Science.gov

Sample records for katrinas wind fields

  1. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures

  2. Gone with the Wind? Integrity and Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Frances; Katz, Brit

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina slammed into 80 miles of Mississippi shoreline on August 29, 2005. It was the nation's worst natural disaster, a perfect storm. One hundred sixty miles-per-hour winds sent 55-foot-tall waves and a 30-foot wall of water across the shore and miles inland. It displaced 400,000 residents along the coast of the Mississippi, and…

  3. Climate change, warm Gulf waters and westerly wind shear, and Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. S.

    The present year experienced several strong hurricanes intensifying in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall and severely damaging the Gulf States especially Hurricane Katrina Here we show that increasing trend of sea surface temperature SST and decreasing vertical wind shear since 1995 over the Gulf may be attributed to climate change and provide favorable conditions for the recent increase in hurricane activity especially the 2005 hurricanes Higher SST anomaly at the right side of storm track induced the increase in surface heat fluxes which corresponds to the deepening of hurricane minimum central pressure A phase lag of about two days is found between SST increase and significant deepening of hurricane central pressure Our results suggest that in addition to the magnitude of vertical wind shear the effects of westerly from easterly wind shear on the intensification of hurricane may need to be separated and westerly environmental wind shear is conducive to hurricane development Warmer SST is found to correspond to the increase of vertical wind shear over the Gulf of Mexico

  4. Evaluation of Vertically Resolved Water Winds from AIRS using Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Dobkowski, Edwin C.; Gregorich, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of wind velocity as a function of altitude is key to weather forecast improvements. The ability of hyperspectral sounders in principle to measure vertically resolved water winds, which has long been recognized, has been tested with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. AIRS retrievals of total column water above 300 mb have been correlated with the radiosonde upper-tropospheric wind velocity and moisture data. The excellent correlation is illustrated with results obtained from hurricane Katrina and from the western United States. AIRS is a hyperspectral infrared sounder in low Earth orbit. It was launched in May 2002. We illustrate the use of AIRS data for the measurement of upper tropospheric water by using the 2387/cm CO2 R-branch channel and the 1551/cm water vapor channel. The 2387/cm channel measures the temperature at 300 mb totally independent of water vapor. The weighting function of the 1551/cm channel peaks at 300 mb only under moist conditions; the peak shifts downward (higher temperature) for less water and upward (lower temperature) for more water. The difference between the brightness temperatures bt2387 and bt1551 cancels the local several degree weather related variability of the temperature and measures the component due to the water vapor at 300 mb.

  5. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: Winds of Change Transform a New Orleans Addiction Treatment Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Pedersen-Wasson, Else; Crisham, Erin M.; Ellis, Robert; Morse, Patricia; Morse, Edward V.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on the operations of the largest residential, addiction treatment organization in New Orleans is described. Pre- and post-Katrina experiences are discussed and augmented with organizational performance data. Suggestions for future research are provided. (Contains 4 figures.)

  6. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  7. Modeling Hurricane Katrina's merchantable timber and wood damage in south Mississippi using remotely sensed and field-measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Curtis Andrew

    Ordinary and weighted least squares multiple linear regression techniques were used to derive 720 models predicting Katrina-induced storm damage in cubic foot volume (outside bark) and green weight tons (outside bark). The large number of models was dictated by the use of three damage classes, three product types, and four forest type model strata. These 36 models were then fit and reported across 10 variable sets and variable set combinations for volume and ton units. Along with large model counts, potential independent variables were created using power transforms and interactions. The basis of these variables was field measured plot data, satellite (Landsat TM and ETM+) imagery, and NOAA HWIND wind data variable types. As part of the modeling process, lone variable types as well as two-type and three-type combinations were examined. By deriving models with these varying inputs, model utility is flexible as all independent variable data are not needed in future applications. The large number of potential variables led to the use of forward, sequential, and exhaustive independent variable selection techniques. After variable selection, weighted least squares techniques were often employed using weights of one over the square root of the pre-storm volume or weight of interest. This was generally successful in improving residual variance homogeneity. Finished model fits, as represented by coefficient of determination (R2), surpassed 0.5 in numerous models with values over 0.6 noted in a few cases. Given these models, an analyst is provided with a toolset to aid in risk assessment and disaster recovery should Katrina-like weather events reoccur.

  8. Hurricane Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-08

    ... Mississippi regions were acquired before and one day after Katrina made landfall along the Gulf of Mexico coast, and highlight many of the ... http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/HPDOCS/misr/misr_html/hurricane_katrina_flood.html ...

  9. Children's mental health care following Hurricane Katrina: a field trial of trauma-focused psychotherapies.

    PubMed

    Jaycox, Lisa H; Cohen, Judith A; Mannarino, Anthony P; Walker, Douglas W; Langley, Audra K; Gegenheimer, Kate L; Scott, Molly; Schonlau, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    New Orleans school children participated in an assessment and field trial of two interventions 15 months after Hurricane Katrina. Children (N = 195) reported on hurricane exposure, lifetime trauma exposure, peer and parent support, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depressive symptoms. Teachers reported on behavior. At baseline, 60.5% screened positive for PTSD symptoms and were offered a group intervention at school or individual treatment at a mental health clinic. Uptake of the mental health care was uneven across intervention groups, with 98% beginning the school intervention, compared to 37% beginning at the clinic. Both treatments led to significant symptom reduction of PTSD symptoms, but many still had elevated PTSD symptoms at posttreatment. Implications for future postdisaster mental health work are discussed.

  10. Hurricane Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Roiling Clouds of Hurricane Katrina     View Larger ... (MISR) shows the strong convective development of Hurricane Katrina on Saturday, August 27, 2005 as it moved west through the ... development - it had just been upgraded to a Category 3 hurricane, and within 24 hours it would reach Category 5. On Monday morning ...

  11. Time dependent wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    Two tasks were performed: (1) determination of the accuracy of Seasat scatterometer, altimeter, and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer measurements of wind speed; and (2) application of Seasat altimeter measurements of sea level to study the spatial and temporal variability of geostrophic flow in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The results of the first task have identified systematic errors in wind speeds estimated by all three satellite sensors. However, in all cases the errors are correctable and corrected wind speeds agree between the three sensors to better than 1 ms sup -1 in 96-day 2 deg. latitude by 6 deg. longitude averages. The second task has resulted in development of a new technique for using altimeter sea level measurements to study the temporal variability of large scale sea level variations. Application of the technique to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current yielded new information about the ocean circulation in this region of the ocean that is poorly sampled by conventional ship-based measurements.

  12. Wind field model-based estimation of Seasat scatterometer winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.

    1993-01-01

    A model-based approach to estimating near-surface wind fields over the ocean from Seasat scatterometer (SASS) measurements is presented. The approach is a direct assimilation technique in which wind field model parameters are estimated directly from the scatterometer measurements of the radar backscatter of the ocean's surface using maximum likelihood principles. The wind field estimate is then computed from the estimated model parameters. The wind field model used in this approach is based on geostrophic approximation and on simplistic assumptions about the wind field vorticity and divergence but includes ageostrophic winds. Nine days of SASS data were processed to obtain unique wind estimates. Comparisons in performance to the traditional two-step (point-wise wind retrieval followed by ambiguity removal) wind estimate method and the model-based method are provided using both simulated radar backscatter measurements and actual SASS measurements. In the latter case the results are compared to wind fields determined using subjective ambiguity removal. While the traditional approach results in missing measurements and reduced effective swath width due to fore/aft beam cell coregistration problems, the model-based approach uses all available measurements to increase the effective swath width and to reduce data gaps. The results reveal that the model-based wind estimates have accuracy comparable to traditionally estimated winds with less 'noise' in the directional estimates, particularly at low wind speeds.

  13. Offshore wind resource estimation from satellite SAR wind field maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasager, C. B.; Nielsen, M.; Astrup, P.; Barthelmie, R.; Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N. O.; Jørgensen, B. H.; Pryor, S. C.; Rathmann, O.; Furevik, B. R.

    2005-10-01

    A wind resource estimation study based on a series of 62 satellite wind field maps is presented. The maps were retrieved from imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The wind field maps were used as input to the software RWT, which calculates the offshore wind resource based on spatial averaging (footprint modelling) of the wind statistic in each satellite image. The calculated statistics can then be input to the program WAsP and used in lieu of in-situ observations by meteorological instruments. A regional wind climate map based on satellite SAR images delineates significant spatial wind speed variations. The site of investigation was Horns Rev in the North Sea, where a meteorological time series is used for comparison. The advantages and limitations of these new techniques, which seem particularly useful for mapping of the regional wind climate, are discussed. Copyright

  14. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  15. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  16. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  17. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

    2012-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances

  18. Field verification of the wind tunnel coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate information about wind action on antennas is required for reliable prediction of antenna pointing errors in windy weather and for the design of an antenna controller with wind disturbance rejection properties. The wind tunnel data obtained 3 years ago using a scaled antenna model serves as an antenna industry standard, frequently used for the first purpose. The accuracy of the wind tunnel data has often been challenged, since they have not yet been tested in a field environment (full-aized antenna, real wind, actual terrain, etc.). The purpose of this investigation was to obtain selected field measurements and compare them with the available wind tunnel data. For this purpose, wind steady-state torques of the DSS-13 antenna were measured, and dimensionless wind torque coefficients were obtained for a variety of yaw and elevation angles. The results showed that the differences between the wind tunnel torque coefficients and the field torque coefficients were less than 10 percent of their values. The wind-gusting action on the antenna was characterized by the power spectra of the antenna encoder and the antenna torques. The spectra showed that wind gusting primarily affects the antenna principal modes.

  19. Recovering from Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    The Gulf Coast region suffered an unusually severe hurricane season in 2005: Hurricane Katrina (August 28-29, 2005) devastated much of southern Mississippi and Louisiana. Approximately 2,700 licensed early care and education facilities in those states and in Alabama were affected by Katrina, in addition to an unknown number of family child care…

  20. Erosion by Wind: Field Measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion and deposition results when wind moves soil from a bare susceptible surface to another location downwind. Although placement of permanent vertical references such as pins or rods has been used to measure soil redistribution, it is more commonly measured by capturing sediment moving dur...

  1. Continuity, social change and Katrina.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    For some time, disaster researchers have looked for social change and mostly found continuity. This paper argues that shifting the focus from investigating social change to documenting continuity may enhance the understanding and planning of post-disaster situations especially in industrialised societies like the United States. Drawing from qualitative data from post-Katrina New Orleans, it proposes using the concept of continuity as an analytical device both to identify the axes of continuity and evaluate the likelihood and possible dimensions of social change. The analysis of long-term recovery plans, along with field observations and interviews with evacuees, suggest that despite the well-documented emergence of conflict in post-Katrina New Orleans, the likelihood of social change appears limited.

  2. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  3. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Gladeston C.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Medeiros, Fátima N. S.; de Lima, Gilson G.

    2010-01-01

    Wind field analysis from synthetic aperture radar images allows the estimation of wind direction and speed based on image descriptors. In this paper, we propose a framework to automate wind direction retrieval based on wavelet decomposition associated with spectral processing. We extend existing undecimated wavelet transform approaches, by including à trous with B3 spline scaling function, in addition to other wavelet bases as Gabor and Mexican-hat. The purpose is to extract more reliable directional information, when wind speed values range from 5 to 10 ms−1. Using C-band empirical models, associated with the estimated directional information, we calculate local wind speed values and compare our results with QuikSCAT scatterometer data. The proposed approach has potential application in the evaluation of oil spills and wind farms. PMID:22219699

  4. Wavelet analysis for wind fields estimation.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gladeston C; Ushizima, Daniela M; Medeiros, Fátima N S; de Lima, Gilson G

    2010-01-01

    Wind field analysis from synthetic aperture radar images allows the estimation of wind direction and speed based on image descriptors. In this paper, we propose a framework to automate wind direction retrieval based on wavelet decomposition associated with spectral processing. We extend existing undecimated wavelet transform approaches, by including à trous with B(3) spline scaling function, in addition to other wavelet bases as Gabor and Mexican-hat. The purpose is to extract more reliable directional information, when wind speed values range from 5 to 10 ms(-1). Using C-band empirical models, associated with the estimated directional information, we calculate local wind speed values and compare our results with QuikSCAT scatterometer data. The proposed approach has potential application in the evaluation of oil spills and wind farms.

  5. Hurricane Katrina disaster diplomacy.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Ilan

    2007-09-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck the United States at the end of August 2005. The consequent devastation appeared to be beyond the US government's ability to cope with and aid was offered by several states in varying degrees of conflict with the US. Hurricane Katrina therefore became a potential case study for 'disaster diplomacy', which examines how disaster-related activities do and do not yield diplomatic gains. A review of past disaster diplomacy work is provided. The literature's case studies are then categorised using a new typology: propinquity, aid relationship, level and purpose. Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath are then placed in the context of the US government's foreign policy, the international response to the disaster and the US government's reaction to these responses. The evidence presented is used to discuss the potential implications of Hurricane Katrina disaster diplomacy, indicating that factors other than disaster-related activities generally dominate diplomatic relations and foreign policy.

  6. Katrina Retrospective: 5 Years Later

    NASA Video Gallery

    Five years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, NASA revisits the storm with a short video that shows Katrina as captured by satellites. Before and during the hurricane's landfall, NASA p...

  7. Near-ground tornado wind fields

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    A study of near-ground tornado wind fields has been conducted by inspecting damage and debris patterns found in tornado damage paths. Because there were no significant tornado events (F4 or greater) during the contract performance period, data from the literature and the files of the Institute for Disaster Research were used to perform the analyses. The results indicate: (1) maximum tornado wind speed ever experienced or expected is in the range of 250 to 300 mph; (2) appearance of damage, taken by itself, is a misleading parameter of tornado intensity. Type of construction, age of construction, materials and other construction features significantly affect structural performance of a building subjected to wind loads and should be taken into account in assigning Fujita-Scale ratings; (3) damage to forests gives a good indication of tornado wind field flow patterns, but do not give verifiable values of wind speed; (4) factors such as translational speed, wind direction and path width affect appearance of damage or a tornado; and (5) even the most awesome appearing missiles do not require incredible wind speeds to explain them. Some progress in computer simulation of tornado missiles have been made. 31 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Langley Field wind tunnel apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    The difficulties experienced in properly holding thin tipped or tapered airfoils while testing on an N.P.L. type aerodynamic balance even at low air speeds, and the impossibility of holding even solid metal models at the high speeds attainable at the National Advisory Committee's wind tunnel, necessitated the design of a balance which would hold model airfoils of any thickness and at speeds up to 150 m.p.h. In addition to mechanical strength and rigidity, it was highly desirable that the balance readings should require a minimum amount of correction and mathematical manipulation in order to obtain the lift and drag coefficients and the center of pressure. The balance described herein is similar to one in use at the University of Gottingen, the main difference lying in the addition of a device for reading the center of pressure directly, without the necessity of any correction whatsoever. Details of the design and operation of the device are given.

  9. The impact of Ensemble-based data assimilation on the predictability of landfalling Hurricane Katrina (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Pu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of the track, intensity and structure of a landfalling hurricane can save lives and mitigate social impacts. Over the last two decades, significant improvements have been achieved for hurricane forecasts. However, only a few of studies have emphasized landfalling hurricanes. Specifically, there are difficulties in predicting hurricane landfall due to the uncertainties in representing the atmospheric near-surface conditions in numerical weather prediction models, the complicated interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean, and the multiple-scale dynamical and physical processes accompanying storm development. In this study, the impact of the assimilation of conventional and satellite observations on the predictability of landfalling hurricanes is examined by using a mesoscale community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and an ensemble Kalman filter developed by NCAR Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). Hurricane Katrina (2005) was chosen as a case study since it was one of the deadliest disasters in US history. The minimum sea level pressure from the best track, QuikScat ocean surface wind vectors, surface mesonet observations, airborne Doppler radar derived wind components and available conventional observations are assimilated in a series of experiments to examine the data impacts on the predictability of Hurricane Katrina. The analyses and forecasts show that ensemble-based data assimilation significantly improves the forecast of Hurricane Katrina. The assimilation improves the track forecast through modifying the storm structures and related environmental fields. Cyclonic increments are clearly seen in vorticity and wind analyses. Temperature and humidity fields are also modified by the data assimilation. The changes in relevant fields help organize the structure of the storm, intensify the circulation, and result in a positive impact on the evolution of the storm in both analyses and forecasts. The forecasts in the

  10. Satellite imagery maps Hurricane Katrina-induced flooding and oil slicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykhus, Russell P.

    In the early morning of 29 August 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Buras, Louisiana, as a Category 4 hurricane. With wind speeds of about 233 kilometers per hour, a storm surge of 8.5 meters, and heavy rains, Katrina pounded the U.S. Gulf Coast states of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi with lifethreatening flooding and destruction. Katrina's high winds and storm surge breached the levees protecting New Orleans, a city located below sea level, and flooded approximately 80% of the city.Katrina also caused major damage to the region's oil and natural gas production and refining capabilities. On 2 September 2005, the Associated Press reported that Katrina had damaged 58 oil platforms, 30 of which were reported lost; one damaged platform had been blown nearly 100 km from its original location.

  11. Lessons from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Kay

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the lessons she learned from Hurricane Katrina. During the first few days after the hurricane, it took 2,500 volunteers per hour around the clock to do what needed to be done. That included medical volunteers; crisis counselors and mental health professionals; and volunteers to distribute water and snacks, serve…

  12. Contemplating Katrina's Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    To get some notion of how deeply scholars have been affected by Hurricane Katrina, one might look to someone like Dr. Erma Lawson, a medical sociologist from the University of North Texas. Lawson, who has coordinated the assistance efforts for the Association of Black Sociologists, has not hesitated to call on colleagues, graduate students, civil…

  13. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  14. Construction of surface pressure field from scatterometer wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtele, Morton G.; Hsu, Carol H.; Cunningham, Glen F.; Woiceshyn, Peter M.

    1989-01-01

    An account of the construction of surface pressure fields from Seasat-A satellite scatterometer (SASS) winds as carried out by different methods, and the comparison of these pressure fields with those derived from in situ ship observations is presented. On the assumption that the pressure adjusts itself instantaneously to the motion field, it may be computed by various methods. One of these makes use of planetary boundary theory, and of the possible techniques in this category a two-layer iterative scheme admitting of the parametrization of diabatic and baroclinic effects and of secondary flow was chosen. A second method involves the assumption of zero two-dimensional divergence, leading to a Laplace's equation (the balance equation) in pressure, with the wind field serving as a forcing function. This method does not accommodate adiabatic or baroclinic effects, and requires a knowledge of the pressure at all boundary points. Two comparison fields are used for validation: the conventional operational analyses of the US National Meteorological Center (NMC), and the special analyses of the Gulf of Alaska Experiment (GOASEX), which were done by hand. The results of the computations were as follows: (1) The pressure fields, as computed from the SASS winds alone, closely approximated the NMC fields in regions where reasonable in situ coverage was available (typically, one or two mb differences over most of the chart, three to four mb in extreme cases); (2) In some cases the SASS-derived pressure fields displayed high-resolution phenomena not detected by the NMC fields, but evident in the GOASEX data; and, (3) As expected, the pressure fields derived from the balance equation were much smoother and less well resolved than the SASS-derived or NMC fields. The divergence as measured from the SASS winds is smaller than, but of the same order of magnitude as, the vorticity.

  15. "Keeping it Real -High School Science Curriculum"- Hurricane Katrina and BP Oil Spill inspire creative curriculum by Dave Jungblut, Oakcrest High School Science Teacher, Mays Landing, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungblut, D.

    2011-12-01

    After Hurricane Katrina devastated Gulf Coast homes in 2005, Oakcrest High School science teacher and geologist, Dave Jungblut, traveled from Gulfport to Ocean Springs, Mississippi and conducted research to determine whether property damage was caused by wind or water. Jungblut wrote several studies, " Katrina Straight- Line Wind Field Study", "Applying Research to Practical Use for Hurricane Katrina Homeowners", and "Hurricane Katrina Wind Study" proving wind damage. Jungblut's research, done pro bono, helped thousands of homeowner's in the Mississippi area be reimbursed by insurance companies for wind damage caused by Hurricane Katrina http://www.hurricanekatrinastudy.com/ Jungblut incorporated his extensive data, in a high school curriculum that is now part of the science program he teaches each year. In January 2010, Jungblut presented "Hurricane Forensics" curriculum at the Rutgers Center for Mathematics, Science and Computer January 2009 Workshop http://www.dimacs.rutgers.edu/wst/. Through labs and creative hands-on activities, Jungblut challenged his students to analyze the photographic evidence, and data he collected, for themselves. Jungblut taught his students how to use geologic and forensic inquiry techniques to discover the difference between straight-line winds from microburst activity. The students applied the concept of the Geological Principle of Relative Dating, to determine the sequence of events that happened during Hurricane Katrina. They built model structures, which were subjected to wind and water forces to better understand the effects of these phenomena, Finally, the students evaluated local and worldwide environmental issues, such as land use risks and benefits, in the face of global warming, In the spring of 2010 when the BP Oil Spill occurred, Jungblut realized, another opportunity to bring real world issues into the classroom. After exploring scientific concepts relating to this environmental crisis, Jungblut challenged his students to

  16. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  17. Katrina's progress with learning mathematics.

    PubMed

    McConnochie, Jan; Sneath, Greg

    2007-07-01

    Katrina is 10 years old and has Down syndrome. She is making good progress with learning and numbers and mathematics. We describe how Katrina has learned number concepts and arithmetic skills over several years. We highlight the influence of early learning habits, visual supports, motivation and practice, and the uses made of different number teaching schemes.

  18. Comparison Between Field Data and NASA Ames Wind Tunnel Data

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this analysis is to compare the measured data from the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment to those collected in the field at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) with the same turbine configuration. The results of this analysis provide insight into what measurements can be made in the field as opposed to wind tunnel testing.

  19. Wind measurements for non-uniform wind fields from spaceborne scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung; Li, Fuk K.

    1987-01-01

    Radar backscattering coefficient measurements by spaceborne scatterometers are presently simulated for the case of nonuniform wind fields, by means of a detailed numerical integration of the radar equation. The winds thus estimated are then compared with a nominal field which is defined as the average wind vector over the wind cell. The simulation results obtained for the NASA scatterometer are presented for cases of random wind fields whose spectra are consistent with the Seasat scatterometer sea surface wind spectrum. When the nonuniformity is small, system noise dominates the wind error; wind error degradation is therefore small for both perfect and imperfect coregistration cases. When it is relatively large, however, the wind error degradation persistently increases for both perfect and imperfect coregistrations.

  20. Comparison Study of SEASAT Scatterometer and Conventional Wind Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Support was provided by the United States Navy through the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any...remotely sensing surface wind information, developed in response to this requirement for a surface wind field with global coverage and improved spatial...winds provide a unique set of scatterometer wind information for a global comparison with winds from conventional sources. A one-month (12 August to 9

  1. Cloud Spirals and Outflow in Tropical Storm Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On Tuesday, August 30, 2005, NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer retrieved cloud-top heights and cloud-tracked wind velocities for Tropical Storm Katrina, as the center of the storm was situated over the Tennessee valley. At this time Katrina was weakening and no longer classified as a hurricane, and would soon become an extratropical depression. Measurements such as these can help atmospheric scientists compare results of computer-generated hurricane simulations with observed conditions, ultimately allowing them to better represent and understand physical processes occurring in hurricanes.

    Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are characterized by an inward counterclockwise (cyclonic) rotation towards the center. It is less widely known that, at high altitudes, outward-spreading bands of cloud rotate in a clockwise (anticyclonic) direction. The image on the left shows the retrieved cloud-tracked winds as red arrows superimposed across the natural color view from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper clouds are apparent in these images. The speeds for the clockwise upper level winds have typical values between 40 and 45 m/s (144-162 km/hr). The low level counterclockwise winds have typical values between 7 and 24 m/s (25-86 km/hr), weakening with distance from the storm center. The image on the right displays the cloud-top height retrievals. Areas where cloud heights could not be retrieved are shown in dark gray. Both the wind velocity vectors and the cloud-top height field were produced by automated computer recognition of displacements in spatial features within successive MISR images acquired at different view angles and at slightly different times.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously, viewing the

  2. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields (nonsteady winds)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques to predict the dynamic response and the structural dynamic loads of flat plate photovoltaic arrays due to wind turbulence were analyzed. Guidelines for use in predicting the turbulent portion of the wind loading on future similar arrays are presented. The dynamic response and the loads dynamic magnification factor of the two array configurations are similar. The magnification factors at a mid chord and outer chord location on the array illustrated and at four points on the chord are shown. The wind tunnel test experimental rms pressure coefficient on which magnification factors are based is shown. It is found that the largest response and dynamic magnification factor occur at a mid chord location on an array and near the trailing edge. A technique employing these magnification factors and the wind tunnel test rms fluctuating pressure coefficients to calculate design pressure loads due to wind turbulence is presented.

  3. The Astrobiology Field Guide in World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalice, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    In collaboration with the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA), and NASA Learning Technologies (NLT), and utilizing the powerful visualization capabilities of their "World Wind" software, the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is crafting a prototype "Astrobiology Field Guide" to bring the field experiences and stories of astrobiology science to the public and classrooms around the world. The prototype focuses on one region in particular - The Pilbara in Western Australia. This first Field Guide "hotspot" is an internationally recognized area hosting the best known example of the earliest evidence of life on Earth - a stromatolitic chert precipitation in the 3.45 Ga Warrawoona Group. The goal of the Astrobiology Field Guide is to engage students of all ages with the ongoing field expeditions of today's astrobiologists as they explore the ends of the Earth searching for clues to life's origin, evolution, and distribution in the Universe. The NAI hopes to expand this Field Guide to include many more astrobiologically relevant areas across the globe such as Cuatro Cienegas in Mexico, the Rio Tinto in Spain, Yellowstone National Park in the US, and the Lost City hydrothermal vent field on the mid-Atlantic ridge - and possibly sites on Mars. To that end, we will be conducting feasibility studies and evaluations with informal and formal education contacts. The Astrobiology Field Guide is also serving as a cornerstone to educational materials being developed focused on the Pilbara region for use in classrooms in Australia, the UK, and potentially the US. These materials are being developed by the Australian Centre for Astrobiology, and the ICT Innovations Centre at Macquarie University in Sydney, in collaboration with the NAI and the Centre for Astronomy and Science Education at the University of Glamorgan in the UK.

  4. REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S; Loosmore, G A

    2004-06-17

    The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goal of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.

  5. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  6. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2017-02-21

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  7. Simulation of the surface wind field and wind waves over the Oman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzeloo, Sima; Hadi Moeini, Mohammad; Jandaghi Alaee, Majid

    2016-04-01

    Surface wind field is one of the most important factors in the generation of the marine hydrodynamic phenomena such as wind waves that highly affected by the surface winds. Therefore, accessibility to the correct wind field is of great importance for accurate prediction and simulation of the hydrodynamic variables. Nowadays numerical mesoscale weather prediction models are widely applied as powerful tools to simulate wind and other atmospheric variables with predefined temporal and spatial resolution in desired areas. Despite appropriate results of the numerical models in many regions, there are still some complications in the simulation of the surface wind field in areas with complex orography since the surface wind field is highly affected by the local topography, land-sea discontinuity, temperature gradient etc. Nowadays, with the development of high-speed processors the third generation spectral models are generally used for simulation of wind waves. Wind data are the main input parameters of the numerical spectral wave model. Therefore, the quality of the input wind data can be assessed by comparison of the wave model outputs with measured values. The main goal of the current study is to simulate surface wind field over the Oman Sea using WRF modeling system. To verify the model results, the simulated wind speeds were compared with synoptic and buoy measurements and satellite observations. Wind-wave parameters simulated by the spectral model were also compared with wave measurements to verify simulated surface wind field as the input of the wave model. The Comparison simulated wind speed and directions in coastal synoptic stations and QuikSCAT satellite shows sufficient results for both offshore and coastal areas.

  8. Shelf sediment transport during hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kehui; Mickey, Rangley C.; Chen, Qin; Harris, Courtney K.; Hetland, Robert D.; Hu, Kelin; Wang, Jiaze

    2016-05-01

    Hurricanes can greatly modify the sedimentary record, but our coastal scientific community has rather limited capability to predict hurricane-induced sediment deposition. A three-dimensional sediment transport model was developed in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to study seabed erosion and deposition on the Louisiana shelf in response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the year 2005. Sensitivity tests were performed on both erosional and depositional processes for a wide range of erosional rates and settling velocities, and uncertainty analysis was done on critical shear stresses using the polynomial chaos approximation method. A total of 22 model runs were performed in sensitivity and uncertainty tests. Estimated maximum erosional depths were sensitive to the inputs, but horizontal erosional patterns seemed to be controlled mainly by hurricane tracks, wave-current combined shear stresses, seabed grain sizes, and shelf bathymetry. During the passage of two hurricanes, local resuspension and deposition dominated the sediment transport mechanisms. Hurricane Katrina followed a shelf-perpendicular track before making landfall and its energy dissipated rapidly within about 48 h along the eastern Louisiana coast. In contrast, Hurricane Rita followed a more shelf-oblique track and disturbed the seabed extensively during its 84-h passage from the Alabama-Mississippi border to the Louisiana-Texas border. Conditions to either side of Hurricane Rita's storm track differed substantially, with the region to the east having stronger winds, taller waves and thus deeper erosions. This study indicated that major hurricanes can disturb the shelf at centimeter to meter levels. Each of these two hurricanes suspended seabed sediment mass that far exceeded the annual sediment inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, but the net transport from shelves to estuaries is yet to be determined. Future studies should focus on the modeling of sediment exchange between

  9. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  10. Construction of Marine Surface Pressure Fields From Scatterometer Winds Alone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Carol S.; Wurtele, Morton G.; Cunningham, Glenn F.; Woiceshyn, Peter M.

    1997-01-01

    A series of six-hourly, synoptic, gridded, global surface wind fields with a resolution of 100 km has been generated using the data set of dealiased Seasat satellite scatterometer (SASS) winds produced as described by peteherych et al. (1984). This paper is an account of the construction of surface pressure fields from these SASS synoptic wind fields only, as carried out by differnt methods, and the comparison of these pressure fields with U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses, with the pressure fields of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) and with the special analyses of the Gulf of Alaska Experiment (GOASEX).

  11. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  12. Probabilistic Motion Planning of Balloons in Strong, Uncertain Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael T.; Blackmore, Lars; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Fathpour, Nanaz; Elfes, Alberto; Newman, Claire

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new algorithm for probabilistic motion planning in arbitrary, uncertain vector fields, with emphasis on high-level planning for Montgolfiere balloons in the atmosphere of Titan. The goal of the algorithm is to determine what altitude--and what horizontal actuation, if any is available on the vehicle--to use to reach a goal location in the fastest expected time. The winds can vary greatly at different altitudes and are strong relative to any feasible horizontal actuation, so the incorporation of the winds is critical for guidance plans. This paper focuses on how to integrate the uncertainty of the wind field into the wind model and how to reach a goal location through the uncertain wind field, using a Markov decision process (MDP). The resulting probabilistic solutions enable more robust guidance plans and more thorough analysis of potential paths than existing methods.

  13. Brushless exciters using a high temperature superconducting field winding

    DOEpatents

    Garces, Luis Jose; Delmerico, Robert William; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Parslow, John Harold; Sanderson, Harold Copeland; Sinha, Gautam

    2008-03-18

    A brushless exciter for a synchronous generator or motor generally includes a stator and a rotor rotatably disposed within the stator. The rotor has a field winding and a voltage rectifying bridge circuit connected in parallel to the field winding. A plurality of firing circuits are connected the voltage rectifying bridge circuit. The firing circuit is configured to fire a signal at an angle of less than 90.degree. or at an angle greater than 90.degree.. The voltage rectifying bridge circuit rectifies the AC voltage to excite or de-excite the field winding.

  14. Hurricane Season 2005: Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen days after Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans, much of the city is still under water. In this pair of images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite, the affected areas can clearly be seen. The top image mosaic was acquired in April and September 2000, and the bottom image was acquired September 13, 2005. The flooded parts of the city appear dark blue, such as the golf course in the northeast corner, where there is standing water. Areas that have dried out appear light blue gray, such as the city park in the left middle. On the left side of the image, the failed 17th street canal marks a sharp boundary between flooded city to the east, and dry land to the west.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 10.4 by 7.1 kilometers Location: 30 degrees North latitude, 90.1 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1, 2, and 3 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: September 13, 2005

  15. Measurements of the E region neutral wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogger, L. L.; Murphree, J. S.; Tepley, C. A.; Meriwether, J. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral E-region wind field was measured at Calgary, Canada (51 N, 114 N) during 75 nights in 1982. Observations of the Doppler shift of the 5577-A emission line of atomic oxygen using a Fabry-Perot interferometer were converted to horizontal wind vectors. From the analysis of the data, four categories of wind characteristics were identified. In order of increasing magnetic activity these categories are: (1) wind field mostly variable in space and time; (2) predominantly equatorward flow throughout the night, (3) predominantly poleward flow throughout the night and (4) north-westward flow before midnight and southward after midnight. The wind magnitude was also variable and on some disturbed days exceeded 200 m/s.

  16. Covering (Up?) Katrina: Discursive Ambivalence in Coverage of Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Aimee; Cochran, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Long before Katrina, the South functioned in the social imaginary to contain racism and poverty, and the Mason-Dixon acts then in the national imagination as a buffer to safeguard the nation from the taint of such undemocratic realities. More and more, in many countries of America, a system known as "neoliberalism" prevails; based on a…

  17. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  18. Hosting a Katrina Evacuee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David

    2008-03-01

    No individual or institution anticipated the impact on the academic research community of hurricane Katrina. When Tulane physicist Wayne Reed asked me to host his research group just a day or two after the disaster, with no authorization or understanding of the commitment, I agreed immediately and then pondered implications. Fortunately, colleagues helped in making the commitment real, only the bureaucracy of my public university posing small hindrances. Industry was remarkably generous in providing Reed with significant ``loaner'' equipment, and amazingly, a suite of custom Reed experiments was running within weeks. At the end, the most productive collaborations for Reed seemed not to have been with my group, with its similar research, but to other groups at my institution, particularly the synthetic chemists, who gained access to methods previously unique to Tulane while offering samples previously unique to UMass. Quickly designed projects exploiting this match turned out remarkably productive. Although begun with trepidation, hosting of Reed had huge positive benefits to me and UMass, and I believe, also to Reed and Tulane. Some key lessons for the future: (i) industry has capacity and willingness to help academic research during disruption (ii) commitment of a host institution must be immediate, without a wait for formal approvals or arrangement of special funding -- delay leads only to discouragement, (iii) continuing academic progress of displaced students must come first, and (iv) intellectual synergy rather than overlap should be the basis for seeking a host. Lastly, NSF or other funding agency should consider a program directly addressing the research needs of unexpectedly disrupted academic scientists, and most particularly, graduate students who face greatly extended studies.

  19. Tropical Atlantic wind field variations during sequal: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, D. E.; Cardone, Vincent J.

