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  1. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 4: Results of SURV-4 and SURV-6

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, W.E.; Hayner, G.O.; Carlson, B.G.; Ebersole, E.R.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. For both the irradiated and thermally aged samples, one half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In addition to the fifteen types of metal samples, graphite blocks were irradiated in the SURV subassemblies to determine the effect of irradiation on the graphite neutron shield. In this report, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 2.2 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (over 2,994 days) are compared with those of similar specimens thermally aged at 370 C for 2,994 days in the storage basket of the reactor. The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, impact strength, and creep.

  2. 25 CFR 39.806 - How is the SURV calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Determining the Amount Necessary To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.806 How is the SURV... school year 1999-2000 was $11,000....

  3. 25 CFR 39.806 - How is the SURV calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Determining the Amount Necessary To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.806 How is the SURV... school year 1999-2000 was $11,000....

  4. 25 CFR 39.806 - How is the SURV calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Determining the Amount Necessary To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.806 How is the SURV... school year 1999-2000 was $11,000....

  5. 25 CFR 39.806 - How is the SURV calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Determining the Amount Necessary To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.806 How is the SURV... school year 1999-2000 was $11,000....

  6. 25 CFR 39.806 - How is the SURV calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Determining the Amount Necessary To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.806 How is the SURV... school year 1999-2000 was $11,000....

  7. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}.

  8. SurvNet: a web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Roebuck, Paul; Grünewald, Stefan; Liang, Han

    2012-07-01

    An important task in biomedical research is identifying biomarkers that correlate with patient clinical data, and these biomarkers then provide a critical foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Conventionally, such an analysis is based on individual genes, but the results are often noisy and difficult to interpret. Using a biological network as the searching platform, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more robust and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease. We have developed a novel bioinformatics web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data, SurvNet. The web server takes three input files: one biological network file, representing a gene regulatory or protein interaction network; one molecular profiling file, containing any type of gene- or protein-centred high-throughput biological data (e.g. microarray expression data or DNA methylation data); and one patient survival data file (e.g. patients' progression-free survival data). Given user-defined parameters, SurvNet will automatically search for subnetworks that most correlate with the observed patient survival data. As the output, SurvNet will generate a list of network biomarkers and display them through a user-friendly interface. SurvNet can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/SurvNet.

  9. ExSurv: A Web Resource for Prognostic Analyses of Exons Across Human Cancers Using Clinical Transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Hashemikhabir, Seyedsasan; Budak, Gungor; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Survival analysis in biomedical sciences is generally performed by correlating the levels of cellular components with patients' clinical features as a common practice in prognostic biomarker discovery. While the common and primary focus of such analysis in cancer genomics so far has been to identify the potential prognostic genes, alternative splicing - a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism that affects the functional form of a protein due to inclusion or exclusion of individual exons giving rise to alternative protein products, has increasingly gained attention due to the prevalence of splicing aberrations in cancer transcriptomes. Hence, uncovering the potential prognostic exons can not only help in rationally designing exon-specific therapeutics but also increase specificity toward more personalized treatment options. To address this gap and to provide a platform for rational identification of prognostic exons from cancer transcriptomes, we developed ExSurv (https://exsurv.soic.iupui.edu), a web-based platform for predicting the survival contribution of all annotated exons in the human genome using RNA sequencing-based expression profiles for cancer samples from four cancer types available from The Cancer Genome Atlas. ExSurv enables users to search for a gene of interest and shows survival probabilities for all the exons associated with a gene and found to be significant at the chosen threshold. ExSurv also includes raw expression values across the cancer cohort as well as the survival plots for prognostic exons. Our analysis of the resulting prognostic exons across four cancer types revealed that most of the survival-associated exons are unique to a cancer type with few processes such as cell adhesion, carboxylic, fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of T-cell signaling common across cancer types, possibly suggesting significant differences in the posttranscriptional regulatory pathways contributing to prognosis. PMID:27528797

  10. ExSurv: A Web Resource for Prognostic Analyses of Exons Across Human Cancers Using Clinical Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Hashemikhabir, Seyedsasan; Budak, Gungor; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Survival analysis in biomedical sciences is generally performed by correlating the levels of cellular components with patients’ clinical features as a common practice in prognostic biomarker discovery. While the common and primary focus of such analysis in cancer genomics so far has been to identify the potential prognostic genes, alternative splicing – a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism that affects the functional form of a protein due to inclusion or exclusion of individual exons giving rise to alternative protein products, has increasingly gained attention due to the prevalence of splicing aberrations in cancer transcriptomes. Hence, uncovering the potential prognostic exons can not only help in rationally designing exon-specific therapeutics but also increase specificity toward more personalized treatment options. To address this gap and to provide a platform for rational identification of prognostic exons from cancer transcriptomes, we developed ExSurv (https://exsurv.soic.iupui.edu), a web-based platform for predicting the survival contribution of all annotated exons in the human genome using RNA sequencing-based expression profiles for cancer samples from four cancer types available from The Cancer Genome Atlas. ExSurv enables users to search for a gene of interest and shows survival probabilities for all the exons associated with a gene and found to be significant at the chosen threshold. ExSurv also includes raw expression values across the cancer cohort as well as the survival plots for prognostic exons. Our analysis of the resulting prognostic exons across four cancer types revealed that most of the survival-associated exons are unique to a cancer type with few processes such as cell adhesion, carboxylic, fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of T-cell signaling common across cancer types, possibly suggesting significant differences in the posttranscriptional regulatory pathways contributing to prognosis. PMID:27528797

  11. [The Italian SurveY on carDiac rEhabilitation 2008 (ISYDE 2008): study presentation].

    PubMed

    Tramarin, Roberto; Ambrosetti, Marco; De Feo, Stefania; Griffo, Raffaele; Maslowsky, Franco; Diaco, Tommaso; Piepoli, M; Riccio, C

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the Italian Society of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention (GICR) presents the third survey on the status of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Italy. The Italian SurveY on carDiac rEhabilitation 2008 (ISYDE 2008) is a multicenter, observational study aimed at identifying the number and characteristics of Italian CR facilities, both in terms of health operators and interventions. Clinical records of all patients consecutively discharged within the whole network--composed of up to 200 CR units--from January 28 to February 10, 2008 will also be reviewed for diagnosis of admission, comorbidities, rehabilitation programs, and drug therapy, in order to obtain a snapshot of current implementation strategies in daily clinical practice. The survey will adopt a web-based methodology for data provision and transmission. Preliminary results of the survey are expected in the late summer 2008.

  12. Tuberculosis among people living with HIV/AIDS in the German ClinSurv HIV Cohort: long-term incidence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) still presents a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), including those on antiretroviral therapy. In this study, we aimed to determine the long-term incidence density rate (IDR) of TB and risk factors among PLWHA in relation to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-status. Methods Data of PLWHA enrolled from 2001 through 2011 in the German ClinSurv HIV Cohort were investigated using survival analysis and Cox regression. Results TB was diagnosed in 233/11,693 PLWHA either at enrollment (N = 62) or during follow-up (N = 171). The TB IDR during follow-up was 0.37 cases per 100 person-years (PY) overall [95% CI, 0.32-0.43], and was higher among patients who never started cART and among patients originating from Sub-Saharan Africa (1.23 and 1.20 per 100PY, respectively). In two multivariable analyses, both patients (I) who never started cART and (II) those on cART shared the same risk factors for TB, namely: originating from Sub-Saharan Africa compared to Germany (I, hazard ratio (HR); [95% CI]) 4.05; [1.87-8.78] and II, HR 5.15 [2.76-9.60], CD4+ cell count <200 cells/μl (I, HR 8.22 [4.36-15.51] and II, HR 1.90 [1.14-3.15]) and viral load >5 log10 copies/ml (I, HR 2.51 [1.33-4.75] and II, HR 1.77 [1.11-2.82]). Gender, age or HIV-transmission risk group were not independently associated with TB. Conclusion In the German ClinSurv HIV cohort, patients originating from Sub-Saharan Africa, with low CD4+ cell count or high viral load at enrollment were at increased risk of TB even after cART initiation. As patients might be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, early screening for latent TB infection and implementing isoniazid preventive therapy in line with available recommendations is crucial. PMID:24646042

  13. Using relative survival measures for cross-sectional and longitudinal benchmarks of countries, states, and districts: the BenchRelSurv- and BenchRelSurvPlot-macros

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of screening programs is to discover life threatening diseases in as many patients as early as possible and to increase the chance of survival. To be able to compare aspects of health care quality, methods are needed for benchmarking that allow comparisons on various health care levels (regional, national, and international). Objectives Applications and extensions of algorithms can be used to link the information on disease phases with relative survival rates and to consolidate them in composite measures. The application of the developed SAS-macros will give results for benchmarking of health care quality. Data examples for breast cancer care are given. Methods A reference scale (expected, E) must be defined at a time point at which all benchmark objects (observed, O) are measured. All indices are defined as O/E, whereby the extended standardized screening-index (eSSI), the standardized case-mix-index (SCI), the work-up-index (SWI), and the treatment-index (STI) address different health care aspects. The composite measures called overall-performance evaluation (OPE) and relative overall performance indices (ROPI) link the individual indices differently for cross-sectional or longitudinal analyses. Results Algorithms allow a time point and a time interval associated comparison of the benchmark objects in the indices eSSI, SCI, SWI, STI, OPE, and ROPI. Comparisons between countries, states and districts are possible. Exemplarily comparisons between two countries are made. The success of early detection and screening programs as well as clinical health care quality for breast cancer can be demonstrated while the population’s background mortality is concerned. Conclusions If external quality assurance programs and benchmark objects are based on population-based and corresponding demographic data, information of disease phase and relative survival rates can be combined to indices which offer approaches for comparative analyses between benchmark objects. Conclusions on screening programs and health care quality are possible. The macros can be transferred to other diseases if a disease-specific phase scale of prognostic value (e.g. stage) exists. PMID:23316692

  14. The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

  15. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AS A SENSITIVE END-POINT FOLLOWING ACUTE PERNATAL EXPOSURE TO A LOW DOSE ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE IN FEMALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the potential developmental effects of atrazine (ATR) metabolites at low doses, an environmentally-based mixture (EBM) of ATR and its metabolites hydroxyatrazine, diaminochlorotriazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine was formulated based on surv...

  16. Assessing patterns of fish demographics and habitat in stream networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective habitat restoration planning requires correctly anticipating demographic responses to altered habitats. New applications of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to fish-habitat research have provided critical insights into fish movement, growth, and surv...

  17. Application of restoration scenarios to basin-scale demographics of coho salmon inferred from pit-tags

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective habitat restoration planning requires correctly anticipating demographic responses to altered habitats. New applications of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to fish-habitat research have provided critical insights into fish movement, growth, and surv...

  18. Facial tics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2010;33:641-655. Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ... Malhotra R. Review and update of involuntary facial movement disorders presenting in the ophthalmological setting. Surv Ophthalmol. Ryan ...

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF SELECTED INVASIVE PLANTS IN RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEMS OF THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems typically exhibit high levels of plant species richness, physical disturbance, and interconnectedness; characteristics that may favor establishment and spread of invasive plant species. To assess the magnitude of this invasion, we organized an extensive surve...

  20. Effect of Grapevine Fanleaf Virus on the Reproduction and Survival of its Nematode Vector, Xiphinema index Thorne &Allen.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Raski, D J

    1969-04-01

    Studies on the virus-vector interaction between the grapevine fanleaf virus (GFV) and its nematode vector, Xiphinema index, indicate the virus had no measurable effect on the rate of reproduction of its vector, but significantly influenced survNal of the nematodes.

  1. Theory of planned behavior and multivitamin supplement use in Caucasian college females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to identify predictors of the use of multivitamin supplements among Caucasian college females utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior. Variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior and the self-reported use of multivitamin supplements were measured by two separate surv...

  2. Lessons on dehydration tolerance from desiccation tolerant plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extremophiles: organisms that thrive (a relative term) in environments where conditions are such that the majority of organisms cannot survive. This is not strictly true if one is describing desiccation-tolerant plants, as other plants do grow around them, but it is certainly true that they can surv...

  3. ENDANGERED AQUATIC VERTEBRATES: COMPARATIVE AND PROBABILISTIC-BASED TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has previously been assumed that endangered, threatened, and candidate endangered species (collectively known as “listed” species) are uniquely sensitive to chemicals. The purpose of this cooperative research effort (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Surve...

