalized responses, including an increase in turbidity and potassium concentrations and a decrease in major ion and nitrate concentrations with infiltrating storm runoff. Factor analysis of major ions and turbidity revealed strikingly similar behavior of the chemical variables for the two aquifers: The first two factors, explaining more than 75% of the variability, illustrate that dynamics of most major ions (including nitrate) are opposed to those of turbidity and of potassium. The results demonstrate that potassium and nitrate are effective tracers of infiltrating storm runoff and resident ground water, respectively, and the similar results for these two highly contrasting aquifers suggest that the dynamics identified might be applicable to karst systems in general. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating regional transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.H. )

    1993-03-01

    The distribution of permeability in the Upper Floridan aquifer is complex due to variations in the original depositional environments and the post-depositional history. The transmissivity of the aquifer is directly related to the thickness and lithology of the overlying confining unit (Miocene clastic deposits). Where this unit has been thinned or removed by erosion, solution-cavity development and thus high transmissivity are common. At depth, transmissivity is affected by the lithology of the carbonate rocks and the occurrence of paleokarst. The transmissivity of the Upper Floridan varies by more than three orders of magnitude: from less than 1,000 feet squared per day in the thickly confined, micrite-rich limestone of the Fort Walton Beach area of panhandle Florida to more than 1,000,000 feet squared per day in the unconfined, karstic areas of central and northern Florida. The application of aquifer-test methods to determine transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer is summarized as follows: (1) Conducting aquifer tests in the unconfined, karstic areas is virtually impossible because of logistical problems (removing large volumes of pumped water to prevent recycling) and because non-Darcian flow can preclude the use of standard aquifer-test methods. However, flow-net analyses using springs as the discharge control have been used successfully to estimate regional transmissivity values. (2) Multi-well aquifer tests outside of karst areas generally provide data plots that match appropriate type curves. (3) Specific capacity is not a good basis for estimating regional transmissivity values. Transmissivity maps of the Floridan should be accompanied by an evaluation of their reliability based on availability of field-test data. If transmissivity values are derived from computer models, the model sensitivity to transmissivity should be discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Flow Dynamics in a Karst Aquifer System at Sapanca Lake Basin (turkey) via Hydrochemical and Isotopic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, O. C.; Yolcubal, I.

    2013-12-01

    Sapanca Lake, located 20 km west of Izmit bay, is a fresh water lake with tectonic origin and supplies drinking and municipal water to the region. Groundwater discharges from a karstic aquifer developed in Permo-Triassic and Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous aged marbles and an alluvial aquifer distributed in east-west direction on the Sapanca plain play an important role in the recharge of the lake. In the Sapanca lake basin, there are numerous springs discharging (1 to 75 lt/s) from different elevations of the karstic aquifer system. Dolines, sinkholes, depression fields, and disappearing rivers developed on the southern heights of the basin are directly connected with the karstic aquifer and allow the aquifer system to show rapid recharge and discharge characteristics. In the scope of the study, 25 karst spring waters as well as 25 wells drilled in the alluvial aquifer were sampled as representatives of dry and rainy periods. Hydrochemical and isotopic (18O/2D/3H) compositions of the samples were evaluated along with the hydrogeology and the fracture analysis of the basin in order to assess the hydraulic relationship between the aquifer systems and the groundwater circulation in the basin. Results show that groundwaters from alluvial and karstic aquifers are modern water and demonstrate similar hydrochemical facies (Ca-HCO3 ve Ca+Mg-HCO3). Although showing seasonal differences, isotopic composition (18O/2D) of the karst springs resembles those of the streams and groundwaters from alluvial aquifer. This suggests that ground and surface waters feed each other periodically and characterize a mixing. Fracture analysis of the basin suggests that faulting has significant control over groundwater discharge and circulation in the karst aquifer and form discontinuities in the system, subdividing it into several aquifer sub-systems.

  11. Simulating groundwater flow in karst aquifers with distributed parameter models—Comparison of porous-equivalent media and hybrid flow approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2016-09-22

    been developed that incorporate the submerged conduits as a one-dimensional pipe network within the aquifer rather than as discrete, extremely transmissive features in a porous-equivalent medium; these submerged conduit models are usually referred to as hybrid models and may include the capability to simulate both laminar and turbulent flow in the one-dimensional pipe network. Comparisons of the application of a porous-equivalent media model with and without turbulence (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 2 and basic MODFLOW, respectively) and a hybrid (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 1) model to the Woodville Karst Plain near Tallahassee, Florida, indicated that for annual, monthly, or seasonal average hydrologic conditions, all methods met calibration criteria (matched observed groundwater levels and average flows). Thus, the increased effort required, such as the collection of data on conduit location, to develop a hybrid model and its increased computational burden, is not necessary for simulation of average hydrologic conditions (non-laminar flow effects on simulated head and spring discharge were minimal). However, simulation of a large storm event in the Woodville Karst Plain with daily stress periods indicated that turbulence is important for matching daily springflow hydrographs. Thus, if matching streamflow hydrographs over a storm event is required, the simulation of non-laminar flow and the location of conduits are required. The main challenge in application of the methods and approaches for developing hybrid models relates to the difficulty of mapping conduit networks or having high-quality datasets to calibrate these models. Additionally, hybrid models have long simulation times, which can preclude the use of parameter estimation for calibration. Simulation of contaminant transport that does not account for preferential flow through conduits or extremely permeable zones in any approach is ill-advised. Simulation results in other karst aquifers or other

  12. Chemical Source Tracking of Bacterial Contamination Using Micropollutants - A Karst Aquifer Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirlewagen, Johannes; Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Schiperski, Ferry; Stange, Claudia; Tiehm, Andreas; Scheytt, Traugott

    2015-04-01

    Karst aquifers are important drinking water resources in many parts of the world, though they are well known for their high vulnerability to contamination. Rainfall and snowmelt often trigger temporary contamination of karst water resources. Free-range animal breeding and application of manure on the one hand and sewage leakage or spillage on the other hand are usually regarded as main sources for fecal contamination. But distinction of their respective contributions is difficult. This study investigates the feasibility to track the origin of fecal contamination from the occurrences of indicator bacteria and chemical source indicators in karst spring water. The study site is the 45 km² rural catchment of the perennial karst spring Gallusquelle in SW-Germany (mean discharge: 0.5 m³/s). Overflow events of a stormwater detention basin (combined sewer system) are known to impact water quality at the spring. There is no free-range animal breeding in the catchment but intense application of manure. Following two heavy rainfall events with overflow of the stormwater detention basin, spring water was sampled over several days. Samples were analysed for indicator bacteria (total Coliform, E. coli, Enterococci) and 57 micropollutants, among them cyclamate and metazachlor. For the Gallusquelle catchment the artificial sweetener cyclamate and the herbicide metazachlor have been established as source specific indicators, the former for the sewer system and the latter for cropland. Though recharge in the Gallusquelle catchment is predominantly diffuse, there is a significant portion of direct recharge reflected by distinct breakthrough curves for cyclamate and metazachlor. The breakthrough of indicator bacteria coincides very well with the occurrence of both, cyclamate and metazachlor. However, indicator bacteria cannot be unambiguously tracked back to a specific source.

  13. Changes in groundwater quality in a conduit-flow-dominated karst aquifer, following BMP implementation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Water quality in the Pleasant Grove Spring karst groundwater basin, Logan County, Kentucky, was monitored to determine the effectiveness of best management practices (BMPs) in protecting karst aquifers. Ninety-two percent of the 4,069-ha (10,054-acre) watershed is used for agriculture. Water-quality monitoring began in October 1992 and ended in November 1998. By the fall of 1995 approximately 72% of the watershed was enrolled in BMPs sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture Water Quality Incentive Program (WQIP). Pre-BMP nitrate-nitrogen concentration averaged 4.65 mg/1. The median total suspended solids concentration was 127 mg/1. The median triazine concentration measured by immunosorbent assay was 1.44 ??tg/l. Median bacteria counts were 418 colonies per 100 ml (col/100 ml) for fecal coliform and 540 col/100 ml for fecal streptococci. Post-BMP, the average nitrate-nitrogen concentration was 4.74 mg/1. The median total suspended solids concentration was 47.8 mg/1. The median triazine concentration for the post-BMP period was 1.48 ??g/1. The median fecal coliform count increased to 432 col/100 ml after BMP implementation, but the median fecal streptococci count decreased to 441 col/100 ml. The pre- and post-BMP water quality was statistically evaluated by comparing the annual mass flux, annual descriptive statistics, and population of analyses for the two periods. Nitrate-nitrogen concentration was unchanged. Increases in atrazine-equivalent flux and triazine geometric averages were not statistically significant. Total suspended solids concentration decreased slightly, whereas orthophosphate concentration increased slightly. Fecal streptococci counts were reduced. The BMPs were only partially successful because the types available and the rules for participation resulted in less effective BMPs being chosen. Future BMP programs in karst areas should emphasize buffer strips around sinkholes, excluding livestock from streams and karst windows, and withdrawing

  14. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  15. Identifying the impact of climate and anthropic pressures on karst aquifers using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Jean-Baptiste; Ladouche, Bernard; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    This paper assesses the implications of climate and anthropic pressures on short to long-term changes in water resources in a Mediterranean karst using wavelet analysis. This approach was tested on 38-year (1974-2011) hydrogeological time series recorded at the Lez spring (South France), which is exploited for water supply. Firstly, we investigated inter-relationships in the frequency domain by cross-correlation across multiresolution levels. Our results showed that rainfall and spring discharge are highly correlated in the high frequency domain which reflects the hydrogeological response during flood events of typical highly karstified systems. Pumping and groundwater level are correlated in a lower frequency domain, illustrating seasonal to multi-year relationships. Secondly, continuous wavelet transform was applied to characterize the temporal variability of the inter-relationships involved. On the contrary to examples of "non-managed" karst aquifers in the literature, our results showed that the 10-year rainfall component was attenuate in the discharge signal. We assume that the reason is that the storage variations are strongly affected by pumping. This interesting result shows that possible long-term impacts of rainfall variability due to climate change may be masked by a high pumping rate. We showed also that despite an increase of the pumping rate from the 1980s, the stress on the groundwater resource does not increase from year to year. The present pumping strategy does not affect the drawdown in the long term, avoiding an over-exploitation of the aquifer. Finally, this study highlights the effectiveness of wavelet analysis in characterizing the response variability of karst systems where the hydrogeological regime is modified by pumping.

  16. Development of a process-oriented vulnerability concept for water travel time in karst aquifers-case study of Tanour and Rasoun springs catchment area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Sauter, Martin; Ptak, Thomas; Wiegand, Bettina; Margane, Armin; Toll, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    Key words: Karst aquifer, water travel time, vulnerability assessment, Jordan. The understanding of the groundwater pathways and movement through karst aquifers, and the karst aquifer response to precipitation events especially in the arid to semi-arid areas is fundamental to evaluate pollution risks from point and non-point sources. In spite of the great importance of the karst aquifer for drinking purposes, karst aquifers are highly sensitive to contamination events due to the fast connections between the land-surface and the groundwater (through the karst features) which is makes groundwater quality issues within karst systems very complicated. Within this study, different methods and approaches were developed and applied in order to characterise the karst aquifer system of the Tanour and Rasoun springs (NW-Jordan) and the flow dynamics within the aquifer, and to develop a process-oriented method for vulnerability assessment based on the monitoring of different multi-spatially variable parameters of water travel time in karst aquifer. In general, this study aims to achieve two main objectives: 1. Characterization of the karst aquifer system and flow dynamics. 2. Development of a process-oriented method for vulnerability assessment based on spatially variable parameters of travel time. In order to achieve these aims, different approaches and methods were applied starting from the understanding of the geological and hydrogeological characteristics of the karst aquifer and its vulnerability against pollutants, to using different methods, procedures and monitored parameters in order to determine the water travel time within the aquifer and investigate its response to precipitation event and, finally, with the study of the aquifer response to pollution events. The integrated breakthrough signal obtained from the applied methods and procedures including the using of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, the monitoring of multi qualitative and quantitative parameters

  17. Isotopic evolution of groundwater in a telogenetic karst aquifer: A method to study recharge and contaminant transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There exists a limited understanding of hydrogeologic flow and contaminant transport within karst aquifers, particularly in the epikarst zone, which are highly susceptible to natural and anthropogenic contamination, such as agricultural runoff, due to the interconnected nature of the surface and sub...

  18. Assessment of vulnerability in karst aquifers using a quantitative integrated numerical model: catchment characterization and high resolution monitoring - Application to semi-arid regions- Lebanon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, Joanna; Aoun, Michel; Andari, Fouad

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are highly heterogeneous and characterized by a duality of recharge (concentrated; fast versus diffuse; slow) and a duality of flow which directly influences groundwater flow and spring responses. Given this heterogeneity in flow and infiltration, karst aquifers do not always obey standard hydraulic laws. Therefore the assessment of their vulnerability reveals to be challenging. Studies have shown that vulnerability of aquifers is highly governed by recharge to groundwater. On the other hand specific parameters appear to play a major role in the spatial and temporal distribution of infiltration on a karst system, thus greatly influencing the discharge rates observed at a karst spring, and consequently the vulnerability of a spring. This heterogeneity can only be depicted using an integrated numerical model to quantify recharge spatially and assess the spatial and temporal vulnerability of a catchment for contamination. In the framework of a three-year PEER NSF/USAID funded project, the vulnerability of a karst catchment in Lebanon is assessed quantitatively using a numerical approach. The aim of the project is also to refine actual evapotranspiration rates and spatial recharge distribution in a semi arid environment. For this purpose, a monitoring network was installed since July 2014 on two different pilot karst catchment (drained by Qachqouch Spring and Assal Spring) to collect high resolution data to be used in an integrated catchment numerical model with MIKE SHE, DHI including climate, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone. Catchment characterization essential for the model included geological mapping and karst features (e.g., dolines) survey as they contribute to fast flow. Tracer experiments were performed under different flow conditions (snow melt and low flow) to delineate the catchment area, reveal groundwater velocities and response to snowmelt events. An assessment of spring response after precipitation events allowed the estimation of the

  19. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 Ωm. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities

  20. Viruses and bacteria in karst and fractured rock aquifers in East Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Trisha B; McKay, Larry D; Layton, Alice C; Jones, Sidney W; Johnson, Greg C; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Dahling, Daniel R; Villegas, Leah F; Fout, G Shay; Williams, Daniel E; Sayler, Gary

    2011-01-01

    A survey of enteric viruses and indicator bacteria was carried out in eight community water supply sources (four wells and four springs) in East Tennessee. Seven sites derived their water from carbonate aquifers and one from fractured sandstone. Four of the sites were deemed "low-risk" based on prior monitoring of fecal indicators and factors such as presence of thick layers of overlying sediments. The remaining sites were deemed "high-risk." Enteric viruses (enterovirus and reovirus) were detected by cell culture at least once in seven of the eight wells or springs including all but one of the four low-risk sites. Viral RNA, however, was not detected in any of the samples by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Conventional indicators of microbial contamination (Escherichia coli and total coliform bacteria) were detected together with culturable viruses in seven of nine virus positive samples. Bacteroides, an alternative fecal indicator which has not previously been used in groundwater investigations, was also detected in all but one of the samples containing E. coli or total coliform bacteria, as well as in one sample where viruses were present in the absence of other bacterial indicators. The study highlights some of the challenges involved in surveys of virus occurrence and indicates that culturable enteric viruses in East Tennessee karst aquifers may be more widespread than previously observed in studies of karst aquifers in Pennsylvania (8%), the Ozark region of Missouri (< 1%), or several other states covered in a national microbial water quality survey conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (43%). Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Viruses and bacteria in karst and fractured rock aquifers in east Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, T.B.; McKay, L.D.; Layton, A.C.; Jones, S.W.; Johnson, G.C.; Cashdollar, J.L.; Dahling, D.R.; Villegas, L.F.; Fout, G.S.; Williams, D.E.; Sayler, G.

    2011-01-01

    A survey of enteric viruses and indicator bacteria was carried out in eight community water supply sources (four wells and four springs) in East Tennessee. Seven sites derived their water from carbonate aquifers and one from fractured sandstone. Four of the sites were deemed "low-risk" based on prior monitoring of fecal indicators and factors such as presence of thick layers of overlying sediments. The remaining sites were deemed "high-risk." Enteric viruses (enterovirus and reovirus) were detected by cell culture at least once in seven of the eight wells or springs including all but one of the four low-risk sites. Viral RNA, however, was not detected in any of the samples by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Conventional indicators of microbial contamination (Escherichia coli and total coliform bacteria) were detected together with culturable viruses in seven of nine virus positive samples. Bacteroides, an alternative fecal indicator which has not previously been used in groundwater investigations, was also detected in all but one of the samples containing E. coli or total coliform bacteria, as well as in one sample where viruses were present in the absence of other bacterial indicators. The study highlights some of the challenges involved in surveys of virus occurrence and indicates that culturable enteric viruses in East Tennessee karst aquifers may be more widespread than previously observed in studies of karst aquifers in Pennsylvania (8%), the Ozark region of Missouri (< 1%), or several other states covered in a national microbial water quality survey conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (43%). Copyright ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  2. Effects of projected climate (2011–50) on karst hydrology and species vulnerability—Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, and Madison aquifer, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Stamm, John F.; Poteet, Mary F.; Symstad, Amy J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Long, Andrew J.; Norton, Parker A.

    2015-12-22

    Karst aquifers—formed by the dissolution of soluble rocks such as limestone—are critical groundwater resources in North America, and karst springs, caves, and streams provide habitat for unique flora and fauna. Springflow and groundwater levels in karst terrane can change greatly over short time scales, and therefore are likely to respond rapidly to climate change. How might the biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst respond to climate change and accompanying changes in groundwater levels and springflow? Sites in two central U.S. regions—the Balcones Escarpment of south-central Texas and the Black Hills of western South Dakota (fig. 1)—were selected to study climate change and its potential effects on the local karst hydrology and ecosystem. The ecosystems associated with the Edwards aquifer (Balcones Escarpment region) and Madison aquifer (Black Hills region) support federally listed endangered and threatened species and numerous State-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. Full results are provided in Stamm and others (2014), and are summarized in this fact sheet.

  3. [Nitrate storage and transport within a typical karst aquifer system in the paralleled ridge-valley of east Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping-Heng; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Ren, You-Rong; Xie, Shi-You; He, Qiu-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Feng

    2012-09-01

    In order to investigate the nitrate storage and transport in the karst aquifer system, the hydrochemical dynamics of Qingmuguan underground river system was monitored online by achieving high-resolution data during storm events and monthly data in normal weather. The principal component analysis was employed to analyze the karst water geochemistry. Results showed that nitrate in Jiangjia spring did not share the same source with soluble iron, manganese and aluminum, and exhibited different geochemical behaviors. Nitrate was derived from land surface and infiltrated together with soil water, which was mainly stored in fissure, pore and solution crack of karst unsaturated zone, whereas soluble iron, manganese and aluminum were derived from soil erosion and directly recharged the underground river through sinkholes and shafts. Nitrate transport in the karst aquifer system could be ideally divided into three phases, including input storage, fast output and re-inputting storage. Under similar external conditions, the karstification intensity of vadose zone was the key factor to determine the dynamics of nitrate concentrations in the groundwater during storm events. Nitrate stored in the karst vadose zone was easily released, which would impair the aquatic ecosystem and pose seriously threats to the local health. Thus, to strengthen the management of ecological system, changing the land-use patterns and scientifically applying fertilizer could effectively make a contribution to controlling mass nutrient input from the surface.

  4. Transit time distributions to assess present and future contamination risk of karst aquifers over Europe and the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Karst develops through the dissolution of carbonate rock. Karst groundwater in Europe is a major source of fresh water contributing up to half of the total drinking water supply in some countries. Climate model projections suggest that in the next 100 years, karst regions will experience a strong increase in temperature and a serious decrease of precipitation - especially in the Mediterranean region. Previous work showed that the karstic preferential recharge processes result in enhanced recharge rates and future climate sensitivity. But as there is fast water flow form the surface to the aquifer, there is also an enhanced risk of groundwater contamination. In this study we will assess the contamination risk of karst aquifers over Europe and the Mediterranean using simulated transit time distributions. Using a new type of semi-distributed model that considers the spatial heterogeneity of the karst system by distribution functions we simulated a range of spatially variable pathways of karstic groundwater recharge. The model is driven by the bias-corrected 5 GCMs of the ISI-MIP project (RCP8.5). Transit time distributions are calculated by virtual tracer experiments. These are repeated several times in the present (1991-2010) and the future (2080-2099). We can show that regions with larger fractions of preferential recharge show higher risks of contamination and that spatial patterns of contamination risk change towards the future.

  5. Groundwater vulnerability assessment for the karst aquifer of Tanour and Rasoun spring using EPIK, COP, and travel time methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Sauter, Martin; Margane, Armin; Ptak, Thomas; Wiegand, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Key words: Karst, groundwater vulnerability, EPIK, COP, travel time, Jordan. Karst aquifers are especially sensitive to short-lived contaminants because of fast water travel times and a low storage capacity in the conduit system. Tanour and Rasoun karst springs located around 75 km northwest of the city of Amman in Jordan represent the main domestic water supply for the surrounding villages. Both springs suffer from pollution events especially during the winter season, either by microbiological contamination due to wastewater leakage from septic tanks or by wastewater discharge from local olive oil presses. To assess the vulnerability of the karst aquifer of Tanour and Rasoun spring and its sensitivity for pollution, two different intrinsic groundwater vulnerability methods were applied: EPIK and COP. In addition, a travel time vulnerability method was applied to determine the time water travels from different points in the catchment to the streams, as a function of land surface gradients and presumed lateral flow within the epikarst. For the application of the COP and EPIK, a detailed geological survey was carried out to determine karst features and the karst network development within the catchment area. In addition, parameters, such as soil data, long term daily precipitation data, land use and topographical data were collected. For the application of the travel time vulnerability method, flow length, hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity, and slope gradient was used in order to determining the travel time in days. ArcGIS software was used for map preparation. The results of the combined vulnerability methods (COP, EPIK and travel time) show a high percentage of "very high" to "moderate" vulnerable areas within the catchment area of Tanour and Rasoun karst springs. Therefore, protection of the catchment area of Tanour and Rasoun springs from pollution and proper management of land use types is urgently needed to maintain the quality of drinking water in the

  6. Geostatistical borehole image-based mapping of karst-carbonate aquifer pores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the character and spatial distribution of porosity in carbonate aquifers is important as input into computer models used in the calculation of intrinsic permeability and for next-generation, high-resolution groundwater flow simulations. Digital, optical, borehole-wall image data from three closely spaced boreholes in the karst-carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida are used in geostatistical experiments to assess the capabilities of various methods to create realistic two-dimensional models of vuggy megaporosity and matrix-porosity distribution in the limestone that composes the aquifer. When the borehole image data alone were used as the model training image, multiple-point geostatistics failed to detect the known spatial autocorrelation of vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes, which were only 10 m apart. Variogram analysis and subsequent Gaussian simulation produced results that showed a realistic conceptualization of horizontal continuity of strata dominated by vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes.

  7. Geostatistical Borehole Image-Based Mapping of Karst-Carbonate Aquifer Pores.

    PubMed

    Sukop, Michael C; Cunningham, Kevin J

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of the character and spatial distribution of porosity in carbonate aquifers is important as input into computer models used in the calculation of intrinsic permeability and for next-generation, high-resolution groundwater flow simulations. Digital, optical, borehole-wall image data from three closely spaced boreholes in the karst-carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida are used in geostatistical experiments to assess the capabilities of various methods to create realistic two-dimensional models of vuggy megaporosity and matrix-porosity distribution in the limestone that composes the aquifer. When the borehole image data alone were used as the model training image, multiple-point geostatistics failed to detect the known spatial autocorrelation of vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes, which were only 10 m apart. Variogram analysis and subsequent Gaussian simulation produced results that showed a realistic conceptualization of horizontal continuity of strata dominated by vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Fractal And Multi-fractal Analysis Of The Hydraulic Property Variations Of Karst Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Borsato, A.

    Karst aquifers are very heterogeneous systems with hydraulic property variations acting at several continuous and discrete scales, as a result of the fact that macro- structural elements, such as faults and karst channels, and fractures are intertwined in a complex, and largely unknown, manner. Many experimental studies on karst springs showed that the recession limb of the typical storm hydrograph can be divided into several regions with different decreasing rate, suggesting that the discharge is com- posed of contributions experiencing different travel times. Despite the importance of karst aquifers as a source of fresh water for most Mediterranean countries fostered the attention of scientists and practitioners, the mechanisms controlling runoff production in such a complex subsurface environment need to be further explored. A detailed sur- vey, lasting for one year and conducted by the Museo Tridentino di Scienze Naturali of Trento, represents a unique opportunity to analyze the imprint of hydraulic prop- erty variations on the hydrological signal recorded at the spring of Prese Val, located in the Dolomiti group near Trento. Data include water discharge (Q), temperature (T) and electric conductivity of water (E). Analysis of the data revealed that the power spectrum of E scales as 1/f, with slightly, but significantly, smaller than 1. The scaling nature of the E-signal has been confirmed by rescaled range analysis of the time series. Since the electric conductivity is proportional to the concentration of ions in the spring water, which increases with the residence time, one may conclude that the fractal structure of the E signal is the consequence of a similar structure in the hydraulic property variations. This finding confirms previous results of Kirchner et al. (2000), who reported a similar behavior for chloride concentration in the streamflow of three small Welsh catchments. A more detailed analysis revealed that E and T are both multifractal signals

  9. Evidence of influence of regional and local heterogeneities within a chalk karst aquifer based on nitrates and chlorides analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, S.; Dupont, J. P.; Massei, N.; Dörfliger, N.

    2012-04-01

    In Upper Normandy, a region located in the western Paris Basin, the main source of drinking water comes from the karst aquifer. Developing under the chalk plateaus, it is a covered aquifer overlaid by superficial formations of clay-with-flints and loess. Clay-with-flints result from chalk weathering whereas loess are wind periglacial deposits. The local geologic and hydrogelogic contexts are characterized by a mature development of sinkholes. The chalk karst is causing turbidity, often linked to the fast infiltration of surface water, carrying the products of river and slope erosion and associated contaminants into the aquifer through the sinkholes. Several authors have shown the potential of turbidity as a marker of suspended elements transport and karst conduits fast transport. In this study, we conducted monthly monitoring of 11 boreholes located in the upstream watershed near boreholes (surveyed by the French Geological Survey BRGM): Graveron-Semerville in the Southern department of Upper Normandy (Eure) and Rocquemont in the Norhtern department of Upper Normandy (Seine-Maritime). The monitoring carried out included water level and electrical conductivity (reflecting total water mineralization) measurements, and major elements analysis. In any case, the water levels are similar over time (in accordance with the reference borehole). High mineralizations are observed in the Eure boreholes with significant anomalies of nitrate (70 to 130 mg/l ) and chloride (35 to 90 mg/l). For the Seine Maritime boreholes, no anomalies in nitrates and chlorides were found. To explain such differences, the agricultural activities are not sufficiently different from the study site. The explanation would then come from different reservoirs involved in water storage: loessic formations, thicker and more spreaded in the Seine Maritime department and clay with flints, of significantly higher thickness on average in the Eure department. We also discuss the influence of the drainage

  10. Hydrologic connections and dynamics of water movement in the classical Karst (Kras) Aquifer: evidence from frequent chemical and stable isotope sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    A review of past research on the hydrogeology of the Classical Karst (Kras) region and new information obtained from a two- year study using environmental tracers are presented in this paper. The main problems addressed are 1) the sources of water to the Kras aquifer resurgence zone-including the famous Timavo springs-under changing flow regimes; 2) a quantification of the storage volumes of the karst massif corresponding to flow regimes defined by hydrograph recessions of the Timavo springs; and 3) changing dynamics between deep phreatic conduit flow and shallow phreatic and epiphreatic storage within the aquifer resurgence zone as determined through changes in chemical and isotopic composition at springs and wells. Particular focus was placed on addressing the long-standing question of the influence of the Soca River on the ground waters of the aquifer resurgence zone. The results indicate that the alluvial aquifer supplied by the sinking of the Soca River on the northwestern edge of the massif contributes approximately 75% of the mean annual outflow to the smaller springs of the aquifer resurgence zone, and as much as 53% to the mean annual outflow of the Timavo springs. As a whole, the Soca River is estimated to contribute 56% of the average outflow of the Kras aquifer resurgence. The proportions of Soca River water increase under drier conditions, and decrease under wetter conditions. Time series analysis of oxygen stable isotope records indicate that the transit time of Soca River water to the Timavo springs, Sardos spring, and well B-4 is on the order of 1-2 months, depending on hydrological conditions. The total baseflow storage of the Timavo springs is estimated to be 518 million m3, and represents 88.5% of the storage capacity estimated for all flow regimes of the springs. The ratio of baseflow storage volume to the average annual volume discharged at the Timavo springs is 0.54. The Reka River sinking in Slovenia supplies substantial allogenic recharge to

  11. PaPRIKa: a method for estimating karst resource and source vulnerability—application to the Ouysse karst system (southwest France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouri, Konstantina; Plagnes, Valérie; Tremoulet, Joël; Dörfliger, Nathalie; Rejiba, Fayçal; Marchet, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic vulnerability mapping method, PaPRIKa, is proposed as a common basis for karst groundwater protection in France. PaPRIKa is a specialized method for studying karst aquifers, derived from updating the RISKE and EPIK methods. Both the structure and functioning of karst aquifers are considered in order to develop a resource and source-vulnerability mapping method. PaPRIKa means Protection of aquifers from the assessment of four criteria: P for protection (considering the most protective aspects among parameters related to soil cover, unsaturated zone and epikarst behavior), R for rock type, I for infiltration and Ka for karstification degree. The Ouysse karst system, located in the Causses area in southwest France, is one of the nine pilot sites where this method was tested and standardized. The specificities of the Ouysse system such as the size of the catchment area, the spatial variability of the karst network development, the thick infiltration zone and the system's dual character (both karst and non-karst areas), have provided a valuable field of application. The vulnerability of the resource was assessed for the entire catchment area, while source-orientated cartography was attempted for the catchment areas of the three different capture works used for drinking water.

  12. Structure and water storage capacity of a small karst aquifer based on stream discharge in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tonggang; Chen, Hongsong; Wang, Kelin

    2016-03-01

    Karst spring/stream discharge reflects the global configuration of the aquifer. However, quantitative description of the aquifer structure such as effective porosity (neff) and water storage capacity by the discharge analysis is difficult because of the complex conduit/fracture system. This study attempted to quantify the characteristics of karst aquifer based on discharge recession and time series analysis methods. Three recession models, including modified Maillet, Mangin and Boussinesq models, were evaluated to choose the most suitable one for analyzing the aquifer structure, and auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions were applied to study the aquifer response in both year and rainfall event time scales. The results showed that the modified Maillet model was more suitable in the study catchment with Mangin model overestimating and Boussinesq model underestimating the discharge. The neff was 3.73% for the total aquifer, and it was 0.07%, 0.33% and 3.33% for the conduit, fracture and matrix, respectively. Based on a case study of a rainfall event with precipitation of 68 mm, the water volumes drained by the three media were 25.43%, 33.40% and 41.17%, respectively. This indicates that, although conduit network is not very developed with lower neff, it is still an important water transmissive element (draining more than a quarter of water after the rainfall event). The memory time of the aquifer was 4 days for the year scale and 8 h for the rainfall event (68 mm) scale. This demonstrates that the aquifer has a well developed drainage system with a quick response to the rainfall. The above results provide further insights for hydrological processes modeling and water resources management for the small catchment in karst regions.

  13. Water-rock interaction induced by contaminated groundwater in a karst aquifer, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, G.; Lambrakis, N.; Katagas, C.; Papoulis, D.; Tsolis-Katagas, P.

    2005-12-01

    The karst system of SW Trifilia is composed of a thick sequence of carbonate sediments, which have experienced two types of dolomitization and dedolomitization processes and comprise an extended aquifer. The application of fertilizers in the region have not only caused the degradation of the groundwater quality but also induced hydrochemical changes exerting major control on dolomitization processes. Factor analysis indicates high correlation coefficient between NH{4/+}, NO{3/-}, Ca2+ and Mg2+, which can be attributed to cation-exchange processes involving clay minerals. The application of a conservative mixing model showed that the calculated groundwater types indicate a cation-exchange process between NH{4/+}, derived from fertilizers, and between Ca2+ and Mg2+. Mg2+ released from smectite interlayers, exchanged for NH{4/+} in the groundwater and favor a dolomitization process through the partial replacement of Ca2+ in the lattice of calcite (dedolomite) contained in precursor dolomites. This recent stage dolomitization occurred near the water level and within the phreatic zone only and had not influenced the whole karst massif; it also resulted in low Mg/Ca values found in the zone characterized by intensive application of nitrogen-based fertilizers and the absence of overlying impermeable strata.

  14. Karst aquifers on small islands--the island of Olib, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Tatjana; Munda, Boris

    2012-10-01

    Water supply is a major problem in the Adriatic islands, especially during the summer tourism season, and represents a limiting factor to the islands' further economic development. Much attention has been given to water supply solutions, primarily in terms of attempting to use the existing island water. Unfortunately, few islands have favourable hydrological conditions to accumulate significant quantities of surface water or groundwater. In the period from 2001 to 2004, investigations were conducted on many islands to define their own freshwater or partially brackish water resources since desalinisation technology could resolve a significant part of the water supply demand on small and distant islands. Due to the specificity and complexity of research in karst areas, the study was conducted in phases and included the geological and hydrogeological reconnaissance of the island, aimed at locating possible areas on the island where the necessary quantities of groundwater of adequate quality could be captured; a detailed hydrogeological mapping of the specified areas, geophysical investigation and test drilling; and, over several days, test pumping of the most promising borehole. One of the islands investigated was the island of Olib. The conducted surveys indicated that it is possible to pump about 3.5 L/s of groundwater from the karst aquifer of the island of Olib, which fully complies with the sanitary quality of drinking water.

  15. Regional-scale analysis of karst underground flow deduced from tracing experiments: examples from carbonate aquifers in Malaga province, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberá, J. A.; Mudarra, M.; Andreo, B.; De la Torre, B.

    2017-08-01

    Tracer concentration data from field experiments conducted in several carbonate aquifers (Malaga province, southern Spain) were analyzed following a dual approach based on the graphical evaluation method (GEM) and solute transport modeling to decipher flow mechanisms in karst systems at regional scale. The results show that conduit system geometry and flow conditions are the principal factors influencing tracer migration through the examined karst flow routes. Solute transport is mainly controlled by longitudinal advection and dispersion throughout the conduit length, but also by flow partitioning between mobile and immobile fluid phases, while the matrix diffusion process appears to be less relevant. The simulation of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) suggests that diffuse and concentrated flow through the unsaturated zone can have equivalent transport properties under extreme recharge, with high flow velocities and efficient mixing due to the high hydraulic gradients generated. Tracer mobilization within the saturated zone under low flow conditions mainly depends on the hydrodynamics (rather than on the karst conduit development), which promote a lower longitudinal advection and retardation in the tracer migration, resulting in a marked tailing effect of BTCs. The analytical advection-dispersion equation better approximates the effective flow velocity and longitudinal dispersion estimations provided by the GEM, while the non-equilibrium transport model achieves a better adjustment of most asymmetric and long-tailed BTCs. The assessment of karst underground flow properties from tracing tests at regional scale can aid design of groundwater management and protection strategies, particularly in large hydrogeological systems (i.e. transboundary carbonate aquifers) and/or in poorly investigated ones.

  16. Groundwater Assessment of the Bleone Catchment Karst Aquifer in Southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Mosoh Bambi, Confidence K.

    2016-10-01

    Karst aquifer is an important water resource in southern France. It is the main source for agriculture and for domestic water supply. Hence, it is necessary to assess the quantity and quality of water in the Bleone Catchment. In order to achieve this aim, a groundwater chemistry analysis and regional numerical groundwater flow modelling using MODFLOW were conducted. Groundwater samples from springs and wells analyzed for water quality in the Bléone Catchment demonstrate different water types dominated mostly by fresh water, which is of moderate alkalinity and contains calcium and magnesium as major cations and bicarbonate as a common anion. The saturation indices for calcite and dolomite reveal that dissolution of calcite and dolomite can still take place. In addition, there is a very complex interaction between surface water and groundwater in the catchment.

  17. Storage and Drainage Characteristics of a Highly Heterogeneous Karst Aquifer in Houzhai Basin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongrong; Shu, Longcang; Zhu, Jianting; Yu, Zhongbo; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of karst aquifers are difficult to be determined due to their heterogeneous physical properties and lack of hydrogeological information. In this case study, we applied two methods for a comparative analysis of storage and drainage characteristics in upstream, midstream, and downstream of Houzhai cave stream basin. In the first method, Minimum Smoothed Method (MSM) is used to determine the proportion of baseflow to the total flow (Baseflow Index, BFI). In the second method, a bicarbonate-base two-end member mixing model is used to quantify the slow flow component and fast flow component. For both methods, slow flow and quick flow are quantified at three sampling sites, which provide useful information for the analysis of storage and drainage characteristics. The results from flow separation method and hydrogeochemical analysis show a consistently increasing trend of the proportion of slow flow to total flow from the upstream to downstream which indicates that the voids of highly conductive conduits and well-connected fissures decrease along the flow paths in the Houzhai cave stream basin in southwest China. The upstream areas have a low proportion of baseflow which indicates a high drainage capacity due to high permeable conduits and well-connected fissures. The downstream areas, on the contrary, have a high proportion of baseflow which indicates a high storage capacity and slow infiltration due to the predominant presence of matrix and poorly-connected fissures. These numerical methods provide alternative ways to investigate the storage and drainage characteristics of karst aquifers where direct measurement are not available. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Modeling of Groundwater Flow in a Karst Aquifer in Northeast Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2001-12-01

    are widespread in this watershed. Results from the simulations will be discussed to show how karst conditions affect groundwater and contaminant flow in a limestone aquifer.

  19. Correlation of Spatio-Temporal Contaminant Distribution, Land Use, and Hydrogeological Factors in the Karst Aquifers of Northern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Torres, N. I.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by caves, springs, and sinkholes, and typified by interconnected fissures, fractures and conduits. These characteristics make these aquifers highly productive, and vulnerable to contamination. Previous studies in the northern karst aquifers of Puerto Rico have shown significant distribution of contaminants, including volatile organic compounds, phthalates and other contaminants of emerging concern, beyond demarked sources of contamination. This study develops spatial-temporal distributions of phthalate contaminants in the karst system of northern Puerto Rico and assesses statistical correlations between hydrogeologic factors and groundwater contamination with phthalates. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and technologies, and statistical models are applied to attain these objectives. Results show that there is an extensive contamination with phthalates that varies with time. Contamination is present in the confined and shallow aquifers. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most detected contaminant (20.6% of the sites). Diethyl phthalate and and dibutyl phthalate are also detected in 6.7% and 8.24% of the sites, respectively. Phthalates detected as mixtures components are significantly detected in areas of high urban and industrial development. They are also detected in areas within 5 miles of superfund sites and landfills. The results indicate that phthalate contamination is highly related to land use. Statistical models show that the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers, sinkholes density, and time are significantly related to the presence of phthalates in groundwater. The extensive spatio-temporal contamination suggests that contaminants can persist in the environment for long periods of time, and that land use and hydrogeological factors are important factors contributing to the presence of emerging contaminants in karst systems.

  20. Geochemical and statistical evidence of recharge, mixing, and controls on spring discharge in an eogenetic karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Paul J.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryInformation about sources of recharge, distributions of flow paths, and the extent of water-rock reactions in karst aquifers commonly result from monitoring spring chemistry and discharge. To investigate the relationship between spring characteristics and the complexities of karst aquifers, we couple variations in surface- and groundwater chemistry to physical conditions including river stage, precipitation, and evapotranspiration (ET) within a sink-rise system through a 6-km portion of the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) in north-central Florida. Principal component analysis (PCA) of time series major-element compositions suggests that at least three sources of water affect spring discharge, including allogenic recharge into a swallet, diffuse recharge through a thin vadose zone, and water upwelling from deep within the aquifer. The deep-water source exerts the strongest influence on water chemistry by providing a majority of Na +, Mg 2+, K +, Cl -, and SO42- to the system. Anomalously high temperature at one of several monitoring wells reflects vertical flow of about 1 m/year. Mass-balance calculations suggest diffuse recharge and deep-water upwelling can provide up to 50% of the spring discharge; however, their contributions depend on head gradients between the conduit and surrounding aquifer matrix, which are influenced by variations in precipitation, ET, and river stage. Our results indicate that upwelling from deep flow paths may provide significant contributions of water to spring discharge, and that monitoring only springs limits interpretations of karst systems by masking critical components of the aquifer, such as water sources and flow paths. These results also suggest the matrix in eogenetic aquifers is a major pathway for flow even in a system dominated by conduits.

  1. A multi-method approach for groundwater resource assessment in coastal carbonate (karst) aquifers: the case study of Sierra Almijara (southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, B.; Barberá, J. A.; Mudarra, M.; Marín, A. I.; García-Orellana, J.; Rodellas, V.; Pérez, I.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the transference of water resources within hydrogeological systems, particularly in coastal aquifers, in which groundwater discharge may occur through multiple pathways (through springs, into rivers and streams, towards the sea, etc.), is crucial for sustainable groundwater use. This research aims to demonstrate the usefulness of the application of conventional recharge assessment methods coupled to isotopic techniques for accurately quantifying the hydrogeological balance and submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) from coastal carbonate aquifers. Sierra Almijara (Southern Spain), a carbonate aquifer formed of Triassic marbles, is considered as representative of Mediterranean coastal karst formations. The use of a multi-method approach has permitted the computation of a wide range of groundwater infiltration rates (17-60%) by means of direct application of hydrometeorological methods (Thornthwaite and Kessler) and spatially distributed information (modified APLIS method). A spatially weighted recharge rate of 42% results from the most coherent information on physiographic and hydrogeological characteristics of the studied system. Natural aquifer discharge and groundwater abstraction have been volumetrically quantified, based on flow and water-level data, while the relevance of SGD was estimated from the spatial analysis of salinity, 222Rn and the short-lived radium isotope 224Ra in coastal seawater. The total mean aquifer discharge (44.9-45.9 hm3 year-1) is in agreement with the average recharged groundwater (44.7 hm3 year-1), given that the system is volumetrically equilibrated during the study period. Besides the groundwater resources assessment, the methodological aspects of this research may be interesting for groundwater management and protection strategies in coastal areas, particularly karst environments.

  2. Microgravity monitoring of recharge in a karst aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.A.; Ahern, J.L. . School of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-02-01

    Natural and artificial recharge of a shallow karst aquifer in Harmon County, Oklahoma, is being studied by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the US Bureau of Reclamation. The aquifer, the Permian Blaine Formation, consists of interbedded gypsum, shale, and dolomite. It is the only significant fresh water aquifer developed in evaporite rocks in the USA. The Blaine Formation forms major cave systems locally and generally consists of an intricate network of caves, cavities, sinks, and dissolution-collapse structures affecting the five gypsum bed subunits. At the recharge-demonstration sites, the Blaine is roughly 200 feet thick. At each site, observations wells cluster about a central recharge well which injects rainfall runoff at the depth of maximum void space (approximately 100 to 200 feet) determining from drilling. Annual variation in water level is up to 50 feet. Local storms can cause a rise of several tens of feet in a few days and a gradual decrease over several weeks. This may lead to a regional increase in water table elevation near the recharge well ( mounding'), and localized filling of voids in the gypsum. Both of these effects are expected to cause changes in the local gravity field following a heavy rainfall. For example, the filling of a 5 meter radius cylindrical void at a depth of 25 meters would produce a 46 microgal anomaly, easily detectable by a microgravity meter after instrumental and tidal drift corrections are made. To look for these changes, microgravity profiles will be conducted across the recharge zones. If correlation of gravity with measured water levels and recharge volume is demonstrated, microgravity surveys may prove useful in siting recharge wells from surface measurements alone.