    An evaluation of the U.S. Navy NOGAPS surface wind product is made to establish its utility as an initial descriptor of the surface wind field in the tropical Atlantic during SEQUAL. In this preliminary study, NOGAPS synoptic fields are compared to synoptic ship reports, and to winds measured at three separate stations along the equator during SEQUAL I. At least within 20° of the equator the comparisons suggest that the mean monthly surface winds from NOGAPS almost always differ by less than 2 m/s from averages of surface wind observations, and can be less than 1 m/s. Similar comparisons are also found from daily mean winds derived from NOGAPS, along the equator near 30°W. A comparison of NOGAPS monthly mean winds with 100-year climatology of merchant ship reports suggests that the major surface wind anomaly during SEQUAL I in the tropical Atlantic occurred in March and April 1983 along the equator west of 30°W.

  20. The Immigrant Children of Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Augustina H.

    2010-01-01

    In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina displaced the largest number of public school children ever affected by any disaster. Approximately 370,000 children, including 15,000 Latino/Hispanic children from Louisiana, were scattered throughout the 48 U.S. states (Landrieu, 2010; Louisiana Department of Education, 2004). Although much of the media…

  1. Hurricane Katrina: A Teachable Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents suggestions for integrating the phenomenon of hurricanes into the teaching of high school fluid mechanics. Students come to understand core science concepts in the context of their impact upon both the environment and human populations. Suggestions for using information about hurricanes, particularly Hurricane Katrina, in a…

  2. After Katrina, Teachers Reaching Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about teachers communicating with students to show willingness to listen and care. In cases of real emotional distress, he refers students to the proper campus counseling services, but after Hurricane Katrina, it broke the barriers of his disengagement from students' personal problem. He learned that in many…

  3. Hurricane Katrina and perinatal health.

    PubMed

    Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    We review the literature on the effects of Hurricane Katrina on perinatal health, and providing data from our own research on pregnant and postpartum women. After Katrina, obstetric, prenatal, and neonatal care was compromised in the short term, but increases in adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth, low birthweight, and maternal complications were mostly limited to highly exposed women. Both pregnant and postpartum women had rates of post-traumatic stress disorder similar to, or lower than, others exposed to Katrina, and rates of depression similar to other pregnant and postpartum populations. Health behaviors, such as smoking and breastfeeding, may have been somewhat negatively affected by the disaster, whereas effects on nutrition were likely associated with limited time, money, and food choices, and indicated by both weight gain and loss. We conclude that, with a few specific exceptions, postdisaster concerns and health outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women were similar to those of other people exposed to Hurricane Katrina. In such situations, disaster planners and researchers should focus on providing care and support for the normal concerns of the peripartum period, such as breastfeeding, depression, and smoking cessation. Contraception needs to be available for those who do not want to become pregnant. Although additional physical and mental health care needs to be provided for the most severely exposed women and their babies, many women are capable of surviving and thriving in postdisaster environments.

  4. Higher Education in Katrina's Wake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Anyone who has ever complained that colleges and universities are highly bureaucratic entities, almost inherently incapable of moving quickly, should be gratified by what we saw in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. With amazing swiftness, colleges and universities across the country--from large publics to small privates to community and…

  5. STEM Progress in Katrina's Wake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Dana

    2008-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, it caused a devastating impact on the Crescent City's public education system. The devastating storm and its aftermath completely wiped out the educational infrastructure of the New Orleans Public Schools, making one of the country's largest metropolitan school districts virtually disappear. Two…

  6. Identification of wind fields for wave modeling near Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Sashikant; Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Due to the development of coastal and offshore infrastructure in and around the Arabian Gulf, a large semi-enclosed sea, knowledge of met-ocean factors like prevailing wind systems, wind generated waves, and currents etc. are of great importance. Primarily it is important to identify the wind fields that are used as forcing functions for wave and circulation models for hindcasting and forecasting purposes. The present study investigates the effects of using two sources of wind-fields on the modeling of wind-waves in the Arabian Gulf, in particular near the coastal regions of Qatar. Two wind sources are considered here, those obtained from ECMWF and those generated by us using the WRF model. The wave model SWAN was first forced with the 6 hourly ERA Interim daily winds (from ECMWF) having spatial resolution of 0.125°. For the second option, wind fields were generated by us using the mesoscale wind model (WRF) with a high spatial resolution (0.1°) at every 30 minute intervals. The simulations were carried out for a period of two months (7th October-7th December, 2015) during which measurements were available from two moored buoys (deployed and operated by the Qatar Meteorological Department), one in the north of Qatar ("Qatar North", in water depth of 58.7 m) and other in the south ("Shiraouh Island", in water depth of 16.64 m). This period included a high-sea event on 11-12th of October, recorded by the two buoys where the significant wave heights (Hs) reached as high as 2.9 m (i.e. max wave height H ~ 5.22 m) and 1.9 (max wave height H ~ 3.4 m) respectively. Model results were compared with the data for this period. The scatter index (SI) of the Hs simulated using the WRF wind fields and the observed Hs was found to be about 30% and 32% for the two buoys (total period). The observed Hs were generally reproduced but there was consistent underestimation. (Maximum 27% for the high-sea event). For the Hs obtained with ERA interim wind fields, the underestimation was

  7. Hurricane Katrina's carbon footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast forests.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Jeffrey Q; Fisher, Jeremy I; Zeng, Hongcheng; Chapman, Elise L; Baker, David B; Hurtt, George C

    2007-11-16

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on U.S. Gulf Coast forests was quantified by linking ecological field studies, Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image analyses, and empirically based models. Within areas affected by relatively constant wind speed, tree mortality and damage exhibited strong species-controlled gradients. Spatially explicit forest disturbance maps coupled with extrapolation models predicted mortality and severe structural damage to approximately 320 million large trees totaling 105 teragrams of carbon, representing 50 to 140% of the net annual U.S. forest tree carbon sink. Changes in disturbance regimes from increased storm activity expected under a warming climate will reduce forest biomass stocks, increase ecosystem respiration, and may represent an important positive feedback mechanism to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  8. Satellite Studies of Ionospheric Electric Fields and Neutral Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, Bela G.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied mid- and low-latitude electrodynamic and neutral thermospheric dynamic processes using measurements on board the AE-E, DE-2, and UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) satellites, and global convection and general circulation models. These studies have determined the morphology of the equatorial zonal electric fields, the response of equatorial plasma irregularities to magnetospheric disturbances, and the time dependent response of the mid- and low latitude electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances. We have also used extensive F region zonal and meridional wind data obtained by Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) instrument on board the UARS to study the latitudinal dependence of daytime disturbance winds during magnetically disturbed periods and the general characteristics of the global thermospheric disturbance wind system during geomagnetically active periods. This project has supported the PhD thesis research of John Emmert.

  9. Extratropical transitioning in the RMS Japan typhoon wind field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loridan, Thomas; Scherer, Emilie; Khare, Shree

    2013-04-01

    Given its meridional extent and location within the Pacific basin, Japan is regularly impacted by strong winds from cyclones at different stages of their lifecycle. To quantify the associated risk of damage to properties, catastrophe models such as the ones developed by RMS aim to simulate wind fields from thousands of stochastic storms that extrapolate historical events. In a recent study using 25 years of reanalysis data, Kitabatake (2011) estimated that 40 % of all Pacific tropical cyclones completed their transition as an extra tropical system. From a cat modelling point of view it is the increase in wind field asymmetry observed during these transitioning episodes that is critical, with examples like typhoon Tokage in 2004 showing the potential for damaging gusts on both sides of the storm track. In this context a compromise has to be found between the need for complex numerical models able to simulate wind field variability around the cyclone during its entire evolution, and obvious running time constrains. The RMS wind field model is based on an optimized version of the Willoughby parametric profile (Willoughby et al., 2006) which requires calibration against targets representative of cyclone wind fields throughout their lifecycle. We here present the different sources of data involved in the development of this model. This includes (1) satellite products to characterize wind fields from fully tropical storms, (2) high resolution simulations of key transitioning events using the WRF mesoscale model to complement the database at other stages (i.e. for transitioning and fully extra tropical wind fields), and (3) reanalysis data which can be used with Hart (2003)'s cyclone phase space methodology to provide an estimate of the mean duration of transitioning episodes in the Pacific. Kitabatake, N., 2011: Climatology of extratropical transition of tropical cyclones in the Western North Pacific defined by using cyclone phase space. J. Meteor. Soc. Japan, 89, 309

  10. Verification of wind fields by means of rain cell tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbort, F.

    2009-09-01

    VERIFICATION OF WIND FIELDS BY MEANS OF RAIN CELL TRACKING Herbort, F., Knigge, C. and Etling, D, Institute of Meteorology and Climatology, Leibniz University Hannover,Germany herbort@muk.uni-hannover.de The regional weather forecast model COSMO-DE of the German weather service is run at a spatial resolution of 2.8 km. This results in rather detailed simulations of meteorological fields like pressure, temperature and wind. In contrast, for verification of those NWP products outside the atmospheric surface layer, only a few radiosonde stations can provide the necessary observations. In order to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of observed wind fields we propose a new method based on the motion of rain cells as observed by the German rain radar network. The radar product consist of the radar reflectivity over Germany caused by hydrometeors with a spatial resolution of about 1 km and a temporal resolution of 5 minutes. The tracking of localised radar echoes caused by post frontal showers has been used for statistical analysis of rain showers in earlier work at our institute (Weusthoff and Hauf,2008). The fields of radar reflectivity are analysed in our work by the so-called PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) method as used in experimental fluid mechanics for obtaining velocity fields of flow phenomena. Instead of solid particles as used as tracking objects in laboratory flows we use the localised radar reflectivities caused by the rain showers as tracer particles for the PIV method. The PIV algorithm provides two dimensional wind fields in the area of Germany with a few kilometres spatial resolution. The observed wind fields are compared to the wind fields obtained by the COSMO-DE model at several vertical levels in the lowest 4 kilometres of the atmosphere. By this way we could not only obtain some estimates for the skill of the wind field forecasts of the model but also could provide information on the most suitable model level for wind forecast

  11. Coronal Magnetic Field Topology and Source of Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Sittler, E.; Fisher, R.; McComas, D.; Thompson, B.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a steady state, 2D semi-empirical MHD model of the solar corona and the solar wind with many surprising results. This model for the first time shows, that the boundary between the fast and the slow solar wind as observed by Ulysses beyond 1 AU, is established in the low corona. The fastest wind observed by Ulysses (680-780 km/s) originates from the polar coronal holes at 70 -90 deg. latitude at the Sun. Rapidly diverging magnetic field geometry accounts for the fast wind reaching down to a latitude of +/- 30 deg. at the orbit of Earth. The gradual increase in the fast wind observed by Ulysses, with latitude, can be explained by an increasing field strength towards the poles, which causes Alfven wave energy flux to increase towards the poles. Empirically, there is a direct relationship between this gradual increase in wind speed and the expansion factor, f, computed at r greater than 20%. This relationship is inverse if f is computed very close to the Sun.

  12. Lessons Learned from a Bout with Hurricane Katrina: The Delgado College Community Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alex B.; Nolan, Gayle; Siegrist, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, it inflicted wind and flooding damage on all but one of the five campuses and centers of Delgado Community College, the oldest and largest two-year institution in Louisiana. Hardest hit was Delgado's main location, the City Park Campus in New Orleans, where three to six feet of flood…

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS IN NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL WATERS FOLLOWING HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the morning of August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina struck the coast of Louisiana, between New Orleans and Biloxi, Mississippi, as a strong category three hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The massive winds and flooding had the potential for a tremendous environmental impac...

  14. Drift studies--comparison of field and wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R; Regenauer, W

    2005-01-01

    Drift at pesticide application leads to a pollution of non-target crops, non-target species and surface water. Spray drift is influenced by many factors like environmental conditions, vegetation, technical conditions, and physical properties of the tank mixes and influenced by Chemicals. Field experiments to characterise spray drift effects with the risk of permanent changing weather conditions can be supported by wind tunnel experiments. Wind tunnel experiments do not lead to the same soil deposition curves like field experiments, but the ratio of drift reduction potential is comparable.

  15. Applying Lessons of Hurricane Katrina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    of the country. However, the DHS 2007 Spills of National Significance exercise is aligned with the New Madrid Seismic Zone through the Midwestern...levees protecting New Orleans to break. Communications were disrupted by failed circuits and cellular towers, as well as by the loss of electrical...assistance to others, many emergency responders became disaster victims themselves.Flooding in New Orleans after Hurricane KatrinaU.S . C oa st G ua rd (K

  16. Construction of solar-wind-like magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D Aaron

    2012-12-07

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfvén waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This Letter provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations; the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the "random" character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes ("discontinuities"), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  17. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  18. Hurricane Katrina as a "teachable moment"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, M. H.

    2008-04-01

    By American standards, New Orleans is a very old, very popular city in the southern part of the United States. It is located in Louisiana at the mouth of the Mississippi River, a river which drains about 40% of the Continental United States, making New Orleans a major port city. It is also located in an area of major oil reserves onshore, as well as offshore, in the Gulf of Mexico. Most people know New Orleans as a tourist hotspot; especially well-known is the Mardi Gras season at the beginning of Lent. People refer to the city as the "Big Easy". A recent biography of the city refers to it as the place where the emergence of modern tourism began. A multicultural city with a heavy French influence, it was part of the Louisiana Purchase from France in early 1803, when the United States bought it, doubling the size of the United States at that time. Today, in the year 2007, New Orleans is now known for the devastating impacts it withstood during the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina in late August 2005. Eighty percent of the city was submerged under flood waters. Almost two years have passed, and many individuals and government agencies are still coping with the hurricane's consequences. And insurance companies have been withdrawing their coverage for the region. The 2005 hurricane season set a record, in the sense that there were 28 named storms that calendar year. For the first time in hurricane forecast history, hurricane forecasters had to resort to the use of Greek letters to name tropical storms in the Atlantic and Gulf (Fig.~1). Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane when it was in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, after having passed across southern Florida. At landfall, Katrina's winds decreased in speed and it was relabeled as a Category 4. It devolved into a Category 3 hurricane as it passed inland when it did most of its damage. Large expanses of the city were inundated, many parts under water on the order of 20 feet or so. The Ninth Ward, heavily

  19. Wind effects in solar fields with various collector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, Joachim; Cochard, Steve; Fletcher, David F.; Vassallo, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic trough power plants are often located in areas that are subjected to high wind speeds, as an open terrain without any obstructions is beneficial for the plant performance. The wind impacts both the structural requirements and the performance of the plant. The aerodynamic loads from the wind impose strong requirements on the support structure of the reflectors, and they also impact the tracking accuracy. On a thermal level the airflow around the glass envelope of the receiver tube cools its outer surface through forced convection, thereby contributing to the heat loss. Based on previous studies at the level of an individual row of collectors, this study analyses the wind effects in a full-scale solar field of different continuous and staggered trough designs. The airflow around several rows of parabolic trough collectors (PTC) is simulated at full scale in steady state simulations in an atmospheric boundary layer flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYSO® CFX 15.0. The effect of the wake of a collector row on the following collectors is analysed, and the aerodynamic loads are compared between the different geometries. The outermost collectors of a solar field experience the highest wind forces, as the rows in the interior of the solar field are protected from high wind speeds. While the aerodynamic forces in the interior of the solar field are almost independent of the collector shape, the deeper troughs (with large rim angles) tested in this study show a lower heat loss due to forced convection on the outer surface of the receiver tube than the shallower ones (with small rim angles) in most of the solar field.

  20. Model-based estimation of wind fields over the ocean from wind scatterometer measurements. I - Development of the wind field model. II - Model parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.; Mendel, Jerry M.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of near-surface mesoscale ocean wind fields on the basis of satellite scatterometer data are developed and demonstrated. The derivation of normal-boundary and parameterized-boundary-condition (PBC) wind-field models is outlined, and results from a simulation performed to estimate the model errors are presented in tables. It is shown that the PBC model provides accurate results while minimizing the number of unknowns. After a review of the principles of scatterometry and an analysis of scatterometer measurement noise, an objective function for the measurement parameters is developed and optimized on the basis of gradient search with initial values computed from pointwise wind estimates. The model is then applied to data from a simulation of the NASA Scatterometer (Li et al., 1984), and the results are presented in extensive graphs. The feasibility of model-based wind-field estimation and the appropriateness of the PBC model are demonstrated.

  1. Synoptic scale wind field properties from the SEASAT SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Salfi, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Dealiased SEASAT SEASAT A Scatterometer System SASS vector winds obtained during the Gulf Of Alaska SEASAT Experiment GOASEX program are processed to obtain superobservations centered on a one degree by one degree grid. The grid. The results provide values for the combined effects of mesoscale variability and communication noise on the individual SASS winds. These superobservations winds are then processed further to obtain estimates of synoptic scale vector winds stress fields, the horizontal divergence of the wind, the curl of the wind stress and the vertical velocity at 200 m above the sea surface, each with appropriate standard deviations of the estimates for each grid point value. They also explain the concentration of water vapor, liquid water and precipitation found by means of the SMMR Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer at fronts and occlusions in terms of strong warm, moist air advection in the warm air sector accompanied by convergence in the friction layer. Their quality is far superior to that of analyses based on conventional data, which are shown to yield many inconsistencies.

  2. Efficient Low-Speed Flight in a Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    A new software tool was needed for flight planning of a high altitude, low speed unmanned aerial vehicle which would be flying in winds close to the actual airspeed of the vehicle. An energy modeled NLP (non-linear programming) formulation was used to obtain results for a variety of missions and wind profiles. The energy constraint derived included terms due to the wind field and the performance index was a weighted combination of the amount of fuel used and the final time. With no emphasis on time and with no winds the vehicle was found to fly at maximum lift to drag velocity, V(sub md). When flying in tail winds the velocity was less than V(sub md), while flying in head winds the velocity was higher than V(sub md). A family of solutions was found with varying times of flight and varying fuel amounts consumed which will aid the operator in choosing a flight plan depending on a desired landing time. At certain parts of the flight, the turning terms in the energy constraint equation were found to be significant. An analysis of a simpler vertical plane cruise optimal control problem was used to explain some of the characteristics of the vertical plane NLP results.

  3. Colliding-wind Binaries with Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissmann, R.; Reitberger, K.; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.; Grimaldo, E.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems and conditions for efficient particle acceleration therein have attracted multiple numerical studies in recent years. These numerical models seek an explanation of the thermal and nonthermal emission of these systems as seen by observations. In the nonthermal regime, radio and X-ray emission is observed for several of these CWBs, while gamma-ray emission has so far only been found in η Carinae and possibly in WR 11. Energetic electrons are deemed responsible for a large fraction of the observed high-energy photons in these systems. Only in the gamma-ray regime might there be, depending on the properties of the stars, a significant contribution of emission from neutral pion decay. Thus, studying the emission from CWBs requires detailed models of the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons. This in turn requires a detailed understanding of the magnetic field, which will affect not only the energy losses of the electrons but also, in the case of synchrotron emission, the directional dependence of the emissivity. In this study we investigate magnetohydrodynamic simulations of different CWB systems with magnetic fields that are strong enough to have a significant effect on the winds. Such strong fields require a detailed treatment of the near-star wind acceleration zone. We show the implementation of such simulations and discuss results that demonstrate the effect of the magnetic field on the structure of the wind collision region.

  4. Field measurements in the wake of a model wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Suhas; Taylor, Amelia; Bilbao, Argenis; Doostalab, Ali; Novoa, Santiago; Westergaard, Carsten; Hussain, Fazle; Sheng, Jian; Ren, Beibei; Giesselmann, Michael; Glauser, Mark; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    As a first step to study the dynamics of a wind farm' we experimentally explored the flow field behind a single wind turbine of diameter 1.17 m at a hub height of 6.25 m. A 10 m tower upstream of the wind farm characterizes the atmospheric conditions and its influence on the wake evolution. A vertical rake of sonic anemometers is clustered around the hub height on a second tower' 6D downstream of the turbine. We present preliminary observations from a 1- hour block of data recorded in near-neutral atmospheric conditions. The ratio of the standard deviation of power to the inflow velocity is greater than three' revealing adverse effects of inflow turbulence on the power and load fluctuations. Furthermore' the wake defect and Reynolds stress and its gradient are pronounced at 6D. The flux of energy due to Reynolds stresses is similar to that reported in wind tunnel studies. The swirl and mixing produces a constant temperature wake which results in a density jump across the wake interface. Further field measurements will explore the dynamics of a model wind farm' including the effects of atmospheric variability.

  5. Mortality associated with Hurricane Katrina--Florida and Alabama, August-October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall between Hallandale Beach and Aventura, Florida, as a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of 80 mph. Storm effects, primarily rain, flooding, and high winds, were substantial; certain areas reported nearly 12 inches of rainfall. After crossing southern Florida and entering the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane strengthened and made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of 125 mph. Katrina was one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the United States during the past 100 years and was likely the nation's costliest natural disaster to date. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from a review of mortality records of Florida's Medical Examiners Commission (FMEC) and the Alabama Department of Forensic Science (ADFS). CDC was invited by the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) to assess the mortality related to Hurricane Katrina. The mortality review was intended to provide county-based information that would be used to 1) define the impact of the hurricane, 2) describe the etiology of deaths, and 3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane-related mortality. Combined, both agencies identified five, 23, and 10 deaths, respectively, that were directly, indirectly, or possibly related to Hurricane Katrina. Information from the characterization of these deaths will be used to reduce hurricane-related mortality through early community awareness of hurricane-related risk, prevention measures, and effective communication of a coordinated hurricane response plan.

  6. Ocean wind field measurement performance of the ERS-1 scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans, P.; Schuessler, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Active Microwave Instrumentation (AMI), which will be implemented on the ERS-1, is a 5.3 GHz multipurpose radar for land surface imaging, ocean wave spectrum measurement and wind observations over oceans. The imaging and wave measurements apply Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques, while wind field detection is performed by the Scatterometer as part of the AMI. The Scatterometer system design was developed and optimized with the aid of a performance simulator. This paper, aimed at giving an overview, is presented about the: (1) ERS-1 Scatterometer system design; (2) Error budget; and the (3) Overall calibration concept.

  7. Momentum transfer from solar wind to interplanetary field enhancements inferred from magnetic field draping signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Wei, H. Y.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-03-01

    Characterized by a cusp-shaped enhancement in the magnetic field strength, the magnetic structure in the solar wind, called an interplanetary field enhancement (IFE), has been investigated since its discovery. To understand its three-dimensional magnetic field geometry, we study an IFE detected by five spacecraft simultaneously. Field lines are seen draping around in the upstream region and rotating in the ambient convection electric field direction in the downstream region. Earlier studies suggest that IFEs are created when the solar wind accelerates newly formed dust clouds. Both signatures found in our study support this hypothesis: the field line draping is caused by dust-solar wind momentum exchange, while the field line rotation is a typical signature of dusty plasma pickup. The force that exchanges the momentum is approximately 106 N. This study illustrates the nature of the interaction between two flowing plasmas of very different mass-to-charge ratio.

  8. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  9. Prediction of the far field noise from wind energy farms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic physical factors involved in making predictions of wind turbine noise and an approach which allows for differences in the machines, the wind energy farm configurations and propagation conditions are reviewed. Example calculations to illustrate the sensitivity of the radiated noise to such variables as machine size, spacing and numbers, and such atmosphere variables as absorption and wind direction are presented. It is found that calculated far field distances to particular sound level contours are greater for lower values of atmospheric absorption, for a larger total number of machines, for additional rows of machines and for more powerful machines. At short and intermediate distances, higher sound pressure levels are calculated for closer machine spacings, for more powerful machines, for longer row lengths and for closer row spacings.

  10. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  11. Lessons Learnt From Hurricane Katrina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and its suburbs on Monday August 29^th, 2005. The previous Friday morning, August 26, the National Hurricane Center indicated that Katrina was a Category One Hurricane, which was expected to hit Florida. By Friday afternoon, it had changed its course, and neither the city nor Xavier University was prepared for this unexpected turn in the hurricane's path. The university had 6 to 7 ft of water in every building and Xavier was closed for four months. Students and university personnel that were unable to evacuate were trapped on campus and transportation out of the city became a logistical nightmare. Email and all electronic systems were unavailable for at least a month, and all cell phones with a 504 area code stopped working. For the Department, the most immediate problem was locating faculty and students. Xavier created a list of faculty and their new email addresses and began coordinating with faculty. Xavier created a web page with advice for students, and the chair of the department created a separate blog with contact information for students. The early lack of a clear method of communication made worse the confusion and dismay among the faculty on such issues as when the university would reopen, whether the faculty would be retained, whether they should seek temporary (or permanent) employment elsewhere, etc. With the vision and determination of President Dr. Francis, Xavier was able to reopen the university in January and ran a full academic year from January through August. Since Katrina, the university has asked every department and unit to prepare emergency preparedness plans. Each department has been asked to collect e-mail addresses (non-Xavier), cell phone numbers and out of town contact information. The University also established an emergency website to communicate. All faculty have been asked to prepare to teach classes electronically via Black board or the web. Questions remain about the longer term issues of

  12. Impacts of Hurricane Katrina on floodplain forests of the Pearl River: Chapter 6A in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faulkner, Stephen; Barrow, Wylie; Couvillion, Brady R.; Conner, William; Randall, Lori; Baldwin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Floodplain forests are an important habitat for Neotropical migratory birds. Hurricane Katrina passed through the Pearl River flood plain shortly after making landfall. Field measurements on historical plots and remotely sensed data were used to assess the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the structure of floodplain forests of the Pearl River.

  13. The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    Paper 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2007 – 10 Nov 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited...magnitude [B] had a floor of ≈ 4.6 nT in yearly averages, a value which the interplanetary magnetic - field [IMF] strength returned to, or approached, at...is implicit in the work of Owens and Crooker (2006, 2007) who simulated the interplanetary magnetic - field strength in terms of a constant open-flux

  14. Field Wind Tunnel Assessment of the Potential for Wind Transport of Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Nicholas; Metzger, Steve

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a series of field experiments carried out in the Double Tracks area of the Tonopah Test Range in June, July, and August 1996 and March and July 1997. The aim of the experiments was to: (1) determine the wind speeds necessary to entrain surface particles from excavated surfaces in the study area and (2) determine dust emissions from surfaces that had been stabilized permanently by planted natural vegetation. This investigation assessed the potential for wind transport of surface soils, including resuspension and emission of dust sized particles from areas of surface heavy metal contamination, following site remediation, as well as the actual emissions from these areas. The remediation site is located in Area 73 of the Tonopah Test Range. The goal of the field experiments was to measure the velocities with which boundary layer winds might initiate dust emissions from the affected site, and to gage the effectiveness of surface stabilization procedures to prevent such emissions. Particle movement measurements were generated through the use of a portable wind tunnel laid directly on the excavated surface.

  15. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Winds and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    2005-11-01

    The problems facing magnetically guided wind models for the generation of stellar disks are outlined, particularly in relation to Be stars. Various parametric, analytic and numerical treatments have been published; some with and some without rotation, but all considering dipole like magnetic fields that can steer the star's wind to create a compressed equatorial region, variously termed; Magnetically Torqued Disk ( MTD), Magnetically Rigidized Disk, or Magnetically Confined Wind Shocked Disk. The essential issues are A) What field and rotation are required to create a MTD that is dense enough to generate emission line Equivalent Widths, the observed level of intrinsic polarization, and IR excesses? B) Can semi-corotational velocity fields be reconciled with observed line profiles and with the long term V/R variations normally attributed to spiral density waves in a Keplerian disk? C) What limits the lifetime of such a disk? D) Can the Keplerian disks model be reconciled with the fact that recently observed B fields in some early B type stars are large enough for MTD production. E) Can any other model predict as well as MTD does, the range of Spectral types in which disks are observed. F) What are the critical observations that might test the MTD model?

  16. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2014-04-01

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbine response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.

  17. Field test of wake steering at an offshore wind farm

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Paul; Annoni, Jennifer; Shah, Jigar J.; ...

    2017-02-06

    In this study, a field test of wake steering control is presented. The field test is the result of a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Envision Energy, a smart energy management company and turbine manufacturer. In the campaign, an array of turbines within an operating commercial offshore wind farm in China have the normal yaw controller modified to implement wake steering according to a yaw control strategy. The strategy was designed using NREL wind farm models, including a computational fluid dynamics model, SOWFA, for understanding wake dynamics and an engineering model, FLORIS, for yaw control optimization.more » Results indicate that, within the certainty afforded by the data, the wake-steering controller was successful in increasing power capture, by amounts similar to those predicted from the models.« less

  18. Sustainability: a view from the wind-eroded field.

    PubMed

    Warren, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the assessment of sustainability in fields subject to wind erosion. In the first part, simple sustainability audits are examined, as of soil depth and nutrients. Direct measurement of these characteristics has many problems, largely because of huge variability in space and time at all scales. Modelling still has its problems, but it may be possible to overcome many of them soon. It is true that wind erosion preferentially removes soil nutrients, but there are imponderables even here. The nutrient balance in many of these soils includes considerable input from dust. In West Africa, it has been shown that the amounts of calcium and potassium that are added in dust are sufficient to fertilize dispersed crops. In mildly acidic sandy soils, such as those found on the widespread palaeoaeolian deposits, much of the phosphorus is fixed and unavailable to plants by the time it is removed by wind erosion, so that erosion has no added downside. Most of the nutrients carried by dust have been shown to travel close to the ground (even when they are attached to dust-sized particles), and so are trapped in nearby fallow strips, and are thus not lost to the farming system. Second, the sustainability of a whole semi-arid farming system is explored. Wind erosion in semi-arid areas (like China, the Sahel and Northwestern Europe) generally takes place on aeolian deposits of the recent geological past. Most of these soils are deep enough to withstand centuries of wind erosion before they are totally lost to production, and some of these soils have greater fertility at greater depth (so that wind erosion may even improve the soil). Finally some remarks are made about environmental change in relation to sustainability.

  19. Mental illness and suicidality after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Galea, Sandro; Jones, Russell T.; Parker, Holly A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of Hurricane Katrina on mental illness and suicidality by comparing results of a post-Katrina survey with those of an earlier survey. METHODS: The National Comorbidity Survey-Replication, conducted between February 2001 and February 2003, interviewed 826 adults in the Census Divisions later affected by Hurricane Katrina. The post-Katrina survey interviewed a new sample of 1043 adults who lived in the same area before the hurricane. Identical questions were asked about mental illness and suicidality. The post-Katrina survey also assessed several dimensions of personal growth that resulted from the trauma (for example, increased closeness to a loved one, increased religiosity). Outcome measures used were the K6 screening scale of serious mental illness and mild-moderate mental illness and questions about suicidal ideation, plans and attempts. FINDINGS: Respondents to the post-Katrina survey had a significantly higher estimated prevalence of serious mental illness than respondents to the earlier survey (11.3% after Katrina versus 6.1% before; chi(2)1= 10.9; P < 0.001) and mild-moderate mental illness (19.9% after Katrina versus 9.7% before; chi(2)1 = 22.5; P < 0.001). Among respondents estimated to have mental illness, though, the prevalence of suicidal ideation and plans was significantly lower in the post-Katrina survey (suicidal ideation 0.7% after Katrina versus 8.4% before; chi(2)1 = 13.1; P < 0.001; plans for suicide 0.4% after Katrina versus 3.6% before; chi(2)1 = 6.0; P = 0.014). This lower conditional prevalence of suicidality was strongly related to two dimensions of personal growth after the trauma (faith in one's own ability to rebuild one's life, and realization of inner strength), without which between-survey differences in suicidality were insignificant. CONCLUSION: Despite the estimated prevalence of mental illness doubling after Hurricane Katrina, the prevalence of suicidality was unexpectedly low. The role of post

  20. 3D wind field from spaceborne Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Y.; Viltard, N.

    2013-10-01

    Numerous space radar missions are presently envisioned to study the water cycle in the tropics. Among them, the DYCECT (DYnamique, énergie et Cycle de l'Eau dans la Convection Tropicale) mission, a French proposal (submitted to the French CNES Agency), could embark a Doppler radar (W-band or Ka-band) with scanning possibilities onboard a low-orbiting satellite. This instrument could be implemented in addition to a Passive Microwave Radiometer (PMR), and eventually an improved ScaraB-like broadband radiometer, and a lightning detection instrument. This package will document the ice microphysics and the heat budgets. Since the microphysics and the water and energy budgets are strongly driven by the dynamics, the addition of a Doppler radar with scanning possibilities could provide valuable information (3D wind and rain fields) and a large statistic of such critical information over the entire tropics and for all the stages of development. These new information could be used to better understand the tropical convection and to improve convection parameterization relevant for cloud and climate models. It could be used also to associate direct applications such as now-casting and risk prevention. The present study focuses on the feasibility of such 3D wind field retrieval from spaceborne radar. It uses a simulator of some parts of the spaceborne radar in order i) to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieved wind fields to the scanning strategies and sampling parameters, and to the instrumental and platform parameters and ii) to determine the best parameters providing the most accurate wind fields.

  1. Influence of Loop Current on Hurricane Katrina in a High-Resolution Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Chen, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    Recent observational and numerical modeling studies have shown that coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean models may lead to substantial improvement in prediction of hurricane intensity. However, forecasting hurricane structure and intensity change is still a real challenge, especially when storm moving over the complex ocean features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm ocean eddies, which can result in a rapid intensification in some hurricanes under a favorable atmospheric environment. Uncertainty remains to be high from storm to storm. A lack of understanding of the mechanisms of how these ocean features influence hurricane structure could be one of the reasons. To address this issue, a coupled atmospheric-wave-ocean model is adopted in this study to simulate the evolution of Hurricane Katrina (2005), which shows the rapid intensification when moving into the Gulf of Mexico. The coupled model is consist of the 5th generation Pennsylvania State University / National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model (MM5), WAVEWATCH III (WW3), and the 3D Price-Weller-Pinkel (3DPWP) upper ocean model. To examine the influence of the Loop Current and warm eddy on Katrina, coupled modeling experiments were conducted with both a simplified and a more realistic upper-ocean initial condition. The latter is based on the full physics Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) assimilation fields at 0000UTC 26 August 2005. Furthermore, experiments with and without WW3 are also compared to highlight the influence of the ocean surface waves on hurricane structure and intensity. Preliminary results show that both the surface waves and a better oceanic initial condition improved significantly the storm intensity forecasts compared to the observations. The inclusion of surface waves seems to produce a better wind-pressure relationship. To fully understand the physical processes that affect the hurricane intensity by oceanic initial condition and the surface waves, a comprehensive analysis of

  2. Wind turbine wake meandering at the laboratory and field scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisel, Michael; Musa, Mirko; Hong, Jiarong; Guala, Michele

    2016-11-01

    Flow measurements were collected in the wake of the utility-scale (2.5MW) Eolos wind turbine using a ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler to identify the characteristics of wake meandering at the field scale. The investigation seeks to establish the influence of scale and atmospheric turbulence on wake meandering, which has been observed to leave a strong spectral signature on laboratory measurements in wind tunnel and channel flows. The experimental data include multiple test periods at various downstream distances within the turbine wake. Inflow conditions were assessed using a meteorological tower equipped with sonic anemometers. Additionally, an experiment was conducted in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel to provide a direct comparison for the utility-scale results and to reaffirm the findings of previous laboratory-scale investigations. Estimates of the wake and inflow one-dimensional velocity spectra were compared to determine whether wake meandering characteristics are present at both scales. An empirical correction to the velocity spectra of the LiDAR and a few options to extract a more local velocity signal are discussed to compensate for the inherent limitations of LiDAR in capturing turbulent fluctuations.