  4. Expatriate Parents and Supplementary Education in Japan: Survival Strategy or Acculturation Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Melodie

    2013-01-01

    The increase in the use of supplementary education, or "juku," in Japan by Japanese families in order to augment their children's chances of success in entering prestigious pre-tertiary and tertiary institutions is documented (Blumenthal in "Asian Surv" 32(5):448-460, 1992; Bray and Lykins in "Shadow education;…

  5. Loss of microbial (pathogen) infections associated with recent invasions of the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of natural enemies during colonization is a prominent hypothesis explaining enhanced performance of invasive species in introduced areas. Numerous studies have tested this enemy release hypothesis in a wide range of taxa but few studies have focused on invasive ants. We conducted extensive surv...

  6. National Aquatic Resource Surveys: Multiple objectives and constraints lead to design complexity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency began conducting the National Aquatic resource Surveys (NARS) in 2007 with a national survey of lakes (NLA 2007) followed by rivers and streams in 2008-9 (NRSA 2008), coastal waters in 2010 (NCCA 2010) and wetlands in 2011 (NWCA). The surve...

  7. Classifying Exercise Activities According to Motivation, Self-Objectification, and Disordered Eating: How Can We Target Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupski, Allison

    2009-01-01

    SurvObjectification theorists suggest that one way for women to combat self-objectification is through participation in sport and exercise activities that encourage body competence. This two-part study investigates the impact of (a) motivation for physical activity and (b) type of physical activity on the outcomes of self-objectification, body…

  8. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS - UNITED STATES, 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for the occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs).This surv...

  9. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  10. Resistance of Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis) Seeds to Harsh Environments and the Implications for Dispersal by Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) in Georgia, U.S.A.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential dispersal of Benghal dayflower seeds by mourning doves was studied in southern Georgia, U.S.A. The gut contents (both crop and gizzard) of mourning doves harvested in the autumn months were investigated to determine if mourning doves fed on Benghal dayflower and whether seeds can surv...

  11. Old moms with new tricks: modeling the effects of age-specific spawning behaviors in Pacific Ocean perch

    EPA Science Inventory

    In commercially exploited, long-lived fish species, age structure plays an important role in determining population stability and resilience to human and environmental impacts. The often observed increase in energy allocation per offspring by older females can improve larval surv...

  12. Assessment of an altered E1B promoter on the specificity and potency of triple-regulated conditionally replicating adenoviruses: implications for the generation of ideal m-CRAs.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Y; Wang, Y; Nagano, S; Kamizono, J; Ikeda, M; Komiya, S; Kosai, K-i

    2011-10-01

    Although previous studies modified two components of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAs), which selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells, the most accurate ways to achieve increased cancer specificity (that is, safety) without reducing the anticancer (that is, therapeutic) effects are unknown. Here, we generated two types of survivin-responsive m-CRAs (Surv.m-CRAs), Surv.m-CRA-CMVp and Surv.m-CRA-OCp, which use two and three different mechanisms to target cancer, that is, early region 1A (E1A) regulated by the survivin promoter and mutated E1BΔ55K regulated by the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter and cancer/tissue-specific osteocalcin promoter, respectively, and carefully examined their safety and anticancer effects. Endogenous osteocalcin mRNA was expressed and further enhanced by vitamin D(3) in all osteosarcoma and prostate cancer cell lines and human osteoblasts, but not in human fibroblasts. The osteocalcin promoter activity was weak even with vitamin D(3) treatment in these osteocalcin-expressing cancers, leading to low E1BΔ55K expression after Surv.m-CRA-OCp infection. Nevertheless, Surv.m-CRA-OCp had significantly increased cancer specificity without reduced anticancer effects in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The unexpected but favorable fact that strong activity of an altered E1B promoter is unnecessary indicates that the majority of cancer/tissue-specific promoters may be used to generate ideal m-CRAs and will advance the development of m-CRA-based cancer therapies.

  13. Conditionally replicating adenovirus prevents pluripotent stem cell–derived teratoma by specifically eliminating undifferentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Kaoru; Ide, Kanako; Takayama, Akiko; Wada, Tadahisa; Irie, Rie; Kosai, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete abolition of tumorigenicity creates potential safety concerns in clinical trials of regenerative medicine based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Here, we demonstrate that conditionally replicating adenoviruses that specifically target cancers using multiple factors (m-CRAs), originally developed as anticancer drugs, may also be useful as novel antitumorigenic agents in hPSC-based therapy. The survivin promoter was more active in undifferentiated hPSCs than the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, whereas both promoters were minimally active in differentiated normal cells. Accordingly, survivin-responsive m-CRA (Surv.m-CRA) killed undifferentiated hPSCs more efficiently than TERT-responsive m-CRAs (Tert.m-CRA); both m-CRAs exhibited efficient viral replication and cytotoxicity in undifferentiated hPSCs, but not in cocultured differentiated normal cells. Pre-infection of hPSCs with Surv.m-CRA or Tert.m-CRA abolished in vivo teratoma formation in a dose-dependent manner following hPSC implantation into mice. Thus, m-CRAs, and in particular Surv.m-CRAs, represent novel antitumorigenic agents that could facilitate safe clinical applications of hPSC-based regenerative medicine. PMID:26269798

  14. Estimating Trends in the Proportion of Transmitted and Acquired HIV Drug Resistance in a Long Term Observational Cohort in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schülter, Eugen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Jensen, Björn-Erik Ole; Stoll, Matthias; Bogner, Johannes R.; Eberle, Josef; Meixenberger, Karolin; Kücherer, Claudia; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed trends in the proportion of transmitted (TDR) and acquired (ADR) HIV drug resistance and associated mutations between 2001 and 2011 in the German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study. Method The German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study is a subset of the German ClinSurv-HIV Cohort. For the ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study all available sequences isolated from patients in five study centres of the long term observational ClinSurv-HIV Cohort were included. TDR was estimated using the first viral sequence of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve patients. One HIV sequence/patient/year of ART experienced patients was considered to estimate the proportion of ADR. Trends in the proportion of HIV drug resistance were calculated by logistic regression. Results 9,528 patients were included into the analysis. HIV-sequences of antiretroviral naïve and treatment experienced patients were available from 34% (3,267/9,528) of patients. The proportion of TDR over time was stable at 10.4% (95% CI 9.1–11.8; p for trend = 0.6; 2001–2011). The proportion of ADR among all treated patients was 16%, whereas it was high among those with available HIV genotypic resistance test (64%; 1,310/2,049 sequences; 95% CI 62–66) but declined significantly over time (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.77–0.83; p for trend<0.001; 2001–2011). Viral load monitoring subsequent to resistance testing was performed in the majority of treated patients (96%) and most of them (67%) were treated successfully. Conclusions The proportion of TDR was stable in this study population. ADR declined significantly over time. This decline might have been influenced by broader resistance testing, resistance test guided therapy and the availability of more therapeutic options and not by a decline in the proportion of TDR within the study population. PMID:25148412

  15. Design definition study of a lift/cruise fan technology V/STOL aircraft. Volume 1: Navy operational aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Aircraft were designed and sized to meet Navy mission requirements. Five missions were established for evaluation: anti-submarine warfare (ASW), surface attack (SA), combat search and rescue (CSAR), surveillance (SURV), and vertical on-board delivery (VOD). All missions were performed with a short takeoff and a vertical landing. The aircraft were defined using existing J97-GE gas generators or reasonable growth derivatives in conjunction with turbotip fans reflecting LF460 type technology. The multipurpose aircraft configuration established for U.S. Navy missions utilizes the turbotip driven lift/cruise fan concept for V/STOL aircraft.

  16. Extending information retrieval methods to personalized genomic-based studies of disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuyun; Dawson, John A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Genomic-based studies of disease now involve diverse types of data collected on large groups of patients. A major challenge facing statistical scientists is how best to combine the data, extract important features, and comprehensively characterize the ways in which they affect an individual's disease course and likelihood of response to treatment. We have developed a survival-supervised latent Dirichlet allocation (survLDA) modeling framework to address these challenges. Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models have proven extremely effective at identifying themes common across large collections of text, but applications to genomics have been limited. Our framework extends LDA to the genome by considering each patient as a "document" with "text" detailing his/her clinical events and genomic state. We then further extend the framework to allow for supervision by a time-to-event response. The model enables the efficient identification of collections of clinical and genomic features that co-occur within patient subgroups, and then characterizes each patient by those features. An application of survLDA to The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian project identifies informative patient subgroups showing differential response to treatment, and validation in an independent cohort demonstrates the potential for patient-specific inference. PMID:25733795

  17. The effects of low dose rate irradiation and thermal aging on reactor structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Trybus, C. L.; Cole, J. I.

    As part of the EBR-II reactor materials surveillance program, test samples of fifteen different alloys were placed into EBR-II in 1965. The surveillance (SURV) program was intended to determine property changes in reactor structural materials caused by irradiation and thermal aging. In this work, the effect of low dose rate (approximately 2 × 10 -8 dpa/s) irradiation at 380-410°C and long term thermal aging at 371°C on the properties of 20% cold worked 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel, Inconel X750, 304/308 stainless weld material, and 17-4 PH steel are evaluated. Doses of up to 6.8 dpa and thermal aging to 2994 days did not significantly affect the density of these alloys. The strength of 304 SS, X750, 17-4 PH, and 304/308 weld material increased with irradiation. In contrast, the strength of 420 stainless steel decreased with irradiation. Irradiation decreased the impact energy in both Inconel X750 and 17-4 PH steel. Thermal aging decreased the impact energy in 17-4 PH steel and increased the impact energy in Inconel X750. Tensile property comparisons of 304 SURV samples with 304 samples irradiated in EBR-II at a higher dose rate show that the higher dose rate samples had greater increases in strength and greater losses in ductility.

  18. Extending information retrieval methods to personalized genomic-based studies of disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuyun; Dawson, John A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Genomic-based studies of disease now involve diverse types of data collected on large groups of patients. A major challenge facing statistical scientists is how best to combine the data, extract important features, and comprehensively characterize the ways in which they affect an individual's disease course and likelihood of response to treatment. We have developed a survival-supervised latent Dirichlet allocation (survLDA) modeling framework to address these challenges. Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models have proven extremely effective at identifying themes common across large collections of text, but applications to genomics have been limited. Our framework extends LDA to the genome by considering each patient as a "document" with "text" detailing his/her clinical events and genomic state. We then further extend the framework to allow for supervision by a time-to-event response. The model enables the efficient identification of collections of clinical and genomic features that co-occur within patient subgroups, and then characterizes each patient by those features. An application of survLDA to The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian project identifies informative patient subgroups showing differential response to treatment, and validation in an independent cohort demonstrates the potential for patient-specific inference.

  19. Optimal values for oxygen transport during hypothermia in sepsis and ARDS.

    PubMed

    Pernerstorfer, T; Krafft, P; Fitzgerald, R; Fridrich, P; Koc, D; Hammerle, A F; Steltzer, H

    1995-01-01

    Mild hypothermia (33 degrees C to 35.5 degrees C) is reported to improve oxygenation and survival in patients with lung failure (1). Although hypermetabolism may account for about 50% of the ventilatory demand in ARDS patients, the concept of reducing oxygen consumption (VO2) by lowering metabolic rate, has only recently gained attention (2). Our study was aimed to test whether mild hypothermia established by continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVHF), could optimize values for oxygen kinetics in ARDS patients. Overall, we recruited 27 patients with ARDS and sepsis. Prior initiation of CVVHF patients had to meet the following criteria: a) Murray score > 2.5, and hypoxaemia with PaO2/FIO2 < 200, b) hyperthermia of > 38 degrees C, c) cardiovascular instability requiring inotropic support. Evaluation of cardio-respiratory data was performed within four different phases (I = before, II + III during and IV = after CVVHF) every 6 hours. Core temperature as derived from the thermistor of pulmonary artery catheter was aimed to be between 35.0 degrees C and 36.5 degrees C. Optimal values for oxygen delivery (DO2) (> 550 mL/min/m2) and VO2 (> 160 mL/min/m2) were defined according to Shoemaker and achieved by fluid loading, transfusion and inotropic support (3). Septic shock occurred in 10 of 14 nonsurvivors (nons) and 2 of 13 survivors (surv). Mean values for DO2 and VO2 were calculated at different body temperature ranges. While at 37 degrees C DO2 was identical between surv and nons, (663 +/- 128 versus 666 +/- 127 means +/- SD) moderate hypothermia led to a small decrease of DO2 in surv and a significant decrease in nons (632 +/- 134 versus 605 +/- 128 mL/min/m2) at 35 degrees C. Concerning VO2 during hypothermia, there was a significant drop in nonsurvivors while in survivors the decrease was less pronounced. We could demonstrate a decrease in DO2 and VO2 during mild hypothermia during CVVHF. However, decreases in nonsurvivors were more pronounced than in survivors