  3. Prominence of ichnologically influenced macroporosity in the karst Biscayne aquifer: Stratiform "super-K" zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.; Sukop, M.C.; Huang, H.; Alvarez, P.F.; Curran, H.A.; Renken, R.A.; Dixon, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of cyclostratigraphic, ichnologic, and borehole geophysical analyses of continuous core holes; tracer-test analyses; and lattice Boltzmann flow simulations was used to quantify biogenic macroporosity and permeability of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida. Biogenic macroporosity largely manifests as: (1) ichnogenic macroporosity primarily related to postdepositional burrowing activity by callianassid shrimp and fossilization of components of their complex burrow systems (Ophiomorpha); and (2) biomoldic macroporosity originating from dissolution of fossil hard parts, principally mollusk shells. Ophiomorpha-dominated ichno-fabric provides the greatest contribution to hydrologic characteristics in the Biscayne aquifer in a 345 km2 study area. Stratiform tabular-shaped units of thalassinidean-associated macroporosity are commonly confined to the lower part of upward-shallowing high-frequency cycles, throughout aggradational cycles, and, in one case, they stack vertically within the lower part of a high-frequency cycle set. Broad continuity of many of the macroporous units concentrates groundwater flow in extremely permeable passage-ways, thus making the aquifer vulnerable to long-distance transport of contaminants. Ichnogenic macroporosity represents an alternative pathway for concentrated groundwater flow that differs considerably from standard karst flow-system paradigms, which describe groundwater movement through fractures and cavernous dissolution features. Permeabilities were calculated using lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) applied to computer renderings assembled from X-ray computed tomography scans of various biogenic macroporous limestone samples. The highest simulated LBM permeabilities were about five orders of magnitude greater than standard laboratory measurements using air-permeability methods, which are limited in their application to extremely permeable macroporous rock samples. Based on their close conformance to analytical

  4. Percolation and particle transport in the unsaturated zone of a karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Michiel; Goldscheider, Nico; Zopfi, Jakob; Zwahlen, Francxois

    2009-01-01

    Recharge and contamination of karst aquifers often occur via the unsaturated zone, but the functioning of this zone has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, irrigation and tracer experiments, along with monitoring of rainfall events, were used to examine water percolation and the transport of solutes, particles, and fecal bacteria between the land surface and a water outlet into a shallow cave. Monitored parameters included discharge, electrical conductivity, temperature, organic carbon, turbidity, particle-size distribution (PSD), fecal indicator bacteria, chloride, bromide, and uranine. Percolation following rainfall or irrigation can be subdivided into a lag phase (no response at the outlet), a piston-flow phase (release of epikarst storage water by pressure transfer), and a mixed-flow phase (increasing contribution of freshly infiltrated water), starting between 20 min and a few hours after the start of recharge event. Concerning particle and bacteria transport, results demonstrate that (1) a first turbidity signal occurs during increasing discharge due to remobilization of particles from fractures (pulse-through turbidity); (2) a second turbidity signal is caused by direct particle transfer from the soil (flow-through turbidity), often accompanied by high levels of fecal indicator bacteria, up to 17,000 Escherichia coli/100 mL; and (3) PSD allows differentiation between the two types of turbidity. A relative increase of fine particles (0.9 to 1.5 microm) coincides with microbial contamination. These findings help quantify water storage and percolation in the epikarst and better understand contaminant transport and attenuation. The use of PSD as "early-warning parameter" for microbial contamination in karst water is confirmed.

  5. Intensive exploitation of a karst aquifer leads to Cryptosporidium water supply contamination.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, S; Ratajczak, M; Gargala, G; Fournier, M; Berthe, T; Favennec, L; Dupont, J P

    2011-04-01

    Groundwater from karst aquifers is an important source of drinking water worldwide. Outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis linked to surface water and treated public water are regularly reported. Cryptosporidium oocysts are resistant to conventional drinking water disinfectants and are a major concern for the water industry. Here, we examined conditions associated with oocyst transport along a karstic hydrosystem, and the impact of intensive exploitation on Cryptosporidium oocyst contamination of the water supply. We studied a well-characterized karstic hydrosystem composed of a sinkhole, a spring and a wellbore. Thirty-six surface water and groundwater samples were analyzed for suspended particulate matter, turbidity, electrical conductivity, and Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cyst concentrations. (Oo)cysts were identified and counted by means of solid-phase cytometry (ChemScan RDI(®)), a highly sensitive method. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 78% of both surface water and groundwater samples, while Giardia cysts were found in respectively 22% and 8% of surface water and groundwater samples. Mean Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations were 29, 13 and 4/100 L at the sinkhole, spring and wellbore, respectively. Cryptosporidium oocysts were transported from the sinkhole to the spring and the wellbore, with respective release rates of 45% and 14%, suggesting that oocysts are subject to storage and remobilization in karst conduits. Principal components analysis showed that Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations depended on variations in hydrological forcing factors. All water samples collected during intensive exploitation contained oocysts. Control of Cryptosporidium oocyst contamination during intensive exploitation is therefore necessary to ensure drinking water quality. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of Methods for Delineating Zones of Transport for Production Wells in Karst and Fractured-Rock Aquifers of Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of groundwater-flow conditions in the vicinity of production wells in karst and fractured-rock settings commonly is difficult due in part to the lack of detailed hydrogeologic information and the resources needed to collect it. To address this concern and to better understand the hydrogeology and aquifer properties of karst and fractured-rock aquifers in Minnesota, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Health, conducted a study to evaluate methods for delineating zones of transport for 24 production wells in karst and fractured-rock aquifers in Minnesota. Two empirical methods for delineating zones of transport around wells were applied to the 24 production wells that extract groundwater from karst and fractured-rock aquifers in nine Minnesota communities. These methods were the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods, and both methods assume porous-media flow conditions. The 24 wells extracted water from a karst aquifer (Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer), porous aquifers interspersed with solution-enhanced fractures (Jordan and Hinckley aquifers), or fractured-bedrock aquifers (Biwabik Iron-Formation and Sioux Quartzite aquifers). Zones of transport delineated using these two empirical methods were compared with zones of transport previously delineated by Minnesota Department of Health hydrologists for the wells using the calculated-fixed-radius method and groundwater-flow models. Large differences were seen in the size and shapes of most zones of transport delineated using the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods compared with the zones of transport delineated by the Minnesota Department of Health. In general, the zones of transport delineated using the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods were smaller in area than those delineated by the Minnesota Department of Health and included only small parts of the Minnesota Department of Health zones of transport. About two-thirds(67 percent) of

  7. Change in the structure of Escherichia coli population related to the settling velocities in karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, F.; Massei, N.; Berthe, T.; Deloffre, J.; Fournier, M.; Bertel, F.; jolivet, F.; lallemand, H.; Niepceron, F.; Sellier, C.; Benjamin, S.

    2012-04-01

    Change in the structure of Escherichia coli population related to the settling velocities in karst aquifer. Fabienne Petit1, Fanny Bertel2, Florence Jolivet2, Hélène Lallemand2, Fanny Niepceron2, Clémentine Sellier2, Benjamin Smith2, Thierry Berthe, Julien Deloffre1, Matthieu Fournier1,Nicolas Massei 1. 1- Université de Rouen, UMR 6143 M2C, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 1- CNRS, UMR 6143 M2C, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 1- SFR SCALE, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 2 Research project of students from MasterEnvironment ( ESEB University of Rouen) According to the farming or human use of their watershed, the karst aquifers were particularly vulnerable to contamination by fecal bacteria mainly Escherichia coli (E. coli). To date, if E. coli is a commensal bacteria originated from intestinal tracts of humans and vertebrate animals, the water and sediment are also considered as a putative second habitat where some strains could be naturalized. Among the phenotypic characteristics of E.coli, association with particles not only could enhance the survival of some strains but also greatly influenced the particles dynamics. The great genetic diversity of E. coli may explain this variety of lifestyles of this bacteria species. Indeed we have previously shown that in river, the structure of the population of E. coli was not stable, but depended on hydrological conditions (Ratajczak, 2010). In this work we go further into the understanding of the behaviour of E. coli population in karstic hydrosystem by investigating (i) the structure of E. coli population based on the distribution in four main phylo-groups (A, B1, B2, D) according their settling velocities from surface water to groundwater. For this purpose we combined microbiology , microscopy (SEM) and hydrology approaches. During their transfer along the karst hydrosystem, both modalities of the association of E. coli to the particles and, the structure of E. coli population were modified. Settling experiment led

  8. Multitracer test for the determination of transport and in-situ degradation of organic micro-contaminants in karst aquifers on the example of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, O.; Nödler, K.; Licha, T.; Geyer, T.

    2012-04-01

    The application of organic micro-contaminants as indicators for contamination sources in aquifers and surface-water bodies has been increasingly discussed in the literature over the last years. One of the proposed substances was caffeine. It served as indicator for wastewater-leakage to various systems. As well, wastewater volumes could be estimated from caffeine concentrations. Although caffeine is known to be degradable, the degradation rates are normally only determined from mass balances or laboratory experiments. Degradation rates obtained from mass balances are relatively uncertain, as the input-function is difficult to be assessed. Laboratory experiments are hardly capable to consider the full complexity of natural systems and can rarely be transferred to those. To solve this problem, in-situ degradation rates of reactive indicators have to be determined. Especially multitracer tests can be used to access compound-specific transport parameters and degradation rates, relative to conservative tracers. A multitracer test with caffeine and uranine has been performed in a karst system (catchment of the Gallusquelle spring, SW Germany). From the breakthrough curves of the tracers, the transport behavior and the in-situ degradation rate of caffeine could be deduced. The tracers were injected into a sinkhole with a linear distance of 3000 m to the spring. The mean residence time of the tracers was found to be 84 h at a flow velocity of 35 m/h. Throughout the whole experiment, the spring discharge was constant at 187 L/s. Uranine served as conservative reference-tracer for the calibration of a one-dimensional transport model with respect to solute-unspecific parameters. Relative to that, the tracer breakthrough curve of caffeine was interpreted. As solute-specific parameters the retardation coefficient as well as degradation rate of caffeine in the investigated karst aquifer could be determined. The results indicate, that caffeine is slightly retarded in the

  9. Environmental isotopic and hydrochemical study of water in the karst aquifer and submarine springs of the Syrian coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charideh, Al; Rahman, Abdul

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater of major karst systems and submarine springs in the coastal limestone aquifer of Syria has been investigated using chemical and isotopic techniques. The δ18O values of groundwater range from -6.8 to -5.05‰, while those for submarine springs vary from -6.34 to +1.08‰ (eastern Mediterranean seawater samples have a mean of +1.7‰). Groundwater originates from the direct infiltration of atmospheric water. Stable isotopes show that the elevation of the recharge zones feeding the Banyas area (400-600 m a.s.l.) is higher than that feeding the Amrit area (100-300 m a.s.l.). The 18Oextracted (18O content of the seawater contribution) for the major submarine springs suggests a mean recharge area elevation of 600-700 m a.s.l., and lower than 400 m a.s.l. for the spring close to Amrit. Based on the measured velocity and the percentage of fresh water at the submarine springs outlet, the estimated discharge rate is 350 million m3/year. The tritium concentrations in groundwater (1.6-5.9 TU) are low and very close to the current rainfall values (2.9-5.6 TU). Adopting a model with exponential time distribution, the mean turnover time of groundwater in the Al-sen spring was evaluated to be 60 years. A value of about 3.7 billion m3 was obtained for the maximum groundwater reservoir size.

  10. Tracing coastal and estuarine groundwater discharge sources in a complex faulted and fractured karst aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Price, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater discharge can be an important input of water, nutrients and other constituents to coastal wetlands and adjacent marine areas, particularly in karst regions with little to no surface water flow. A combination of natural processes (e.g., sea-level rise and climate change) and anthropogenic pressures (e.g., urban growth and development) can alter the subterranean water flow to the coastline. For water management practices and environmental preservation to be better suited for the natural and human environment, a better understanding is needed of the hydrogeologic connectivity between the areas of fresh groundwater recharge and the coastal zone. The Yucatan peninsula has a unique tectonic and geologic history consisting of a Cretaceous impact crater, Miocene and Eocene tectonic plate movements, and multiple sea-level stands. These events have shaped many complex geologic formations and structures. The Sian Káan Biosphere Reserve (SKBR), a UNESCO World Heritage Site located along the Atlantic Ocean, overlaps two distinct hydrogeologic regions: the evaporate region to the south and south west, and the Holbox Fracture Zone to the north. These two regions create a complex network of layered, perched and fractured aquifers and an extensive groundwater cave network. The two regions are distinguished by bedrock mineralogical differences that can be used to trace shallow subsurface water from interior portions of the peninsula to the Bahia de la Ascension in the SKBR. The objective of this research was to use naturally occurring geochemical tracers (eg., Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, K+, Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+ and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen) to decipher the sources of groundwater flow through the coastal wetlands of the SKBR and into the Bahia de la Ascension. Surface water and groundwater samples were collected during two field campaigns in 2010 and 2012 within the coastal and estuarine waters of the SKBR. Additional water samples were collected at select cenotes along

  11. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-07-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  12. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mountain, Gregory S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  13. Time-series variations in CFC and 3H/3He ages in springs discharging from an eogenetic karst aquifer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. B.; Kurz, M. J.; Khadka, M. B.; Cohen, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    increasing from the low flow to flood samples while 3H/3He ages decrease in five of the six springs with increasing discharge. The age of the water would be expected to decrease following the storm, suggesting that the CFC data may be contaminated. Assuming the drought discharge is solely groundwater and the measured reduction in the 3H/3He ages originates from mixing old groundwater with zero-aged water from the storm, the fraction of discharging storm water ranged from 4 to 25% of the total discharge. This variation in the fraction of the storm-derived water corresponds to estimated depths of flow paths to the springs based on dissolved oxygen and temperature data. Springs originating from deep flow paths have smaller fractions of storm water. Time-series measurements of ages of water discharging from springs appear to be a useful technique for estimating fractions of storm derived water and possibly flow paths in springs discharging from eogenetic karst aquifers.

  14. Estimating aquifer thickness using multiple pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Dewandel, Benoit

    2010-12-01

    A method to estimate aquifer thickness and hydraulic conductivity has been developed, consisting of multiple pumping tests. The method requires short-duration pumping cycles on an unconfined aquifer with significant seasonal water-table fluctuations. The interpretation of several pumping tests at a site in India under various initial conditions provides information on the change in hydrodynamic parameters in relation to the initial water-table level. The transmissivity linearly decreases compared with the initial water level, suggesting a homogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth. The hydraulic conductivity is estimated from the slope of this linear relationship. The extrapolation of the relationship between transmissivity and water level provides an estimate of the aquifer thickness that is in good agreement with geophysical investigations. The hydraulically active part of the aquifer is located in both the shallow weathered and the underlying densely fractured zones of the crystalline basement. However, no significant relationship is found between the aquifer storage coefficient and initial water level. This new method contributes to filling the methodological gap between single pumping tests and hydraulic tomography, in providing information on the variation of the global transmissivity according to depth. It can be applied to any unconfined aquifer experiencing large seasonal water-table fluctuations and short pumping cycles.

  15. Groundwater Quality: Analysis of Its Temporal and Spatial Variability in a Karst Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Pacheco Castro, Roger; Pacheco Ávila, Julia; Ye, Ming; Cabrera Sansores, Armando

    2017-06-15

    This study develops an approach based on hierarchical cluster analysis for investigating the spatial and temporal variation of water quality governing processes. The water quality data used in this study were collected in the karst aquifer of Yucatan, Mexico, the only source of drinking water for a population of nearly two million people. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to the quality data of all the sampling periods lumped together. This was motivated by the observation that, if water quality does not vary significantly in time, two samples from the same sampling site will belong to the same cluster. The resulting distribution maps of clusters and box-plots of the major chemical components reveal the spatial and temporal variability of groundwater quality. Principal component analysis was used to verify the results of cluster analysis and to derive the variables that explained most of the variation of the groundwater quality data. Results of this work increase the knowledge about how precipitation and human contamination impact groundwater quality in Yucatan. Spatial variability of groundwater quality in the study area is caused by: a) seawater intrusion and groundwater rich in sulfates at the west and in the coast, b) water rock interactions and the average annual precipitation at the middle and east zones respectively, and c) human contamination present in two localized zones. Changes in the amount and distribution of precipitation cause temporal variation by diluting groundwater in the aquifer. This approach allows to analyze the variation of groundwater quality controlling processes efficiently and simultaneously. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Imaging Karst Aquifers with Multichannel Seismic Data in Biscayne Bay: Conventional Wisdom Defied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C.; Cunningham, K. J.

    2008-05-01

    Conventional wisdom reasons that acquisition of useful seismic data in shallow-marine carbonate environments is not possible because: (1) water-bottom multiples will dominate; (2) receiver offsets will be too short to image deep reflectors; (3) normal move out is too small to effectively calculate velocities; (4) air-gun source arrays are not appropriate or frequency band-limited; and (5) it is folly to over-sample the seismic data and process very large digital data sets. In 2007, about 108 km (17 individual profiles) of marine, multichannel, high-resolution, seismic data were acquired almost entirely inside Biscayne National Park in water depths ranging from 0.9 to 100 m. The data were collected using a 48-trace, towed-streamer array; an interdependent air-gun as the seismic source; and a proprietary 52-channel, 24-bit recording system. The seismic vessel was a fast, shallow-draft catamaran capable of continuously acquiring data in water as shallow as 0.7 m. The set of seismic images from 17 profiles show well-defined reflections from near surface to the Eocene Oldsmar Formation (including the karstic Boulder Zone in the Lower Floridan aquifer). The profiles also display distinctive geologic features that include karst, clinoformal prograding strata, unconformities, fractures, stratal truncation, and evidence for breaching of confining units.

  17. Organic and inorganic carbon dynamics in a karst aquifer: Santa Fe River Sink-Rise system, north Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jin; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Moore, Paul J.; Martin, Jonathan B.

    2014-03-01

    Spatiotemporal variations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), major ions concentrations and other geochemical parameters including stable carbon isotopes of DIC (δ13CDIC), were measured in surface water and deep and shallow well water samples of the Santa Fe River Sink-Rise eogenetic karst system, north Florida, USA. Three end-member water sources were identified: one DOC-rich/DIC-poor/δ13CDIC-depleted, one DOC-poor/DIC-rich/δ13CDIC-enriched, and one enriched in major ions. Given their spatiotemporal distributions, they were presumed to represent soil water, upper aquifer groundwater, and deep aquifer water sources, respectively. Using assumed ratios of Na+, Cl, and SO42- for each end-member, a mixing model calculated the contribution of each water source to each sample. Then, chemical effects of biogeochemical reactions were calculated as the difference between those predicted by the mixing model and measured species concentrations. In general, carbonate mineral dissolution occurred throughout the Sink-Rise system, surface waters were net autotrophic and the subsurface was in metabolic balance, i.e., no net DOC or DIC production or consumption. However, there was evidence for chemolithoautotrophy, perhaps by hydrogen oxidizing microbes, at some deep aquifer sites. Mineralization of this autochthonous natural dissolved organic matter (NDOM) led to localized carbonate dissolution as did surface water-derived NDOM supplied to shallow well sites during the highest flow periods. This study demonstrates linkages between hydrology, abiotic and microbial processes and carbon dynamics and has important implications for groundwater quality, karst morphologic evolution, and hydrogeologic projects such as aquifer storage and recovery in karst systems.

  18. Groundwater recharge assessment at local and episodic scale in a soil mantled perched karst aquifer in southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allocca, V.; De Vita, P.; Manna, F.; Nimmo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Depending on the seasonally varying air temperature, evapotranspiration, and precipitation patterns, calculated values of RPR varied between 35% and 97% among the individual episodes. A multiple linear correlation of the RPR with both the average intensity of recharging rainfall events and the antecedent soil water content was calculated. Given the relatively easy measurability of precipitation and soil water content, such an empirical model would have great hydrogeological and practical utility. It would facilitate short-term forecasting of recharge in karst aquifers of the Mediterranean region and other aquifers with similar hydrogeological characteristics. By establishing relationships between the RPR and climate-dependent variables such as average storm intensity, it would facilitate prediction of climate-change effects on groundwater recharge. The EMR methodology could further be applied to other aquifers for evaluating the relationship of recharge to various hydrometeorological and hydrogeological processes.

  19. Tracking changing X-ray contrast media application to an urban-influenced karst aquifer in the Wadi Shueib, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Zemann, Moritz; Wolf, Leif; Grimmeisen, Felix; Tiehm, Andreas; Klinger, Jochen; Hötzl, Heinz; Goldscheider, Nico

    2015-03-01

    Sewage input into a karst aquifer via leaking sewers and cesspits was investigated over five years in an urbanized catchment. Of 66 samples, analyzed for 25 pharmaceuticals, 91% indicated detectable concentrations. The former standard iodinated X-ray contrast medium (ICM) diatrizoic acid was detected most frequently. Remarkably, it was found more frequently in groundwater (79%, median: 54 ng/l) than in wastewater (21%, 120 ng/l), which is supposed to be the only source in this area. In contrast, iopamidol, a possible substitute, spread over the aquifer during the investigation period whereas concentrations were two orders of magnitude higher in wastewater than in groundwater. Knowledge about changing application of pharmaceuticals thus is essential to assess urban impacts on aquifers, especially when applying mass balances. Since correlated concentrations provide conclusive evidence that, for this catchment, nitrate in groundwater rather comes from urban than from rural sources, ICM are considered useful tracers.

  20. Groundwater temperature and electrical conductivity as tools to characterize flow patterns in carbonate aquifers: The Sierra de las Nieves karst aquifer, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñán Baena, C.; Andreo, B.; Mudry, J.; Carrasco Cantos, F.

    2009-06-01

    In carbonate massifs, flow patterns are conditioned by karstification processes which develop a conduit network and preserve low permeability microfractured blocks. The Sierra de las Nieves karst massif (southern Spain) is subjected to a given climatic and geological context, and thus it is possible to analyse the spatial and temporal variability of the water temperature and electrical conductivity at its main karst outlets, which display different responses to rainfall episodes. In this experimental field area, conduit flow and diffuse flow drainage patterns have been distinguished by combining groundwater temperature and electrical conductivity data. Both parameters show large variations in water coming from conduit flow systems and low variations in water drained by springs draining diffuse flow systems. However, groundwater temperature displays the smallest variations, which seems to indicate that this parameter is less sensitive as regards characterising the degree of karstification, which is a key question in characterising the aquifer functioning.

  1. Bacterial Activity and Geochemical Reactions in Submerged Cave Development -- Impact on Karst Aquifers in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, J. S.; Franklin, R. B.; Mills, A. L.; Giannotti, A. L.; Tysall, T. N.

    2008-05-01

    Elucidation of coupled mechanisms of sulfide oxidation and biomass generation supports an improved understanding the driving forces behind acid production, calcite dissolution, cave development, and karst aquifers characterization. Wekiwa Springs Cave and DeLeon Springs Cave, located in central Florida, both contain prolific bacterial mats from which sulfur-oxidizing bacteria have been identified. Wekiwa Springs Cave, a submerged cave developed in the Hawthorne Formation and located near Orlando, Florida, has groundwater discharge from the Floridian aquifer system, with some contribution from surficial and intermediate aquifers. The spring is the headwater of the Wekiwa River and releases a total of 170,000 m3 of water per day. The ceiling and walls are heavily covered (10 cm thick) with three morphologically distinct types of microbial mats largely comprising sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Analysis of nearby groundwater collected from wells confirms sulfide concentrations in the regional groundwater of ~ 1.5 mg/L, though sulfide concentrations for water collected in the cave are below detection. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the water is low (<0.5 mg/L). DeLeon Springs Cave, a submerged cave located in Volusia County, Florida, is a single conduit with an average discharge of ~ 70,000 m3 of water per day, and water chemistry data suggest the presence of a saline seep in the system. Dense microbial mats cover the rock surfaces of the cave; the mats are highly filamentous, with long white streamers that often extend 1-2 feet from the cave wall. Microscopic analysis has confirmed the presence of sulfur granules within these bacterial cells, similar to those observed in the Wekiwa cave organisms. The water chemistry in DeLeon Springs Cave, however, is distinct from that of Wekiwa Springs Cave. Though DO, Fetotal, and HS- values are similar for the two sites, the concentration of ions such as Cl-, Na+, and SO42- are considerably higher at DeLeon. A similar contrast

  2. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  3. Can we simulate regional groundwater flow in a karst system using equivalent porous media models? Case study, Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Mace, Robert E.; Barrett, Michael E.; Smith, Brian

    2003-05-01

    Various approaches can be used to simulate groundwater flow in karst systems, including equivalent porous media distributed parameter, lumped parameter, and dual porosity approaches, as well as discrete fracture or conduit approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two different equivalent porous media approaches: lumped and distributed parameter, for simulating regional groundwater flow in a karst aquifer and to evaluate the adequacy of these approaches. The models were applied to the Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, Texas. Unique aspects of this study include availability of detailed information on recharge from stream-loss studies and on synoptic water levels, long-term continuous water level monitoring in wells throughout the aquifer, and spring discharge data to compare with simulation results. The MODFLOW code was used for the distributed parameter model. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity distribution was optimized by using a combination of trial and error and automated inverse methods. The lumped parameter model consists of five cells representing each of the watersheds contributing recharge to the aquifer. Transient simulations were conducted using both distributed and lumped parameter models for a 10-yr period (1989-1998). Both distributed and lumped parameter models fairly accurately simulated the temporal variability in spring discharge; therefore, if the objective of the model is to simulate spring discharge, either distributed or lumped parameter approaches can be used. The distributed parameter model generally reproduced the potentiometric surface at different times. The impact of the amount of pumping on a regional scale on spring discharge can be evaluated using a lumped parameter model; however, more detailed evaluation of the effect of pumping on groundwater levels and spring discharge requires a distributed parameter modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses indicated that spring discharge was much more sensitive to variations in

  4. Transport of suspended solids from a karstic to an alluvial aquifer: The role of the karst/alluvium interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massei, N.; Lacroix, M.; Wang, H.Q.; Mahler, B.J.; Dupont, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This study focuses on the coupled transport of dissolved constituents and particulates, from their infiltration on a karst plateau to their discharge from a karst spring and their arrival at a well in an alluvial plain. Particulate markers were identified and the transport of solids was characterised in situ in porous and karstic media, based on particle size analyses, SEM, and traces. Transport from the sinkhole to the spring appeared to be dominated by flow through karst: particulate transport was apparently conservative between the two sites, and there was little difference in the overall character of the particle size distribution of the particulates infiltrating the sinkhole and of those discharging from the spring. Qualitatively, the mineralogy of the infiltrating and discharging material was similar, although at the spring an autochthonous contribution from the aquifer was noted (chalk particles eroded from the parent rock by weathering). In contrast, transport between the spring and the well appears to be affected by the overlying alluvium: particles in the water from the well, showed evidence of considerable size-sorting. Additionally, SEM images of the well samples showed the presence of particles originating from the overlying alluvial system; these particles were not found in samples from the sinkhole or the spring. The differences between the particulates discharging from the spring and the well indicate that the water pumped from the alluvial plain is coming from the karst aquifer via the very transmissive, complex geologic interface between the underlying chalk formation and the gravel at the base of the overlying alluvial system. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aquifer parameter estimation from surface resistivity data.

    PubMed

    Niwas, Sri; de Lima, Olivar A L

    2003-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the additional use, other than ground water exploration, of surface geoelectrical sounding data for aquifer hydraulic parameter estimation. In a mesoscopic framework, approximated analytical equations are developed separately for saline and for fresh water saturations. A few existing useful aquifer models, both for clean and shaley sandstones, are discussed in terms of their electrical and hydraulic effects, along with the linkage between the two. These equations are derived for insight and physical understanding of the phenomenon. In a macroscopic scale, a general aquifer model is proposed and analytical relations are derived for meaningful estimation, with a higher level of confidence, of hydraulic parameter from electrical parameters. The physical reasons for two different equations at the macroscopic level are explicitly explained to avoid confusion. Numerical examples from existing literature are reproduced to buttress our viewpoint.

  6. New approach to the investigation of groundwater contamination at petroleum release sites in karst aquifers of Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.R.; Owens, R.S.

    1997-12-31

    The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) provides technical guidance and regulatory oversight for the investigation and remediation of a large number of petroleum release sites in the state. A significant number of these sites are located in southeastern Minnesota. The carbonate bedrock in this region of the state has been subjected to at least 400 million years of karstification processes. Consequently, all these formations are karstified, with a wide range in the intensity of the karstification. This range is very poorly understood, is not established, and is only now beginning to be mapped in the state. However, this is largely irrelevant to groundwater contamination issues, since the presence of even minor solution features can lead to significant deviations from the porous media approximations on which conventional groundwater investigations are based. Essentially, all of the-unconfined carbonate bedrock aquifers are karst aquifers and both groundwater and contaminant movement is best described and managed under discrete-flow or dual-porosity models. Experience gathered over several years has demonstrated that conventional groundwater investigation techniques were proving to be inadequate and also not cost effective in these areas of the state. Application of conventional groundwater investigation methods had resulted in a large number of incompletely characterized sites, inadequate monitoring networks, and failure of remedial systems. This led the MPCA to develop an alternative approach for groundwater characterization techniques specific to karst areas. In early 1996, this approach was presented to the consulting and regulated communities as draft guidance to be implemented during the forthcoming field season. These guidelines present procedures and techniques that recognize the fact that karst aquifers possess hydrogeologic properties that cannot be characterized by porous media approximations.

  7. Laboratory analog and numerical study of groundwater flow and solute transport in a karst aquifer with conduit and matrix domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Jonathan; Hu, Bill X.; Kish, Stephen; Hua, Fei

    2009-11-01

    New mathematical and laboratory methods have been developed for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport in karst aquifers having conduits imbedded in a porous medium, such as limestone. The Stokes equations are used to model the flow in the conduits and the Darcy equation is used for the flow in the matrix. The Beavers-Joseph interface boundary conditions are adopted to describe the flow exchange at the interface boundary between the two domains. A laboratory analog is used to simulate the conduit and matrix domains of a karst aquifer. The conduit domain is located at the bottom of the transparent plexiglas laboratory analog and glass beads occupy the remaining space to represent the matrix domain. Water flows into and out of the two domains separately and each has its own supply and outflow reservoirs. Water and solute are exchanged through an interface between the two domains. Pressure transducers located within the matrix and conduit domains of the analog provide data that is processed and stored in digital format. Dye tracing experiments are recorded using time-lapse imaging. The data and images produced are analyzed by a spatial analysis program. The experiments provide not only hydraulic head distribution but also capture solute front images and mass exchange measurements between the conduit and matrix domains. In the experiment, we measure and record pressures, and quantify flow rates and solute transport. The results present a plausible argument that laboratory analogs can characterize groundwater water flow, solute transport, and mass exchange between the conduit and matrix domains in a karst aquifer. The analog validates the predictions of a numerical model and demonstrates the need of laboratory analogs to provide verification of proposed theories and the calibration of mathematical models.

  8. CO2 outgassing in a combined fracture and conduit karst aquifer near lititz spring, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toran, L.; Roman, E.

    2006-01-01

    Lititz Spring in southeastern Pennsylvania and a nearby domestic well were sampled for 9 months. Although both locations are connected to conduits (as evidenced by a tracer test), most of the year they were saturated with respect to calcite, which is more typical of matrix flow. Geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) was used to explain this apparent paradox and to infer changes in matrix and conduit contribution to flow. The saturation index varied from 0.5 to 0 most of the year, with a few samples in springtime dropping below saturation. The log PCO2 value varied from -2.5 to -1.7. Lower log PCO2 values (closer to the atmospheric value of -3.5) were observed when the solutions were at or above saturation with respect to calcite. In contrast, samples collected in the springtime had high PCO2, low saturation indices, and high water levels. Geochemical modeling showed that when outgassing occurs from a water with initially high PCO2, the saturation index of calcite increases. In the Lititz Spring area, the recharge water travels through the soil zone, where it picks up CO2 from soil gas, and excess CO 2 subsequently is outgassed when this recharge water reaches the conduit. At times of high water level (pipe full), recharge with excess CO 2 enters the system but the outgassing does not occur. Instead the recharge causes dilution, reducing the calcite saturation index. Understanding the temporal and spatial variation in matrix and conduit flow in karst aquifers benefited here by geochemical modeling and calculation of PCO2 values. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  9. Fate of effluent-borne contaminants beneath septic tank drainfields overlying a Karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Brian G; Griffin, Dale W; McMahon, Peter B; Harden, Harmon S; Wade, Edgar; Hicks, Richard W; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality effects from septic tanks were investigated in the Woodville Karst Plain, an area that contains numerous sinkholes and a thin veneer of sands and clays overlying the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA). Concerns have emerged about elevated nitrate concentrations in the UFA, which is the source of water supply in this area of northern Florida. At three sites during dry and wet periods in 2007-2008, water samples were collected from the septic tank, shallow and deep lysimeters, and drainfield and background wells in the UFA and analyzed for multiple chemical indicators including nutrients, nitrate isotopes, organic wastewater compounds (OWCs), pharmaceutical compounds, and microbiological indicators (bacteria and viruses). Median NO3-N concentration in groundwater beneath the septic tank drainfields was 20 mg L(-1) (8.0-26 mg L(-1)). After adjusting for dilution, about 25 to 40% N loss (from denitrification, ammonium sorption, and ammonia volatilization) occurs as septic tank effluent moves through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Nitrogen loading rates to groundwater were highly variable at each site (3.9-12 kg N yr(-1)), as were N and chloride depth profiles in the unsaturated zone. Most OWCs and pharmaceutical compounds were highly attenuated beneath the drainfields; however, five Cs (caffeine, 1,7-dimethylxanthine, phenol, galaxolide, and tris(dichloroisotopropyl)phosphate) and two pharmaceutical compounds (acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole) were detected in groundwater samples. Indicator bacteria and human enteric viruses were detected in septic tank effluent samples but only intermittently in soil water and groundwater. Contaminant movement to groundwater beneath each septic tank system also was related to water use and differences in lithology at each site.

  10. Vulnerability of karst aquifers to agricultural contaminants: A case study in the Pennyroyal Plateau of Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Karst landscapes are common in many agricultural regions in the US. Well-developed karst landscapes are characterized by shallow soils, sinkholes, sinking streams, underground conduits, and springs. In these landscapes surface runoff is minimal and most recharge enters the subsurface relatively quic...

  11. Eikonal-Based Inversion of GPR Data from the Vaucluse Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; van Vorst, D.; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present an easy-to-implement eikonal-based travel time inversion algorithm and apply it to borehole GPR measurement data obtained from a karst aquifer located in the Vaucluse in Provence. The boreholes are situated with a fault zone deep inside the aquifer, in the Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB). The measurements were made using 250 MHz MALA RAMAC borehole GPR antennas. The inversion formulation is unique in its application of a fast-sweeping eikonal solver (Zhao [1]) to the minimization of an objective functional that is composed of a travel time misfit and a model-based regularization [2]. The solver is robust in the presence of large velocity contrasts, efficient, easy to implement, and does not require the use of a sorting algorithm. The computation of sensitivities, which are required for the inversion process, is achieved by tracing rays backward from receiver to source following the gradient of the travel time field [2]. A user wishing to implement this algorithm can opt to avoid the ray tracing step and simply perturb the model to obtain the required sensitivities. Despite the obvious computational inefficiency of such an approach, it is acceptable for 2D problems. The relationship between travel time and the velocity profile is non-linear, requiring an iterative approach to be used. At each iteration, a set of matrix equations is solved to determine the model update. As the inversion continues, the weighting of the regularization parameter is adjusted until an appropriate data misfit is obtained. The inversion results, shown in the attached image, are consistent with previously obtained geological structure. Future work will look at improving inversion resolution and incorporating other measurement methodologies, with the goal of providing useful data for groundwater analysis. References: [1] H. Zhao, “A fast sweeping method for Eikonal equations,” Mathematics of Computation, vol. 74, no. 250, pp. 603-627, 2004. [2] D

  12. Transfer of bacteria-contaminated particles in a karst aquifer: evolution of contaminated materials from a sinkhole to a spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart-Baptista, L.; Massei, N.; Dupont, J.-P.; Jouenne, T.

    2003-12-01

    The transport of particle-associated bacteria during rain events in karst waters has been investigated. In this aim, we studied the correlations between water turbidity and enumerations of sessile (attached) and planktonic (non-attached) bacteria. We monitored physicochemical, i.e. turbidity, electrical conductivity, size and nature of the transported particles, and bacteriological properties of waters since their infiltration on a karst plateau to their discharge at a karstic spring. Results showed a decrease of the concentration of sessile bacteria at the sinkhole for high turbidities. This phenomenon might be explained by the arrival of lower contaminated material. On the other hand, the amount of sessile bacteria at the spring was not influenced by the turbidity values. These data demonstrated that slightly contaminated larger particles were not recovered, whereas small-size particles, which exhibited a higher bacterial contamination, were directly transferred (i.e. not affected by intra-karstic deposition) through the aquifer. Our study highlighted some significant differences between the bacteriological time series at the sinkhole and at the spring, which characterizes the storage/resuspension function of the considered karst system. Moreover, we show a decrease of the concentration of planktonic bacteria after transport through the system whereas no reduction of the sessile population occurred. The present data confirm that turbidity does not constitute a good indicator for bacterial contamination: if high turbidity corresponds to high bacterial contamination, low turbidity does not systematically exclude a risk of contamination by sessile organisms.

  13. Assessing flow paths in a karst aquifer based on multiple dye tracing tests using stochastic simulation and the MODFLOW-CFP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assari, Amin; Mohammadi, Zargham

    2017-09-01

    Karst systems show high spatial variability of hydraulic parameters over small distances and this makes their modeling a difficult task with several uncertainties. Interconnections of fractures have a major role on the transport of groundwater, but many of the stochastic methods in use do not have the capability to reproduce these complex structures. A methodology is presented for the quantification of tortuosity using the single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) algorithm and a groundwater flow model. A training image was produced based on the statistical parameters of fractures and then used in the simulation process. The SNESIM algorithm was used to generate 75 realizations of the four classes of fractures in a karst aquifer in Iran. The results from six dye tracing tests were used to assign hydraulic conductivity values to each class of fractures. In the next step, the MODFLOW-CFP and MODPATH codes were consecutively implemented to compute the groundwater flow paths. The 9,000 flow paths obtained from the MODPATH code were further analyzed to calculate the tortuosity factor. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity values calculated from the dye tracing experiments were refined using the actual flow paths of groundwater. The key outcomes of this research are: (1) a methodology for the quantification of tortuosity; (2) hydraulic conductivities, that are incorrectly estimated (biased low) with empirical equations that assume Darcian (laminar) flow with parallel rather than tortuous streamlines; and (3) an understanding of the scale-dependence and non-normal distributions of tortuosity.

  14. Analysis of hydrologic and geochemical time-series data at James Cave, Virginia: Implications for epikarst influence on recharge in Appalachian karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagle, Sarah D.; Orndorff, William; Schwartz, Benjamin F.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Gerst, Jonathan D.; Schreiber, Madeline E.

    2016-01-01

    The epikarst, which consists of highly weathered rock in the upper vadose zone of exposed karst systems, plays a critical role in determining the hydrologic and geochemical characteristics of recharge to an underlying karst aquifer. This study utilized time series (2007–2014) of hydrologic and geochemical data of drip water collected within James Cave, Virginia, to examine the influence of epikarst on the quantity and quality of recharge in a mature, doline-dominated karst terrain. Results show a strong seasonality of both hydrology and geochemistry of recharge, which has implications for management of karst aquifers in temperate climatic zones. First, recharge (discharge from the epikarst to the underlying aquifer) reaches a maximum between late winter and early spring, with the onset of the recharge season ranging from as early as December to as late as March during the study period. The timing and duration of the recharge season were found to be a function of precipitation in excess of evapotranspiration on a seasonal time scale. Secondly, seasonally variable residence times for water in the epikarst influence rock-water interaction and, hence, the geochemical characteristics of recharge. Overall, results highlight the strong and complex influence that the epikarst has on karst recharge, which requires long-term and high-resolution data sets to accurately understand and quantify.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s−1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  16. Three-Dimensional Geologic Framework Model for a Karst Aquifer System, Hasty and Western Grove Quadrangles, Northern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Kenzie J.; Hudson, Mark R.; Murray, Kyle E.; Mott, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding ground-water flow in a karst aquifer benefits from a detailed conception of the three-dimensional (3D) geologic framework. Traditional two-dimensional products, such as geologic maps, cross-sections, and structure contour maps, convey a mental picture of the area but a stronger conceptualization can be achieved by constructing a digital 3D representation of the stratigraphic and structural geologic features. In this study, a 3D geologic model was created to better understand a karst aquifer system in the Buffalo National River watershed in northern Arkansas. The model was constructed based on data obtained from recent, detailed geologic mapping for the Hasty and Western Grove 7.5-minute quadrangles. The resulting model represents 11 stratigraphic zones of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian age. As a result of the highly dissected topography, stratigraphic and structural control from geologic contacts and interpreted structure contours were sufficient for effectively modeling the faults and folds in the model area. Combined with recent dye-tracing studies, the 3D framework model is useful for visualizing the various geologic features and for analyzing the potential control they exert on the ground-water flow regime. Evaluation of the model, by comparison to published maps and cross-sections, indicates that the model accurately reproduces both the surface geology and subsurface geologic features of the area.

  17. Improved regional groundwater flow modeling using drainage features: a case study of the central northern karst aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-09-01

    In northern Puerto Rico (USA), subsurface conduit networks with unknown characteristics, and surface features such as springs, rivers, lagoons and wetlands, drain the coastal karst aquifers. In this study, drain lines connecting sinkholes and springs are used to improve the developed regional model by simulating the drainage effects of conduit networks. Implemented in an equivalent porous media (EPM) approach, the model with drains is able to roughly reproduce the spring discharge hydrographs in response to rainfall. Hydraulic conductivities are found to be scale dependent and significantly increase with higher test radius, indicating scale dependency of the EPM approach. Similar to other karst regions in the world, hydraulic gradients are steeper where the transmissivity is lower approaching the coastline. This study enhances current understanding of the complex flow patterns in karst aquifers and suggests that using a drainage feature improves modeling results where available data on conduit characteristics are minimal.

  18. Effects of Hydrogeologic Conditions on Groundwater Contamination of CVOCs in the North Coast Karst Aquifer of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Torres, N. I.; Howard, J.; Padilla, I. Y.; Torres, P.; Cotto, I.; Irizarry, C.

    2012-12-01

    The karst system of northern Puerto Rico is the most productive aquifer of the island. It serves freshwater to industrial, domestic and agricultural purposes, and contributes to the ecological integrity of the region. The same characteristics that make this a highly productive aquifer, make it vulnerable to contamination of groundwater. Of particular importance is contamination with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), which have been related to preterm birth problems. A great extent of CVOC contamination has been seen in the North Coast of Puerto Rico since the 1970s. The main purposes of this study are (1) to relate the water quality of wells and springs with the hydrogeological conditions in the north coast limestone aquifer of Puerto Rico, and (2) to make a statistical analysis of the historical groundwater contamination in that area. To achieve these objectives, groundwater samples are collected from wells and springs during dry and wet seasons. Results show that trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and chloroform (TCM) are frequently detected in groundwater samples. A greater detection of CVOCs is detected during the wet season than the dry season. This is attributed to a greater capacity to flush stored contaminants during the wet season. Historical analysis of contamination in the north coast of Puerto Rico shows a high capacity of the aquifer to store and release contaminants. Future work will be focused the statistical analysis of the historical groundwater contamination data to understand the behavior of the contaminants in different hydrologic conditions.

  19. Changes in sources and storage in a karst aquifer during a transition from drought to wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. I.; Mahler, B. J.; Musgrove, M.; Banner, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    SummaryUnderstanding the sources and processes that control groundwater compositions and the timing and magnitude of groundwater vulnerability to potential surface-water contamination under varying meteorologic conditions is critical to informing groundwater protection policies and practices. This is especially true in karst terrains, where infiltrating surface water can rapidly affect groundwater quality. We analyzed the evolution of groundwater compositions (major ions and Sr isotopes) during the transition from extreme drought to wet conditions, and used inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) to constrain controls on groundwater compositions during this evolution. Spring water and groundwater from two wells dominantly receiving diffuse and conduit flow (termed diffuse site and conduit site, respectively) in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer (central Texas, USA) and surface water from losing streams that recharge the aquifer were sampled every 3-4 weeks during November 2008-March 2010. During this period, water compositions at the spring and conduit sites changed rapidly but there was no change at the diffuse site, illustrating the dual nature (i.e., diffuse vs. conduit) of flow in this karst system. Geochemical modeling demonstrated that, within a month of the onset of wet conditions, the majority of spring water and groundwater at the conduit site was composed of surface water, providing quantitative information on the timing and magnitude of the vulnerability of groundwater to potential surface-water contamination. The temporal pattern of increasing spring discharge and changing pattern of covariation between spring discharge and surface-water (steam) recharge indicates that that there were two modes of aquifer response—one with a small amount of storage and a second that accommodates more storage.