  3. A wind tunnel application of large-field focusing schlieren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.; Mitchell, L. K.; Manning, James C.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1992-01-01

    A large-field focusing schlieren apparatus was installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 by 15 foot wind tunnel in an attempt to determine the density gradient flow field of a free jet issuing from a supersonic nozzle configuration. The nozzle exit geometry was designed to reduce acoustic emissions from the jet by enhancing plume mixing. Thus, the flow exhibited a complex three-dimensional structure which warranted utilizing the sharp focusing capability of this type of schlieren method. Design considerations concerning tunnel limitations, high-speed photography, and video tape recording are presented in the paper.

  4. Design, construction and calibration of a portable boundary layer wind tunnel for field use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels have been used for several decades to study wind erosion processes. Portable wind tunnels offer the advantage of testing natural surfaces in the field, but they must be carefully designed to insure that a logarithmic boundary layer is formed and that wind erosion processes may develop ...

  5. Thermospheric Response to Solar Wind Electric Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlongo, N. J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The electron density of the thermosphere is of paramount importance for radio communications and drag on low altitude satellites, particularly during geomagnetic storms. Transient enhancements of ion velocities and subsequent density and temperature increases frequently occur as a result of storm-driven solar wind electric field fluctuations. Since the Earth's dipole magnetic field is tilted and offset from the center of the planet, significant asymmetries arise that alter the thermospheric response to energy input based upon the time of day of the disturbance. This study utilizes the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) to investigate this phenomenon by enhancing the convective electric field for one hour of the day in 22 different simulations. An additional baseline run was conducted with no IMF perturbation. Furthermore, four configurations of Earth's magnetic field were considered, Internal Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), a perfect dipole, a dipole tilted by 10 degrees, and a tilted and offset dipole. These runs were conducted at equinox when the amount of sunlight falling on the different hemispheres is the same. Two additional runs were conducted at the solstices for comparison. It was found that the most geo-effective times are when the poles are pointed towards the sun. The electron density, neutral density and temperature as well as the winds are explored.

  6. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  7. Wind Field and Trajectory Models for Tornado-Propelled Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmann, G. H.; Radbill, J. R.; Marte, J. E.; Dergarabedian, P.; Fendell, F. E.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado born objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants is developed. An improved tornado wind field model satisfied the no slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Subscale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12 inch pipe and automobile. The original six degree of freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three degree of freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12 inch diameter pipe are examined.

  8. Stratwarm Effects in the Ionospheric D Region Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vergasova, G. V.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis is made of the wind field structure in the strato-thermosphere over Eastern Siberia during the winter stratwarms of 1975-1977. It is found that coupling between dynamical processes in the stratosphere and lower thermosphere is effected through changes of the temperature regime of the atmosphere. The circulation regime both in the stratosphere and lower thermosphere depends on location of the source of perturbations that cause stratospheric warmings. The effect of warming-induced perturbations on the dynamics of above- and underlying layers and the meridional extent of the processes are determined by the altitude and region where anti-cyclones originate. In conditions of a warmer stratosphere, there is a considerable loss of wind stability in the ionospheric D-region. A time delay of 1 to 2 days of lower-thermosphere processes is found to occur with respect to stratospheric processes of temperature variation at 30 mb level.

  9. Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans: The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan

    2009-01-01

    The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study was designed to examine the current location, well-being, and plans of people who lived in the City of New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck on 29 August 2005. The study is based on a representative sample of pre-Katrina dwellings in the city. Respondents were administered a short paper-and-pencil interview by mail, by telephone, or in person. The pilot study was fielded in the fall of 2006, approximately one year after Hurricane Katrina. In this paper, we describe the motivation for the pilot study, outline its design, and describe the fieldwork results using a set of fieldwork outcome rates and multivariate logistic models. We end with a discussion of the lessons learned from the pilot study for future studies of the effects of Hurricane Katrina on the population of New Orleans. The results point to the challenges and opportunities of studying this unique population. PMID:20161061

  10. DRUG MARKET RECONSTITUTION AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA: LESSONS FOR LOCAL DRUG ABUSE CONTROL INITIATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alex S.; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina accomplished what no law enforcement initiative could ever achieve: It completely eradicated the New Orleans drug market. However, Katrina did little to eliminate the demand for drugs. This article documents the process of the drug market reconstitution that occurred 2005–2008 based on in-depth interviews and focus groups with predominately low-income drug users and sellers. Before Katrina, the drug market was largely characterized by socially-bonded participants involved with corporate style distribution. After Katrina, a violent freelance market emerged. The conclusion draws recommendations for law enforcement for dealing with drug markets after a major disaster. This article uses New Orleans as a case study to chart the process of drug market reconstitution following an extreme disaster, namely Hurricane Katrina. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall and engulfed the New Orleans area, overwhelming levees and causing extensive flooding and destruction across the city. The storm generated 30- to 40-foot waves, which demolished many cities and small towns in Southern Mississippi and Alabama and caused considerable wind damage further inland. Although the hurricane eye missed central New Orleans by about 30 miles, the wave action in Lake Pontchartrain caused several levees to break and flood most of eastern New Orleans, which was under sea level. The storm had an impact on practically all New Orleans residents and almost destroyed New Orleans (Cooper & Block, 2006; Levitt & Whitaker, 2009; Lee, 2006). Our research focused on the impact of this storm on the drug markets in New Orleans. Katrina destroyed the physical environment and organizational structure that sustained the drug trade, yet drug use and sales did not disappear. During and soon after the storm, improvised sales and distribution organizations provided a wide range of illicit drugs to users (see Dunlap, Johnson, Kotarba, & Fackler, 2009; Dunlap & Golub, 2010; Dunlap

  11. DRUG MARKET RECONSTITUTION AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA: LESSONS FOR LOCAL DRUG ABUSE CONTROL INITIATIVES.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alex S; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina accomplished what no law enforcement initiative could ever achieve: It completely eradicated the New Orleans drug market. However, Katrina did little to eliminate the demand for drugs. This article documents the process of the drug market reconstitution that occurred 2005-2008 based on in-depth interviews and focus groups with predominately low-income drug users and sellers. Before Katrina, the drug market was largely characterized by socially-bonded participants involved with corporate style distribution. After Katrina, a violent freelance market emerged. The conclusion draws recommendations for law enforcement for dealing with drug markets after a major disaster.This article uses New Orleans as a case study to chart the process of drug market reconstitution following an extreme disaster, namely Hurricane Katrina. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall and engulfed the New Orleans area, overwhelming levees and causing extensive flooding and destruction across the city. The storm generated 30- to 40-foot waves, which demolished many cities and small towns in Southern Mississippi and Alabama and caused considerable wind damage further inland. Although the hurricane eye missed central New Orleans by about 30 miles, the wave action in Lake Pontchartrain caused several levees to break and flood most of eastern New Orleans, which was under sea level. The storm had an impact on practically all New Orleans residents and almost destroyed New Orleans (Cooper & Block, 2006; Levitt & Whitaker, 2009; Lee, 2006).Our research focused on the impact of this storm on the drug markets in New Orleans. Katrina destroyed the physical environment and organizational structure that sustained the drug trade, yet drug use and sales did not disappear. During and soon after the storm, improvised sales and distribution organizations provided a wide range of illicit drugs to users (see Dunlap, Johnson, Kotarba, & Fackler, 2009; Dunlap & Golub, 2010; Dunlap

  12. Emergency Response Transport Forecasting Using Historical Wind Field Pattern Matching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Roger G.; Keislar, Robert E.

    2000-03-01

    Historical pattern matching, or analog forecasting, is used to generate short-term mesoscale transport forecasts for emergency response at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. A simple historical pattern-matching algorithm operating on a database from the spatially and temporally dense Eastern Idaho Mesonet is used to generate a wind field forecast, which then is input to an existing puff diffusion model. The forecasts are rated both by a team of meteorologists and by a computer scoring method. Over 60% of the forecasts are rated as acceptable. The forecasts also are compared with a persistence method, using both a subjective human evaluation and root-mean-square error calculations.

  13. 3D wind field retrieval from spaceborne Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaêtre, Y.; Viltard, N.

    2012-11-01

    Numerous space missions carrying a radar are presently envisioned, particularly to study tropical rain systems. Among those missions, BOITATA is a joint effort between Brazil (INPE/AEB) and France (CNES). The goal is to embark a Doppler radar with scanning possibilities onboard a low-orbiting satellite. This instrument should be implemented in addition to a Passive Microwave Radiometer (PMR) between 19 and 183 GHz, an improved ScaraB-like broadband radiometer, a mm/submm PMR and a lightning detection instrument. This package would be meant to document the feedback of the ice microphysics on the rain systems life cycle and on their heat and radiative budgets. Since the microphysics and the water and energy budgets are strongly driven by the dynamics, the addition of a Doppler radar with scanning possibilities could provide precious information (3D wind and rain fields). It would allow us to build a large statistics of such critical information over the entire tropics and for all the stages of development of the convection. This information could be used to better understand the tropical convection and to improve convection parameterization relevant for cloud and climate models and associated applications such as now-casting and risk prevention. The present work focuses on the feasibility to retrieve 3D winds in precipitating areas from such a radar. A simulator of some parts of the spaceborne radar is developed to estimate the precision on the retrieved wind field depending on the scanning strategies and instrumental parameters and to determine the best sampling parameters.

  14. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    1. Introduction Numerous large-scale offshore wind farms have been built in European waters and play an important role in providing renewable energy. Therefore, knowledge of behavior of wakes, induced by large wind turbines and their impact on wind power output is important. The spatial variation of offshore wind turbine wake is very complex, depending on wind speed, wind direction, ambient atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stability. In this study we demonstrate the application of X-band TerraSAR-X (TS-X) data with high spatial resolution for studies on wind turbine wakes in the near and far field of the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus, located in the North Sea. Two cases which different weather conditions and different wake pattern as observed in the TS-X image are presented. 2. Methods The space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a unique sensor that provides two-dimensional information on the ocean surface. Due to their high resolution, daylight and weather independency and global coverage, SARs are particularly suitable for many ocean and coastal applications. SAR images reveal wind variations on small scales and thus represent a valuable means in detailed wind-field analysis. The general principle of imaging turbine wakes is that the reduced wind speed downstream of offshore wind farms modulates the sea surface roughness, which in turn changes the Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS, denoted by σ0) in the SAR image and makes the wake visible. In this study we present two cases at the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus to investigate turbine-induced wakes and the retrieved sea surface wind field. Using the wind streaks, visible in the TS-X image and the shadow behind the offshore wind farm, induced by turbine wake, the sea surface wind direction is derived and subsequently the sea surface wind speed is calculated using the latest generation of wind field algorithm XMOD2. 3. Case study alpha ventus Alpha Ventus is located approximately 45 km from the

  15. Military First Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    capable of providing information to 48 George Cloutier, "U-2 Aids in Katrina Relief," Air Force Link, http://www.af.mil. 49 Mark Haviland , "After Katrina... Haviland , Mark. "After Katrina: ACC’s Intel Team Applies Lessons Learned." Air Combat Command Public Affairs, http://www.af.mil (accessed 11 November

  16. Mesospheric Winds and Magnetic Fields from the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. L.; Burrows, S. M.; Brown, M. J.; Roberts, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    We show how carbon monoxide (CO) can be used as a tracer of mesospheric neutral wind speeds, by measuring small Doppler shifts in its rotational emission spectrum. Since the altitude range we are most sensitive to is generally inaccessible to many other measurement techniques, this fills a significant experimental gap. Using this method, high-resolution ground-based measurements of mesospheric CO taken from the AST/RO sub-millimeter telescope, located at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station have been used to calculate wind speeds and column densities over the Antarctic from 2002 to 2005. For more information see Burrows et al. JGR-Atmospheres doi:10.1029/2006JD007993. In addition, the 2→ 1 rotational transition of O18O has been measured and used as a tracer of the mesospheric magnetic field over the Antarctic. We demonstrate how the Zeeman splitting of this molecule was used to measure the Earth's magnetic field during the geomagnetic storm of January 2003.

  17. Measurement of two-dimensional Doppler wind fields using a field widened Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Langille, Jeffery A; Ward, William E; Scott, Alan; Arsenault, Dennis L

    2013-03-10

    An implementation of the field widened Michelson concept has been applied to obtain high resolution two-dimensional (2D) images of low velocity (<50 m/s) Doppler wind fields in the lab. Procedures and techniques have been developed that allow Doppler wind and irradiance measurements to be determined on a bin by bin basis with an accuracy of less than 2.5 m/s from CCD images over the observed field of view. The interferometer scanning mirror position is controlled to subangstrom precision with subnanometer repeatability using the multi-application low-voltage piezoelectric instrument control electronics developed by COM DEV Ltd.; it is the first implementation of this system as a phase stepping Michelson. In this paper the calibration and characterization of the Doppler imaging system is described and the planned implementation of this new technique for imaging 2D wind and irradiance fields using the earth's airglow is introduced. Observations of Doppler winds produced by a rotating wheel are reported and shown to be of sufficient precision for buoyancy wave observations in airglow in the mesopause region of the terrestrial atmosphere.

  18. The magnetospheric electric field and convective processes as diagnostics of the IMF and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Indirect measurements of the convection field as well as direct of the ionospheric electric field provide a means to at least monitor quanitatively solar wind processes. For instance, asymmetries in the ionospheric electric field and ionospheric Hall currents over the polar cap reflect the solar wind sector polarity. A stronger electric field, and thus convective flow, is found on the side of the polar cap where the y component of the IMF is parallel to the y component of the geomagnetic field. Additionally, the magnitude of the electric field and convective southward B sub Z and/or solar wind velocity, and thus may indicate the arrival at Earth of an interaction region in the solar wind. It is apparent that processes associated with the convention electric field may be used to predict large scale features in the solar wind; however, with present empirical knowledge it is not possible to make quantitative predictions of individual solar wind or IMF parameters.

  19. Three Dimensional Dynamic Model Based Wind Field Reconstruction from Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raach, Steffen; Schlipf, David; Haizmann, Florian; Cheng, Po Wen

    2014-06-01

    Using the inflowing horizontal and vertical wind shears for individual pitch controller is a promising method if blade bending measurements are not available. Due to the limited information provided by a lidar system the reconstruction of shears in real-time is a challenging task especially for the horizontal shear in the presence of changing wind direction. The internal model principle has shown to be a promising approach to estimate the shears and directions in 10 minutes averages with real measurement data. The static model based wind vector field reconstruction is extended in this work taking into account a dynamic reconstruction model based on Taylor's Frozen Turbulence Hypothesis. The presented method provides time series over several seconds of the wind speed, shears and direction, which can be directly used in advanced optimal preview control. Therefore, this work is an important step towards the application of preview individual blade pitch control under realistic wind conditions. The method is tested using a turbulent wind field and a detailed lidar simulator. For the simulation, the turbulent wind field structure is flowing towards the lidar system and is continuously misaligned with respect to the horizontal axis of the wind turbine. Taylor's Frozen Turbulence Hypothesis is taken into account to model the wind evolution. For the reconstruction, the structure is discretized into several stages where each stage is reduced to an effective wind speed, superposed with a linear horizontal and vertical wind shear. Previous lidar measurements are shifted using again Taylor's Hypothesis. The wind field reconstruction problem is then formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem, which minimizes the residual between the assumed wind model and the lidar measurements to obtain the misalignment angle and the effective wind speed and the wind shears for each stage. This method shows good results in reconstructing the wind characteristics of a three dimensional

  20. Spatial interpolation of fine particulate matter concentrations using the shortest wind-field path distance.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxiang; Gong, Jianhua; Zhou, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Effective assessments of air-pollution exposure depend on the ability to accurately predict pollutant concentrations at unmonitored locations, which can be achieved through spatial interpolation. However, most interpolation approaches currently in use are based on the Euclidean distance, which cannot account for the complex nonlinear features displayed by air-pollution distributions in the wind-field. In this study, an interpolation method based on the shortest path distance is developed to characterize the impact of complex urban wind-field on the distribution of the particulate matter concentration. In this method, the wind-field is incorporated by first interpolating the observed wind-field from a meteorological-station network, then using this continuous wind-field to construct a cost surface based on Gaussian dispersion model and calculating the shortest wind-field path distances between locations, and finally replacing the Euclidean distances typically used in Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) with the shortest wind-field path distances. This proposed methodology is used to generate daily and hourly estimation surfaces for the particulate matter concentration in the urban area of Beijing in May 2013. This study demonstrates that wind-fields can be incorporated into an interpolation framework using the shortest wind-field path distance, which leads to a remarkable improvement in both the prediction accuracy and the visual reproduction of the wind-flow effect, both of which are of great importance for the assessment of the effects of pollutants on human health.

  1. Observations of oceanic surface-wind fields from the Nimbus-7 microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. R.; Geyser, J. E.; Chang, A. T. C.; Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Brightness temperatures from the five-frequency dual-polarized scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus 7 have been used to obtain surface wind fields over the ocean. The satellite-derived wind field for 1200Z, Feb. 19, 1979, in the eastern North Pacific has been compared with an operationally generated surface-wind analysis field. Previous point comparisons at selected locations have indicated that satellite winds are accurate to 3 m/sec. The results, although of a preliminary nature, indicate that SMMR-derived winds may be used to determine large-scale wind fields over the ocean, particularly in areas of strong wind gradients such as found in cyclonic systems.

  2. Exploring the nearshore marine wind profile from field measurements and numerical hindcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Jesus, F.; Menendez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I.

    2012-12-01

    Wind power is the predominant offshore renewable energy resource. In the last years, offshore wind farms have become a technically feasible source of electrical power. The economic feasibility of offshore wind farms depends on the quality of the offshore wind conditions compared to that of onshore sites. Installation and maintenance costs must be balanced with more hours and a higher quality of the available resources. European offshore wind development has revealed that the optimum offshore sites are those in which the distance from the coast is limited with high available resource. Due to the growth in the height of the turbines and the complexity of the coast, with interactions between inland wind/coastal orography and ocean winds, there is a need for field measurements and validation of numerical models to understand the marine wind profile near the coast. Moreover, recent studies have pointed out that the logarithmic law describing the vertical wind profile presents limitations. The aim of this work is to characterize the nearshore vertical wind profile in the medium atmosphere boundary layer. Instrumental observations analyzed in this work come from the Idermar project (www.Idermar.es). Three floating masts deployed at different locations on the Cantabrian coast provide wind measurements from a height of 20 to 90 meters. Wind speed and direction are measured as well as several meteorological variables at different heights of the profile. The shortest wind time series has over one year of data. A 20 year high-resolution atmospheric hindcast, using the WRF-ARW model and focusing on hourly offshore wind fields, is also analyzed. Two datasets have been evaluated: a European reanalysis with a ~15 Km spatial resolution, and a hybrid downscaling of wind fields with a spatial resolution of one nautical mile over the northern coast of Spain.. These numerical hindcasts have been validated based on field measurement data. Several parameterizations of the vertical wind

  3. Investigation of Coastal Wind Fields over the Black Sea Using Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Ivanov, Andrei Yu.; Dagestad, Knut-Frode

    2010-12-01

    The sea area off the east coast of the Black Sea is an area where often pronounced local winds are encountered. The most prominent one is the Novorossiyskaya bora, which is a strong wind blowing from the coastal mountains onto the Black Sea, which can attain speeds of up to 40 ms-1. But also katabatic winds and foehn winds are often encountered in this area. We have analyzed seven coastal wind events by using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the European Envisat satellite. The winds modify the sea surface roughness and thus they become visible on SAR images. Information on the spatial extent and the fine-scale structure of the coastal wind fields can be obtained from these images. In particular, SAR images can be used to study 1) wind jets, wakes, and atmospheric eddies generated by the interaction of winds with coastal topography, 2) boundaries between the local and ambient wind fields, and 3) atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Quantitative information on the near-surface wind field is derived from the SAR images by using the CMOD4 wind scatterometer model for converting radar backscatter values into wind speeds. It is argued that the east coast of the Black Sea is an ideal test area for validating meso-scale atmospheric models.

  4. A not pointwise approach to the wind field retrieval from scatterometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoloni, A.; D`Amelio, C.; Olivieri Pennesi, C.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors propose a different approach to the wind field retrieval over the sea surface from the scatterometer data. This approach is based on the exploitation of different properties of the wind field which allow the coupling of the wind field reconstruction in nearest neighbor points of the scatterometer measure grid (not pointwise method). The results obtained by the reconstruction procedure on ERS-1 scatterometer data over the Mediterranean Sea are shown.

  5. Conversion of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1972-01-01

    The outflow of the solar magnetic field energy (the radial component of the Poynting vector) per steradian is inversely proportional to the solar wind velocity. It is a decreasing function of the heliocentric distance. When the magnetic field effect is included in the one-fluid model of the solar wind, the transformation of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy during the expansion process increases the solar wind velocity at 1 AU by 17 percent.

  6. A review of wind field models for atmospheric transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Skyllingstad, E.D.

    1993-06-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is developing a computer code to estimate these doses and their uncertainties. The code, known as the HEDR integrated Code (HEDRIC), consists of four separate component codes. One of the component codes, called the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET) combines meteorological and release data to estimate time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination at specific locations in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The RATCHET domain covers approximately 75,000 square miles, extending from the crest of the Cascade Mountains on the west to the eastern edge of the Idaho panhandle and from central Oregon on the south to the Canadian border. This letter report explains the procedures in RATCHET that transform observed wind data into the wind fields used in atmospheric transport calculations. It also describes and evaluates alternative procedures not selected for use in RATCHET.

  7. Design development and construction of the RFX field shaping winding

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Guarnieri, M.; Stella, A.

    1989-03-01

    The paper describes the development work on the design and the manufacture of the RFX Field Shaping Winding, from the preliminary analysis and the tests on prototypes to the final design. The winding consists of 16 coils, with 24 copper turns each and of diameters up to 5.5 m. The maximum current is 6.25 kA and the maximum voltage to earth is 35 kV. Each coil is supported in 24 radial locations and the electrodynamic load on a single coil is approximately 40 kN/m in normal operation. Fiberglass impregnated with epoxy resin, reinforced in places with polymide tape, has been used for the insulation. The high levels of the electrical and mechanical strength specified present conflicting constraints, which have required some care in the structural design and the definition of insulation system and impregnation technology. Although the use of copper coils with this kid of insulation may seem obvious and well established, indeed the stringent operational requirements have posed a number of problems which have demanded extensive work on the design and prototype development.

  8. System and method for evaluating wind flow fields using remote sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2016-12-13

    The present invention provides a system and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind field using a first remote sensing device and a second remote sensing device. Coordinated data is collected from the first and second remote sensing devices and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind field. The first remote sensing device is positioned to have a portion of the wind field within a first scanning sector of the first remote sensing device. The second remote sensing device is positioned to have the portion of the wind field disposed within a second scanning sector of the second remote sensing device.

  9. Using ground-based stereo cameras to derive cloud-level wind fields.

    PubMed

    Porter, John N; Cao, Guang Xia

    2009-08-15

    Upper-level wind fields are obtained by tracking the motion of cloud features as seen in calibrated ground-based stereo cameras. By tracking many cloud features, it is possible to obtain horizontal wind speed and direction over a cone area throughout the troposphere. Preliminary measurements were made at the Mauna Loa Observatory, and resulting wind measurements are compared with winds from the Hilo, Hawaii radiosondes.

  10. Magnetic Fields in the Termination Shock, Heliosheath and Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will discuss recent magnetic field observations of the termination shock (TS), heliosheath (HSH), and supersonic solar wind (SW) made by Voyager 1 (V1) and Voyager 2 (V2). Voyager 2 crossed the TS at least 5 times at 83.7 AU and 27.5deg South heliographic latitude during 2007/242.14 to 244.80. The structure of the shock, observed on three of the crossings, was highly variable, ranging from a simple quasi-perpendicular supercritical shock to a complex profile suggesting reformation. Two merged interaction regions were observed in the SW upstream of the TS, and the magnetic field increased to relatively high values during the month prior to crossing the TS. Voyager 2 observations in the HSH will also be discussed. Voyager 1 observed a small radial gradient of the magnetic field strength B in the HSH. It is expected that B should increase from the TS to heliopause, but the available predictions of the profile are not adequate to compare with the observations. Voyager 1 has entered a unipolar region, as the heliospheric current sheet moved below the latitude of V1.

  11. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  12. Storm Surge Flood Hazards of Hurricane Katrina 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Daneshvaran, S.; Jakubowski, S.

    2008-05-01

    . Flooding due to hurricane storm surge is one of the most damaging natural disasters in tropical and sub-tropical coastal regions. Storm surge peril can cause catastrophic loss to coastal properties and loss of life. Estimated hurricane flood risk is often statistically-based and relies on historical data. It provides catastrophic loss and risk information for the event as a whole, but lacks geographical detail. The purpose of this study is to analyze hurricane-induced storm surge flood damage using a grid-based numerical model. Storm surge flood damage due to Hurricane Katrina 2005 is presented as a case study. In order to analyze the resulting hazard from Hurricane Katrina, the United States National Weather Service's operational storm surge model, SLOSH (Sea, Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes) was used to predict the maximum storm surge surface using track data from meteorological observations. Local inundation is computed using the flood water depth with the ground elevation above the mean sea level. Residential exposure is estimated using total number of housing units damaged by flood water in each US census block in a grid of 0.01 by 0.01 degrees for hurricane Katrina in 2005. The modeled results for the storm surge inundation and the estimated number of housing units damaged by hurricane Katrina are compared with the extensive field observations by US Geological Survey and FEMA in the counties along the Gulf Coast in the three impacted states of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The modeled surge results are compared and contrasted with high water mark observations, where available. Storm surge losses in residential construction are highly sensitive to location and are best evaluated at a fine spatial resolution. This paper presents the analysis of the catastrophic flood risk based on the magnitude of hurricane storm surge flood depth on a local scale of US census blocks. The framework presented here is analytically-derived and can be used to

  13. Katrina Effect on Mathematics Achievement in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John; Lewis, Mark; Gross, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina caused severe physical damage to the Gulf Coast states of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Natural habitats were annihilated, and many Americans were displaced for days, weeks, and even years. This study investigated the within-subject effects and contrasts of poverty, rurality, and…

  14. Revisiting the Gulf Coast after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In August 2005, the world witnessed one of the most destructive natural disasters on America's mainland. Hurricane Katrina, followed a month later by Hurricane Rita, brought more than broken levees, flooded streets and homes, and destroyed businesses. It caused changes in the dynamics and the demographic and cultural makeup of the region. One of…

  15. Real-Time Teaching: Lessons from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Antoinette S.; Phillips, Carl R.

    2008-01-01

    Professors strive constantly to find ways for students to apply what they are learning in the classroom, thereby reinforcing principles being taught and increasing student interest and involvement in the learning process. Hurricane Katrina's devastating impact on the Gulf Coast had wide-ranging consequences. As a result, many individuals…

  16. Schooling the Forgotten Kids of Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about students being taking in public schools in Houston and Dallas, as well as other states, after evacuating from New Orleans which was struck by Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita. For students displaced by the storm, mobility is as constant as stability is elusive. Already traumatized and faced with the loss…

  17. Educators Reach out to Katrina Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The emotional trauma of recent events may never go away. A million people were uprooted by Hurricane Katrina, including an estimated 372,000 children of school age. Three weeks later, Hurricane Rita slammed into the Texas-Louisiana coastline, forcing thousands more to evacuate. Acute symptoms of trauma range from confusion, nightmares, and…

  18. SSC marks anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At the Hurricane Katrina observance held Aug. 29 in the StenniSphere auditorium, Stennis Space Center Deputy Director David Throckmorton (left) and RAdm. Timothy McGee, Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, unveil a plaque dedicated to SSC employees.

  19. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Damage to the Mississippi Gulf Coast Using IKONOS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; McKellip, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 10 a.m. CDT as a category 3 event with storm surges up to approximately 9 m and sustained winds of approximately 120 mph. The hurricane ravaged several coastal towns, destroying or severely damaging hundreds of homes. Hurricand Katrina deposited millions of tons of debris and caused severe damage to coastal forests. In response, several Federal agencies have been using a broad range of remotely sensed data (e.g., IKONOS) to aid damage assessment and disaster recovery efforts. This presentation discusses an effort to use IKONOS data for damage assessment, based on data collected over southwestern coastal Mississippi on September 2, 2005.

  20. CFD wind tunnel test: Field velocity patterns of wind on a building with a refuge floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. K.; Yuen, K. K.; Lam, K. M.; Lo, S. M.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports a CFD wind tunnel study of wind patterns on a square-plan building with a refuge floor at its mid-height level. In this study, a technique of using calibrated power law equations of velocity and turbulent intensity applied as the boundary conditions in CFD wind tunnel test is being evaluated by the physical wind tunnel data obtained by the Principal Author with wind blowing perpendicularly on the building without a refuge floor. From the evaluated results, an optimised domain of flow required to produce qualitative agreement between the wind tunnel data and simulated results is proposed in this paper. Simulated results with the evaluated technique are validated by the wind tunnel data obtained by the Principal Author. The results contribute to an understanding of the fundamental behaviour of wind flow in a refuge floor when wind is blowing perpendicularly on the building. Moreover, the results reveal that the designed natural ventilation of a refuge floor may not perform desirably when the wind speed on the level is low. Under this situation, the refuge floor may become unsafe if smoke was dispersed in the leeward side of the building at a level immediately below the refuge floor.

  1. Observed wind and wave field structures from multi-sensor satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Queffeulou, P.; Bentamy, A.

    1994-12-31

    Sea surface wind speed and wave data are presently available from various sensors in flight on several satellites. The wind speed and direction are available from the wind scatterometer of ERS-1. The wind speed can also be inferred from altimeters on board ERS-1 and TOPEX POSEIDON, and from the Special Microwave Imager on the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Space Program. These data are merged and used to investigate sea surface wind and wave field structure. One application study presently in progress, concerning the Mistral, is presented.

  2. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-08-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that the pattern is complex, representing two constructional generations of dunes. The oldest and best-organized generation forms the primary crestlines and is transverse to circumpolar easterly winds. Gross bed form-normal analysis of the younger pattern of crestlines indicates that it emerged with both circumpolar easterly winds and NE winds and is reworking the older pattern. Mapping of secondary flow fields over the dunes indicates that the most recent transporting winds were from the NE. The younger pattern appears to represent an influx of sediment to the dune field associated with the development of the Olympia Cavi reentrant, with NE katabatic winds channeling through the reentrant. A model of the pattern reformation based upon the reconstructed primary winds and resulting secondary flow fields shows that the development of the secondary pattern is controlled by the boundary condition of the older dune topography.

  3. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  4. Global measurements of wind fields using the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) on the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.

    1988-01-01

    The technology for measuring global wind fields in space by the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) to be flown on the Earth Observing System (EOS) is discussed. Studies initiated by NASA to determine the feasibility of using Doppler lidar from a platform in space to measure the wind globally have shown the general feasibility of the technique and have identified the technological problems that need to be resolved. Among the lidar systems being evaluated, CO2 coherent detection lidar is given special consideration. A comprehensive research program, the Global Backscatter Experiment, has been established to study global distribution of naturally occurring atmospheric aerosols that provide signal return at the wavelengths used by the techniques under consideration. Wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering the present knowledge of the large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and of global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles.

  5. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic derivatives and critical wind speed for long-span bridges based on simplified steady wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Dabo; Ou, Jinping

    2007-06-01

    Combining the computational fluid dynamics-based numerical simulation with the forced vibration technique for extraction of aerodynamic derivatives, an approach for calculating the aerodynamic derivatives and the critical flutter wind speed for long-span bridges is presented in this paper. The RNG k-ɛ turbulent model is introduced to establish the governing equations, including the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations, for solving the wind flow field around a two-dimensional bridge section. To illustrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed approach, a simple application to the Hume Bridge in China is provided, and the numerical results show that the aerodynamic derivatives and the critical flutter wind speed obtained agree well with the wind tunnel test results.

  6. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  7. Joint Offshore Wind Field Monitoring with Spaceborne SAR and Platform-Based Doppler LIDAR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S.; Lehner, S.; Hieronimus, J.; Schneemann, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2015-04-01

    The increasing demand for renewable energy resources has promoted the construction of offshore wind farms e.g. in the North Sea. While the wind farm layout consists of an array of large turbines, the interrelation of wind turbine wakes with the remaining array is of substantial interest. The downstream spatial evolution of turbulent wind turbine wakes is very complex and depends on manifold parameters such as wind speed, wind direction and ambient atmospheric stability conditions. To complement and validate existing numerical models, corresponding observations are needed. While in-situ measurements with e.g. anemometers provide a time-series at the given location, the merits of ground-based and space- or airborne remote sensing techniques are indisputable in terms of spatial coverage. Active microwave devices, such as Scatterometer and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), have proven their capabilities of providing sea surface wind measurements and particularly SAR images reveal wind variations at a high spatial resolution while retaining the large coverage area. Platform-based Doppler LiDAR can resolve wind fields with a high spatial coverage and repetition rates of seconds to minutes. In order to study the capabilities of both methods for the investigation of small scale wind field structures, we present a direct comparison of observations obtained by high resolution TerraSAR-X (TS-X) X-band SAR data and platform-based LiDAR devices at the North Sea wind farm alpha ventus. We furthermore compare the results with meteorological data from the COSMO-DE model run by the German Weather Service DWD. Our study indicates that the overall agreement between SAR and LiDAR wind fields is good and that under appropriate conditions small scale wind field variations compare significantly well.

  8. Appendix I1-2 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Zack; Deborah Hanley; Dora Nakafuji

    2012-07-15

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to dev elop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET field campaign deployment experiences and challenges. As part of the WindNET project on the Big Island of Hawaii, AWS Truepower (AWST) conducted a field campaign to assess the viability of deploying a network of monitoring systems to aid in local wind energy forecasting. The data provided at these monitoring locations, which were strategically placed around the Big Island of Hawaii based upon results from the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) observational targeting study (Figure 1), provided predictive indicators for improving wind forecasts and developing responsive strategies for managing real-time, wind-related system events. The goal of the field campaign was to make measurements from a network of remote monitoring devices to improve 1- to 3-hour look ahead forecasts for wind facilities.

  9. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  10. Fields of Opportunity: Wind Machines Return to the Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowers, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a rebirth of wind machines on the rural landscape. In ironic fashion the wind's kinetic energy has grown in significance through its ability to generate commercial amounts of electricity, the commodity that a few generations earlier hastened the demise of the old Great Plains windmill. Yet the reemergence of wind…

  11. Solar flare acceleration of solar wind: influence of active region magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, H; Wilcox, J M; Scherrer, P H

    1981-06-26

    The direction of the photospheric magnetic field at the site of a solar flare is a good predictor of whether the flare will accelerate solar wind plasma. If the field has a southward component, high-speed solar wind plasma is usually observed near the earth about 4 days later. If the field has a northward component, such high-speed solar wind is almost never observed. Southward-field flares may then be expected to have much larger terrestrial effects than northward flares.