  20. HIV-Prevalence in Tuberculosis Patients in Germany, 2002–2009: An Estimation Based on HIV and Tuberculosis Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    Fiebig, Lena; Kollan, Christian; Hauer, Barbara; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; an der Heiden, Matthias; Hamouda, Osamah; Haas, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV comorbidity is a major challenge in TB prevention and control but difficult to assess in Germany as in other countries, where data confidentiality precludes notifying the HIV status of TB patients. We aimed to estimate the HIV-prevalence in TB patients in Germany, 2002–2009, and to characterize the HIV/TB patients demographically. Data from the long-term observational open multicentre cohort ClinSurv HIV were used to identify incident TB in HIV-positive individuals. We assessed the cohort’s coverage for the nationwide HIV-positive population by contrasting ClinSurv HIV patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART) with national HIV patient numbers derived from ART prescriptions (data by Insight Health; available for 2006–2009). The HIV-prevalence in TB patients was calculated as the number of HIV/TB cases projected for Germany over all culture-positive TB notifications. From 2002 to 2009, 298 of 15,531 HIV-positive patients enrolled in the ClinSurv HIV cohort were diagnosed with TB. A 21% cohort coverage was determined. The annual estimates of the HIV-prevalence in TB patients were on average 4.5% and ranged from 3.5% (95%CI 2.3–5.1%) in 2007 to 6.6% (95%CI 5.0–8.5%) in 2005. The most recent estimate for 2009 was 4.0% (95%CI 2.6–5.9%). The 298 HIV/TB patients were characterized by a male-to-female ratio of 2.1, by a median age of 38 years at TB diagnosis, and by 59% of the patients having a foreign origin, mainly from Subsahara Africa. We provide, to our knowledge, the first estimate of the HIV-prevalence in TB patients for Germany by joint evaluation of anonymous HIV and TB surveillance data sources. The identified level of HIV in TB patients approximates available surveillance data from neighbouring countries and indicates a non-negligible HIV/TB burden in Germany. Our estimation approach is valuable for epidemiological monitoring of HIV/TB within the current legal frameworks. PMID:23145087

  1. Privacy Sensitive Surveillance for Assisted Living - A Smart Camera Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Sven; Straßer, Wolfgang

    An elderly woman wanders about aimlessly in a home for assisted living. Suddenly, she collapses on the floor of a lonesome hallway. Usually it can take over two hours until a night nurse passes this spot on her next inspection round. But in this case she is already on site after two minutes, ready to help. She has received an alert message on her beeper: "Inhabitant fallen in hallway 2b". The source: the SmartSurv distributed network of smart cameras for automated and privacy respecting video analysis.Welcome to the future of smart surveillance Although this scenario is not yet daily practice, it shall make clear how such systems will impact the safety of the elderly without the privacy intrusion of traditional video surveillance systems.

  2. The nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas: a chaotic model with flat obstacles?

    PubMed

    Bianca, Carlo; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2009-03-01

    It is known that the nonequilibrium version of the Lorentz gas (a billiard with dispersing obstacles [Ya. G. Sinai, Russ. Math. Surv. 25, 137 (1970)], electric field, and Gaussian thermostat) is hyperbolic if the field is small [N. I. Chernov, Ann. Henri Poincare 2, 197 (2001)]. Differently the hyperbolicity of the nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas constitutes an open problem since its obstacles are rhombi and the techniques so far developed rely on the dispersing nature of the obstacles [M. P. Wojtkowski, J. Math. Pures Appl. 79, 953 (2000)]. We have developed analytical and numerical investigations that support the idea that this model of transport of matter has both chaotic (positive Lyapunov exponent) and nonchaotic steady states with a quite peculiar sensitive dependence on the field and on the geometry, not observed before. The associated transport behavior is correspondingly highly irregular, with features whose understanding is of both theoretical and technological interests.

  3. Anisotropic Regularity Conditions for the Suitable Weak Solutions to the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    We are concerned with the problem, originated from Seregin (159-200, 2007), Seregin (J. Math. Sci. 143: 2961-2968, 2007), Seregin (Russ. Math. Surv. 62:149-168, 2007), what are minimal sufficiently conditions for the regularity of suitable weak solutions to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. We prove some interior regularity criteria, in terms of either one component of the velocity with sufficiently small local scaled norm and the rest part with bounded local scaled norm, or horizontal part of the vorticity with sufficiently small local scaled norm and the vertical part with bounded local scaled norm. It is also shown that only the smallness on the local scaled L 2 norm of horizontal gradient without any other condition on the vertical gradient can still ensure the regularity of suitable weak solutions. All these conclusions improve pervious results on the local scaled norm type regularity conditions.

  4. The nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas: A chaotic model with flat obstacles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianca, Carlo; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2009-03-01

    It is known that the nonequilibrium version of the Lorentz gas (a billiard with dispersing obstacles [Ya. G. Sinai, Russ. Math. Surv. 25, 137 (1970)], electric field, and Gaussian thermostat) is hyperbolic if the field is small [N. I. Chernov, Ann. Henri Poincare 2, 197 (2001)]. Differently the hyperbolicity of the nonequilibrium Ehrenfest gas constitutes an open problem since its obstacles are rhombi and the techniques so far developed rely on the dispersing nature of the obstacles [M. P. Wojtkowski, J. Math. Pures Appl. 79, 953 (2000)]. We have developed analytical and numerical investigations that support the idea that this model of transport of matter has both chaotic (positive Lyapunov exponent) and nonchaotic steady states with a quite peculiar sensitive dependence on the field and on the geometry, not observed before. The associated transport behavior is correspondingly highly irregular, with features whose understanding is of both theoretical and technological interests.

  5. Subdwarf B and O Stars: Which Evolutionary Pathways?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiwotzki, R.

    2009-03-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (spectral types subdwarf B and O) are long lived stars producing a large amount of UV radiation. This makes them excellent candidates to explain the UV radiation observed in old populations. However, the origin of both classes of hot subdwarfs is unclear. I review possible single star and binary channels. High resolution observations of hot subdwarfs taken in the course of the Supernova type Ia Progenitor surveY (SPY) are presented. The SPY observations are used for a systematic assessment of the frequency of close binaries among hot subdwarfs. Results are a high binary fraction among the subdwarf B stars - albeit not as high as in a previous investigation, but a very low binary frequency in helium-rich hot subdwarf O stars. Implications for the evolutionary status of hot subdwarfs are discussed.

  6. Stratigraphical evidence of late Amazonian periglaciation and glaciation in the Astapus Colles region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, Richard J.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2009-07-01

    Recent modeling of the meteorological conditions during and following times of high obliquity suggests that an icy mantle could have been emplaced in western Utopia Planitia by atmospheric deposition during the late Amazonian period [Costard, F.M., Forget, F., Madeleine, J.B., Soare, R.J., Kargel, J.S., 2008. Lunar Planet. Sci. 39. Abstract 1274; Madeleine, B., Forget, F., Head, J.W., Levrard, B., Montmessin, F., 2007. Lunar Planet. Sci. 38. Abstract 1778]. Astapus Colles (ABa) is a late Amazonian geological unit - located in this hypothesized area of accumulation - that comprises an icy mantle tens of meters thick [Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888]. For the most part, this unit drapes the early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis interior unit (ABvi); to a lesser degree it overlies the early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis marginal unit (ABvm) and the early to late Hesperian UP plains unit HBu2 [Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888]. Landscapes possibly modified by late-Amazonian periglacial processes [Costard, F.M., Kargel, J.S., 1995. Icarus 114, 93-112; McBride, S.A., Allen, C.C., Bell, M.S., 2005. Lunar Planet. Sci. 36. Abstract 1090; Morgenstern, A., Hauber, E., Reiss, D., van Gasselt, S., Grosse, G., Schirrmeister, L., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, doi:10.1029/2006JE002869. E06010; Seibert, N.M., Kargel, J.S., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 899-902; Soare, R.J., Kargel, J.S., Osinski, G.R., Costard, F., 2007. Icarus 191, 95-112; Soare, R.J., Osinski, G.R., Roehm, C.L., 2008. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 272, 382-393] and glacial processes [Milliken, R.E., Mustard, J.F., Goldsby, D.L., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108 (E6), doi:10.1029/2002JE002005. 5057; Mustard, J.F., Cooper, C.D., Rifkin, M.K., 2001. Nature 412, 411-414; Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Hare, T.M., 2005. US Geol. Surv. Sci. Invest., Map 2888] have been reported within the region. Researchers have assumed that the

  7. Phenotyping transgenic wheat for drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Carolina; Crossa, José L; Bonnett, David; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Reynolds, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    Realistic experimental protocols to screen for drought adaptation in controlled conditions are crucial if high throughput phenotyping is to be used for the identification of high performance lines, and is especially important in the evaluation of transgenes where stringent biosecurity measures restrict the frequency of open field trials. Transgenic DREB1A-wheat events were selected under greenhouse conditions by evaluating survival and recovery under severe drought (SURV) as well as for water use efficiency (WUE). Greenhouse experiments confirmed the advantages of transgenic events in recovery after severe water stress. Under field conditions, the group of transgenic lines did not generally outperform the controls in terms of grain yield under water deficit. However, the events selected for WUE were identified as lines that combine an acceptable yield-even higher yield (WUE-11) under well irrigated conditions-and stable performance across the different environments generated by the experimental treatments.

  8. Norovirus Genotype Profiles Associated with Foodborne Transmission, 1999�?"2012

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Joanne; Barclay, Leslie; Ahmed, Sharia; Lake, Rob; Hall, Aron J.; Lopman, Ben; Kroneman, Annelies; Vennema, Harry; VinjA(c), Jan; Koopmans, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis. They can be transmitted from person to person directly or indirectly through contaminated food, water, or environments. To estimate the proportion of foodborne infections caused by noroviruses on a global scale, we used norovirus transmission and genotyping information from multiple international outbreak surveillance systems (Noronet, CaliciNet, EpiSurv) and from a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature. The proportion of outbreaks caused by food was determined by genotype and/or genogroup. Analysis resulted in the following final global profiles: foodborne transmission is attributed to 10% (range 9%%�?"11%) of all genotype GII.4 outbreaks, 27% (25%�?"30%) of outbreaks caused by all other single genotypes, and 37% (24%%�?"52%) of outbreaks caused by mixtures of GII.4 and other noroviruses. When these profiles are applied to global outbreak surveillance data, results indicate that �%^14% of all norovirus outbreaks are attributed to food. PMID:25811368

  9. Road safety control: Application in urban environment in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charisoudis, A.; Mintsis, G.; Basbas, S.; Taxiltaris, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine what is and what is not a "road safety control" on the one hand and on the other hand to examine the procedure of the realization of this control in different countries in the level of the organization as well as in the level of the praxis through the Road Safety Manuals of each country. The countries under examination are: The United Kinghdom, Danish, U.S.A, Australia and New Zeeland. The Road Safety Manual of the International Organization World Road Association-PIARC is also mentioned. Finally examples of the application of road safety control, which were realized in the frame of the research programs of the research team of the Department of Transportation Engineering, School of Rural and Surveing, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in the town of Aridea, are given.(in Greeks)

  10. Tissue microarray-based study of hepatocellular carcinoma validating SPIB as potential clinical prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Yueh-Min; Huang, Yen-Chi; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lin, Liang-In; Lu, Jeng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the prognostic significance of SPIB protein overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of SPIB expression in human HCC in order to determine possible correlations between SPIB expression and clinicopathological findings. The expression of SPIB proteins was detected using immunohistochemical staining in commercial multiple-tissue microarrays as a means of examining expression profiles in patients. Using online biomarker validation tool SurvExpress, we focused on the correlation between SPIB overexpression and survival as well as relapse-free survival (RFS). Results show that SPIB protein expression levels were significantly higher in colon, liver, and stomach tumors than in non-tumor tissues (p<0.05). SPIB overexpression in patients with HCC was also significantly higher than that of the normal samples (p<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, SPIB protein expression levels differ significantly according to the stage of liver disease, specifically between stages I, II, and III of HCC (p<0.05). SPIB expression was also shown to be significantly correlated with age (p=0.046) and histological grade (p=0.027). Furthermore, the SurvExpress analysis suggested that high SPIB and KI-67 mRNA expression were significantly associated with the poor survival of patients with HCC (p<0.05). Our results indicate that cross-talk in the expression of SPIB and KI-67 may be associated with poor prognosis and may potentially serve as a clinical prognostic indicator of HCC. This is the first time that such an association has been reported. PMID:26610895