  20. Changes in sources and storage in a karst aquifer during a transition from drought to wet conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, C.I.; Mahler, B.J.; Musgrove, M.; Banner, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sources and processes that control groundwater compositions and the timing and magnitude of groundwater vulnerability to potential surface-water contamination under varying meteorologic conditions is critical to informing groundwater protection policies and practices. This is especially true in karst terrains, where infiltrating surface water can rapidly affect groundwater quality. We analyzed the evolution of groundwater compositions (major ions and Sr isotopes) during the transition from extreme drought to wetconditions, and used inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) to constrain controls on groundwater compositions during this evolution. Spring water and groundwater from two wells dominantly receiving diffuse and conduit flow (termed diffuse site and conduit site, respectively) in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer (central Texas, USA) and surface water from losing streams that recharge the aquifer were sampled every 3–4 weeks during November 2008–March 2010. During this period, water compositions at the spring and conduit sites changed rapidly but there was no change at the diffuse site, illustrating the dual nature (i.e., diffuse vs. conduit) of flow in this karst system. Geochemical modeling demonstrated that, within a month of the onset of wetconditions, the majority of spring water and groundwater at the conduit site was composed of surface water, providing quantitative information on the timing and magnitude of the vulnerability of groundwater to potential surface-water contamination. The temporal pattern of increasing spring discharge and changing pattern of covariation between spring discharge and surface-water (steam) recharge indicates that that there were two modes of aquifer response—one with a small amount of storage and a second that accommodates more storage.

  1. The impact of river water intrusion on trace metal cycling in karst aquifers: an example from the Floridan aquifer system at Madison Blue Spring, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. L.; Martin, J. B.; Screaton, E.; Spellman, P.; Gulley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Springs located adjacent to rivers can serve as recharge points for aquifers when allogenic runoff increases river stage above the hydraulic head of the spring, forcing river water into the spring vent. Depending on relative compositions of the recharged water and groundwater, the recharged river water could be a source of dissolved trace metals to the aquifer, could mobilize solid phases such as metal oxide coatings, or both. Whether metals are mobilized or precipitated should depend on changes in redox and pH conditions as dissolved oxygen and organic carbon react following intrusion of the river water. To assess how river intrusion events affect metal cycling in springs, we monitored a small recharge event in April 2011 into Madison Blue Spring, which discharges to the Withlacoochee River in north-central Florida. Madison Blue Spring is the entrance to a phreatic cave system that includes over 7.8 km of surveyed conduits. During the event, river stage increased over base flow conditions for approximately 25 days by a maximum of 8%. Intrusion of the river water was monitored with conductivity, temperature and depth sensors that were installed within the cave system and adjacent wells. Decreased specific conductivity within the cave system occurred for approximately 20 days, reflecting the length of time that river water was present in the cave system. During this time, grab samples were collected seven times over a period of 34 days for measurements of major ion and trace metal concentrations at the spring vent and at Martz sink, a karst window connected to the conduit system approximately 150 meters from the spring vent. Relative fractions of surface water and groundwater were estimated based on Cl concentrations of the samples, assuming conservative two end-member mixing during the event. This mixing model indicates that maximum river water contribution to the groundwater system was approximately 20%. River water had concentrations of iron, manganese, and other

  2. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryConvolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium ( 3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  3. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Convolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium (3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  4. Estimated Withdrawals from Stream-Valley Aquifers and Refined Estimated Withdrawals from Selected Aquifers in the United States, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B. Pierre; Maupin, Molly A.; Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Information Program compiles estimates of fresh ground-water withdrawals in the United States on a 5-year interval. In the year-2000 compilation, withdrawals were reported from principal aquifers and aquifer systems including two general aquifers - Alluvial and Other aquifers. Withdrawals from a widespread aquifer group - stream-valley aquifers - were not specifically identified in the year-2000 compilation, but they are important sources of ground water. Stream-valley aquifers are alluvial aquifers located in the valley of major streams and rivers. Stream-valley aquifers are long but narrow aquifers that are in direct hydraulic connection with associated streams and limited in extent compared to most principal aquifers. Based in large part on information published in U.S. Geological Survey reports, preliminary analysis of withdrawal data and hydrogeologic and surface-water information indicated areas in the United States where possible stream-valley aquifers were located. Further assessment focused on 24 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Withdrawals reported from Alluvial aquifers in 16 states and withdrawals reported from Other aquifers in 6 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico were investigated. Two additional States - Arkansas and New Jersey - were investigated because withdrawals reported from other principal aquifers in these two States may be from stream-valley aquifers. Withdrawals from stream-valley aquifers were identified in 20 States and were about 1,560 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), a rate comparable to withdrawals from the 10 most productive principal aquifers in the United States. Of the 1,560 Mgal/d of withdrawals attributed to stream-valley aquifers, 1,240 Mgal/d were disaggregated from Alluvial aquifers, 150 Mgal/d from glacial sand and gravel aquifers, 116 Mgal/d from Other aquifers, 28.1 Mgal/d from Pennsylvanian aquifers, and 24.9 Mgal/d from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial

  5. Characterizing pharmaceutical, personal care product, and hormone contamination in a karst aquifer of southwestern Illinois, USA, using water quality and stream flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Dodgen, L K; Kelly, W R; Panno, S V; Taylor, S J; Armstrong, D L; Wiles, K N; Zhang, Y; Zheng, W

    2017-02-01

    Karst aquifers are drinking water sources for 25% of the global population. However, the unique geology of karst areas facilitates rapid transfer of surficial chemicals to groundwater, potentially contaminating drinking water. Contamination of karst aquifers by nitrate, chloride, and bacteria have been previously observed, but little knowledge is available on the presence of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), such as pharmaceuticals. Over a 17-month period, 58 water samples were collected from 13 sites in the Salem Plateau, a karst region in southwestern Illinois, United States. Water was analyzed for 12 pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), 7 natural and synthetic hormones, and 49 typical water quality parameters (e.g., nutrients and bacteria). Hormones were detected in only 23% of samples, with concentrations of 2.2-9.1ng/L. In contrast, PPCPs were quantified in 89% of groundwater samples. The two most commonly detected PPCPs were the antimicrobial triclocarban, in 81% of samples, and the cardiovascular drug gemfibrozil, in 57%. Analytical results were combined with data of local stream flow, weather, and land use to 1) characterize the extent of aquifer contamination by CECs, 2) cluster sites with similar PPCP contamination profiles, and 3) develop models to describe PPCP contamination. Median detection in karst groundwater was 3 PPCPs at a summed concentration of 4.6ng/L. Sites clustered into 3 subsets with unique contamination models. PPCP contamination in Cluster I sites was related to stream height, manganese, boron, and heterotrophic bacteria. Cluster II sites were characterized by groundwater temperature, specific conductivity, sodium, and calcium. Cluster III sites were characterized by dissolved oxygen and barium. Across all sites, no single or small set of water quality factors was significantly predictive of PPCP contamination, although gemfibrozil concentrations were strongly related to the sum of PPCPs in karst groundwater

  6. Climatic and geologic controls on the piezometry of the Querença-Silves karst aquifer, Algarve (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Maria C.; Costa, Luis; Monteiro, José P.

    2016-06-01

    Karst aquifers in semi-arid regions, like Querença-Silves (Portugal), are particularly vulnerable to climate variability. For the first time in this region, the temporal structure of a groundwater-level time series (1985-2010) was explored using the continuous wavelet transform. The investigation focused on a set of four piezometers, two at each side of the S. Marcos-Quarteira fault, to demonstrate how each of the two sectors of the aquifer respond to climate-induced patterns. Singular spectral analysis applied to an extended set of piezometers enabled identification of several quasi-periodic modes of variability, with periods of 6.5, 4.3, 3.2 and 2.6 years, which can be explained by low-frequency climate patterns. The geologic forcing accounts for ~15 % of the differential variability between the eastern and western sectors of the aquifer. The western sector displays spatially homogenous piezometric variations, large memory effects and low-pass filtering characteristics, which are consistent with relatively large and uniform values of water storage capacity and transmissivity properties. In this sector, the 6.5-year mode of variability accounts for ~70 % of the total variance of the groundwater levels. The eastern sector shows larger spatial and temporal heterogeneity, is more reactive to short-term variations, and is less influenced by the low-frequency components related to climate patterns.

  7. Spatiotemporal changes of CVOC concentrations in karst aquifers: analysis of three decades of data from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue; Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Kaeli, David; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2014-01-01

    We studied the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds (CVOCs) in the karst aquifers in northern Puerto Rico (1982-2013). Seventeen CVOCs were widely detected across the study area, with the most detected and persistent contaminated CVOCs including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (TCM), and methylene chloride (DCM). Historically, 471 (76%) and 319 (52%) of the 615 sampling sites have CVOC concentrations above the detection limit and maximum contamination level (MCL), respectively. The spatiotemporal patterns of the CVOC concentrations showed two clusters of contaminated areas, one near the Superfund site “Upjohn” and another near “Vega Alta Public Supply Wells.” Despite a decreasing trend in concentrations, there is a general northward movement and spreading of contaminants even beyond the extent of known sources of the Superfund and landfill sites. Our analyses suggest that, besides the source conditions, karst characteristics (high heterogeneity, complex hydraulic and biochemical environment) are linked to the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of CVOCs in groundwater. PMID:25522355

  8. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  9. Spatiotemporal changes of CVOC concentrations in karst aquifers: analysis of three decades of data from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Kaeli, David; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-04-01

    We studied the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds (CVOCs) in the karst aquifers in northern Puerto Rico (1982-2013). Seventeen CVOCs were widely detected across the study area, with the most detected and persistent contaminated CVOCs including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (TCM), and methylene chloride (DCM). Historically, 471 (76%) and 319 (52%) of the 615 sampling sites have CVOC concentrations above the detection limit and maximum contamination level (MCL), respectively. The spatiotemporal patterns of the CVOC concentrations showed two clusters of contaminated areas, one near the Superfund site "Upjohn" and another near "Vega Alta Public Supply Wells." Despite a decreasing trend in concentrations, there is a general northward movement and spreading of contaminants even beyond the extent of known sources of the Superfund and landfill sites. Our analyses suggest that, besides the source conditions, karst characteristics (high heterogeneity, complex hydraulic and biochemical environment) are linked to the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of CVOCs in groundwater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterizing the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the karst aquifer of Fangshan, Beijing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Haibo; Wei, Jiahua; Wang, Rong; Xin, Baodong

    2016-12-01

    Correct understanding of groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction in karst systems is of greatest importance for managing the water resources. A typical karst region, Fangshan in northern China, was selected as a case study. Groundwater levels and hydrochemistry analyses, together with isotope data based on hydrogeological field investigations, were used to assess the GW-SW interaction. Chemistry data reveal that water type and the concentration of cations in the groundwater are consistent with those of the surface water. Stable isotope ratios of all samples are close to the local meteoric water line, and the 3H concentrations of surface water and groundwater samples are close to that of rainfall, so isotopes also confirm that karst groundwater is recharged by rainfall. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that rainfall leads to a rise in groundwater level with a lag time of 2 months and groundwater exploitation leads to a fall within 1 month. Spectral analysis also reveals that groundwater level, groundwater exploitation and rainfall have significantly similar response periods, indicating their possible inter-relationship. Furthermore, a multiple nonlinear regression model indicates that groundwater level can be negatively correlated with groundwater exploitation, and positively correlated with rainfall. The overall results revealed that groundwater level has a close correlation with groundwater exploitation and rainfall, and they are indicative of a close hydraulic connection and interaction between surface water and groundwater in this karst system.

  11. Characterizing the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the karst aquifer of Fangshan, Beijing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Haibo; Wei, Jiahua; Wang, Rong; Xin, Baodong

    2017-03-01

    Correct understanding of groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction in karst systems is of greatest importance for managing the water resources. A typical karst region, Fangshan in northern China, was selected as a case study. Groundwater levels and hydrochemistry analyses, together with isotope data based on hydrogeological field investigations, were used to assess the GW-SW interaction. Chemistry data reveal that water type and the concentration of cations in the groundwater are consistent with those of the surface water. Stable isotope ratios of all samples are close to the local meteoric water line, and the 3H concentrations of surface water and groundwater samples are close to that of rainfall, so isotopes also confirm that karst groundwater is recharged by rainfall. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that rainfall leads to a rise in groundwater level with a lag time of 2 months and groundwater exploitation leads to a fall within 1 month. Spectral analysis also reveals that groundwater level, groundwater exploitation and rainfall have significantly similar response periods, indicating their possible inter-relationship. Furthermore, a multiple nonlinear regression model indicates that groundwater level can be negatively correlated with groundwater exploitation, and positively correlated with rainfall. The overall results revealed that groundwater level has a close correlation with groundwater exploitation and rainfall, and they are indicative of a close hydraulic connection and interaction between surface water and groundwater in this karst system.

  12. Rapid salinization of a karst aquifer after a typhoon-generated storm surge: Hydraulics, geochemistry, and community impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, P.; Cardenas, M. B.; Zamora, P. B.; Befus, K. M.; Rodolfo, R. S.; Cabria, H. B.; Lapus, M. R.; Muan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Super Typhoon (STY) Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines with sustained winds of 315 kph producing a 7+ meter storm surge that inundated parts of Leyte and Samar; >8000 died, > 106 homes were destroyed, and thousands of people are still missing. The surge reached 1 km inland and resulted in widespread seawater (SW) contamination of groundwater (GW) resources critical for coastal villages. We conducted field-work in a village of ~2200 residents, inundated by a 5-6 m surge, 2 months and again 8 months after STY Haiyan. The 330+ shallow tube wells (STWs) had been drilled through beach sand into karstic reef carbonates to 5-20m below the water table (WT). Residents reported their STWs salinized immediately after the storm, even the deepest wells, and the only source of fresh water was a karst spring 1 km from the village. 2 months after the storm GW salinity was up to 18% SW. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was used to image salt distribution in the surficial aquifer alongside the developed village. ERT detected an electrically conductive layer ~1m below the WT, and water sampling confirmed that this was due to infiltrated seawater. Variable-density flow and transport models corroborate the ER tomograms and show that the salt is infiltrating through the aquifer and slowly flushing to the ocean. We hypothesize that SW rapidly infiltrated the ~2m sandy unsaturated zone and contaminated the shallow GW over a wide area. This salt layer is slowly sinking and flushing toward the ocean, and flow models show that it might be several years to flush the system. Results from a second ERT survey 6 months later show little change in the ER field, consistent with model predictions. But karst features and the STWs themselves served as preferential paths into the aquifer for SW injection to the deeper zone under the 6m surge potential, salinizing deep wells ahead of the advancing shallow SW layer. These wells have seen substantial decrease in salinity over 6 months, as much

  13. Climate-change impacts in a regional karst aquifer, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loáiciga, H. A.; Maidment, D. R.; Valdes, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Climate-change scenarios were created from scaling factors derived from several general circulation models to assess the likely impacts of aquifer pumping on the water resources of the Edwards Balcones Fault Zone (BFZ) aquifer, Texas, one of the largest aquifer systems in the United States. Historical climatic time series in periods of extreme water shortage (1947-1959), near-average recharge (1978-1989), and above-average recharge (1975-1990) were scaled to 2×CO2 conditions to create aquifer recharge scenarios in a warmer climate. Several pumping scenarios were combined with 2×CO2 climate scenarios to assess the sensitivity of water resources impacts to human-induced stresses on the Edwards BFZ aquifer. The 2×CO2 climate-change scenarios were linked to surface hydrology and used to drive aquifer dynamics with alternative numerical simulation models calibrated to the Edwards BFZ aquifer. Aquifer simulations indicate that, given the predicted growth and water demand in the Edwards BFZ aquifer region, the aquifer's ground water resources appear threatened under 2×CO2 climate scenarios. Our simulations indicate that 2×CO2 climatic conditions could exacerbate negative impacts and water shortages in the Edwards BFZ aquifer even if pumping does not increase above its present average level. The historical evidence and the results of this article indicate that without proper consideration to variations in aquifer recharge and sound pumping strategies, the water resources of the Edwards BFZ aquifer could be severely impacted under a warmer climate.

  14. Imaging the Stratification and Tidal Dynamics of a Saltwater-Freshwater Interface Using Continuous Shallow Electrical Resistivity Techniques in the Karst Coastal Biscayne Aquifer, South Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalker, J. C.; Whitman, D.; Price, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    Shallow ground resistivity was used to image the saline-freshwater mixing zone in the subsurface due to saltwater intrusion at a site less than 2 kilometers from the coastline of Biscayne Bay, an estuary in South Florida. Resistivity arrays have several advantages when applied to coastal groundwater environments. Experiments can be set up to measure several depths by varying the electrode spacing. Additionally Resistivity techniques can be used to resolve multiple changes in lithology and compositions making them ideal for saltwater intrusion studies. Miami-Dade county and adjoining the Biscayne Bay are underlain by the karst Biscayne aquifer system where the freshwater aquifer is in direct contact with the saline bay system. Saltwater intrusion has been a continuous problem since anthropogenic alteration of the hydrological system occurred to manage flood control and promote agriculture. To better understand the nature and dynamics of the saltwater intrusion in the near coastal shallow subsurface, a Supersting 28-electrode resistivity unit, configured in a Wenner array, was used to produce a 2D image of the freshwater/brackish water/saltwater stratification, and was deployed in a continuous data collection mode to observe the movement of the saltwater mixing zone through a tidal cycle. Results show at a depth of 9m below the surface there is a 2m meter thick freshwater layer above the brackish/saltwater mixing zone. In addition, the continuous imaging of the mixing zone over a tidal cycle shows a fluctuation landward and seaward of the mixing zone as the tide floods and ebbs. This technique provides an efficient tool for detection and characterization of the saltwater/freshwater mixing zone in shallow coastal aquifers and lends new insight to the stratification and thicknesses of the fresh and saline layers. In addition the detection of cyclical tidal movement and an estimate of its magnitude will aid in the understanding of the mixing zone geochemistry and

  15. Estimating Preferential Flow in Karstic Aquifers Using Statistical Mixed Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Angel A.; Padilla, Ingrid; Macchiavelli, Raul; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Meeker, John D.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers are highly productive groundwater systems often associated with conduit flow. These systems can be highly vulnerable to contamination, resulting in a high potential for contaminant exposure to humans and ecosystems. This work develops statistical models to spatially characterize flow and transport patterns in karstified limestone and determines the effect of aquifer flow rates on these patterns. A laboratory-scale Geo-HydroBed model is used to simulate flow and transport processes in a karstic limestone unit. The model consists of stainless-steel tanks containing a karstified limestone block collected from a karst aquifer formation in northern Puerto Rico. Experimental work involves making a series of flow and tracer injections, while monitoring hydraulic and tracer response spatially and temporally. Statistical mixed models are applied to hydraulic data to determine likely pathways of preferential flow in the limestone units. The models indicate a highly heterogeneous system with dominant, flow-dependent preferential flow regions. Results indicate that regions of preferential flow tend to expand at higher groundwater flow rates, suggesting a greater volume of the system being flushed by flowing water at higher rates. Spatial and temporal distribution of tracer concentrations indicates the presence of conduit-like and diffuse flow transport in the system, supporting the notion of both combined transport mechanisms in the limestone unit. The temporal response of tracer concentrations at different locations in the model coincide with, and confirms the preferential flow distribution generated with the statistical mixed models used in the study. PMID:23802921

  16. Contamination risk and drinking water protection for a large-scale managed aquifer recharge site in a semi-arid karst region, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanke, Julian; Liesch, Tanja; Goeppert, Nadine; Klinger, Jochen; Gassen, Niklas; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Karst aquifers in semi-arid regions are particularly threatened by surface contamination, especially during winter seasons when extremely variable rainfall of high intensities prevails. An additional challenge is posed when managed recharge of storm water is applied, since karst aquifers display a high spatial variability of hydraulic properties. In these cases, adapted protection concepts are required to address the interaction of surface water and groundwater. In this study a combined protection approach for the surface catchment of the managed aquifer recharge site at the Wala reservoir in Jordan and the downstream Hidan wellfield, which are both subject to frequent bacteriological contamination, is developed. The variability of groundwater quality was evaluated by correlating contamination events to rainfall, and to recharge from the reservoir. Both trigger increased wadi flow downstream of the reservoir by surface runoff generation and groundwater seepage, respectively. A tracer test verified the major pathway of the surface flow into the underground by infiltrating from pools along Wadi Wala. An intrinsic karst vulnerability and risk map was adapted to the regional characteristics and developed to account for the catchment separation by the Wala Dam and the interaction of surface water and groundwater. Implementation of the proposed protection zones for the wellfield and the reservoir is highly recommended, since the results suggest an extreme contamination risk resulting from livestock farming, arable agriculture and human occupation along the wadi. The applied methods can be transferred to other managed aquifer recharge sites in similar karstic environments of semi-arid regions.

  17. Contamination risk and drinking water protection for a large-scale managed aquifer recharge site in a semi-arid karst region, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanke, Julian; Liesch, Tanja; Goeppert, Nadine; Klinger, Jochen; Gassen, Niklas; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-09-01

    Karst aquifers in semi-arid regions are particularly threatened by surface contamination, especially during winter seasons when extremely variable rainfall of high intensities prevails. An additional challenge is posed when managed recharge of storm water is applied, since karst aquifers display a high spatial variability of hydraulic properties. In these cases, adapted protection concepts are required to address the interaction of surface water and groundwater. In this study a combined protection approach for the surface catchment of the managed aquifer recharge site at the Wala reservoir in Jordan and the downstream Hidan wellfield, which are both subject to frequent bacteriological contamination, is developed. The variability of groundwater quality was evaluated by correlating contamination events to rainfall, and to recharge from the reservoir. Both trigger increased wadi flow downstream of the reservoir by surface runoff generation and groundwater seepage, respectively. A tracer test verified the major pathway of the surface flow into the underground by infiltrating from pools along Wadi Wala. An intrinsic karst vulnerability and risk map was adapted to the regional characteristics and developed to account for the catchment separation by the Wala Dam and the interaction of surface water and groundwater. Implementation of the proposed protection zones for the wellfield and the reservoir is highly recommended, since the results suggest an extreme contamination risk resulting from livestock farming, arable agriculture and human occupation along the wadi. The applied methods can be transferred to other managed aquifer recharge sites in similar karstic environments of semi-arid regions.

  18. Effect of irrigation pumpage during drought on karst aquifer systems in highly agricultural watersheds: example of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin, southeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Subhasis; Srivastava, Puneet; Singh, Sarmistha

    2016-09-01

    In the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river basin in Alabama, Georgia, and Florida (USA), population growth in the city of Atlanta and increased groundwater withdrawal for irrigation in southwest Georgia are greatly affecting the supply of freshwater to downstream regions. This study was conducted to understand and quantify the effect of irrigation pumpage on the karst Upper Floridan Aquifer and river-aquifer interactions in the lower ACF river basin in southwest Georgia. The groundwater MODular Finite-Element model (MODFE) was used for this study. The effect of two drought years, a moderate and a severe drought year, were simulated. Comparison of the results of the irrigated and non-irrigated scenarios showed that groundwater discharge to streams is a major outflow from the aquifer, and irrigation can cause as much as 10 % change in river-aquifer flux. The results also show that during months with high irrigation (e.g., June 2011), storage loss (34 %), the recharge and discharge from the upper semi-confining unit (30 %), and the river-aquifer flux (31 %) are the major water components contributing towards the impact of irrigation pumpage in the study area. A similar scenario plays out in many river basins throughout the world, especially in basins in which underlying karst aquifers are directly connected to a nearby stream. The study suggests that improved groundwater withdrawal strategies using climate forecasts needs to be developed in such a way that excessive withdrawals during droughts can be reduced to protect streams and river flows.

  19. Karst hydrology and chemical contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ground-water flow in karst aquifers is very different from flow in granular or fractured aquifers. Chemical contamination may be fed directly to a karst aquifer via overland flow to a sinkhole with little or no attenuation and may contaminate downgradient wells, springs, and sinkholes within a few hours or a few days. Contaminants may also become temporarily stored in the epikarstic zone for eventual release to the aquifer. Flood pulses may flush the contaminants to cause transiently higher levels of contamination in the aquifer and discharge points. The convergent nature of flow in karst aquifers may result in contaminants becoming concentrated in conduits. Once contaminants have reached the subsurface conduits, they are likely to be rapidly transported to spring outlets. Traditional aquifer remediation techniques for contaminated aquifers are less applicable to karst aquifers.

  20. Large-scale simulation of karst processes - parameter estimation, model evaluation and quantification of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneity is an intrinsic property of karst systems. It results in complex hydrological behavior that is characterized by an interplay of diffuse and concentrated flow and transport. In large-scale hydrological models, these processes are usually not considered. Instead average or representative values are chosen for each of the simulated grid cells omitting many aspects of their sub-grid variability. In karst regions, this may lead to unreliable predictions when those models are used for assessing future water resources availability, floods or droughts, or when they are used for recommendations for more sustainable water management. In this contribution I present a large-scale groundwater recharge model (0.25° x 0.25° resolution) that takes into karst hydrological processes by using statistical distribution functions to express subsurface heterogeneity. The model is applied over Europe's and the Mediterranean's carbonate rock regions ( 25% of the total area). As no measurements of the variability of subsurface properties are available at this scale, a parameter estimation procedure, which uses latent heat flux and soil moisture observations and quantifies the remaining uncertainty, was applied. The model is evaluated by sensitivity analysis, comparison to other large-scale models without karst processes included and independent recharge observations. Using with historic data (2002-2012) I can show that recharge rates vary strongly over Europe and the Mediterranean. At regions with low information for parameter estimation there is a larger prediction uncertainty (for instance in desert regions). Evaluation with independent recharge estimates shows that, on average, the model provides acceptable estimates, while the other large scale models under-estimate karstic recharge. The results of the sensitivity analysis corroborate the importance of including karst heterogeneity into the model as the distribution shape factor is the most sensitive parameter for

  1. Determination of groundwater travel time in a karst aquifer by stable water isotopes, Tanour and Rasoun spring (Jordan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Sauter, Martin; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Key words: karst aquifers, stable isotopes, water travel time, Jordan. Tanour and Rasoun karst springs are located about 75 kilometers northwest of the city of Amman in Jordan. The aquifer is composed of Upper Cretaceous limestone that exhibits a moderate to high degree of karstification. The two springs represent the main drinking water resources for the surrounding villages. The yearly water production is about 1,135,000 m3/yr for Tanour spring and 125,350 m3/yr for Rasoun spring (MWI 2015). Due to contamination from microbiological pollution (leakage of wastewater from septic tanks) or infiltration of wastewater from local olive presses, drinking water supply from the two springs is frequently interrupted. From November 2014 through March 2015, spring water samples were collected from Tanour and Rasoun spring for the analysis of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes to investigate spring response to precipitation and snowmelt events. Both Tanour and Rasoun spring show a fast response to precipitation and snowmelt events, implying short water travel times. Based on the variation of δ 18O and δ 2H in spring discharge, the average maximum water travel time is in the order of 8 days for Tanour spring and 6 days for Rasoun spring. Due to fast water travel times, Tanour and Rasoun spring can be considered as highly vulnerable to pollutants. δ 18O and δ 2H values of Tanour and Rasoun springs parallel other monitored parameter like water temperature, turbidity, electrical conductivity and spring discharge. In addition, a high turbidity peak was monitored in Tanour spring during a pollution event from olive mills wastewater (Hamdan et al., 2016; Hamdan, in prep.). The fast response in both Tanour and Rasoun springs to precipitation events requires monitoring potential sources of pollution within the catchment area. References: MWI (Ministry of Water and Irrigation) (2015) Monthly Production values for Tanour and Rasoun Springs for the time period between 1996 and 2014

  2. Geochemical evidence of water source characterization and hydrodynamic responses in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano Bicalho, C.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J. L.; Van Exter, S.; Jourde, H.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Lez karst spring, the main perennial outlet of the Lez karst system in southern France, plays an important role in supplying drinking water to the Montpellier metropolitan region. In order to investigate the origin of groundwater, its circulation patterns, and to understand the connectivity and compartmentalization of a karst system, a multi-tracer approach was used to describe the hydrogeology of the Lez karst system. Groundwater samples were collected from Lez karst during a range of hydrologic conditions (between March 2006 and August 2009) and analyzed for major and trace elements, total organic carbon, fecal, and total coliform. During the first recharge event of autumn, highly-mineralized water was observed at Lez Spring during the studied years. Multiple parameters of water during this rise were monitored with a fine time-step in 2008. Discriminate Factorial Analyses revealed the existence of different water-types discharging at Lez Spring. During high stage periods, highly mineralized water initially discharges from the spring, followed by rapid infiltration water. This behavior suggests that hydrodynamics affect groundwater circulation by soliciting different endmembers. These characteristics were observed on a larger scale when monitoring three intermittent springs connected to Lez Spring. A detailed analysis using bivariate diagrams of major, trace elements and elemental ratios provided insight into different water origins, associated lithologies, and mineral-solution reactions related to hydrodynamic responses. From the five identified water-types, the two more contrasting ones are emphasized: the first one corresponds to the most geochemically evolved waters, issued from deep layers where evaporite chemical fingerprinting has been identified. They are characterized by high mineralization and high concentrations in Cl, Na, Mg, Li, B and Br elements, and high Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and Cl/Br ratios. The second water-type corresponds to the most diluted

  3. Occurrence of Pepper Mild Mottle Virus (PMMoV) in Groundwater from a Karst Aquifer System in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rosiles-González, Gabriela; Ávila-Torres, Gerardo; Moreno-Valenzuela, Oscar A; Acosta-González, Gilberto; Leal-Bautista, Rosa María; Grimaldo-Hernández, Cinthya D; Brown, Judith K; Chaidez-Quiroz, Cristóbal; Betancourt, Walter Q; Gerba, Charles P; Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia

    2017-06-23

    The Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico hosts a karst aquifer system that is the only source of freshwater for the area; however, it is vulnerable to human-mediated contamination. Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is one of the most abundant RNA viruses associated with human feces, making it a viable indicator for tracking fecal pollution in aquatic environments, including groundwater. In this study, groundwater samples collected from a karst aquifer from fresh and brackish water locations were analyzed for fecal indicator bacteria, somatic and male F+ specific coliphages, and PMMoV during the rainy and dry seasons. Total coliform bacteria were detected at all sites, whereas Escherichia coli were found at relatively low levels <40 MPN/100 ml. The highest average concentrations of somatic and male F+ specific coliphages were 920 and 330 plaque forming units per 100 ml, respectively, detected in freshwater during the rainy season. PMMoV RNA was detected in 85% of the samples with gene sequences sharing 99-100% of nucleotide identity with PMMoV sequences available in GenBank. Quantification of PMMoV genome copies (GC) by quantitative real-time PCR indicated concentrations ranging from 1.7 × 10(1) to 1.0 × 10(4) GC/L, with the highest number of GC detected during the rainy season. No significant correlation was observed between PMMoV occurrence by season or water type (p > 0.05). Physicochemical and indicator bacteria were not correlated with PMMoV concentrations. The abundance and prevalence of PMMoV in the karst aquifer may reflect its environmental persistence and its potential as a fecal indicator in this karst aquifer system.

  4. Microbial Decomposition of Elm and Oak Leaves in a Karst Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Eichem, Angela C.; Dodds, Walter K.; Tate, Cathy M.; Edler, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Dry Chinquapin oak (Quercus macrocarpa) and American elm (Ulmus americana) leaves were placed in four microcosms fed by groundwater springs to monitor changes in dry mass, ash-free dry mass, and microbial activity over a 35-day period. Oxygen microelectrodes were used to measure microbial activity and to estimate millimeter-scale heterogeneity in that activity. Oak leaves lost mass more slowly than elm leaves. Generally, there was a decrease in total dry weight over the first 14 days, after which total dry weight began to increase. However, there were consistent decreases in ash-free dry mass over the entire incubation period, suggesting that the material remaining after initial leaf decomposition trapped inorganic particles. Microbial activity was higher on elm leaves than on oak leaves, with peak activity occurring at 6 and 27 days, respectively. The level of oxygen saturation on the bottom surface of an elm leaf ranged between 0 and 75% within a 30-mm2 area. This spatial heterogeneity in O2 saturation disappeared when the water velocity increased from 0 to 6 cm s-1. Our results suggest that as leaves enter the groundwater, they decompose and provide substrate for microorganisms. The rate of decomposition depends on leaf type, small-scale variations in microbial activity, water velocity, and the length of submersion time. During the initial stages of decomposition, anoxic microzones are formed that could potentially be important to the biogeochemistry of the otherwise oxic aquifer. PMID:16349078

  5. Nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in an unconfined eogenetic karst aquifer in two sites with different redox potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henson, Wesley; Huang, Laibin; Graham, Wendy D.; Ogram, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates push-pull tracer tests (PPTT) with microbial characterization of extracted water via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR) of selected functional N transformation genes to quantify nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in sites with different redox potential in a karst aquifer. PPTT treatments with nitrate (AN) and nitrate-fumarate (ANC) were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end-members. Oxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates (mmol L−1 h−1) were similar for AN and ANC treatment, ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.01. Anoxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates ranged from 0.03 ± 0.02 (AN) to 0.13 ± 0.02 (ANC). Microbial characterization indicates mechanisms influencing these rates were dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at the anoxic site with AN treatment, assimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (ANRA) with ANC treatment in the water column at both sites, and additional documented nitrate reduction that occurred in unsampled biofilms. With carbon treatment, total numbers of microbes (16S rRNA genes) significantly increased (fourteenfold to thirtyfold), supporting stimulated growth with resulting ANRA. Decreased DNRA gene concentrations (nrfA DNA) and increased DNRA activity ratio (nrfA-cDNA/DNA) supported the assertion that DNRA occurred in the anoxic zone with AN and ANC treatment. Furthermore, decreased DNRA gene copy numbers at the anoxic site with ANC treatment suggests that DNRA microbes in the anoxic site are chemolithoautotrophic. Increased RT-qPCR denitrification gene expression (nirK and nirS) was not observed in water samples, supporting that any observed NO3-N loss due to denitrification may be occurring in unsampled microbial biofilms.

  6. Nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in an unconfined eogenetic karst aquifer in two sites with different redox potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W. R.; Huang, L.; Graham, W. D.; Ogram, A.

    2017-05-01

    This study integrates push-pull tracer tests (PPTT) with microbial characterization of extracted water via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR) of selected functional N transformation genes to quantify nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in sites with different redox potential in a karst aquifer. PPTT treatments with nitrate (AN) and nitrate-fumarate (ANC) were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end-members. Oxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates (mmol L-1 h-1) were similar for AN and ANC treatment, ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.01. Anoxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates ranged from 0.03 ± 0.02 (AN) to 0.13 ± 0.02 (ANC). Microbial characterization indicates mechanisms influencing these rates were dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at the anoxic site with AN treatment, assimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (ANRA) with ANC treatment in the water column at both sites, and additional documented nitrate reduction that occurred in unsampled biofilms. With carbon treatment, total numbers of microbes (16S rRNA genes) significantly increased (fourteenfold to thirtyfold), supporting stimulated growth with resulting ANRA. Decreased DNRA gene concentrations (nrfA DNA) and increased DNRA activity ratio (nrfA-cDNA/DNA) supported the assertion that DNRA occurred in the anoxic zone with AN and ANC treatment. Furthermore, decreased DNRA gene copy numbers at the anoxic site with ANC treatment suggests that DNRA microbes in the anoxic site are chemolithoautotrophic. Increased RT-qPCR denitrification gene expression (nirK and nirS) was not observed in water samples, supporting that any observed NO3-N loss due to denitrification may be occurring in unsampled microbial biofilms.

  7. N Loss flux estimation and associated threshold characteristics from 1961 to 2014 in Epi-karst zone, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wen, Xuefa; He, Nianpeng

    2017-04-01

    Special structure of karst area is deemed to primary cause of N loss, and how N coupling with hydrological process driven by rainfall in epi-karst zone still not clear. N loss load need to be estimated urgently as one of restrict factors of ecological restoration and agricultural development at karst area, China. Situ simulated rainfall method is used to estimate N loss carried by both surface and subsurface flow in this research to obtain related runoff and N loss parameters. The result shows that in karst area, rainfall have a fine linear relation with surface flow and subsurface flow, and subsurface flow occupy major of rainfall due to the rapid and vertical movement of water through KCN at karst area. Nitrate that accounts for 60% 95% of DTN is main loss form. The annual N loss load coupling with water from the shallow epi-karst layer is 1.67-2.27 Tg·yr-1, and mean N loss flux during 1961-2014 is 1.61±0.11 t. km2 yr-1, of which about 80% of N loss during wet season, more than 90% loss through subsurface flow and 76% loss from southwest karst zone in China. The southwest karst in China is main N loss source and has a crucial effect on ecosystem restoration and sustainable agricultural development.

  8. Results of a hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study of a semi-arid karst aquifer in Tezbent plateau, Tebessa region, northeast of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfar, Dalila; Fehdi, Chemseddine; Baali, Fethi; Salameh, Elias

    2017-06-01

    The Hammamet Plain, situated in the northwest of the Tezbent mountain range, northeast of Algeria, drains carbonate aquifers through some important karst springs. The physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water samples were studied for 2 years to assess the origin of groundwater and determine the factors driving the geochemical composition. The ionic speciation and mineral dissolution/precipitation was calculated. Water wells, characterizing groundwater circulation at shallow depths, are moderate to high mineralized waters of Na-HCO3 type. In contrast to the shallow environment, the CO2-rich, deeper waters are of the Ca-HCO3-SO4 type and undergo significant changes in the baseline chemistry along flow lines with increasing residence time. The main factors controlling the groundwater composition and its seasonal variations are the geology, because of the presence of carbonate formations, the elevation and the rate of karst development. In both groups, the carbonate chemistry is diagnostic of the effect of karst development. The supersaturation with respect to calcite indicates CO2 degassing, occurring either inside the aquifer in open conduits, or at the outlet in reservoirs. The undersaturation with respect to calcite shows the existence of fast flow and short residence time conditions inside the aquifer. Interaction between groundwater and surrounding host rocks is believed to be the main process responsible for the observed chemical characteristics of groundwater in the study area.

  9. Results of a hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study of a semi-arid karst aquifer in Tezbent plateau, Tebessa region, northeast of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfar, Dalila; Fehdi, Chemseddine; Baali, Fethi; Salameh, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The Hammamet Plain, situated in the northwest of the Tezbent mountain range, northeast of Algeria, drains carbonate aquifers through some important karst springs. The physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water samples were studied for 2 years to assess the origin of groundwater and determine the factors driving the geochemical composition. The ionic speciation and mineral dissolution/precipitation was calculated. Water wells, characterizing groundwater circulation at shallow depths, are moderate to high mineralized waters of Na-HCO3 type. In contrast to the shallow environment, the CO2-rich, deeper waters are of the Ca-HCO3-SO4 type and undergo significant changes in the baseline chemistry along flow lines with increasing residence time. The main factors controlling the groundwater composition and its seasonal variations are the geology, because of the presence of carbonate formations, the elevation and the rate of karst development. In both groups, the carbonate chemistry is diagnostic of the effect of karst development. The supersaturation with respect to calcite indicates CO2 degassing, occurring either inside the aquifer in open conduits, or at the outlet in reservoirs. The undersaturation with respect to calcite shows the existence of fast flow and short residence time conditions inside the aquifer. Interaction between groundwater and surrounding host rocks is believed to be the main process responsible for the observed chemical characteristics of groundwater in the study area.

  10. Investigating surface and groundwater mixing dynamics under varying antecedent moisture conditions in a karst aquifer, Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C.; Banner, J. L.; Musgrove, M.; Mahler, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Variability in Sr concentrations and isotope values of groundwater from the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer during the period of November 2008 to March 2010 reflects a broad range of hydrologic conditions, and lends insight into surface and groundwater mixing dynamics. Surface water recharge rapidly moves through the karst groundwater system, making surface water quality an important component of groundwater quality. Understanding how surface and groundwater mixing changes in response to varying antecedent moisture conditions is critical to groundwater management. Within the Barton Spring segment, groundwater compositions are characterized by Sr concentrations (median = 1,600 μg/l) and Sr isotope values (median = 0.70792) that reflect extensive interaction with the carbonate bedrock. Surface water, in contrast, has lower Sr concentrations (median = 290 μg/l) and higher Sr isotope values (median = 0.70805) that reflect interaction with soils and urban water inputs. Groundwater was sampled from wells that accessed conduit and diffuse flow dominated parts of the aquifer and from the main discharge point (Barton Springs) of the aquifer segment. Samples were collected in conditions ranging from drought and near-historically low spring discharge to above average rainfall conditions and spring discharge. Groundwater sampled from a well accessing the diffuse part of the aquifer had consistent Sr concentrations and Sr isotope values, reflecting little to no surface water mixing. Groundwater sampled from a well accessing the conduit part of the aquifer had gradually decreasing Sr concentrations and increasing Sr isotope values with increasingly wetter hydrologic conditions, reflecting an increasing proportion of surface water mixing. While spring water also has decreasing Sr concentrations and increasing Sr isotope values with increasingly wetter hydrologic conditions, concentrations and isotope values begin to change only after spring discharge exceeded 50

  11. Preliminary characterization of an alpine karst aquifer in a complex geological setting using the KARSYS approach. Picos de Europa, North Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín; Meléndez, Mónica; Sendra, Gemma

    2013-04-01

    Research applied to karst aquifers linked to a homogeneous limestone in high mountain areas affected by several tectonic events is a hard task, due to methodological constraints and the uncertainties of the geological data. The KARSYS approach (Jeannin et al. 2012) is based on the combination of existing geological data and basic principles of karst hydraulic, allowing for characterizing the geometry of an aquifer considering a smaller amount of data than other methods. The Picos de Europa (North Spain) is an alpine karst massif with a surface area of 700 km2, peaks up to 2,648 m and fluvial gorges up to 2,000 m deep, including about 270 km of cave passage. The bedrock is mainly composed of Ordovician quartzite covered by massive Carboniferous limestone and is affected by two systems of thrusts and other faults. The most of the geological structures are from Variscan orogeny (Carboniferous in age), some of them could be originated or modified during the Permian-Mesozoic extensional episode, and the others were originated or reactivated during the Alpine Orogeny. Therefore, the Picos de Europa can be considered as a complex geological environment in which usual hydrogeological methods are difficult to use. The aim of this study is to characterize the geometry of the Picos de Europa aquifers applying the KARSYS approach. The approach includes: 1) the identification of aquifer and aquiclude formations; 2) the inventory of the main springs; 3) the establishment of a 3D geological model, focused on the aquifer boundaries; 4) the implementation of the hydraulic features within the 3D model and the delineation of the karst system. The main aquifer of the Picos de Europa is developed within the Carboniferous limestone and displays a complex geometry generally limited and divided into several unconfined groundwater bodies by Ordovician to Carboniferous rocks related to the thrusts. The lowest limit of the aquifer is marked by the N-dipping detachment level of the thrusts

  12. Relative importance of the saturated and the unsaturated zones in the hydrogeological functioning of karst aquifers: The case of Alta Cadena (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarra, M.; Andreo, B.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryFrom analysis of the hydrodynamic and hydrochemical responses of karst springs, it is possible to know the behaviour of the aquifers they drain. This manuscript aims to contribute to the characterization of infiltration process, and to determine the relative importance of the saturated zone and of the unsaturated zone in the hydrogeological functioning of carbonate aquifers, using natural hydrochemical tracers. Thus, chemical components together with temperature and electrical conductivity (both punctual and continuous records) have been monitored in three springs which drain Alta Cadena carbonate aquifer, Southern Spain. An evaluation of the percentage of the electrical conductivity frequency peaks determined for each of the three springs is linked to the chemical parameters that comprise the conductivity signal. One of these springs responds rapidly to precipitation (conduit flow system), due to the existence of a high degree of karstification in the unsaturated zone and in the saturated zone, both of which play a similar role in the functioning of the spring. Another spring responds to precipitation with small increases in water flow, somewhat lagged, because the aquifer has a low degree of karstification, even in the unsaturated zone, which seems to influence its functioning more strongly than does the saturated zone. The third spring drains a sector of the aquifer with a moderately developed degree of karstification, one that is intermediate between the other two, in which both the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone participate in the functioning of the spring, but with the latter zone having a stronger influence. These three springs show different hydrogeological functioning although they are in similar geological and climatic contexts, which show the heterogeneity of karst media and the importance of an adequate investigation for groundwater management and protection in karst areas.