  12. Evaluation of wind fields used in Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission analyses.

    PubMed

    Green, M C; Pai, P; Ashbaugh, L; Farber, R J

    2000-05-01

    The Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission (GCVTC) was established by the U.S. Congress to assess the potential impacts of projected growth on atmospheric visibility at Grand Canyon National Park and to make recommendations to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on what measures could be taken to avoid such adverse impacts. A critical input to the assessment tool used by the commission was three-dimensional model-derived wind fields used to transport the emissions. This paper describes the evaluation of the wind fields used at various stages in the assessment. Wind fields evaluated included those obtained from the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), the National Meteorological Center's Nested Grid Model (NGM), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion (ATAD) trajectory model. The model-derived wind fields were evaluated at multiple vertical levels at several locations in the southwestern United States by determining differences between model predicted winds and winds that were measured using radiosonde and radar wind profiler data. Model-derived winds were also evaluated by determining the percent of time that they were within acceptable differences from measured winds. All models had difficulties, generally meeting the acceptable criteria for less than 50% of the predictions. The RAMS model had a persistent bias toward southwesterly winds at the expense of other directions, especially failing to represent channeling by north-south mountain ranges in the lower levels. The NGM model exhibited a substantial bias in the summer months by extending northwesterly winds in the eastern Pacific Ocean well inland, in contrast to the observed southwesterlies at inland locations. The simpler ATAD trajectory model performed somewhat better than the other models, probably because of its use of more upper air sites. The results of the evaluation indicated that these wind fields

  13. Global surface wind and flux fields from model assimilation of Seasat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Busalacchi, A. J.; Kalnay, E.; Bloom, S.; Ghil, M.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for dealiasing Seasat data and developing global surface wind and latent and sensible heat flux fields are discussed. Seasat data from September 20, 1978 was dealiased using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analysis/forecast system. The wind data obtained with the objective GLA forecast model are compared to the data subjectively dealiased by Peteherych et al. (1984) and Hoffman (1982, 1984). The GLA procedure is also verified using simulated Seasat data. The areas of high and low heat fluxes and cyclonic and anticyclonic wind stresses detected in the generated fields are analyzed and compared to climatological fields. It is observed that there is good correlation between the time-averaged analyses of wind stress obtained subjectively and objectively, and the monthly mean wind stress and latent fluxes agree with climatological fields and atmospheric and oceanic features.

  14. Deriving dynamics from GPS radio occultation: Three-dimensional wind fields for monitoring the climate.

    PubMed

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea Karin; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2014-10-28

    Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements are proven highly useful for observing the thermal structure of the troposphere and stratosphere. Here we use RO data for the first time to derive climatological wind fields from sampling error-corrected geopotential height fields on isobaric surfaces from about 800 hPa to 3 hPa. We find monthly mean RO geostrophic wind and gradient wind fields (2007 to 2012, about 500 km horizontal resolution, outside tropics) to clearly capture all main wind features, with differences to atmospheric analysis winds being, in general, smaller than 2 m/s. Larger differences (up to 10 m/s) occur close to the subtropical jet where RO winds underestimate actual winds. Such biases are caused by the geostrophic and gradient wind approximations, while RO retrieval errors introduce negligible effect. These results demonstrate that RO wind fields are of high quality and can provide new information on troposphere-stratosphere dynamics, for the benefit of monitoring the climate from weekly to decadal scales.

  15. Deriving dynamics from GPS radio occultation: Three-dimensional wind fields for monitoring the climate

    PubMed Central

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea Karin; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements are proven highly useful for observing the thermal structure of the troposphere and stratosphere. Here we use RO data for the first time to derive climatological wind fields from sampling error-corrected geopotential height fields on isobaric surfaces from about 800 hPa to 3 hPa. We find monthly mean RO geostrophic wind and gradient wind fields (2007 to 2012, about 500 km horizontal resolution, outside tropics) to clearly capture all main wind features, with differences to atmospheric analysis winds being, in general, smaller than 2 m/s. Larger differences (up to 10 m/s) occur close to the subtropical jet where RO winds underestimate actual winds. Such biases are caused by the geostrophic and gradient wind approximations, while RO retrieval errors introduce negligible effect. These results demonstrate that RO wind fields are of high quality and can provide new information on troposphere-stratosphere dynamics, for the benefit of monitoring the climate from weekly to decadal scales. PMID:26074640

  16. Features of wind field over the sea surface in the coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzikova, A. K.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Myasoedov, A. G.; Chapron, B.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze SAR wind field features, in particular the effects of wind shadowing. These effects represent the dynamics of the internal atmospheric boundary layer, which is formed due to the transition of the air flow arriving from the rough land surface to the "smooth" water surface. In the wind-shadowed area, the flow accelerates, and a surface wind stress increases with fetch. The width of the shadow depends not only on the wind speed and atmospheric boundary layer stratification, but also on geographic features such as windflow multiple transformations over the complex surface land-Lake Chudskoe-land-Gulf of Finland. Measurements showed that, in the area of wind acceleration, the surface stress normalized by an equilibrium value (far from the coast) is a universal function of dimensionless fetch Xf/G. Surface wind stress reaches an equilibrium value at Xf/G ≈ 0.4, which is the scale of the planetary-boundary-layer relaxation.

  17. Flooding in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These views of the Louisiana and Mississippi regions were acquired before and one day after Katrina made landfall along the Gulf of Mexico coast, and highlight many of the changes to the rivers and vegetation that occurred between the two views. The images were acquired by NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on August 14 and August 30, 2005. These multiangular, multispectral false-color composites were created using red band data from MISR's 46o backward and forward-viewing cameras, and near-infrared data from MISR's nadir camera. Such a display causes water bodies and inundated soil to appear in blue and purple hues, and highly vegetated areas to appear bright green. The scene differentiation is a result of both spectral effects (living vegetation is highly reflective at near-infrared wavelengths whereas water is absorbing) and of angular effects (wet surfaces preferentially forward scatter sunlight). The two images were processed identically and extend from the regions of Greenville, Mississippi (upper left) to Mobile Bay, Alabama (lower right).

    There are numerous rivers along the Mississippi coast that were not apparent in the pre-Katrina image; the most dramatic of these is a new inlet in the Pascagoula River that was not apparent before Katrina. The post-Katrina flooding along the edges of Lake Pontchartrain and the city of New Orleans is also apparent. In addition, the agricultural lands along the Mississippi floodplain in the upper left exhibit stronger near-infrared brightness before Katrina. After Katrina, many of these agricultural areas exhibit a stronger signal to MISR's oblique cameras, indicating the presence of inundated soil throughout the floodplain. Note that clouds appear in a different spot for each view angle due to a parallax effect resulting from their height above the surface.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously, viewing the entire globe between 82o north and 82o

  18. Multivariate stationary non-Gaussian process simulation for wind pressure fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Su, Ning; Wu, Yue

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic simulation is an important means of acquiring fluctuating wind pressures for wind induced response analyses in structural engineering. The wind pressure acting on a large-span space structure can be characterized as a stationary non-Gaussian field. This paper reviews several simulation algorithms related to the Spectral Representation Method (SRM) and the Static Transformation Method (STM). Polynomial and Exponential transformation functions (PSTM and ESTM) are discussed. Deficiencies in current algorithms, with respect to accuracy, stability and efficiency, are analyzed, and the algorithms are improved for better practical application. In order to verify the improved algorithm, wind pressure fields on a large-span roof are simulated and compared with wind tunnel data. The simulation results fit well with the wind tunnel data, and the algorithm accuracy, stability and efficiency are shown to be better than those of current algorithms.

  19. Impact of ocean warm layer thickness on the intensity of hurricane Katrina in a regional coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyodae; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2013-10-01

    The effect of pre-storm subsurface thermal structure on the intensity of hurricane Katrina (2005) is examined using a regional coupled model. The Estimating Circulation and Climate of Ocean (ECCO) ocean state estimate is used to initialize the ocean component of the coupled model, and the source of deficiencies in the simulation of Katrina intensity is investigated in relation to the initial depth of 26 °C isotherm (D26). The model underestimates the intensity of Katrina partly due to shallow D26 in ECCO. Sensitivity tests with various ECCO initial fields indicate that the correct relationship between intensity and D26 cannot be derived because D26 variability is underestimated in ECCO. A series of idealized experiments is carried out by modifying initial ECCO D26 to match the observed range. A more reasonable relationship between Katrina’s intensity and pre-storm D26 emerges: the intensity is much more sensitive to D26 than to sea surface temperature (SST). Ocean mixed layer process plays a critical role in modulating inner-core SSTs when D26 is deep, reducing mixed layer cooling and lowering the center pressure of the Katrina. Our result lends strong support to the notion that accurate initialization of pre-storm subsurface thermal structure in prediction models is critical for a skillful forecast of intensity of Katrina and likely other intense storms.

  20. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Resor, Brian R.; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  1. Environmental impact of Hurricane Katrina on Lake Pontchartrain: Chapter 7G in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Thomas; Perez, Brian C.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina slammed the Louisiana-Mississippi Gulf Coast with 135-mi/hour (217-km/hour) winds and up to a 30-ft (9-m) storm surge. Lake Pontchartrain was further subjected to environmental threat by way of the millions of gallons of contaminated flood water that were pumped daily from the city of New Orleans into the lake.

  2. Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Tulane's Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ian L.

    2007-01-01

    On Monday, August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina passed east of New Orleans causing minimal damage to Tulane's Medical Center. Later that day, levees that protected the city failed and several feet of water entered the hospitals and school buildings. Emergency generators provided power for 36 hours before running out of fuel. Temperatures in the hospitals soared into the upper 90's and conditions were made intolerable by 100% humidity and backed-up sewage. For several days, faculty, residents, nurses and hospital personnel performed heroically, caring for patients in appalling conditions, hand-ventilating critically ill patients in shifts. Approximately 200 patients, and 1500 additional personnel would be evacuated on Wednesday and Thursday from a makeshift heliport on Tulane's parking garage. Current disaster plans may be inadequate should facilities be inaccessible for months because of damage or contamination. Contingency plans also need to be made should outside disaster relief be markedly delayed as was the case with Katrina. PMID:18528490

  3. Wind Loads on Flat Plate Photovoltaic Array Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.; Zimmerman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays were investigated. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20 deg to 60 deg, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. A wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices is outlined.

  4. Hurricane Katrina-induced forest damage in relation to ecological factors at landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fugui; Xu, Y Jun

    2009-09-01

    Forest stand stability to strong winds such as hurricanes has been found to be associated with a number of forest, soil and topography factors. In this study, through applying geographic information system (GIS) and logit regression, we assessed effects of forest characteristics and site conditions on pattern, severity and probability of Hurricane Katrina disturbance to forests in the Lower Pearl River Valley, USA. The factors included forest type, forest coverage, stand density, soil great group, elevation, slope, aspect, and stream buffer zone. Results showed that Hurricane Katrina damaged 60% of the total forested land in the region. The distribution and intensity of the hurricane disturbance varied across the landscape, with the bottomland hardwood forests on river floodplains most severely affected. All these factors had a variety of effects on vulnerability of the forests to the hurricane disturbance and thereby spatial patterns of the disturbance. Soil groups and stand factors including forest types, forest coverage and stand density contributed to 85% of accuracy in modeling the probability of the hurricane disturbance to forests in this region. Besides assessment of Katrina's damage, this study elucidates the great usefulness of remote sensing and GIS techniques combined with statistics modeling in assessment of large-scale risks of hurricane damage to coastal forests.

  5. Katrina: macro-ethical issues for engineers.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Byron

    2010-09-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the worst disasters in United States history. Failures within New Orleans' engineered hurricane protection system (levees and floodwalls) contributed to the severity of the event and have drawn considerable public attention. In the time since Katrina, forensic investigations have uncovered a range of issues and problems related to the engineering work. In this article, my goal is to distill from these investigations, and the related literature that has accumulated, some overarching macro-ethical issues that are relevant for all engineers. I attempt to frame these issues, using illustrative examples taken from Katrina, in a way that might be of pedagogical use and benefit for engineering educators interested in engaging their students in discussions of engineering ethics, societal impact of engineered systems, engineering design, or related topics. Some of the issues discussed are problems of unanticipated failure modes, faulty assumptions, lack or misuse of information, the importance of resiliency, the effects of time, balancing competing interests, attending to the details of interfaces, the fickleness of risk perception, and how the past constrains the present.

  6. Generating wind fields that honour point observations and physical conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlabing, Dirk; Bárdossy, András

    2015-04-01

    Wind exhibits a strong spatial and temporal variability. In the application of lake modelling, these features are important for simulating water flows and stratification correctly, as mean and variance of wind speed determine the input of momentum into the lake. This makes a mere interpolation of point measurements an unsuitable method for producing model input. Additionally to concrete point measurements, more subtle aspects of wind fields are to be reproduced. It follows from the fact that wind vectors represent moving air that a wind field has to be divergency-free in order to be mass-conservative. Further, a temporal sequence of wind fields has to comply with the Navier-Stokes equation in order to conserve momentum. All these constraints can be met by representing the conditioned wind field as a linear combination of unconditioned, normally distributed random fields that individually possess the same spatial covariance structuref as observed wind fields. The aim of having the same covariance structure in the conditioned wind field is formulated as an optimization problem with respect to the weights used in the linear combination. With the help of Quadratic Programming (QP) and exploiting the convexity of the problem, feasible solutions can easily be found. In this QP problem, observations become linear constraints. Conservation laws can be incorporated by introducing control volumes in a similar fashion as they are used in fluid mechanics. Budgets of flows through these control volumes become integral conditions in the QP problem. The applicability of the approach will be shown using an artificial example and real-world data measured on shore and on a moving boat on Lake Constance.

  7. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    PubMed

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere.

  8. Leakage diffusion of underwater crude oil in wind fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqiong; Liu, Qi; Li, Yunyun; Lu, Rui; Wu, Shijuan; Li, Xin; Hou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of underwater crude oil pipes causes severe pollution to soil and water, and results in great economic loss. To predict the diffusion area of spilled oil before it reaches the water's surface and to reduce the time required for emergency response, numerical simulations were conducted on underwater spilled oil diffusion of bare crude oil pipes using FLUENT software. The influences of water-surface wind speed, leakage hole diameter, water velocity, and initial leakage velocity on oil diffusion were analyzed. The results revealed the following: (1) with wind blowing on the surface of the water, the vertical displacement of spilled oil jet-flow was affected by the combined action of water flow and wind, making it difficult for a high-speed jet-flow to form. A horizontal oil flow mostly moved in the direction of the bottom water, and frontier oil droplets dispersed quickly; (2) during the diffusion of spilled oil in water, the maximum horizontal displacement mostly increased linearly, while the maximum vertical displacement initially increased quickly and then slowed; (3) the greater the initial velocity and leakage hole diameter, the higher the oil jet-flow and the wider the diffusion area; the higher the water flow rate and water-surface wind speed, the smaller the vertical displacement of spilled oil. The existence of water-surface wind had no obvious influence on the horizontal displacement of underwater spilled oil.

  9. Meta-Leadership in a Mega Disaster: A Case Study of Governor Haley Barbour’s Leadership During Hurricane Katrina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    forestry, gaming, and poultry industries were severely damaged. Of the 2,678 businesses located in the areas flooded by Katrina’s storm surge, 1,827...damaged or destroyed by tropical force winds and heavy rains. Second only to the timber industry in Mississippi is poultry production. Katrina...killed 6.2 million birds valued at over $15 million. Additionally, the storm destroyed 2,400 poultry barns with a replacement cost of over $6 million

  10. In-field use of laser Doppler vibrometer on a wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, M.; Hurtado, J.; Hansche, B.

    1998-12-31

    One of our primary goals was to determine how well a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) could measure the structural dynamic response of a wind turbine that was parked in the field. We performed a series of preliminary tests in the lab to determine the basic limitations of the LDV for this application. We then instrumented an installed parked horizontal axis wind turbine with accelerometers to determine the natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes of the wind turbine and rotor as a baseline for the LDV and our other tests. We also wanted to determine if LDV modal information could be obtained from a naturally (wind) excited wind turbine. We compared concurrently obtained accelerometer and LDV data in an attempt to assess the quality of the LDV data. Our test results indicate the LDV can be successfully used in the field environment of an installed wind turbine, but with a few restrictions. We were successful in obtaining modal information from a naturally (wind) excited wind turbine in the field, but the data analysis requires a large number of averaged data sets to obtain reasonable results. An ultimate goal of this continuing project is to develop a technique that will monitor the health of a structure, detect damage, and hopefully predict an impending component failure.

  11. Operational Generation of Urban Wind Fields to Support Transport and Dispersion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, J. H.; Sheu, R.; Brown, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    A realistic wind field is a key component to any transport and dispersion model simulation. In the urban environment observing the wind field accurately is complicated by the presence of the building structures themselves. In situ measurements are only representative over a limited area near the point of observation due to the influence of nearby buildings. Winds observed remotely, via radar or lidar, have good spatial resolution, but are limited to making measurements above rooftop. The Urban Shield project is an emergency response system for hazardous atmospheric releases in Arlington County Virginia. To provide building aware wind fields over a 100 square kilometer area for transport and dispersion modeling we use a combined approach of remotely sensed wind observations and very high resolution, ~10 meters, diagnostic wind modeling. In brief, the system uses 3-D wind analyses from Doppler radar and lidar as input to Los Alamos National Laboratory's QUIC-Urb empirical wind model. An overview of the system and results will be presented.

  12. Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Fields: Relation to Albedo Swirls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Harrison, L.; Halekas, J. S.; Hood, L. L.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer onboard Lunar Prospector has observed the solar wind interaction with remanent crustal magnetic fields at altitudes from 20 to 120 km. This interaction may be responsible for the formation of albedo swirls.

  13. Atmospheric wind fields derived from Nimbus ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.

    1972-01-01

    The global ozone measurements made by the Nimbus 3 IRIS were used to trace the circulation in the upper troposphere. This was possible because the atmospheric ozone content is closely related to the geopotential heights in the upper troposphere. There is a linear relationship between 200 mbar geopotential heights and the total ozone measured by Nimbus 3. With the help of the geostrophic law, atmospheric winds can be derived from the horizontal gradient of the geopotential heights. Utilizing the linear relationship shown, winds can be deduced from satellite measurements of total ozone.

  14. Stakeholder Organizations: Hurricane Katrina and the New Orleans Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the district temporarily lost 100% of its students and did not reopen a single school for more than two months. As it became apparent that the district was not prepared to bring the schools back from such a devastating blow, educators began to see a silver lining in Katrina's dark clouds. State School Board…

  15. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  16. The Rebirth of Montessori: Rebuilding a Public Charter Montessori School in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" are common terms for time frames these days in New Orleans, often reminding me of the BCE/CE timeline distinctions. You hear "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" on the news, in the paper, and in everyday conversations. Although more and more people have moved back to New…

  17. Relationship between auroral electrojet intensity fluctuations and the wind field near the mesopause

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, B.B.; Carter, D.A.; Ecklund, W.L.

    1982-03-01

    We report an observed correlation between short-term fluctuation in the wind field near the mesopause (happrox. =83--90 km) and intensity variations of the auroral electrojet (happrox. =110--115 km). Our results were obtained by comparing mesospheric wind variations obtained from the MST radar at Poker Flat, Alaska with electrojet intensity varitions determined by both the intensity of radar-auroral echoes and ground-based magnetometer data. The apparent correlation between these parameters suggests a partial control of the mesospheric wind field by the overlying current system.

  18. Toward Transformative Learning: An Inquiry into the Work and Subsequent Learning Experiences of Individuals Who Assisted Hurricane Katrina Evacuees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficks, David B., II.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this multi-case study was to examine in depth the personal and learning experiences of helping professionals and volunteer helpers when challenged to assist adult Hurricane Katrina evacuees and victims in the aftermath of the disaster. The study contributes theoretically, practically and substantively to the adult education field.…

  19. FRAME DEPENDENCE OF THE ELECTRIC FIELD SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C.; Mozer, F. S.

    2011-08-20

    We present the first survey of electric field data using the ARTEMIS spacecraft in the solar wind to study inertial range turbulence. It was found that the average perpendicular spectral index of the electric field depends on the frame of measurement. In the spacecraft frame it is -5/3, which matches the magnetic field due to the large solar wind speed in Lorentz transformation. In the mean solar wind frame, the electric field is primarily due to the perpendicular velocity fluctuations and has a spectral index slightly shallower than -3/2, which is close to the scaling of the velocity. These results are an independent confirmation of the difference in scaling between the velocity and magnetic field, which is not currently well understood. The spectral index of the compressive fluctuations was also measured and found to be close to -5/3, suggesting that they are not only passive to the velocity but may also interact nonlinearly with the magnetic field.

  20. Using SAR and LAM Wind Fields to Investigate the Effects of Land/Atmosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; De Biasio, Francesco; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Biamino, Walter

    2010-12-01

    Modern satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images provide datasets at exceptionally high spatial resolutions, appropriate for investigating the mesoscale phenomena in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Due to the still unsolved problems in the methodologies of wind field retrieval, and the poor temporal coverage at mid-latitudes offered by present SARs, the use of such wind fields is still limited. A fruitful application concerns the combined use of SAR and the hindcasts provided by limited area models, to study the effects of the land/atmosphere interaction. This has been carried out over an area, about 400 km by 400 km wide, around the Crete island in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, a region subject to complex wind patterns, due to the interaction of the almost steady northerly Etesian wind with the orography of the many islands in the region. The Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model has been used to hindcast the wind field at a horizontal resolution of 1 km over the area imaged by an Envisat ASAR image, from which the wind field has been extracted using a methodology based on the two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform. The 10 m wind fields resulting from the numerical simulations, carried out using different diffusion and boundary layer parameterization schemes, have been compared to the SAR-derived one, in order to select the most appropriate scheme, to analyze the correspondence of the observed and the simulated wind structures, and to evaluate the differences in direction and speed. Such a comparison has shown the possible benefits for both the modelling and SAR-wind extraction activities.

  1. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the forest structure of taxodium distichum swamps of the Gulf Coast, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina pushed mixed Taxodium distichum forests toward a dominance of Taxodium distichum (baldcypress) and Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo) because these species had lower levels of susceptibility to wind damage than other woody species. This study documents the volume of dead versus live material of woody trees and shrubs of T. distichum swamps following Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast of Mississippi and Louisiana. Pearl River Wildlife Management Area near Canton, Mississippi had the highest winds of the study areas, and these forests were located in the northeast quadrant of Hurricane Katrina (sustained wind 151 kph (94 mph)). Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve south of New Orleans had medium to high winds (sustained winds 111 kph (69 mph) at the New Orleans lakefront). Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge had a lower level of winds and was positioned on the western edge of the storm. The forests at Pearl River and to a lesser extent at Jean Lafitte had the highest amount of structural damage in the study. For Cat Island, Jean Lafitte, and Pearl River, the total volume of dead material (debris) was 50, 80, and 370 m3 ha-1, respectively. The ratio of dead to live volume was 0.010, 0.082, and 0.039, respectively. For both of the dominant species, T. distichum and N. aquatica, the percentage of dead to live volume was less than 1. Subdominant species including Acer rubrum, Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus lyrata, and Quercus nigra were more damaged by the storm at both Pearl River and Jean Lafitte. Only branches were damaged by Hurricane Katrina at Cat Island. Shrubs such as Morella cerifera, Euonymous sp., and Vaccinium sp. were often killed by the storm, while other species such as Cephalanthus occidentalis, Forestiera acuminata, and Cornus florida were not killed. Despite the fact that Hurricane Katrina was a Category 3 storm and struck Pearl River and Jean Lafitte fairly directly, dominant species of the T. distichum swamps were

  2. Variability of the wind field in the tropical oceans as observed by satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, N.; Bentamy, A.; Quilfen, Y.

    1995-12-01

    The wind stress is the primary force driving the tropical oceans from daily to interannual time scales. Conventional measurements from ships of the wind vectors are not available with a sufficient quality regarding data accuracy as well as their coverage. Satellite observations of the surface wind over the sea are now available on a routine basis at the Institut Francais de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), derived from the European Remote Sensing-1 (ERS-1) scatterometer and altimeter and from the radiometer special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I). More than 3 years of weekly stress fields (1991-1994) with a resolution of one degree in latitude and longitude are produced using an objective analysis method. The accuracy of these gridded winds was evaluated by comparison with TAO buoys in the tropical Pacific area (Riou, 1995). The root mean square differences are of the order of 1.2 m/s and 15 degrees. The greatest differences are observed in the TOGA/COARE region where the wind variability is largest on the weekly scale. The low frequencies (monthly to interannual) of the wind variability are discussed and compared to those obtained from the TAO buoys. In this paper the time and space scales of the sea surface wind are described using a complex EOF analysis. One of the most interesting results is that the weekly averaged wind fields derived from ERS-1 scatterometer are useful to depict a 30-50 day oscillation over the tropical Pacific Ocean.

  3. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  4. Implementing a wind measurement Doppler Lidar based on a molecular iodine filter to monitor the atmospheric wind field over Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Li-fang; Yang, Guo-tao; Wang, Ji-hong; Yue, Chuan; Chen, Lin-xiang

    2017-02-01

    A wind measurement Doppler Lidar system was developed, in which injection seeded laser was used to generate narrow linewidth laser pulse. Frequency stabilization was achieved through absorption of iodine molecules. Commands that control the instrumental system were based on the PID algorithm and coded using VB language. The frequency of the seed laser was locked to iodine molecular absorption line 1109 which is close to the upper edge of the absorption range,with long-time (>4 h) frequency-locking accuracy being ≤0.5 MHz and long-time frequency stability being 3.55×10-9. Design the continuous light velocity measuring system, which concluded the cure about doppler frequency shift and actual speed of chopped wave plate, the velocity error is less than 0.4 m/s. The experiment showed that the stabilized frequency of the seed laser was different from the transmission frequency of the Lidar. And such frequency deviation is known as Chirp of the laser pulse. The real-time measured frequency difference of the continuous and pulsed lights was about 10 MHz, long-time stability deviation was around 5 MHz. When the temporal and spatial resolutions were respectively set to 100 s and 96 m, the wind velocity measurement error of the horizontal wind field at the attitude of 15-35 km was within ±5 m/s, the results showed that the wind measurement Doppler Lidar implemented in Yanqing, Beijing was capable of continuously detecting in the middle and low atmospheric wind field at nighttime. With further development of this technique, system measurement error could be lowered, and long-run routine observations are promising.

  5. The effects of vortex structure and vortex translation on the tropical cyclone boundary layer wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2015-03-01

    The effects of vortex translation and radial vortex structure in the distribution of boundary layer winds in the inner core of mature tropical cyclones are examined using a high-resolution slab model and a multilevel model. It is shown that the structure and magnitude of the wind field (and the corresponding secondary circulation) depends sensitively on the radial gradient of the gradient wind field above the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is shown that vortex translation creates low wave number asymmetries in the wind field that rotate anticyclonically with height. A budget analysis of the steady state wind field for both models was also performed in this study. Although the agradient force drives the evolution of the boundary layer wind field for both models, it is shown that the manner in which the boundary layer flow responds to this force differs between the two model representations. In particular, the inner core boundary layer flow in the slab model is dominated by the effects of horizontal advection and horizontal diffusion, leading to the development of shock structures in the model. Conversely, the inner core boundary layer flow in the multilevel model is primarily influenced by the effects of vertical advection and vertical diffusion, which eliminates shock structures in this model. These results further indicate that special care is required to ensure that qualitative applications from slab models are not unduly affected by the neglect of vertical advection. This article was corrected on 31 MAR 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  6. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations in the Inner Heliosphere: A Wind and MESSENGER Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Koval, A.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the similar observations made by the MESSENGER spacecraft in the inner heliosphere affords an opportunity to compare magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of radial distance from the Sun under different solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The powe'r spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. Wind and MESSENGER magnetic fluctuations are compared for times when the two spacecraft are close to radial and Parker field alignment. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed.

  7. Upgrade of Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Field Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    26 Appendix A: Cmpawi1so of Five-Nest and Seven-Nest Models for Huricane Camille ................................... AI Appendix B...tropical storm behavior , it is timely to review the model limitations. Limita- tions of the CE model may be described in three basic categories: physics...C14. (Sheet 3 of 12) C34 Appendx C Sample Application. 12 Snapshots of Huricane Gibert ----- Wind Speed ---- Inflow Angle, Radius Radius Scaler Avg

  8. Field Calibration of Wind Direction Sensor to the True North and Its Application to the Daegwanryung Wind Turbine Test Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Wan

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a field calibration technique for aligning a wind direction sensor to the true north. The proposed technique uses the synchronized measurements of captured images by a camera, and the output voltage of a wind direction sensor. The true wind direction was evaluated through image processing techniques using the captured picture of the sensor with the least square sense. Then, the evaluated true value was compared with the measured output voltage of the sensor. This technique solves the discordance problem of the wind direction sensor in the process of installing meteorological mast. For this proposed technique, some uncertainty analyses are presented and the calibration accuracy is discussed. Finally, the proposed technique was applied to the real meteorological mast at the Daegwanryung test site, and the statistical analysis of the experimental testing estimated the values of stable misalignment and uncertainty level. In a strict sense, it is confirmed that the error range of the misalignment from the exact north could be expected to decrease within the credibility level. PMID:27873957

  9. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Walter, R.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. Methods: We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. Results: We obtain very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice higher than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of β ~ 0.5 is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations successfully reproduce several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  10. Magnetic field sector structure and origins of solar wind streams in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugay, Yulia; Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor

    2014-08-01

    The origins of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field sector structure in the beginning of the magnetic polarity reversal of 24th solar cycle were investigated using the Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetic field measurements and their products as well as the solar wind data from ACE and the SDO/AIA EUV images. The dominance of the quadrupole harmonics in the solar magnetic field in this period resulted in a four-sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The dominating source of recurrent high-speed solar wind stream was a large trans-equatorial coronal hole of negative polarity evolving in the course of the polarity reversal process. The contribution of ICMEs to the high-speed solar wind did not exceed 17% of the total flux. The solar wind density flux averaged over the year amounted to 1 × 108 cm-2 s-1 which is considerably lower than the typical long-term value (2-4 × 108 cm-2 s-1). The slow-speed component of solar wind density flux constituted in average more than 68% of the total flux, the high-speed component was about 10%, reaching the maximum of 32% in some Carrington rotations.

  11. Aerodynamic roughness measured in the field and simulated in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluates how well values of aerodynamic surface roughness, z sub 0, measured over scale models in wind tunnels correlate with values of z sub 0 measured at full scale in the field. A field experiment was conducted in which values of z sub 0 and u* (wind friction speed) were measured over three arrays of non-erodible roughness elements on a dry lake bed. Wind profiles were measured by ten anemometers on a 15 m mast under thermally neutral atmospheric conditions. Values of z sub 0 increased from .00014 m (dry lake bed only) to .026 m with increasing roughness element density. The three roughness element arrays were simulated at 1/10 and 1/20 scale in an open-circuit atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel. Velocities were measured with a boundary-layer pitot-tube rake from the same relative position within the scale model arrays as the anemometers were relative to the field arrays. Each array at each scale was sampled three times at five freestream velocities. Average values of z sub 0 for each model array at each scale were compared with full-scale values of z sub 0 obtained in the field. The field vs. wind tunnel correspondence of z sub 0 is found to be z sub 0 field = 0.2661 x (z sub(0 model) x scale(exp -1))exp .8159.

  12. Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina on John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, William D.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2007-01-01

    The peril from hurricanes to Space Operations Centers is real and is forecast to continue; Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 and Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne of 2004 are sufficient motivation for NASA to develop a multi-Center plan for preparedness and response. As was demonstrated at SSC (Stennis Space Center) in response to Hurricane Katrina, NASA Centers are efficiently activated as local command centers, playing host to Federal and State agencies and first responders to coordinate and provide evacuation, relocation, response, and recovery activities. Remote sensing decision support provides critical insight for managing NASA infrastructure and for assisting Center decision makers. Managers require geospatial information to manage the federal city. Immediately following Katrina, SSC s power and network connections were disabled, hardware was inoperative, technical staff was displaced and/or out of contact, and graphical decision support tools were non-existent or less than fully effective. Despite this circumstance, SSC EOC (Emergency Operations Center) implemented response operations to assess damage and to activate recovery plans. To assist Center Managers, the NASA ASP (Applied Sciences Program) made its archive of high-resolution data over the site available. In the weeks and months after the immediate crisis, NASA supplemented this data with high-resolution, post-Katrina imagery over SSC and much of the affected coastal areas. Much of the high-resolution imagery was made available through the Department of Defense Clear View contract and was distributed through U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science "Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response" Web site. By integrating multiple image data types with other information sources, ASP applied an all-source solutions approach to develop decision support tools that enabled managers to respond to critical issues, such as expedient access to infrastructure and deployment of resources

  13. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (i) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (ii) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (iii) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (iv) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  14. 8000 Ways to Model a Vortex: A Review of Hindcast Wind Field Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hindcasts of cyclonic wind fields are crucial for extreme analysis in the oil and gas industry. Recent scientific developments have increased the number of parameterization options for tropical cyclone vortices, leading to well over 8000 permutations of model choices. Which is best? Also problematic is how best to blend modelled vortex winds into a global wind model (such as the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR)) in order to resolve tropical cyclones to sufficient detail for wave modelling. Standard blending schemes can leave a 'moat' between the vortex and the CFSR circulation (see Figure 1 from TC Olivia 1996). Using a 35-year track database from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, this study assesses model configurations and blending schemes against the most extensive measured meteorological dataset in the north-east Indian Ocean (largely commercial-in-confidence). The Holland profile models of 1980 and 2008 are two starting points, with other options examined for radius to maximum wind calculations, pressure-wind relationships, averaging periods, atmospheric profiles, gust factors, and asymmetry methods. Once a vortex is modelled, the winds are then fitted to the radius of gales and blended into the CFSR before further verification. Initial results support recent theoretical developments by Hu et al (2012), with additional results that call for a new asymmetry method and the separation of pressure and wind field modelling.

  15. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  16. ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, Makoto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

  17. Global disturbance of the transient magnetic field associated with thermospheric storm winds on March 23, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Fambitakoye, O. ); Menvielle, M. ); Mazaudier, C. Centre de Recherche sur la Physique de l'Environnement, Saint Maur des Fosses )

    1990-09-01

    During large magnetic storms, wind disturbances produces by auroral phenomena can affect the whole thermospheric circulation and associated ionospheric dynamo currents for many hours after the end of the storm. This paper presents a morphological analysis of the ground magnetic field disturbance related to the storm winds observed on March 23, 1979, the day after the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 events. The disturbance in the magnetic field variations is observed on a planetary scale, and its pattern does not correspond to that of the regular field variations related to the undisturbed atmospheric dynamo.

  18. Ion exchange with the solar wind for planets with negligible intrinsic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    The exchange of ions between the ionosphere of a planet with negligible intrinsic magnetic field, and the solar wind is examined. It is suggested that a balance exists between the outflow of ionospheric ions at the plasmapause and ions from the solar wind in a restricted region close to the subsolar point. This results in a current system towards the subsolar point on the surface of the ionopause and a toroidal magnetic field. Simple calculations are made of the current and field configuration that might result from the system for conditions similar to those encountered on the Viking 1 and 2 transits of the Mars ionosphere.

  19. What determines the direction of minimum variance of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grappin, R.; Velli, M.

    1995-01-01

    The solar wind is not an isotropic medium; two symmetry axis are provided, first the radial direction (because the mean wind is radial) and second the spiral direction of the mean magnetic field, which depends on heliocentric distance. Observations show very different anisotropy directions, depending on the frequency waveband; while the large-scale velocity fluctuations are essentially radial, the smaller scale magnetic field fluctuations are mostly perpendicular to the mean field direction, which is not the expected linear (WkB) result. We attempt to explain how these properties are related, with the help of numerical simulations.

  20. Galactic cosmic ray currents and magnetic field irregularity degree in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmin, A. I.; Samsonov, I. S.; Samsonova, Z. N.