  11. Defining desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding objective using analytic hierarchy process.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lim, P; Komen, H; Kause, A; van Arendonk, J A M; Barfoot, A J; Martin, K E; Parsons, J E

    2012-06-01

    Distributing animals from a single breeding program to a global market may not satisfy all producers, as they may differ in market objectives and farming environments. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to estimate preferences, which can be aggregated to consensus preference values using weighted goal programming (WGP). The aim of this study was to use an AHP-WGP based approach to derive desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding and to study whether breeding trait preferences vary depending on commercial products and farming environments. Two questionnaires were sent out. Questionnaire-A (Q-A) was distributed to 178 farmers from 5 continents and used to collect information on commercial products and farming environments. In this questionnaire, farmers were asked to rank the 6 most important traits for genetic improvement from a list of 13 traits. Questionnaire B (Q-B) was sent to all farmers who responded to Q-A (53 in total). For Q-B, preferences of the 6 traits were obtained using pairwise comparison. Preference intensity was given to quantify (in % of a trait mean; G%) the degree to which 1 trait is preferred over the other. Individual preferences, social preferences, and consensus preferences (Con-P) were estimated using AHP and WGP. Desired gains were constructed by multiplying Con-P by G%. The analysis revealed that the 6 most important traits were thermal growth coefficient (TGC), survival (Surv), feed conversion ratio (FCR), condition factor (CF), fillet percentage (FIL%), and late maturation (LMat). Ranking of traits based on average Con-P values were Surv (0.271), FCR (0.246), TGC (0.246), LMat (0.090), FIL% (0.081), and CF (0.067). Corresponding desired genetic gains (in % of trait mean) were 1.63, 1.87, 1.67, 1.29, 0.06, and 0.33%, respectively. The results from Con-P values show that trait preferences may vary for different types of commercial production or farming environments. This study demonstrated that combination of AHP and WGP can

  12. Unbiased Prediction and Feature Selection in High-Dimensional Survival Regression

    PubMed Central

    Laimighofer, Michael; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With widespread availability of omics profiling techniques, the analysis and interpretation of high-dimensional omics data, for example, for biomarkers, is becoming an increasingly important part of clinical medicine because such datasets constitute a promising resource for predicting survival outcomes. However, early experience has shown that biomarkers often generalize poorly. Thus, it is crucial that models are not overfitted and give accurate results with new data. In addition, reliable detection of multivariate biomarkers with high predictive power (feature selection) is of particular interest in clinical settings. We present an approach that addresses both aspects in high-dimensional survival models. Within a nested cross-validation (CV), we fit a survival model, evaluate a dataset in an unbiased fashion, and select features with the best predictive power by applying a weighted combination of CV runs. We evaluate our approach using simulated toy data, as well as three breast cancer datasets, to predict the survival of breast cancer patients after treatment. In all datasets, we achieve more reliable estimation of predictive power for unseen cases and better predictive performance compared to the standard CoxLasso model. Taken together, we present a comprehensive and flexible framework for survival models, including performance estimation, final feature selection, and final model construction. The proposed algorithm is implemented in an open source R package (SurvRank) available on CRAN. PMID:26894327

  13. Improving Accuracy of Influenza-Associated Hospitalization Rate Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carrie; Kirley, Pam Daily; Aragon, Deborah; Meek, James; Farley, Monica M.; Ryan, Patricia; Collins, Jim; Lynfield, Ruth; Baumbach, Joan; Zansky, Shelley; Bennett, Nancy M.; Fowler, Brian; Thomas, Ann; Lindegren, Mary L.; Atkinson, Annette; Finelli, Lyn; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic test sensitivity affects rate estimates for laboratory-confirmed influenza–associated hospitalizations. We used data from FluSurv-NET, a national population-based surveillance system for laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations, to capture diagnostic test type by patient age and influenza season. We calculated observed rates by age group and adjusted rates by test sensitivity. Test sensitivity was lowest in adults >65 years of age. For all ages, reverse transcription PCR was the most sensitive test, and use increased from <10% during 2003–2008 to ≈70% during 2009–2013. Observed hospitalization rates per 100,000 persons varied by season: 7.3–50.5 for children <18 years of age, 3.0–30.3 for adults 18–64 years, and 13.6–181.8 for adults >65 years. After 2009, hospitalization rates adjusted by test sensitivity were ≈15% higher for children <18 years, ≈20% higher for adults 18–64 years, and ≈55% for adults >65 years of age. Test sensitivity adjustments improve the accuracy of hospitalization rate estimates. PMID:26292017

  14. Does Influenza Vaccination Modify Influenza Severity? Data on Older Adults Hospitalized With Influenza During the 2012−2013 Season in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Carmen S.; Anderson, Evan J.; Baumbach, Joan; Bennett, Nancy; Bohm, Susan; Hill, Mary; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista; Meek, James; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Monroe, Maya L.; Morin, Craig; Oni, Oluwakemi; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Finelli, Lyn; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some studies suggest that influenza vaccination might be protective against severe influenza outcomes in vaccinated persons who become infected. We used data from a large surveillance network to further investigate the effect of influenza vaccination on influenza severity in adults aged ≥50 years who were hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Methods. We analyzed influenza vaccination and influenza severity using Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) data for the 2012−2013 influenza season. Intensive care unit (ICU) admission, death, diagnosis of pneumonia, and hospital and ICU lengths of stay served as measures of disease severity. Data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression, parametric survival models, and propensity score matching (PSM). Results. Overall, no differences in severity were observed in the multivariable logistic regression model. Using PSM, adults aged 50−64 years (but not other age groups) who were vaccinated against influenza had a shorter length of ICU stay than those who were unvaccinated (hazard ratio for discharge, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12−3.01). Conclusions. Our findings show a modest effect of influenza vaccination on disease severity. Analysis of data from seasons with different predominant strains and higher estimates of vaccine effectiveness are needed. PMID:25821227

  15. Self-reported attitudes, skills and use of evidence-based practice among Canadian doctors of chiropractic: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, André E.; Terhorst, Lauren; Leach, Matthew; Stuber, Kent; Evans, Roni; Schneider, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify Canadian chiropractors’ attitudes, skills and use of evidence based practice (EBP), as well as their level of awareness of previously published chiropractic clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Methods: 7,200 members of the Canadian Chiropractic Association were invited by e-mail to complete an online version of the Evidence Based practice Attitude & utilisation SurvEy (EBASE); a valid and reliable measure of participant attitudes, skills and use of EBP. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 554 respondents. Most respondents (>75%) held positive attitudes toward EBP. Over half indicated a high level of self-reported skills in EBP, and over 90% expressed an interest in improving these skills. A majority of respondents (65%) reported over half of their practice was based on evidence from clinical research, and only half (52%) agreed that chiropractic CPGs significantly impacted on their practice. Conclusions: While most Canadian chiropractors held positive attitudes towards EBP, believed EBP was useful, and were interested in improving their skills in EBP, many did not use research evidence or CPGs to guide clinical decision making. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously due to the low response rate. PMID:26816412

  16. Marginal Bayesian nonparametric model for time to disease arrival of threatened amphibian populations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiming; Hanson, Timothy; Knapp, Roland

    2015-12-01

    The global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has caused the extinction of hundreds of amphibian species worldwide. It has become increasingly important to be able to precisely predict time to Bd arrival in a population. The data analyzed herein present a unique challenge in terms of modeling because there is a strong spatial component to Bd arrival time and the traditional proportional hazards assumption is grossly violated. To address these concerns, we develop a novel marginal Bayesian nonparametric survival model for spatially correlated right-censored data. This class of models assumes that the logarithm of survival times marginally follow a mixture of normal densities with a linear-dependent Dirichlet process prior as the random mixing measure, and their joint distribution is induced by a Gaussian copula model with a spatial correlation structure. To invert high-dimensional spatial correlation matrices, we adopt a full-scale approximation that can capture both large- and small-scale spatial dependence. An efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with delayed rejection is proposed for posterior computation, and an R package spBayesSurv is provided to fit the model. This approach is first evaluated through simulations, then applied to threatened frog populations in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park. PMID:26148536

  17. DISRUPTION OF STAR CLUSTERS IN THE INTERACTING ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, Simon J.; Naab, Thorsten; Fall, S. Michael E-mail: naab@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2011-06-10

    We re-examine the age distribution of star clusters in the Antennae in the context of N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of these interacting galaxies. All of the simulations that account for the observed morphology and other properties of the Antennae have star formation rates that vary relatively slowly with time, by factors of only 1.3-2.5 in the past 10{sup 8} yr. In contrast, the observed age distribution of the clusters declines approximately as a power law, dN/d{tau}{proportional_to}{tau}{sup {gamma}} with {gamma} = -1.0, for ages 10{sup 6} yr {approx}< {tau} {approx}< 10{sup 9} yr. These two facts can only be reconciled if the clusters are disrupted progressively for at least {approx}10{sup 8} yr and possibly {approx}10{sup 9} yr. When we combine the simulated formation rates with a power-law model, f{sub surv}{proportional_to}{tau}{sup {delta}}, for the fraction of clusters that survive to each age {tau}, we match the observed age distribution with exponents in the range -0.9 {approx}< {delta} {approx}< -0.6 (with a slightly different {delta} for each simulation). The similarity between {delta} and {gamma} indicates that dN/d{tau} is shaped mainly by the disruption of clusters rather than variations in their formation rate. Thus, the situation in the interacting Antennae resembles that in relatively quiescent galaxies such as the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds.

  18. Epidemiology training for primary health care: the use of computer-assisted distance learning.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, S B; Cuevas, L E; Moody, J B; Russell, W B; Schlecht, B J

    1996-10-01

    The Liverpool Epidemiology Programme, based in the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, has designed a series of computer-based modules for use in distance learning. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of computers in training health workers in epidemiology in developing countries. The aim of the modules is to provide health workers with solutions to problems which they face in their everyday work. The modules are written in hypertext software for IBM compatible machines and interact with the epidemiological software Epi Info. Four modules are described: LEP-Nut which deals with nutritional surveillance, LEP-Ref which looks at the role of epidemiology within a refugee health care programme, LEP-Surv dealing with health surveillance and LEP-Rap which introduces the concept of rapid appraisal. They are also easily distributed, particularly with the development of the Internet. The modules are carefully evaluated before and after distribution. Issues related to their evaluation and subsequent revision are discussed, in particular is the content important, adequate, communicated and useful? A major advantage of computer-based learning materials is that they can be easily updated with new advancements of knowledge and experience from the field. PMID:8936951

  19. Late Pleistocene eolian features in southeastern Maryland and Chesapeake Bay region indicate strong WNW-NW winds accompanied growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markewich, H.W.; Litwin, R.J.; Pavich, M.J.; Brook, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Inactive parabolic dunes are present in southeastern Maryland, USA, along the east bank of the Potomac River. More elongate and finer-grained eolian deposits and paha-like ridges characterize the Potomac River-Patuxent River upland and the west side of Chesapeake Bay. These ridges are streamlined erosional features, veneered with eolian sediment and interspersed with dunes in the low-relief headwaters of Potomac- and Patuxent-river tributaries. Axis data for the dunes and ridges indicate formation by WNW-NW winds. Optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon age data suggest dune formation from ??? 33-15??ka, agreeing with the 30-13??ka ages Denny, C.S., Owens, J.P., Sirkin, L., Rubin, M., 1979. The Parsonburg Sand in the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1067-B, 16??pp. suggested for eolian deposits east of Chesapeake Bay. Age range and paleowind direction(s) for eolian features in the Bay region approximate those for late Wisconsin loess in the North American midcontinent. Formation of midcontinent loess and Bay-region eolian features was coeval with rapid growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and strong cooling episodes (??18O minima) evident in Greenland ice cores. Age and paleowind-direction coincidence, for eolian features in the midcontinent and Bay region, indicates strong mid-latitude WNW-NW winds for several hundred kilometers south of the Laurentide glacial terminus that were oblique to previously simulated anticyclonic winds for the last glacial maximum.

  20. Is the Bangweulu Basin in Zambia the Eroded Remnant of a Large, Multiring Impact Crater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, S.