  13. Use of sinkhole and specific capacity distributions to assess vertical gradients in a karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, K.J.; Kozar, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate-rock aquifer in the Great Valley, West Virginia, USA, was evaluated using a database of 687 sinkholes and 350 specific capacity tests to assess structural, lithologic, and topographic influences on the groundwater flow system. The enhanced permeability of the aquifer is characterized in part by the many sinkholes, springs, and solutionally enlarged fractures throughout the valley. Yet, vertical components of subsurface flow in this highly heterogeneous aquifer are currently not well understood. To address this problem, this study examines the apparent relation between geologic features of the aquifer and two spatial indices of enhanced permeability attributed to aquifer karstification: (1) the distribution of sinkholes and (2) the occurrence of wells with relatively high specific capacity. Statistical results indicate that sinkholes (funnel and collapse) occur primarily along cleavage and bedding planes parallel to subparallel to strike where lateral or downward vertical gradients are highest. Conversely, high specific capacity values are common along prominent joints perpendicular or oblique to strike. The similarity of the latter distribution to that of springs suggests these fractures are areas of upward-convergent flow. These differences between sinkhole and high specific capacity distributions suggest vertical flow components are primarily controlled by the orientation of geologic structure and associated subsurface fracturing. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Application of carbonate cyclostratigraphy and borehole geophysics to delineate porosity and preferential flow in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, SE Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.; Renken, R.A.; Wacker, M.A.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Robinson, E.; Shapiro, A.M.; Wingard, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    Combined analyses of cores, borehole geophysical logs, and cyclostratigraphy produced a new conceptual hydrogeologic framework for the triple-porosity (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit porosity) karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in a 0.65 km2 study area, SE Florida. Vertical lithofacies successions, which have recurrent stacking patterns, fit within high-frequency cycles. We define three ideal high-frequency cycles as: (1) upward-shallowing subtidal cycles, (2) upward-shallowing paralic cycles, and (3) aggradational subtidal cycles. Digital optical borehole images, tracers, and flow meters indicate that there is a predictable vertical pattern of porosity and permeability within the three ideal cycles, because the distribution of porosity and permeability is related to lithofacies. Stratiform zones of high permeability commonly occur just above flooding surfaces in the lower part of upward-shallowing subtidal and paralic cycles, forming preferential groundwater flow zones. Aggradational subtidal cycles are either mostly high-permeability zones or leaky, low-permeability units. In the study area, groundwater flow within stratiform high-permeability zones is through a secondary pore system of touching-vug porosity principally related to molds of burrows and pelecypods and to interburrow vugs. Movement of a dye-tracer pulse observed using a borehole fluid-temperature tool during a conservative tracer test indicates heterogeneous permeability. Advective movement of the tracer appears to be most concentrated within a thin stratiform flow zone contained within the lower part of a high-frequency cycle, indicating a distinctly high relative permeability for this zone. Borehole flow-meter measurements corroborate the relatively high permeability of the flow zone. Identification and mapping of such high-permeability flow zones is crucial to conceptualization of karst groundwater flow within a cyclostratigraphic framework. Many karst aquifers are included in cyclic

  15. Characterization of groundwater and surface water mixing in a semiconfined karst aquifer using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhoff, Steven B.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Revil, André; Martin, Jonathan B.; Karaoulis, Marios; Graham, Wendy D.

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater flow in karst includes exchange of water between large fractures, conduits, and the surrounding porous matrix, which impacts both water quality and quantity. Electrical resistivity tomography combined with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) and numerical flow and transport modeling was used to study mixing of karst conduit and matrix waters to understand spatial and temporal patterns of mixing during high flow and base flow conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time EMMA and synthetic geophysical simulations have been combined. Here we interpret an 8 week time-lapse electrical resistivity data set to assess groundwater-surface mixing. We simulate flow between the karst conduits and the porous matrix to determine fractions of water recharged to conduits that has mixed with groundwater stored in the pore space of the matrix using a flow and transport model in a synthetic time-lapse resistivity inversion. Comparing the field and synthetic inversions, our results enable us to estimate exchange dynamics, spatial mixing, and flow conditions. Results showed that mixing occurred at a volumetric flux of 56 m3/d with a dispersivity around 1.69 m during the geophysical experiment. For these conditions, it was determined that conduit water composition ranged from 75% groundwater during base flow conditions to less than 50% groundwater in high flow conditions. Though subject to some uncertainties, the time-lapse inversion process provides a means to predict changing hydrologic conditions, leading to mixing of surface water and ground water and thus changes to water quantity and quality, as well as potential for water-rock reactions, in a semiconfined, sink-rise system.

  16. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Nur N; Lutz, Hans O; Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana; Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana

    2014-07-15

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 ma.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0°C-328 μS/cm, 9.6°C-350 μS/cm and 8.9°C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ(18)O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around -10.1‰, -9.2‰ and -8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the(18)O signal of precipitation, the (18)O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm(3)), 12 years (1,190 Mm(3)), and 12.2 years (1,210 Mm(3)), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total aquifer volumes.

  17. Preliminary characterization of binary karst aquifers with tracer tests and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, J. A.; Calux, A. S.; Hiruma, S. T.; Armani, G.; Karmann, I.

    2016-12-01

    The studied site is a polygonal karst developed in a synclinal structure in the Atlantic Rainforest, southeastern Brazil. The carbonatic surface (10.4 km2) receives allogenic recharge from drainage basins (13.9 km2) formed in psammitic rocks. Two main springs drains the karst on the opposite flanks of the synclinal: Alambari (AL) and Ouro Grosso (OG). The karst is inserted in a conservation unit and the hydrological investigation supports its management. Qualitative dye tracer tests were performed to identify recharge areas of the two springs. Monitoring stations at springs measured the water discharge (Q) and the specific conductance, (SC) every hour. The rainfall (R) was measured by a pluviometer connected to an event logger. The time series (2014 to 2016) were analyzed with autocorrelation (ACF) and cross-correlation functions (CCF) to compare the flow dynamics of both systems. Tracer tests indicate that AL spring drains most of the area. Field observations show that the main volume of perennial sink waters is related with this spring. The average values of the parameters from the hydrologic monitoring are: AL - Q= 0.6 m3/s, SC = 137.7 µS cm-1; OG - Q= 0.1 m3/s, SC=158.2 µS cm-1. The mean annual rainfall in the region is 1250 mm. The global analysis of Q (daily average) with ACF shows that memory effect in OG is 3 times higher than the obtained for AL. The same analysis for SC shows that the memory is 1.5 times higher in AL. The CCF was also used to analyze the relations between R, Q and SC time series (in hour basis). When analyzing CCF for R x Q, the maximum value occurs after 4 h for AL (r= 0.31) and after 3 h for OG (r= 0.25). Contrasting results were observed when CCF was applied for R x SC. The CCF for AL shows the usual behavior with a "negative peak" (after 13 h) that represents the pulse of fresh infiltrated rainwater, whereas OG shows a "negative peak" (after 2 h), followed by a 50 h peak (peaks identified with 99% of confidence intervals). The

  18. Viruses and Bacteria in Karst and Fractured Rock Aquifers in East Tennessee, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of enteric viruses and indicator bacteria was carried out in eight community water supply sources (four wells and four springs) in east Tennessee. Seven of the sites were in carbonate aquifers and the other was in fractured sandstone. Four sites (three wells and one sp...

  19. Viruses and Bacteria in Karst and Fractured Rock Aquifers in East Tennessee, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of enteric viruses and indicator bacteria was carried out in eight community water supply sources (four wells and four springs) in east Tennessee. Seven of the sites were in carbonate aquifers and the other was in fractured sandstone. Four sites (three wells and one sp...

  20. On the use of multiple-point statistics to improve groundwater flow modeling in karst aquifers: A case study from the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coz, Mathieu; Bodin, Jacques; Renard, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Limestone aquifers often exhibit complex groundwater flow behaviors resulting from depositional heterogeneities and post-lithification fracturing and karstification. In this study, multiple-point statistics (MPS) was applied to reproduce karst features and to improve groundwater flow modeling. For this purpose, MPS realizations were used in a numerical flow model to simulate the responses to pumping test experiments observed at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France. The main flow behaviors evident in the field data were simulated, particularly (i) the early-time inflection of the drawdown signal at certain observation wells and (ii) the convex behavior of the drawdown curves at intermediate times. In addition, it was shown that the spatial structure of the karst features at various scales is critical with regard to the propagation of the depletion wave induced by pumping. Indeed, (i) the spatial shape of the cone of depression is significantly affected by the karst proportion in the vicinity of the pumping well, and (ii) early-time inflection of the drawdown signal occurs only at observation wells crossing locally well-developed karst features.

  1. Simple method for quick estimation of aquifer hydrogeological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Li, Y. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Development of simple and accurate methods to determine the aquifer hydrogeological parameters was of importance for groundwater resources assessment and management. Aiming at the present issue of estimating aquifer parameters based on some data of the unsteady pumping test, a fitting function of Theis well function was proposed using fitting optimization method and then a unitary linear regression equation was established. The aquifer parameters could be obtained by solving coefficients of the regression equation. The application of the proposed method was illustrated, using two published data sets. By the error statistics and analysis on the pumping drawdown, it showed that the method proposed in this paper yielded quick and accurate estimates of the aquifer parameters. The proposed method could reliably identify the aquifer parameters from long distance observed drawdowns and early drawdowns. It was hoped that the proposed method in this paper would be helpful for practicing hydrogeologists and hydrologists.

  2. Estimating hydraulic properties from tidal attenuation in the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer, territory of Guam, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, Kolja; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Jenson, John W.; El-Kadi, Aly I.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal-signal attenuations are analyzed to compute hydraulic diffusivities and estimate regional hydraulic conductivities of the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer, Territory of Guam (Pacific Ocean), USA. The results indicate a significant tidal-damping effect at the coastal boundary. Hydraulic diffusivities computed using a simple analytical solution for well responses to tidal forcings near the periphery of the island are two orders of magnitude lower than for wells in the island’s interior. Based on assigned specific yields of ~0.01–0.4, estimated hydraulic conductivities are ~20–800 m/day for peripheral wells, and ~2,000–90,000 m/day for interior wells. The lower conductivity of the peripheral rocks relative to the interior rocks may best be explained by the effects of karst evolution: (1) dissolutional enhancement of horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the interior; (2) case-hardening and concurrent reduction of local hydraulic conductivity in the cliffs and steeply inclined rocks of the periphery; and (3) the stronger influence of higher-conductivity regional-scale features in the interior relative to the periphery. A simple numerical model calibrated with measured water levels and tidal response estimates values for hydraulic conductivity and storage parameters consistent with the analytical solution. The study demonstrates how simple techniques can be useful for characterizing regional aquifer properties.

  3. Estimating Hydraulic Properties for Hawaiian Aquifers Using Aquifer Tests and Tidal Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzoll, K.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 30 years the population of the island of Maui, Hawaii, has significantly increased and so has the ground-water demand. To ensure prudent management of the ground-water resources, an improved understanding of ground-water flow systems is needed. At present, no large-scale estimation of the aquifer properties has been completed for Maui. Ground-water flow and chemical transport depends highly on aquifer characteristics such as storage properties and hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity. The suitability of several methods is examined for a number of Hawaiian aquifers. Seven analytical methods using constant and variable-rate withdrawals in a single well provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity for over 100 wells in central Maui. The spatial distribution permits to form regional clusters of similar hydraulic conductivity. The response of the harmonic ocean tide signal in several wells in the aquifer is investigated. Analytical methods and numerical modeling allow estimating aquifer diffusivity. Results of this analysis are in general agreement with typical values for confined and unconfined aquifers in central Maui. The results of this study will provide information needed to build a numerical ground-water flow model for central Maui in order to estimate ground-water availability.

  4. Dissolved oxygen fluctuations in karst spring flow and implications for endemic species: Barton Springs, Edwards aquifer, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Bourgeais, Renan

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers and springs provide the dissolved oxygen critical for survival of endemic stygophiles worldwide, but little is known about fluctuations of dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) and factors that control those concentrations. We investigated temporal variation in DO at Barton Springs, Austin, Texas, USA. During 2006–2012, DO fluctuated by as much as a factor of 2, and at some periods decreased to concentrations that adversely affect the Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sorosum) (≤4.4 mg/L), a federally listed endangered species endemic to Barton Springs. DO was lowest (≤4.4 mg/L) when discharge was low (≤1 m3/s) and spring water temperature was >21 °C, although not at a maximum; the minimum DO recorded was 4.0 mg/L. Relatively low DO (3/s) and maximum T (22.2 °C). A four-segment linear regression model with daily data for discharge and spring water temperature as explanatory variables provided an excellent fit for mean daily DO (Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient for the validation period of 0.90). DO also fluctuated at short-term timescales in response to storms, and DO measured at 15-min intervals could be simulated with a combination of discharge, spring temperature, and specific conductance as explanatory variables. On the basis of the daily-data regression model, we hypothesize that more frequent low DO corresponding to salamander mortality could result from (i) lower discharge from Barton Springs resulting from increased groundwater withdrawals or decreased recharge as a result of climate change, and (or) (ii) higher groundwater temperature as a result of climate change.

  5. U-isotopes and (226)Ra as tracers of hydrogeochemical processes in carbonated karst aquifers from arid areas.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, José Luis; Vallejos, Ángela; Cerón, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Martos, Francisco; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2016-07-01

    Sierra de Gádor is a karst macrosystem with a highly complex geometry, located in southeastern Spain. In this arid environment, the main economic activities, agriculture and tourism, are supported by water resources from the Sierra de Gádor aquifer system. The aim of this work was to study the levels and behaviour of some of the most significant natural radionuclides in order to improve the knowledge of the hydrogeochemical processes involved in this groundwater system. For this study, 28 groundwater and 7 surface water samples were collected, and the activity concentrations of the natural U-isotopes ((238)U, (235)U and (234)U) and (226)Ra by alpha spectrometry were determined. The activity concentration of (238)U presented a large variation from around 1.1 to 65 mBq L(-1). Elevated groundwater U concentrations were the result of oxidising conditions that likely promoted U dissolution. The PHREEQC modelling code showed that dissolved U mainly existed as uranyl carbonate complexes. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were higher than unity for all samples (1.1-3.8). Additionally, these ratios were in greater disequilibrium in groundwater than surface water samples, the likely result of greater water-rock contact time. (226)Ra presented a wide range of activity concentrations, (0.8 up to about 4 × 10(2) mBq L(-1)); greatest concentrations were detected in the thermal area of Alhama. Most of the samples showed (226)Ra/(234)U activity ratios lower than unity (median = 0.3), likely the result of the greater mobility of U than Ra in the aquifer system. The natural U-isotopes concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolution of sulphate evaporites (mainly gypsum). (226)Ra had a more complex behaviour, showing a strong correlation with water salinity, which was particularly evident in locations where thermal anomalies were detected. The most saline samples showed the lowest (234)U/(238)U activity ratios, probably due to fast uniform bulk mineral dissolution

  6. Estimation of effective hydrogeological parameters in heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Tsung; Tan, Yih-Chi; Chen, Chu-Hui; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Wu, Shih-Ching; Ke, Kai-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    SummaryObtaining reasonable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Analysis of temporal evolution during pump-induced drawdown is one common approach used to estimate the effective transmissivity and storage coefficients in a heterogeneous aquifer. In this study, we propose a Modified Tabu search Method (MTM), an improvement drawn from an alliance between the Tabu Search (TS) and the Adjoint State Method (ASM) developed by Tan et al. (2008). The latter is employed to estimate effective parameters for anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifers. MTM is validated by several numerical pumping tests. Comparisons are made to other well-known techniques, such as the type-curve method (TCM) and the straight-line method (SLM), to provide insight into the challenge of determining the most effective parameter for an anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifer. The results reveal that MTM can efficiently obtain the best representative and effective aquifer parameters in terms of the least mean square errors of the drawdown estimations. The use of MTM may involve less artificial errors than occur with TCM and SLM, and lead to better solutions. Therefore, effective transmissivity is more likely to be comprised of the geometric mean of all transmissivities within the cone of depression based on a precise estimation of MTM. Further investigation into the applicability of MTM shows that a higher level of heterogeneity in an aquifer can induce an uncertainty in estimations, while the changes in correlation length will affect the accuracy of MTM only once the degree of heterogeneity has also risen.

  7. Estimating transmissivity in the Edwards Aquifer using upscaling, geostatistics, and Bayesian updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S. L.; Jiang, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Edwards Aquifer, a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer located in south central Texas, is the sole source of drinking water for more than one million people. Hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements in the Edwards Aquifer are sparse, highly variable (log-K variance of 6.4), and are mostly from single-well drawdown tests that are appropriate for the spatial scale of a few meters. To support ongoing efforts to develop a groundwater management (MODFLOW) model of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards Aquifer, a multistep procedure was developed to assign hydraulic parameters to the 402 m x 402 m computational cells intended for the management model. The approach used a combination of nonparametric geostatistical analysis, stochastic simulation, numerical upscaling, and automatic model calibration based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. Indicator correlograms reveal a nested spatial structure in the well-test K of the confined zone, with practical correlation ranges of 3,600 and 15,000 meters and a large nugget effect. The fitted geostatistical model was used in unconditional stochastic simulations by the sequential indicator simulation method. The resulting realizations of K, defined at the scale of the well tests, were then numerically upscaled to the block scale. A new geostatistical model was fitted to the upscaled values. The upscaled model was then used to cokrige the block-scale K based on the well-test K. The resulting K map was then converted to transmissivity (T) using deterministically mapped aquifer thickness. When tested in a forward groundwater model, the upscaled T reproduced hydraulic heads better than a simple kriging of the well-test values (mean error of -3.9 meter and mean-absolute-error of 12 meters, as compared with -13 and 17 meters for the simple kriging). As the final step in the study, the upscaled T map was used as the prior distribution in an inverse procedure based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. When input to the forward groundwater model, the

  8. Development of a new P3 (Probability, Protection, and Precipitation) method for vulnerability, hazard, and risk intensity index assessments in karst watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Timothy P.; Gao, Yongli

    2017-06-01

    Vulnerability, hazard, and risk intensity index (RII) maps are valuable tools for water managers to protect aquifers from contamination. However, in karst aquifers the development of vulnerability and RII maps is subject to explorational bias due to the impracticality of identifying all karst features within watersheds. The P3 method (Probability, Protection, and Precipitation) is proposed to minimize explorational bias through a decision tree model generated from probability maps and nearest neighbor analysis to assign a reduction in aquifer protection based on the probability of encountering karst features. This new method was used in conjunction with previously mapped hazards to assess the vulnerability and RII of nitrate contamination in 2 karst watersheds in semi-arid climate conditions. Validation of the P3 method was conducted with spring hydrographs, tracer tests, nitrate results, and output from a previously developed SWAT model. The maps generated with the P3 method were compared with maps generated from the COP method (Concentration of flow, Overlying layers, Precipitation) using known karst features as well as karst features inferred from analyzing a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (COP-DEM method). Validation results show the P3 method most closely estimates the aquifer's vulnerability and RII by minimizing explorational bias. Conversely, the COP method using known karst features underestimates vulnerability and RII by not accounting for all karst features and the COP-DEM method overestimates vulnerability and RII due to false positives of karst features. The P3 method is suitable for all karst aquifers and offers improvements over existing vulnerability mapping methodologies. Namely, the P3 method minimizes explorational bias without requiring knowledge of the location of all karst features within a study area.

  9. Absolute hydraulic conductivity estimates from aquifer pumping and tracer tests in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Thorbjarnarson, K.W.; Huntley, D.; McCarty, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Independent estimates of absolute hydraulic conductivity were obtained by a standard aquifer pumping test and a forced-gradient tracer test in a highly heterogeneous aquifer. An aquifer hydraulic test was conducted to evaluate the average hydraulic conductivity (K), and to establish steady-state flow for the tracer test. An average K of 48 m/day was interpreted from the draw-down data in a fully screened well. Type-curve matching and simulation with MODFLOW of the hydraulic response in partially screened wells indicates K of 10 to 15 m/day for the upper section and 71 to 73 m/day for the deeper section. Iodide and fluorescent dye tracers were injected at low rates in wells located approximately 8 m upgradient of the production well. Tracer breakthrough was monitored in the production well and at ten depth intervals within the fully screened monitoring well. Interpretation of tracer response in the production well reveals tracer transport is limited to a 3.9 m thick section of the 20 m thick aquifer, with a hydraulic conductivity of 248 m/day. However, the depth distribution of these permeable strata cannot be determined from the production well tracer response. When sampled at 1.5 m depth intervals in the monitoring well, breakthrough was observed in only three intervals along the entire 18.2 m screened well. K estimates from tracer travel time within discrete high-permeability strata range from 31 to 317 m/day. Inclusion of permeameter K estimates for the lower permeability aquifer sands result in a range in relative K of 0.01 to 1.0. This field site has the highest absolute K estimate for a discrete stratum and the widest range in relative hydraulic conductivity among research field sites with K estimates for discrete strata. Within such a highly stratified aquifer, the use of an average K from an aquifer pumping test to predict solute transport results in great underestimation of transport distances for a given time period.

  10. Natural and anthropogenic hazards in karst areas of Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, M.; Qiriazi, P.; Sala, S.

    2004-10-01

    In Albania, about one quarter of the country is occupied by outcroppings of soluble rocks; thus, karst represents an important and typical natural environment. Today karst areas are seriously threatened by a number of hazards, of both natural and anthropogenic origin. Many problems are related to agricultural practices: the use of heavy machinery, ever-increasing in recent years, results at many sites in destruction of the original karst landscapes. Use of pesticides and herbicides, in addition, causes the loss of karst ecosystems of great biological relevance, as has been observed in the Dumre district, where about 80 lakes of karst origin are present in the evaporites of Permian-Triassic age. Agricultural practice performed on slopes with medium to high gradient is a further factor which greatly predispose the slopes to erosion. The cave heritage of Albania (estimated so far in about 1000 caves) is at risk because of the uncontrolled quarrying activities which determine the total or partial destruction of karst caves, including many of naturalistic, archaeological and speleological interest. Many caves have also become sites of illegal disposal of solid and liquid wastes, which causes pollution of the karst ecosystems and of the aquifer therein present, with heavy negative consequences on the quality of water. Even though most of the cases here mentioned are related to anthropogenic activities, the natural hazards, such as subsidence phenomena, floods, and the development of sinkholes, have not to be disregarded.

  11. NMR Logging to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity in Unconsolidated Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knight, Rosemary; Walsh, David O; Butler, James J; Grunewald, Elliot; Liu, Gaisheng; Parsekian, Andrew D; Reboulet, Edward C; Knobbe, Steve; Barrows, Mercer

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging provides a new means of estimating the hydraulic conductivity (K) of unconsolidated aquifers. The estimation of K from the measured NMR parameters can be performed using the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation, which is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation and initially developed for obtaining permeability from NMR logging in petroleum reservoirs. The SDR equation includes empirically determined constants. Decades of research for petroleum applications have resulted in standard values for these constants that can provide accurate estimates of permeability in consolidated formations. The question we asked: Can standard values for the constants be defined for hydrogeologic applications that would yield accurate estimates of K in unconsolidated aquifers? Working at 10 locations at three field sites in Kansas and Washington, USA, we acquired NMR and K data using direct-push methods over a 10- to 20-m depth interval in the shallow subsurface. Analysis of pairs of NMR and K data revealed that we could dramatically improve K estimates by replacing the standard petroleum constants with new constants, optimal for estimating K in the unconsolidated materials at the field sites. Most significant was the finding that there was little change in the SDR constants between sites. This suggests that we can define a new set of constants that can be used to obtain high resolution, cost-effective estimates of K from NMR logging in unconsolidated aquifers. This significant result has the potential to change dramatically the approach to determining K for hydrogeologic applications.

  12. Estimation of sources of water used by plant established in rocky karst habitats, subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y.; Chen, H.; Schwinning, S.

    2014-12-01

    Plant communities in continental ecosystems usually access to at least two pools of water that can be differentiated based on their turnover characteristics: a plant preferred pool with rapid recharge and depletion (dynamic pool), and a more consistent pool with less frequent recharge and slower loss rates (reserve pool). Identifying the use of different pools by community members is the key to estimating their ecological and hydrological functions. In regions with rocky, thin soils in which plant roots also take up water from rock fissures and crevices, it is usually very difficult to locate plant available water pools and quantify their water status or use by plants. Fortunately, we expect dynamic water pools to frequently change isotopic ratios due to rapid recharge and depletion, while reserve pools of water is expected to have distinct isotope ratios and maintain much less variability. Thus, we can use this fact to derive limited quantitative conclusions about the species differences in water use. In order to reveal sources of water used by one karst endemic tree species (Platycarya longipes) established in two typical karst habitats (cliff face and nearby loose rocky soils), stem samples for the tree and one coexistence shallow rooted shrub species (Tirpitzia ovoidea, which was proved to relied on shallow water sources) were collected for 9 times throughout a growing season. Linear relationships (regression slopes were closed to 1) were found between stem water isotope ratios of the two species in each habitat, indicating that the target tree species also relied on water in the dynamic pool. We further discussed the probable water movement mechanism based on the responses of stem water isotope ratios to rainfall.

  13. Mass load estimation errors utilizing grab sampling strategies in a karst watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogle, A.W.; Taraba, J.L.; Dinger, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Developing a mass load estimation method appropriate for a given stream and constituent is difficult due to inconsistencies in hydrologic and constituent characteristics. The difficulty may be increased in flashy flow conditions such as karst. Many projects undertaken are constrained by budget and manpower and do not have the luxury of sophisticated sampling strategies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine two grab sampling strategies with varying sampling intervals and determine the error in mass load estimates, and (2) determine the error that can be expected when a grab sample is collected at a time of day when the diurnal variation is most divergent from the daily mean. Results show grab sampling with continuous flow to be a viable data collection method for estimating mass load in the study watershed. Comparing weekly, biweekly, and monthly grab sampling, monthly sampling produces the best results with this method. However, the time of day the sample is collected is important. Failure to account for diurnal variability when collecting a grab sample may produce unacceptable error in mass load estimates. The best time to collect a sample is when the diurnal cycle is nearest the daily mean.

  14. Combined use of natural and artificial tracers to determine the hydrogeological functioning of a karst aquifer: the Villanueva del Rosario system (Andalusia, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarra, M.; Andreo, B.; Marín, A. I.; Vadillo, I.; Barberá, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of natural responses of karst springs provides information on the behavior of the aquifers they drain. Detailed monitoring and qualitative and quantitative analyses of natural responses, and environmental—total organic carbon (TOC), NO3 -, Cl- and intrinsic fluorescence—and artificial (fluorescent dye) tracers, in the water drained by Villanueva del Rosario spring (southern Spain), suggest the existence of a conduit flow system with rapid flows and very short transit times of water through the aquifer. This is in agreement with uranine and eosin breakthrough curves and with simple numerical models done using these data. However, due to the low capacity for natural regulation, not all the recharge effects are simultaneously transmitted to the spring water; given a single input, the system modulates and transfers hydrodynamic variations faster than variations of chemical composition and of water temperature. Additionally, time lags between maximum concentrations of natural and artificial tracers show that the global system response (including diffuse infiltration) is faster and more sensitive than that produced from infiltration concentrated at a single point on the surface (sinkholes).

  15. Estimating aquifer channel recharge using optical data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gary R; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Recharge through intermittent and ephemeral stream channels is believed to be a primary aquifer recharge process in arid and semiarid environments. The intermittent nature of precipitation and flow events in these channels, and their often remote locations, makes direct flow and loss measurements difficult and expensive. Airborne and satellite optical images were interpreted to evaluate aquifer recharge due to stream losses on the Frio River in south-central Texas. Losses in the Frio River are believed to be a major contributor of recharge to the Edwards Aquifer. The results of this work indicate that interpretation of readily available remote sensing optical images can offer important insights into the spatial distribution of aquifer recharge from losing streams. In cases where upstream gauging data are available, simple visual analysis of the length of the flowing reach downstream from the gauging station can be used to estimate channel losses. In the case of the Frio River, the rate of channel loss estimated from the length of the flowing reach at low flows was about half of the loss rate calculated from in-stream gain-loss measurements. Analysis based on water-surface width and channel slope indicated that losses were mainly in a reach downstream of the mapped recharge zone. The analysis based on water-surface width, however, did not indicate that this method could yield accurate estimates of actual flow in pool and riffle streams, such as the Frio River and similar rivers draining the Edwards Plateau. © 2011, Southwest Research Institute. Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Hyper-resolution aquifer map of North America: estimating alluvial aquifer thickness, vertical structure, and conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I.; Condon, L. E.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The lack of robust, spatially distributed data of the subsurface is a major limitation for complex and realistic groundwater dynamics within large-scale land surface, hydrologic, and climate models. Improving these inputs will enable a more realistic physical representation of the groundwater system and are especially needed as these models more the higher resolutions. Here, we present a new parameterization of aquifer stratification and three-dimensional input dataset over Continental North America. We estimated thickness of alluvial aquifers for North America at 250m2 resolution based on terrain attributes, such as curvature, and calibrated this with U.S. groundwater studies. Also, spatial distribution, thickness, and depth of confining layers are estimated by using information of U.S. groundwater studies. A dataset of aquifer thickness was not previously available at this level of detail, over this extent. The new derived aquifer map is used as an input to the integrated physical hydrological model ParFlow. Two smaller domains, representing different hydrogeological settings (i.e. parts of the Central Valley and High Plains) were selected for a sensitivity analysis. In this sensitivity analysis, we perturbed model parameter values and vertical and horizontal resolution under stead-state forcing (precipitation - evaporation). Specifically, the model was run with various conductivities, using global scale data of Gleeson et al. (2014) and regional scale data of U.S.G.S. groundwater studies, and various vertical and horizontal (i.e. 1km2, 250m2) discretization. Simulated groundwater depths and streamflow were evaluated against observations. The results show that model performance improves with increased horizontal and vertical discretization, and that variation in conductivity has the highest impact on spatial distribution of groundwater depth and simulated streamflow. In future work, human water demands will be added to the model to study the sensitivity of

  17. Comparison of age distributions estimated from environmental tracers by using binary-dilution and numerical models of fractured and folded karst: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Kauffman, Leon J.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Nelms, David L.; Schlosser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Measured concentrations of environmental tracers in spring discharge from a karst aquifer in the Shenandoah Valley, USA, were used to refine a numerical groundwater flow model. The karst aquifer is folded and faulted carbonate bedrock dominated by diffuse flow along fractures. The numerical model represented bedrock structure and discrete features (fault zones and springs). Concentrations of 3H, 3He, 4He, and CFC-113 in spring discharge were interpreted as binary dilutions of young (0–8 years) water and old (tracer-free) water. Simulated mixtures of groundwater are derived from young water flowing along shallow paths, with the addition of old water flowing along deeper paths through the model domain that discharge to springs along fault zones. The simulated median age of young water discharged from springs (5.7 years) is slightly older than the median age estimated from 3H/3He data (4.4 years). The numerical model predicted a fraction of old water in spring discharge (0.07) that was half that determined by the binary-dilution model using the 3H/3He apparent age and 3H and CFC-113 data (0.14). This difference suggests that faults and lineaments are more numerous or extensive than those mapped and included in the numerical model.

  18. Comparison of age distributions estimated from environmental tracers by using binary-dilution and numerical models of fractured and folded karst: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, Richard M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Kauffman, Leon J.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Nelms, David L.; Schlosser, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Measured concentrations of environmental tracers in spring discharge from a karst aquifer in the Shenandoah Valley, USA, were used to refine a numerical groundwater flow model. The karst aquifer is folded and faulted carbonate bedrock dominated by diffuse flow along fractures. The numerical model represented bedrock structure and discrete features (fault zones and springs). Concentrations of 3H, 3He, 4He, and CFC-113 in spring discharge were interpreted as binary dilutions of young (0-8 years) water and old (tracer-free) water. Simulated mixtures of groundwater are derived from young water flowing along shallow paths, with the addition of old water flowing along deeper paths through the model domain that discharge to springs along fault zones. The simulated median age of young water discharged from springs (5.7 years) is slightly older than the median age estimated from 3H/3He data (4.4 years). The numerical model predicted a fraction of old water in spring discharge (0.07) that was half that determined by the binary-dilution model using the 3H/3He apparent age and 3H and CFC-113 data (0.14). This difference suggests that faults and lineaments are more numerous or extensive than those mapped and included in the numerical model.

  19. Megaporosity and permeability of Thalassinoides-dominated ichnofabrics in the Cretaceous karst-carbonate Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Current research has demonstrated that trace fossils and their related ichnofabrics can have a critical impact on the fluid-flow properties of hydrocarbon reservoirs and groundwater aquifers. Most petroleum-associated research has used ichnofabrics to support the definition of depositional environments and reservoir quality, and has concentrated on siliciclastic reservoir characterization and, to a lesser degree, carbonate reservoir characterization (for example, Gerard and Bromley, 2008; Knaust, 2009). The use of ichnology in aquifer characterization has almost entirely been overlooked by the hydrologic community because the dynamic reservoir-characterization approach has not caught on with hydrologists and so hydrology is lagging behind reservoir engineering in this area (de Marsily and others, 2005). The objective of this research is to show that (1) ichnofabric analysis can offer a productive methodology for purposes of carbonate aquifer characterization, and (2) a clear relation can exist between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers.

  20. Isotopic and hydrogeochemical characterization of high-altitude karst aquifers in complex geological settings. The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park (Northern Spain) case study.

    PubMed

    Lambán, L J; Jódar, J; Custodio, E; Soler, A; Sapriza, G; Soto, R

    2015-02-15

    The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park, located in the Southern Pyrenees, constitutes the highest karst system in Western Europe. No previous studies regarding its geochemical and isotopic groundwater characterization are available in this area. This work presents the results of field and sampling campaigns carried out between July 2007 and September 2013. The groundwater presents high calcium bicarbonate contents due to the occurrence of upper Cretaceous and lower Paleocene-Eocene carbonate materials in the studied area. Other relevant processes include dissolution of anhydrite and/or gypsum and incongruent dissolution of Mg-limestone and dolomite. The water stable isotopes (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) show that the oceanic fronts from the Atlantic Ocean are responsible for the high levels of precipitation. In autumn, winter, and spring, a deuterium excess is found in the recharge water, which could be related to local atmospheric transport of low-altitude snow sublimation vapour and its later condensation on the snow surface at higher altitude, where recharge is mostly produced. The recharge zones are mainly between 2500m and 3200ma.s.l. The tritium content of the water suggests short groundwater transit times. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulphate points to the existence of regional fluxes mixed with local discharge in some of the springs. This work highlights the major role played by the altitude difference between the recharge and discharge zones in controlling the chemistry and the vertical variability of the isotopic composition in high-altitude karst aquifers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. ); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. )

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  2. Estimating ecological indicators of karst rocky desertification by linear spectral unmixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Shang, Kun; Cen, Yi; Shuai, Tong; Sun, Yanli

    2014-09-01

    Coverage rates of vegetation and exposed bedrock are two key indicators of karst rocky desertification. In this study, the abundances of vegetation and exposed rock were retrieved from a hyperspectral Hyperion image using linear spectral unmixing method. The results were verified using the spectral indices of karst rocky desertification (KRDSI) and an integrated LAI spectral index: modified chlorophyll absorption ratio index (MCARI2). The abundances showed significant linear correlations with KRDSI and MCARI2. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.93, 0.66, and 0.84 for vegetation, soil, and rock, respectively, indicating that the abundances of vegetation and bedrock can characterize their coverage rates to a certain extent. Finally, the abundances of vegetation and bedrock were graded and integrated to evaluate rocky desertification in a typical karst region. This study suggests that spectral unmixing algorithm and hyperspectral remote sensing imagery can be used to monitor and evaluate karst rocky desertification.

  3. Hydrologic and geochemical dynamics of vadose zone recharge in a mantled karst aquifer: Results of monitoring drip waters in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Alexander, E. Calvin; Jameson, Roy A.; Alexander, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Caves provide direct access to flows through the vadose zone that recharge karst aquifers. Although many recent studies have documented the highly dynamic processes associated with vadose zone flows in karst settings, few have been conducted in mantled karst settings, such as that of southeastern Minnesota. Here we present some results of a long-term program of cave drip monitoring conducted within Mystery Cave, Minnesota. In this study, two perennial ceiling drip sites were monitored between 1997 and 2001. The sites were located about 90 m (300 ft) apart along the same cave passage approximately 18 m (60 ft) below the surface; 7 to 9 m (20 to 30 ft) of loess and 12 m (40 ft) of flat-lying carbonate bedrock strata overlie the cave. Records of drip rate, electrical conductivity, and water temperature were obtained at 15 minute intervals, and supplemented with periodic sampling for major ion chemistry and water stable isotopes. Patterns in flow and geochemistry emerged at each of the two drip sites that were repeated year after year. Although one site responded relatively quickly (within 2-7 hours) to surface recharge events while the other responded more slowly (within 2-5 days), thresholds of antecedent moisture needed to be overcome in order to produce a discharge response at both sites. The greatest amount of flow was observed at both sites during the spring snowmelt period. Rainfall events less than 10 mm (0.4 in) during the summer months generally did not produce a drip discharge response, yet rapid drip responses were observed following intense storm events after periods of prolonged rainfall. The chemical data from both sites indicate that reservoirs of vadose zone water with distinct chemical signatures mixed during recharge events, and drip chemistry returned to a baseline composition during low flow periods. A reservoir with elevated chloride and sulfate concentrations impacts the slow-response drip site with each recharge event, but does not similarly

  4. Dynamics and anthropogenic impacts of multiple karst flow systems in a mountainous area of South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Criss, Robert E.; Zhou, Hong; Huang, He; Han, Zhaofeng; Shi, Tingting

    2016-12-01

    The Xiangxi River basin, South China, is a steep terrane with well-developed karst features and an important Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer. Meteoric water in this mountainous area features a mean δ18O elevation gradient of -2.4 ‰/km. This gradient was used to estimate mean recharge elevations of 760 m for Shuimoxi (SMX) spring, 1,060 m for Xiangshuidong (XSD) spring, and 1,430 m for drill hole ZK03, indicating multiple flow paths in the Cambrian-Ordovician karst aquifer. Mean residence times of 230 and 320 days and ˜2 years were estimated for these features, respectively, using the damped running average model that predicts the isotopic variations in groundwater from those in precipitation. Groundwater in the regional karst flow system has the longest residence time, the highest recharge elevation, the longest flow paths, the lowest addition of anthropogenic components, and the greatest amount of water-rock interaction as indicated by its higher dissolved solids, Mg2+ concentrations and Mg/Ca ratios than the springs. In contrast, the local and shallow karst flow systems respond rapidly to recharge events. Artificial tracer tests prove that these shallow karst systems can also quickly transmit anthropogenic contaminants, indicating that they are highly vulnerable to human impacts, which include the enrichment of NO3 -. The intensity of water-rock interaction and groundwater vulnerability are mainly determined by the structure and dynamics of the multiple karst flow systems.

  5. Estimation of underground river water availability based on rainfall in the Maros karst region, South Sulawesi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsyad, Muhammad; Ihsan, Nasrul; Tiwow, Vistarani Arini

    2016-02-01

    Maros karst region, covering an area of 43.750 hectares, has water resources that determine the life around it. Water resources in Maros karst are in the rock layers or river underground in the cave. The data used in this study are primary and secondary data. Primary data includes characteristics of the medium. Secondary data is rainfall data from BMKG, water discharge data from the PSDA, South Sulawesi province in 1990-2010, and the other characteristics data Maros karst, namely cave, flora and fauna of the Bantimurung Bulusaraung National Park. Data analysis was conducted using laboratory test for medium characteristics Maros karst, rainfall and water discharge were analyzed using Minitab Program 1.5 to determine their profile. The average rainfall above 200 mm per year occurs in the range of 1999 to 2005. The availability of the water discharge at over 50 m3/s was happened in 1993 and 1995. Prediction was done by modeling Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), with the rainfall data shows that the average precipitation for four years (2011-2014) will sharply fluctuate. The prediction of water discharge in Maros karst region was done for the period from January to August in 2011, including the type of 0. In 2012, the addition of the water discharge started up in early 2014.