    1985-01-01

    Currents of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) obtained by global survey method are analyzed. The cases of almost total disappearance of GCR currents are compared with the results of direct measurements of the solar wind parameters. The conclusion is made on a restricted application of the convective-diffusive mechanism of the GCR modulation by the solar wind during the occurrence of stationary and regular magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium.

  1. Probabilistic Path Planning of Montgolfier Balloons in Strong, Uncertain Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael; Blackmore, James C.; Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Lighter-than-air vehicles such as hot-air balloons have been proposed for exploring Saturn s moon Titan, as well as other bodies with significant atmospheres. For these vehicles to navigate effectively, it is critical to incorporate the effects of surrounding wind fields, especially as these winds will likely be strong relative to the control authority of the vehicle. Predictive models of these wind fields are available, and previous research has considered problems of planning paths subject to these predicted forces. However, such previous work has considered the wind fields as known a priori, whereas in practical applications, the actual wind vector field is not known exactly and may deviate significantly from the wind velocities estimated by the model. A probabilistic 3D path-planning algorithm was developed for balloons to use uncertain wind models to generate time-efficient paths. The nominal goal of the algorithm is to determine what altitude and what horizontal actuation, if any is available on the vehicle, to use to reach a particular goal location in the least expected time, utilizing advantageous winds. The solution also enables one to quickly evaluate the expected time-to-goal from any other location and to avoid regions of large uncertainty. This method is designed for balloons in wind fields but may be generalized for any buoyant vehicle operating in a vector field. To prepare the planning problem, the uncertainty in the wind field is modeled. Then, the problem of reaching a particular goal location is formulated as a Markov decision process (MDP) using a discretized space approach. Solving the MDP provides a policy of what actuation option (how much buoyancy change and, if applicable, horizontal actuation) should be selected at any given location to minimize the expected time-to-goal. The results provide expected time-to-goal values from any given location on the globe in addition to the action policy. This stochastic approach can also provide

  2. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  3. Solar wind interaction effects on the magnetic fields around Mars: Consequences for interplanetary and crustal field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Brain, D. A.; Ulusen, D.; Lillis, R. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Espley, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The first unambiguous detections of the crustal remanent magnetic fields of Mars were obtained by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) during its initial orbits around Mars, which probed altitudes to within ∼110 km of the surface. However, the majority of its measurements were carried out around 400 km altitude, fixed 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, mapping orbit. While the general character and planetary origins of the localized crustal fields were clearly revealed by the mapping survey data, their effects on the solar wind interaction could not be investigated in much detail because of the limited mapping orbit sampling. Previous analyses (Brain et al., 2006) of the field measurements on the dayside nevertheless provided an idea of the extent to which the interaction of the solar wind and planetary fields leads to non-ideal field draping at the mapping altitude. In this study we use numerical simulations of the global solar wind interaction with Mars as an aid to interpreting that observed non-ideal behavior. In addition, motivated by models for different interplanetary field orientations, we investigate the effects of induced and reconnected (planetary and external) fields on the Martian field's properties derived at the MGS mapping orbit altitude. The results suggest that inference of the planetary low order moments is compromised by their influence. In particular, the intrinsic dipole contribution may differ from that in the current models because the induced component is so dominant.

  4. Mechanisms for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones: A Case Study of Hurricane Katrina (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rivera, J. M.; Lin, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to simulate the last eyewall replacement cycle (ERC) of Hurricane Katrina (2005) just before it's landfall in the Louisiana coastline. In this study, we pursue a complete understanding of the physics behind the secondary eyewall formation (SEF) in tropical cyclones. The simulation results show the occurrence of the early stages of an ERC in the simulated storm just before landfall. This confirms that with the appropriate set of physics parameterization schemes, grid spacing and initial conditions, the numerical model is able to reproduce ERCs on certain tropical cyclones with no data assimilation or extra data inputs. Strong updrafts are observed to converge in a ring outside the primary eyewall of Hurricane Katrina (2005) suggesting SEF during that period. The increase of divergence outside the primary eyewall with an outer-ring of convergence forming above the boundary layer can be part of the mechanisms that lead to SEF. Also, potential vorticity (PV) field is analyzed for its possible relationship with the development of the secondary eyewall. This detailed study of the pre-ERC events in the inner-core of Hurricane Katrina can build the foundations for testing some of the existing hypotheses for the development of secondary eyewalls leading to new ideas behind their formation.

  5. Solar Wind Slowdown Due to Dust Pickup during Interplanetary Field Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong; Russell, Christopher; Wei, Hanying

    2013-04-01

    The interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are characterized by their cusp-shaped enhancement in the magnetic field magnitude. They are observed throughout the inner solar system from 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter to 5AU by Ulysses. The annual IFE rate is ten at 0.72AU and around eight at 1AU, i.e., decreases as the heliocentric distance increases. Multiple-spacecraft observations show that IFEs are moving radially away from the Sun at nearly the ambient solar wind speed. During the IFE events, case studies show that while there are correlated diamagnetic compensations in pressure there are no significant correlated changes in the solar wind speed. An IFE formation mechanism that explains most of the IFE features is that IFEs result from interactions between solar wind and clouds of picked up nanoscale charged dust, which is released in interplanetary collisions between objects of 10 to 1000m in diameter. The enhanced magnetic field behaves as a magnetic barrier that can transfer momentum to the charged dust from the solar wind. Momentum lifts the dust outward in the solar gravitational well. A prediction of this hypothesis is that solar wind will be slowed down even when the IFEs have reached exactly the solar wind speed. To test this hypothesis, we perform a superposed analysis on the radial velocity of IFEs observed at 1AU. In contrast to the case studies, the statistical results have a significant change in speed. The velocity on the solar wind side of the IFEs is smaller than the ambient velocity. This slowdown increases for larger IFEs with larger estimated mass. In addition, the amount of momentum due to the solar wind slowdown is quantitatively consistent with the momentum expected to be needed to lift the dust out of the Sun's gravitational potential well, which is in strong support of our IFE formation mechanism.

  6. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  7. Atmospheric wind field conditions generated by active grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, Pascal; Kittel, Achim; Peinke, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    An active grid for turbulence generation of several rotatable axes with surmounted vanes that can be driven via stepper or servo motors is presented. We investigate the impact of different excitation protocols for the grid. Using such protocols that already have the intermittent structure of turbulence, higher intermittent flows can be achieved. This concept can also be used to generate turbulent flows of high turbulence intensities (>25%) exhibiting integral length scales beyond the typical size of the test section of the wind tunnel. Similar two-point correlations measured by the intermittent statistics of velocity increments that are characteristic for flows of high Reynolds number, i.e. in the atmospheric boundary layer, can be reproduced.

  8. Coincident vortices in Antarctic wind fields and sea ice motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, S.; Schmitt, C.; Kottmeier, C.; Simmonds, I.

    2006-08-01

    This study introduces a method to examine the coincidence of rotational ice drift and winds caused by the forcing of ice motion by Antarctic cyclones. Vortices are automatically detected using the algorithm of Murray and Simmonds (1991) from both ECMWF surface pressures and SSM/I sea ice motions. For compatibility with this algorithm sea ice motion vectors are transformed to a scalar stream function. During a seven-day test period positions of pressure minima and stream function maxima (SFM) of ice drift are within 300 km in 96% of the cases. Lowest pressure minima are related to highest stream function maxima. The results promise the method to provide a complementary tool of detecting and localizing low-pressure systems over sea ice, adding to numerical pressure analyses.

  9. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  10. Relationship Between Solar-Wind Speed and Coronal Magnetic-Field Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Iju, Tomoya; Hakamada, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Masayoshi

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the relationship between the solar-wind speed [V] and the coronal magnetic-field properties (a flux-expansion factor [f] and photospheric magnetic-field strength [BS]) at all latitudes using data of interplanetary scintillation and solar magnetic field obtained for 24 years from 1986 to 2009. Using a cross-correlation analyses, we verified that V is inversely proportional to f and found that V tends to increase with BS if f is the same. As a consequence, we find that V has an extremely good linear correlation with BS/f. However, this linear relation of V and BS/f cannot be used for predicting the solar-wind velocity without information on the solar-wind mass flux. We discuss why the inverse relation between V and f has been successfully used for solar-wind velocity prediction, even though it does not explicitly include the mass flux and magnetic-field strength, which are important physical parameters for solar-wind acceleration.

  11. Solar wind plasma profiles during interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs): Consistent with charged-dust pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind contains many magnetic structures, and most of them have identifiable correlated changes in the flowing plasma. However, the very characteristic rise and fall of the magnetic field in an interplanetary field enhancement has no clear solar wind counterpart. It appears to be a pure magnetic ``barrier'' that transfers solar wind momentum to charged dust produced in collisions of interplanetary bodies in the size range of tens to hundreds of meters. This transfer lifts the fine scale dust out of the Sun's gravitational well. We demonstrate the lack of field-plasma correlation with several examples from spacecraft records as well as show an ensemble average velocity profile during IFEs which is consistent with our IFE formation hypothesis.

  12. The influence of the tropics on the prediction of ultralong waves. I - Tropical wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Paegle, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of tropical wind data from the FGGE and tropical latent heating on numerical modeling of ultralong waves are considered in a two-part study. The model studied is the global fourth-order GLAS general circulation model, an energy-conserving format with horizontal differences calculated with fourth-order accuracy. Data assimilation experiments were performed with and without the wind data, with account taken of eastward and northward wind components, the geopotential height, and the relative humidity, all over pressure surfaces. The initial conditions were used to generate six pairs of forecasts, and the tropical wind error decreased after two days of prediction when the initial conditions contained the wind data. The deviations from the measured planetary wave data were attributed to differences in the initial rotational wind field, which varied on a three-day basis. The latent heat initial data had a five-day period and extended its influence beyond the tropical zone. The tropical heat sources sustained the tropical westerlies in the GLAS model, and removal of the tropical heat sources reversed the wind to easterlies.

  13. Turbine-scale wind field measurements using dual-Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Fischer, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of micro-scale winds are retrieved using scanning dual-Doppler lidar, and validated against independent in situ wind measurements. Data for this study were obtained during a month-long field campaign conducted at a site in north-central Oklahoma in November of 2010. Observational platforms include one heavily instrumented 60-m meteorological tower and two scanning coherent Doppler lidars. The lidars were configured to perform coordinated dual-Doppler scans surrounding the 60-m tower, and the resulting radial velocity observations were processed to retrieve the 3-component velocity vector field on surfaces defined by the intersecting scan planes. Raw radial velocity measurements from the lidars were calibrated by direct comparison to a sonic anemometer located at the 60 m level on the tower. Wind retrievals were performed using both calibrated and uncalibrated measurements, and validated against the 60-m sonic anemometer observations. Retrievals using uncalibrated radial velocity data show a significant slow bias in the wind speed of about 14%; whereas the retrievals using the calibrated data show a much smaller slow bias of 1.2%. Retrievals using either the calibrated or uncalibrated data exhibit negligible bias in the wind direction (<0.2o), and excellent correlation in the wind speeds (>0.96).

  14. An integrated approach for wind fields assessment in coastal areas, based on bioindicators, CFD modeling, and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Bruno M.; Lopes, António

    2015-12-01

    Wind-deformed trees can be good bioindicators of the mean wind speed and prevailing wind directions. The current research used bioindicators, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and linear models to assess the wind fields in the windy coastal area of Cascais/Portugal. The main objectives of this research are to assess mean speed and directions of winds by using bioindicators and modeling techniques and to correlate both results in order to assess the best methods. The results obtained with the bioindicators showed that carpeting, the most severe deformation, was observed near the shoreline showing that the highest wind speeds are felt in this sector. Inland, where the winds have lower mean speeds, flagging forms are more frequent. When correlated with the bioindicators, the linear model gave better results than CFD models. We can conclude that in areas with good wind potential, the use of bioindicators can be a good alternative in the absence of wind data.

  15. Application of satellite data to the variational analysis of the three dimensional wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Barbara A.; Achtemeier, Gary L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a hybrid vertical velocity algorithm, composed of the kinematic and adiabatic methods of Pettersen (1956), to analyze three-dimensional wind fields is studied. The basic principles and advantages and disadvantages of the adiabatic and kinematic techniques are discussed. The adiabatic method is useful in the clear regions and above the tropopause and the kinematic method is applicable near the surface and in cloudy regions. The effects of a finite difference scheme and the objective analysis of Barnes (1973) on a wind field are investigated. The variational algorithm is evaluated by applying it to SESAME data collected in April 1979.

  16. Signature of open magnetic field lines in the extended solar corona and of solar wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Benna, C.; Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.; Michels, J.; Fineschi, S.

    1997-01-01

    The observations carried out with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are discussed. The purpose of the observations was to determine the line of sight and radial velocity fields in coronal regions with different magnetic topology. The results showed that the regions where the high speed solar wind flows along open field lines are characterized by O VI 1032 and HI Lyman alpha 1216 lines. The global coronal maps of the line of sight velocity were reconstructed. The corona height, where the solar wind reaches 100 km/s, was determined.

  17. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in damage and destruction to local water supplies in Mississippi and Louisiana affecting millions of people. Immediately following the devastation, a multidisciplinary team of 30 EPA emergency response, research, and water program personnel joined force...

  18. Children and Trauma: A Post-Katrina and Rita Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Barbara B.; Ballard, Mary B.

    2007-01-01

    Many children have struggled to cope with the traumatic experiences brought about by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This article recounts how the authors intervened in the lives of children and families after the storms. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the environmental sampling completed by EPA in southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina caused major catastrophic damage. Presentation also describes EPA's Environmental Unit activities in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA, and Dallas, TX.

  20. Genetics Experts Unite to I.D. Unknown Katrina Victims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Genetics Experts Unite to I.D. Unknown Katrina Victims ... in the recent Advances in molecular biology and genetics," says team member Stephen Sherry, Ph.D., of ...

  1. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 9:45 a.m. CDT as a category 3 storm with surges up to approx. 9 m and sustained winds of approx. 120 mph. The hurricane's wind, rain, and flooding devastated several coastal towns, from New Orleans through Mobile. The storm also caused significant damage to infrastructure and vegetation of NASA's SSC (Stennis Space Center). Storm recovery at SSC involved not only repairs of critical infrastructure but also forest damage mitigation (via timber harvests and control burns to reduce fire risk). This presentation discusses an effort to use commercially available high spatial resolution multispectral IKONOS data for vegetation damage assessment, based on data collected over SSC on September 2, 2005.

  2. The Magnetic Field of Mars and its Interaction with the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The outermost layers of the Martian atmosphere are thought to be scientifically unique due to the large influences exerted by the highly dynamic lower atmosphere and the direct input of the solar wind from above. The nature of the solar wind interaction with the upper atmosphere is of particular interest because Mars lacks a global magnetic field, but is well shielded over some regions by strong crustal magnetic fields. Under such circumstances, the direct impact of solar wind plasma may have resulted in enhanced loss of volatiles over the ages including the components of water. The history of upper atmosphere and solar wind interaction measurements at Mars will be reviewed, recent results from the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Express summarized, and prospects for new scientific advances enabled by the measurements that will be made by planned orbiter and penetrator missions. Special attention will be given to planetary magnetic field measurements, the measurement of ionospheric currents driven by the solar wind, and the role of space weather modeling and forecasting in the future of Mars exploration.

  3. Configuration and Evaluation of a Dual-Doppler 3-D Wind Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2014-01-01

    Current LSP, GSDO, and SLS space vehicle operations are halted when wind speeds from specific directions exceed defined thresholds and when lightning is a threat. Strong winds and lightning are difficult parameters for the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to forecast, yet are important in the protection of customer vehicle operations and the personnel that conduct them. A display of the low-level horizontal wind field to reveal areas of high winds or convergence would be a valuable tool for forecasters in assessing the timing of high winds, or convection initiation and subsequent lightning occurrence. This is especially important for areas where no weather observation platforms exist. Developing a dual-Doppler radar capability would provide such a display to assist forecasters in predicting high winds and convection initiation. The wind fields can also be used to initialize a local mesoscale numerical weather prediction model to help improve the model forecast winds, convection initiation, and other phenomena. The 45 WS and NWS MLB tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a dual- Doppler wind field display using data from the 45th Space Wing radar, known as the Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), NWS MLB Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (KMLB), and the Orlando International Airport Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (KMCO). They also stipulated that the software used should be freely available. The AMU evaluated two software packages and, with concurrence from NWS MLB and the 45 WS, chose the Warning Decision Support System-Integrated Information (WDSS-II). The AMU collected data from two significant weather cases: a tornadic event on 14 April 2013 and a severe wind and hail event on 12 February 2014. For the 14 April case, the data were from WSR and KMLB. For the 12 February case, the data were from KMCO and KMLB. The AMU installed WDSS-II on a Linux PC, then processed and quality controlled the radar data for display and analysis using WDSS-II tools

  4. Neutral wind and electric field calculation from monostatic IS radar measurements by means of stochastic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A.; Nygren, T.; Kuula, R.; Voiculescu, M.

    2012-04-01

    We present the principles of a new method that utilises stochastic inversion in determining the electric field and neutral wind from monostatic beam swing incoherent scatter (IS) radar measurements (Nygren et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2011). The method consists of two stages. In the first inversion of beam-aligned ion velocities from the F region, we get the two perpendicular electric field components and the field-aligned ion velocity profile together with their error estimates. The number of beam directions can be freely selected, as long as there are at least three non-coplanar directions. Typically, we use the best possible time resolution for electric field, which is about 6 min for the Tromso CP2 experiment. In the second stage, the input to the inversion problem consists of beam-aligned ion velocities from the E region as well as the calculated electric field components. The number of applied beam cycles for E-region winds is typically greater than in the first inversion problem, since the neutral wind usually changes more slowly than the electric field. The solution of the second inversion problem gives the most probable values of the three neutral wind components and their errors. In the method described above, a stationary and horizontally homogeneous ionosphere has been assumed. These assumptions are not necessarily valid during a single beam cycle or within the whole measurement region. Disturbances in the receiver may also cause errors. Thus the results may contain errors, which are not of statistical nature. A method has been developed that finds and rejects such measurements from the analysis described above (Nygrén et al., submitted). In consequence, more reliable results for electric fields and neutral winds are expected.

  5. Change in distribution and composition of vegetated habitats on Horn Island, Mississippi, northern Gulf of Mexico, in the initial five years following Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, K. L.; Carter, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico, sudden alterations to barrier islands occur relatively often as a result of hurricanes. Barrier island vegetation is affected by storm impacts, such as burial under sand overwash and direct removal by erosion, and also by wind-driven salt spray and flooding by saltwater tidal surge. This study utilized field surveys in conjunction with remotely-sensed data to evaluate changes in the composition and distribution of vegetation on Horn Island, Mississippi, U.S.A., in the initial five years after Hurricane Katrina. The majority of habitat change occurred closer to the shoreline and in areas of overwash. Habitat change was most often associated with an adjustment to higher-elevation plant communities at the expense of wetlands. In addition, substantial tree and shrub mortality as a result of wind, storm surge, salt-spray, and saltwater flooding reduced maritime forest and stable dune habitat, decreasing habitat stability and ecosystem maturity. The lag time in vegetation establishment and foredune development following the storm allowed for sediment transport into back-barrier habitats. Thus, postponing restoration efforts, such as dune plantings or fencing, until at least one full growing season has elapsed following a hurricane may provide back-barrier habitats with the sediment deposition needed to offset sea-level rise and subsidence.

  6. Wide Field-of-View Soft X-Ray Imaging for Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Read, A. M.; Sembay, S.; Thomas, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  7. Mapping ERS-1 wind fields over north west Atlantic using a variational objective analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefridt, L.; Legler, D. M.; Barnier, B.; Obrien, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    A variational method is implemented to produce five day mean gridded ERS-1 analyzed wind fields in the north west Atlantic with the aim of providing for wind forcing of basin scale ocean models. The method consists of minimizing a cost functional, designed to measure misfits to prescribed weighted constraints which express a smoothed behavior and the proximity to input data vectors and curl. The weights are empirically determined by comparison with independent ship and buoy data over four five day periods. Root mean square differences between analyzed winds and independent data are thus further decreased: they range from 0.8 up to 1.8 m/s. Some problems present in the initial data remain; they are principally due to incomplete data coverage (instrumental problems), and possibly unresolved ambiguities. The resulting curl fields are smoothed and show coherent patterns. A comparison with the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) analysis is encouraging.

  8. The intrinsic magnetic field and solar-wind interaction of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    1992-01-01

    The Venus-like interaction between the solar wind and the atmosphere of Mars is examined. The bow shock and magnetosheath of Mars indicate the presence of an obstacle to the solar wind that is somewhat larger than the size of the planet and its observed ionosphere, and also relatively larger than the Venus obstacle under comparable conditions. The intrinsic magnetic field of Mars must be no greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 12 T/cu m, or about 0.0001 times as strong as that of the earth to produce an obstacle of such small size. At least for solar minimum conditions, like those prevailing at the time of the Viking Landers, the ionospheric plasma (thermal) pressure is insufficient to balance the incident solar-wind pressure by itself. The ion and electron temperatures in the Martian ionosphere indicate the presence of local horizontal magnetic fields and heat sources in excess of solar radiation alone.

  9. Analytical comparison of hypersonic flight and wind tunnel viscous/inviscid flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fivel, H. J.; Masek, R. V.; Mockapetris, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Flow fields were computed about blunted, 0.524 and 0.698 radians, cone configurations to assess the effects of nonequilibrium chemistry on the flow field geometry, boundary layer edge conditions, boundary layer profiles, and heat transfer and skin friction. Analyses were conducted at typical space shuttle entry conditions for both laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow. In these calculations, a wall temperature of 1365 K (2000 F) was assumed. The viscous computer program used in this investigation was a modification of the Blottner non-similar viscous code which incorporated a turbulent eddy viscosity model after Cebeci. The results were compared with equivalent calculations for similar (scaled) configurations at typical wind tunnel conditions. Wind tunnel test gases included air, nitrogen, CF4 and helium. The viscous computer program used for wind tunnel conditions was the Cebeci turbulent non-similar computer code.

  10. [Distribution of Regional Pollution and the Characteristics of Vertical Wind Field in the Pearl River Delta].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shao-jia

    2015-11-01

    Based on the data of hourly PM2.5 concentration of 56 environmental monitoring stations and 9 cities over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, the distributions of PM2.5 pollution in PRD region were analyzed by systematic cluster analysis and correlational analysis. It was found that the regional pollution could be divided into 3 types. The first type was the pollution occurred in Dongguan, Guangzhou, Foshan and Jiangmen (I type), and the second type was the pollution occurred in Zhongshan, Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou (II type), while the last type was the pollution only occurred in Zhaoqing (III type). During the study period, they occurred 47, 7 and 128 days, respectively. During events of pollution type I, except Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou, the PM2.5 concentrations of other cities were generally high, while the PM2.5 concentration in whole PRD region was over 50.0 μg x m(-3) during events of pollution type II. The regions with higher PM2.5 concentration was mainly concentrated in Zhaoqing, Guangzhou and Foshan during events of pollution type III. The wind data from 4 wind profile radars located in PRD region was used to study the characteristics of vertical wind field of these 3 pollution types. It was found that the wind profiles of type I and III were similar that low layer and high layer were controlled by the southeast wind and the southwest wind, respectively. For type II, the low layer and high layer were influenced by northerly wind and westerly wind, respectively. Compared with other types, the wind speed and ventilation index of type II. were much higher, and the variation of wind direction at lower-middle-layer was much smaller. When PRD region was influenced by northerly winds, the PM2.5 concentration in the entire PRD region was higher. When PRD region was controlled by southeast wind, the PM2.5 concentrations of I and II areas were relatively lower, while the pollution in III area was relatively heavier.

  11. Measuring electromagnetic fields (EMF) around wind turbines in Canada: is there a human health concern?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The past five years has seen considerable expansion of wind power generation in Ontario, Canada. Most recently worries about exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from wind turbines, and associated electrical transmission, has been raised at public meetings and legal proceedings. These fears have not been based on any actual measurements of EMF exposure surrounding existing projects but appear to follow from worries from internet sources and misunderstanding of the science. Methods The study was carried out at the Kingsbridge 1 Wind Farm located near Goderich, Ontario, Canada. Magnetic field measurements were collected in the proximity of 15 Vestas 1.8 MW wind turbines, two substations, various buried and overhead collector and transmission lines, and nearby homes. Data were collected during three operational scenarios to characterize potential EMF exposure: ‘high wind’ (generating power), ‘low wind’ (drawing power from the grid, but not generating power) and ‘shut off’ (neither drawing, nor generating power). Results Background levels of EMF (0.2 to 0.3 mG) were established by measuring magnetic fields around the wind turbines under the ‘shut off’ scenario. Magnetic field levels detected at the base of the turbines under both the ‘high wind’ and ‘low wind’ conditions were low (mean = 0.9 mG; n = 11) and rapidly diminished with distance, becoming indistinguishable from background within 2 m of the base. Magnetic fields measured 1 m above buried collector lines were also within background (≤ 0.3 mG). Beneath overhead 27.5 kV and 500 kV transmission lines, magnetic field levels of up to 16.5 and 46 mG, respectively, were recorded. These levels also diminished rapidly with distance. None of these sources appeared to influence magnetic field levels at nearby homes located as close as just over 500 m from turbines, where measurements immediately outside of the homes were ≤ 0.4 mG. Conclusions The results suggest that there is

  12. Magnetic field measurements and wind-line variability of OB-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnerr, R. S.; Henrichs, H. F.; Neiner, C.; Verdugo, E.; de Jong, J.; Geers, V. C.; Wiersema, K.; van Dalen, B.; Tijani, A.; Plaggenborg, B.; Rygl, K. L. J.

    2008-06-01

    Context: The first magnetic fields in O- and B-type stars that do not belong to the Bp-star class, have been discovered. The cyclic UV wind-line variability, which has been observed in a significant fraction of early-type stars, is likely to be related to such magnetic fields. Aims: We attempt to improve our understanding of massive-star magnetic fields, and observe twenty-five carefully-selected, OB-type stars. Methods: Of these stars we obtain 136 magnetic field strength measurements. We present the UV wind-line variability of all selected targets and summarise spectropolarimetric observations acquired using the MUSICOS spectropolarimeter, mounted at the TBL, Pic du Midi, between December 1998 and November 2004. From the average Stokes I and V line profiles, derived using the LSD method, we measure the magnetic field strengths, radial velocities, and first moment of the line profiles. Results: No significant magnetic field is detected in any OB-type star that we observed. Typical 1σ errors are between 15 and 200 G. A possible magnetic-field detection for the O9V star 10 Lac remains uncertain, because the field measurements depend critically on the fringe-effect correction in the Stokes V spectra. We find excess emission in UV-wind lines, centred about the rest wavelength, to be a new indirect indicator of the presence of a magnetic field in early B-type stars. The most promising candidates to host magnetic fields are the B-type stars δ Cet and 6 Cep, and a number of O stars. Conclusions: Although some O and B stars have strong dipolar field, which cause periodic variability in the UV wind-lines, such strong fields are not widespread. If the variability observed in the UV wind-lines of OB stars is generally caused by surface magnetic fields, these fields are either weak (⪉few hundred G) or localised. Figures [see full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee full text]-[see full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee

  13. Wind tunnel and field evaluation of drift from aerial spray applications with multiple spray formulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of different spray tank modifiers into an active ingredient spray mixture on spray atomization and in-field behavior under aerial application conditions were examined. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated that active ingredient solutions potentially results in significantly different atomizati...

  14. A field wind tunnel study of fine dust emissions in sandy soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable field wind tunnel has been developed to allow measurements of dust emissions from soil surfaces to test the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study, we report on the effect of ...

  15. Effects of heterogeneous wind fields and vegetation composition on modeled estimates of pollen source area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K. D.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J. W.; Holloway, T.

    2015-12-01

    Fossil pollen records from lakes, bogs, and small hollows offer the main source of information about vegetation responses to climate change and land use over timescales of decades to millennia. Millions of pollen grains are released from individual trees each year, and are transported by wind before settling out of the atmosphere. Reconstructing past vegetation from sedimentary pollen records, however, requires careful modeling of pollen production, transport, and deposition. The atmosphere is turbulent, and regional wind patterns shift from day to day. In accordance with this, it is necessary for pollen transport models to adequately account for variable, non-uniform wind patterns and vegetation heterogeneity. Using a simulation approach, with both simulated vegetation patterns and vegetation gradients, as well as simulated wind fields, we show the inconsistency in pollen loading proportions and local vegetation proportions when non-uniform wind patterns are incorporated. Vegetation upwind from the lake is over-represented due to the increased prevalence of winds transporting pollen from that area. The inclusion of North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) wind records affirms this finding. Of the lake sites explored in this study, none had uniform wind patterns. The use of a settlement-era gridded vegetation dataset, compiled by the PalEON project and based on Public Land Survey System (PLSS) records allows us to model pollen source area with realistic vegetation heterogeneity. Due to differences in productivity, pollen fall speeds, and neighboring vegetation, there exist patterns of vegetation that may be poorly characterized due to over/under representation of different taxa. Better understanding these differences in representation allows for more accurate reconstruction of historical vegetation, and pollen-vegetation relationships.

  16. Thigmomorphogenesis: field and laboratory studies of Abies fraseri in response to wind or mechanical perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telewski, F. W.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Field- and greenhouse-grown Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Fraser fir) were analyzed for wind- or mechanically-induced flexure changes. These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, reinforcement of branch bases around the stem, and increased radial growth in the direction of the mechanical perturbation (MP). Mature trees exposed to high wind conditions were severely flag-formed. These modified tree crowns had a lower drag than crowns of non-flag formed trees in wind-tunnel tests. In both field-grown and greenhouse-grown A. fraseri, MP induced a decrease in flexibility and increased elasticity of the stems. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in the overall decrease in flexibility. The increase in radial growth caused by wind or mechanical flexure was due to greater cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decrease in stem elongation in these trees was due, at least in part, to a decrease in tracheid length. The potential biological and mechanical significance of these induced growth changes in trees are addressed. The data support the thigmomorphogenetic theory, which states that plants respond to wind and other mechanical perturbations in a way that is favorable to the plant for continued survival in windy environments.

  17. Field and numerical study of wind and surface waves at short fetches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    Measurements were carried out in 2012-2015 from May to October in the waters of Gorky Reservoir belonging to the Volga Cascade. The methods of the experiment focus on the study of airflow in the close proximity to the water surface. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. One of wind sensors (0.1 m) was located on the float tracking the waveform for measuring the wind speed in the close proximity to the water surface. Basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer (the friction velocity u∗, the wind speed U10 and the drag coefficient CD) were calculated from the measured profiles of wind speed. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-12 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 4 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. However, for weak winds (less than 3 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The suggested parameterization of drag coefficient CD(U10) was implemented within wind input source terms in WAVEWATCH III [3]. The results of the numerical experiments were compared with the results obtained in the field experiments on the Gorky Reservoir. The use of the new drag coefficient improves the agreement in significant wave heights HS [4]. At the same time, the predicted mean wave periods are overestimated using both built-in source terms and adjusted source terms. We associate it with the necessity of the adjusting of the DIA nonlinearity model in WAVEWATCH III to the conditions of the middle-sized reservoir. Test experiments on the adjusting were carried out. The work was supported by the

  18. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  19. Contributions to the Fourth Solar Wind Conference. [interplanetary magnetic fields and medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R.; Ness, N.; Ogilvie, K.; Pizzo, J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results in interplanetary physics are examined. These include observations of shock waves and post-shock magnetic fields made by Voyager 1, 2; observations of the electron temperature as a function of distance between 1.36 AU and 2.25 AU; and observations of the structure of sector boundaries observed by Helios 1. A theory of electron energy transport in the collisionless solar wind is presented, and compared with observations. Alfven waves and Alvenic fluctuations in the solar wind are also discussed.

  20. Flow field study in the T-313 wind-tunnel test section for M = 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapryagaev, V. I.; Mazhul, I. I.; Maksimov, A. I.

    2013-06-01

    Results of a numerical and experimental study of flow-field characteristics in the test section of the T-313 supersonic blow-down wind tunnel of ITAM SB RAS at Mach number M = 7 are reported. The distributions of local Mach numbers, stagnation temperatures, static pressures, angles of flow deflection from the test-section axis were analyzed. For comparison, distributions of Mach numbers across the flow at several stations at M = 5 and 6 are reported as well. We show that, in the T-313 wind tunnel, two-dimensional nozzle inserts can be used to perform experiments at M = 7.

  1. A circular median filter approach for resolving directional ambiguities in wind fields retrieved from spaceborne scatterometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Howard

    1990-01-01

    The retrieval algorithm for spaceborne scatterometry proposed by Schultz (1985) is extended. A circular median filter (CMF) method is presented, which operates on wind directions independently of wind speed, removing any implicit wind speed dependence. A cell weighting scheme is included in the algorithm, permitting greater weights to be assigned to more reliable data. The mathematical properties of the ambiguous solutions to the wind retrieval problem are reviewed. The CMF algorithm is tested on twelve simulated data sets. The effects of spatially correlated likelihood assignment errors on the performance of the CMF algorithm are examined. Also, consideration is given to a wind field smoothing technique that uses a CMF.

  2. Connecting the surface of the Sun to the Heliosphere : wind speed and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Rui

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale solar wind speed distribution varies in time in response to the cyclic variations of the strength and geometry of the magnetic field of the corona. Based on this idea, semi-empirical predictive laws for the solar wind speed (such as in the widely-used WSA law) use simple parameters describing the geometry of the coronal magnetic field. In practice, such scaling laws require ad-hoc corrections and empirical fits to in-situ spacecraft data, and a predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. I will discuss improvements to this kind of laws based on the analysis of very large samples of wind acceleration profiles in open flux-tubes (both from MHD simulations and potential-field extrapolations), and possible strategies for corona and heliosphere model coupling. I will, furthermore present an ongoing modelling effort to determine the magnetic connectivity, paths and propagation delays of any type of disturbance (slow/fast solar wind, waves, energetic particles, ballistic propagation) between the solar surface and any point in the interplanetary space at any time. This is a key point for the exploitation of data from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, and more generally for establishing connections between remote and in-situ spacecraft data. This is work is supported by the FP7 project #606692 (HELCATS).

  3. THE SOLAR WIND AND INTERPLANETARY FIELD DURING VERY LOW AMPLITUDE SUNSPOT CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr. E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil

    2013-02-10

    Cosmogenic isotope records indicate that a solar-cycle modulation persists through extended periods of very low sunspot activity. One immediate implication is that the photospheric field during such grand minima did not consist entirely of ephemeral regions, which produce a negligible amount of open magnetic flux, but continued to have a large-scale component originating from active regions. Present-day solar and heliospheric observations show that the solar wind mass flux and proton density at the coronal base scale almost linearly with the footpoint field strength, whereas the wind speed at Earth is uncorrelated with the latter. Thus a factor of {approx}4-7 reduction in the total open flux, as deduced from reconstructions of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the Maunder Minimum, would lead to a similar decrease in the solar wind densities, while leaving the wind speeds largely unchanged. We also demonstrate that a decrease in the strengths of the largest active regions during grand minima will reduce the amplitude of the Sun's equatorial dipole relative to the axial component, causing the IMF strength to peak near sunspot minimum rather than near sunspot maximum, a result that is consistent with the phase shift observed in the {sup 10}Be record during the Maunder Minimum. Finally, we discuss the origin of the 5 yr periodicity sometimes present in the cosmogenic isotope data during low and medium amplitude cycles.