    1993-07-01

    , surrounded by an arcuate high south of the Luongo Fold Belt [7,8]. There are few heat flow measurements in Zambia [9], but there is no indication that the Bangweulu Basin has abnormally high heat flow, which is present in the Luangwaand Upper Zambezi rifts, as evidenced by numerous hot springs and historical geysers [10]. Satellite imagery of Central Africa clearly shows a roughly circular outline of the Bangweulu Basin, including the lakes and swamps, surrounded by a concentric ring of uplifts. The concentric islands in Lake Bangweulu are reminiscent of the multiple concentric rings around impact basins in other planetary bodies, e.g., Valhalla and Asgard structures on the jovian moon of Callisto. Lunar craters Eratosthenes, Aristarchus, and others also have similar terraced morphologies with concentric rings. Based on the above geomorphological and geophysical features, it is postulated that the Bangweulu Basin represents the eroded remnant of a large multiring impact structure that postdates the Katangan Supergroup. Any possible connection between the Bangweulu structure and the Lukanga swamp (a postulated astrobleme in central Zambia [11]) is unknown at this stage. Ground search for macro- and microscopic shock features in the Bangweulu Basin is planned for 1994. References: [1] Debenham F. (1947) Geog. Rev., 37, 351-368. [2] Thieme J. G. and Johnson R. L. (1976) The 1:1,000,000 Scale Geological Map of the Republic of Zambia, Geol. Surv. Zambia. [3] Andersen L. S. and Unrug R. (1984) Precambrian Res., 25, 187-212. [4] Bram K. (1972). Bull. Seis. Soc. Am., 62, 1211-1216. [5] Fairhead J. D. and Henderson N. B. (1977) Tectonophysics, 41, 19-26. [6] Saviaro K. (1979) Bull. Geol. Surv. Botswana, 22, 159-181. [7] Mazac O. (1974) Tech. Rept. Geol. Surv. Zambia, 76, 40 pp. [8] Cowan I. M. and Pollack H. N. (1977) Nature, 266, 615-617. [9] Chapman D. S. and Pollack H. N. (1975) Nature, 256, 28-30. [10] Legg C. A. (1974) Econ. Rept. Geol. Surv. Zambia, 50, 60 pp. [11] Vrana S

  1. The Tyrrhena-Malea Volcanic Province, Mars: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Greeley, R.; Ferguson, R.; Kuzmin, R.; McCord, T.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J.; Xiao, L.; Manfredi, L.; Poulet, F.; Pinet, P.; Baratoux, D.; Plaut, J. J.; Raitala, J.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    `softened' appearance of their surfaces, but they do contain pedestal and ejecta flow craters and large, smooth, bright plateaus in their central depressions. This morphology is indicative of a surface with not only a high water ice content, but also a more consolidated material that is less susceptible to degradation (relative to the other four volcanoes). We suggest that Malea and Pityusa (and possibly Peneus) Paterae are Martian equivalents to Earth's giant calderas (e.g., Yellowstone, Long Valley) that erupted large volumes of volcanic materials, and that Malea and Pityusa are probably composed of either lava flows or ignimbrites. HRSC and OMEGA spectral data indicate that dark gray to slightly red materials (often represented as blue or black pixels in HRSC color images), found in the patera floors and topographic lows throughout the T-MVP, have a basaltic composition. A key issue is whether this dark material represents concentrations of underlying basaltic material exposed by aeolian winnowing, or if the material was transported from elsewhere on Mars by regional winds. Understanding the provenance of these dark materials may be the key to understanding the volcanic diversity of the Tyrrhena-Malea Volcanic Province. References [1] Crown, D. and Greeley, R. (2007) U.S. Geol. Surv. Sci. Inves. Ser. Map 2936. [2] Gregg, T., et al. (1998) U.S. Geol. Surv. Map I- 2556. [3] Leonard, G. and Tanaka, K. (2001) U. S. Geol. Survey Misc. Invest. Series Map I-2694. [4] Kolb, E. and Tanaka, K. (2008) Geologic Map of the Planum Australe Region of Mars. U. S. Geol. Survey. Misc. Investigation Series, in review. [5] Peterson, J. (1978) Proc. 9th LPSC, 3411-3432.

  2. PEARS Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy; Hathi, Nimish P.; Cohen, Seth; Belini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitless grism spectroscopic data obtained vl'ith the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random surveY of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allOW8 us to detect the presence of multiple emission line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. 1162 [OII], [OIII] and/or H-alpha emission lines have been identified in the PEARS sample of approx 906 galaxies down to a limiting flux of approx 10 - 18 erg/s/sq cm . The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis we find three key results: 1) The computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; 2) The star forming systems show evidence of disturbed morphologies, with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass; and 3) The number density of star forming galaxies with M(*) >= 10(exp 9) Solar M decreases by an order of magnitude at z<=0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9 in support of the argument for galaxy downsizing.

  3. Beads and glows in sprite discharges resulting from a dynamical instability of streamer channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C.; McHarg, Matthew G.; Haaland, Ryan K.

    2015-04-01

    High-speed video recordings of sprite discharges show patches of luminosity appearing some milliseconds after a streamer channel is formed [1]. Called beads or glows depending on their size, these luminous patches have decay times of tens of milliseconds and they are responsible for most of the light emitted by the sprite [2]. A possible mechanism explaining the frequent formation of beads and glows is called "attachment instability". This is a dynamical instability inherent in streamer channels that results when a locally higher electric field enhances the effective attachment rate and reduces the electron density. In turn, a depleted electron density enhances the electric field, thus feeding the instability. The instability can be triggered by small perturbations to the streamer channel, such as those arising from a pre-existing inhomogeneity in the electron density [3]. We present observations of the formation of beads and glows and measurements of their decay times. Then we compare with numerical simulations of a streamer channel where the attachment instability generates bright patches with a high electric field. Most of the observed properties of beads and glows are present in the simulation, which leads us to believe that these features are indeed manifestations of the attachment instability. [1] H. C. Stenbaek-Nielsen and M. G. McHarg, J. Phys. D 41, 234009 (2008). [2] H. C. Stenbaek-Nielsen , T. Kanmae, M. G. McHarg and R. K. Haaland, Surv. Geophys. 34:769-795 (2013). [3] A. Luque and F. J. Gordillo-Vázquez, Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L04808 (2011).

  4. The "normal" elongation of river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, Sebastien

    2013-04-01

    The spacing between major transverse rivers at the front of Earth's linear mountain belts consistently scales with about half of the mountain half-width [1], despite strong differences in climate and rock uplift rates. Like other empirical measures describing drainage network geometry this result seems to indicate that the form of river basins, among other properties of landscapes, is invariant. Paradoxically, in many current landscape evolution models, the patterns of drainage network organization, as seen for example in drainage density and channel spacing, seem to depend on both climate [2-4] and tectonics [5]. Hovius' observation [1] is one of several unexplained "laws" in geomorphology that still sheds mystery on how water, and rivers in particular, shape the Earth's landscapes. This narrow range of drainage network shapes found in the Earth's orogens is classicaly regarded as an optimal catchment geometry that embodies a "most probable state" in the uplift-erosion system of a linear mountain belt. River basins currently having an aspect away from this geometry are usually considered unstable and expected to re-equilibrate over geological time-scales. Here I show that the Length/Width~2 aspect ratio of drainage basins in linear mountain belts is the natural expectation of sampling a uniform or normal distribution of basin shapes, and bears no information on the geomorphic processes responsible for landscape development. This finding also applies to Hack's [6] law of river basins areas and lengths, a close parent of Hovius' law. [1]Hovius, N. Basin Res. 8, 29-44 (1996) [2]Simpson, G. & Schlunegger, F. J. Geophys. Res. 108, 2300 (2003) [3]Tucker, G. & Bras, R. Water Resour. Res. 34, 2751-2764 (1998) [4]Tucker, G. & Slingerland, R. Water Resour. Res. 33, 2031-2047 (1997) [5]Tucker, G. E. & Whipple, K. X. J. Geophys. Res. 107, 1-1 (2002) [6]Hack, J. US Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 294-B (1957)

  5. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  6. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (<5% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6).

  7. Frequent eruptions of Mount Rainier over the last ∼2,600 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Vallance, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Field, geochronologic, and geochemical evidence from proximal fine-grained tephras, and from limited exposures of Holocene lava flows and a small pyroclastic flow document ten–12 eruptions of Mount Rainier over the last 2,600 years, contrasting with previously published evidence for only 11–12 eruptions of the volcano for all of the Holocene. Except for the pumiceous subplinian C event of 2,200 cal year BP, the late-Holocene eruptions were weakly explosive, involving lava effusions and at least two block-and-ash pyroclastic flows. Eruptions were clustered from ∼2,600 to ∼2,200 cal year BP, an interval referred to as the Summerland eruptive period that includes the youngest lava effusion from the volcano. Thin, fine-grained tephras are the only known primary volcanic products from eruptions near 1,500 and 1,000 cal year BP, but these and earlier eruptions were penecontemporaneous with far-traveled lahars, probably created from newly erupted materials melting snow and glacial ice. The most recent magmatic eruption of Mount Rainier, documented geochemically, was the 1,000 cal year BP event. Products from a proposed eruption of Mount Rainier between AD 1820 and 1854 (X tephra of Mullineaux (US Geol Surv Bull 1326:1–83, 1974)) are redeposited C tephra, probably transported onto young moraines by snow avalanches, and do not record a nineteenth century eruption. We found no conclusive evidence for an eruption associated with the clay-rich Electron Mudflow of ∼500 cal year BP, and though rare, non-eruptive collapse of unstable edifice flanks remains as a potential hazard from Mount Rainier.

  8. Initiation of Sprite Streamers from Natural Mesospheric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Dwyer, J. R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; McHarg, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are large, luminous electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere caused by intense cloud-to-ground lightning flashes. They manifest a possible, impulsive coupling mechanism between low atmospheric regions and the upper atmosphere. Their dynamics are governed by filamentary plasma discharges, of tens to hundreds of meter wide, known as streamers. The propagation properties of sprite streamers have been well studied by past work [e.g., Liu, et al., JGR, 114, A00E02, 2009; Liu et al, JGR, 114, A00E03, 2009; Luque and Ebert, Nat. Geosci., 2, 757, 2009; Liu, GRL, 37, L04102, 2010; Luque and Ebert, GRL, 37, L06806, 2010]. However, how sprite streamers are initiated is not well understood. Recent high-speed images show that mesospheric/lower ionospheric structures are frequently involved in initiation of sprite streamers [e.g., Stenbaek-Nielsen et al., Surv. Geophys., 34, 769, 2013; Qin et al., Nat. Comm., 5, 2014]. Although earlier theoretical and numerical studies routinely used strong plasma inhomogeneities to initiate streamers, it is only recently that inhomogeneities are concluded to be required for sprite streamer initiation [e.g., Qin et al., JGR, 116, A06305, 2011; Liu et al., PRL, 109, 025002, 2012; Kosar et al., JGR, 117, A08328, 2012; Kosar et al, GRL, 40, 6282, 2013]. However, the inhomogeneities used in various models are rather ad hoc and often unrealistic. In this talk, we present numerical simulations to show naturally-existing mesospheric structures, such as those produced by gravity waves via instability and breaking [e.g., Fritts and Alexander, Rev. Geophys., 41, 1003, 2003], can initiate sprite streamers under the influence of the measurement-inferred lightning field. Evidence from high-speed video observations supporting this theory is discussed. This mechanism naturally explains many aspects of observed sprite streamer initiation including variability in the delay of sprite initiation, sprites caused by weak lightning, optical signatures of

  9. Testing earthquake prediction algorithms: Statistically significant advance prediction of the largest earthquakes in the Circum-Pacific, 1992-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kossobokov, V.G.; Romashkova, L.L.; Keilis-Borok, V. I.; Healy, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Algorithms M8 and MSc (i.e., the Mendocino Scenario) were used in a real-time intermediate-term research prediction of the strongest earthquakes in the Circum-Pacific seismic belt. Predictions are made by M8 first. Then, the areas of alarm are reduced by MSc at the cost that some earthquakes are missed in the second approximation of prediction. In 1992-1997, five earthquakes of magnitude 8 and above occurred in the test area: all of them were predicted by M8 and MSc identified correctly the locations of four of them. The space-time volume of the alarms is 36% and 18%, correspondingly, when estimated with a normalized product measure of empirical distribution of epicenters and uniform time. The statistical significance of the achieved results is beyond 99% both for M8 and MSc. For magnitude 7.5 + , 10 out of 19 earthquakes were predicted by M8 in 40% and five were predicted by M8-MSc in 13% of the total volume considered. This implies a significance level of 81% for M8 and 92% for M8-MSc. The lower significance levels might result from a global change in seismic regime in 1993-1996, when the rate of the largest events has doubled and all of them become exclusively normal or reversed faults. The predictions are fully reproducible; the algorithms M8 and MSc in complete formal definitions were published before we started our experiment [Keilis-Borok, V.I., Kossobokov, V.G., 1990. Premonitory activation of seismic flow: Algorithm M8, Phys. Earth and Planet. Inter. 61, 73-83; Kossobokov, V.G., Keilis-Borok, V.I., Smith, S.W., 1990. Localization of intermediate-term earthquake prediction, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 19763-19772; Healy, J.H., Kossobokov, V.G., Dewey, J.W., 1992. A test to evaluate the earthquake prediction algorithm, M8. U.S. Geol. Surv. OFR 92-401]. M8 is available from the IASPEI Software Library [Healy, J.H., Keilis-Borok, V.I., Lee, W.H.K. (Eds.), 1997. Algorithms for Earthquake Statistics and Prediction, Vol. 6. IASPEI Software Library]. ?? 1999 Elsevier

  10. Effects of a flood pulse on exchange flows along a sinuous stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, D.; Brunner, P.; Renard, P.; Perrochet, P.; Schirmer, M.; Hunkeler, D.