  6. Estimating hydraulic properties of volcanic aquifers using constant-rate and variable-rate aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Gingerich, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the ground-water demand of the population of the island of Maui, Hawaii, has significantly increased. To ensure prudent management of the ground-water resources, an improved understanding of ground-water flow systems is needed. At present, large-scale estimations of aquifer properties are lacking for Maui. Seven analytical methods using constant-rate and variable-rate withdrawals for single wells provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity for 103 wells in central Maui. Methods based on constant-rate tests, although not widely used on Maui, offer reasonable estimates. Step-drawdown tests, which are more abundantly used than other tests, provide similar estimates as constant-rate tests. A numerical model validates the suitability of analytical solutions for step-drawdown tests and additionally provides an estimate of storage parameters. The results show that hydraulic conductivity is log-normally distributed and that for dike-free volcanic rocks it ranges over several orders of magnitude from 1 to 2,500 m/d. The arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and median values of hydraulic conductivity are respectively 520, 280, and 370 m/d for basalt and 80, 50, and 30 m/d for sediment. A geostatistical approach using ordinary kriging yields a prediction of hydraulic conductivity on a larger scale. Overall, the results are in agreement with values published for other Hawaiian islands. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  7. Employing hydrochemistry and stable isotopes in analyzing groundwater flow mechanism, dynamics in karst aquifer of the Lower Jordan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musallam, Shadha; Sauter, Martin; Marei, Amer

    2015-04-01

    Water is a valuable resource, especially in arid and semi arid areas. In order to do proper management of the water resources, studies on the aquifer system is essential. The study case is located in the lower part of the western Jordan Valley. This karstic area has different systems from which the upper and lower Mountain aquifer systems. Two representative springs were chosen for each aquifer, Sultan spring for the lower aquifer and Auja spring for the upper one. Sultan spring has a continues and constant discharge rate through the year while Auja spring has high oscillation in discharge accompanied by frequent dry-out in summer months and fast response to precipitation events. The two systems have been thought to be separated by an aquiclute, however after frequent intensive sampling of both springs during the raining winter season, This study shows that with the exception of Na+ and Cl- all other concentration of ions are very similar. The average of Sodium for Sultan spring is 33 mg/L, while the average Chloride for the same spring is 54.5 mg/L. As for Auja spring the average Sodium and Chloride are 24 mg/L and 39.4 mg/L respectively, therefore, the water of Sultan spring contains higher content of sodium and chloride than Auja, this could be related to the chemistry of the lower aquifer. The ratio of Na+/Cl- for Sultan and Auja springs are 0.92 and 0.94 respectively, this indicates that Auja is close to the rain ratio of 0.86 while Sultan (although slightly higher) may be closer to the Halite ratio of 1. The isotopic signature of 18O for both springs has shown to be very similar with only a -0.5‰ of difference in most cases, with a range of -5.2‰ to -6.2‰ for Sultan and -5.4‰ to -6.2‰ for Auja spring. These results may indicate the same recharge elevation for both springs in the Mountain area. On the other hand, in some places east to the major fault system, the shallow aquifer's 18O content in Jericho is close to that of Sultan spring, which could

  8. Geochemistry and microbial diversity of cave waters in the gypsum karst aquifers of Emilia Romagna region, Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, Ilenia M; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Montanari, Chiara; Vannini, Lucia; Gardini, Fausto; De Waele, Jo

    2017-11-15

    Fifty-seven control points of waters (sinking streams, rivers in caves, and resurgences) hosted in gypsum karst areas in Emilia Romagna region (N-Italy) were sampled in the framework of a Project LIFE+08NAT/IT/000369 "Gypsum" in the period 2010-2014. The microbiology and chemistry of these waters have been analyzed to evaluate the impact of human activities or natural factors, in the gypsum karst systems. Waters have been analyzed for major chemistry (Ca, Mg, Na, K, SO4, HCO3, Cl, NO3) and some minor constituents (F, Br, NH4 and PO4), measuring pH, electric conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS) and temperature (T) in situ. The same samples have been analyzed with traditional microbiology techniques focused on total microbial count and on fecal microbiota, as index of human and/or animal contamination, and molecular biology techniques (sequencing of 16S rRNA segment and PCR-DGGE), focused on the characterization of microbial populations in the different sampling sites and determination of their variations and/or changes during the five years of the project. As expected, waters tend to be increasingly mineralized from sinking streams to resurgences, with only local and temporarily high contents in nitrates and ammonium, often related to the presence of bat colonies. PCR-DGGE revealed ecological changes, in terms of microbial populations present in the bulk water samples, in different sampling sites within the same cave. Although the impact of fecal microorganisms only rarely exceeded 2 log UFC/ml, the results evidenced fluctuations of these microorganisms mainly correlated to the season and to the biological activity of bats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating harvested rainwater at greenhouses in south Portugal aquifer Campina de Faro for potential infiltration in Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luís; Monteiro, José Paulo; Leitão, Teresa; Lobo-Ferreira, João Paulo; Oliveira, Manuel; Martins de Carvalho, José; Martins de Carvalho, Tiago; Agostinho, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The Campina de Faro (CF) aquifer system, located on the south coast of Portugal, is an important source of groundwater, mostly used for agriculture purposes. In some areas, this multi-layered aquifer is contaminated with high concentration of nitrates, possibly arising from excessive usage of fertilizers, reaching to values as high as 300 mg/L. In order to tackle this problem, Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques are being applied at demonstration scale to improve groundwater quality through aquifer recharge, in both infiltration basins at the river bed of ephemeral river Rio Seco and existing traditional large diameter wells located in this aquifer. In order to assess the infiltration capacity of the existing infrastructures, in particular infiltration basins and large diameter wells at CF aquifer, infiltration tests were performed, indicating a high infiltration capacity of the existing infrastructures. Concerning the sources of water for recharge, harvested rainwater at greenhouses was identified in CF aquifer area as one of the main potential sources for aquifer recharge, once there is a large surface area occupied by these infrastructures at the demo site. This potential source of water could, in some cases, be redirected to the large diameter wells or to the infiltration basins at the riverbed of Rio Seco. Estimates of rainwater harvested at greenhouses were calculated based on a 32 year average rainfall model and on the location of the greenhouses and their surface areas, the latter based on aerial photograph. Potential estimated annual rainwater intercepted by greenhouses at CF aquifer accounts an average of 1.63 hm3/year. Nonetheless it is unlikely that the totality of this amount can be harvested, collected and redirected to aquifer recharge infrastructures, for several reasons, such as the lack of appropriate greenhouse infrastructures, conduits or a close location between greenhouses and large diameter wells and infiltration basins. Anyway, this

  10. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    three different sources of groundwater occur characterized by different flow velocity, recharge age and chemical composition. Although CFC's has been degraded, it is possible to use the results to distinguish groundwater different components and even to estimate groundwater flow velocity because of near located recharge and discharge areas. Tritium results doesn't show considerable variations along flow path with 6 TU in average confirming conclusions based on CFC's. Tracer test approve very high groundwater velocity zones in study area that supposedly doesn't mix with groundwater in matrix. References Delina A., Babre A., Popovs K., Sennikovs J., Grinberga B. 2012. Effects of karst processes on surface water and groundwater hydrology at Skaistkalne vicinity, Latvia. - Hydrology Research, 43(4), IWA Publishing, pp. 445-459, doi:10.2166/nh.2012.123. This study is supported by ERAF project Nr. 1013/00542DP/2.1.1.1.0/13/APIA/VIAA/007

  11. Bootstrap calibration and uncertainty estimation of downhole NMR hydraulic conductivity estimates in an unconsolidated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Parsekian, A D; Dlubac, K; Grunewald, E; Butler, J J; Knight, R; Walsh, D O

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of hydraulic conductivity (K) in aquifers is critical for evaluation, management, and remediation of groundwater resources. While estimates of K have been traditionally obtained using hydraulic tests over discrete intervals in wells, geophysical measurements are emerging as an alternative way to estimate this parameter. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging, a technology once largely applied to characterization of deep consolidated rock petroleum reservoirs, is beginning to see use in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers. Using a well-known rock physics relationship-the Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) equation--K and porosity can be estimated from NMR water content and relaxation time. Calibration of SDR parameters is necessary for this transformation because NMR relaxation properties are, in part, a function of magnetic mineralization and pore space geometry, which are locally variable quantities. Here, we present a statistically based method for calibrating SDR parameters that establishes a range for the estimated parameters and simultaneously estimates the uncertainty of the resulting K values. We used co-located logging NMR and direct K measurements in an unconsolidated fluvial aquifer in Lawrence, Kansas, USA to demonstrate that K can be estimated using logging NMR to a similar level of uncertainty as with traditional direct hydraulic measurements in unconsolidated sediments under field conditions. Results of this study provide a benchmark for future calibrations of NMR to obtain K in unconsolidated sediments and suggest a method for evaluating uncertainty in both K and SDR parameter values. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    PubMed

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  13. Estimating the input of wastewater-born micropollutants in a rural karst catchment (Gallusquelle, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirlewagen, Johannes; Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Schiperski, Ferry; Scheytt, Traugott; Licha, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The main focus of the AGRO research project is on the use of various micropollutants as indicators (e.g. for wastewater) in the catchment of the karst spring Gallusquelle, Swabian Alb. For modeling the micropollutants' fate in the subsurface and their occurrence in spring water, reliable estimates of the spatio-temporal input, i.e. input functions, are crucial. Therefore potential sources for wastewater-born substances are identified. These are the combined sewer system with a stormwater retention basin (untreated wastewater) and the river Fehla (treated wastewater). The micropollutants' concentrations and loads in the potentially infiltrating waters are estimated on the one hand by local water and substance consumption data and on the other hand by water sample analysis and stream gauging. The spring's discharge varies from 0.2-2.0 m³/s with an average of 0.5 m³/s. Treated spring water serves as drinking water for 45 000 people. The catchment area measures 45 km² and is rural in character with 55% forest, 27% grassland, 15% agriculture and 3% residential/industrial. Industrial activity is restricted to a few minor textile and metal works. There are around 4 000 inhabitants and except for a few farms, all households are connected to the public sewer system. The only surface water within the catchment is the stream Fehla, which forms a part of the catchment boundary. It was formerly identified as a sinking stream with an ephemeral part in the lower course. Connections to the Gallusquelle spring were proven by several tracer tests conducted in the 1960's, when the river started to become perennial over the whole course due to heavy colmatation. During a one week campaign, samples of wastewater and river water were taken three times per day. Additionally, hourly samples were taken during a 24 h period. Water samples were analysed for major ions and 58 micropollutants, including pharmaceuticals, stimulants (as caffeine), the artificial sweeteners acesulfame and

  14. A large-scale integrated karst-vegetation recharge model to understand the impact of climate and land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, Fanny; Hartmann, Andreas; Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Karst aquifers are an important source of drinking water in many regions of the world, but their resources are likely to be affected by changes in climate and land cover. Karst areas are highly permeable and produce large amounts of groundwater recharge, while surface runoff is typically negligible. As a result, recharge in karst systems may be particularly sensitive to environmental changes compared to other less permeable systems. However, current large-scale hydrological models poorly represent karst specificities. They tend to provide an erroneous water balance and to underestimate groundwater recharge over karst areas. A better understanding of karst hydrology and estimating karst groundwater resources at a large-scale is therefore needed for guiding water management in a changing world. The first objective of the present study is to introduce explicit vegetation processes into a previously developed karst recharge model (VarKarst) to better estimate evapotranspiration losses depending on the land cover characteristics. The novelty of the approach for large-scale modelling lies in the assessment of model output uncertainty, and parameter sensitivity to avoid over-parameterisation. We find that the model so modified is able to produce simulations consistent with observations of evapotranspiration and soil moisture at Fluxnet sites located in carbonate rock areas. Secondly, we aim to determine the model sensitivities to climate and land cover characteristics, and to assess the relative influence of changes in climate and land cover on aquifer recharge. We perform virtual experiments using synthetic climate inputs, and varying the value of land cover parameters. In this way, we can control for variations in climate input characteristics (e.g. precipitation intensity, precipitation frequency) and vegetation characteristics (e.g. canopy water storage capacity, rooting depth), and we can isolate the effect that each of these quantities has on recharge. Our results

  15. Interpretation of transmissivity estimates from single-well pumping aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.; Weight, W.D.; Schreiber, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    Interpretation of single-well tests with the Cooper-Jacob method remains more reasonable than most alternatives. Drawdowns from 628 simulated single-well tests where transmissivity was specified were interpreted with the Cooper-Jacob straight-line method to estimate transmissivity. Error and bias as a function of vertical anisotropy, partial penetration, specific yield, and interpretive technique were investigated for transmissivities that ranged from 10 to 10,000 m2/d. Cooper-Jacob transmissivity estimates in confined aquifers were affected minimally by partial penetration, vertical anisotropy, or analyst. Cooper-Jacob transmissivity estimates of simulated unconfined aquifers averaged twice the known values. Transmissivity estimates of unconfined aquifers were not improved by interpreting results with an unconfined aquifer solution. Judicious interpretation of late-time data consistently improved estimates where transmissivity exceeded 250 m2/d in unconfined aquifers. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

  16. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF PETROLEUM RELEASED FROM UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS in Areas of Karst Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study determines the transport and ultimate fate of petroleum products within a region of karst geomorphology. The paper entails a complete literature review, including references that pertain to contaminant transport within karst aquifers

  17. Management Can Reduce Mobility of Escherichia coli compared to traditional groundwater tracers within karst terrains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An understanding of fundamental processes controlling pathogen movement is necessary to protect water resources across the globe. Limited filtration and turbulent flow make karst aquifers susceptible to microbial contamination. Groundwater tracers typically used in karst terrains include fluorescent...

  18. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF PETROLEUM RELEASED FROM UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS in Areas of Karst Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study determines the transport and ultimate fate of petroleum products within a region of karst geomorphology. The paper entails a complete literature review, including references that pertain to contaminant transport within karst aquifers

  19. The influence of DOM and microbial processes on arsenic release from karst during ASR operations in the Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, J.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of subsurface As poses a serious threat to human health, particularly in a region such as Florida where population is heavily dependent on highly porous karstic aquifers for drinking water. Injection water used in aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) or aquifer recharge (AR) operations is commonly high in dissolved organic matter (DOM) and OM can also be present in the subsurface carbonate rock. Using batch incubation experiments, this study examined the role of core preservation methods, as well as the influence of labile and more refractory DOM on the mobilization of As from carbonate rock. Incubation experiments used sealed reaction vessels with preserved and homogenized core materials collected via coring the Suwannee Formation in southwest Florida and treatment additions consisting of 1) source water (SW) enriched in sterilized soil DOM, 2) SW enriched in soil DOM and microbes, and 3) SW enriched in sodium acetate. During an initial equilibration phase in native groundwater (NGW) with low dissolved oxygen (DO; Phase 1), we found the greatest As release of the whole incubation. In the beginning of Phase 2 (N2 headspace) in which NGW was replaced with treatment solutions, there was little As release except in the vessel with Na-acetate added, which also had the lowest ORP. At the start of Phase 3, when incubations were exposed to air, most vessels saw more ion (including As) release into solution. Vessel with Na-acetate had less As release in Phase 3 than in Phase 2. During all experimental phases, treatments of DOM or microbe additions had no apparent effect on the amount of As release. The core materials was found contain significant amount of indigenous DOM (about 8 g OC/kg core) which was released during the incubation so DOC concentrations displayed no clear pattern among different treatments. At least three abiotic As mobilization mechanisms may play a role in As released during different stages of the experiment. Desorption of As from iron

  20. Distinguishing and estimating recharge to karst springs in snow and glacier dominated mountainous basins of the western Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Shah, Rouf A.; Deshpande, Rajendrakumar D.; Fryar, Alan E.; Perrin, Jerome; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2017-07-01

    Recharge assessment is a challenge in snow and glacier dominated Himalayan basins. Quantification of recharge to karst springs in these complex geological environments is important both for hydrologic understanding and for effective water resource management. We used spring hydrographs and environmental tracers (isotopes and solutes) to distinguish and estimate the sources of spring water and to identify the flow paths of the recharging waters in three mountainous basins of the western Himalaya. The karst springs are perennial with high discharge amplitudes. The results indicate that ambient temperature has a strong influence on the hydrological behavior of the springs. Although the spring flow is dominantly controlled by the melting of snow and/or glaciers, rain events produce sharp spikes in spring hydrographs. The facies patterns in springs within the Bringi basin (Ca-HCO3) and the Liddar basin (Ca-HCO3 and Ca-Mg-HCO3) suggest flow dominantly through limestone and dolomite. Higher concentrations of SO42- and Na+ in warm springs of the Kuthar basin indicate flow through carbonate, silicate and other rocks. The isotopic composition (δ18O, δ2H) of precipitation, snowpacks, glacier melt and karst springs show wide variation both in space and time, and are strongly influenced by the basin relief and meteorology. The tracer-based two- and three-component mixing models suggest that the snowmelt dominantly contributes to the spring flow (55-96%), followed by glacier melt (5-36%) and rain (4-34%). Based on tracer tests with good recovery rates, springs are dominantly recharged through point sources rather than by diffuse infiltration. Changes in the timing, form, and amount of winter precipitation substantially affect the timing and magnitude of spring discharge during the rest of the year.

  1. Comparing and refining karst disturbance index methods through application in an island karst setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Brandon L.; North, Leslie A.; Polk, Jason S.

    2016-12-01

    The interconnected nature of surface and subsurface karst environments allows easy disturbance to their aquifers and specialized ecosystems from anthropogenic impacts. The karst disturbance index is a holistic tool used to measure disturbance to karst environments and has been applied and refined through studies in Florida and Italy, among others. Through these applications, the karst disturbance index has evolved into two commonly used methods of application; yet, the karst disturbance index is still susceptible to evaluation and modification for application in other areas around the world. The geographically isolated and highly vulnerable municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico's karst area provides an opportunity to test the usefulness and validity of the karst disturbance index in an island setting and to compare and further refine the application of the original and modified methods. This study found the both methods of karst disturbance index application resulted in high disturbance scores (Original Method 0.54 and Modified Method 0.69, respectively) and uncovered multiple considerations for the improvement of the karst disturbance index. An evaluation of multiple methods together in an island setting also resulted in the need for adding additional indicators, including Mogote Removal and Coastal Karst. Collectively, the results provide a holistic approach to using the karst disturbance index in an island karst setting and suggest a modified method by which scaling and weighting may compensate for the difference between the original and modified method scores and allow interested stakeholders to evaluate disturbance regardless of his or her level of expertise.

  2. Comparing and refining karst disturbance index methods through application in an island karst setting.

    PubMed

    Porter, Brandon L; North, Leslie A; Polk, Jason S

    2016-12-01

    The interconnected nature of surface and subsurface karst environments allows easy disturbance to their aquifers and specialized ecosystems from anthropogenic impacts. The karst disturbance index is a holistic tool used to measure disturbance to karst environments and has been applied and refined through studies in Florida and Italy, among others. Through these applications, the karst disturbance index has evolved into two commonly used methods of application; yet, the karst disturbance index is still susceptible to evaluation and modification for application in other areas around the world. The geographically isolated and highly vulnerable municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico's karst area provides an opportunity to test the usefulness and validity of the karst disturbance index in an island setting and to compare and further refine the application of the original and modified methods. This study found the both methods of karst disturbance index application resulted in high disturbance scores (Original Method 0.54 and Modified Method 0.69, respectively) and uncovered multiple considerations for the improvement of the karst disturbance index. An evaluation of multiple methods together in an island setting also resulted in the need for adding additional indicators, including Mogote Removal and Coastal Karst. Collectively, the results provide a holistic approach to using the karst disturbance index in an island karst setting and suggest a modified method by which scaling and weighting may compensate for the difference between the original and modified method scores and allow interested stakeholders to evaluate disturbance regardless of his or her level of expertise.

  3. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  4. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in both mildly and highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests. In mildly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests with relatively large tracer transport distances are similar to ??L values from natural-gradient simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests at all tracer transport distances are typically smaller than ??L values from natural-gradient simulations.

  5. Estimation of hydraulic parameters in a complex porous aquifer system using geoelectrical methods.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, N; Vargemezis, G; Voudouris, K S

    2016-04-15

    Geoelectrical methods have been widely used for the estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties. In this study, geoelectrical methods were applied in a lithologically and hydrochemically complex porous aquifer to estimate its porosity, hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity. For this purpose, the electrical resistivity of the aquifer as well as the electrical conductivity of the groundwater was measured in 37 sites and wells. Initially, the Archie's law was used to generate sets of cementation factor (m) and alpha (α) parameter from which the mode values of α=0.98 and m=1.75 are representative of the studied aquifer. The transmissivity of the aquifer varies from 5.1×10(-3) to 3.1×10(-5)m(2)/s, whereas the mean value of its porosity is 0.45. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer which was calculated according to Archie's law varies from 2.08×10(-6) to 6.84×10(-5)m/s and is strongly correlated with the pumping test's hydraulic conductivity. In contrast, the hydraulic conductivity which was calculated using Dar-Zarrouk parameters presents lower correlation with the pumping test's hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, a relation between aquifer resistivity and hydraulic conductivity was established for the studied aquifer to enable the estimation of these parameters in sites lacking data.

  6. Multi-compartment modelling for aquifer parameter estimation using natural tracers in non-steady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adar, E.; Sorek, S.

    A method is developed for aquifer parameter estimation incorporating dissolved hydrochemical constituents and environmental isotopes. This model is developed for basins with lack of hydrological information but with enough wells to allow for hydraulic head measurements and water sampling for chemical and isotoic analyses. It was developed for aquifer systems with observed hydraulic head fluctuations. The model is based on a distributed parameter approach in which the aquifer is represented by a finte number of cells. Inflows through external aquifer boundaries and internal fluxes are evaluated by optimizing a set of mass balance equations expressing the conservation of water, isotopes and dissolved chemicals. Storativity and transmissivity coefficients are then evaluated by the previously calculated flow components and the periodic changes in hydraulic heads. This paper presents a methodology to enhance the accuracy of estimated physical parameters in heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers by adding chemical and isotopic information.

  7. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and catchment size for Florida lakes in mantled karst terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie Mackin

    2002-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrain of Florida, the size of the catchment delivering ground-water inflow to lakes is often considerably smaller than the topographically defined drainage basin. The size is determined by a balance of factors that act individually to enhance or diminish the hydraulic connection between the lake and the adjacent surficial aquifer, as well as the hydraulic connection between the surficial aquifer and the deeper limestone aquifer. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and the size of the ground-water catchment for lakes in mantled karst terrain were examined by: (1) reviewing the physical and hydrogeological characteristics of 14 Florida lake basins with available ground-water inflow estimates, and (2) simulating ground-water flow in hypothetical lake basins. Variably-saturated flow modeling was used to simulate a range of physical and hydrogeologic factors observed at the 14 lake basins. These factors included: recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, thickness of the unsaturated zone, size of the topographically defined basin, depth of the lake, thickness of the surficial aquifer, hydraulic conductivity of the geologic units, the location and size of karst subsidence features beneath and onshore of the lake, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. Catchment size and the magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with increases in recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, the size of the topographically defined basin, hydraulic conductivity in the surficial aquifer, the degree of confinement of the deeper Upper Floridan aquifer, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The catchment size and magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with decreases in the number and size of karst subsidence features in the basin, and the thickness of the unsaturated zone near the lake. Model results, although qualitative, provided insights into: (1) the types of lake basins in mantled karst terrain that have the potential to generate small and large

  8. Comparison of a karst groundwater model with and without discrete conduit flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, Stephen P.; Ronayne, Michael J.; Long, Andrew J.

    2013-11-01

    Karst aquifers exhibit a dual flow system characterized by interacting conduit and matrix domains. This study evaluated the coupled continuum pipe-flow framework for modeling karst groundwater flow in the Madison aquifer of western South Dakota (USA). Coupled conduit and matrix flow was simulated within a regional finite-difference model over a 10-year transient period. An existing equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was modified to include major conduit networks whose locations were constrained by dye-tracing data and environmental tracer analysis. Model calibration data included measured hydraulic heads at observation wells and estimates of discharge at four karst springs. Relative to the EPM model, the match to observation well hydraulic heads was substantially improved with the addition of conduits. The inclusion of conduit flow allowed for a simpler hydraulic conductivity distribution in the matrix continuum. Two of the high-conductivity zones in the EPM model, which were required to indirectly simulate the effects of conduits, were eliminated from the new model. This work demonstrates the utility of the coupled continuum pipe-flow method and illustrates how karst aquifer model parameterization is dependent on the physical processes that are simulated.

  9. Travel time based approach for the assessment of vulnerability of karst groundwater: the Transit Time Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosig, Karolin; Geyer, Tobias; Subah, Ali; Sauter, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Karst aquifers represent important water resources in many parts of the world. Unfortunately, karst aquifers are characterised by high contamination risks. This paper presents a travel time based method for the estimation of karst groundwater vulnerability. It considers (1) physics-based lateral flow within the uppermost weathered zone (epikarst) in a limestone-dominated region and (2) high velocities of vertical infiltration at discrete infiltration points (e.g. sinkholes) or lines (e.g. dry valleys, faults). Consequently, the Transit Time Method honours the actual flow path within the unsaturated zone of a karst aquifer system. A test site in Northern Jordan was chosen for the demonstration of the assessment technique, i.e. the catchment area of the Qunayyah Spring north of the capital Amman. The results demonstrate that zones of highest vulnerability lie within valleys and nearby main fault zones. It also reveals that regions, categorised as protected areas by other methods due to thick unsaturated zones, contribute to a major degree to the total risk.

  10. Comparison of a karst groundwater model with and without discrete conduit flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saller, Stephen P.; Ronayne, Michael J.; Long, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers exhibit a dual flow system characterized by interacting conduit and matrix domains. This study evaluated the coupled continuum pipe-flow framework for modeling karst groundwater flow in the Madison aquifer of western South Dakota (USA). Coupled conduit and matrix flow was simulated within a regional finite-difference model over a 10-year transient period. An existing equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was modified to include major conduit networks whose locations were constrained by dye-tracing data and environmental tracer analysis. Model calibration data included measured hydraulic heads at observation wells and estimates of discharge at four karst springs. Relative to the EPM model, the match to observation well hydraulic heads was substantially improved with the addition of conduits. The inclusion of conduit flow allowed for a simpler hydraulic conductivity distribution in the matrix continuum. Two of the high-conductivity zones in the EPM model, which were required to indirectly simulate the effects of conduits, were eliminated from the new model. This work demonstrates the utility of the coupled continuum pipe-flow method and illustrates how karst aquifer model parameterization is dependent on the physical processes that are simulated.

  11. Karst in Wadi Bani Khalid, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan

    2017-04-01

    There are several important in Oman. The main aquifer is surficial aquifer and fractured rocks. In fact, the geology of Oman is complex whichmake the hydraulic continuity of bedrock is limited and formaing localized aquifers. caves in Oman are varying types and length, size and geographic formations. Many caves and valleys founded in Oman. Wadi Bani Khalid hosts complex network of fractured rock. Karst in Wadi Bani Kalid made upof Limestone(Calcium, which is dissolve in water.A rain water pass through the rock it is erode the rock and form caves. The cave located in Miqil. The karst was formed in Calcium Carbonate rocks.

  12. Occurrence and transport of pharmaceuticals in a karst groundwater system affected by domestic wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Einsiedl, Florian; Radke, Michael; Maloszewski, Piotr

    2010-09-20

    The occurrence of two pharmaceuticals, ibuprofen and diclofenac, in a vulnerable karst groundwater system was investigated. The hydrogeology of the karst system was identified by collecting (3)H samples in groundwater over 27years and by performing tracer tests. The isotopes and tracer data were interpreted by mathematical modeling to estimate the mean transit time of water and to characterize the hydrogeological flow paths in the groundwater system. By this approach, a mean (3)H transit time of 4.6 years for the fissured-porous karst aquifer was determined, whereas the fast flowing water in the conduit system showed a mean transit time of days. Both pharmaceuticals which infiltrated along sinkholes and small streams into the karst system were detected in concentrations of up to approximately 1 microg/L in effluent water of the wastewater treatment plants. Diclofenac was present in most samples collected from four springs discharging the karst groundwater to the rivers Altmühl and Anlauter in concentrations between 3.6 and 15.4 ng/L. In contrast, ibuprofen was rarely detected in groundwater. The results of this study suggest that both pharmaceuticals move into the fractured system of the karst system and go into storage. Thus dilution processes are the dominant control on the concentrations of both pharmaceuticals in the fractured system, whereas biodegradation is likely less important. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence and transport of pharmaceuticals in a karst groundwater system affected by domestic wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Radke, Michael; Maloszewski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of two pharmaceuticals, ibuprofen and diclofenac, in a vulnerable karst groundwater system was investigated. The hydrogeology of the karst system was identified by collecting 3H samples in groundwater over 27 years and by performing tracer tests. The isotopes and tracer data were interpreted by mathematical modeling to estimate the mean transit time of water and to characterize the hydrogeological flow paths in the groundwater system. By this approach, a mean 3H transit time of 4.6 years for the fissured-porous karst aquifer was determined, whereas the fast flowing water in the conduit system showed a mean transit time of days. Both pharmaceuticals which infiltrated along sinkholes and small streams into the karst system were detected in concentrations of up to approximately 1 μg/L in effluent water of the wastewater treatment plants. Diclofenac was present in most samples collected from four springs discharging the karst groundwater to the rivers Altmühl and Anlauter in concentrations between 3.6 and 15.4 ng/L. In contrast, ibuprofen was rarely detected in groundwater. The results of this study suggest that both pharmaceuticals move into the fractured system of the karst system and go into storage. Thus dilution processes are the dominant control on the concentrations of both pharmaceuticals in the fractured system, whereas biodegradation is likely less important.

  14. Estimated availability of water from stratified-drift aquifers in the Concord River Basin, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bratton, Lisa; Parker, Gene W.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management, Office of Water Resources, studied the Concord River Basin to estimate the volume of water that is available from stratified-drift aquifers. A combined hydrograph-separation and streamflow- duration-curve analysis indicates that 20.8 million cubic feet of water can be withdrawn from the stratified-drift aquifer above the South Acton streamflow-gaging station during a 102-day period of no recharge before streamflow is reduced to a prescribed minimum level. This volume, which equaled 2.85 million cubic feet per square mile of strati- fied drift, was used to estimate volume of available water for the 17 aquifer areas in the Concord River Basin. The total volume of available water in the Concord River Basin is estimated to be 561 million cubic feet. Finite-difference ground-water-flow models for the River Meadow Brook aquifer area and the Sudbury and Concord aquifer area quantified the current and potential water availability. The results of three withdrawal simulations for each aquifer area indicate that the 1989 withdrawal rates do not exceed the volume of water available during a 102-day period of no recharge. Results from model simulations of 10- and 65-percent water-table draw- down at existing and hypothetical wells indicate that withdrawn water volumes would exceed the available water in the two aquifer areas.

  15. Uncertainties in temperature based estimates of stream-aquifer flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, C. D.; Meixner, T.; Ferre, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    The use of temperature to quantify stream-aquifer interactions has become a common scientific measurement technique. Diurnal air temperature fluctuations force diurnal temperature fluctuations in surface waters. These oscillations force continuous pulses of heat that propagate downward through streambed sediments. Many researchers have developed methods to analyze time series of temperature beneath the streambed to estimate the direction and/or magnitude of water fluxes between surface and ground waters. One such method uses measurements of changes in amplitude and phase of the temperature signal at different depths beneath the stream. The measurements are analyzed using numerical, analytical, or approximate solutions to the coupled water flow and heat transport equations. These methods rely on correctly identifying the thermal properties of the streambed sediments and the water. While some of these property values are readily available (e.g. thermal conductivity, heat capacity of water), others are less well defined (e.g. thermal dispersivity). While there has been considerable use and examination of these temperature methods, none have considered the impacts of temperature measurement uncertainty on the inferred water flux. Without consideration of these errors, previous researchers have reported that the water flux can be inferred reliably for fluxes ranging over ±10 m/day or ±1.157x10^-2 cm/s based on paired temperature measurements made with sensors at different depths. We use a numerical model (HYDRUS1D) to develop a “true” time series of temperature fluctuations in a stream and the subsurface. Uncertainty is added in the form of normally distributed noise with a mean of zero. This synthetic data is analyzed using a commonly applied analytical solution to infer the water flux. The inferred flux is compared to the “known” flux to calculate the error. The uncertainty is determined for multiple error realizations and true fluxes. Results show that the

  16. Estimating 14C groundwater ages in a methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, Ramon; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Plummer, L. Niel

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 14C age dating of groundwaters in a confined regional aquifer affected by methanogenesis. Increasing CH4 concentrations along the groundwater flow system and 13C and 14C isotopic data for dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and CH4 clearly show the effect of methanogenesis on groundwater chemistry. Inverse reaction path modeling using NETPATH indicates the predominant geochemical reactions controlling the chemical evolution of groundwater in the aquifer are incongruent dissolution of dolomite, ion exchange, methanogenesis, and oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. Modeling of groundwater 14C ages using NETPATH indicates that a significant part of groundwater in the Alliston aquifer is less than 13,000 years old; however, older groundwater in the range of 15,000–23,000 years is also present in the aquifer. This paper demonstrates that 14C ages calculated using NETPATH, incorporating the effects of methanogenesis on the carbon pools, provide reasonable groundwater ages that were not possible by other isotopic methods.

  17. Hydrogeophysical Characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a limestone mining area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Qi, Z.; Li, X., Sr.; Ma, X.; Xue, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Karst is a kind of geological phenomenon under the chemical erosion process from water to soluble rock, such as limestone, gypsum, salt rock etc. Karst is widely distributed around the world and also in southwest of China. The Guangxi area is famous as the highly degree of karstification due to long time groundwater erosion and the development of fracture network. The hydrogeological units become complex involving subsurface karst pipes, caves, eroded groove, etc. Moreover, the complex system is hard to evaluate. The karst collapse may cause many kind of disaster which will influence the human activities. Classical hydrogeological methods, such as pumping tests and tracer tests, to estimate the hydraulic conductivity distribution in an aquifer are hard to finish in some condition with large area and high resolution required. Because a large number of wells are needed, which is uncommon because of the high drilling costs. However, geophysical method is cost-effective in mapping underground structures. And geophysical imaging is highly linked with the subsurface hydrological parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a widely used geophysical method in environmental and engineering applications. It detect and identify targets with different resistivity to the background by measuring the potential difference between different electric nodes. When the target has lower resistivity than the background, such as water resource, karst, evaluation of marine transgression etc., the acquired data show higher voltage corresponding to low resistivity. While when the target has higher resistivity than the background, such as empty holes, sliding surface for dry landslide and archaeological geophysics etc., the acquired data show opposite phenomenon. One can obtain the real resistivity profile of the subsurface by inverting the acquired data. We study the characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) which is the most cost effective

  18. Estimating equivalent hydraulic properties in deep bedrock aquifers using dynamic well field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A.; Ronayne, M. J.; Sale, T.

    2013-12-01

    Production well water levels from active well fields offer a transient dataset that can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. In this study, we apply an inverse modeling method to estimate representative values of aquifer transmissivity and storativity in areas stressed by well fields. We consider water level and pumping data collected within the sedimentary bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin in Colorado (USA). The forward model is based on superposition of the Theis equation (over space and time for multiple interacting production wells) and includes a correction term for well losses. Calculated water levels are compared to observed water levels at individual production wells, and the inverse method is used to identify equivalent aquifer and well properties that minimize residuals. The method is initially tested using synthetic water level datasets generated from numerical models with patterns of heterogeneity characteristic of the Denver Basin aquifers. An application is presented using actual municipal well field data collected over a 3-year period within two Denver Basin aquifers. Modeled water levels provide a good fit to the observed levels once the hydraulic properties and well loss constants are estimated by the inversion routine. Accurate estimation of these values is necessary for certain problems facing municipal well fields such as how to shedule pumping to minimize energy costs and where to drill new wells in existing well fields.

  19. Estimating aquifer properties from the water level response to Earth tides.

    PubMed

    Cutillo, Paula A; Bredehoeft, John D

    2011-01-01

    Water level fluctuations induced by tidal strains can be analyzed to estimate the elastic properties, porosity, and transmissivity of the surrounding aquifer material. We review underutilized methods for estimating aquifer properties from the confined response to earth tides. The earth tide analyses are applied to an open well penetrating a confined carbonate aquifer. The resulting range of elastic and hydraulic aquifer properties are in general agreement with that determined by other investigators for the area of the well. The analyses indicate that passive monitoring data from wells completed in sufficiently stiff, low porosity formations can provide useful information on the properties of the surrounding formation. Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  20. Estimation of hydraulic characteristics of the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers at East Meadow, New York, by use of aquifer tests. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, K.R.; Schneider, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This study obtained estimates of the hydraulic properties of the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers in the East Meadow area for use in analyzing the movement of reclaimed waste water through the aquifer system. This report presents drawdown and recovery data form the two aquifer tests of 1978 and 1985, describes the six methods of analysis used, and summarizes the results of the analyses in tables and graphs. The drawdown and recovery data were analyzed through three simple analytical equations, two curve-matching techniques, and a finite-element radial-flow model. The resulting estimates of hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy, and storage characteristics were used as initial input values to the finite-element radial-flow model (Reilly, 1984). The flow model was then used to refine the estimates of the aquifer properties by more accurately representing the aquifer geometry and field conditions of the pumping tests.

  1. Using dye tracing to establish groundwater flow paths in a limestone marble aquifer, University of California, Santa Cruz, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.; Bertschinger, V. ); Aley, T. )

    1993-04-01

    Areas underlain by karst aquifers are characterized by soluble rock with sinkholes, caves, and a complex underground drainage network. Groundwater issues such as flow direction, well pumping impacts, spring recharge areas, and potential contamination transport routes are greatly complicated by the unique structure of karst aquifers. Standard aquifer analysis techniques cannot be applied unless the structure of the karst aquifer is understood. Water soluble fluorescent dyes are a powerful tool for mapping the irregular subsurface connections and flow paths in karst aquifers. Mapping the subsurface connections allows reasonable estimates of the hydrologic behavior of the aquifer. Two different fluorescent dyes were injected at two points in a limestone karst aquifer system beneath the University of California, Santa Cruz campus. Flow paths in the marble were thought to be closely tied to easily recognized geomorphic alignments of sinkholes associated with fault and fracture zones. The dye tests revealed unexpected and highly complex interconnections. These complex flow paths only partially corresponded to previous surface mapping and aerial photo analysis of fracture systems. Several interfingering but hydrologically unconnected flow paths evidently exist within the cavernous aquifer. For example, dye did not appear at some discharge springs close to the dye injection points, but did appear at more distant springs. This study shows how a dye tracing study in a small, well-defined limestone body can shed light on a variety of environmental and hydrological issues, including potential well pumping impact areas, wellhead protection and recharge areas, parking lot runoff injection to aquifers, and drainage routes from hazardous materials storage areas.

  2. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in mildly heterogeneous aquifers, for tests with relatively large tracer transport distances, ??L estimates from the two test types are generally similar, and are also similar to ??L values determined from natural-gradient tracer simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests, and the ??L estimates from both test types are typically smaller than the ??L values determined from natural-gradient simulations.

  3. Speleogenesis in Dinaric karst area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2015-04-01

    remarkable variety in types of caves. It is estimated that the Dinaric Karst has at least 100,000 caves, only a fifth of which have been explored and suitably documented so far. Karst caves are truly unique by a variety of their types (dry caves, water caves, cave systems, shafts, spring caves, etc.), by their dimensions (the longest cave systems can reach over 100 km, the deepest ones are more than 1,430 metres deep), and by their great spatial frequency. In the Classical Karst, in area around the town Sežana and Fernetti/Fernetiči there are up to 60 caves/km2 - the number which is unprecedented. The great numbers of cave channels covered in dripstone, types of dripstone and its forms (stalactites, stalagmite, curtains, cave pearls, etc.) only contribute to this abundance. One should not forget the significance of cave sediments for scientific explorations. Their dating was used to determine the age of caves and scientifically explain the dynamics of karst evolution. Another important set of karst features are numerous submarine springs. This is the area where the science of karstology and speleology started to develop, where the basic ideas about the karstification processes (corrosion) and karst hydrology were born. The international term karst and the scientific investigation of karst originate in this region as well as many other international professional terms. Many words, describing karst features, originate from the Dinaric Karst Area, and belong to internationally accepted karst terminology (karst, dolina, polje, vrtača, ponikva, vrulja etc.). The word "karst" was first mentioned in Charter of Juraj Pariježić in 1230 in which "kras" locality near Dobrinj on the Island Krk in Croatia was subject of donation. The first written note that mentions the Italian word "Carso" dates back to the year 1292. In an Austrian document term "Karst" was cited for the first time in 1423. From the etymological point of view the word "Karst" is expression of Indo

  4. Managing environmental problems in Cuban karstic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Leslie Molerio; Parise, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The Cuban archipelago hosts some of the most typical karst features in the Caribbean, and has very important and high-quality resources of karst water. Carbonate rocks cover about 70% of the country area, with a great variety of karst features, and outstanding exokarstic landforms such as the cone karst; in addition, many caves are regarded as cultural and historical sites. Protection of the karst hydric resources is therefore essential. In karst, the intrinsic vulnerability of the environment makes it highly susceptible to pollution, which may result in dramatic consequences for both the quality of karst water and the amount of water available. Many anthropogenic activities produce negative changes in the karst aquifers, in some cases with unrecoverable effects. In Cuba, five main sources of pollution to karst aquifers have been identified: sea water intrusion, agricultural practices, waste disposal, industrial activity, and mining and oil production. Due to the narrow and elongated configuration of the main island, wide portions of the territory are mostly affected by seawater intrusion problems, exacerbated by the concentration of both population and human activities in the largest towns located along, or very close to, the coasts. Seawater intrusion, however, is not the only source of pollution for Cuban karst aquifers. The other aforementioned sources are important, and may locally prevail (e.g. pollution resulting from sugar cane factories). Considerations on the management of karst aquifers and a brief description of the water quality monitoring system of Cuban inland waters are also provided.

  5. Impact of atmospheric pollution inputs and climate change on dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in karst aquifers: evidences from a 36 years past monitoring of karstic watersheds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, Stephane; Probst, Jean-Luc; Batiot-Guilhe, Christelle; Seidel, Jean-Luc; Emblanch, Christophe; Peyraube, Nicolas; Mangin, Alain; Bakalowicz, Michel; Probst, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric pollution is known to modify the soil CO2 consumption associated with carbonate bedrock weathering. To evidence the long term feedbacks of atmospheric pollution and climate change on this chemical reaction, we investigated the inorganic carbon fluxes monitored weekly from 1979 to 2006 in a small forested karstic watershed in the Pyrénées Mountains, characterized by a large precipitation variability, a 0.025 °C air temperature increase per year and a low agricultural pressure. The yearly average concentrations of [Ca + Mg] and dissolved inorganic carbon increases of about 0.057 meq.L-1.yr-1 and the 0.1 meq.L-1.yr-1, respectively. The gap relative to the 1:2 relationship between [Ca + Mg] and HCO3 (in mmole. L-1), noted Delta-HCO3, was founded to be driven by the atmospheric pollution inputs, producing strong acids that inhibit the consumption of carbon from soil during the carbonate dissolution processes. In addition, atmospheric temperature increase is correlated with the [Ca +Mg] change, whereas the decrease of the atmospheric acid inputs observed since the seventies, is linked with a + 0.0022 meq.L-1.yr-1 increase in Delta-HCO3. Similar trends in Delta-HCO3 change were found over other karstic watersheds monitored more recently in the framework of the SNO KARST, one the observatory networks from the OZCAR Research Infrastructure, highlighting that Delta-HCO3 changes over time were partially controlled by atmospheric pollution inputs. The re-interpretation of hydrochemical databases using this Delta-HCO3 indicator enables to evaluate better the impact of atmospheric pollution load and climate change on surface waters. In an indirect way, the dephasing between atmospheric loads recorded in precipitation and Delta-HCO3 observed in groundwater could be a new tracer method to estimate groundwater residence times.

  6. Inferring aquifer storage parameters using satellite and in situ measurements: Estimation under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Green, Ronald; Rodell, Matthew; Swenson, Sean

    2010-05-01

    We present a robust optimization method for estimating aquifer storage parameters (specific yield or storativity) using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, in situ well level observations, and other ancillary information. Uncertainty inherent in the remotely sensed and in situ time series can adversely affect the parameter estimation process and, in the worse case, make the solution completely meaningless. Our estimation problem is formulated to directly minimize the negative impact of data uncertainty by incorporating bounds on data variations. We demonstrate our method for the interconnected Edwards-Trinity Plateau and Pecos Valley aquifers in central Texas. The study area is divided into multiple zones based on the geology and monitor well coverage. Our estimated aquifer storage parameters are consistent with previous results obtained from pumping tests and model calibration, demonstrating the potential of using GRACE data for validating regional groundwater model parameters.

  7. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  8. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    DOE PAGES

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; ...

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. Anmore » analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.« less

  9. Estimation of hydraulic characteristics of the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers at East Meadow, New York, by use of aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prince, K.R.; Schneider, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Drawdown and recovery data from two aquifer tests in central Nassau County, NY were used to calculate aquifer characteristics by several methods to aid in predicting the response of the aquifer system to stress. The first test, on May 12, 1978, entailed pumping the Magothy aquifer for 12 hours; the second on July 30-31, 1985, entailed pumping the upper glacial aquifer for 24 hours. Drawdown and recovery data from both tests were analyzed through analytical solutions and curve-matching procedures, and the resulting hydraulic values were used as initial values in a finite-element radial-flow numerical model to simulate the observed drawdowns and recoveries. Storativity values obtained by all methods were consistent with published estimates; but hydraulic conductivity values were higher than published estimates. The simple analytical solutions and curve-matching procedures gave reasonable values of most terms quickly, but the greatest confidence is in the estimates made with the finite-element model. These estimates for the Magothy aquifer were: horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 100 ft/d; ratio of horizontal to vertical conductivity, 5; and specific storage, 0.0001. Estimates for the upper glacial aquifer were: horizontal hydraulic conductivity, 380 ft/d; ratio of horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity, 2.5; and specific yield, 0.15. (USGS)

  10. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  11. HYDRUS-1D Modeling of an Irrigated Agricultural Plot with Application to Aquifer Recharge Estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A variety of methods are available for estimating aquifer recharge in semi-arid regions, each with advantages and disadvantages. We are investigating a procedure for estimating recharge in an irrigated basin. The method involves computing irrigation return flows based on HYDRUS-1D modeling of root z...

  12. Estimation of aquifer scale proportion using equal area grids: assessment of regional scale groundwater quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Landon, Matthew K.; Fram, Miranda S.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of an aquifer with constituent concentrations above a specified threshold (high concentrations) is taken as a nondimensional measure of regional scale water quality. If computed on the basis of area, it can be referred to as the aquifer scale proportion. A spatially unbiased estimate of aquifer scale proportion and a confidence interval for that estimate are obtained through the use of equal area grids and the binomial distribution. Traditionally, the confidence interval for a binomial proportion is computed using either the standard interval or the exact interval. Research from the statistics literature has shown that the standard interval should not be used and that the exact interval is overly conservative. On the basis of coverage probability and interval width, the Jeffreys interval is preferred. If more than one sample per cell is available, cell declustering is used to estimate the aquifer scale proportion, and Kish's design effect may be useful for estimating an effective number of samples. The binomial distribution is also used to quantify the adequacy of a grid with a given number of cells for identifying a small target, defined as a constituent that is present at high concentrations in a small proportion of the aquifer. Case studies illustrate a consistency between approaches that use one well per grid cell and many wells per cell. The methods presented in this paper provide a quantitative basis for designing a sampling program and for utilizing existing data.