  4. Hurricane Katrina and mental health: a research note on Mississippi Gulf Coast residents.

    PubMed

    Picou, J Steven; Hudson, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Katrina was the most devastating and deadliest hurricane in recent U.S. history. The storm was particularly destructive for residents of the Mississippi Gulf Coast where sustained winds of 135 mph and a storm surge of 32 feet literally obliterated the built and modified environments. Limited research exists on the chronic (32 months) mental health impacts of survivors in this geographical area. Random-digit dialing telephone surveys were administered in Harrison and Hancock counties (Mississippi) in April and May 2008 and data were collected on a number of mental health outcomes. The results of the calculation of Oridinary Least Squares (OLS) regression models revealed that females, African Americans, and less-educated residents manifested the most severe mental health impacts. Most important, consistent findings for depression and Katrina-related psychological stress indicate that residents who were separated from family members, had maximum residential damage, and suffered severe financial problems remained significantly impacted 32 months after Katrina’s landfall. A secondary stressor, in the form of having applications to the Mississippi State Grant Program denied or not processed also predicted personal depression. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Montgomery Potential and Wind Fields on Isentropic Surfaces from GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Leroy, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements provide precise and accurate information on the thermal structure of the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Since altitude (and also geopotential height) is based on accurate knowledge of the position and velocity vectors of the transmitter and receiver satellites involved, it is possible to obtain highly resolved and accurate vertical information from RO. In this study we use observational data from 2007 to 2013 from the RO missions CHAMP, SAC-C, GRACE-A, and Formosat-3/COSMIC. Using potential temperature as the vertical coordinate we calculate monthly means of the Montgomery potential on isentropic surfaces from 300 K to 600 K (approximately 12 km to 24 km in altitude) with a horizontal resolution of 5° in latitude and 5° in longitude. Contours of the Montgomery potential on isentropic surfaces correspond to a stream-function for adiabatic, geostrophic flow. Subsequently we derive monthly mean geostrophic wind fields (outside the tropics) from sampling error-corrected fields of the Montgomery potential on isentropic surfaces. We find that these climatological RO wind fields clearly capture all of the main wind features with departures from analysis winds being, in general, smaller than 2 m s-1. Larger biases close to the subtropical jet and at high latitudes'biases rarely exceed 10 %'are caused by the geostrophic approximation. We present monthly mean wind fields, their annual cycle as well as inter-annual variability related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. This three-dimensional information of high quality from RO data can subsequently be utilized to investigate atmospheric dynamics close to the tropopause.

  6. Probing the solar wind with radio measurements of the second moment field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.; Ishimaru, A.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of spectral broadening on anisotropic electron-density irregularities and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind is investigated on the basis of results for a second moment mutual coherence function obtained by a parabolic-equation method. It is found that although anisotropic irregularities and wind-velocity fluctuations decrease the bandwidth of the spectrum relative to that for isotropic irregularities and no velocity fluctuations, the shape of the spectrum remains unchanged. Examination of the frequency dependence and shape of a computed angular spectrum indicates that the electron-density spectrum is consistent with a power law having a spectral index close to the value appropriate for the Kolmogorov spectrum. It is proposed that multiple-station observations of some total field be employed to measure the solar wind.

  7. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  8. Electromagnetic Simulation of the Near-Field Distribution around a Wind Farm

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Shang-Te; Ling, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An efficienmore » t approach to compute the near-field distribution around and within a wind farm under plane wave excitation is proposed. To make the problem computationally tractable, several simplifying assumptions are made based on the geometry problem. By comparing the approximations against full-wave simulations at 500 MHz, it is shown that the assumptions do not introduce significant errors into the resulting near-field distribution. The near fields around a 3 × 3 wind farm are computed using the developed methodology at 150 MHz, 500 MHz, and 3 GHz. Both the multipath interference patterns and the forward shadows are predicted by the proposed method.« less

  9. Wind tunnel and field assessment of pollen dispersal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Although genetically modified (GM) soybean has never been cultivated commercially in Japan, it is essential to set up the isolation distance required to prevent out-crossing between GM and conventional soybean in preparation for any future possibility of pollen transfer. The airborne soybean pollen was sampled using some Durham pollen samplers located in the range of 20 m from the field edge. In addition, the dispersal distance was assessed in a wind tunnel under constant air flow and then it was compared with the anticipated distances based on the pollen diameter. In the field, the maximum pollen density per day observed was 1.235 grains cm(-2) day(-1) at three observation points within 2.5 m from the field and inside the field the mean density did not reach the rate of 1 grain cm(-2 )day(-1) during 19 flowering days. The results of the wind tunnel experiment also showed that the plants had almost no airborne release of pollen and the dispersal distance was shorter than theoretical value due to clustered dispersal. This study showed little airborne pollen in and around the soybean field and the dispersal is restricted to a small area. Therefore, wind-mediated pollination appears to be negligible.

  10. The effect of interplanetary magnetic field orientation on the solar wind flux impacting Mercury's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the plasma flows on the Mercury surface for different interplanetary magnetic field orientations on the day side of the planet. We use a single fluid MHD model in spherical coordinates to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere for six solar wind realistic configurations with different magnetic field orientations: Mercury-Sun, Sun-Mercury, aligned with the magnetic axis of Mercury (Northward and Southward) and with the orbital plane perpendicular to the previous cases. In the Mercury-Sun (Sun-Mercury) simulation the Hermean magnetic field is weakened in the South-East (North-East) of the magnetosphere leading to an enhancement of the flows on the South (North) hemisphere. For a Northward (Southward) orientation there is an enhancement (weakening) of the Hermean magnetic field in the nose of the bow shock so the fluxes are reduced and drifted to the poles (enhanced and drifted to the equator). If the solar wind magnetic field is in the orbital plane the magnetosphere is tilted to the West (East) and weakened at the nose of the shock, so the flows are enhanced and drifted to the East (West) in the Northern hemisphere and to the West (East) in the Southern hemisphere.

  11. A new approach to the mapping of the equatorial neutral wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriwether, John; Makela, Jonathan J.; Navarro, Luis; Harding, Brian; Milla, Marco

    Increased information about the spatial structure of thermospheric winds may be retrieved through the combination of Doppler shift observations from multiple Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) observatories. In this paper we present examples of results obtained for a network of three FPIs located in central Peru at Jicamarca, Nazca, and Arequipa. These results are based upon the application of a second-order Taylor series expansion of the zonal and meridional wind components as a model of the thermospheric wind field for the latitudinal span of 10 S to 20 S. The Doppler shift data are analyzed with the singular value decomposition algorithm to determine these model parameters. Results of the model fits are compared with the zonal and meridional winds observed at six common volume locations in the thermosphere for 250 km height, and good agreement was found indicating a successful application of the SVD analysis. One example of the results found from the inspection of the maps produced with this approach shows near 1-2 UT an area of weak winds that is seen to move southward as an entity through the region10-20 S near 1-2 LT. The cause of this 'null zone' region in the thermospheric wind field is proposed to be a result of the balancing of the eastward day to night pressure gradient with the westward pressure gradient of the pressure bulge as this bulge (associated with the midnight temperature maximum) propagates through the equatorial thermosphere region from the southwest toward the northeast. Further discussion about alternative basis functions that might be used in this analysis is provided.

  12. An Improvement of Fine Scale Wind Field Prediction using WRF/MMIF Models for CALPUFF Application.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. L.; Koo, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate simulation of CALPUFF dispersion modeling is largely dependent on the data sets which are properly resolved in the spatial and temporal evolution of meteorological field on a wide range of scales. The fine scale field wind of 100 m spatial resolution is required for the CALPUFF modeling in the complex terrain near the coastal area. The objective of this paper is to provide information how to calculate the fine scale wind field using recent advances in the meteorological model. The diagnostic model of CALMET has been used to generate fine grid scale wind field by interpolating output of mesoscale prognostic weather models of MM5 (short for Fifth-Generation Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model) and WRF (Weather Research and Forecast). The MMIF(The Mesoscale Model Interface Program) interfacial program directly converting WRF meteorological output to formats appropriate for CALPUFF modeling without diagnostic interpolations is recently developed. The modeling comparison between WRF/CALMET and WRF/MMIF was carried out to find out a best way in generating fine wind field in the complex geological conditions. For the WRF/CALMET modeling, WRF model output of 900m grid resolution was provided to CALMET model and CALMET then calculated the fine grid resolution of 100m by diagnostically interpolating the WRF output. For the WRF/MMIF modeling, the WRF model directly calculate the fine grid of 100m and the MMIF program was used to convert WRF data. In order to validate model performance of two methods, simulated variables of meteorological fields were compared with observations at the landfill site near the coast in KOREA. It is found that WRF/MMIF is in better agreement with observations than CALWRF/CALMET in respect to the statics of RMSE and IOA. CALPUFF modeling with landfill emission data of H2S was performed and compared with monitoring data to identify effects on meteorological data on the final outcome of CALPUFF dispersion modeling.

  13. Electric fields and neutral winds from monostatic incoherent scatter measurements by means of stochastic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygrén, T.; Aikio, A. T.; Kuula, R.; Voiculescu, M.

    2011-05-01

    A new method utilizing stochastic inversion in determining the electric field and neutral wind from monostatic beam swing incoherent scatter measurements is described. The method consists of two stages. In the first stage, beam-aligned ion velocities from a chosen F region height interval and a set of subsequent beam directions are taken as measurements. The unknowns are the two electric field components and the field-aligned ion velocity profile. The solution gives the most probable values of the unknowns with error estimates. In the second stage, the measurements consist of beam-aligned ion velocities from the E region, and the electric fields given by the first inversion problem are also used as measurements. The number of applied beam directions may be greater than in the first inversion problem. This is a feasible approach since the neutral wind usually changes more slowly than the electric field. The solution of the second inversion problem gives the most probable values of the three neutral wind components. Results of the method are shown for 11 September 2005, when the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) UHF radar was running in the CP2 experiment mode, which is a four-position 6 min monostatic cycle. In addition, from each beam direction a tristatic measurement at one F region range gate was made using two additional receivers. That allowed comparison between the monostatic and tristatic electric field results, which were in excellent agreement. The calculated neutral wind components were in good accordance with previous measurements during disturbed conditions from the same site.

  14. Experimental investigations of a sphere anemometer: Wind tunnel and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In our contribution we will compare the sphere anemometer and two standard sensors for wind energy and meteorology based on results from laboratory and atmospheric measurements. The sphere anemometer is a drag-based sensor for simultaneous wind speed and direction measurements. The new anemometer makes use of the velocity-dependent deflection of a lightweight sphere mounted on top of a flexible tube. The deflection of the sphere is detected by means of a highly sensitive light pointer, as used in atomic force microscopy. This allows for the detection of very small displacements and thus enables a high sensor resolution. In wind tunnel experiments the sphere anemometer, a 3D sonic anemometer and a standard cup anemometer were exposed to a turbulent wind field generated with a so-called active grid. All acquired data was compared to those of a highly resolving hot-wire probe. Moreover, the sphere anemometer and the two reference sensors were installed on two near-shore sites in the German Wadden Sea. Several month of data from these campaigns were analyzed regarding wind speed and direction measurements as well as durability and stability of the new anemometer. The presented work was founded by the German Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety.

  15. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  16. Tropical cyclone wind field asymmetry—Development and evaluation of a new parametric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olfateh, Mohammad; Callaghan, David P.; Nielsen, Peter; Baldock, Tom E.

    2017-01-01

    A new parametric model is developed to describe the wind field asymmetry commonly observed in tropical cyclones or hurricanes in a reference frame fixed at its center. Observations from 21 hurricanes from the North Atlantic basin and TC Roger (1993) in the Coral Sea are analyzed to determine the azimuthal and radial asymmetry typical in these mesoscale systems after removing the forward speed. On the basis of the observations, a new asymmetric directional wind model is proposed which adjusts the widely used Holland (1980) axisymmetric wind model to account for the action of blocking high-pressure systems, boundary layer friction, and forward speed. The model is tested against the observations and demonstrated to capture the physical features of asymmetric cyclones and provides a better fit to observed winds than the Holland model. Optimum values and distributions of the model parameters are derived for use in statistical modeling. Finally, the model is used to investigate the asymmetric character of TC systems, including the azimuth of the maximum wind speed, the degree of asymmetry, and the relationship between asymmetry and forward speed.

  17. Comparison of wind tunnel and field experiments to measure potential deposition of fenpropimorph following volatilisation from treated crops.

    PubMed

    Hassink, Jan; Platz, Klaus; Stadler, Reinhold; Zangmeister, Werner; Fent, Gunnar; Möndel, Martin; Kubiak, Roland

    2007-02-01

    The potential for short-range transport via air, i.e. volatilisation from the area of application and subsequent deposition on adjacent non-target areas, was investigated for the fungicide fenpropimorph in a wind tunnel system and under outdoor conditions in a higher-tier field study. Fenpropimorph 750 g L(-1) EC was applied post-emergence to cereal along with a reference standard lindane EC. Stainless steel containers of water were placed at different distances downwind of the application area to trap volatile residues during a study period of 24 h following application. Meteorological conditions in the wind tunnel as well as on the field were constantly monitored during the study period. The wind tunnel system was a partly standardised system on a semi-field scale, i.e. wind direction and wind speed (2 m s(-1)) were constant, but temperature and humidity varied according to the conditions outside. In the field experiment, the average wind speed over the 24 h study period was 3 m s(-1) and no rainfall occurred. Three different measuring lines were installed on the non-target area beside the treated field to cover potential variations in the wind direction. However, no significant differences were observed since the wind direction was generally constant. Fenpropimorph was detected in minor amounts of 0.01-0.05% of the applied material in the wind tunnel experiment. Even at a distance of 1 m beside the treated field, no significant deposition occurred (0.04% of applied material after 24 h). In the field, less than 0.1% of the applied fenpropimorph was detected at 0 m directly beside the treated field. At 5 m distance the deposition values were below 0.04%, and at 20 m distance about 0.01%. In general, the amounts of deposited fenpropimorph detected in the partly standardised wind tunnel system and the higher-tier field study were in good agreement.

  18. On the Use of Coupled Wind, Wave, and Current Fields in the Simulation of Loads on Bottom-Supported Offshore Wind Turbines during Hurricanes: March 2012 - September 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eungsoo; Manuel, Lance; Curcic, Milan; Chen, Shuyi S.; Phillips, Caleb; Veers, Paul

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, potential offshore wind plant sites have been identified along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Gulf of Mexico. It is imperative that we define external conditions associated with hurricanes and severe winter storms and consider load cases for which wind turbines may need to be designed. We selected two hurricanes, Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012), and investigated the effect these tropical storms would have on bottom-supported offshore wind turbines that were hypothetically in or close to their path as they made landfall. For realistic turbine loads assessment, it is important that the coupled influences of the changing wind, wave, and current fields are simulated throughout the evolution of the hurricanes. We employed a coupled model--specifically, the University of Miami Coupled Model (UMCM)--that integrates atmospheric, wave, and ocean components to produce needed wind, wave, and current data. The wind data are used to generate appropriate vertical wind profiles and full wind velocity fields including turbulence; the current field over the water column is obtained by interpolated discrete output current data; and short-crested irregular second-order waves are simulated using output directional wave spectra from the coupled model. We studied two monopile-supported offshore wind turbines sited in 20 meters of water in the Gulf of Mexico to estimate loads during Hurricane Ike, and a jacket space-frame platform-supported offshore wind turbine sited in 50 meters of water in the mid-Atlantic region to estimate loads during Hurricane Sandy. In this report we discuss in detail how the simulated hurricane wind, wave, and current output data are used in turbine loads studies. In addition, important characteristics of the external conditions are studied, including the relative importance of swell versus wind seas, aerodynamic versus hydrodynamic forces, current velocity effects, yaw control options for the turbine, hydrodynamic drag versus inertia forces

  19. Assimilating concentration observations for transport and dispersion modeling in a meandering wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Sue Ellen; Beyer-Lout, Anke; Long, Kerrie J.; Young, George S.

    Assimilating concentration data into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model can provide information to improve downwind concentration forecasts. The forecast model is typically a one-way coupled set of equations: the meteorological equations impact the concentration, but the concentration does not generally affect the meteorological field. Thus, indirect methods of using concentration data to influence the meteorological variables are required. The problem studied here involves a simple wind field forcing Gaussian dispersion. Two methods of assimilating concentration data to infer the wind direction are demonstrated. The first method is Lagrangian in nature and treats the puff as an entity using feature extraction coupled with nudging. The second method is an Eulerian field approach akin to traditional variational approaches, but minimizes the error by using a genetic algorithm (GA) to directly optimize the match between observations and predictions. Both methods show success at inferring the wind field. The GA-variational method, however, is more accurate but requires more computational time. Dynamic assimilation of a continuous release modeled by a Gaussian plume is also demonstrated using the genetic algorithm approach.

  20. Assimilation of scatterometer winds into surface pressure fields using a variational method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, J., Jr.; Obrien, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A variational formulation was used to assimilate Seasat-A scatterometer (SASS) surface wind measurements near and during a severe storm in the North Atlantic into conventional National Meteorological Center sea level pressure fields. An estimate of the relative vorticity at every point on a grid was calculated using each of these two data sets. A solution to a modified geostrophic stream function is found subject to the constraints that (1) the relative vorticities calculated from the data agree as closely as possible with the relative vorticities from the variational solution, and that (2) the average kinetic energy is a minimum. Results are obtained which support the idea that averaged satellite data can be treated as synoptic data. Direct substitution rather than a time-weighted insertion made from SASS winds generally resulted in more accurate pressure analyses. In addition, this relatively simple model provides surface pressure fields which agree extremely well with surface truth and the results of other investigators who required additional sources of input data into more complex models. It will be possible to obtain improved wind field maps from future scatterometer pressure fields in mid-latitudes.

  1. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions - I. Spherical clouds in uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragán, W. E.; Parkin, E. R.; Federrath, C.; Crocker, R. M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, yet their formation, internal structure, and longevity have not been studied in detail. We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the characteristics, formation, and evolution of filaments arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and dense clouds. Here, we improve on previous simulations by utilizing sharper density contrasts and higher numerical resolutions. By following multiple density tracers, we find that material in the envelopes of the clouds is removed and deposited downstream to form filamentary tails, while the cores of the clouds serve as footpoints and late-stage outer layers of these tails. Aspect ratios ≳12, subsonic velocity dispersions ˜0.1-0.3 of the wind sound speed, and magnetic field amplifications ˜100 are found to be characteristic of these filaments. We also report the effects of different magnetic field strengths and orientations. The magnetic field strength regulates vorticity production: sinuous filamentary towers arise in non-magnetic environments, while strong magnetic fields inhibit small-scale perturbations at boundary layers making tails less turbulent. Magnetic field components aligned with the direction of the flow favour the formation of pressure-confined flux ropes inside the tails, whilst transverse components tend to form current sheets. Softening the equation of state to nearly isothermal leads to suppression of dynamical instabilities and further collimation of the tail. Towards the final stages of the evolution, we find that small cloudlets and distorted filaments survive the break-up of the clouds and become entrained in the winds, reaching velocities ˜0.1 of the wind speed.

  2. The magnetic field and wind confinement of θ1 Orionis C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Babel, J.; Harries, T. J.; Howarth, I. D.; Petit, P.; Semel, M.

    2002-06-01

    We report the detection, through spectropolarimetric observations, of a strong dipolar magnetic field of presumably fossil origin at the surface of the very young O star θ1 Ori C. The Stokes V signatures we detect are variable with time, the variations being consistent with rotational modulation. A detailed modelling of our observations indicates that this dipole field has an intensity of 1.1+/-0.1kG and is inclined at 42°+/-6° with respect to the rotation axis (assumed to be inclined at 45° to the line of sight). We find, in particular, that the positive magnetic pole comes closest to the observer when the variable Hα emission component observed on this star reaches maximum strength. This discovery represents the first definite detection of a magnetic field in an O star, as well as the first detection of a fossil field in a very young star. We also investigate in this paper the magnetic confinement of the radiatively driven wind of θ1 Ori C in the context of the magnetically confined wind-shock model of Babel & Montmerle. In the case of θ1 Ori C, this model predicts the formation of a large magnetosphere (extending as far as 2-3R*), consisting of a very hot post-shock region (with temperatures in excess of 10MK and densities of about 1010-1011cm-3) generated by the strong collision of the wind streams from both stellar magnetic hemispheres, as well as a dense cooling disc forming in the magnetospheric equator. We find that this model includes most of the physics required to obtain a satisfactory level of agreement with the extensive data sets available for θ1 Ori C in the literature (and, in particular, with the recent X-ray data and the phase-resolved spectroscopic observations of ultraviolet and optical wind lines) provided that the mass-loss rate of θ1 Ori C is at least 5 times smaller than that predicted by radiatively driven wind models. We finally show how new observations with the XMM or Chandra spacecraft could help us constrain this model much

  3. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  4. Drug markets during the Katrina disaster

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Golub, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of poor drug users and sellers who remained in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 to identify their special needs and the unique challenges they present to disaster management. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 119 poor, predominantly African-American, drug users and sellers. Their stories in their own words provide a mosaic of drug-related experiences from the period immediately preceding the storm through evacuation and reveal the motivations behind their behaviors. Findings Many drug users placed partying, maintaining their habits, and making money ahead of personal safety and evacuation. Drug use and sales led many not to evacuate before the storm, to use drugs in congregate shelters, to avoid shelters, to roam through flooded debris-strewn streets, to loot stores and homes of drug dealers, and to use violence or the threat of violence to achieve their drug-related aims. Originality/value During a disaster, many poor drug users place risks on themselves, their families, their communities and ultimately on rescue workers. The conclusion presents pragmatic and humanitarian guidelines for successfully addressing this additional challenge. The recommendations are consistent with other suggestions concerning the special needs of indigent populations. PMID:21841898

  5. The TurbEFA Field Experiment—Measuring the Influence of a Forest Clearing on the Turbulent Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queck, Ronald; Bernhofer, Christian; Bienert, Anne; Schlegel, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in the interaction between the land surface and the atmosphere. Measurements and modelling efforts have revealed significant uncertainties in state-of-the-art flux assessments due to spatial inhomogeneities in the airflow and land surface. Here, a field experiment is used to describe the turbulent flow across a typical Central European forest clearing. A three-dimensional model of the inhomogeneous forest stand was developed using an innovative approach based on terrestrial laser-scanner technology. The comparison of the wind statistics of two measurement campaigns (5 and 12 months long) showed the spatial and temporal representativeness of the ultrasonic anemometer measurements within the canopy. An improved method for the correction of the vertical velocity enables the distinction between the instrumental offsets and the vertical winds due to the inclination of the instrument. Despite a 13 % fraction of deciduous plants within the otherwise evergreen canopy, the effects of phenological seasons on the velocity profiles were small. The data classified according to the wind speed revealed the intermittent nature of recirculating air in the clearing. Furthermore, the development of sub-canopy wind-speed maxima is explained by considering the velocity moments and the momentum equation (including measurements of the local pressure gradient). Clearings deflect the flow downward and feed the sub-canopy flow, i.e., advective fluxes, according to wind speed and, likely, clearing size, whereas local pressure gradients play an important role in the development of sub-canopy flow. The presented dataset is freely available at the project homepage.

  6. Controlling disasters: recognising latent goals after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lee M

    2012-01-01

    Classic sociological theory can be used to interpret the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall in the United States on 29 August 2005. The delayed and ineffective response to the storm and the subsequent failure of the levees become more understandable when one considers the latent goals of social control in disaster recovery. Constructing the survivors as suspect or criminal and conceptualising the impacts of the disaster as individual problems occurred in order to justify the emphasis on controlling the survivors of Katrina rather than on assisting them. Parallels are drawn here between the disaster response featuring social control efforts and a recent paradigmatic shift in criminal justice from justice to 'risk management'. Recognition of the implicit aims of the inadequate disaster response provides a more complete explanation of why post-Katrina efforts failed to achieve the manifest goals of response and recovery. The conclusion suggests ways to ensure more equitable and just disaster responses.

  7. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  8. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  9. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  10. Visualization of Wind Data on Google Earth for the Three-dimensional Wind Field (3DWF) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    satellite images. Since the imagery is geo -referenced, providing relatively accurate latitude and longitude information, 3DWF’s geo -referenced wind...wind model gridded data. The case for adoption boiled down to convenience, user-friendliness, and the vast library of geo -referenced satellite...the 3DWF model grid. In this report, the provided data file is the 3D geo -referenced gridded wind component data file output from a run of the 3DWF

  11. Effect of non-zero divergence wind fields on atmospheric transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitada, Toshihiro

    The use of wind fields that do not satisfy the equation of continuity exactly can introduce significant errors in the calculation of the atmospheric transport of chemical species. Results are presented showing that non-zero divergence winds, used as inputs to a transport equation of conservation form, can introduce local fictitious production or destruction rates into the numerical calculations. A divergence-corrected form of the equation, which is mathematically equivalent but not numerically equivalent to an advection form of the equation, can eliminate these undesirable effects as well as the advection form equation can. The divergence-corrected form of the equation leads exactly to the conservation form when massconsistent winds are used. Also, it has the desirable property that the numerical form can preserve, to a large extent, integral conservation relations of the original mass balance equation even when Δ · V ≠ 0. The effects of using non-zero divergence winds appear as first-order chemical reactions. These terms are compared quantitatively with the rates of several tropospheric chemical reactions.

  12. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  13. Effect of Wind Shear on the Characteristics of a Rotating Blade of a Field Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takao; Kawabuchi, Hideyuki

    This paper shows the aerodynamic characteristics at the mid-length of a rotor blade of a 10-m-diameter wind turbine exposed to wind shear. A sonic wind speed meter and six cup-anemometers were installed one diameter upwind of the turbine in order to measure wind profiles. The anemometers at the top, middle and bottom levels were installed at heights of 18.3, 13.3 and 8.3 meters, respectively, which correspond to the heights of the tip of the blade at the blade top position, the hub height, and the tip of the blade at the blade bottom position, respectively. Our measurements suggest that the normal force coefficients in strong wind shear conditions are lower than those in weak wind shear condition. Even if the local angle of attack is almost the same, the normal force coefficient shows differences due to the hysteresis effect. In particular, the influence of shear is large not only when there is strong wind shear in a vertical direction, but also when there is strong wind shear in a horizontal direction. A remarkable difference appears in the pressure distribution under these conditions.

  14. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Ate; Keijsers, Joep G S; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface.

  15. Prediction of far-field wind turbine noise propagation with parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongkyu; Lee, Dongjai; Honhoff, Saskia

    2016-08-01

    Sound propagation of wind farms is typically simulated by the use of engineering tools that are neglecting some atmospheric conditions and terrain effects. Wind and temperature profiles, however, can affect the propagation of sound and thus the perceived sound in the far field. A better understanding and application of those effects would allow a more optimized farm operation towards meeting noise regulations and optimizing energy yield. This paper presents the parabolic equation (PE) model development for accurate wind turbine noise propagation. The model is validated against analytic solutions for a uniform sound speed profile, benchmark problems for nonuniform sound speed profiles, and field sound test data for real environmental acoustics. It is shown that PE provides good agreement with the measured data, except upwind propagation cases in which turbulence scattering is important. Finally, the PE model uses computational fluid dynamics results as input to accurately predict sound propagation for complex flows such as wake flows. It is demonstrated that wake flows significantly modify the sound propagation characteristics.

  16. Influence of Thermal Effects on the Wind Field Within the Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, R.; Sini, Jean-François; Richards, K.; Schatzmann, M.; Weeks, M.; Perez García, E.; Borrego, C.

    2009-05-01

    Micrometeorological conditions in the vicinity of urban buildings strongly influence the requirements that are imposed on building heating and cooling. The goal of the present study, carried out within the Advance Tools for Rational Energy Use towards Sustainability (ATREUS) European research network, is the evaluation of the wind field around buildings with walls heated by solar radiation. Two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were validated against extensive wind-tunnel observations to assess the influence of thermal effects on model performance. The code selected from this validation was used to simulate the wind and temperature fields for a summer day in a specific region of the city of Lisbon. For this study, the meteorological data produced by a non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model (MM5) were used as boundary conditions for a CFD code, which was further applied to analyze the effects of local roughness elements and thermodynamic conditions on the air flow around buildings. The CFD modelling can also provide the inflow parameters for a Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system, used to evaluate the building energy budgets and to predict performance of the air-conditioning system. The main finding of the present three-dimensional analyses is that thermal forcing associated with the heating of buildings can significantly modify local properties of the air flow.

  17. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Joep G.S.; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  18. Field wind tunnel testing of two silt loam soils on the North American Central High Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Van Pelt, R.; Baddock, Matthew C.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Schlegel, Alan J.; Vigil, Merle F.; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica

    2013-09-01

    Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that threatens agricultural sustainability and environmental quality globally. Protecting the soil surface with cover crops and plant residues, practices common in no-till and reduced tillage cropping systems, are highly effective methods for shielding the soil surface from the erosive forces of wind and have been credited with beneficial increases of chemical and physical soil properties including soil organic matter, water holding capacity, and wet aggregate stability. Recently, advances in biofuel technology have made crop residues valuable feed stocks for ethanol production. Relatively little is known about cropping systems effects on intrinsic soil erodibility, the ability of the soil without a protective cover to resist the erosive force of wind. We tested the bare, uniformly disturbed, surface of long-term tillage and crop rotation research plots containing silt loam soils in western Kansas and eastern Colorado with a portable field wind tunnel. Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) were measured using glass fiber filters and respirable dust, PM10 and PM2.5, were measured using optical particle counters sampling the flow to the filters. The results were highly variable and TSP emission rates varied from less than 0.5 mg m-2 s-1 to greater than 16.1 mg m-2 s-1 but all the results indicated that cropping system history had no effect on intrinsic erodibility or dust emissions from the soil surfaces. We conclude that prior best management practices will not protect the soil from the erosive forces of wind if the protective mantle of crop residues is removed.

  19. Formation of lunar swirls by magnetic field standoff of the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Bandfield, Joshua L; Lucey, Paul G; Hayne, Paul O; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Arnold, Jessica A; Ghent, Rebecca R; Paige, David A

    2015-02-04

    Lunar swirls are high-albedo markings on the Moon that occur in both mare and highland terrains; their origin remains a point of contention. Here, we use data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer to support the hypothesis that the swirls are formed as a result of deflection of the solar wind by local magnetic fields. Thermal infrared data from this instrument display an anomaly in the position of the silicate Christiansen Feature consistent with reduced space weathering. These data also show that swirl regions are not thermophysically anomalous, which strongly constrains their formation mechanism. The results of this study indicate that either solar wind sputtering and implantation are more important than micrometeoroid bombardment in the space-weathering process, or that micrometeoroid bombardment is a necessary but not sufficient process in space weathering, which occurs on airless bodies throughout the solar system.

  20. Comparison of computational modelling and field testing of a small wind turbine operating in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradney, D. R.; Evans, S. P.; Salles Pereira Da Costa, M.; Clausen, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    Small horizontal-axis wind turbines are likely to operate in a broad range of operating flow conditions, often in highly turbulent flow, due, in part, to their varied site placements. This paper compares the computational simulations of the performance of a 5 kW horizontal-axis wind turbine to detailed field measurements, with a particular focus on the impact of unsteady operating conditions on the drivetrain performance and generator output. Results indicate that the current Blade Element Momentum Theory based aerodynamic models under-predict the effect of high turbine yaw on the rotor torque, leading to a difference between predicted and measured shaft speed and power production. Furthermore, the results show discrepancies between the predicted instantaneous turbine yaw performance and measurements.

  1. Inferring Near-Surface Tornado Wind Fields from Simulated Surface Marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael; Lewellen, David

    2010-02-01

    In 1967, T. T. Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from various classes of surface marks left behind by translating, debris-laden tornadoes. Here we revisit this approach by merits of Fujita's idea in the context of simulated surface marks, after decades of inactivity by the scientific community. We employ large eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled, sand-like debris that may be lofted from and redeposited to the surface. The resulting patterns of debris removal and deposition are convolutions of events in space and time that contain information about the wind fields that created them. The most prominent marks are insensitive to modest changes in the parameterizations employed. We extend Fujita's original treatment of surface marks to encompass more general families of marks, inferring near-surface flow velocities and spatial scales in different types of simulated tornadoes. Finally, we show how our methods and results could be applied to improve interpretations of observational data. )

  2. The use of wind fields in a land use regression model to predict air pollution concentrations for health exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, M. A.; Blair, R.; Finkelstein, N.; Brook, J. R.; Sahsuvaroglu, T.; Beckerman, B.; Zhang, L.; Jerrett, M.

    A methodology is developed to include wind flow effects in land use regression (LUR) models for predicting nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) concentrations for health exposure studies. NO 2 is widely used in health studies as an indicator of traffic-generated air pollution in urban areas. Incorporation of high-resolution interpolated observed wind direction from a network of 38 weather stations in a LUR model improved NO 2 concentration estimates in densely populated, high traffic and industrial/business areas in Toronto-Hamilton urban airshed (THUA) of Ontario, Canada. These small-area variations in air pollution concentrations that are probably more important for health exposure studies may not be detected by sparse continuous air pollution monitoring network or conventional interpolation methods. Observed wind fields were also compared with wind fields generated by Global Environmental Multiscale-High resolution Model Application Project (GEM-HiMAP) to explore the feasibility of using regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields in LUR models when observed data are either sparse or not available. While GEM-HiMAP predicted wind fields well at large scales, it was unable to resolve wind flow patterns at smaller scales. These results suggest caution and careful evaluation of regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields before incorporating into human exposure models for health studies. This study has demonstrated that wind fields may be integrated into the land use regression framework. Such integration has a discernable influence on both the overall model prediction and perhaps more importantly for health effects assessment on the relative spatial distribution of traffic pollution throughout the THUA. Methodology developed in this study may be applied in other large urban areas across the world.

  3. Simulations of Hurricane Katrina (2005) with the 0.125 degree finite-volume General Circulation Model on the NASA Columbia Supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B.-W.; Atlas, R.; Reale, O.; Lin, S.-J.; Chern, J.-D.; Chang, J.; Henze, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was the sixth most intense hurricane in the Atlantic. Katrina's forecast poses major challenges, the most important of which is its rapid intensification. Hurricane intensity forecast with General Circulation Models (GCMs) is difficult because of their coarse resolution. In this article, six 5-day simulations with the ultra-high resolution finite-volume GCM are conducted on the NASA Columbia supercomputer to show the effects of increased resolution on the intensity predictions of Katrina. It is found that the 0.125 degree runs give comparable tracks to the 0.25 degree, but provide better intensity forecasts, bringing the center pressure much closer to observations with differences of only plus or minus 12 hPa. In the runs initialized at 1200 UTC 25 AUG, the 0.125 degree simulates a more realistic intensification rate and better near-eye wind distributions. Moreover, the first global 0.125 degree simulation without convection parameterization (CP) produces even better intensity evolution and near-eye winds than the control run with CP.