    2012-04-01

    typically assume a straight channel. The discussion covers an evaluation of this work with respect to previous studies that considered the influence of sinuosity on interfacial exchange flows. It addresses the issue of steady vs. transient exchanges, which is of uppermost importance at the operational scale of river restoration schemes. Langbein WB, Leopold LB. 1966. River meanders - theory of minimum variance. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 422-H: 15 p.

  11. Salmonella and Escherichia coli contamination of poultry meat from a processing plant and retail markets in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeyanju, Gladys Taiwo; Ishola, Olayinka

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli are the two most important food-borne pathogens of public health interest incriminated in poultry meat worldwide. This study is to access their levels in frozen poultry meat obtained in Ibadan, Oyo State and compare those obtained from a commercial Nigerian-registered poultry company having a broiler-processing plant, Sayed Farms Ltd(R), with that obtained from retail stores. These retail stores source their products as illegal imports from neighboring Benin Republic or Togo because of a ban imposed by Government policy in Nigeria since July 2002 (USDA, GAIN report #NI2025:1-6, 2002). Microbiological Standards and Guidelines by USDA (National Agricultural library) (USDA 2011) and NCCLS guidelines (from Global Salm-Surv, 2003) were used during the research work. The study was approved by the Ethical Research Review Board (ERRB, Research Management Office 2011), University of Ibadan, Nigeria. A total of one hundred and fifty-two (152) frozen poultry meat samples comprising ninety-nine retail poultry (53 chicken and 46 turkey) and 53 chicken from the processing plant were accessed. ISO Standards catalogue 07.100.30 (2011) was used in accessing the levels of Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae counts and Aerobic plate count. ISO 6579: 2002 was used for Salmonella isolation and ISO-16654:2001 for Escherichia coli isolation. There was a higher level of Aerobic plate counts and Enterobacteriaceae counts in frozen retail poultry meat than from the processing plant. Salmonella contamination from the ninety-nine poultry samples (53 chicken and 46 turkey) obtained from retail markets was at 33% [chicken 32.1% (17/53) and turkey 34.8% (16/46)] while Escherichia coli at 43.4% [chicken 47.2% (25/53) and turkey 39.1% (18/46)]. From the processing plant, twelve (12) Salmonella isolates were obtained and prevalence rate calculated as 22.6% while three (3) Escherichia coli isolates at 5.7% was obtained. Antibiotic sensitivity for

  12. Comparing the topographic long profiles of gullies on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Balme, Matthew; Murray, John; Towner, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Planet. Sci. Conf. 35, (2004),no. 1556. [6] C.H. Hugenholtz, Icarus, (2008), 197,65-72. [7] J.L. Dickson and J.W. Head, Icarus, (2009), 204,63-86. [8] C.J. Gallagher and M.R. Balme, Geol. Soc. Lond. Spec. Publ., (2011), 356,87-110. [9] J.T. Hack, US Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap., (1957), 294-B,45-97. [10] M.A. Kreslavsky, Workshop Martian Gullies, (2008),abs.#1301.

  13. Aeolian processes and dune morphology in the Gobi and Badain Jaran Desert using LandSat Imagery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, Marco; Cannito, Arturo; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Global Sand Sea. (1979) [2] Yang, X. Chinese Science Bulletin 46, 6-11, (2000). [3] Yang, X., et al. Quaternary International 104 ( 2003). 99-112. [4] NASA Landsat Program (2003) Landsat ETM+scene, p129r031_7t20000713, SLC-Off, USGS, Sioux Falls, 10/26/2003. [5] Tachikawa, T., et al. The characteristics of ASTER GDEM version 2, IGARSS, July 2011. [6] McKee E. D. (1979) U.S.Geol. Surv.Prof. Pap., 1052, 3-17. [7] Werner, B.T. 1995. Eolian dunes: Computer simulations and attractor interpretation. Geology 23: 1107-1110.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of eplerenone in NYHA class II chronic heart failure patients with reduced LVEF: an analysis for Greece

    PubMed Central

    Athanasakis, Kostas; Bilitou, Aikaterini; Lee, Dawn; Karampli, Eleftheria; Karavidas, Apostolos; Parissis, John; Sykara, Georgia; Kyriopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness (CE) of treatment with eplerenone versus standard care in adult patients with New York Heart Association class II chronic heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction from the perspective of the Greek national health care payer. Methods A discrete-event model simulating the clinical course and respective outcomes of eplerenone as an add-on to standard therapy versus standard therapy alone based on the pivotal Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and SurvIval Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) trial was locally adapted for the Greek setting. Data on medications followed the resource use from eplerenone in mild patients hospitalization and survival study in heart failure and were estimated on a lifetime basis (or until discontinuation). Cost calculations were based on year 2014, event costs (cardiovascular hospitalizations, adverse events, and devices) were sourced from published diagnosis-related groups. A 3% discount rate was applied. In order to test the robustness of the model projections, a range of deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results Over a patient’s lifetime, the addition of eplerenone to standard care compared to standard care alone led to an incremental gain of 1.33 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (6.53 vs 5.20 QALYs, respectively) as well as an increase in the cost of treatment by €2,160; these outcomes produced an incremental CE ratio of €1,624/QALY for the Greek setting. On the basis of probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there was a 100% likelihood of eplerenone being cost-effective versus standard care at a threshold of €3,500/QALY. Conclusion This analysis indicates that eplerenone may be a cost-effective option versus standard care accompanied by additional clinical benefits and an added incremental cost at an acceptable, if not low, CE ratio. The results are consistent with the previously published

  15. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  16. Low-accommodation detrital apron alongside a basement uplift, Pennsylvanian of Midcontinent North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joeckel, R. M.; Nicklen, B. L.; Carlson, M. P.

    2007-04-01

    The northern end of the 650-km-long Nemaha Uplift (Nebraska and Kansas, USA) is an important example of basin-margin sedimentation in the North American Midcontinent. An apron of coarse, basal Pennsylvanian arkosic clastic sediments (BPC) was deposited on the flanks of the uplift while marine cyclothems were encroaching from the east. Small-scale fining-upward intervals, many with demonstrably erosional bases, dominate the BPC and are interpreted as overridingly fluvial in origin. Weak paleosols, desiccation cracks, and reddened intervals in the BPC record episodic subaerial exposure. Multiple, burrowed horizons and heterolithic strata of probable tidal origin and rare marine fossils also indicate episodic marine influence. The BPC appear to have been deposited as a thin apron of coalesced, alluvial fans and fan deltas. Deposition of the BPC occurred during the waning of uplift and subsequent quiescence. The comparative thinness and large-scale packaging of the BPC are compatible with the controlling effects of relict relief, regional subsidence, and eustasy, rather than ongoing, major vertical displacements along active faults. A strong autocyclic influence on sedimentation is evidenced by stacked fining-upward intervals of poorly-sorted conglomerates, sandstones, and sandy mudstones. Correlations demonstrate that the accumulation of the BPC took place over more than seven major sea-level cycles, beginning in Cherokee Group times (middle Moscovian/middle Pennsylvanian) and ending only when the eroded uplift was inundated and buried by marine cyclothems. On the basis of local correlations with marine cyclothems, and using black phosphatic shales (so-called "core shales" of Heckel, P.H., 1986. Sea-level surve for Pennsylvanian eustatic marine transgressive-regressive depositional cycles along Midcontinent outcrop belt, North America: Geology 14, 330-334., Heckel, P.H., 1994. Evaluation of evidence for glacio-eustatic control over marine Pennsylvanian cyclothems in

  17. Milankovitch Forcing in Equatorial, Late Triassic Pangea: (Deep River; Dan River, and Richmond Basins, Southeastern USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Letourneau, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Milankovitch character of lake level fluctuations in the tropics of central Pangea has been well established since the pioneering work of Van Houten in the 1960's (1) that laid the foundation for quantitative analysis of core and outcrops in the 1990's (2,3). In the region from about 3° to 10° N latitude giant rift lakes fluctuated to the classic Milankovitch frequencies of precessional forcing of ~20, 96, 128, and 404 ky, as well as the less well known 1.75 and 3.5 m.y. cycles. The latter are the Triassic values for the periods of g4-g3 of eccentricity related precessional forcing and the secular resonance, theta (2(g4- g3) - (s4-s3)), of precessional and obliquity related forcing. We attribute the forcing of lake depth largely to modulation of the strength of tropical convergence. Late Triassic rifts located from 0° to 3° N latitude show similar patterns, except with a strong tendency towards a doubling of the climatic precessional frequency and a lack of evaporites as previously reported from the Dan River basin (4,5,6). Here we report on new analyses of coal-bearing cores and drill holes from the Deep River, Dan River, and Richmond basin of older Late Triassic lacustrine strata that reinforce this pattern but show that the doubling of the precessional frequency is not ubiquitous at the equator and also show that very strong climatic transitions appear related to the 1.75 and 3.5 m.y. cycles juxtaposing coals and caliches in vertical sequence and sometimes coinciding with major faunal and floral transitions. (1) Van Houten FB. 1964. Kansas Geol. Surv. Bull. 169:497. (2) Olsen PE & Kent DV. 1996. Palaeogeo. Palaeoclim. Palaeoecol. 122:1-26. (3) Olsen PE & Kent DV. 1999. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. (A) 357:1761-1787. (4) Olsen PE & Kent DV.1996. Eos, Trans., AGU 77(46), Suppl.:301. (5) Olsen PE. 1997. Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 25:337-401. (6) Olsen PE & Kent DV. 2000. in Bachmann G. and Lerche I. (eds.), Epicontinental Triassic, Vol. 3, Zent. Geol

  18. Predictions for ASKAP neutral hydrogen surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Alan R.; Meyer, Martin J.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Gerstmann, Derek; Westerlund, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will revolutionize our knowledge of gas-rich galaxies in the universe. Here we present predictions for two proposed extragalactic ASKAP neutral hydrogen (H I) emission-line surveys, based on semi-analytic models applied to cosmological N-body simulations. The ASKAP H I All-Sky Survey, known as Widefield ASKAP L-band Legacy All-sky Blind surveY (WALLABY), is a shallow 3 π survey (z = 0-0.26) which will probe the mass and dynamics of over 6 × 105 galaxies. A much deeper small-area H I survey, called Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins (DINGO), aims to trace the evolution of H I from z = 0 to 0.43, a cosmological volume of 4 × 107 Mpc3, detecting potentially 105 galaxies. The high-sensitivity 30 antenna ASKAP core (diameter ˜2 km) will provide an angular resolution of 30 arcsec (at z = 0). Our simulations show that the majority of galaxies detected in WALLABY (87.5 per cent) will be resolved. About 5000 galaxies will be well resolved, i.e. more than five beams (2.5 arcmin) across the major axis, enabling kinematic studies of their gaseous discs. This number would rise to 1.6 × 105 galaxies if all 36 ASKAP antennas could be used; the additional six antennas provide baselines up to 6 km, resulting in an angular resolution of 10 arcsec. For DINGO this increased resolution is highly desirable to minimize source confusion, reducing confusion rates from a maximum of 10 per cent of sources at the survey edge to 3 per cent. We estimate that the sources detected by WALLABY and DINGO will span four orders of magnitude in total halo mass (from 1011 to 1015 M⊙) and nearly seven orders of magnitude in stellar mass (from 105 to 1012 M⊙), allowing us to investigate the process of galaxy formation across the last four billion years.

  19. Redox effect on the Cr isotope proxy: transitional signal of associated cap-carbonates, BIF and black shale, Chuos Formation (Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodler, A.; Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2013-12-01

    -rich, ferruginous sediments with dropstones and higher TiO2 and Al2O3 due to enhanced terrigenous sedimentary input. [1] Hoffman et al. (1996) Communs Geol. Surv. Namibia 11, 47-52. [2] Schoenberg et al. (2008) Chemical Geology 249, 294-306. [3] Døssing et al. (2011) Chemical Geology 285, 157-166.