  13. Caffeine as an indicator for the quantification of untreated wastewater in karst systems.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Contamination from untreated wastewater leakage and related bacterial contamination poses a threat to drinking water quality. However, a quantification of the magnitude of leakage is difficult. The objective of this work is to provide a highly sensitive methodology for the estimation of the mass of untreated wastewater entering karst aquifers with rapid recharge. For this purpose a balance approach is adapted. It is based on the mass flow of caffeine in spring water, the load of caffeine in untreated wastewater and the daily water consumption per person in a spring catchment area. Caffeine is a source-specific indicator for wastewater, consumed and discharged in quantities allowing detection in a karst spring. The methodology was applied to estimate the amount of leaking and infiltrating wastewater to a well investigated karst aquifer on a daily basis. The calculated mean volume of untreated wastewater entering the aquifer was found to be 2.2 ± 0.5 m(3) d(-1) (undiluted wastewater). It corresponds to approximately 0.4% of the total amount of wastewater within the spring catchment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Attenuation of Diffuse Phosphorus Transfers within an Agricultural Karst Spring Zone of Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellander, Per-Erik; Jordan, Philip; Melland, Alice R.; Murphy, Paul N. C.; Mechan, Sarah; Meehan, Robert; Kelly, Coran; Shine, Oliver; Shortle, Ger

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the apparent contradiction of good water quality (as determined from phosphorus (P) concentrations) and relatively intensive agriculture and high soil P status in a 32 km2 karst spring zone of contribution where groundwater vulnerability mapping had indicated high and extreme risk of pollution. Phosphorus attenuation potential was investigated along the nutrient transfer continuum based on soil P buffering, depth to bedrock and retention within the aquifer. Surface karst features such as enclosed depressions, were reclassified based on P attenuation potential in soil at the base. New techniques of high temporal resolution monitoring of P loads in the emergent spring made it possible to estimate P transfer pathways and retention within the aquifer. For one major winter flow event, an estimated 56% of both total P (TP) and total reactive P (TRP) were transported via small-medium fissure flow, and 15.5 kg (36%) of TP and 11.0 kg (42%) of TRP was retained in the limestone aquifer. A revised groundwater vulnerability assessment was used to produce a specific P susceptibility map and the definition of critical source areas in karst landscapes was demonstrated.

  15. Estimates of the volume of water in five coal aquifers, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuck, L.K.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Cannon, M.R.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tongue River Member of the Tertiary Fort Union Formation is the primary source of groundwater in the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in southeastern Montana. Coal beds within this formation generally contain the most laterally extensive aquifers in much of the reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, conducted a study to estimate the volume of water in five coal aquifers. This report presents estimates of the volume of water in five coal aquifers in the eastern and southern parts of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation: the Canyon, Wall, Pawnee, Knobloch, and Flowers-Goodale coal beds in the Tongue River Member of the Tertiary Fort Union Formation. Only conservative estimates of the volume of water in these coal aquifers are presented. The volume of water in the Canyon coal was estimated to range from about 10,400 acre-feet (75 percent saturated) to 3,450 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Wall coal was estimated to range from about 14,200 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 3,560 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Pawnee coal was estimated to range from about 9,440 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 2,360 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Knobloch coal was estimated to range from about 38,700 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 9,680 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Flowers-Goodale coal was estimated to be about 35,800 acre-feet (100 percent saturated). Sufficient data are needed to accurately characterize coal-bed horizontal and vertical variability, which is highly complex both locally and regionally. Where data points are widely spaced, the reliability of estimates of the volume of coal beds is decreased. Additionally, reliable estimates of the volume of water in coal aquifers depend heavily on data about water levels and data about coal-aquifer characteristics. Because the data needed to

  16. Estimation of formation strength index of aquifer from neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Bieng-Zih; Wang, Chih-Wen; Lin, Zsay-Shing

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to construct a model that predicts an aquifer's formation strength index (the ratio of shear modulus and bulk compressibility, G/ Cb) from geophysical well logs by using a back-propagation neural network (BPNN). The BPNN model of an aquifer's formation strength index is developed using a set of well logging data. The model is a [4-5-1] three-layer BPNN with a four-neuron input layer (depth, gamma-ray log data, formation density log data, and sonic log data, respectively), a five-neuron hidden layer, and a one-neuron output layer (formation strength index). The optimal learning rate and momentum constant used in the BPNN model are obtained from serial combinative experiments. The inside test and outside test are implemented to check the performance of network learning and the prediction ability of the network, respectively. The results of the inside test, based on 84 training data sets from a total of 105 data sets, show that the network has been well-trained because the mean square error between the network output value and the target value from the inside test is very small (1.1×10 -4). The results of the outside test, based on 21 testing data sets from 105 data sets, show the excellent prediction ability of the BPNN model, because the network prediction values closely track with the target values (the mean square error is 2.1×10 -4).

  17. Analytical estimation show low depth-independent water loss due to vapor flux from deep aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selker, John S.

    2017-06-01

    Recent articles have provided estimates of evaporative flux from water tables in deserts that span 5 orders of magnitude. In this paper, we present an analytical calculation that indicates aquifer vapor flux to be limited to 0.01 mm/yr for sites where there is negligible recharge and the water table is well over 20 m below the surface. This value arises from the geothermal gradient, and therefore, is nearly independent of the actual depth of the aquifer. The value is in agreement with several numerical studies, but is 500 times lower than recently reported experimental values, and 100 times larger than an earlier analytical estimate.

  18. Scale dependence of the hydraulic properties of a fractured aquifer estimated using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Russian, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Dentz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the scale dependence of hydraulic parameters in fractured media based on the concept of transfer functions (TF). TF methods provide an inexpensive way to perform aquifer parameter estimation, as they relate the fluctuations of an observation time series (hydraulic head fluctuations) to an input function (aquifer recharge) in frequency domain. Fractured media are specially sensitive to this approach as hydraulic parameters are strongly scale-dependent, involving nonstationary statistical distributions. Our study is based on an extensive data set, involving up to 130 measurement points with periodic head measurements that in some cases extend for more than 30 years. For each point, we use a single-porosity and dual-continuum TF formulation to obtain a distribution of transmissivities and storativities in both mobile and immobile domains. Single-porosity TF estimates are compared with data obtained from the interpretation of over 60 hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests). Results show that the TF is able to estimate the scale dependence of the hydraulic parameters, and it is consistent with the behavior of estimates from traditional hydraulic tests. In addition, the TF approach seems to provide an estimation of the system variance and the extension of the ergodic behavior of the aquifer (estimated in approximately 500 m in the analyzed aquifer). The scale dependence of transmissivity seems to be independent from the adopted formulation (single or dual-continuum), while storativity is more sensitive to the presence of multiple continua.

  19. Using existing data to estimate aquifer properties, Great Lakes Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darner, Robert A.; Sheets, Rodney A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine specific storage and porosity, areally limited and time-consuming aquifer tests are frequently done. Hydrogeologic studies often do not have the resources to collect such data and rely on existing data sources for aquifer properties. An alternative tool for determining these aquifer properties is the analysis of earth tides. The objective of this study was to determine whether existing water-level and barometric-pressure data could be used to determine aquifer properties, such as porosity and specific storage, on a regional scale. In this study, national databases from the Great Lakes Region were queried for continuous records of groundwater-level and barometric-pressure data. Records from 37 selected wells were then analyzed for barometric efficiency and earth-tide responses. Specific-storage (Ss) and porosity values were determined, and the quality of the results were assessed with a measure of the "goodness of fit" (percent variance) of reconstruction of the response. Records from wells completed in several aquifer systems were analyzed with varying degrees of success. Aquifer Ss values ranging from 5.9 x 10-8 to 3.8 x 10-6/m were derived, with percent variance of reconstruction ranging from 1% to 78%. Comparisons with aquifer and laboratory testing of Ss and porosity are favorable if the percent variance of reconstruction is above about 30%. Although the earth-tide-analysis method is not suitable for every situation, the Ss and porosity of aquifers can, in many places, be estimated with existing water-level and barometric-pressure data or with data that are relatively inexpensive to collect.

  20. Sustainable-yield estimation for the Sparta Aquifer in Union County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Phillip D.

    2000-01-01

    Options for utilizing alternative sources of water to alleviate overdraft from the Sparta aquifer and ensure that the aquifer can continue to provide abundant water of excellent quality for the future are being evaluated by water managers in Union County. Sustainable yield is a critical element in identifying and designing viable water supply alternatives. With sustainable yield defined and a knowledge of total water demand in an area, any unmet demand can be calculated. The ground-water flow model of the Sparta aquifer was used to estimate sustainable yield using an iterative approach. The Sparta aquifer is a confined aquifer of regional importance that comprises a sequence of unconsolidated sand units that are contained within the Sparta Sand. Currently, the rate of withdrawal in some areas greatly exceeds the rate of recharge to the aquifer and considerable water-level declines have occurred. Ground-water flow model results indicate that the aquifer cannot continue to meet growing water-use demands indefinitely and that water levels will drop below the top of the primary producing sand unit in Union County (locally termed the El Dorado sand) by 2008 if current water-use trends continue. Declines of that magnitude will initiate dewatering of the El Dorado sand. The sustainable yield of the aquifer was calculated by targeting a specified minimum acceptable water level within Union County and varying Union County pumpage within the model to achieve the target water level. Selection of the minimum target water level for sustainable-yield estimation was an important criterion for the modeling effort. In keeping with the State Critical Ground-Water Area designation criteria and the desire of water managers in Union County to improve aquifer conditions and bring the area out of the Critical Ground-Water Area designation, the approximate altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand in central Union County was used as the minimum water level target for estimation of

  1. Pumpspeicherbecken im Karstgrundwasserleiter des Weißen Jura der Schwäbischen Alb. Erste Ergebnisse aus der geologischen und hydrogeologischen Erkundung für die Planfeststellung Pumped-storage hydroelectric power plant in the Jurassic karst aquifer of the swabian alb, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Köhler, Hans Joachim; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas; Hennings, Sibylle; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-06-01

    Extensive geological and hydrogeological investigations have been undertaken for the planned pumped-storage hydroelectric power plant in "Blautal" (Swabian Alb, Germany) in order to characterise the Jurassic karst aquifer in which the lower reservoir will be constructed. The preferred option for the plant setup is to integrate the lower reservoir into the groundwater without sealing. Therefore, in order to reliably predict the impact of the pumped storage plant operations on the surrounding drinking water wells and groundwater dependent ecosystems, a comprehensive database has been developed to assess the hydraulic conditions of the karst aquifer. A large scale geological site investigation was carried out to characterise the rock mass and extensive hydraulic tests were performed in many boreholes. The results of the hydraulic characterisation were then implemented in a three dimensional flow model. In this paper, the first results of the geological and hydrogeological investigations are presented and discussed.

  2. Application of dye-tracing techniques for determining solute-transport characteristics of ground water in karst terranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, D.S.; Liebermann, T.D.; Smoot, J.L.; Woosley, L.H.

    1988-10-01

    Approximately 20% of the United States is underlain by karst aquifers. This approximation includes roughly 50% of both Kentucky and Tennessee, substantial portions of northern Georgia and Alabama, and parts of other Region IV states. The prevalence of karst aquifers in the southeast, the common use of karst aquifers as drinking water sources and the vulnerability of these aquifers to contamination highlighted the need to provide a mechanism to assist in ground-water management and protection in karst terranes. In an attempt to meet this need, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)--Region IV and the Kentucky District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), have been cooperating to document the application of dye tracing techniques and concepts to ground-water protection in karst aquifers. These efforts have resulted in the preparation of the manual. The information presented herein should be viewed as another analytical 'tool' to assist in the management and protection of karst water supplies.

  3. Coupling heat and chemical tracer experiments for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, S; Jamin, P; Orban, P; Hermans, T; Klepikova, M; Nguyen, F; Brouyère, S; Dassargues, A

    2014-11-15

    Geothermal energy systems, closed or open, are increasingly considered for heating and/or cooling buildings. The efficiency of such systems depends on the thermal properties of the subsurface. Therefore, feasibility and impact studies performed prior to their installation should include a field characterization of thermal properties and a heat transfer model using parameter values measured in situ. However, there is a lack of in situ experiments and methodology for performing such a field characterization, especially for open systems. This study presents an in situ experiment designed for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers with focus on the specific heat capacity. This experiment consists in simultaneously injecting hot water and a chemical tracer into the aquifer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and concentration in the recovery well (and possibly in other piezometers located down gradient). Temperature and concentrations are then used for estimating the specific heat capacity. The first method for estimating this parameter is based on a modeling in series of the chemical tracer and temperature breakthrough curves at the recovery well. The second method is based on an energy balance. The values of specific heat capacity estimated for both methods (2.30 and 2.54MJ/m(3)/K) for the experimental site in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River (Belgium) are almost identical and consistent with values found in the literature. Temperature breakthrough curves in other piezometers are not required for estimating the specific heat capacity. However, they highlight that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River is complex and contrasted with different dominant process depending on the depth leading to significant vertical heat exchange between upper and lower part of the aquifer. Furthermore, these temperature breakthrough curves could be included in the calibration of a complex heat transfer model for

  4. Coupling heat and chemical tracer experiments for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildemeersch, S.; Jamin, P.; Orban, P.; Hermans, T.; Klepikova, M.; Nguyen, F.; Brouyère, S.; Dassargues, A.

    2014-11-01

    Geothermal energy systems, closed or open, are increasingly considered for heating and/or cooling buildings. The efficiency of such systems depends on the thermal properties of the subsurface. Therefore, feasibility and impact studies performed prior to their installation should include a field characterization of thermal properties and a heat transfer model using parameter values measured in situ. However, there is a lack of in situ experiments and methodology for performing such a field characterization, especially for open systems. This study presents an in situ experiment designed for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers with focus on the specific heat capacity. This experiment consists in simultaneously injecting hot water and a chemical tracer into the aquifer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and concentration in the recovery well (and possibly in other piezometers located down gradient). Temperature and concentrations are then used for estimating the specific heat capacity. The first method for estimating this parameter is based on a modeling in series of the chemical tracer and temperature breakthrough curves at the recovery well. The second method is based on an energy balance. The values of specific heat capacity estimated for both methods (2.30 and 2.54 MJ/m3/K) for the experimental site in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River (Belgium) are almost identical and consistent with values found in the literature. Temperature breakthrough curves in other piezometers are not required for estimating the specific heat capacity. However, they highlight that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River is complex and contrasted with different dominant process depending on the depth leading to significant vertical heat exchange between upper and lower part of the aquifer. Furthermore, these temperature breakthrough curves could be included in the calibration of a complex heat transfer model for

  5. Estimating transmissivity and storage properties from aquifer tests in the Southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The results show that transmissivity in the Lihue basin ranges over several orders of magnitude, 42 to 7,900 square feet per day, but is generally lower than reported values of transmissivity of other basaltic aquifers in Hawaii. Estimates of confined-aquifer storage coefficient range from 1.3x10-4 to 8.2x10-2. The hydraulic conductivity estimates obtained using an elliptical-equation method compare favorably with the results obtained from the generally more-accepted curvematching methods. No significant difference is apparent between the estimated transmissivity of the Koloa Volcanics and the Waimea Canyon Basalt in the study area. An analysis of the lithology penetrated by the wells indicates the transmissivity is probably controlled mainly by the stratigraphic position of the layers penetrated by the well. The range of transmissivity values estimated for the southern Lihue basin is lower than reported values from aquifer tests at wells penetrating postshield-stage or rejuvenation-stage lava flows on other Hawaiian islands. This range is one to four orders of magnitude lower than most reported values for dike-free basalt aquifers in Hawaii.

  6. Mapping karst regions of Illinois: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Weibel, C.P.; Panno, S.V. )

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater contamination may be significant in shallow aquifers in the parts of Illinois where karst occurs. Problems with ground-water contamination in shallow aquifers in karst areas may be significant in parts of Illinois. A study is underway to study factors that contribute to karst development and to map the karst areas of the state, including areas where obvious diagnostic karst geomorphic features are absent. The following generalizations can be made about the structural and stratigraphic factors that control the extent and maturity of karst areas and the development of karstic terrain in Illinois: (1) karstification is restricted to the flanks of the Illinois Basin because most of the basin interior contains carbonate-poor Pennsylvanian bedrock; (2) karstic terrain generally occurs in thick, flatlying, carbonate-rich lithologic units; (3) carbonate to non-carbonate facies changes in formations and the presence of disconformities affect the degree of karstification; (4) structures (folds, faults) may either increase or decrease the likelihood of karstification; and (5) karstification is potentially greater in areas where overlying regolith is absent or thin.

  7. 2-D and 3-D Visualization of the Freshwater/Saltwater Mixing Front, and Zones of Preferential Groundwater Flow in the Karst Biscayne Coastal Aquifer using Electromagnetic Induction Techniques, Miami, Southeastern Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalker, J. C.; Glaccum, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined, composed primarily of Karst limestone, and underlies all of Miami-Dade County and much of Biscayne Bay in southeastern Florida. It is the sole source of drinking water for the 3 million inhabitants of the city of Miami and Miami-Dade County, as well as portions of Broward and Monroe Counties. Saltwater intrusion is a prominent problem for all coastal aquifers including the Biscayne aquifer. Simple and quick detection of the three-dimensional saltwater/freshwater interface has been problematic without the use of extensive sounding surveys or multiple well sampling. We are developing a technique combining rapid EM-31 surface surveys with EM-31 vertical soundings to model the depth to the saltwater/freshwater front at two sites located within a half mile of Biscayne Bay. The EM-31 has a maximum signal penetration of about 25ft allowing for accurate near shore surveys. Depths to the saltwater have ranged from over 25 ft inland to less than 2-3 ft near the Bay and saltwater mangroves. Changes in conductivity along survey lines of equal elevation that are equidistant from the Bay may indicate zones of preferential flow due to conduit networks or the presence of backfill, both of which exacerbate saltwater intrusion. All surveys show a rapid change from fresh to brackish water as you move toward the Bay indicating a shallow and abrupt mixing zone. Using a simple depth-modeling program, a wire frame contour map of the mixing zone can be constructed. This technique has proven to be a quick, inexpensive method for first-order hydrogeological and spatial analysis of the saltwater/freshwater interface. In an allied study we are using down-hole electromagnetic induction techniques with an EM-39 tool on existing wells, analyzing fluctuations in conductivity within the saltwater zone to look for zones of high permeability in the aquifer. Conductivity fluctuates within the mixing zone from brackish values to values equivalent to Biscayne Bay

  8. Enumeration and Biomass Estimation of Bacteria in Aquifer Microcosm Studies by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, P. C.; Baveye, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and characterize bacteria from a sand column microcosm simulating aquifer conditions. Pure cultures of a species of Bacillus isolated from subsurface sediments or Bacillus megaterium were first evaluated to identify these organisms' characteristic histograms. Counting was then carried out with samples from the aquifer microcosms. Enumeration by flow cytometry was compared with more-traditional acridine orange direct counting. These two techniques gave statistically similar results. However, counting by flow cytometry, in this case, surveyed a sample size 700 times greater than did acridine orange direct counting (25 (mu)l versus 0.034 (mu)l) and required 1/10 the time (2 h versus 20 h). Flow cytometry was able to distinguish the same species of bacteria grown under different nutrient conditions, and it could distinguish changes in cell growth patterns, specifically single cell growth versus chained cell growth in different regions of an aquifer microcosm. A biomass estimate was calculated by calibrating the total fluorescence of a sample from a pure culture with the dry weight of a freeze-dried volume from the original pure culture. Growth conditions significantly affected histograms and biomass estimates, so the calibration was carried out with cells grown under conditions similar to those in the aquifer microcosm. Costs associated with using flow cytometry were minimal compared with the amount of time saved in counting cells and estimating biomass. PMID:16535470

  9. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  10. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X.; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  11. Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

  12. Estimating Parameters of Aquifer Heterogeneity Using Pumping Tests - a Paradigm for Field Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Arnold, Sven; Schneider, Christoph; Attinger, Sabine

    2013-04-01

    The vast majority of natural aquifers are characterized by heterogeneity which can be statistically represented by parameters such as geometric mean, correlation lengths and variance of hydraulic conductivity. Head measurements of pumping tests are commonly used to estimate the hydraulic properties of porous media. Zech et al. 2012, WRR introduced the effective well flow method allowing a direct parameter estimation from steady state pumping test drawdowns. However, in contrast to simulated pumping tests, the number and spatial distribution of piezometers is limited for on-site pumping tests. We analyze the capability of the effective well flow method to provide accurate and confident parameter estimates of a heterogeneous aquifer under limited availability of head measurements. We use simulated pumping tests to systematically reduce sampling size while also determining the accuracy and uncertainty of estimates at each level of data availability. The same analytical solution is then applied to estimate the statistical parameters of a fluvial heterogeneous aquifer at the test site Horkheimer Insel, Germany. We thereby close the gap between theoretical and practical application of an analytical solution describing three-dimensional steady state well flow. Our findings indicate how accuracy and uncertainty of estimated parameters, like mean conductivities and correlation lengths correlate to number and spatial distribution of head measurements. The results provide valuable implications regarding the conceptual design of ground water pumping tests and the predictive power of established pumping test sites.

  13. Automatic estimation of aquifer parameters using long-term water supply pumping and injection records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ning; Illman, Walter A.

    2016-09-01

    Analyses are presented of long-term hydrographs perturbed by variable pumping/injection events in a confined aquifer at a municipal water-supply well field in the Region of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Such records are typically not considered for aquifer test analysis. Here, the water-level variations are fingerprinted to pumping/injection rate changes using the Theis model implemented in the WELLS code coupled with PEST. Analyses of these records yield a set of transmissivity ( T) and storativity ( S) estimates between each monitoring and production borehole. These individual estimates are found to poorly predict water-level variations at nearby monitoring boreholes not used in the calibration effort. On the other hand, the geometric means of the individual T and S estimates are similar to those obtained from previous pumping tests conducted at the same site and adequately predict water-level variations in other boreholes. The analyses reveal that long-term municipal water-level records are amenable to analyses using a simple analytical solution to estimate aquifer parameters. However, uniform parameters estimated with analytical solutions should be considered as first rough estimates. More accurate hydraulic parameters should be obtained by calibrating a three-dimensional numerical model that rigorously captures the complexities of the site with these data.

  14. Estimating parameters of aquifer heterogeneity using pumping tests - implications for field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Arnold, Sven; Schneider, Christoph; Attinger, Sabine

    2015-09-01

    The knowledge of subsurface heterogeneity is a prerequisite to describe flow and transport in porous media. Of particular interest are the variance and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity. In this study, we present how these aquifer parameters can be inferred using empirical steady state pumping test data. We refer to a previously developed analytical solution of "effective well flow" and examine its applicability to pumping test data as under field conditions. It is examined how the accuracy and confidence of parameter estimates of variance and correlation length depend on the number and location of head measurements. Simulations of steady state pumping tests in a confined virtual aquifer are used to systematically reduce sampling size while determining the rating of the estimates at each level of data density. The method was then applied to estimate the statistical parameters of a fluvial heterogeneous aquifer at the test site Horkheimer Insel, Germany. We conclude that the "effective well flow" solution is a simple alternative to laboratory investigations to estimate the statistical heterogeneity parameter using steady state pumping tests. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of the estimates depend on the design of the field study. In this regard, our results can help to improve the conceptual design of pumping tests with regard to the parameter of interest.

  15. Estimated trichloroethene transformation rates due to naturally occurring biodegradation in a fractured-rock aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of trichloroethene (TCE) mass transformed by naturally occurring biodegradation processes in a fractured rock aquifer underlying a former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) site in West Trenton, New Jersey, were estimated. The methodology included (1) dividing the site into eight elements of equal size and vertically integrating observed concentrations of two daughter products of TCE biodegradation–cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and chloride–using water chemistry data from a network of 88 observation wells; (2) summing the molar mass of cis-DCE, the first biodegradation product of TCE, to provide a probable underestimate of reductive biodegradation of TCE, (3) summing the molar mass of chloride, the final product of chlorinated ethene degradation, to provide a probable overestimate of overall biodegradation. Finally, lower and higher estimates of aquifer porosities and groundwater residence times were used to estimate a range of overall transformation rates. The highest TCE transformation rates estimated using this procedure for the combined overburden and bedrock aquifers was 945 kg/yr, and the lowest was 37 kg/yr. However, hydrologic considerations suggest that approximately 100 to 500 kg/yr is the probable range for overall TCE transformation rates in this system. Estimated rates of TCE transformation were much higher in shallow overburden sediments (approximately 100 to 500 kg/yr) than in the deeper bedrock aquifer (approximately 20 to 0.15 kg/yr), which reflects the higher porosity and higher contaminant mass present in the overburden. By way of comparison, pump-and-treat operations at the NAWC site are estimated to have removed between 1,073 and 1,565 kg/yr of TCE between 1996 and 2009.

  16. Carbamazepine breakthrough as indicator for specific vulnerability of karst springs: application on the Jeita spring, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, J.; Geyer, T.; Noedler, K.; Sauter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The pharmaceutical drug carbamazepine is considered an effective wastewater marker. The varying concentration of this drug was analyzed in a mature karst spring following a precipitation event. The results show that carbamazepine is an indicator of wastewater entering the system through a fast flow pathway, leading to an increase of the drug concentrations in spring water shortly after a strong rainfall event. The analysis of the breakthrough curve of carbamazepine along with the electrical conductivity signal and major ions chemograph allowed the development of a conceptual model for precipitation event-based flow and transport in the investigated karst system. Furthermore the amount of newly recharged water and the mass of carbamazepine reaching the aquifer system during the event could be estimated using a simple mixing approach. The distance between the karst spring and the potential carbamazepine source was estimated by the combination of results from artificial tracer tests and the carbamazepine breakthrough curve. The assessment of spring responses to precipitation event using persistent drugs like carbamazepine helps assess the effect of waste water contamination at a spring and gives therefore insights to the specific vulnerability of a karst spring.

  17. Negative grouting consequences on karst environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, O.; Roje-Bonacci, T.; Gottstein, S.

    2009-04-01

    Grouting is a procedure by means of which grout is injected into different kinds of karst spaces (cracks, fissures, conduits and caves). It has a wide application in modern civil engineering, especially in karst terrains. It started nearly 200 years ago. In most cases the ingredients for the preparation of mortars and grouting suspensions are: cement, bentonite, clay and fillers, additives for stability and water. In practice the composition of grouting suspension is not standardized. A suspension injected under pressure will circulate in the karst spaces like a more or less viscous fluid until some of the larger suspended particles are blocked where the karst voids get narrower than the size of injected grains. The injection of materials into karst groundwater, i.e. the construction of grouting curtains, definitely could be the cause of unpredictable negative consequences on karst groundwater environments. The building of dams in karst areas always go along the construction of grouting curtains. During the construction of most dams in karst all over the world millions tons of injection mass have been injected in karst underground. It may impact water quantity in vadose zone and in karstic aquifer causing water table lowering and spring desiccation. In such cases the negative impact on local karst environment could be very dangerous. Physically as well as chemically this mass voraciously and quickly destroyed underground habitats and killed an enormous number of endangered and endemic species. Very often this is extremely expensive procedure and in many cases not very successful from the engineering point of view. From the ecological point of view it could causes catastrophic consequences. The greatest problem is that until now neither engineers nor ecologists took care of these great and massive negative influences on underground karst environments. In this paper few examples of different consequences of grouting on the hydrogeological as well as ecological regime

  18. Estimating energy fluxes within the stream-aquifer interface of the Avenelles basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrhouma, Asma; Rivière, Agnès; Goblet, Patrick; Cucchi, Karina; Rubin, Yoram; Baudin, Aurélien; Ansart, Patrick; Flipo, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of water temperature evolution and its associated energy fluxes is important to follow the aquatic habitats evolution and to predict future modifications induced by climate change. The spatio-temporal energy balance dynamics within the stream-aquifer interface is complex because of the multitude of physical, morphological and meteorological parameters on which it depends. This critical interface is involving numerous physical and bio-geochemical processes which are taking place at different time and spatial scales. The energy balance estimation at this interface depends mainly on the direction, magnitude and variability of water exchanges and the temporal variation of river and aquifer temperatures as well as the thermal porous media properties. In this work, a combined numerical and experimental approach is used to study the temporal and spatial evolution of the energy budget along 6 km of the stream network of the Avenelles watershed. With an area of 46 km2, the Avenelles watershed is located 70 km east from Paris. The Avenelles river presents different types of connectivity with the underlying aquifers. Five Local Monitoring Stations (LOMOS) have been deployed along the hydraulic corridor to monitor the water and thermal exchanges between the stream and aquifer over years, based on continuous pressure and temperature measurements in the river, the hyporheic zone (HZ) and the underlying aquifer. A 2D finite element thermo-hydrogeological model (METIS) coupled with a parameters screening script is used to determine the hydrogeological and thermal properties of the HZ and of the underlying aquifers by inversion at five LOMOS. Once the local models are calibrated, water and heat fluxes through the stream - aquifer interface are assessed over years (2012-2015) along the stream network. This work offers a new understanding of the stream-aquifer interface functioning, shifting from a pure hydrological characterizing toward a more subtle view that

  19. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  20. Estimating hydraulic parameters of the Açu-Brazil aquifer using the computer analysis of micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucena, Leandson R. F.; da Silva, Luis R. D.; Vieira, Marcela M.; Carvalho, Bruno M.; Xavier Júnior, Milton M.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional way of obtaining hydraulic parameters of aquifers is through the interpretation of aquifer tests that requires a fairly complex logistics in terms of equipment and personnel. On the other way, the processing and analysis of digital images of two-dimensional rock sample micrographs presents itself as a promising (simpler and cheaper) alternative procedure for obtaining estimates for hydraulics parameters. This methodology involves the sampling of rocks, followed by the making and imaging of thin rock samples, image segmentation, three-dimensional reconstruction and flow simulation. This methodology was applied to the outcropping portion of the Açu aquifer in the northeast of Brazil, and the computational analyses of the thin rock sections of the acquired samples produced effective porosities between 11.2% and 18.5%, and permeabilities between 52.4 mD and 1140.7 mD. Considering that the aquifer is unconfined, these effective porosity values can be used effectively as storage coefficients. The hydraulic conductivities produced by adopting different water dynamic viscosities at the temperature of 28 °C in the conversion of the permeabilities result in values in the range of [ 6.03 ×10-7, 1.43 ×10-5 ] m/s, compatible with the local hydrogeology.

  1. Aquifer residence times for recycled water estimated using chemical tracers and the propagation of temperature signals at a managed aquifer recharge site in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Elise; Patterson, Bradley; Toze, Simon; Furness, Andrew; Higginson, Simon; Shackleton, Mark

    2014-09-01

    A prerequisite for minimizing contamination risk whilst conducting managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with recycled water is estimating the residence time in the zone where pathogen inactivation and biodegradation processes occur. MAR in Western Australia's coastal aquifers is a potential major water source. As MAR with recycled water becomes increasingly considered in this region, better knowledge of applied and incidental tracer-based options from case studies is needed. Tracer data were collected at a MAR site in Floreat, Western Australia, under a controlled pumping regime over a distance of 50 m. Travel times for bromide-spiked groundwater were compared with two incidental tracers in recycled water: chloride and water temperature. The average travel time using bromide was 87 ± 6 days, whereas the estimates were longer based on water temperature (102 ± 17 days) and chloride (98 ± 60 days). The estimate of average flow velocity based on water temperature data was identical to the estimate based on bromide within a 25-m section of the aquifer (0.57 ± 0.04 m day-1). This case study offers insights into the advantages, challenges and limitations of using incidental tracers in recycled water as a supplement to a controlled tracer test for estimating aquifer residence times.

  2. A detailed comparison of laboratory and borehole NMR estimated parameters in unconsolidated aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Müller-Petke, M.; Johnson, C. D.; Vilhelmsen, T. N.; Barfod, A. A. S.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Borehole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to obtain information about the hydrologic properties of unconsolidated aquifers. The NMR estimated parameters, water content and relaxation time, can be linked to hydraulic conductivity (K). In unconsolidated aquifers, attempts have been made to establish the NMR-K relationship by acquiring NMR and K data in boreholes. However, it is challenging in unconsolidated aquifers to obtain reliable estimates of the NMR parameters from borehole data. The aquifer formation can be altered due to severe washout during drilling and there can be a large disturbed zone around the PVC casing. Laboratory-NMR data could be used to assist in the development of reliable NMR-K models, as is typically done in the petroleum industry. The challenge has been obtaining high quality laboratory samples, from unconsolidated aquifers. In this study, we present a detailed comparison of laboratory and borehole NMR data at a study site in Denmark. To address the challenges with both laboratory and borehole measurements in unconsolidated aquifers, we drilled a borehole using a sonic rig that minimally disturbs the formation and produces essentially no disturbed zone around the PVC casing, thus providing ideal conditions for borehole NMR measurements. Moreover, continuous undisturbed samples, 3 in in diameter, were obtained for the entire depth of the borehole, 32 m. These samples are excellent for the laboratory NMR measurements because they are representative of in-situ conditions. With this drilling method we obtained reliable borehole NMR results that are supported by other logging data and lithologic description of the cores. In addition, we successfully acquired laboratory-NMR data that are in excellent agreement with our borehole NMR estimated parameters. This study provides insights into the impact of sample size and condition on laboratory measurements. Laboratory measurements of hydraulic conductivity were made in an

  3. Estimation of aquifer dimensions from passive seismic signals in the presence of material and source uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähivaara, T.; Dudley Ward, N. F.; Huttunen, T.; Rawlinson, Z.; Kaipio, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Small magnitude seismic activity has recently been considered for the assessment of aquifer properties and state. Since the aquifers are modelled as poroelastic, the computational resources needed to simulate the related wave propagation accurately can prove to be impracticable for field studies. Furthermore, the related parameter estimation problem poses significantly higher requirements. In this paper, we investigate model reduction and the Bayesian approximation error (BAE) approach under additional model uncertainties, and establish its feasibility for the estimation of aquifer geometry. The main model approximation is the use of an elastic model in lieu of a poroelastic model. However, the use of an elastic model alone results in a posterior distribution that does not capture the actual parameters. We use the BAE to recover from the model errors. The main uncertainties on which we focus here are related to the unknown material properties and the earthquake itself, including the location and moments. In this feasibility study, we show that the overall approach is able to provide posterior models that capture the actual parameters.

  4. Use of geophysical logs to estimate the quality of ground water and the permeability of aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The relation of formation factor to resistivity of formation water and intergranular permeability has often been investigated, and the general consensus is that this relation is closest when established in a clean-sand aquifer in which water quality does not vary substantially. When these restrictions are applied, the following standard equation is a useful tool in estimating the resistance of the formation water: F = Ro/Rw, where F is the formation factor, which is a function of the effective porosity; Ro is the resistivity of a formation that is 100 percent saturated with interstitial water; and Rw is the resistivity of the water in the saturated zone. However, arenaceous aquifers can have electrical resistivities that are not directly related to resistivity of water or porosity. Surface conductivity and ion exchange are significant factors when the sediments are clay bearing. The solid constituents are a major component of the parameters needed to solve the equation for formation-water resistivity and estimates of aquifer permeability. A correction process needs to be applied to adjust the variables, Ro and F, to the equivalent of clean sand. This report presents an empirical method of using the neutron log and the electrical-resistivity values from long- and short-normal resistivity logs to correct for fine-grained material and the subsequent effects of low impedance to electrical flow that are not related to the resistance of formation water.

  5. A new method for estimating recharge to unconfined aquifers using differential river gauging.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Andrew M; Andersen, Martin S; Acworth, R Ian

    2014-01-01

    In semiarid and arid environments, leakage from rivers is a major source of recharge to underlying unconfined aquifers. Differential river gauging is widely used to estimate the recharge. However, the methods commonly applied are limited in that the temporal resolution is event-scale or longer. In this paper, a novel method is presented for quantifying both the total recharge volume for an event, and variation in recharge rate during an event from hydrographs recorded at the upstream and downstream ends of a river reach. The proposed method is applied to river hydrographs to illustrate the method steps and investigate recharge processes occurring in a sub-catchment of the Murray Darling Basin (Australia). Interestingly, although it is the large flood events which are commonly assumed to be the main source of recharge to an aquifer, our analysis revealed that the smaller flow events were more important in providing recharge.

  6. Karst development in central Butler County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.A.

    1993-02-01

    Research was conducted to study the geology and hydrology of sinkholes, springs, and caves formed in Lower Permian, Fort Riley Limestone, located in central Butler County, Kansas. The goal was to better understand the controlling factors of these karst features and the processes that produce them in a portion of Kansas that is undergoing rapid population growth and increased groundwater usage. Research was accomplished in seven phases: literature search, locating karst features, measuring bedrock fracture joint trends, surveying major caves, estimating discharge of springs, dye tracing, and water chemistry analysis. Recognizable karst landforms within the study area were plotted onto a base map to demonstrate their geographic, geologic, and hydrologic relationships. Karst features identified were 125 sinkholes, a major cave system composed of at least three enterable cave segments, and one large spring. The karst terrain found within the study area is clearly a system of interrelated features and processes. Long-term solution of the bedrock allows karst features to form, joints and bedding planes to enlarge, and creates an efficient network of subsurface drainage. Factors that control karst development in the study area are lithology, thickness, and dip of the bedrock; presence of well defined joints and bedding planes; relatively level topography; nearby entrenched river valleys; lack of thick surficial cover; and climate. Of these influences, solutional activity at joints plays a major role in the formation of sinkholes and cave passages; however, a complex combination of all the controlling factors is responsible for the present, unique, and dynamic karst system.

  7. Thermographic Data Analyses for Karst Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren; McCaleb, Rebecca C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerial thermography is an emerging technology unsurpassed for locating groundwater discharges. Thermography can be used to locate submerged discharges that are extremely difficult to find by other means. In two large projects, thermography was used to identify almost every significant spring at sites underlain by karst aquifers. This technology effectively converts Brown's Type 5 topology to types 1 or 2 (all discharges known), which has a significant impact on dye tracing. At a north Alabama site, springs located by thermography quadrupled the known groundwater discharge in and around the site. For submerged discharges, thermographic temperatures can be measured down the center of the groundwater plume that rises to the surface in the winter. Using the Cornell Mixing (CORMIX) model, flow rate for one submerged spring was estimated. Once identified, estimates of spring recharge area were desired. The size of the area of recharge was estimated by hydrograph separation of flow data from nearby, unregulated surface streams. Monthly recharge estimates were also made and used to show that in north Alabama the mean annual recharge/discharge occurs during May and December. Spring flow measurements for the same county of north Alabama were averaged to obtain mean flows. Then measurements for May only, were averaged. The two averages usually agreed to within 20 percent. This provides evidence that hydrograph separation determinations of recharge are valid.

  8. Estimated rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, John E.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989-90, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, conducted a field study to determine the depth to the water table and to estimate the rate of recharge in outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers near Houston, Texas. The study area (fig. 1) comprises about 2,000 square miles of outcrops of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in northwestern Harris County, Montgomery County, and southern Walker County. The depth to the water table was estimated using seismic refraction, and an estimated rate of recharge in the aquifer outcrops was computed using the tritium-interface method (Andres and Egger, 1985) in which environmental tritium is the ground-water tracer. The water table generally ranges in depth between 10 and 30 feet in the study area, and the average total recharge rate was estimated to be not larger than 6 inches per year. The rate is total recharge to the saturated zone, rather than net recharge to the deep regional flow system. The total recharge can be reduced by evapotranspiration and by local discharge, mainly to streams. These results are published in USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 96-4018 (Noble and others, 1996). A second study of environmental tritium in the same area as the 1989-90 study, also in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, was done in 1996 to confirm the results of the original study. This fact sheet documents the estimation of an upper limit on the average total recharge rate on the basis of the vertical movement of tritium in ground water during 1953-89 and during 1953-95.

  9. Biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes at a karst site in middle Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byl, Thomas Duane; Williams, Shannon D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents results of field and laboratory investigations examining the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes in a karst aquifer contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). The study site, located in Middle Tennessee, was selected because of the presence of TCE degradation byproducts in the karst aquifer and available site hydrologic and chlorinated-ethene information. Additional chemical, biological, and hydrologic data were gathered to evaluate whether the occurrence of TCE degradation byproducts in the karst aquifer was the result of biodegradation within the aquifer or simply transport into the aquifer. Geochemical analysis established that sulfate-reducing conditions, essential for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents, existed in parts of the contaminated karst aquifer. Other areas of the aquifer fluctuated between anaerobic and aerobic conditions and contained compounds associated with cometabolism, such as ethane, methane, ammonia, and dissolved oxygen. A large, diverse bacteria population inhabits the contaminated aquifer. Bacteria known to biodegrade TCE and other chlorinated solvents, such as sulfate-reducers, methanotrophs, and ammonia-oxidizers, were identified from karst-aquifer water using the RNA-hybridization technique. Results from microcosms using raw karst-aquifer water found that aerobic cometabolism and anaerobic reductive-dechlorination degradation processes were possible when appropriate conditions were established in the microcosms. These chemical and biological results provide circumstantial evidence that several biodegradation processes are active in the aquifer. Additional site hydrologic information was developed to determine if appropriate conditions persist long enough in the karst aquifer for these biodegradation processes to be significant. Continuous monitoring devices placed in four wells during the spring of 1998 indicated that pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potentials

  10. Delineation of ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs in a karst aquifer system in the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs for the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky, were delineated using a hydrogeologic-mapping approach, potentiometric map interpretation, anddye-tracing tests. Five distinct ground-water basins drained by major karst springs are present in the Elizabethtown area. These basins are composed of networks of hydraulically interconnected solution conduits and fractures. The boundaries of the basins for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs-the primary sources of water for the city of Elizabethtown-weredelineated by the positions of inferred ground-water divides on an existing potentiometric contour map. The results of dye-tracing tests, plotted as straight- line flowpaths, were used to confirm the presence and location of inferred ground-water divides and to adjust the position of the basin boundaries. Recharge areas of 4.8 and 2.7 square miles weredelineated for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs, respectively. Swallets that drain concentrated stormwater runoff from major highways are presentin the recharge areas for both municipal-supply springs. Each spring is therefore potentially vulnerable to stormwater-runoff contaminants oraccidental spills and releases of toxic or hazardous materials into certain highway drainage culverts.