  4. The magnetic field and wind confinement of β Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Wade, G. A.; Babel, J.; Henrichs, H. f.; de Jong, J. A.; Harries, T. J.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we use the very recent spectropolarimetric observations of β Cep collected by Henrichs et al. and propose for this star a consistent model of the large-scale magnetic field and of the associated magnetically confined wind and circumstellar environment. A re-examination of the fundamental parameters of β Cep in the light of the Hipparcos parallax indicates that this star is most likely a 12-Msolar star with a radius of 7Rsolar, effective temperature of 26000K and age of 12Myr, viewed with an inclination of the rotation axis of about 60°. Using two different modelling strategies, we obtain that the magnetic field of β Cep can be approximately described as a dipole with a polar strength of 360± 30 G, the axis of symmetry of which is tilted with respect to the rotation axis by about 85°±10°. Although one of the weakest detected to date, this magnetic field is strong enough to magnetically confine the wind of β Cep up to a distance of about 8 to 9R*. We find that both the X-ray luminosity and variability of β Cep can be explained within the framework of the magnetically confined wind-shock model of Babel & Montmerle, in which the stellar-wind streams from both magnetic hemispheres collide with each other in the magnetic equatorial plane, producing a strong shock, an extended post-shock region and a high-density cooling disc. By studying the stability of the cooling disc, we obtain that field lines can support the increasing disc weight for no more than a month before they become significantly elongated in an effort to equilibrate the gravitational plus centrifugal force, thereby generating strong field gradients across the disc. The associated current sheet eventually tears, forcing the field to reconnect through resistive diffusion and the disc plasma to collapse towards the star. We propose that this collapse is the cause for the recurrent Be episodes of β Cep, and finally discuss the applicability of this model to He peculiar, classical Be

  5. Extracting full-field dynamic strain response of a rotating wind turbine using photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Health monitoring of wind turbines is typically performed using conventional sensors (e.g. strain-gages and accelerometers) that are usually mounted to the nacelle or gearbox. Although many wind turbines stop operating due to blade failures, there are typically few to no sensor mounted on the blades. Placing sensors on the rotating parts of the structure is a challenge due to the wiring and data transmission constraints. Within the current work, an approach to monitor full-field dynamic response of rotating structures (e.g. wind turbine blades or helicopter rotors) is developed and experimentally verified. A wind turbine rotor was used as the test structure and was mounted to a block and horizontally placed on the ground. A pair of bearings connected to the rotor shaft allowed the turbine to freely spin along the shaft. Several optical targets were mounted to the blades and a pair of high-speed cameras was used to monitor the dynamics of the spinning turbine. Displacements of the targets during rotation were measured using three-dimensional point tracking. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible deformation of the blades at target locations. While the structure is rotating, only flap displacements of optical targets (displacements out of the rotation plane) were used in strain prediction process. The measured displacements were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the turbine to extract full-field dynamic strain on the structure. The proposed approach enabled the prediction of dynamic response on the outer surface as well as within the inner points of the structure where no other sensor could be easily mounted. In order to validate the proposed approach, the predicted strain was compared to strain measured at four locations on the spinning blades using a wireless strain-gage system.

  6. First ever cross comparison of thermospheric wind measured by narrow- and wide-field optical Doppler spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Meriwether, J.; Conde, M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first ever cross comparisons of F region horizontal neutral wind measurements taken using two different types of optical Doppler spectrometer: all-sky scanning Doppler imagers (SDI) and narrow-field Fabry-Perot interferometers (NFPIs). Horizontal neutral winds were inferred using bistatic observations from three NFPIs, together with monostatic and bistatic observations from two SDIs. All instruments were located in Alaska. Cross comparisons were made for a total of seven nights in January and February 2010. The results show a high degree of correlation between the diurnal behaviors of the line-of-sight (LOS) winds measured by both instruments. The SDI and NFPI LOS wind time series also often contained high-frequency fluctuations with similar overall characteristics, strongly suggesting that these fluctuations were geophysical in origin. However, the amplitude of the high-frequency component was stronger in the NFPI LOS wind than in the SDI data. Even the smallest SDI angular resolution element is much larger than the NFPI field of view, suggesting that its relative insensitivity to high frequencies is because these fluctuations are associated with local-scale structures whose spatial extent is smaller than ˜40 km spanned by the smallest SDI viewing field. Upon fitting vectors to the LOS wind data, close agreement was found between the wind components estimated by the two types of instrument. Discrepancies that did arise occurred most often when the neutral wind speed was weak, suggesting that conditions capable of driving higher neutral wind speeds also suppressed the development of small-scale structures in the thermospheric neutral wind fields.

  7. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  8. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  9. Could a change in magnetic field geometry cause the break in the wind-activity relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Jardine, M.; See, V.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; Boro Saikia, S.; Hébrard, E.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Wood et al. suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux (dot{M}∝ F_x^{1.34}) for dwarf stars with Fx ≲ Fx,6 ≡ 106 erg cm-2 s-1. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at Fx,6 could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al. sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the dot{M} - Fx relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at Fx,6. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exist for stars with Fx ≳ Fx,6. This strengthens the importance of multi-epoch ZDI observations. Finally, we show that there is a correlation between Fx and magnetic energy, which implies that dot{M} - magnetic energy relation has the same qualitative behaviour as the original dot{M} - Fx relation. No break is seen in any of the Fx - magnetic energy relations.

  10. 3-D MHD Model of the Solar Wind-Interplanetary Space Combining System 1:Variation of Solar Wind Speed Associated with the Photospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-12-01

    Existing global models of the solar-wind/IMF expanding to the Earth's orbit are basically grounded in the idea of "source surface." It is widely accepted that the sector structure and the solar wind speed are primarily controlled by the magnetic field at the source surface and the so-called "expansion factor." On the other hand, 3-D MHD model is still off from practical use because both of scientific and technical problems. One of the former problems is the reproduction of supersonic solar-wind. From the viewpoint of the physics of the solar wind, coronal heating and outward acceleration mechanisms are invoked to explain the supersonic evolution of the solar wind. Since the mechanism responsible for the heating/acceleration is still one of the primary subjects of the physics of the solar wind, many MHD models have taken into account their effects by incorporating additional source terms corresponding to promising candidates such as thermal conductions, radiation losses and wave pressures. However there are few MHD models considering the effect of the expansion factor, which determines the solar-wind speed in the series of source surface models. In this study we newly incorporate the flux tube expansion rate into the MHD equation system including heat source function in the energy equation. Appling the unstructured grid system, we achieved the dense grid spacing at the inner boundary, which enable us to adopt realistic solar magnetic fields, and a size of simulation space of 1AU. Photospheric magnetic field data is used as the inner boundary condition.The simulation results are summarized as: (1) The variation of solar wind speed is well controlled by the structure of magnetic fields at and little above the solar surface and (2) Far above the solar surface, the interface between high and low speed flows evolves to a structure suggestive of CIRs. Comparing the data from simulation with the actual solar wind data obtained by spacecrafts, we will discuss the future

  11. Joint analysis of the wind and wave-field variability in the Indian Ocean area for 1998-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogarskii, F.; Polnikov, V.; Sannasiraj, S. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of the wind and wave fields in the Indian Ocean (IO) for the period of 1998-2009 was performed based on using the wind fields taken from the site of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NCEP/NOAA) [1] and on the numerical wind-wave model WAM [2] modified with the source function proposed in [3]. The primary analysis of the fields includes mapping the wind and wave fields, as well as their energy fields, calculated with different scales of space-time averaging; the subsequent zoning of the IO area; and assessing the seasonal interannual variability of all the fields and their 12-years trends. Further analysis is carried out taking into account the zoning. This analysis includes a construction of the time series obtained with different scales of space-time averaging for all the fields, a spectral analysis of these series, finding and analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution of extrema of the wind and wave fields (accounting for the their sharing in the zones), and making histograms of the wind and wave fields and calculating their first four statistical moments (in the zones and in the ocean as a whole). The results allow us to evaluate a large set of statistical characteristics of the wind and wave fields in the IO area, scales of their variability, their long-term trends, and the features of distribution for these statistical characteristics in the ocean area as well.

  12. Experience of Hurricane Katrina and Reported Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harville, Emily W.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Tesfai, Helen; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been associated with stress, but few studies have examined the effect of natural disaster on IPV. In this study, the authors examine the relationship between experience of Hurricane Katrina and reported relationship aggression and violence in a cohort of 123 postpartum women. Hurricane experience is measured…

  13. Community College Re-Enrollment after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Sarah R.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored predictors of community college re-enrollment after Hurricane Katrina among a sample of low-income women (N = 221). It was predicted that participants' pre-hurricane educational optimism would predict community college re-enrollment a year after the hurricane. The influence of various demographic and additional resources…

  14. Resilience of Professional Counselors Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Simone F.; Lawson, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors who provided services to those affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita completed the K6+ (screen for severe mental illness), the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, and the Professional Quality of Life Scale. Results indicated that participants who survived the hurricanes had higher levels of posttraumatic growth than…

  15. Stress and Support in Family Relationships after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Megan; Reczek, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors merge the study of support, strain, and ambivalence in family relationships with the study of stress to explore the ways family members provide support or contribute to strain in the disaster recovery process. The authors analyze interviews with 71 displaced Hurricane Katrina survivors, and identify three family…

  16. Wading in the waters: spirituality and older black Katrina survivors.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Erma Jean; Thomas, Cecelia

    2007-05-01

    Hurricane Katrina has drawn increased interest in coping strategies, spirituality, and mental health among low-income Blacks. Given the paucity of information available regarding the role of spirituality in surviving Hurricane Katrina, this qualitative study explores active coping strategies of older Blacks. Older respondents who were evacuated to a Texas retirement apartment complex participated in a series of three in-depth interviews (starting approximately three weeks after their arrival in the host state and continuing weekly). Without exception, the findings indicate that this population coped with Katrina and its aftermath through reliance on a Higher Power. The relationship to a Higher Power did not necessarily translate into church membership. The conclusions of the respondents' spiritual coping mechanisms revealed the following themes: 1) regular communication with a supernatural power; 2) miracles of faith through this source of guidance and protection; 3) daily reading of the Bible and various spiritual and devotional materials; and 4) helping others as a consequence of faith and devotion to a supreme being. This study indicates that spirituality promotes emotional resilience in the aftermath of traumatic events such as Hurricane Katrina. These findings also point to the need for researchers to reconsider expressions of spirituality based solely on church membership/attendance and prayer, and to consider redefining spiritual coping as a form of cultural capital.

  17. Coping with a Man-Made Crisis: Lessons from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowen, Scott S.

    2009-01-01

    In the fall of 2005, Tulane University responded to Katrina's devastation by undertaking a significant re-envisioning of the university's mission and strategy. Tulane needed to survive financially without sacrificing the core academic strengths that have drawn so many students to them: a holistic undergraduate experience that leverages the…

  18. SIMULATING LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUTFLOW AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hurricane Katrina was the direct cause of the flooding of New Orleans in September 2005. Between its passage and the pumping of flood waters back into Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, the flood waters acquired considerable amounts of contaminants, notably silver, but...

  19. Children Displaced by Hurricane Katrina: A Focus Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J. Brian; Wyche, Karen Fraser; Van Horn, Richard L.; Reyes, Gilbert; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; North, Carol S.

    2008-01-01

    Focus groups were conducted with 23 children and adolescents, aged 9 to 17 years, who relocated from Louisiana to Texas following Hurricane Katrina to explore their disaster, evacuation, and resettlement experiences. The resilience described by some was remarkable and, despite evidence of cultural disparity and stigma, many identified positive…

  20. New Orleans Colleges Slog toward Recovery from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-eight months after Hurricane Katrina forced the closures of more than a half-dozen New Orleans colleges and universities, many of them are still struggling to regain their enrollments and restore buildings damaged by floodwater and mold. Over all, college enrollment in New Orleans increased slightly in the fall of 2007, reaching 74 percent…

  1. Change in Chaos: Seven Lessons Learned from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Chellman, Alison A.; Beabout, Brian; Alkandari, Khaled A.; Almeida, Luis C.; Gursoy, Husra T.; Ma, Ziyan; Modak, Rucha S.; Pastore, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses seven lessons learned from Katrina, suggesting that after chaos: (1) there is hope; (2) there is a strong atmosphere of indeterminacy; (3) things tend to break apart and reform in somewhat similar ways but with different values; (4) there is a desire for organization, leadership, and familiarity; (5) there is a sense of…

  2. Increase in West Nile neuroinvasive disease after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Caillouët, Kevin A; Michaels, Sarah R; Xiong, Xu; Foppa, Ivo; Wesson, Dawn M

    2008-05-01

    After Hurricane Katrina, the number of reported cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) sharply increased in the hurricane-affected regions of Louisiana and Mississippi. In 2006, a >2-fold increase in WNND incidence was observed in the hurricane-affected areas than in previous years.

  3. Increase in West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Sarah R.; Xiong, Xu; Foppa, Ivo; Wesson, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    After Hurricane Katrina, the number of reported cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) sharply increased in the hurricane-affected regions of Louisiana and Mississippi. In 2006, a >2-fold increase in WNND incidence was observed in the hurricane-affected areas than in previous years. PMID:18439367

  4. Telling Katrina Stories: Problems and Opportunities in Engaging Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Michael S.; Bowman, Ruth Laurion

    2010-01-01

    As the fifth anniversary of life-changing events like Hurricanes Katrina and Rita approaches, the authors talk about the problems those who reside at the site of the disaster face in keeping those events alive in public memory and in making them an ongoing issue for deliberation in the public sphere. In short, then, the authors address the…

  5. Corona discharges in asymmetric electric fields and its impact on ionic wind generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirumala, Rakshit

    configurations that induce asymmetric electric fields in the discharge space. Multiple collector configurations are a particular subset of these and are studied in more detail to characterize their fundamental behavior and to understand the differences from traditional discharges involving a single collecting electrode. The configurations are shown to present characteristics that are suitable for mitigating some of the problems encountered in device miniaturization. The three-electrode configurations are shown to reduce the onset potentials for device operation, increase the total current production, and present a favorable redistribution of current to the various collectors. Traditional corona modeling procedures are demonstrated to have significant shortcomings in asymmetric configurations and an alternative modeling procedure is developed for application in these conditions. The multi-electrode configurations were adapted to the development of an ionic wind blower. In a laboratory setup, these configurations are shown to improve flow rates by a factor of ˜3x and reduce power consumption by up to 0.5x. A prototype fabricated within the constraints imposed by handheld electronic systems on size and operating potential is described. The performance of the prototype-installed system is compared to the baseline system for flow and acoustic characteristics and is shown to be comparable in terms of the flow rates generated and significantly better in the acoustic signature levels. The technology presented in this dissertation has been patented [1].

  6. An analysis of the Ross Ice Shelf low-level wind field using surface observations and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, Mark William

    A dominant feature of the Ross Ice Shelf region wind field is the Ross Ice Shelf air stream (RAS). The RAS is a northward moving air stream in the lower atmosphere over the Ross Ice Shelf. The RAS is comprised of katabatic winds, barrier winds, and winds associated with the passage of cyclone and mesocyclones. An analysis of the surface wind field is done using automatic weather station (AWS) observations by dividing the wind field into dominant wind regimes. The dominant wind regimes are classified by identifying patterns in the wind speed and wind direction from AWS across the Ross Ice Shelf region. The results indicate that previous studies on the Ross Ice Shelf surface wind field, focusing on katabatic winds and barrier winds, represent less than half of the observed winds. An analysis of the presence and location of low-level jets (LLJs) across the Ross Ice Shelf region is presented based on the analysis of the archived real-time numerical weather prediction output. The method of self-organizing maps (SOMs) is used to objectively identify different patterns in column-averaged wind speed as an identifier to the location of LLJs. The results indicate three LLJs in the region. The largest and most dominant LLJ is along the Transantarctic Mountains by the Siple Coast and the southern end of the Ross Ice Shelf. The second LLJ extends from the base of Byrd Glacier and curves to the north passing by the eastern extremes of Ross Island. The third LLJ extends from the base of Reeves Glacier and curves to the north across the western Ross Sea. The low-level wind field is investigated to provide more insight into the RAS through the use of SOMs. Four generalized patterns are found in the low-level wind field. The patterns are associated with a weak synoptic environment, a Ross Sea cyclone, a Cape Colbeck cyclone, and an elongated cyclone near Cape Adare. A temporal sequence in the low-level wind field is presented based on an analysis of transitions in the low-level wind

  7. Remote Sensing Data in Wind Velocity Field Modelling: a Case Study from the Sudetes (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancewicz, Kacper

    2014-06-01

    The phenomena of wind-field deformation above complex (mountainous) terrain is a popular subject of research related to numerical modelling using GIS techniques. This type of modelling requires, as input data, information on terrain roughness and a digital terrain/elevation model. This information may be provided by remote sensing data. Consequently, its accuracy and spatial resolution may affect the results of modelling. This paper represents an attempt to conduct wind-field modelling in the area of the Śnieżnik Massif (Eastern Sudetes). The modelling process was conducted in WindStation 2.0.10 software (using the computable fluid dynamics solver Canyon). Two different elevation models were used: the Global Land Survey Digital Elevation Model (GLS DEM) and Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Level 2. The terrain roughness raster was generated on the basis of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC 2006) data. The output data were post-processed in ArcInfo 9.3.1 software to achieve a high-quality cartographic presentation. Experimental modelling was conducted for situations from 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012, and 26 May 2012, based on a limited number of field measurements and using parameters of the atmosphere boundary layer derived from the aerological surveys provided by the closest meteorological stations. The model was run in a 100-m and 250-m spatial resolution. In order to verify the model's performance, leave-one-out cross-validation was used. The calculated indices allowed for a comparison with results of former studies pertaining to WindStation's performance. The experiment demonstrated very subtle differences between results in using DTED or GLS DEM elevation data. Additionally, CLC 2006 roughness data provided more noticeable improvements in the model's performance, but only in the resolution corresponding to the original roughness data. The best input data configuration resulted in the following mean values of error measure: root mean squared error of velocity

  8. Forest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane wind-field distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Hodgson, M.E.; Sapkota, S.K.; Nelson, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    An empirical model was used to relate forest type and hurricane-impact distribution with wind speed and duration to explain the variation of hurricane damage among forest types along the Atchafalaya River basin of coastal Louisiana. Forest-type distribution was derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper image data, hurricane-impact distribution from a suite of transformed advanced very high resolution radiometer images, and wind speed and duration from a wind-field model. The empirical model explained 73%, 84%, and 87% of the impact variances for open, hardwood, and cypress-tupelo forests, respectively. These results showed that the estimated impact for each forest type was highly related to the duration and speed of extreme winds associated with Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The wind-field model projected that the highest wind speeds were in the southern basin, dominated by cypress-tupelo and open forests, while lower wind speeds were in the northern basin, dominated by hardwood forests. This evidence could explain why, on average, the impact to cypress-tupelos was more severe than to hardwoods, even though cypress-tupelos are less susceptible to wind damage. Further, examination of the relative importance of wind speed in explaining the impact severity to each forest type showed that the impact to hardwood forests was mainly related to tropical-depression to tropical-storm force wind speeds. Impacts to cypress-tupelo and open forests (a mixture of willows and cypress-tupelo) were broadly related to tropical-storm force wind speeds and by wind speeds near and somewhat in excess of hurricane force. Decoupling the importance of duration from speed in explaining the impact severity to the forests could not be fully realized. Most evidence, however, hinted that impact severity was positively related to higher durations at critical wind speeds. Wind-speed intervals, which were important in explaining the impact severity on hardwoods, showed that higher durations, but not the

  9. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  10. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  11. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  12. Magnetic Field and Wind of Kappa Ceti: Toward the Planetary Habitability of the Young Sun When Life Arose on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Vidotto, A. A.; Petit, P.; Folsom, C.; Castro, M.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Meibom, S.; Jeffers, S. V.; Guinan, E.; Ribas, I.

    2016-03-01

    We report magnetic field measurements for κ1 Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth. We carry out an analysis of the magnetic properties determined from spectropolarimetric observations and reconstruct the large-scale surface magnetic field to derive the magnetic environment, stellar winds, and particle flux permeating the interplanetary medium around {κ }1 Cet. Our results show a closer magnetosphere and mass-loss rate of \\dot{M}=9.7× {10}-13 {M}⊙ \\quad {{{yr}}}-1, i.e., a factor of 50 times larger than the current solar wind mass-loss rate, resulting in a larger interaction via space weather disturbances between the stellar wind and a hypothetical young-Earth analogue, potentially affecting the planet’s habitability. Interaction of the wind from the young Sun with the planetary ancient magnetic field may have affected the young Earth and its life conditions.

  13. A wind tunnel for measuring selenium volatilization under field-like conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dungan, R.S.; Stork, A.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.

    2000-04-01

    A wind tunnel was developed to measure the loss of volatile selenium (Se) from soil under field-like conditions. The wind tunnel consisted of a volatilization chamber made of Plexiglas (2.4 m long x 0.8 m wide x 1.2 m high), which was set above a stainless steel lysimeter (0.5 m{sup 2} surface area x 0.8 m deep). High air exchange rates (avg. 700 air changes h{sup {minus}1}) were used to simulate field-like environmental conditions inside the wind tunnel. To monitor the fate and transport of the Se, radiolabeled {sup 75}Se as sodium selenite (Na{sub 2}{sup 75}SeO{sub 3}) was incorporated into the top 5 cm of soil. Volatile Se was trapped on activated carbon filters and measured directly using gamma counting. A 135-d bare-soil experiment was carried out, during which 2.7% of the Se was released through volatilization without added C. The average flux rate of gaseous Se was 17 mg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}, with a high of 72 mg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} occurring on Day 6. After 135 d, 59 and 43% of the {sup 75}Se was located in the 0 to 5 and 5 to 10 cm soil layers, respectively. A total of 84.5% of all applied {sup 75}Se was recovered. The purpose of this study was to improve estimates on Se volatilization from seleniferous soils and help close the gap between previous laboratory and field experiments.

  14. Modulation of urban atmospheric electric field measurements with the wind direction in Lisbon (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Matthews, J. C.; Conceição, R.; Wright, M. D.; Pereira, S. N.; Reis, A. H.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric electric field measurements (potential gradient, PG) were retrieved in the urban environment of the city of Lisbon (Portugal). The measurements were performed with a Benndorf electrograph at the Portela Meteorological station in the suburbs of the city (NE from the centre). The period of 1980 to 1990 is considered here. According to wind direction, different content and types of ions and aerosols arrive at the measurement site causing significant variations to the PG. To the south there are significant pollution sources while to the north such sources are scarcer. The Iberian Peninsula is found east of the station and the Atlantic Ocean covers the western sector, Wind directions are divided in four sectors: i) NW: 270° ≤ θ ≤ 360° ii) NE: 0 ≤ θ ≤ 90° iii) SE: 90 ≤ θ ≤ 180° iv) SW: 180° ≤ θ ≤ 270°. Analysis of weekly cycle, caused by anthropogenic pollution related with urban activity, was undertaken for each wind sector. NW sector has been shown to be less affected by this cycle, which is attributed to the effect of marine air. The daily variation of NE sector for weekends reveals a similar behaviour to the Carnegie curve, which corresponds to a clean air daily variation of PG, following universal time, independent of measurement site.

  15. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  16. Spatial variances of wind fields and their relation to second-order structure functions and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelzang, Jur; King, Gregory P.; Stoffelen, Ad

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic energy variance as a function of spatial scale for wind fields is commonly estimated either using second-order structure functions (in the spatial domain) or by spectral analysis (in the frequency domain). Both techniques give an order-of-magnitude estimate. More accurate estimates are given by a statistic called spatial variance. Spatial variances have a clear interpretation and are tolerant for missing data. They can be related to second-order structure functions, both for discrete and continuous data. Spatial variances can also be Fourier transformed to yield a relation with spectra. The flexibility of spatial variances is used to study various sampling strategies, and to compare them with second-order structure functions and spectral variances. It is shown that the spectral sampling strategy is not seriously biased to calm conditions for scatterometer ocean surface vector winds. When the second-order structure function behaves like rp, its ratio with the spatial variance equals >(p+1>)>(p+2>). Ocean surface winds in the tropics have p between 2/3 and 1, so one-sixth to one-fifth of the second-order structure function value is a good proxy for the cumulative variance.

  17. Plasma wave electric fields in the solar wind - Initial results from Helios 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma-wave measurements by Helios 1 show that the electric-field intensities in the solar wind are usually very low, much lower than those for comparable measurements near earth, where particles moving upstream from the bow shock often cause large disturbances in the solar wind. The most commonly occurring plasma wave detected by Helios is a sporadic emission at frequencies from about 1 to 10 kHz, between the electron and ion plasma frequencies. These waves are thought to be ion acoustic waves Doppler-shifted upward in frequency from below the ion plasma frequency. The maximum electric-field intensity of these waves is a few hundred microvolts per meter. At higher frequencies, from about 20 to 100 kHz, electron plasma oscillations are detected at frequencies near the local electron plasma frequency. These electron plasma oscillations are more intense, with field strengths sometimes as large as a few millivolts per meter, but occur very infrequently. Both the ion acoustic waves and the electron plasma oscillations show a tendency to occur at higher frequencies closer to the sun but no pronounced variation in intensity with radial distance from the sun. In four cases, electron plasma oscillations have been found in association with type III radio bursts.

  18. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  19. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  20. Basin-Scale Wind Transport during the MILAGRO Field Campaign and Comparison to Climatology Using Cluster Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    de Foy, B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Paech, S. J.; Phillips, D.; Walters, J. T.; Coulter, Richard L.; Martin, Tim J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.; Kastendeuch, P. P.; Marley, Nancy A.; Retama, A.; Molina, Luisa T.

    2008-03-03

    The MILAGRO field campaign was a multi-agency international collaborative project to evaluate the regional impacts of the Mexico City air pollution plume as a means of understanding urban impacts on the global climate. Mexico City lies on an elevated plateau with mountains on three sides and has complex mountain and surface-driven wind flows. This paper asks what the wind transport was in the basin during the field campaign and how representative it was of the climatology. Surface meteorology and air quality data, radiosoundings and radar wind profiler data were collected at sites in the basin and its vicinity. Cluster analysis is used to identify the dominant wind patterns both during the campaign and within the past 10 years of operational data from the warm dry season. Our analysis shows that March 2006 was representative of typical flow patterns experienced in the basin. Six episode types were identified for the basin scale circulation providing a way of interpreting atmospheric chemistry and particulate data collected during the campaign. Decoupling between surface winds and those aloft had a strong influence in leading to convection and poor air quality episodes. Hourly characterisation of wind circulation during the MILAGRO, MCMA-2003 and IMADA field campaigns will enable the comparisons of similar air pollution episodes and the evaluation of the impact of wind transport on measurements of the atmospheric chemistry taking place in the basin.

  1. Engaging non-Majors: Teaching From the Eye of Hurricane Katrina and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, S. E.

    2007-12-01

    Engaging non-majors to become interested in the geosciences college courses they take for a science requirement represents a challenge. These courses are most likely the only exposure they will ever have to a formal earth science curriculum. Experience shows a general lack of motivation and the need to find effective teaching methods to raise their interest. In the beginning of the fall 2005 semester, I participated in a research project to measure water vapor contents on the ground of the eye of hurricane Katrina in Slidell, Louisiana. Sharing this experience with my physical and environmental geology students made a significant difference (25 percentage final grade improvement) on their interest and course performance over previous semesters. Class presentations with data collected in Katrina contributed to build a general trust in the instructor and in the way, students viewed the role of geosciences in the mitigation of natural hazardous processes. The use of travel blogs and internet enhanced courses allows teaching real time from almost anywhere as it was recently done from the east pacific (360 miles NW from Guam). An interactive portfolio of the faculty field experiences presented at the beginning of the semester has the potential to build student interest and their trust on the faculty experience and passion for the subject.

  2. Modeling the wind-fields of accidental releases by mesoscale forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Albritton, J.R.; Lee, R.L.; Mobley, R.L.; Pace, J.C.; Hodur, R.A.; Lion, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    Modeling atmospheric releases even during fair weather can present a sever challenge to diagnostic, observed-data-driven, models. Such schemes are often handicapped by sparse input data from meteorological surface stations and soundings. Forecasting by persistence is only acceptable for a few hours and cannot predict important changes in the diurnal cycle or from synoptic evolution. Many accident scenarios are data-sparse in space and/or time. Here we describe the potential value of limited-area, mesoscale, forecast models for real-time emergency response. Simulated wind-fields will be passed to ARAC`s operational models to produce improved forecasts of dispersion following accidents.

  3. A theoretical relation between Dst and the solar wind merging electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G.; Crooker, N.

    1974-01-01

    Using a model in which magnetic merging near the nose of the magnetosphere results in energy transfer from the solar wind by means of a tangential force on the geomagnetic tail, a linear relation between the time rate of change of Dst, representing energy transfer to the magnetosphere, and the merging electric field is developed, with the proportionality factor an explicit function of magnetospheric parameters. The linear relation is in agreement with a recent empirical result; and, using the empirical numerical coefficient, it is found that the distance from the earth to the neutral line in the tail during substorms is in the range from 10 to 30 earth radii.

  4. Field and wind tunnel comparison of four aerosol samplers using agricultural dusts.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stephen J; Nakatsu, Jason; Tillery, Marvin; Keefe, Thomas; Mehaffy, John; Thorne, Peter S; Donham, Kelley; Nonnenmann, Matthew; Golla, Vijay; O'shaughnessy, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    Occupational lung disease is a significant problem among agricultural workers exposed to organic dusts. Measurements of exposure in agricultural environments in the USA have traditionally been conducted using 37-mm closed-face cassettes (CFCs) and respirable Cyclones. Inhalable aerosol samplers offer significant improvement for dose estimation studies to reduce respiratory disease. The goals of this study were to determine correction factors between the inhalable samplers (IOM and Button) and the CFC and Cyclone for dusts sampled in livestock buildings and to determine whether these factors vary among livestock types. Determination of these correction factors will allow comparison between inhalable measurements and historical measurements. Ten sets of samples were collected in swine, chicken, turkey, and dairy facilities in both Colorado and Iowa. Pairs of each sampling device were attached to the front and back of a rotating mannequin. Laboratory studies using a still-air chamber and a wind tunnel provided information regarding the effect of wind speed on sampler performance. Overall, the IOM had the lowest coefficient of variation (best precision) and was least affected by changes in wind speed. The performance of the Button was negatively impacted in poultry environments where larger (feather) particulates clogged the holes in the initial screen. The CFC/IOM ratios are important for comparisons between newer and older studies. Wind speed and dust type were both important factors affecting ratios. Based on the field studies (Table 6), a ratio of 0.56 is suggested as a conversion factor for the CFC/IOM (average for all environments because of no statistical difference). Suggested conversion factors for the Button/IOM are swine (0.57), chicken (0.80), turkey (0.53), and dairy (0.67). Any attempt to apply a conversion factor between the Cyclone and inhalable samplers is not recommended.

  5. Field and Wind Tunnel Comparison of Four Aerosol Samplers Using Agricultural Dusts

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Stephen J.; Nakatsu, Jason; Tillery, Marvin; Keefe, Thomas; Mehaffy, John; Thorne, Peter S.; Donham, Kelley; Nonnenmann, Matthew; Golla, Vijay; O'shaughnessy, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Occupational lung disease is a significant problem among agricultural workers exposed to organic dusts. Measurements of exposure in agricultural environments in the USA have traditionally been conducted using 37-mm closed-face cassettes (CFCs) and respirable Cyclones. Inhalable aerosol samplers offer significant improvement for dose estimation studies to reduce respiratory disease. The goals of this study were to determine correction factors between the inhalable samplers (IOM and Button) and the CFC and Cyclone for dusts sampled in livestock buildings and to determine whether these factors vary among livestock types. Determination of these correction factors will allow comparison between inhalable measurements and historical measurements. Ten sets of samples were collected in swine, chicken, turkey, and dairy facilities in both Colorado and Iowa. Pairs of each sampling device were attached to the front and back of a rotating mannequin. Laboratory studies using a still-air chamber and a wind tunnel provided information regarding the effect of wind speed on sampler performance. Overall, the IOM had the lowest coefficient of variation (best precision) and was least affected by changes in wind speed. The performance of the Button was negatively impacted in poultry environments where larger (feather) particulates clogged the holes in the initial screen. The CFC/IOM ratios are important for comparisons between newer and older studies. Wind speed and dust type were both important factors affecting ratios. Based on the field studies (Table 6), a ratio of 0.56 is suggested as a conversion factor for the CFC/IOM (average for all environments because of no statistical difference). Suggested conversion factors for the Button/IOM are swine (0.57), chicken (0.80), turkey (0.53), and dairy (0.67). Any attempt to apply a conversion factor between the Cyclone and inhalable samplers is not recommended. PMID:19443852

  6. Investigation of the turbulent wind field below 500 feet altitude at the Eastern Test Range, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackadar, A. K.; Panofsky, H. A.; Fiedler, F.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of wind profiles and turbulence at the 150 m Cape Kennedy Meteorological Tower is presented. Various methods are explored for the estimation of wind profiles, wind variances, high-frequency spectra, and coherences between various levels, given roughness length and either low-level wind and temperature data, or geostrophic wind and insolation. The relationship between planetary Richardson number, insolation, and geostrophic wind is explored empirically. Techniques were devised which resulted in surface stresses reasonably well correlated with the surface stresses obtained from low-level data. Finally, practical methods are suggested for the estimation of wind profiles and wind statistics.

  7. Galactic winds and the origin of large-scale magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Sokoloff, D.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Observations of dwarf galaxies suggest the presence of large-scale magnetic fields. However the size and slow rotation of these galaxies appear insufficient to support a mean-field dynamo action to excite such fields. Aims: Here we suggest a new mechanism to explain large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies that are too small to support mean-field dynamo action. The key idea is that we do not identify large-scale and mean magnetic fields. In our scenario the magnetic structures originate from a small-scale dynamo which produces small-scale magnetic field in the galactic disc and a galactic wind that transports this field into the galactic halo where the large turbulent diffusion increases the scale and order of the field. As a result, the magnetic field becomes large-scale; however its mean value remains vanishing in a strict sense. Methods: We verify the idea by numerical modelling of two distinct simplified configurations, a thin disc model using the no-z approximation, and an axisymmetric model using cylindrical r,z coordinates. Results: Each of these allows reduction of the problem to two spatial dimensions. Taken together, the models support the proposition that the general trends will persist in a fully 3D model. We demonstrate that a pronounced large-scale pattern can develop in the galactic halo for a wide choice of the dynamo governing parameters. Conclusions: We believe that our mechanism can be relevant to explaining the presence of the fields observed in the halos of dwarf galaxies, and maybe elsewhere. We emphasize that detailed modelling of the proposed scenario needs 3D simulations, and adjustment to the specific dynamo governing parameters of dwarf galaxies.

  8. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  9. The electric wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind"-like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Fedorov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Nordheim, Tom A.; Mitchell, David; Moore, Thomas E.; Peterson, William K.; Winningham, John D.; Zhang, Tielong L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  10. The Electric Wind of Venus: A Global and Persistent Polar Wind -Like Ambipolar Electric Field Sufficient for the Direct Escape of Heavy Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Federov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Moore, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an ambipolar electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earths similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an electric wind must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  11. Uncertainty contribution of a wind turbine to the electric field of a DVOR antenna as a function of wind direction and rotor position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Sergei; Garbe, Heyno

    2016-09-01

    The presence of a wind turbine (WT) has the potential to distort electromagnetic fields emitted by terrestrial radio navigation aids. In this paper especially the field distortion of a Doppler Very High Frequency Omnidirectional Radio Range (DVOR) surveillance navigation system is investigated as a function of wind direction and rotor position. Therefor, the field distribution of a DVOR is simulated in the surrounding of a WT for 104 combinations of the angles of wind direction and rotor position. Furthermore, these calculations are executed for two different rotor diameters and 10 steps of distance between DVOR and WT in the range of 10 km. Based on the calculated data a method to estimate the maximum field distortion is developed. It is shown that the presented method allows to approximate the worst case field distortion with the results of two general simulation setups. Eliminating the need of simulating all possible geometric constellations of the WT this method hereby offers the benefit of significantly reduced simulation effort.