  20. Statistical development and validation of discharge equations for natural channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingman, S. Lawrence; Sharma, Keshav P.

    1997-12-01

    Although the Manning equation is widely accepted as the empirical flow law for rough turbulent open-channel flow, using the equation in practical situations such as slope-area computations is fraught with uncertainty because of the difficulty in specifying the value of the reach resistance, Manning's n. Riggs (1976, J. Res. US Geol. Surv., 4: 285-291) found that n was correlated with water-surface slope, and proposed a multiple-regression equation that obviates the need for estimating n in slope-area estimates of discharge. Because his relation was developed from a relatively small sample ( N = 62), had potential flaws owing to multicollinearity, and was not thoroughly validated, we used an expanded data base ( N = 520) and objective methods to develop a new relation for the same purpose: Q = 1.564 A1.173R0.400S-0.0543log S where Q is discharge (m 3 s -1), A is cross-sectional area (m 2), R is hydraulic radius (m), and S is water-surface slope. We validated Rigg's model and our model using 100 measurements not included in model development and found that both give similar results. Riggs's model is somewhat better in terms of actual (m 3 s -1) error, but ours is better in terms of relative (log Q) error. We conclude that either Riggs's or our model can be used in place of Manning's equation in slope-area computations, but that our model is preferable because it has less bias, minimizes multicollinearity, and performs better when applied to discharge changes in individual reaches. We also found that our model performs better than those of Jarrett (1984, J. Hydraul. Eng., 110: 1519-1539) or Riggs in the range of applicability of Jarrett's equation (0.15 m ≤ R ≤ 2.13 m; 0.002 ≤ S ≤ 0.052). Both Riggs's and our models significantly overestimate Q in flows satisfying both the following conditions: Q < 3 m 3s -1 and Froude number less than 0.2. For other in-bank flows in relatively straight reaches, our model can be recommended for use in slope-area computations

  1. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  2. Compositional heterogeneity of lunar impact melts: Issues of origin and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Pieters, Carle

    2012-07-01

    Impact melt formation and emplacement occurs in a dynamically active environment during the excavation and modification stages of the cratering process [1]. They are typically very mobile and as a result occur in a variety of geographical settings including crater floor, walls, rim and beyond. Diverse morphologies of impact melts on the Moon have been well documented [e.g. 2, 3, 4]. Little attention however, has been given to their compositional nature [e.g. 5, 6]. Impact melts occur in diverse geological settings and display wide variability in their volume, liquid to clast ratio and degrees of crystallinity. All these factors affect their physical and chemical attributes. It is therefore necessary to study the compositional nature of impact melts in order to understand their evolution. We have initiated a global remote sensing survey of impact melts on the Moon integrating their compositional character with morphology to understand their evolution. Our initial results suggest compositional heterogeneity in impact melts at various spatial scales [7]. However, it is yet to be understood if the variation is caused by unmelted clast component, the melted target or both. Inefficient mixing of impact melts has been noted at terrestrial impact craters [8] and might be responsible for the heterogeneous composition of impact melts. We are exploring the role of these factors in different environments. In this context, craters with both homogeneous and heterogeneous targets have been selected. Data from Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) have been integrated with Kaguya Terrain Camera (TC) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). The integration of these new datasets will enable detailed study of impact melts. Acknowledgment: This research is supported by NLSI grant no. NNA09DB34A References: [1] Grieve R.A.F. et al. (1977) Impact and Expl. Cratering, Eds. D.J. Roddy et al., Pergamon Press, 791-814 [2] Howard and Wilshire (1975) J. Res. U.S. Geol. Surv., 3, 237

  3. Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland-Research Program And Key Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C. O.; Bossart, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    scenarios and v) Evaluation of diffusion and retention parameters for long-lived radionuclides. Experiments related to repository-induced perturbations are focused on: i) Influence of rock liner on the disposal system and the buffering potential of the host rock; ii) Self-sealing processes in the excavation damaged zone; iii) Hydro-mechanical coupled processes (e.g. stress redistributions and pore pressure evolution during excavation); iv) Thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical coupled processes (e.g. heating of bentonite and host rock) and v) Gas-induced transport of radionuclides in porewater and along interfaces in the engineered barrier system. A third research direction is to demonstrate the feasibility of repository construction and long-term safety after repository closure. Demonstration experiments can contribute to improving the reliability of the scientific basis for the safety assessment of future geological repositories, particularly if they are performed on a large scale and with a long duration. These experiments include the construction and installation of engineered barriers on a 1:1 scale: i) Horizontal emplacement of canisters; ii) Evaluation of the corrosion of container materials; repository re-saturation; iii) Sealing of boreholes and repository access tunnels and iv) Long-term monitoring of the repository. References Bossart, P. & Thury, M. (2008): Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Project, Programme 1996 to 2007 and Results. - Rep. Swiss Geol. Surv. 3.

  4. Multidisciplinary management of invasive placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa G; Allen, Lisa; Windrim, Rory C; Kachura, John; Pollard, Lindsay; Pantazi, Sophia; Keating, Sarah; Carvalho, Jose C A; Kingdom, John C P

    2013-05-01

    sultats : Les 33 participantes ont survécu au cours de cette période. Les deux tiers (22/33) d’entre elles présentaient cinq ou six des six composantes des soins multidisciplinaires. L’utilisation croissante des composantes des soins multidisciplinaires a été associée à une baisse significative de la morbidité composite (R2 = 0,228, P = 0,005). Conclusion : L’évaluation et la prise en charge en équipe des femmes qui présentent un placenta prævia invasif sont susceptibles d’améliorer les issues maternelles et devraient être favorisées sur une base régionale.

  5. Could borate have played a role in the RNA World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grew, E. S.; Bada, J. L.; Hazen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Hills, Australia, have been cited as evidence for the presence of granitic (s. l.) "protocontinental" crust by 4.3 Ga (Ushikuba et al. 2008 doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2008.05.032; Valley et al. 2010 Rec Geol Surv W Aust, 5-7), but the existence of conventional plate tectonics prior to 3.8 Ga remains controversial. Chaussidon & Appel (1997 Chem Geol 136, 171-180) concluded that boron isotope compositions (δ11B) of tourmaline from Isua volcaniclastic rocks provide no evidence for changes of δ11B in the mantle or continental crust between now and 3.8 Ga, whereas the very light B (δ11B = -20‰) in tourmaline from Isua metachert could indicate that seawater δ11B was at least 10‰ less at 3.8 Ga than now and that there was proportionally less B in sediments at 3.8 Ga, i.e., fractionation of B between depleted mantle, oceans, continental crust and oceanic crust was still in progress (Chaussidon & Albarède 1992, EPSL 108, 229-241). If fractionation and outgassing of boron had not proceeded very far during the RNA World, neither of the proposed scenarios of borate enrichment is plausible, particularly in the absence of a conventional plate tectonics regime.

  6. Towards understanding the nature of any relationship between Solar Activity and Cosmic Rays with thunderstorm activity and lightning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, J.; Muller, J.-P.; Matthews, S.

    2012-04-01

    both sign and significance over small geographic distances, similar to previous results [3,4,6], highlighting the complexity of the atmospheric processes contributing to the mechanism of thunderstorm generation and lightning discharge. We find correlations are generally more significant over larger timescales, as daily meteorological variability is smoothened out, suggesting a role for changing Solar activity levels in influencing thunderstorm development and onset of lightning discharge. Comparisons of small-scale correlation results to planetary wave patterns suggests an influence over the correlations of lightning activity to the above indices, as proposed by Schlegel et al. [6], and previously suggested by the results of Fritz [3] and Brooks [4]. Our results show agreement with Schlegel et al. [6] for the same region over Germany, but are in disagreement with their results for Austria. This lends support to the idea of the theory of planetary waves influence over correlation signs and significance across short geographic distances, as discussed by Schlegel et al. [6]. Acknowledgement: The authors wish to thank the World Wide Lightning Location Network (http://wwlln.net), a collaboration among over 50 universities and institutions (including MSSL) for providing the lightning location data used in this paper. [1] Ermakov, V.I. and Stozhkov, Yu.I., 2003. Cosmic rays in the mechanism of thundercloud production. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference, pp. 4157-4160. [2] Kirkby, J., 2007. Cosmic rays and climate. Surv Geophys, vol. 28 (5-6) pp. 333-375. [3] Fritz, H., 1878. Die wichtigsten periodischen Erscheinungen der Meteorologie und Kosmologie. Natuurkundige Verhandelingen van de Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen te Haarlem, Deel III, Haarlem. [4] Brooks, C.E.P., 1934. The variation of the annual frequency of thunderstorms in relation to sunspots. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 60, 153-165. [5] Stringfellow, M.F., 1974. Lightning

  7. U-Pb ID-TIMS zircon ages of TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Hiredya; Saikia, Ashima; Kaulina, Tatiana; Bayanova, Tamara; Ahmad, Talat

    2015-04-01

    zircon types from UD-16 sample yield a U-Pb discordant age of 2680±30 Ma. Two zircon fractions from UD-17 sample show discordant 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2506 and 2577 Ma. Zircons in our samples have moderate to high U contents (180-770 ppm) with low Th/U ratios (0.2-0.5) in the sample UD-16, characteristic for magmatic zircons from TTG rocks. Thus the obtained age of 2680±30 Ma is interpreted as an age of magmatic crystallization of tonalites. Gopalan, K. et al., (1990): Precambrian Res., 48, 287-297. Ludwig, K.R. (1991): PBDAT program. US. Geol. Surv. Open-file report 88-542, 38 p. Ludwig, K. R. (2008): Isoplot/Ex, version 3.6, Berkeley Geochronology Center, Special Publication no. 4. Upadhyaya, R. et al., (1992): Current Sci., 62(2): 87-92. Wiedenbeck, M. et al., (1996): Chem Geol. 129: 325-340.

  8. In search of the noble gas 3.52 Ga atmospheric signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, M.; Marty, B.; Philippot, P.

    2008-12-01

    nuclear reactions on Xe isotope production, barite from 30m shallower depth in the same core were analyzed. Variable excesses can be linked to spallogenic and cosmogenic reactions ([4] [5] [6]) which allow the primitive Xe isotopic signature to be isolated from subsequent secondary production. Models of the archaean atmospheric noble gas signature can thereby be compared with different theories on primitive atmospheric composition. [1] Staudacher T. Allègre C.J. (1982) EPSL 60, p 389-406 [2] Van Kranendonk MJ., Hickman A.H., Williams I.R. and Nijman W. (2001) Rec.-Geol. Surv. West. Aust. 2001/9, 134 [3] Foriel J., Philippot P., Rey P., Somogyi A., Banks D. and Ménez B. (2004) EPSL, 228, 451-463 [4]Srinivasan B. (1976) EPSL, 31, 129-141 [5]Charalambus S. (1971) Nuclear Physics, A166, 145 [6]Meshik A. P., Hohenberg C. M., Pravdivtseva O. V. and Kapusta Y. (2001) Phys. Rev., C 64, 035205-1 035205-6

  9. The implications of Chang'e-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer in-situ analysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Meijuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Su, Yan; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Shu; Xue, Xiping

    2015-04-01

    believe that at least the identification of the minerals gives us valuable imformation about the landing site. References: [1] Liu B. (2014). RAA, 14, 1578-1594. [2] Thiessen F. et al., (2014). Planetary and Space Science, 104, 244-252. [3]Yamamoto S. et al., (2010). Nat. Geosci. 3, 533-536. [4] Tong S. et al,. (2013). Icarus 222, 401-410. [5] Wilhelm D.E., and McCauley J.F. (1971). 1-703. U.S. Geol. Surv., Washington D.C. [6] Li C.L. et al., (2014). RAA, 14, 1514-1529. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the CHANG'E-3 funding from Chinese Lunar Exploration Program, undertaken by the China National Space Administration (CNSA). This work is also supported by the NSFC program (41490633).

  10. P and S automatic picks for 3D earthquake tomography in NE Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovisa, L.; Bragato, P.; Gentili, S.