  11. Obtaining permeability estimates from NMR logging data in an unconsolidated groundwater aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubac, K.; Knight, R. J.; Song, Y.; Bachman, N.; Grau, B.; Cannia, J. C.; Williams, J.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging for aquifer characterization because it provides information about water-filled porosity and pore space geometry that can be used to estimate permeability (k). Hydrologists estimate hydraulic conductivity, from which k can be calculated, using wellbore flow (WBF) logging. WBF logging data distributes the total hydraulic conductivity, determined from aquifer testing, throughout the aquifer. However, this method is time consuming and has relatively low vertical resolution. If reliable estimates of k can be obtained from NMR logging data, this would provide hydrologists with an efficient alternate method for characterizing aquifer properties. The Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) and Timur-Coates (T-C) equations are widely used in petroleum applications to obtain k from NMR logging measurements of the relaxation time T2. In this abstract, we focus on the SDR equation which takes the form kSDR=aφ mT2MLn where a, m and n are empirical constants, T2ML is the mean log of the T2 distribution and φ is porosity. The constants have been empirically determined in consolidated materials and are typically assumed to have the following values: a=4, m=4 and n=2. The use of the SDR equation with these values has been found to yield reliable estimates of k in consolidated materials. However, this same equation underestimates k in unconsolidated materials. In this study, we collected NMR logging, aquifer-test, and WBF data from a 150-m deep well that penetrated the High Plains aquifer in central Nebraska. We then worked with a generalized form of the SDR equation: kSDR Generalized =aφ mT2AVG2, where we allowed T2AVG to be calculated as the mean log and arithmetic mean (T2AM) of the T2 distribution. We elected to set the exponent n on the T2 term equal to 2, which results in a k estimate that has the appropriate units of length squared. We used a semi-constrained least squares inversion to

  12. Estimation of hectare-scale soil-moisture characteristics from aquifer-test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of a 72-h, constant-rate aquifer test conducted in a coarse-grained and highly permeable, glacial outwash deposit on Cape Cod, Massachusetts revealed that drawdowns measured in 20 piezometers located at various depths below the water table and distances from the pumped well were significantly influenced by effects of drainage from the vadose zone. The influence was greatest in piezometers located close to the water table and diminished with increasing depth. The influence of the vadose zone was evident from a gap, in the intermediate-time zone, between measured drawdowns and drawdowns computed under the assumption that drainage from the vadose zone occurred instantaneously in response to a decline in the elevation of the water table. By means of an analytical model that was designed to account for time-varying drainage, simulated drawdowns could be closely fitted to measured drawdowns regardless of the piezometer locations. Because of the exceptional quality and quantity of the data and the relatively small aquifer heterogeneity, it was possible by inverse modeling to estimate all relevant aquifer parameters and a set of three empirical constants used in the upper-boundary condition to account for the dynamic drainage process. The empirical constants were used to define a one-dimensional (ID) drainage versus time curve that is assumed to be representative of the bulk material overlying the water table. The curve was inverted with a parameter estimation algorithm and a ID numerical model for variably saturated flow to obtain soil-moisture retention curves and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relationships defined by the Brooks and Corey equations. Direct analysis of the aquifer-test data using a parameter estimation algorithm and a two-dimensional, axisymmetric numerical model for variably saturated flow yielded similar soil-moisture characteristics. Results suggest that hectare-scale soil-moisture characteristics are different from core-scale predictions

  13. Climate, karst, and critters—A multidisciplinary evaluation of karst species vulnerability to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Musgrove, M.; Long, A. J.; Stamm, J. F.; Poteet, M. F.; Symstad, A.

    2015-12-01

    The complex hydrologic regimes of karst aquifers respond rapidly to the effects of climate change, and unique biological communities associated with karst are sensitive to hydrologic changes. To explore how climate change might affect karst-dependent species, we coupled a climate-change model, a hydrologic model, and a vulnerability assessment tool to evaluate projected hydrologic change and vulnerability of selected species at sites in the karstic Edwards aquifer (Texas) and Madison aquifer (South Dakota). The Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate projected climate from 2011 to 2050 at a 36-km grid spacing for 3 weather stations near the study sites. Daily climate projections from the WRF model were used as input for the hydrologic Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow (RRAWFLOW) model and the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI). RRAWFLOW is a lumped-parameter model that simulates hydrologic response at a single site, superposing the quick- and slow-flow responses that commonly characterize karst aquifers. CCVI uses historical and projected climate and hydrologic metrics to assess the vulnerability of a species. An upward trend in temperature was projected at all three weather stations; there was a trend (downward) in precipitation only for the Texas weather station. A downward trend in mean annual spring flow or groundwater level was projected for the three Edwards sites, but there was no significant trend for the two Madison sites. Of 16 Edwards aquifer species evaluated, 10 were scored as highly or moderately vulnerable under the projected climate change scenario. In contrast, all 8 Madison aquifer species evaluated were scored as moderately vulnerable, stable, or intermediate between the two. The inclusion of hydrologic projections in the vulnerability assessment was essential for interpreting the effects of climate change on aquatic species of conservation concern such as endemic salamanders.

  14. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity of a riverbed and aquifer system on the Susquehanna River in Broome County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model of groundwater flow was used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of riverbed and aquifer material in a 1-square-mile valley-fill aquifer system near a large river in which induced infiltration due to pumping cannot be measured directly. The aquifer consists of a 30- to 70-foot thickness of sand and gravel containing discontinuous layers of compact and silty sand and gravel. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer material, estimated through trial-and-error calibration of simulated water levels to drawdowns measured during an aquifer test, ranged from 500 to 10,000 feet per day; anisotropy (ratio of horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) ranged from 125:1 to 250:1. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed was estimated to be 0.1 to 0.5 foot per day, whereas permeameter tests on samples of silty sand and gravel layers from the riverbed yielded vertical hydraulic conductivity of 10 -3 foot per day. A sensitivity analysis indicated that a narrow range of anisotropy values gave the smallest residual error in simulated drawdowns. Residual error increased sharply when the maximum hydraulic conductivity value for the aquifer was lowered to less than 5,000 feet per day. Residual error also was large for large values of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed, but decreased to a constant amount for values less than 0.1 foot per day. Residual error was relatively insensitive to changes in the storage coefficient and specific yield. A nonlinear regression method that approximated the sensitivity matrix with a perturbation technique was applied to refine the estimates of these parameters and compute standard error of the estimates. The nonlinear regression indicated that the model was sensitive to hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and anisotropy of the upper part of the aquifer but not to anisotropy of the lower part, and that vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed was less than 0

  15. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity of a coastal aquifer using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.; Marino-Tapia, I.

    2012-12-01

    The northern Yucatan Peninsula is characterized by a young and dynamic karstic system that yields very high secondary porosity and permeability. However, we have little, if none, knowledge about the hydraulic conductivity and the amount of groundwater being discharged in to ocean. Here we present and estimation of the hydraulic conductivity and quantity of groundwater being discharged by the northern Yucatan Peninsula coastal aquifer into the Gulf of Mexico, using the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Images offshore the Yucatan coast, where we have detected a thermal anomaly that appears few hours after heavy rainfall in northern Yucatan. We associated these thermal anomalies of the SST to the groundwater being discharged into the ocean. To test our hypothesis we conducted a review of extreme rainfall events in the last 10 years; in parallel we used data from pressure and flow direction gauges installed in a known submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the quantity of groundwater being discharged. The satellite imagery and the rainfall data, allowed us to estimate the time lag between the rainfall and the SGD beginning, along with the hydraulic data from the gauges we have estimated the hydrogeological parameters of the coastal aquifer. This data is very important to contribute to the understanding the hydrogeological setting of the Yucatan coastal aquifer and its implications of the impact of human activities on the water quality. July 29th, 2005, NOAA's Sea Surface Temperature (SST) image of the Gulf of Mexico taken a week after hurricane Emily (2005). A thermal low is present offshore northern Yucatan.

  16. Estimate of aquifer properties by numerically simulating ground-water/surface-water interactions, Fort Wainwright, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakanishi, Allen S.; Lilly, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    MODFLOW, a finite-difference model of ground-water flow, was used to simulate the flow of water between the aquifer and the Chena River at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The model was calibrated by comparing simulated ground-water hydrographs to those recorded in wells during periods of fluctuating river levels. The best fit between simulated and observed hydrographs occurred for the following: 20 feet per day for vertical hydraulic conductivity, 400 feet per day for horizontal hydraulic conductivity, 1:20 for anisotropy (vertical to horizontal hydraulic conductivity), and 350 per feet for riverbed conductance. These values include a 30 percent adjustment for geometry effects. The estimated values for hydraulic conductivities of the alluvium are based on assumed values of 0.25 for specific yield and 0.000001 per foot for specific storage of the alluvium; the values assumed for bedrock are 0.1 foot per day horizontal hydraulic conductivity, 0.005 foot per day vertical hydraulic conductivity, and 0.0000001 per foot for specific storage. The resulting diffusivity for the alluvial aquifer is 1,600 feet per day. The estimated values of these hydraulic properties are nearly proportional to the assumed value of specific yield. These values were not found to be sensitive to the assumed values for bedrock. The hydrologic parameters estimated using the cross-sectional model are only valid when taken in context with the other values (both estimated and assumed) used in this study. The model simulates horizontal and vertical flow directions near the river during periods of varying river stage. This information is useful for interpreting bank-storage effects, including the flow of contaminants in the aquifer near the river.

  17. Historical and projected climate (1901–2050) and hydrologic response of karst aquifers, and species vulnerability in south-central Texas and western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamm, John F.; Poteet, Mary F.; Symstad, Amy J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Long, Andrew J.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Norton, Parker A.

    2015-12-18

    Flora and fauna that rely on springflow from Edwards and Madison aquifer sites were assessed for vulnerability to projected climate change on the basis of the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI). The CCVI is determined by the exposure of a species to climate, the sensitivity of the species, and the ability of the species to cope with climate change. Sixteen species associated with springs and groundwater were assessed in the Balcones Escarpment region. The Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sosorum) was scored as highly vulnerable with moderate confidence. Nine species—three salamanders, a fountain darter (Etheostoma fonticola), three insects, and two amphipods—were scored as moderately vulnerable. The remaining six species—four vascular plants, the Barton cavesnail (Stygopyrgus bartonensis), and a cave shrimp—were scored as not vulnerable/presumed stable (not vulnerable and evidence does not support change in abundance or range of the species). Vulnerability of eight species associated with streams that receive springflow from the Madison aquifer in the Black Hills was assessed. Of these, the American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) and the lesser yellow lady’s slipper (Cypripedium parviflorum) were scored as moderately vulernable with high confidence. The dwarf scouringrush (Equisetum scirpoides) and autumn willow (Salix serissima) were also scored as moderately vulnerable with moderate to low confidence, respectively. Other species were assessed as not vulnerable/presumed stable or not vulnerable/increase likely (not vulnerable and evidence supporting an increase in abundance or range of the species). Lower vulnerability scores for the Black Hills species in comparison to the Balcones Escarpment species reflect lower endemicity, higher projected springflow than in the historical period, and high thermal tolerance of many of the species for the Black Hills. Importantly, climate change vulnerability scores differed substantially for Edwards aquifer

  18. A Hydrogeologic Model of the Finegayan Basin of the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalilian, I.; Jenson, J. W.; Lander, M.; Randall, R.

    2016-12-01

    Guam is a 540-km2 island, located at the southern end of the Mariana Archipelago in the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The island's northern half is an uplifted limestone plateau resting on volcanic basement, part of which also stands above sea level. The plateau hosts the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer (NGLA), the source of 90% of the island's drinking water for its 200,000 residents. The aquifer consists of a Miocene-Pliocene foraminiferal limestone core that grades upward and outward into a Plio-Pleistocene reef-lagoonal sequence. The NGLA is thus a carbonate island karst aquifer, and locally exhibits each of the environments described by the Carbonate Island Karst Model (CIKM). The CIKM is a general conceptual model created to integrate and describe the components that control cave and karst development and the hydrogeologic properties of eogenetic carbonate islands, which differ in important ways from telogenetic continental karst. This study examined one of the aquifer's six basins to develop a specific conceptual hydrogeologic model of the basin. Located in the northwest portion of the aquifer and comprising 7% of its surface area, the Finegayan Basin is the source of about 15% of aquifer production. It is structurally the most complex basin in the aquifer, and is likely to undergo intense economic development in the near future. A major fault dominates the drainage system of the basin, intercepting the coast at the site of a cave, from which emerges the aquifer's largest coastal spring. The conceptual model produced by this study characterizes basin hydrogeology in terms of the CIKM, based on field mapping and GIS analyses of sinkholes, faults, fractures, coastal discharge features, and their field relationships. A small cenote along the axis of the fault was instrumented to estimate hydraulic conductivity along the fault from tidal phase lag. The discharging cave was mapped to gain insight into the karst evolution of the conduit system. Preliminary field

  19. Frequency Dependent Hydraulic Properties Estimated from Oscillatory Pumping Tests in an Unconfined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, A.; Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Bakhos, T.; Dagan, G.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests were conducted at the Boise Hydrological Research Site. A periodic pressure signal is generated by pumping and injecting water into the aquifer consecutively and the pressure response is recorded at many points around the source. We present and analyze the data from the field test after applying Fourier analysis. We then match the data with a recently derived analytical solution for homogeneous formations to estimate the equivalent aquifer properties: conductivity K, specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy. The estimated values are shown to be in agreement with previous estimates conducted at this site. We observe variations in the estimated parameters with different oscillation periods of pumping. The trend of the parameters with changing period is discussed and compared to predictions by existing theory and laboratory experiments dealing with dynamic effective properties. It is shown that the results are qualitatively consistent with recent works on effective properties of formations of spatially variable properties in oscillatory flow. To grasp the impact of heterogeneity, a simple configuration is proposed, helping explain the observed increase in effective conductivity with decreasing period.

  20. Frequency dependent hydraulic properties estimated from oscillatory pumping tests in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Avinoam; Barrash, Warren; Cardiff, Michael; Hochstetler, David L.; Bakhos, Tania; Dagan, Gedeon; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests were conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. A periodic pressure signal is generated by pumping and injecting water into the aquifer consecutively and the pressure response is recorded at many points around the source. We present and analyze the data from the field test after applying Fourier analysis. We then match the data with a recently derived analytical solution for homogeneous formations to estimate the equivalent aquifer properties: conductivity K, specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy . The estimated values are shown to be in agreement with previous estimates conducted at this site. We observe variations in the estimated parameters with different oscillation periods of pumping. The trend of the parameters with changing period is discussed and compared to predictions by existing theory and laboratory experiments dealing with dynamic effective properties. It is shown that the results are qualitatively consistent with recent works on effective properties of formations of spatially variable properties in oscillatory flow. To grasp the impact of heterogeneity, a simple configuration is proposed, helping explain the observed increase in effective conductivity with decreasing period.

  1. Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2008-07-11

    Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

  2. Estimating aquifer properties and distributed groundwater recharge in a hard-rock catchment of Udaipur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiwal, Deepesh; Singh, P. K.; Yadav, K. K.

    2016-09-01

    The present study determined aquifer parameters in hard-rock aquifer system of Ahar River catchment, Udaipur, India by conducting 19 pumping tests in large-diameter wells. Spreadsheet programs were developed for analyzing pumping test data, and their accuracy was evaluated by root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient (R). Histograms and Shapiro-Wilk test indicated non-normality (p value <0.01) of pre- and post-monsoon groundwater levels at 50 sites for years 2006-2008, and hence, logarithmic transformations were done. Furthermore, recharge was estimated using GIS-based water table fluctuation method. The groundwater levels were found to be influenced by the topography, presence of structural hills, density of pumping wells, and seasonal recharge. The results of the pumping tests revealed that the transmissivity (T) ranges from 68-2239 m2/day, and the specific yield (S y) varies from 0.211 to 0.51 × 10-5. The T and S y values were found reasonable for the hard-rock formations in the area, and the spreadsheet programs were found reliable (RMSE ~0.017-0.339 m; R > 0.95). Distribution of the aquifer parameters and recharge indicated that the northern portion with high ground elevations (575-700 m MSL), and high S y (0.08-0.25) and T (>600 m2/day) values may act as recharge zone. The T and S y values revealed significant spatial variability, which suggests strong heterogeneity of the hard-rock aquifer system. Overall, the findings of this study are useful to formulate appropriate strategies for managing water resources in the area. Also, the developed spreadsheet programs may be used to analyze the pumping test data of large-diameter wells in other hard-rock regions of the world.

  3. Transmissivity estimation for highly heterogeneous aquifers: comparison of three methods applied to the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Scott L.; Woodbury, Allan D.; Jiang, Yefang

    2007-03-01

    Obtaining reliable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Although many quantitative characterization techniques exist, experience applying these techniques to highly heterogeneous real-world aquifers is limited. Three geostatistical characterization techniques are applied to the Edwards Aquifer, a limestone aquifer in south-central Texas, USA, for the purposes of quantifying the performance in an 88,000-cell groundwater model. The first method is a simple kriging of existing hydraulic conductivity data developed primarily from single-well tests. The second method involves numerical upscaling to the grid-block scale, followed by cokriging the grid-block conductivity. In the third method, the results of the second method are used to establish the prior distribution for a Bayesian updating calculation. Results of kriging alone are biased towards low values and fail to reproduce hydraulic heads or spring flows. The upscaling/cokriging approach removes most of the systematic bias. The Bayesian update reduced the mean residual by more than a factor of 10, to 6 m, approximately 2.5% of the total head variation in the aquifer. This agreement demonstrates the utility of automatic calibration techniques based on formal statistical approaches and lends further support for using the Bayesian updating approach for highly heterogeneous aquifers.

  4. Estimated predevelopment discharge to streams from the High Plains Aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma, southwestern Kansas, and northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luckey, R.R.; Becker, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the High Plains aquifer in Okla homa was initiated in 1996 to: (1) provide the information needed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board to manage the quantity of water produced from the aquifer; and (2) provide base line water-chemistry data. The approach used to meet the first objective is to develop a digital ground-water flow model. The model will be cali brated, in part, by comparing simulated and esti mated predevelopment discharge from the aquifer to streams and cross-boundary flow. This report presents the estimated predevelopment discharge to streams from the High Plains aquifer. Streamflow data were the primary source of information used to estimate predevelopment dis charge from the High Plains aquifer. Data from 30 streamflow stations between the Arkansas and Canadian Rivers were considered in the analysis, and winter low-flow frequencies for 7-, 14-, and 30-day periods were determined for 25 stations. The 14-day low flow with a recurrence interval of 2 years was the primary value used to estimate pre development discharge from the aquifer. The streams that drain the eastern part of the High Plains aquifer in Kansas (generally east of 99.5 longitude) are estimated to have had large predevelopment discharge from the aquifer, and most of them received discharge from near their headwaters. For streams with more than one streamflow gage, the upper perennial reaches appeared to have gained more discharge from the aquifer than the lower reaches. The total predevel opment discharge from the aquifer in this area to several streams is estimated to have been about 312 cubic feet per second, not including discharge that probably went directly to the Arkansas River. The Cimarron River and its tributaries are estimated to have gained about 78 cubic feet per second, but nearly one-half that amount was lost in the lower reaches of the river. The cause of the loss in the lower reaches is unknown. The Beaver River and its tributaries are estimated to have

  5. Inferring Aquifer Storage Parameters Using GRACE and In-Situ Measurement: Estimation Under Data Uncertainty (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have been widely used to assess water storage changes at the regional and continental scales. Although promising, the accuracy of GRACE data is inherently limited by instrumentation error, inaccuracies in atmospheric and ocean fields, and leakage error arising from using a limited range of spherical harmonics to represent the gravity field variations. Similarly, the ancillary data used for disaggregating GRACE data to track changes in individual hydrologic cycle components are also subject to uncertainty. This reflects a familiar dilemma in water resources management, where the remotely sensed and in-situ data provide increasingly more information content and call for more application uses, but the uncertainty inherent in these Earth observation products poses a barrier to the timely fusion of these data. In the worst case scenario, the data uncertainty can render the estimated solution completely meaningless. We present a robust optimization method for inferring aquifer storage parameters (i.e., specific yield or storativity) under uncertainty. The data involved are GRACE TWS, in-situ well level observations, and model-generated soil moisture distributions, all of which are uncertain. The robust optimization paradigm only requires knowing the uncertainty bounds of parameters, but not their actual probability distributions. Error bounds are either specified by data processing centers when distributing the processed satellite data or can be estimated from time series analysis. We demonstrate our method for the interconnected Edwards-Trinity Plateau and Pecos Valley aquifers in central Texas. The study area is divided into multiple zones based on the geology and monitor well coverage. Our estimated aquifer storage parameters are consistent with previous results obtained from pumping tests and model calibration, demonstrating the potential of using

  6. Aquifer Recharge Estimation In Unsaturated Porous Rock Using Darcian And Geophysical Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; De Carlo, L.; Masciale, R.; Turturro, A. C.; Perkins, K. S.; Caputo, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    Within the unsaturated zone a constant downward gravity-driven flux of water commonly exists at depths ranging from a few meters to tens of meters depending on climate, medium, and vegetation. In this case a steady-state application of Darcy's law can provide recharge rate estimates.We have applied an integrated approach that combines field geophysical measurements with laboratory hydraulic property measurements on core samples to produce accurate estimates of steady-state aquifer recharge, or, in cases where episodic recharge also occurs, the steady component of recharge. The method requires (1) measurement of the water content existing in the deep unsaturated zone at the location of a core sample retrieved for lab measurements, and (2) measurement of the core sample's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity over a range of water content that includes the value measured in situ. Both types of measurements must be done with high accuracy. Darcy's law applied with the measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and gravitational driving force provides recharge estimates.Aquifer recharge was estimated using Darcian and geophysical methods at a deep porous rock (calcarenite) experimental site in Canosa, southern Italy. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) profiles were collected from the land surface to water table to provide data for Darcian recharge estimation. Volumetric water content was estimated from resistivity profiles using a laboratory-derived calibration function based on Archie's law for rock samples from the experimental site, where electrical conductivity of the rock was related to the porosity and water saturation. Multiple-depth core samples were evaluated using the Quasi-Steady Centrifuge (QSC) method to obtain hydraulic conductivity (K), matric potential (ψ), and water content (θ) estimates within this profile. Laboratory-determined unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ranged from 3.90 x 10-9 to 1.02 x 10-5 m

  7. A multitracer approach to estimate groundwater residence time distributions at a managed aquifer recharge site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Andrea; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has become a common water management tool and serves various purposes such as improving the quality of groundwater (GW). At the study site, the Hardwald in Muttenz (Switzerland), MAR has been implemented in the mid-1950s to overcome increasing water demands. GW is artificially recharged with water from the river Rhine through a system of channels and ponds. The area is surrounded by potential contamination sites such as chemical industry, former landfills, a highway and a freight depot. Furthermore, the area shows a complex hydrogeologic setting with several fault zones and two main aquifers, the Quaternary Rhine gravel aquifer overlying a karstified Upper Muschelkalk limestone aquifer. Water from the deeper limestone aquifer is suspected to contain contaminants originating from the landfills. The fractures might serve as a hydraulic connection between the upper and lower aquifer. Further, groundwater pumping might enhance the mixing of recently infiltrated water with older water from the lower aquifer. Hence, the proximity to potential contamination sites and the complex geologic setting both pose risks for GW pollution and challenge the drinking water production in this area. To guarantee a safe drinking water supply, it is crucial to know the mixing patterns of young and old GW abstracted from the pumping wells. With this study we aim to determine the spatial variability of GW residence time distributions to differentiate between recently infiltrated river water and older groundwater. To reach our objectives, we use a combination of the following tracers to cover a wide range of possible GW ages: (1) radiogenic 222Rn (young water := <3 weeks); (2) tritium (3H) in combination with its tritiogenic decay product 3He (old water := 0.5-50 years); and (3) radiogenic 4He (very old water := 100-1000 years). Additionally, we analysed other dissolved (noble) gases (O2, N2, Ar, Kr) to estimate the amount of excess air and to derive the

  8. WTAQ: A Computer Program for Calculating Drawdowns and Estimating Hydraulic Properties for Confined and Water-Table Aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Moench, Allen F.

    1999-01-01

    The computer program WTAQ calculates hydraulic-head drawdowns in a confined or water-table aquifer that result from pumping at a well of finite or infinitesimal diameter. The program is based on an analytical model of axial-symmetric ground-water flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic aquifer. The program allows for well-bore storage and well-bore skin at the pumped well and for delayed drawdown response at an observation well; by including these factors, it is possible to accurately evaluate the specific storage of a water-table aquifer from early-time drawdown data in observation wells and piezometers. For water-table aquifers, the program allows for either delayed or instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone. WTAQ calculates dimensionless or dimensional theoretical drawdowns that can be used with measured drawdowns at observation points to estimate the hydraulic properties of confined and water-table aquifers. Three sample problems illustrate use of WTAQ for estimating horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield of a water-table aquifer by type-curve methods and by an automatic parameter-estimation method.

  9. Techniques to better understand complex epikarst hydrogeology and contaminant transport in telogenetic karst settings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The movement of autogenic recharge through the shallow epikarstic zone in soil-mantled karst aquifers is important in understanding recharge areas and rates, groundwater storage, and contaminant transport processes. The groundwater flow in agricultural karst areas, such as Kentucky’s Pennyroyal Plat...

  10. The vulnerability of karst springs—a case study of the Hubelj spring (SW Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trček, B.; Veselič, M.; Pezdič, J.

    2006-03-01

    The hydraulic behaviour of the karst aquifer in the Hubelj spring catchment area (SW Slovenia) was studied by using an indirect research method based on natural tracers. The variations of natural tracers (in precipitation and in groundwater) during the storm event made possible the separation of the Hubelj spring storm hydrograph by the three-component separation technique. The results produced information on the aquifer recharge, storage and discharge processes, as well as on the mechanisms that affected them. They verified the so-called epikarst hypothesis presuming that an important part of a karst aquifer recharge reaches rapidly and intensively from the epikarst zone. It was demonstrated that epikarst water could occupy up to 50% of the spring discharge during precipitation events. This phenomenon could have important consequences on protection and management of the problems of karst aquifers, including engineering problems in karst areas. With this respect the results could give way to new engineering ideas.

  11. Tomographic inverse estimation of aquifer properties based on pressure variations caused by transient water-supply pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D. R.; Koch, R. J.; Birdsell, K. H.

    2008-12-01

    Groundwater pumping of water-supply wells frequently exhibits substantial temporal and spatial variability. Wells are typically operated periodically (on daily and seasonal temporal scales), and the total production is controlled by the water-supply demand,. The pumping causes temporal and spatial variability in the water levels around the pumping wells. During the wellfield operation, water-level data are collected from the production and nearby observation wells. Water level fluctuations are a result of the manner in which the pumping is conducted, aquifer heterogeneity, and variations in other influences such as recharge, poroelastic effects, etc. The variability in aquifer stresses due to pumping can provide valuable information about aquifer properties. The supply-well pumping can be viewed as a single prolonged pumping test extending over multiple pumping cycles and including multiple pumping and observation wells. Here we discuss water level and pumping production data acquired during water-supply production from the regional aquifer at Los Alamos, New Mexico. We have performed extensive interpretation of the data using analytical and numerical techniques. The analytical techniques are applied to provide (1) initial screening of the data for measurement errors, (2) identification of correlations between the pumping and water-level variability, and (3) estimation of the large-scale properties of the aquifer. The numerical models are applied to characterize the spatial heterogeneity of the aquifer using an approach based on tomographic inverse analysis. Our results demonstrate that there are large-scale features in the aquifer that appear to control the spatial propagation of transient pumping effects. The identified aquifer heterogeneities were not previously recognized and are expected to have important effects on the potential migration of contaminants in the regional aquifer.

  12. Karst and artificial recharge: Theoretical and practical problems. A preliminary approach to artificial recharge assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Walid; Pistre, Séverin; Kneppers, Angeline; Bakalowicz, Michel; Najem, Wajdi

    2011-10-01

    SummaryManaged Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is an emerging sustainable technique that has already generated successful results and is expected to solve many water resource problems, especially in semi-arid and arid zones. It is of great interest for karst aquifers that currently supply 20-25% of the world's potable water, particularly in Mediterranean countries. However, the high heterogeneity in karst aquifers is too complex to be able to locate and describe them simply via field observations. Hence, as compared to projects in porous media, MAR is still marginal in karst aquifers. Accordingly, the present work presents a conceptual methodology for Aquifer Rechargeability Assessment in Karst - referred to as ARAK. The methodology was developed noting that artificial recharge in karst aquifers is considered an improbable challenge to solve since karst conduits may drain off recharge water without any significant storage, or recharge water may not be able to infiltrate. The aim of the ARAK method is to determine the ability of a given karst aquifer to be artificially recharged and managed, and the best sites for implementing artificial recharge from the surface. ARAK is based on multi-criteria indexation analysis modeled on karst vulnerability assessment methods. ARAK depends on four independent criteria, i.e. Epikarst, Rock, Infiltration and Karst. After dividing the karst domain into grids, these criteria are indexed using geological and topographic maps refined by field observations. ARAK applies a linear formula that computes the intrinsic rechargeability index based on the indexed map for every criterion, coupled with its attributed weighting rate. This index indicates the aptitude for recharging a given karst aquifer, as determined by studying its probability first on a regional scale for the whole karst aquifer, and then by characterizing the most favorable sites. Subsequently, for the selected sites, a technical and economic feasibility factor is applied, weighted

  13. Karst Lands: The dissolution of carbonate rock produces unique landscapes and poses significant hydrological and environmental concerns

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.B.; Culver, D.C.; Herman, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    Karst lands are produced by the action of water on soluble rocks, a process among the most dynamic of all erosive forces that counterbalance the uplifting forces of tectonics. The dissolution of carbonate rock, primarily limestone and dolomite, produces unique landscapes and poses significant hydrological and environmental concerns. The major topic areas discussed in this article include the following: processes that form karst; karst drainage basins; discharge from karst aquifers; caves as paleoclimatic recorders; caves as ecosystems; water issues in karst regions; and sinkholes, soil piping and subsidence. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Agriculture and Karst in Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication describes the unique hydrologic and environmental issues found in karst environments. The publication describes karst landscapes, the importance of karst, different types of karst features, and how water moves through karst landscapes. The publication includes details on methods for...

  15. Peculiarity and vulnerability of karst settings, analyzed through a review of available environmental indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Mario; Mazzei, Marianna

    2016-04-01

    Karst is a unique environment on Earth, characterized by a variety of peculiar geological and hydrological features, that are expressed by typical landforms at the surface (doline, ponor, polje, etc.) and underground (single cave, sinkhole, complex hypogean systems consisting of sequences of pits and galleries, etc.). Among the main characters of karst, the direct connection between the surface and the underground is at the origin of the fragility of karst settings, and the related high vulnerability. Many different types of natural geological hazards (or geo-hazards) may potentially affect karst lands, with sinkholes and flash floods being the most frequent and typical. In addition, karst is exposed to a variety of anthropogenic disturbances as well, including loss of natural landscapes, destruction of caves and speleothems, and contamination and pollution problems. At this latter regard, it has to be reminded that karst aquifers host high quality groundwaters, that are used as source of drinking water worldwide, with estimates indicating that the supply of drinking water from karst is going to have a significant increase in the next decades, From all of this, the importance in fully defining the karst setting, and in a detail examination of all the natural and anthropogenic events that may cause negative effects on it, comes out. Uniqueness of karst has been acknowledged since a long time, but only in recent years efforts have been made to develop approaches and methods specifically dedicated to this peculiar environment. Such approaches represent definitely a mandatory step in the correct management of karst terranes, providing useful elements to stakeholders, land managers and people living in karst lands about their fragility, and the need to safeguard them and the natural resources therein contained. Starting from these considerations, in this contribution we review the main environmental indices dedicated to karst that have been recently proposed in the

  16. Estimation of groundwater residence time using environmental radioisotopes (14C,T) in carbonate aquifers, southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Samborska, Katarzyna; Różkowski, Andrzej; Małoszewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Triassic carbonate aquifers in the Upper Silesia region, affected by intense withdrawal, have been investigated by means of isotopic analyses of (14)C, δ(13)C, δ(2)H, δ(18)O and (3)H. The isotopic examinations were carried out in the 1970s and in the early 1980s, and it was the first application of tracers to estimate age and vulnerability for the contamination of groundwater in this region. Similar isotopic analyses were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with the same Triassic carbonate formation. The isotopic examinations were performed within the confined part of the carbonate formation, wherein aquifers are covered by semi-permeable deposits. The direct recharge of the aquifer occurs in the outcrop areas, but it mainly takes place due to percolation of the water through aquitards and erosional windows. The Triassic aquifer has been intensively drained by wells and by lead-zinc mines. Nowadays, the declining water demand and closure of some mines have induced a significant increase in the water table level. The detailed analysis of the results, including the radiocarbon age corrections and the comparison of radioisotope activities, has made it possible to estimate the range of residence time within the carbonate Triassic aquifer. This range from several tens to several tens of thousands indicates that the recharge of aquifers might have occurred between modern times and the Pleistocene. The apparent age of the water estimated on the basis of (14)C activity was corrected considering the carbon isotope exchange and the diffusion between mobile water in fractures and stagnant water in micropores. The obtained corrected period of recharge corresponds to the result of investigations of noble gases, which were carried out in the 1990s. In almost half of the cases, groundwater is a mixture of young and old water. The mixing processes occur mainly in areas of heavy exploitation of the aquifer.

  17. Nitrogen budget of a typical subterranean river in peak cluster karst area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fang; Jiang, Guanghui

    2009-10-01

    Karst groundwater is one of the important water resources for people in the world. There is an estimate that by 2028 karst groundwater will supply more than 80% of people in the world. However, several areas in the world are characterized by high nitrate concentrations in karst aquifers. In China, karst groundwater is also threatened by extensive use of fertilizer and pesticides, industry waste, septic systems and poultry, hog or cattle manure. In order to understand the water quality of a subterranean river in south China, especially the dynamic variation of nitrate, nitrogen input and output were determined via auto-monitored apparatus, manual observation and samples from 2004 to 2008 in Guancun subterranean river drainage area. Land use and anthropogenic activities were also investigated frequently. The results showed the range of nitrate variation was 2.56-15.40 mg l-1, with an average value of 6.60 mg l-1. Spatial variation of nitrate concentrations showed nitrate rose where there were villages and agriculture distribution. Long series of nitrate and discharge monitoring revealed there was a nitrate peak in spring just before the beginning of rainy season. Three rainfall events were selected for analysis of relations among hydrological process, water chemistry, and nitrate of the spring. The flood processes of the spring were divided into three or four phases according to change of water level and water chemistry. They were dominated by initial condition of aquifer, piston flow in soil and vadose, piston flow in conduit, diffuse recharge, and bypass recharge. The original condition of aquifer and rainfall pulse controlled recharge flow and changes of nitrate and hydro-chemical graphs of the spring. The quantity of nitrogen input in a year was 66.61 t, and the output was 21.24 t. Nitrogen leaching loss in base flow accounted for 76.11% in a year. Some measures should be taken to protect karst water in the very near future, so that health risks to the local

  18. A GPGPU accelerated modeling environment for quantitatively characterizing karst systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myre, J. M.; Covington, M. D.; Luhmann, A. J.; Saar, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to derive quantitative information on the geometry of karst aquifer systems is highly desirable. Knowing the geometric makeup of a karst aquifer system enables quantitative characterization of the systems response to hydraulic events. However, the relationship between flow path geometry and karst aquifer response is not well understood. One method to improve this understanding is the use of high speed modeling environments. High speed modeling environments offer great potential in this regard as they allow researchers to improve their understanding of the modeled karst aquifer through fast quantitative characterization. To that end, we have implemented a finite difference model using General Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs). GPGPUs are special purpose accelerators which are capable of high speed and highly parallel computation. The GPGPU architecture is a grid like structure, making it is a natural fit for structured systems like finite difference models. To characterize the highly complex nature of karst aquifer systems our modeling environment is designed to use an inverse method to conduct the parameter tuning. Using an inverse method reduces the total amount of parameter space needed to produce a set of parameters describing a system of good fit. Systems of good fit are determined with a comparison to reference storm responses. To obtain reference storm responses we have collected data from a series of data-loggers measuring water depth, temperature, and conductivity at locations along a cave stream with a known geometry in southeastern Minnesota. By comparing the modeled response to those of the reference responses the model parameters can be tuned to quantitatively characterize geometry, and thus, the response of the karst system.

  19. Combining chemical and isotopic measurements to estimate pesticide degradation rates in a fractured-rock aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, Julien; Gallé, Tom; Bayerle, Michael; Pittois, Denis; El-Khabbaz, Hassanya; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Höche, Martina; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Encouraged by new regulatory requirements for pesticide registration and authorization, the transport and environmental fate of these compounds in the different environmental compartments has been studied extensively. Degradation rates vary widely depending on hydraulic and chemical characteristics, with the strongest degradation usually occuring in the topsoil. Nonetheless, significant pesticide attenuation may still take place during transport in the aquifer, since residence times are generally much longer than in the soil. Ideally, pesticide transformation in the aquifer needs to be determined under real field conditions. Mass balance calculations however are complicated by the fact that the initial pesticide mass leached from the soil is often not known precisely enough. In this study, isotopic and classical pesticide concentration measurements were combined with groundwater dating techniques to assess the degradation rate of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine in a fractured sandstone. The mass balance problem was solved by introducing the desethylatrazine to atrazine ratio, a relative measure which was used to quantify the advancement of atrazine degradation with increasing transport time in the subsurface. The extent of transformation of the parent compound was finally estimated from the shift in the isotopic signal between soil application and the outlet of the groundwater system.

  20. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. ); Ketelle, R.H. )

    1990-06-01

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Estimating mountain block recharge to downstream alluvial aquifers from standard methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Lee, Cheng-Haw

    2012-03-01

    SummaryThe purpose of the study is to assess the applicability in estimating the mountain block recharge (MBR) to the downstream alluvial aquifers in the sub-tropical area using baseflow separation and rainfall infiltration methods. The Choushui-Wu River basin, the largest groundwater region in Taiwan was the study area. The high slope mountainous catchment located in the upstream of Choushui-Wu River basin, act as an important conduit in conveying surface and subsurface runoff to the recharge of the downstream alluvial aquifers. Geographic Information Systems (GISs) was applied to facilitate the estimation processes. The estimated MBR using the baseflow separation method was 1.08 × 109 m3/year of which Wu River and Choushui River basins comprised 0.27 × 109 m3/year (25.2%) and 0.81 × 109 m3/year (74.8%), respectively. These results are similar to the previous O18 isotopic study indicating that 22% and 78% were from the Wu River and Choushui River basins, respectively. Moreover, the estimated amount of lateral flow using C14 technique from the upstream of Choushui River basin was 0.83 × 109 m3/year, which is close to the result (0.81 × 109 m3/year) of this study. For comparison, groundwater recharged by rainfall infiltration in the mountainous catchment was derived from the precipitation, evapotranspiration, land use and soil types of the region. The estimated MBR by the rainfall infiltration method is 1.06 × 109 m3/year, which is close to 1.08 × 109 m3/year determined by the baseflow separation method. These results are also similar to the groundwater hydrograph analysis. The proposed methods show simple and efficient computation and do not require complex hydrological modeling and detailed knowledge of soil characteristics. They can reasonably estimate the lateral boundary influx contributing from the MBR and are thus applicable to estimate the MBRs in other sub-tropical regions.

  2. Uncertainty of natural tracer methods for estimating river-aquifer exchange flux in the Heihe River, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter; Shanafield, Margaret; Simmons, Craig; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimation of river-aquifer exchange flux is critical to the conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater, especially in the arid and semiarid regions where potential evapotranspiration is much higher than precipitation. A number of natural tracer methods are available to estimate river-aquifer exchange flux at different spatial scales. However, these methods have primarily been applied to rivers with relatively low flow rates (mostly less than 5 m3 s-1). In this study, several natural tracers including heat, radon-222 and electrical conductivity were used to quantify river-aquifer exchange flux at both point and regional scales in the Heihe River, northwest China with a large flow rate (63 m3 s-1). These tracers were measured both on vertical riverbed profiles and on longitudinal river samples. Results show that the radon-222 profile method can estimate a narrower range of point-scale river-aquifer flux than the temperature profile method. However, three vertical radon-222 profiles failed to estimate the upper bounds of plausible flux ranges. Results also show that when quantifying regional-scale river-aquifer exchange flux, the river chemistry method constrained the flux (5.20 - 10.39 m2 d-1) better than the river temperature method (-100 - 100 m2 d-1). The river chemistry method also identified spatial variation in the flux, whereas the river temperature method did not have sufficient resolution. Overall, for quantifying river-aquifer exchange flux in a large river such as the Heihe River, both the temperature profile method and the radon-222 profile method provide useful complementary information at the point scale to complement each other, whereas the river chemistry method is recommended over the river temperature method at the regional scale.

  3. Evidence for Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in a Fissured-porous Karst System in Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, F.; Mayer, B.

    2005-12-01

    Twenty five percent of the world's population uses karst water as drinking water resources. Since karst groundwater systems are highly vulnerable to contamination, groundwater protection and self purification is a major challenge. Up to now research in karst groundwater systems has predominantly concentrated on hydrodynamic processes. Little is known about anoxic processes in oxygen dominated, fracture-matrix diffusion controlled karst aquifers. Isotope measurements comprise a promising tool to identify biogeochemical processes such as bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction in karstic aquifers. The goal of this study was to determine the sources and the processes affecting sulfate in an oxygen-rich karst aquifer in southern Germany and their dependence on hydrogeological parameters. This was achieved by interpreting tritium data with a simple lumped parameter approach and assessing variations in concentrations and isotopic compositions of sulfate and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with respect to groundwater age. Young groundwater (<30 years) was characterized by comparatively high sulfate concentrations (0.36 mM) and δ34S values similar to those of recent atmospheric deposition (1.5‰). In contrast groundwater with mean residence times >60 years had significantly lower sulfate concentrations (0.08 mM) and markedly higher δ34S values (7.5‰). These results indicate that in karst systems with matrix porosity, bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction may occur. This process has the potential to contribute to long-term biodegradation of contaminants in the porous rock matrix representing the dominant water reservoir in fissured-porous karst aquifers.

  4. Stochastic simulation of karst conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Dowd, Peter A.; Xu, Chaoshui; Durán-Valsero, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Karst aquifers have very high spatial heterogeneity. Essentially, they comprise a system of pipes (i.e., the network of conduits) superimposed on rock porosity and on a network of stratigraphic surfaces and fractures. This heterogeneity strongly influences the hydraulic behavior of the karst and it must be reproduced in any realistic numerical model of the karst system that is used as input to flow and transport modeling. However, the directly observed karst conduits are only a small part of the complete karst conduit system and knowledge of the complete conduit geometry and topology remains spatially limited and uncertain. Thus, there is a special interest in the stochastic simulation of networks of conduits that can be combined with fracture and rock porosity models to provide a realistic numerical model of the karst system. Furthermore, the simulated model may be of interest per se and other uses could be envisaged. The purpose of this paper is to present an efficient method for conditional and non-conditional stochastic simulation of karst conduit networks. The method comprises two stages: generation of conduit geometry and generation of topology. The approach adopted is a combination of a resampling method for generating conduit geometries from templates and a modified diffusion-limited aggregation method for generating the network topology. The authors show that the 3D karst conduit networks generated by the proposed method are statistically similar to observed karst conduit networks or to a hypothesized network model. The statistical similarity is in the sense of reproducing the tortuosity index of conduits, the fractal dimension of the network, the direction rose of directions, the Z-histogram and Ripley's K-function of the bifurcation points (which differs from a random allocation of those bifurcation points). The proposed method (1) is very flexible, (2) incorporates any experimental data (conditioning information) and (3) can easily be modified when

  5. Estimates for self-supplied domestic withdrawals and population served for selected principal aquifers, calendar year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.; Arnold, Terri L.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has groundwater studies that focus on water-quality conditions in principal aquifers of the United States. The Program specifically focuses on aquifers that are important to public supply, domestic, and other major uses. Estimates for self-supplied domestic withdrawals and the population served for 20 aquifers in the United States for calendar year 2005 are provided in this report. These estimates are based on county-level data for self-supplied domestic groundwater withdrawals and the population served by those withdrawals, as compiled by the National Water Use Information Program, for areas within the extent of the 20 aquifers. In 2005, the total groundwater withdrawals for self-supplied domestic use from the 20 aquifers represented about 63 percent of the total self-supplied domestic groundwater withdrawals in the United States; the population served by the withdrawals represented about 61 percent of the total self-supplied domestic population in the United States.

  6. Estimating aquifer recharge in Mission River watershed, Texas: model development and calibration using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddameri, V.; Kuchanur, M.

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture balance studies provide a convenient approach to estimate aquifer recharge when only limited site-specific data are available. A monthly mass-balance approach has been utilized in this study to estimate recharge in a small watershed in the coastal bend of South Texas. The developed lumped parameter model employs four adjustable parameters to calibrate model predicted stream runoff to observations at a gaging station. A new procedure was developed to correctly capture the intermittent nature of rainfall. The total monthly rainfall was assigned to a single-equivalent storm whose duration was obtained via calibration. A total of four calibrations were carried out using an evolutionary computing technique called genetic algorithms as well as the conventional gradient descent (GD) technique. Ordinary least squares and the heteroscedastic maximum likelihood error (HMLE) based objective functions were evaluated as part of this study as well. While the genetic algorithm based calibrations were relatively better in capturing the peak runoff events, the GD based calibration did slightly better in capturing the low flow events. Treating the Box-Cox exponent in the HMLE function as a calibration parameter did not yield better estimates and the study corroborates the suggestion made in the literature of fixing this exponent at 0.3. The model outputs were compared against available information and results indicate that the developed modeling approach provides a conservative estimate of recharge.

  7. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.S.; Gaines, D.; Korneev, V.; Baker, G.; Watson, D.

    2010-09-01

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole datasets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore-based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered-grid finite-difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low-velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically-defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Bowling Green, Kentucky, May 27-29, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2008-01-01

    *INTRODUCTION AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS* Karst aquifer systems are present throughout parts of the United States and some of its territories. The complex depositional environments that form carbonate rocks combined with post-depositional tectonic events and the diverse climatic regimes under which these rocks were formed result in unique hydrologic systems. The dissolution of calcium carbonate and the subsequent development of distinct and beautiful landscapes, caverns, and springs have resulted in some karst areas of the United States being designated as national or state parks and commercial caverns. Karst aquifers and landscapes that form in tropical areas, such as the north coast of Puerto Rico, differ greatly from karst areas in more arid climates, such as central Texas or western South Dakota. Many of these public and private lands contain unique flora and fauna associated with the hydrologic systems in these karst areas. As a result, multiple Federal, State, and local agencies have an interest in the study of karst terrains. Carbonate sediments and rocks (limestone and dolomite) are composed of greater than 50 percent carbonate minerals and the predominant carbonate mineral is calcium carbonate or limestone (CaCO3). Unlike terrigenous clastic sedimentation, the depositional processes that produce carbonate rocks are complex, involving both biological and physical processes. These depositional processes impact greatly the development of permeability of the sediments. Carbonate minerals readily dissolve or precipitate depending on the chemistry of the water flowing through the rock, thus the study of both marine and meteoric diagenesis of carbonate sediments is multidisciplinary. Even with a better understanding of the depositional environment and subsequent diagenesis, the dual porosity nature of karst aquifers presents challenges to scientists attempting to study ground-water flow and contaminant transport. Many of the major springs and aquifers in the United

  9. Estimated hydraulic properties for the surficial-and bedrock-aquifer system, Meddybemps, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, Forest P.; Garabedian, Stephen P.; Hansen, Bruce P.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical and numerical-modeling methods were used to estimate hydraulic properties of the aquifer system underlying the Eastern Surplus Company Superfund Site in Meddybemps, Maine. Estimates of hydraulic properties are needed to evaluate pathways for contaminants in ground water and to support evaluation and selection of remediation measures for contaminated ground water at this site. The hydraulic conductivity of surficial materials, determined from specific-capacity tests, ranges from 17 to 78 feet per day for wells completed in coarse-grained glaciomarine sediments, and from about 0.1 to 1.Ofoot per day for wells completed in till. The transmissivity of fractured bedrock determined from specific-capacity tests and aquifer tests in wells completed in less than 200 feet of bedrock ranges from about 0.09 to 130 feet squared per day. Relatively high values of transmissivity at the south end of the study area appear to be associated with a high-angle fracture or fracture zone that hydraulically connects two wells completed in bedrock. Transmissivities at six low-yielding (less than 0.5 gallon per minute) wells, which appear to lie within a poorly transmissive block of the bedrock, are consistently in a range of about 0.09 to 0.5 foot squared per day. The estimates of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity in the southern half of the study area are supported by results of steady-state calibration of a numerical model and simulation of a 24-hour pumping test at a well completed in bedrock. Hydraulic conductivity values for the surficial aquifer used in the model were 30 feet per day for coarse-grained glaciomarine sediments, 0.001 to 0.01 foot per day for fine-grained glaciomarine sediments, and 0.1 to 0.5 foot per day for till. As part of model calibration, a relatively transmissive zone in the surficial aquifer was extended beyond the hypothesized extent of coarse-grained sediments eastward to the Dennys River. Hydraulic conductivity values used for bedrock in

  10. Effects of steady-state assumption on hydraulic conductivity and recharge estimates in a surficial aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of a calibrated flow model to predict the behavior of a surficial aquifer system is governed the quality of the hydraulic conductivity and recharge estimates used. Reasonable lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivities can be estimated by steady-state simulations driven effective recharge rates that approximate the net effects of evapotranspiration, and water released from storage during periods of recession. Results from a hypothetical, transient, cross-sectional model indicated that most of the water was contributed uniformly from storage from five to 25 days after a recharge event. Results also showed that a steady-state, snapshot calibration approach can be used on aquifers in a humid climate with diffusivities between 20 and 500 m2/d. Most estimates of the lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivities of the hypothetical aquifer system were within 30% of the actual values. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity from the transient cases were similar to those from the snapshot calibration cases. The long-term recharge rate could be identified calibrating to multiple synoptic surveys that were sampled over the range of drier to wetter conditions. The effective recharge rates estimated for the driest and wettest conditions bracketed the long-term recharge rate. Results suggested that the effective recharge rate estimated for the synoptic survey with the lowest water level root-mean-square (RMS) error was the best estimate of the long-term recharge rate. A field application of the snapshot calibration approach simulated the surficial aquifer system beneath Cecil Field Naval Air Station well and provided reasonable estimates of the long-term recharge rate (0.4 mm/d) relative to the range of recharge rates that were independently estimated the chloride concentration ratio method (0.2 to 0.6 mm/d).The ability of a calibrated flow model to predict the behavior of a surficial aquifer system is governed by the quality of the hydraulic conductivity and recharge

  11. Model-derived estimates of groundwater mean ages, recharge rates, effective porosities and storage in a limestone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, M. E.; Mahin, D. A.

    1985-02-01

    The Edwards aquifer of south-central Texas, U.S.A., a highly fractured and faulted group of limestone formations, is the major water supply for the San Antonio area. A discrete-state compartment (DSC) model or mixing-cell model, based upon the conservation of environmental tritium within the aquifer, was used to obtain estimates of groundwater mean ages, recharge, effective porosities and storage in the Edwards aquifer in the vicinity of San Antonio, Texas. The model was calibrated and validated with the spatial and temporal (1953-1971) distributions of environmental 3H (tritium) in the groundwater. The final model consisted of 34 cells; eight of these cells represented the unconfined portion of the Edwards aquifer in the vicinity of the Balcones fault zone, an area where recharge occurs via streamflow infiltration and direct infiltration of precipitation. The model confirmed previous analyses of flow in the Edwards system: generally parallel to the Balcones fault zone with restricted flow perpendicular to this zone. Groundwater mean ages ranged from 16 to over 130 yr. The storage volume of the confined portion of the Edwards aquifer is ˜ 30.9 km 3, which corresponds to an average effective porosity of 4.8% (range: 1.9-8%). The average annual recharge to the Edwards aquifer during the period 1953-1971 was 0.614 km 3. The study demonstrated that discrete-state compartment models calibrated and validated with environmental tritium distributions can yield valuable hydrogeologic information that is difficult or expensive to obtain using traditional techniques. The approach used in the study is particularly suited to limestone aquifers, which are normally extremely difficult to analyze with traditional methods.

  12. Extending Theis' solution: Using transient pumping tests to estimate parameters of aquifer heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Müller, Sebastian; Mai, Juliane; Heße, Falk; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    A framework for interpreting transient pumping tests in heterogeneous transmissivity fields is developed to infer the overall geostatistical parameters of the medium without reconstructing the specific heterogeneous structure point wise. The methodology of Radial Coarse Graining is applied to deduce an effective radial description of multi-Gaussian transmissivity. It was used to derive an Effective Well Flow Solution for transient flow conditions including not only the storativity, but also the geometric mean, the variance, and the correlation length of log-transmissivity. This solution is shown to be appropriate to characterize the pumping test drawdown behavior in heterogeneous transmissivity fields making use of ensembles of simulated pumping tests with multiple combinations of statistical parameters. Based on the Effective Well Flow Solution, a method is developed for inferring heterogeneity parameters from transient pumping test drawdown data by inverse estimation. Thereby, the impact of statistical parameters on the drawdown is analyzed, allowing to determine the dependence of reliability of parameter estimates on location and number of measurements. It is shown, that the number of measurements can be reduced compared to steady state pumping tests. Finally, a sampling strategy for single aquifer analysis is developed, which allows to estimate the statistical parameters, in particular variance and correlation length for individual heterogeneous transmissivity fields making use of transient pumping test measurements at multiple locations.

  13. Multi-tracer investigation of groundwater residence time in a karstic aquifer: Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Lewis; Huff, G. F.

    2010-03-01

    Several natural and anthropogenic tracers have been used to evaluate groundwater residence time within a karstic limestone aquifer in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Natural groundwater discharge occurs in the lower Pecos Valley from a region of karst springs, wetlands and sinkhole lakes at Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, on the northeast margin of the Roswell Artesian Basin. The springs and sinkholes are formed in gypsum bedrock that serves as a leaky confining unit for an artesian aquifer in the underlying San Andres limestone. Because wetlands on the Refuge provide habitat for threatened and endangered species, there is concern about the potential for contamination by anthropogenic activity in the aquifer recharge area. Estimates of the time required for groundwater to travel through the artesian aquifer vary widely because of uncertainties regarding karst conduit flow. A better understanding of groundwater residence time is required to make informed decisions about management of water resources and wildlife habitat at Bitter Lakes. Results indicate that the artesian aquifer contains a significant component of water recharged within the last 10-50 years, combined with pre-modern groundwater originating from deeper underlying aquifers, some of which may be indirectly sourced from the high Sacramento Mountains to the west.

  14. Multi-Tracer Investigation of Groundwater Residence Time in a Karstic Aquifer: Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, L. A.; Huff, R.

    2009-12-01

    Several natural and anthropogenic tracers are used to evaluate groundwater residence time within the karstic limestone aquifer of the Roswell Artesian Basin, southeastern New Mexico, USA. Natural groundwater discharge occurs in the lower Pecos Valley from a region of karst springs, wetlands and sinkhole lakes at Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. The springs and sinkholes are formed in gypsum bedrock that serves as a leaky confining unit for an artesian aquifer in the underlying San Andres limestone. Because wetlands on the Refuge provide habitat for a number of threatened and endangered species, Refuge managers have expressed concern about the potential for contamination by anthropogenic activity in the aquifer recharge area. Estimates of the time required for groundwater to travel through the artesian aquifer vary widely because of uncertainties regarding the role of karst conduit flow. A better understanding of groundwater residence time is thus required to make informed decisions about management of water resources and wildlife habitat at Bitter Lakes. Results of tracer investigations indicate that the artesian aquifer contains a significant component of water recharged within the last 10 to 50 years, combined with pre-modern groundwater originating from deeper underlying aquifers, some of which may be indirectly sourced from the high Sacramento Mountains to the west.

  15. Deriving the time-variant transit time distributions of an Austrian karst system by a semi-distributed karst model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Kobler, Johannes; Kralik, Martin; Dirnboeck, Thomas; Humer, Franko; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Karst systems contribute around 50% to Austria's drinking water supply. Distributions of transit times of water and hence other water quality parameters can be highly valuable when assessing the risk of contamination of a karst aquifer. In this study we assess the transit time distributions of a dolomite karst system in Austria. Using a new type of semi-distributed model that considers the spatial heterogeneity of the karst system by distribution functions we simulated a range of spatially variable pathways through the karst system. To assure a reliable calibration of the model we used observations of discharge at 2 different locations and 3 time series of solute concentrations (DOC, NO3 and SO4). We benchmarked the model with a split sample test using all 5 types of observations. Having enough indication for a realistic representation of the system and its flow and storage behaviour, the range of simulated pathways through the karst system was used to derive transit time distributions for different initial conditions. We use experimentally derived information about transit times (water ages, O 18 observations, tracer experiments) to evaluate the simulated residence time distributions. Finally, the process-based structure of the model allows to attribute the different transit time distributions to physical processes and pathways in the karst system and to assess the system's vulnerability on contamination.

  16. Regional scale hydrologic modeling of a karst-dominant geomorphology: The case study of the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagò, Anna; Efstathiou, Dionissios; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.; Franchini, Marco; Bidoglio, Giovanni; Kritsotakis, Marinos

    2016-09-01

    Crete Island (Greece) is a karst dominated region that faces limited water supply and increased seasonal demand, especially during summer for agricultural and touristic uses. In addition, due to the mountainous terrain, interbasin water transfer is very limited. The resulting water imbalance requires a correct quantification of available water resources in view of developing appropriate management plans to face the problem of water shortage. The aim of this work is the development of a methodology using the SWAT model and a karst-flow model (KSWAT, Karst SWAT model) for the quantification of a spatially and temporally explicit hydrologic water balance of karst-dominated geomorphology in order to assess the sustainability of the actual water use. The application was conducted in the Island of Crete using both hard (long time series of streamflow and spring monitoring stations) and soft data (i.e. literature information of individual processes). The KSWAT model estimated the water balance under normal hydrological condition as follows: 6400 Mm3/y of precipitation, of which 40% (2500 Mm3/y) was lost through evapotranspiration, 5% was surface runoff and 55% percolated into the soil contributing to lateral flow (2%), and recharging the shallow (9%) and deep aquifer (44%). The water yield was estimated as 22% of precipitation, of which about half was the contribution from spring discharges (9% of precipitation). The application of the KSWAT model increased our knowledge about water resources availability and distribution in Crete under different hydrologic conditions. The model was able to capture the hydrology of the karst areas allowing a better management and planning of water resources under scarcity.

  17. Estimation of recharge rates to the sand and gravel aquifer using environmental tritium, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, Jayne Fifield; Olimpio, Julio C.

    1986-01-01

    Estimation of the average annual rate of ground-water recharge to sand and gravel aquifers using elevated tritium concentrations in ground water is an alternative to traditional steady-state and water-balance recharge-rate methods. The concept of the tritium tracer method is that the average annual rate of ground-water recharge over a period of time can be calculated from the depth of the peak tritium concentration in the aquifer. Assuming that ground-water flow is vertically downward and that aquifer properties are reasonably homogeneous, and knowing the date of maximum tritium concentration in precipitation and the current depth to the tritium peak from the water table, the average recharge rate can be calculated. The method, which is a direct-measurement technique, was applied at two sites on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. At site 1, the average annual recharge rate between 1964 and 1983 was 26.1 inches per year, or 68 percent of the average annual precipitation, and the estimated uncertainty is ?15 percent. At site 2, the multilevel water samplers were not constructed deep enough to determine the peak concentration of tritium in ground water. The tritium profile at site 2 resembles the upper part of the tritium profile at site 1 and indicates that the average recharge rate was at least 16 .7 inches per year, or at least 44 percent of the average annual precipitation. The Nantucket tritium recharge rates clearly are higher than rates determined elsewhere in southeastern Massachusetts using the tritium, water-table-fluctuation, and water-balance (Thornthwaite) methods, regardless of the method or the area. Because the recharge potential on Nantucket is so high (runoff is only 2 percent of the total water balance), the tritium recharge rates probably represent the effective upper limit for ground-water recharge in this region. The recharge-rate values used by Guswa and LeBlanc (1985) and LeBlanc (1984) in their ground-water-flow computer models of Cape Cod are

  18. Spring hydrograph simulation of karstic aquifers: Impacts of variable recharge area, intermediate storage and memory effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seiyed Mossa; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.

    2017-09-01

    A simple conceptual rainfall-runoff model is proposed for the estimation of groundwater balance components in complex karst aquifers. In the proposed model the effects of memory length of different karst flow systems of base-flow, intermediate-flow, and quick-flow and also time variation of recharge area (RA) during a hydrological year were investigated. The model consists of three sub-models: soil moisture balance (SMB), epikarst balance (EPB), and groundwater balance (GWB) to simulate the daily spring discharge. The SMB and EPB sub-models utilize the mass conservation equation to compute the variation of moisture storages in the soil cover and epikarst, respectively. The GWB sub-model computes the spring discharge hydrograph through three parallel linear reservoirs for base-flow, intermediate-flow, and quick-flow. Three antecedent recharge indices are defined and embedded in the model structure to deal with the memory effect of three karst flow systems to antecedent recharge flow. The Sasan Karst aquifer located in the semi-arid region of south-west Iran with a continuous long-term (21-years) daily meteorological and discharge data are considered to describe model calibration and validation procedures. The effects of temporal variations of RA of karst formations during the hydrological year namely invariant RA, two RA (winter and summer), four RA (seasonal), and twelve RA (monthly) are assessed to determine their impact on the model efficiency. Results indicated that the proposed model with monthly-variant RA is able to reproduce acceptable simulation results based on modified Kling-Gupta efficiency (KGE = -0.83). The results of density-based global sensitivity analysis for dry (June to September) and a wet (October to May) period reveal the dominant influence of RA (with sensitivity indices equal to 0.89 and 0.93, respectively) in spring discharge simulation. The sensitivity of simulated spring discharge to memory effect of different karst formations during the

  19. Estimation of temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge in unconfined sand aquifers using Scots pine inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, P.; Rossi, P. M.; Kløve, B.

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and land use are rapidly changing the amount and temporal distribution of recharge in northern aquifers. This paper presents a novel method for distributing Monte Carlo simulations of 1-D sandy sediment profile spatially to estimate transient recharge in an unconfined esker aquifer. The modelling approach uses data-based estimates for the most important parameters controlling the total amount (canopy cover) and timing (thickness of the unsaturated zone) of groundwater recharge. Scots pine canopy was parameterized to leaf area index (LAI) using forestry inventory data. Uncertainty in the parameters controlling sediment hydraulic properties and evapotranspiration (ET) was carried over from the Monte Carlo runs to the final recharge estimates. Different mechanisms for lake, soil, and snow evaporation and transpiration were used in the model set-up. Finally, the model output was validated with independent recharge estimates using the water table fluctuation (WTF) method and baseflow estimation. The results indicated that LAI is important in controlling total recharge amount. Soil evaporation (SE) compensated for transpiration for areas with low LAI values, which may be significant in optimal management of forestry and recharge. Different forest management scenarios tested with the model showed differences in annual recharge of up to 100 mm. The uncertainty in recharge estimates arising from the simulation parameters was lower than the interannual variation caused by climate conditions. It proved important to take unsaturated thickness and vegetation cover into account when estimating spatially and temporally distributed recharge in sandy unconfined aquifers.

  20. Identification of recharge zones in the Lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer using high-resolution precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Jamie; Mercer, Andrew; Rigby, James R.; Grimes, Alexandria

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley play a critical role in agricultural productivity due to the widespread use of irrigation during the growing season. However, the unknown specifics of surface-atmosphere feedbacks in the region, along with diminishing groundwater availability and the non-sustainable trend in irrigation draws from the alluvial aquifer, makes it difficult for water resource managers to make sound decisions for future water sustainability. As a result, it is crucial to identify spatial and temporal associations between local rainfall patterns and groundwater levels to determine the influence of precipitation on regional aquifer recharge. Specifically, it is critical to define the recharge zones of the aquifer so that rainfall distribution can be used to assess potential groundwater recovery. This project addresses the issue of defining areas of recharge in the lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer (LMRAA) through an assessment of historical precipitation variability using high-resolution radar-derived precipitation estimates. A rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) of both groundwater and precipitation data from October through April is used to define locations where aquifer levels show the greatest variability, with a stepwise regression approach used to define areas where rainfall and groundwater levels show the strongest association. Results show that the greatest recharge through direct rainfall is along the Tallahatchie River basin in the northeastern Mississippi Delta, with recharge along the periphery of the LMRAA likely a result of direct water flux from surface hydrologic features.

  1. Ratosa playa lake in southern Spain. Karst pan or compound sink?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Pedrera, Antonio; Benavente-Herrera, José

    2015-04-01

    In Andalusia (Spain), there are more than 45 semiarid playa lakes protected as natural reserves and related to karstic outcrops. Some of them are located over regional karstic aquifers and have internal drainage networks with sporadic surface outlets, such as sinkholes (compound sinks), but the majority of such playas have no internal drainage systems, so the only water output is evaporation (karst pans). Karst pans are perched and disconnected from the groundwater system. The fact that the Ratosa playa lake is partially located over a karstic Sierra, as well as other hydromorphological observations, it is suggested that the system could be of a compound type, but a detailed hydrogeological analysis showed that the playa is disconnected from the aquifer, so it is in fact a karst pan. Once the hydrological functioning had been established, a monthly water balance for a 10-year period (1998-2008), enabled us to reproduce the evolution of the water level of the playa lake. Estimations of runoff were carried out by a soil water estimate for a water holding capacity in the soil of 191 mm. Results show a good correlation (>90%) after calibration with the time series of water level in the lake for the same period confirming geological observations. Our results highlight that this water body is extremely vulnerable to hydrological alterations of its watershed caused by human activities, particularly those related to land-use change for agriculture. For this reason, we propose a new protection zone, based on hydrological knowledge, instead of the present Peripheral Area of Protection.

  2. Use of NMR logging to obtain estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the High Plains aquifer, Nebraska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubac, Katherine; Knight, Rosemary; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bachman, Nate; Grau, Ben; Cannia, Jim; Williams, John

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the most important parameters of interest in groundwater applications because it quantifies the ease with which water can flow through an aquifer material. Hydraulic conductivity is typically measured by conducting aquifer tests or wellbore flow (WBF) logging. Of interest in our research is the use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging to obtain information about water-filled porosity and pore space geometry, the combination of which can be used to estimate K. In this study, we acquired a suite of advanced geophysical logs, aquifer tests, WBF logs, and sidewall cores at the field site in Lexington, Nebraska, which is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. We first used two empirical equations developed for petroleum applications to predict K from NMR logging data: the Schlumberger Doll Research equation (KSDR) and the Timur-Coates equation (KT-C), with the standard empirical constants determined for consolidated materials. We upscaled our NMR-derived K estimates to the scale of the WBF-logging K(KWBF-logging) estimates for comparison. All the upscaled KT-C estimates were within an order of magnitude of KWBF-logging and all of the upscaled KSDR estimates were within 2 orders of magnitude of KWBF-logging. We optimized the fit between the upscaled NMR-derived K and KWBF-logging estimates to determine a set of site-specific empirical constants for the unconsolidated materials at our field site. We conclude that reliable estimates of K can be obtained from NMR logging data, thus providing an alternate method for obtaining estimates of K at high levels of vertical resolution.

  3. Use of NMR logging to obtain estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the High Plains aquifer, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dlubac, Katherine; Knight, Rosemary; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bachman, Nate; Grau, Ben; Cannia, Jim; Williams, John

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the most important parameters of interest in groundwater applications because it quantifies the ease with which water can flow through an aquifer material. Hydraulic conductivity is typically measured by conducting aquifer tests or wellbore flow (WBF) logging. Of interest in our research is the use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging to obtain information about water-filled porosity and pore space geometry, the combination of which can be used to estimate K. In this study, we acquired a suite of advanced geophysical logs, aquifer tests, WBF logs, and sidewall cores at the field site in Lexington, Nebraska, which is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. We first used two empirical equations developed for petroleum applications to predict K from NMR logging data: the Schlumberger Doll Research equation (KSDR) and the Timur-Coates equation (KT-C), with the standard empirical constants determined for consolidated materials. We upscaled our NMR-derived K estimates to the scale of the WBF-logging K(KWBF-logging) estimates for comparison. All the upscaled KT-C estimates were within an order of magnitude of KWBF-logging and all of the upscaled KSDR estimates were within 2 orders of magnitude of KWBF-logging. We optimized the fit between the upscaled NMR-derived K and KWBF-logging estimates to determine a set of site-specific empirical constants for the unconsolidated materials at our field site. We conclude that reliable estimates of K can be obtained from NMR logging data, thus providing an alternate method for obtaining estimates of K at high levels of vertical resolution.

  4. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Commer, Michael; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Englert, Andreas L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-06-11

    We consider a field-scale tracer experiment conducted in 2007 in a shallow uranium-contaminated aquifer at Rifle, Colorado. In developing a reliable approach for inferring hydrological properties at the site through inverse modeling of the tracer data, decisions made on how to parameterize heterogeneity (i.e., how to represent a heterogeneous distribution using a limited number of parameters that are amenable to estimation) are of paramount importance. We present an approach for hydrological inversion of the tracer data and explore, using a 2D synthetic example at first, how parameterization affects the solution, and how additional characterization data could be incorporated to reduce uncertainty. Specifically, we examine sensitivity of the results to the configuration of pilot points used in a geostatistical parameterization, and to the sampling frequency and measurement error of the concentration data. A reliable solution of the inverse problem is found when the pilot point configuration is carefully implemented. In addition, we examine the use of a zonation parameterization, in which the geometry of the geological facies is known (e.g., from geophysical data or core data), to reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution and the number of unknown parameters to be estimated. When zonation information is only available for a limited region, special treatment in the remainder of the model is necessary, such as using a geostatistical parameterization. Finally, inversion of the actual field data is performed using 2D and 3D models, and results are compared with slug test data.

  5. Advanced karst hydrological and contaminant monitoring techniques for real-time and high resolution applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In telogenetic and soil-mantled karst aquifers, the movement of autogenic recharge through the epikarstic zone and into the regional aquifer can be a complex process and have implications for flooding, groundwater contamination, and other difficult to capture processes. Recent advances in instrument...

  6. Recent Trends in Karst Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Arthur N.

    1984-01-01

    Recent trends related to the karst processes and the evolution of karst landscapes are discussed. The hydrochemical processes responsible for the origin of karst are expanded on to illustrate the present scope of karst studies. These geomorphological studies are combined with concepts and techniques from hydraulics, chemistry, and mathematics. (JN)

  7. Recent Trends in Karst Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Arthur N.

    1984-01-01

    Recent trends related to the karst processes and the evolution of karst landscapes are discussed. The hydrochemical processes responsible for the origin of karst are expanded on to illustrate the present scope of karst studies. These geomorphological studies are combined with concepts and techniques from hydraulics, chemistry, and mathematics. (JN)

  8. Estimation of hydraulic parameters from an unconfined aquifer test conducted in a glacial outwash deposit, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Garabedian, Stephen P.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2000-01-01

    An aquifer test conducted in a sand and gravel, glacial outwash deposit on Cape Cod, Massachusetts was analyzed by means of a model for flow to a partially penetrating well in a homogeneous, anisotropic unconfined aquifer. The model is designed to account for all significant mechanisms expected to influence drawdown in observation piezometers and in the pumped well. In addition to the usual fluid-flow and storage processes, additional processes include effects of storage in the pumped well, storage in observation piezometers, effects of skin at the pumped-well screen, and effects of drainage from the zone above the water table. The aquifer was pumped at a rate of 320 gallons per minute for 72-hours and drawdown measurements were made in the pumped well and in 20 piezometers located at various distances from the pumped well and depths below the land surface. To facilitate the analysis, an automatic parameter estimation algorithm was used to obtain relevant unconfined aquifer parameters, including the saturated thickness and a set of empirical parameters that relate to gradual drainage from the unsaturated zone. Drainage from the unsaturated zone is treated in this paper as a finite series of exponential terms, each of which contains one empirical parameter that is to be determined. It was necessary to account for effects of gradual drainage from the unsaturated zone to obtain satisfactory agreement between measured and simulated drawdown, particularly in piezometers located near the water table. The commonly used assumption of instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone gives rise to large discrepancies between measured and predicted drawdown in the intermediate-time range and can result in inaccurate estimates of aquifer parameters when automatic parameter estimation procedures are used. The values of the estimated hydraulic parameters are consistent with estimates from prior studies and from what is known about the aquifer at the site. Effects of

  9. The Karst Waters Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Karst Waters Institute (KWI) is a U.S. research organization that was formed to combine the skills of academic, governmental, and private sector specialists to solve existing karst water problems and anticipate future problems. KWI has been incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation in West Virginia to provide the human expertise and database needed to assist the nation in the preservation and utilization of its water resources. KWI plans to develop a core of resident and visiting scientists from across the nation and overseas, technicians, support staff, and graduate students. Its mission is to conduct research to improve our understanding of karst phenomena, to develop techniques to prevent environmental problems from occurring in karst areas, to assist in rectifying existing environmental problems, and to provide education and training for professionals and the general public on the risks and benefits of karst areas.

  10. Estimating Aquifer Properties in the San Joaquin Basin, California, through the Analysis of InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. G.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Chen, J.; Crews, J.; Reeves, J.

    2015-12-01

    Increased groundwater withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley, California, due to recent droughts has over-stressed many parts of the aquifer system, resulting in widespread aquifer compaction and land subsidence. Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, or InSAR, we measure the magnitude of land subsidence to be as much as 20 cm/year for the period from 2007-2011. By comparing the observed subsidence with current and historic groundwater levels, we estimate that 90% of the observed subsidence is inelastic, or not recoverable. Due to delayed drainage in thick aquitards, we find that the majority (>95%) of compaction is caused by thin clay lenses within the upper and lower aquifers, which agrees with previous studies in the area. We use representative skeletal storage coefficients from previous studies in conjunction with observed subsidence and groundwater levels in a 1-dimensional vertical diffusion model to estimate the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, and determine it is on the order of 1×10-6 cm/second.

  11. Geostatistical estimation of the transmissivity in a highly fractured metamorphic and crystalline aquifer (Man-Danane Region, Western Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razack, Moumtaz; Lasm, Théophile

    2006-06-01

    This work is aimed at estimating the transmissivity of highly fractured hard rock aquifers using a geostatistical approach. The studied aquifer is formed by the crystalline and metamorphic rocks of the Western Ivory Coast (West Africa), in the Man Danané area. The study area covers 7290 km 2 (90 km×81 km). The fracturing network is dense and well connected, without a marked fracture direction. A data base comprising 118 transmissivity ( T) values and 154 specific capacity ( Q/ s) values was compiled. A significant empirical relationship between T and Q/ s was found, which enabled the transmissivity data to be supplemented. The variographic analysis of the two variables showed that the variograms of T and Q/ s (which are lognormal variables) are much more structured than those of log T and log Q/ s (which are normal variables). This result is contrary to what was previously published and raises the question whether normality is necessary in geostatistical analysis. Several input and geostatistical estimations of the transmissivity were tested using the cross validation procedure: measured transmissivity data; supplemented transmissivity data; kriging; cokriging. The cross validation results showed that the best estimation is provided using the kriging procedure, the transmissivity field represented by the whole data sample (measured+estimated using specific capacity) and the structural model evaluated solely on the measured transmissivity. The geostatistical approach provided in fine a reliable estimation of the transmissivity of the Man Danané aquifer, which will be used as an input in forthcoming modelling.

  12. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  13. Estimation of Release History of Pollutant Source and Dispersion Coefficient of Aquifer Using Trained ANN Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R.; Ayaz, M.; Jain, A.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the release history of a groundwater pollutant source is critical in the prediction of the future trend of the pollutant movement and in choosing an effective remediation strategy. Moreover, for source sites which have undergone an ownership change, the estimated release history can be utilized for appropriate allocation of the costs of remediation among different parties who may be responsible for the contamination. Estimation of the release history with the help of concentration data is an inverse problem that becomes ill-posed because of the irreversible nature of the dispersion process. Breakthrough curves represent the temporal variation of pollutant concentration at a particular location, and contain significant information about the source and the release history. Several methodologies have been developed to solve the inverse problem of estimating the source and/or porous medium properties using the breakthrough curves as a known input. A common problem in the use of the breakthrough curves for this purpose is that, in most field situations, we have little or no information about the time of measurement of the breakthrough curve with respect to the time when the pollutant source becomes active. We develop an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model to estimate the release history of a groundwater pollutant source through the use of breakthrough curves. It is assumed that the source location is known but the time dependent contaminant source strength is unknown. This temporal variation of the strength of the pollutant source is the output of the ANN model that is trained using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm utilizing synthetically generated breakthrough curves as inputs. A single hidden layer was used in the neural network and, to utilize just sufficient information and reduce the required sampling duration, only the upper half of the curve is used as the input pattern. The second objective of this work was to identify the aquifer parameters. An

  14. Hazard connected to tunnel construction in Mt Stena karstic area (Rosandra Valley, Classical Karst)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, F.; Boschin, W.; Visintin, L.; Zini, L.

    2009-04-01

    Rosandra Valley -a unique geomorphological environment- is located in the western side of the Classical Karst plateau. This deep limestone gorge is crossed by a stream that is fed by a large basin located in Slovenia. Rosandra Valley is the only example of Classical Karst river valley with surface hydrography; the torrent digs a deep gully into the rock, rich in rapids, swirl holes, small waterfalls, enclosed meanders and basins; here, the first seepage phenomena occur, and part of the water feeds the underground aquifer. Rosandra Valley is theatre to complex structural situation; the NE slope culminates in the structure of Mt Stena, a limestone tectonic scale located between two faults and firmly rooted in the karst platform. Tectonics is quite important for the development of deep karst in this area; Mt Stena, in particular, hosts a comprehensive net of articulated and diversely shaped caves, basically organised on several levels, which stretches over a total of 9,000 metres, bearing testimony to ancient geological and hydrogeological origins. The deepest areas of the system reach a suspended aquifer that is probably sustained by an overthrust and placed about 100 meters above Rosandra torrent underground aquifer. During feasibility studies about Trieste-Divača high velocity railway link, interaction between project and karst features was examined; in fact the proximity of proposal project and Mt Stena karst system suggest to improve the knowledge related to karst and hydrogeological aspects of the massif. Compatibly with the project requirements, risk of voids intersection and water contamination were analyzed. In fact the Mt Stena suspended aquifer partially feeds Rosandra torrent which flows in a protected natural area. Karst features were represented in a 3D model in order to better understand the spatial relationship between railway project and karst system.

  15. Pesticides and biocides in a karst catchment: Identification of contaminant sources and related flow components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai; Birk, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Karst aquifers are widely used as drinking water resources. However, their high vulnerability to chemical and bacterial contamination due to the heterogeneity in aquifer properties (highly conductive solution conduits embedded in the less conductive fissured rock) is difficult to assess and thus poses major challenges to the management of karst water resources. Contamination of karst springs by organic micro-pollutants has been observed in recent studies. Within this study the water from different springs draining one karst aquifer as well as the main sinking stream replenishing it were analysed before, during and after a storm water event in order to examine the occurrence of different pesticides and biocides. Contaminants from both urban as well as agricultural origin could be detected in the water with concentrations in the low ng/L range (tebuconazole, carbendazim, diuron, isoproturon, terbutryn, atrazine, dichlorobenzamide (BAM), which is a metabolite of dichlobenil). While some compounds could be followed from the sinking stream to the springs (e.g. dichlorobenzamide) some seem to have a source in the autogenic recharge from the karst plateau (Tebuconazole: wood preservative in buildings). These compounds appear to be related to fast flow components with residence times in the order of days, which are known from a number of tracer tests with fluorescent dyes. However, the occurrence of the pesticide atrazine (banned since 1995 in Austria) in the springs, while on the other hand no current input into the karst occurs, shows that some compounds have long residence times in the karst aquifer. These differences in residence times can hardly be attributed to differences in physico-chemical properties of the compounds and must thus be due to the presence of slow and fast flow components. This is in agreement with the duality of karst aquifers due to highly conductive networks of solution conduits embedded in less conductive fissured carbonate rocks.

  16. River-groundwater connectivity in a karst system, Wellington, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Mohammadreza; Baker, Andy; Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Andersen, Martin S.

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of river-aquifer connectivity in karst environments is difficult due to the presence of conduits and caves. This work demonstrates how geophysical imaging combined with hydrogeological data can improve the conceptualization of surface-water and groundwater interactions in karst terrains. The objective of this study is to understand the association between the Bell River and karst-alluvial aquifer at Wellington, Australia. River and groundwater levels were continuously monitored, and electrical resistivity imaging and water quality surveys conducted. Two-dimensional resistivity imaging mapped the transition between the alluvium and karst. This is important for highlighting the proximity of the saturated alluvial sediments to the water-filled caves and conduits. In the unsaturated zone the resistivity imaging differentiated between air- and sediment-filled karst features, and in the saturated zone it mapped the location of possible water- and sediment-filled caves. Groundwater levels are dynamic and respond quickly to changes in the river stage, implying that there is a strong hydraulic connection, and that the river is losing and recharging the adjacent aquifer. Groundwater extractions (1,370 ML, megalitres, annually) from the alluvial aquifer can cause the groundwater level to fall by as much as 1.5 m in a year. However, when the Bell River flows after significant rainfall in the upper catchment, river-leakage rapidly recharges the alluvial and karst aquifers. This work demonstrates that in complex hydrogeological settings, the combined use of geophysical imaging, hydrograph analysis and geochemical measurements provide insights on the local karst hydrology and groundwater processes, which will enable better water-resource and karst management.

  17. River-groundwater connectivity in a karst system, Wellington, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Mohammadreza; Baker, Andy; Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Andersen, Martin S.

    2016-12-01

    The characterization of river-aquifer connectivity in karst environments is difficult due to the presence of conduits and caves. This work demonstrates how geophysical imaging combined with hydrogeological data can improve the conceptualization of surface-water and groundwater interactions in karst terrains. The objective of this study is to understand the association between the Bell River and karst-alluvial aquifer at Wellington, Australia. River and groundwater levels were continuously monitored, and electrical resistivity imaging and water quality surveys conducted. Two-dimensional resistivity imaging mapped the transition between the alluvium and karst. This is important for highlighting the proximity of the saturated alluvial sediments to the water-filled caves and conduits. In the unsaturated zone the resistivity imaging differentiated between air- and sediment-filled karst features, and in the saturated zone it mapped the location of possible water- and sediment-filled caves. Groundwater levels are dynamic and respond quickly to changes in the river stage, implying that there is a strong hydraulic connection, and that the river is losing and recharging the adjacent aquifer. Groundwater extractions (1,370 ML, megalitres, annually) from the alluvial aquifer can cause the groundwater level to fall by as much as 1.5 m in a year. However, when the Bell River flows after significant rainfall in the upper catchment, river-leakage rapidly recharges the alluvial and karst aquifers. This work demonstrates that in complex hydrogeological settings, the combined use of geophysical imaging, hydrograph analysis and geochemical measurements provide insights on the local karst hydrology and groundwater processes, which will enable better water-resource and karst management.

  18. Karst subsidence in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Waste disposal site selection and facility design in regions dominated by carbonate bedrock must carefully consider karst development and the factors which contribute to subsidence activity. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed a three phase study of karst subsidence in East Tennessee to quantify historical subsidence activity. The purpose of the study was to determine the principal factors which cause karst subsidence in the region. Techniques used and results obtained in this study form a basis for more detailed risk assessment at the local scale within the region. As development pressures diminish available land for various uses, risk-based land use decisions must be made to site critical facilities. To fulfill the study objectives a three phase study was designed including, (1) collection of subsidence data and compilation of a database, (2) performance of detailed studies of subsidence in three, two-to-five square-mile areas, and (3) synthesis of data obtained to; quantify the predominant sinkhole collapse dimensions, and identify events prior to subsidence or collapse events which may have caused the event, and estimate the intensity of subsidence as a function of geologic unit within subregional areas of higher and lower subsidence risk. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Estimation of recharge rates to the sand and gravel aquifer using environmental tritium, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, J.F.; Olimpio, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Estimation of the average annual rate of ground-water recharge to sand and gravel aquifers using elevated tritium concentrations in groundwater is an alternative to traditional steady-state and water balance recharge rate methods. The Nantucket tritium recharge rates clearly are higher than rates determined elsewhere in southeastern Massachusetts using the tritium, water table fluctuation, and water balance methods, regardless of the method or the area. Because the recharge potential on Nantucket is so high (runoff is only 2% of the total water balance), the tritium recharge rates probably represent the effective upper limit for groundwater recharge in this region. The accuracy of the tritium method is dependent on two factors: the accuracy of the effective porosity data, and the sampling interval. For some sites, the need for recharge rate data may require a determination as statistically accurate as that which can be provided by the tritium method. However, the tritium method is more costly and more time consuming than the other methods. For many sites, a less accurate, less expensive, and faster method of recharge rate determination might be more satisfactory. 40 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. GC estimation of organic hydrocarbons that threaten shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zawrah, M F; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; El-Sayed, E; Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Tantawy, M A

    2014-11-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination is one of the important environmental problems at petroleum-related sites, which causes critical environmental and health defects. Severe petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from coastal refinery plant was detected in a shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer is bordered by Gulf in the Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The overall objective of this investigation is to estimate the organic hydrocarbons in shallow sandy aquifers, released from continuous major point-source of pollution over a long period of time (91 years ago). This oil refinery contamination resulted mainly in the improper disposal of hydrocarbons and produced water releases caused by equipment failures, vandalism, and accidents that caused direct groundwater pollution or discharge into the gulf. In order to determine the fate of hydrocarbons, detailed field investigations were made to provide intensive deep profile information. Eight composite randomly sediment samples from a test plot were selected for demonstration. The tested plot was 50 m long × 50 m wide × 70 cm deep. Sediment samples were collected using an American auger around the point 29° 57' 33″ N and 32° 30' 40″ E in 2012 and covered an area of 2,500 m(2) which represents nearly 1/15 of total plant area (the total area of the plant is approximately 3.250 km(2)). The detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were 2.44, 2.62, 4.54, 4.78, 2.83, 3.22, 2.56, and 3.13 wt%, respectively. TPH was calculated by differences in weight and subjected to gas chromatography (GC). Hydrocarbons were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard (HP-7890 plus) gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The percentage of paraffine of the investigated TPH samples was 7.33, 7.24, 7.58, 8.25, 10.25, 9.89, 14.77, and 17.53 wt%, respectively.

  1. Estimates of hydraulic properties from a one-dimensional numerical model of vertical aquifer-system deformation, Lorenzi site, Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Land subsidence related to aquifer-system compaction and ground-water withdrawals has been occurring in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, since the 1930's, and by the late 1980's some areas in the valley had subsided more than 5 feet. Since the late 1980's, seasonal artificial-recharge programs have lessened the effects of summertime pumping on aquifer-system compaction, but the long-term trend of compaction continues in places. Since 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey has continuously monitored water-level changes in three piezometers and vertical aquifer-system deformation with a borehole extensometer at the Lorenzi site in Las Vegas, Nevada. A one-dimensional, numerical, ground-water flow model of the aquifer system below the Lorenzi site was developed for the period 1901-2000, to estimate aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage, and aquitard and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage. Aquifer water-level data were used in the model as the aquifer-system stresses that controlled simulated vertical aquifer-system deformation. Nonlinear-regression methods were used to calibrate the model, utilizing estimated and measured aquifer-system deformation data to minimize a weighted least-squares objective function, and estimate optimal property values. Model results indicate that at the Lorenzi site, aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity is 3 x 10-6 feet per day, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage is 4 x 10-5 per foot, aquitard elastic skeletal specific storage is 5 x 10-6 per foot, and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage is 3 x 10-7 per foot. Regression statistics indicate that the model and data provided sufficient information to estimate the target properties, the model adequately simulated observed data, and the estimated property values are accurate and unique.

  2. Quantification of submarine/intertidal groundwater discharge and nutrient loading from a lowland karst catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, T.; Gill, L. W.; Naughton, O.; Johnston, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now recognised to be a process of significant importance to coastal systems and is of increasing interest within oceanographic and hydrologic research communities. However, due to the inherent difficulty of measuring SGD accurately, its quantification at any particular location is a relatively slow process often involving multiple labour intensive methods. In this paper, the SGD occurring at Kinvara Bay, the outlet of a lowland karst catchment in Western Ireland, is estimated using a hydrological model of the karst aquifer and then further verified by means of a relatively simple salinity survey. Discharge at Kinvara predominantly occurs via two springs, Kinvara West (KW) which serves as the outlet of a major, primarily allogenically fed, karst conduit network and Kinvara East (KE) which discharges water from more diffuse/autogenic sources. Discharge from these springs occurs intertidally and as such, their flow rates cannot be measured using traditional methods. Using the hydrological model, flow rates from KW were seen to vary between 5 and 16 m3/s with a mean value of 8.7 m3/s. Through hydrochemical analysis, this estimated discharge was found to be supplemented by an additional 14-18% via sources not accounted for by the model. Mean discharge at KE was also estimated as approximately 2 m3/s, thus the total mean discharge from both Kinvara Springs was determined to be 11.9-12.3 m3/s. Overall, the range of discharge was found to be lower than previous studies have estimated (as these studies had no means of quantifying attenuation within the conduit network). Combining this discharge with nutrient concentrations from the springs, the nutrient loading from the springs into the bay was estimated as 1230 kg/day N and 24.3 kg/day P. This research illustrates the benefits of a numerical modelling approach to the quantification of SGD when used in the appropriate hydrological scenario.

  3. Karst groundwater: a challenge for new resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalowicz, Michel

    2005-03-01

    Karst aquifers have complex and original characteristics which make them very differ