    2006-12-01

    quantity of recordings must by quickly analyzed to provide some preliminary results (e.g., to decide about further data acquisition when using temporary networks) or when a sort of "real-time tomography" is required (e.g., continuous imaging of volcanoes during their activity). References Evans J.R., Eberhart-Phillips D., and Thurber C.H. (1994). User's manual for simulps12 for imaging vp and vp/vs: a derivative of the Thurber tomographic inversion simul3 for local earthquakes locations and explosions, U.S.Geol. Surv. Open File Report, 7 pp. Gentile, G. F., Bressan, G., Burlini, L., De Franco, R., 2000, Three - dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs models of the upper crust in the Friuli area (Northeastern Italy)., Geophys. Journ. Int., 141, 457-478. Gentili S. and Bragato P. L., 2006,"A neural-tree-based system for automatic location of earthquakes in Northeastern Italy" Journal of Seismology, Volume 10, Number 1, pp.73-89. Michelini, A., Mcevilly, T. V., 1991, "Seismological studies at Parkfield; I, Simultaneous inversion for velocity structure and hypocenters using cubic B-splines parameterization.", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 81, 2, 524-552.

  11. Copernican tectonic activities in the northwestern Imbrium region of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daket, Yuko; Yamaji, Atsushi; Sato, Katsushi

    2015-04-01

    area lasted until recently. Those young tectonic activities are too young to be explained by mascon loading hypothesis. Tectonism induced by global cooling or orbital evolution are possible origins for the young horizontal compression. However, they cannot explain the recent extension. Our study area is located in PKT region where the heat-producing elements are more abundant than surrounding areas. Therefore, regional cooling would be a reasonable explanation for the young extensional tectonics. References Ono, T., A. Kumamoto, H. Nakagawa, Y. Yamaguchi, S. Oshigami, A. Yamaji, T. Kobayashi, Y. Kasahara, and H. Oya, 2009, Science, 323, 909--912. Solomon, S.C. and Head, J.W., 1980, Rev. Geophys., 18, 107--141. Trask, N.J., 1971, Geological Survey Research, U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 750-D, D138--D144. Watters, T.R., M.S. Robinson, M.E. Banks, T. Tran, and B.W. Denevi, 2012, Nature Geosci., 5, 181--185.

  12. Magnetic properties and paleointensities as function of depth in a Hawai'ian lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, M. J.; de Groot, L. V.; ter Maat, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    ) methods on six levels in the flow. Only samples from a very specific depth - the slowest cooled part at 3.9 m from the top - yielded technically acceptable IZZI-Thellier results; the obtained paleointensities (42 × 2.2 μT) are in good agreement with absolute paleointensities of flows of similar age. The pseudo-Thellier results are interpretable for more levels in the flow (between 1.5 and 4 m from the top) and yield 44.1 × 2.4 μT, within uncertainty of the IZZI-Thellier results. Our results illustrate that variations in rock-magnetic properties with depth in the flow considerably influence the suitability of samples for paleointensity experiments. The chance of obtaining a reliable paleointensity from a specific cooling unit can therefore be increased by sampling at multiple levels at different distances from the top of the flow. Evidently, the depth at which samples are taken should always be reported alongside paleointensity results. de Groot et al. (2012). AGU Fall GP43A-1122 Rubin et al. (1987). US Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1350

  13. Variations in Pb concentrations and Pb-isotope ratios in soils collected along an east-west transect across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Woodruff, Laurel; Reimann, Clemens; Flem, Belinda

    2014-05-01

    feldspar content for the same 2500-km portion of the transect from east-central Colorado to the Atlantic coast that shows steadily increasing precipitation. No such correlation exists in the soil C horizon. The data demonstrate the importance of climate and weathering on both Pb concentration and 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios in soil samples and natural shifts thereof in the soil profile during soil-forming processes. The results of this study demonstrate that often none of above two requirements for the use of Pb isotopes in environmental sciences will be met. REFERENCES Smith, D.B., Cannon, W.F., Woodruff, L.G., Garrett, R.G., Klassen, R., Kilburn, J.E., Horton, J.D., King, H.D., Goldhaber, M.B., Morrison, J.M., 2005. Major- and trace-element concentrations in soils from two continental-scale transects of the United States and Canada. U.S. Geol. Surv. Open-File Rep. 2005-1253.

  14. GIS-based landslide hazard evaluation at the regional scale: some critical points in the permanent displacement approach for seismically-induced landslide maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario

    2013-04-01

    local practitioners. Seismically-induced landslide hazard maps have been drawn using the aforementioned three expressions. The preliminary results show Quaternary deposits (including alluvium deposits, slope wash, and terrace deposits) as the lithologies most affected by permanent displacement. Moreover, Towsley and Modelo formations, that are stiffer than the previous rock units, and consist mostly of shales, siltstones and subordinate sandstones, show high hazard value where the slopes increase. The relevant role of local slope in permanent displacement extent is evident where lithologies are characterized by both cohesive and frictional resistance components. Finally, a comparison among the maps produced by using the three expressions for permanent displacements is discussed. References Ambraseys N.N. and Menu J.M. (1988) Earthquake-induced ground displacements. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 16: 985-1006. Harp E.L. and Jibson R.W. (1995) Inventory of landslides triggered by the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake. US Geol. Surv. Open-File Rep. 95-213 17 pp. Jibson R. (2007) Regression models for estimating coseismic landslide displacement. Engineering Geology, 91: 209-218. Luzi L. and Pergalani F. (2000) A correlation between slope failures and accelerometric parameters: the 26 September 1997 earthquake (Umbria-Marche, Italy). Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 20: 301-313. Newmark N.M. (1965) Effects of earthquakes on dams and embankments. Geotechnique 965, 15(2): 139-160. Parise M. and Jibson R.W. (2000) A seismic landslide susceptibility rating of geologic units based on analysis of characteristics of landslides triggered by the 17 January, 1994 Northridge, California earthquake. Engineering Geology, 58: 251-270. Romeo R. (2000) Seismically induced landslide displacements: a predictive model. Engineering Geology, 58: 337-351.

  15. Space Shuttle Radar Images of Terrestrial Impact Structures: SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, J. F.; Blumberg, D. G.; Greeley, R.; Underwood, J. R., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    ; 133 degrees 09'E; largest ca.150 m dia) Although quite small, Henbury crater field [8] appears distinctly radar bright on survey -qualilty imagery. Strong radar backscatter may be due to a combination of impact-disrupted sedimentary horizons and of soil dielectrical properties altered by a significant meteoritic iron content [9]. References: [1] Garvin J. B. and Schnetzler C. C. (1994) GSA Spec. Pap. 293, 249-257. [2] Dietz R. S. and McHone J. F. (1979) Apollo Soyuz Test Proj. Summary Sci. Rept. (2) NASA SP-412, 183-192. [3] Roland N. W. (1976) Geol. Jahrb., Reihe A, 33, 117-131. [4] Becq-Giraudon J. F. et al. (1992) Comptes Rendus de l'Academ. des Sciences, Ser.2, 315, 83-88. [5] Grieve R. A. F. and Therriault A. M. (1995) LPS XXVI, 515-516. [6] Lambert P. et al. (1980) Meteoritics, 15, 157-159. [7] Harms et al. (1980) Nature, 286, 704-706. [8] Milton D. J. (1968) Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 599-C, C1-C16. [9] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1971) JGR, 76, 3880-3895.

  16. Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencini, Massimo; Ginelli, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    . Mon. 82 985 [15] Feigenbaum M J 1978 J. Stat. Phys. 19 25 [16] Oseledets V I 1968 Trans. Moscow Math. Soc. 19 197 [17] Birkhoff G D 1931 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 17 656 [18] von Neumann J 1932 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 18 70 [19] Krylov N S 1979 Works on the Foundations of Statistical Physics (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press) [20] Anosov D V and Sinai Y G 1967 Russ. Math. Surv. 22 103 [21] Pesin Y B 1976 Sov. Math. Dokl. 17 196 [22] Sinai Y G 1972 Russ. Math. Surv. 27 21 [23] Ruelle D 1979 Publ. Math. l'IHES 50 27 [24] Bowen R 1975 Equilibrium States and the Ergodic Theory of Anosov Diffeomorphisms (Lecture Notes in Mathematics vol 470) (Berlin: Springer) [25] Bowen R and Ruelle D 1975 Invent. Math. 29 181 [26] Shimada I and Nagashima T 1979 Prog. Theor. Phys. 61 1605 [27] Benettin G, Galgani L, Giorgilli A and Strelcyn J M 1980 Meccanica 15 9 [28] Grassberger P and Procaccia I 1984 Physica D 13 34 [29] Wolf A, Swift J B, Swinney H L and Vastano J A 1985 Physica D 16 285 [30] Takens F 1981 Detecting strange attractors in turbulence Dynamical Systems and Turbulence (Lecture Notes in Mathematics vol 898) ed D A Rand and L S Young (Berlin: Springer) p 366 [31] Eckmann J P and Ruelle D 1985 Rev. Mod. Phys. 57 617 [32] Legras B and Vautard R 1996 A guide to Lyapunov vectors Predictability (ECWF Seminar vol 1) ed T Palmer (Reading: ECMWF) p 141 3Prior to their publication in the West at the end of the 1970s, Krylov's results appeared in his PhD dissertation, published posthumously in 1950.

  17. Genesis Hypotheses Concerning Putative Rootless Cone Groups in Isidis Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithawala, T. M.; Ghent, R. R.

    2008-09-01

    the non-uniform development of sills [11], such that daughter bodies of a parent sill can vary in size and vertical and horizontal distribution, and thus result in different abutment relationships, causing varying surface manifestations of the hybrid sill tips. A combination of both models is also a likely candidate for the genesis of TPT in Isidis. We are continuing to investigate the details of the two models by analyzing additional datasets and terrestrial analogues. References [1] Kargel et al. (1995) JGR-E, 100, 5351-5368. [2] Pomerantz, W.J and Head III, J.W (2003) LPSC XXXXIII, Abstract 1277. [3] Chapman M. (1994) Icarus, 109(2), 393-406. [4] Head III, J.W and Marchant (2003) LPSC XXXXIII, Abstract 1247. [5] Scott and Underwood (1991) Proceedings of Lunar Planet. Sci, 21, 627-634. [6] Hiesinger, H. and Head III, J.W (2003) 6th Intl Conf. on Mars, Abstract 3061. [7] Ivanov, M.A and Head III, J.W (2003) JGR-E, 108, E6. [8] Greeley, R. and Guest, J.E (1987), US Geol. Surv. Misc. Invest. Ser., Map I-1802-B. [9] Cartwright, J. and Hansen, D.M (2006) Geology 34(11), 929-932. [10] Hansen, D.M and Cartwright, J. (2006) Journal Geol. Soc. London 163 (3), 509-523. [11] Thomson, K., and Hutton, D. (2004) Bull Volcanology, 66, 364-375.

  18. Concentric Crater Fill in Utopia Planitia: Timing and Transitions Between Glacial and Periglacial Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, J.; Head, J.

    2008-09-01

    those observed on flowing debris-covered glaciers on Earth [20]. Inversion of polygon topography at polygon margins due to differential sublimation would result in the formation of raised mounds and chains of mounds, some of which may preserve the original surface trough (e.g., the axial furrows observed in some BT mound chains). Deposition of thin layers of low-albedo BTC material on ice-cored FBT mounds could result in enhanced sublimation of residual icecores [21], leading to collapse of FBT mounds, and generating HBT features at contacts between BT and BTC units. References. [1] Squyres, S. (1979) JGR, 84, 8087-8096. [2] Squyres, S. & Carr, M. (1986) Sci., 231, 249-252. [3] Lucchita, B. (1984) JGR, 89, 409-418. [4] Zimbelman, J. et al. (1989) LPSC19, 397-407. [5] Mangold, N. & Allemand, P. (2001) GRL, 28, 3407-3410. [6] Head, J. et al. (2006) GRL, doi: 10.1029/2005GL024360. [7] Levy, J. et al. (2007) JGR, doi: 10.1029/ 2006JE002852. [8] Holt, J. et al. (2008) LPSC39, #2441. [9] Plaut, J. et al. (2008) LPSC39, #1391. [9] Dobrea, N. et al. (2007) 7th Mars, #3358. [10] Levy, J. et al. (2008) LPSC39, #1171, [11] Mangold, N. (2003) JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JE001885. [12] Mustard, J. et al. (2001) Nature, 412, 411-414. [13] Head, J. et al. (2003) Nature, 426, 797-802. [14] Kreslavsky, M. & Head, J. (2006) M&PS, 41, 1633-1646. [15] Marchant, D. et al. (2002), GSAB, 114, 718-730. [16] Milliken, R. et al. (2003) JGR, doi: 10.1029/2002JE002005. [17] Pewe, T. (1959) Am. J. Sci., 257, 545-552. [18] Root, J. (1975) Geol. Surv. Can., 75-1B, 181. [19] Garvin, J. et al. (2002) LPSC33, #1255. [20] Levy, J. et al. (2006) Ant. Sci., doi: 10.1017/ S0954102006000435. [21] Williams, K. et al. (2008) Icarus, In Press.