  12. Research on solar-wind and magnetospheric electric fields and plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts were made to determine the role of the interplanetary magnetic field in controlling: (1) particle acceleration processes in the earth's polar cap; (2) plasma convection patterns at high latitudes; and, (3) the topology of magnetic field lines in the earth's polar cusps. The primary result of the study on polar-cap particle acceleration regions was that they tend to occur in only one polar cap at a time, and that they occur in the hemisphere for which the magnetospheric tail-lobe field lines have solar-magnetospheric x components that are antiparallel to those of the interplanetary and tail-lobe magnetic field. Southward-directed interplanetary magnetic fields give rise to broad convection throats which cover several hours of local time across the dayside cleft. Under such conditions, solar-wind plasma is channeled efficiently through the polar cusps to populate the plasma mantle and dayside boundary layer. On the other hand, the appearance of strong northward components in the interplanetary magnetic field result in a very constricted throat, resulting in inefficient plasma entry at the cusps by diffusion processes.

  13. Interplanetary Field Enhancements: The Interaction between Solar Wind and Interplanetary Dusty Plasma Released by Interplanetary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are unique large-scale structures in the solar wind. During IFEs, the magnetic-field strength is significantly enhanced with little perturbation in the solar-wind plasma. Early studies showed that IFEs move at nearly the solar-wind speed and some IFEs detected at 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are associated with material co-orbiting with asteroid Oljato. To explain the observed IFE features, we develop and test an IFE formation hypothesis: IFEs result from interactions between the solar wind and clouds of nanoscale charged dust particles released in interplanetary collisions. This hypothesis predicts that the magnetic field drapes and the solar wind slows down in the upstream. Meanwhile the observed IFE occurrence rate should be comparable with the detectable interplanetary collision rate. Based on this hypothesis, we can use the IFE occurrence to determine the spatial distribution and temporal variation of interplanetary objects which produce IFEs. To test the hypothesis, we perform a systematic survey of IFEs in the magnetic-field data from many spacecraft. Our datasets cover from 1970s to present and from inner than 0.3AU to outer than 5 AU. In total, more than 470 IFEs are identified and their occurrences show clustering features in both space and time. We use multi-spacecraft simultaneous observations to reconstruct the magnetic-field geometry and find that the magnetic field drapes in the upstream region. The results of a superposed epoch study show that the solar wind slows down in the upstream and there is a plasma depletion region near the IFE centers. In addition, the solar-wind slowdown and plasma depletion feature are more significant in larger IFEs. The mass contained in IFEs can be estimated by balancing the solar-wind pressure force exerted on the IFEs against the solar gravity. The solar-wind slowdown resultant from the estimated mass is consistent with the result in superposed epoch study. The

  14. Field Test Results from a 10 kW Wind Turbine with Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas; Bychkova, Veronika; Taylor, Keith; Clingman, Dan; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control devices including synthetic jets and dynamic vortex generators were tested on a 10 kW wind turbine at RPI. Previous work has shown that load oscillations caused by dynamic stall could be modified through the use of active flow control by injecting momentum into the flow field near the leading edge of a dynamically pitching model. In this study, this work has been extended to its logical conclusion, field-testing active flow control on a real wind turbine. The blades in the current study have a 0.28m chord and 3.05m span, no twist or taper, and were retrofitted with six synthetic jets on one blade and ten dynamic vortex generators on a second blade. The third blade of this turbine was not modified, in order to serve as a control. Strain gauges were installed on each blade to measure blades' deflection. A simple closed loop control was demonstrated and preliminary results indicate reduced vibrational amplitude. Future testing will be conducted on a larger scale, 600kW machine at NREL, incorporating information collected during this study.

  15. Wind tunnel behavioural response and field trapping of the blowfly Calliphora vicina.

    PubMed

    Aak, A; Knudsen, G K; Soleng, A

    2010-09-01

    The attraction of the blowfly Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to single synthetic compounds, blends and authentic odours was investigated in a wind tunnel. A total of 1850 C. vicina (1750 females and 100 males) were tested. A comparison of male and female responses showed significant differences in attraction between the sexes. Females were more attracted than males to liver odour. The attraction of females lay in the ranges of 0-22% for single compounds, 26-64% for synthetic blends and 58-88% for authentic odours. Dimethyl trisulphide was the most attractive single compound. Significant improvement in attraction was achieved with blends and a three-component lure, consisting of dimethyl trisulphide, mercaptoethanol and o-cresol, was found to be the best solution for field trapping of C. vicina. Authentic odours from dead fish and mice were significantly more attractive than liver and the three-component blend, and the blend and liver were similarly effective as attractants. Field tests support the results of the wind tunnel study and a high number of C. vicina were caught in funnel traps. Overall, 99.1% of the specimens caught were females.

  16. A field application experience of integrating hydrogen technology with wind power in a remote island location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazey, R.; Salman, S. K.; Aklil-D'Halluin, D. D.

    This paper aims to share the field application experience related to the development of an innovative stand-alone sustainable energy system known as the PURE project. The PURE project has been developed alongside a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) scheme, which is supported by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and executed by siGEN in collaboration with The Robert Gordon University. The system has been constructed within an industrial estate on the island of Unst in Shetland, 200 miles north of the Scottish mainland. The energy system now supplies five business properties with clean reliable power and utilises wind turbine and hydrogen technology to provide a sustainable energy source. The stored hydrogen gas generated by the system is used as an energy source for periods when electrical demand within the business properties exceeds wind turbine production. The hydrogen is also utilised as a fuel source for transportation and as a transportable energy source for mobile power generation. The paper therefore gives a detailed description of the PURE project and discusses the field experience accumulated during the development and installation of the system. It also shares a number of practical issues that had to be overcome during its integration and operation. The installation of the PURE project has resulted in a number of unexpected conclusions being identified and marks a significant step forward in the accessible deployment of this technology for community use.

  17. Magnetic fields in Supernova Remnants and Pulsar-Wind Nebulae: Deductions from X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic field strengths B in synchrotron sources are notoriously difficult to measure. Simple arguments such as equipartition of energy can give values for which the total energy is a minimum, but there is no guarantee that Nature obeys it, or even if so, what particle population (just electrons? electrons plus ions?) should have an energy density comparable to that in magnetic field. However, the operation of synchrotron losses can provide additional information, if those losses are manifested in the synchrotron spectra as steepenings of the spectral-energy distribution above some characteristic frequency often called a "break" (though it is more typically a gradual curvature). A source of known age, if it has been accelerating particles continuously, will have such a break above the energy at which particle radiative lifetimes equal the source age, and this can give B. However, in spatially resolved sources such as supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe), systematic advection of particles, if at a known rate, gives a second measure of particle age to compare with radiative lifetimes. In most young SNRs, synchrotron X-rays make a contribution to the X-ray spectrum, and are usually found in thin rims at the remnant edges. If the rims are thin in the radial direction due to electron energy losses, a magnetic-field strength can be estimated. I present recent modeling of this process, along with models in which rims are thin due to decay of magnetic turbulence, and apply them to the remnants of SN 1006 and Tycho. In PWNe, outflows of relativistic plasma behind the pulsar wind termination shock are likely quite inhomogeneous, so magnetic-field estimates based on source lifetimes and assuming spatial uniformity can give misleading values for B. I shall discuss inhomogeneous PWN models and the effects they can have on B estimates.

  18. Compact, Engineered 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  19. Wind as an abiotic factor of Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) flight take-off activity under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, G; Mccarthy, P C; MacKinley, P D

    2010-10-01

    The flight take-off activity of Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), was significantly higher at a landscape-protected than at semiexposed and exposed sites in a 2-yr field study. In both years, mean daylight temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity were generally similar at all sites, but wind speed was lower at the protected site than at the exposed sites. Results suggest that wind was the limiting abiotic factor for flight take-off at the exposed site. Caged beetles exposed to constant wind speeds of 3.4, 4.7, and 7.0 m/s showed a significant corresponding decrease in number of flight take-off. There was no cumulative effect of wind exposure on the readiness of the beetles to fly, suggesting that wind acts as a physical barrier to flight take-off. It should be possible to reduce Colorado potato beetle flight dispersal by selecting fields most exposed to wind over landscape-protected fields when rotating potato, Solanum tuberosum L., crops.

  20. Accounting for vegetation height and wind direction to correct eddy covariance measurements of energy fluxes over hilly crop fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna-Chebbi, Rim; Prévot, Laurent; Jacob, Frédéric; Voltz, Marc

    2015-05-01

    As agricultural hilly watersheds are widespread throughout the world, there is a strong need for reliable estimates of land surface fluxes, especially evapotranspiration, over crop fields on hilly slopes. In order to obtain reliable estimates from eddy covariance (EC) measurements in such conditions, the current study aimed at proposing adequate planar fit tilt corrections that account for the combined effects of topography, wind direction, and vegetation height on airflow inclinations. EC measurements were collected within an agricultural hilly watershed in northeastern Tunisia, throughout the growth cycles of cereals, legumes, and pasture. The wind had two dominant directions that induced upslope and downslope winds. For upslope winds, the airflows were parallel to the slopes and slightly came closer to the horizontal plane when vegetation grew. For downslope winds, over fields located in the lee of the rim top, the airflows were almost horizontal over bare soil and came closer to the topographical slope when vegetation grew. We therefore adjusted the planar fit tilt correction on EC measurements according to vegetation height and by discriminating between upslope and downslope winds. This adjusted tilt correction improved the energy balance closure in most cases, and the obtained energy balance closures were similar to that reported in the literature for flat conditions. We conclude that EC data collected within crop fields on hilly slopes can be used for monitoring land surface fluxes, provided planar fit tilt corrections are applied in an appropriate manner.

  1. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Extensive field measurements of wind waves in deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, have been analyzed to describe the spatial structure of directional wave spectra during hurricane conditions. Following Esquivel-Trava et al. (2015) this analysis was made for minor hurricanes (categories 1 and 2) and major hurricanes (categories 3, 4 and 5). In both cases the directionality of the energy wave spectrum is similar in all quadrants. Some differences are observed however, and they are associated with the presence and the shape of swell energy in each quadrant. Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. This work has been supported by CONACYT scholarship 164510 and projects RugDisMar (155793), CB-2011-01-168173 and the Department of Physical Oceanography of CICESE. References Esquivel-Trava, B., Ocampo-Torres, F. J., & Osuna, P. (2015). Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes. Ocean Dynam., 65(1), 65-76. doi:10.1007/s10236-014-0791-9 Van der

  2. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  3. Penetration of Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Electric Fields to the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Almost 40 years ago Nishida showed that magnetic field fluctuations measured in the solar wind were sometimes highly correlated with magnetic fields measured near the magnetic equator. With the development of electric field measurements, tracking the chain of events from the solar wind to the inner magnetosphere is now possible. Here we present several case studies illustrating this chain. We often find almost identical waveforms for the dawn-to-dusk component of the interplanetary electric field (IEF) and the zonal component of the ionospheric field at latitudes from the auroral zone to the equator. The response is symmetric in that the inner magnetosphere responds to both IEF increases and decreases, implying that an energy storage element in the system can be traced to inductance of the ring current. Thus, when the IEF abruptly turns toward the dusk-to-dawn direction, the inner magnetospheric current system (region 2 currents) continues to flow, with a portion closing in the ionosphere. Likewise, when the IEF dawn-to-dusk component increases, region 1 currents intensify but region 2 currents cannot change immediately. Again, this imbalance is associated with currents in the inner ionosphere. To study the temporal response of this system, four years of electric field data were compared to the IEF using ACE data. The ratio of these parameters is like a transfer function (TF) between the interplanetary and ionospheric systems, which is a function of frequency. Using the average of many such TFs revealed a distinct logarithmic dependence on Kp with a 16 db difference between low and high values. The average TF is significant for periods from 30 min. to 6 hours and displays a small peak near a 1 hour period, suggesting that some capacitance exists in the system and possibly a weak resonance. The average TF indicates that about 3% of the IEF appears in the equatorial ionosphere whereas case studies indicate values as high as 10%. Case studies also show a higher

  4. Wind Profiling from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Beyon, J. Y.; Demoz, B.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled “Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-μm coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors are currently being analyzed and should be available for presentation at the Conference.

  5. Oral history and Hurricane Katrina: reflections on shouts and silences.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, many oral historians throughout the nation began to consider the role their methodology could serve in documenting the storm and its aftermath. Interviewing so soon after such a traumatic event creates new considerations for oral history as an approach to recording experience. The problems and possibilities of oral history as such a moment initiated a vibrant discussion on H-Oralhist and at professional meetings in the fall of 2005. This article reflects on many of the topics raised in that dialogue, including issues of historical distance, objectivity, reflection, and emotional trauma. The piece also offers an early review of the work of the Center for Oral History and Cultural Heritage at the University of Southern Mississippi to document the impact of Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi.

  6. Mexico City basin wind circulation during the MCMA-2003 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Caetano, E.; Magaña, V.; Zitácuaro, A.; Cárdenas, B.; Retama, A.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    MCMA-2003 was a major field campaign investigating the atmospheric chemistry of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in April of 2003. This paper describes the wind circulation patterns during the campaign both within the Mexico City basin and on the regional scale. ''Time roses'' are introduced to concisely analyze the diurnal wind patterns. Three episode types were identified that explain the conditions encountered: ''O3-South'', ''Cold Surge'' and ''O3-North''. These can be diagnosed from a combination of synoptic and basin observations based on whether the day was predominantly cloudy, or whether the O3 peak was in the north or south of the basin. O3-South days have weak synoptic forcing due to an anti-cyclone over the eastern Pacific. Strong solar heating leads to northerly flows in the basin and an evening shift due to a gap flow from the south-east. Peak ozone concentrations are in the convergence zone in the south of the city. Cold Surge days are associated with ''El Norte'' events, with strong surface northerlies bringing cold moist air and rain. Stable conditions lead to high concentrations of primary pollutants and peak ozone in the city center. O3-North days occur when the sub-tropical jet is closer to Mexico City. With strong westerlies aloft, the circulation pattern is the same as O3-South days except for a wind shift in the mid-afternoon leading to ozone peaks in the north of the city. This classification is proposed as a means of understanding pollutant transport in the Mexico City basin and as a basis for future meteorological and chemical analysis. Furthermore, model evaluation and design of policy recommendations will need to take into account the three episode types.

  7. Mexico City basin wind circulation during the MCMA-2003 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Caetano, E.; Magaña, V.; Zitácuaro, A.; Cárdenas, B.; Retama, A.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    MCMA-2003 was a major field campaign investigating the atmospheric chemistry of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in April of 2003. This paper describes the wind circulation patterns during the campaign both within the Mexico City basin and on the regional scale. ''Time roses'' are introduced to concisely analyze the diurnal wind patterns. Three episode types were identified that explain the conditions encountered: ''O3-South'', ''Cold Surge'' and ''O3-North''. These can be diagnosed from a combination of synoptic and basin observations based on whether the day was predominantly cloudy, or whether the O3 peak was in the north or south of the basin. O3-South days have weak synoptic forcing due to an anti-cyclone over the eastern Pacific. Strong solar heating leads to northerly flows in the basin and an evening shift due to a gap flow from the south-east. Peak ozone concentrations are in the convergence zone in the south of the city. Cold Surge days are associated with ''El Norte'' events, with strong surface northerlies bringing cold moist air and rain. Stable conditions lead to high concentrations of primary pollutants and peak ozone in the city center. O3-North days occur when the sub-tropical jet is closer to Mexico City. With strong westerlies aloft, the circulation pattern is the same as O3-South days except for a wind shift in the mid-afternoon leading to ozone peaks in the north of the city. This classification is proposed as a means of understanding pollutant transport in the Mexico City basin and as a basis for future meteorological and chemical analysis. Furthermore, model evaluation and design of policy recommendations will need to take into account the three episode types.

  8. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE 1/f SPECTRUM IN THE SOLAR WIND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Verdini, Andrea; Grappin, Roland; Pinto, Rui

    2012-05-10

    We present a mechanism for the formation of the low-frequency 1/f magnetic spectrum based on numerical solutions of a shell-reduced MHD model of the turbulent dynamics inside the sub-Alfvenic solar wind. We assign reasonably realistic profiles to the wind speed and the density along the radial direction, and a radial magnetic field. Alfven waves of short periodicity (600 s) are injected at the base of the chromosphere, penetrate into the corona, and are partially reflected, thus triggering a turbulent cascade. The cascade is strong for the reflected wave while it is weak for the outward propagating waves. Reflection at the transition region recycles the strong turbulent spectrum into the outward weak spectrum, which is advected beyond the Alfvenic critical point without substantial evolution. There, the magnetic field has a perpendicular power-law spectrum with slope close to the Kolmogorov -5/3. The parallel spectrum is inherited from the frequency spectrum of large (perpendicular) eddies. The shape is a double power law with slopes of {approx_equal} - 1 and -2 at low and high frequencies, respectively, with the position of the break depending on the injected spectrum. We suggest that the double power-law spectrum measured by Helios at 0.3 AU, where the average magnetic field is not aligned with the radial (contrary to our assumptions), results from the combination of such different spectral slopes. At low frequency the parallel spectrum dominates with its characteristic 1/f shape, while at higher frequencies its steep spectral slope (-2) is masked by the more energetic perpendicular spectrum (slope -5/3).

  9. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase III, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Zimmerman, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads.

  10. Hurricane Katrina: Lessons for Army Planning and Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the critical first few days of the response, problems that contributed to the delays in evacuating the Superdome and convention center in New Orleans...Category Three strength or higher made landfall in the United States between 1900 and 2000,1 Hurricane Katrina stands out for several reasons. First ...1.2 shows three representative statistics. The first is the cumulative number of people rescued by civilian and military responders at the end of

  11. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A research perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kates, R. W.; Colten, C. E.; Laska, S.; Leatherman, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events—reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic—accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40–50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency postdisaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8–11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent. PMID:17003119

  12. The geography of mortality from Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, J. C.; Mara, V.; Jayaprakash, S.; None

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the highest mortality disasters in US history. Typical hurricanes of the same strength take very few lives. Katrina's mortality is exceeded only by the so-called Galveston Flood (a hurricane) of 1900 that occurred at a time when forecasting was poor and evacuation was possible only by train or horse. The levee failures in New Orleans were a major contributing factor unique to Katrina. An examination of the characteristics of mortality may give insight into the cause of the great scope of the tragedy and the special vulnerability of those who died. We examine the spatial aspects of mortality. The locations of deceased victims were matched with victim information including age, race and gender for approximately 800 victims (data from Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals). From this we can analyze for spatial clustering of mortality. We know that Katrina took a particularly heavy toll on the elderly so we can analyze, for instance, whether the elderly were more likely to die in some locations than in others. Similarly, we analyze for gender and race against age (dividing age into five groups this gives 20 categories) as a factory in the geographic distribution of mortality as a way to recover measures of vulnerability. We can also correlate the spatial characteristics of mortality with underlying causes that might contribute to vulnerability. Data is available at a census block level on household income, poverty rates, education, home ownership, car ownership and a variety of other factors that can be correlated with the spatial mortality data. This allows for a multi-parameter estimation of factors that govern mortality in this unusually high mortality event.

  13. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: a research perspective.

    PubMed

    Kates, R W; Colten, C E; Laska, S; Leatherman, S P

    2006-10-03

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events--reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic--accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40-50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency post-disaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8-11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent.

  14. Tropical Cyclone Evolution and Water and Energy Fluxes: A Hurricane Katrina Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are a highly destructive force of nature, characterized by extreme precipitation levels and wind speeds and heavy flooding. There are concerns that climate change will cause changes in the intensity and frequency of tropical cyclones. Therefore, the quantification of the water and energy fluxes that occur during a tropical cyclone's life cycle are important for anticipating the magnitude of damages that are likely to occur. This study used HURDAT2 storm track information and data from the satellite-derived SeaFlux and TRMM products to determine changes in precipitation, wind, and latent and sensible heat throughout the life cycle of Hurricane Katrina. The variables were examined along and around the storm track, taking averages both at stationary 5x5 degree boxes and within the instantaneous hurricane domain. Analysis focused on contributions of convergence and latent heat to the storm evolution and examined how the total flux was related to the storm intensity. Certain features, such as the eye, were not resolved due to the data resolution, but the data captures the general trend of enhanced flux levels that are due to the storm's presence. Analysis also included examination of the water and energy budgets as related to convergence and the sensible and latent heat fluxes.

  15. Institute of Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Research of the Rhineland Friedrich-Wilhelm Bonn University (Germany, F.R.): Research field of interplanetary space and solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    In the field of astrophysics, subjects concerning galactic winds, cosmology, double star wind, and general relativity theory are studied. Contributions to the study of the upper atmosphere are made. Theoretical studies of the solar wind, and of the distribution of interstellar neutral gases on the heliosphere are performed.

  16. Assessing the sensitivity to horizontal resolution of Unified Model simulations of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, J. P.; Webster, S.

    2012-12-01

    In August 2005 Hurricane Katrina made landfall close to New Orleans with devastating consequences. It was one of the strongest storms to impact the coast of the United States and was also one of the most costly. At peak intensity, its central pressure was 902 hPa and 10 m wind speeds were 175 mph. The extreme nature of this weather system therefore makes it an ideal case study to assess the ability of the Met Office Unified Model to simulate and potentially forecast such phenomena. In this study we assess the ability of the Met Office Unified Model (UM) to simulate Hurricane Katrina at a range of horizontal resolutions. Thus a set of limited area model simulations have been performed at resolutions of 1.5 km, 4 km and 24 km. By careful implementation of the lateral boundary conditions it has been possible to (one way) nest all these simulations inside the 25 km operational global forecast model version of the UM. The configuration of the 1.5 km and 4 km models is based on the 1.5 km and 4 km models used operationally over the UK and hence convection is treated explicitly, whilst the 24 km LAM is configured in the same way as the operational global forecast model and hence convection is parametrized. The simulations are all performed on a 2400 km x 1600 km domain and are all initialised around four days prior to landfall, when the observed central pressure was close to 990 hPa. The initial data for the simulations are ERA-interim analyses with the 25 km global forecast generating hourly LBCs via a series of 24 hour long forecasts initialised from successive 12z analyses. Overall, these simulations have been configured in order to make as clean an assessment as possible of the impact of horizontal resolution on the simulation of Hurricane Katrina. In this presentation we first describe and illustrate results summarising the impact of model resolution on the simulated hurricane. Consistent with the systematic tropical cyclone behaviour of the global forecast model

  17. Combining Wind-Tunnel and Field Measurements of Street-Canyon Flow via Stochastic Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Laurent; Blackman, Karin; Savory, Eric

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate how application of the stochastic estimation method can be employed to combine spatially well-resolved wind-tunnel particle image velocimetry measurements with instantaneous velocity signals from a limited number of sensors (six sonic anemometers located within the canyon in the present case) to predict full-scale flow dynamics in an entire street-canyon cross-section. The investigated configuration corresponds to a street-canyon flow in a neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer with the oncoming flow being perpendicular to the main canyon axis. Data were obtained during both full-scale and 1:200-scale wind-tunnel experiments. The performance of the proposed method is investigated using both wind-tunnel data and signals from five sonic anemometers to predict the velocity from the sixth one. In particular, based on analysis of the influence of the high-frequency velocity fluctuations on the quality of the reconstruction, it is shown that stochastic estimation is able to correctly reproduce the large-scale temporal features of the flow with the present set-up. The full dataset is then used to spatially extrapolate the instantaneous flow measured by the six sonic anemometers and perform detailed analysis of instantaneous flow features. The main features of the flow, such as the presence of the shear layer that develops over the canyon and the intermittent ejection and penetration events across the canyon opening, are well predicted by stochastic estimation. In addition, thanks to the high spatial resolution made possible by the technique, the intermittency of the main vortical structure existing within the canyon is demonstrated, as well as its meandering motion in the canyon cross-section. It is also shown that the canyon flow, particularly its spanwise component, is affected by large-scale fluctuations of low temporal frequency along the canyon axis. Finally, the proposed techniques based on wind-tunnel data can prove useful for a priori

  18. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schmetz, J.; Menzel, W.P.; Hayden, C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meterological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160{degrees}W to 50{degrees}E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-{mu} absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about -5 x 10{sup -6} and 5 x 10{sup -6} sec{sup -1} when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmetz, Johannes; Menzel, W. Paul; Velden, Christopher; Wu, Xiangqian; Vandeberg, Leo; Nieman, Steve; Hayden, Christopher; Holmlund, Kenneth; Geijo, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160 deg W to 50 deg E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-micron absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper-troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about-5 x 10(exp -6) and 5 x 10(exp 6)/s when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. The results from this 1-month analysis suggest the desirability of further GOES and Meteosat studies to characterize

  20. Mapping the Distribution of Sand Live Oak (Quercus geminata) and Determining Growth Responses to Hurricane Katrina (2005) on Cat Island, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, W.; Carter, G. A.; Harley, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    William R. Funderburk, Gregory A. Carter, Grant Harley Gulf Coast Geospatial Center, University of Southern Mississippi Department of Geography and Geology Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 U.S.A. william.funderburk@usm.edu The Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands serve to buffer mainland coastal areas from the impacts of hurricanes and other extreme weather events. On August 29, 2005, they were impacted heavily by the wind, waves, and storm surges of Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this study is to determine the growth responses of Quercus geminata, a dominant tree species on Cat Island, MS, in relation to the impact of Hurricane Katrina. Remotely sensed data was utilized in conjunction with ground data to assess growth response post Hurricane Katrina. The main objectives of this study were: 1) determine growth response of Q. geminata through tree ring analysis; 2) understand how Q. geminata adapted to intense weather and climatic phenomena on Cat Island. The hypotheses tested were: 1) growth rates of Q. geminata on Cat Island were decreased by the impact of Hurricane Katrina 2) trees at higher elevations survived or recovered while trees at lower elevations did not recover or died. Decadal scale stability is required for forest stand development on siliciclastic barrier islands. Thus, monitoring the distribution of forest climax community species is key to understanding siliciclastic, subsiding, barrier island geomorphic processes and their relationships to successional patterns and growth rates. Preliminary results indicate that Q. geminata produces a faint growth ring, survive for at least two to three hundred years and is well-adapted to frequent salt water flooding. Cat Island: False color Image

  1. Statistics of MLT wind field values derived from 11 years of common volume specular meteor observations in northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jorge Luis; Stober, Gunter; Laskar, Fazlul; Hall, Chris M.; Tsutsumi, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally mean values of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere winds over the radar volume are obtained using monostatic specular meteor radars. Such observing volume consist of a few hundreds of kilometers in radius. Moreover the differences between measured radial velocities and the expected radial velocities from the measured mean winds are used to derive properties of gravity wave momentum fluxes. Recently, Stober and Chau [2015] have proposed to use a multi-static approach to retrieve horizontally resolved wind fields, where most of the radar volume is observed from different viewing angles. Similar results could be obtained if measurements from close-by monostatic systems are combined. In this work we present the results of the derived wind fields from combining specular meteor radar data between 2004 and 2015 from the Trømso (19.22oW, 69.58oN) and Andenes (16.04oW, 69.27oN) radar systems. Among the directly estimated values are the mean winds and the horizontal and vertical gradients of the zonal and meridional winds. Combining the horizontal gradients, the horizontal divergence, relative vorticity, shear and deformation are derived. The seasonal and annual variability of these parameters are presented and discussed, as well as the planetary wave, tidal, and gravity wave information embedded in these new parameters.

  2. Comparison of the Effects of RAS vs. Kain-Fritsch Convective Schemes on Katrina Forecasts with GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; Cohen, Charles; Paxton, Jessica; Robertson, F. R. (Pete)

    2009-01-01

    Global forecasts were made with the 0.25-degree latitude version of GEOS-5, with the RAS scheme and with the Kain-Fritsch scheme. Examination was made of the Katrina (2005) hurricane simulation. Replacement of the RAS convective scheme with the K-F scheme results in a much more vigorous Katrina, closer to reality. Still, the result is not as vigorous as reality. In terms of wind maximum, the gap was closed by 50%. The result seems to be due to the RAS scheme drying out the boundary layer, thus hampering the grid-scale secondary circulation and attending cyclone development. The RAS case never developed a full warm core, whereas the K-F case did. Not shown here: The K-F scheme also resulted in a more vigorous storm than when GEOS-5 is run with no convective parameterization. Also not shown: An experiment in which the RAS firing level was moved up by 3 model levels resulted in a stronger, warm-core storm, though not as strong as the K-F case. Effects on storm track were noticed, but not studied.

  3. SIMULATION OF FRESHWATER PLUME FROM LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN AND THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER IN THE WAKE OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the spirit of a post-Katrina response, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was set up and applied to the hurricane Katrina affected region of Mississippi River delta, Lake Pontchartran, and the Gulf of Mexico coastline near New Orleans. Following Katrina, there was concern ...

  4. Going Home after Hurricane Katrina: Determinants of Return Migration and Changes in Affected Areas. Working Paper 428

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.; Polivka, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the decision of Hurricane Katrina evacuees to return to their pre- Katrina areas and documents how the composition of the Katrina-affected region changed over time. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we show that an evacuee's age and the severity of damage in an evacuee's county of origin are important determinants…

  5. Jupiter's Magnetic Field. Magnetosphere, and Interaction with the Solar Wind: Pioneer 11.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davis, L; Jones, D E; Coleman, P J; Colburn, D S; Dyal, P; Sonett, C P

    1975-05-02

    The Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer provided precise, contititious measurements of the magnetic fields in interplanetary space, inside Jupiter's magnetosphere, and in the near vicinity of Jupiter. As with the Pioneer 10 data, evidence was seen of the dynanmic interaction of Jupiter with the solar wind which leads to a variety of phenomena (bow shock, upstream waves, nonlinear magnetosheath impulses) and to changes in the dimension of the dayside magnetosphere by as much as a factor of 2. The magnetosphere clearly appears to be blunt, not disk-shaped, with a well-defined outer boundary. In the outer magnetosphere, the magnetic field is irregular but exhibits a persistent southward component indicative of a closed magnetosphere. The data contain the first clear evidence in the dayside magnetosphere of the current sheet, apparently associated with centrifugal forces, that was a donminatnt feature of the outbound Pionieer 10 data. A modest westward spiraling of the field was again evident inbound but not outbound at higher latitudes and nearer the Sun-Jupiter direction. Measurements near periapsis, which were nearer the planet and provide better latitude and longitude coverage than Pioneer 10, have revealed a 5 percent discrepancy with the Pioneer 10 offset dipole mnodel (D(2)). A revised offset dipole (6-parameter fit) is presented as well as the results of a spherical harmonic analysis (23 parameters) consisting of an interior dipole, quadrupole, and octopole and an external dipole and quadrupole. The dipole moment and the composite field appear moderately larger than inferred from Pioneer 10. Maximum surface fields of 14 and 11 gauss in the northern and southern hemispheres are inferred. Jupiter's planetary field is found to be slightly more irregular than that of Earth.

  6. Field-test results using a nacelle-mounted lidar for improving wind turbine power capture by reducing yaw misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, P. A.; Scholbrock, A. K.; Jehu, A.; Davoust, S.; Osler, E.; Wright, A. D.; Clifton, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a nacelle-mounted lidar was used to improve the yaw alignment of an experimental wind turbine. Using lidar-recorded data during normal operation, an error correction value for the nacelle vane wind direction measurement used in the yaw controller was determined. A field test was then conducted in which the turbine was operated with and without the correction applied to the yaw controller. Results demonstrated a significant increase in power capture. In addition, the study includes analysis on the impacts on loading of applying this yaw correction. The study demonstrates a successful application in field testing of using a nacelle-mounted lidar to improve turbine performance.

  7. Reconstruction of Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Speed for the Last 135 Years Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.

    2007-12-01

    We reconstruct the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field B and solar wind speed v at 1 AU using 1) yearly values of sunspot numbers and geomagnetic index aa; 2) available spacecraft measurements of v and B since 1964. We compare our results with the reconstruction done by Stamper et al. (1999) and also with the reconstruction by Svalgaard et al. (2003). References Stamper, R., M. Lockwood and M.N. Wild, Solar causes of the long-term increase in geomagnetic activity, J. Geophys. Res., Vol.104 (A12), 24325, 1999. Svalgaard, Leif, E. W. Cliver and P. Lesager, In; Solar variability as an input to the Earth's environment. International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS) Symposium, 23 - 28 June 2003, Tatranska Lomnica, Slovak Republic. Ed.:A. Wilson. ESA SP-535, Noorwijk: ESA Publications Division, IBSN 92-9092-845-X, 2003, p. 15 - 23

  8. Tsallis Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind: Magnetic Field and Velocity Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, Leonard F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2007-12-06

    The distributions the fluctuations of magnetic field strengths B(t) observed on a scale of a year in the heliosphere between 1 AU and 90 AU are approximately lognormal. The PDFs of the corresponding increments of B(t) are Tsallis distributions on scales from 1 hr--128 days between 1 and 90 AU. A deterministic MHD model predicts these results. The model predicts that small chaotic structures merge to form large structures. There is a 'phase transition' near {approx}40 AU at which the there is a change from growth to decay. Between R{approx}40 and 85 AU the solar wind is in a quasi-equilibrium state described by a 'q-triplet'.

  9. Effect of sudden solar wind dynamic pressure changes at subauroral latitudes: Change in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Le, G.; Russell, C.T.; Petrinec, S.M.; Ginskey, M. )

    1993-03-01

    The observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) from the magnetometers of the IGS network extending from Cambridge, England, to Tromso, Norway, are used to study the response of subauroral current systems to sudden changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. Observations show that the response is very strong at subauroral latitudes. The preliminary response in the H component is a brief, small increase in the dayside moring sector and a decrease in the afternoon and night sectors. The main response in the horizontal field (the H and D components) is toward the pole except in the dayside morning sector. The inferred ionospheric current is mainly a circulatory system flowing counterclockwise when viewed form the north pole everywhere at subauroral latitudes except the dayside morning sector. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Improving the predictions of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tham

    2009-09-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model, an advanced version of the potential field source surface (PFSS) model, is widely used to predict the solar wind speed (SWS) and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarities at the Earth. The results, however, do not always match the observations. To improve the predictive capability of this model we made the following changes: (1) We used the high resolution magnetograms produced by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observer (SOHO) spacecraft. We properly calibrated the magnetic field strength of the MDI observations using the Mt. Wilson (MWO) FeI magnetograms so that each MDI level 1.8 magnetogram can be converted to the same basis as the saturation-corrected long-duration MWO Fel magnetogram. (2) The WSA model requires a map of full solar surface magnetic field, and traditionally a synoptic chart is used. However, the synoptic chart does not represent the full solar surface at a particular time. Therefore, we suggest to use a new format called heliospheric (or snapshot) map in the model. (3) We implement a better estimate of the polar field that is not observable during some part of the year due to the solar tilted angle B0. The magnetic field near the solar poles is very important because it may be the dominant part of the solar magnetic field far away from the Sun, especially during the period of solar minimum. (4) The WSA model assumes that the solar photospheric magnetic field is nearly radial, so that its radial component can be obtained directly from the line-of-sight (LOS) of the observed field. This approach produces very strong radial magnetic field near the solar poles. We solve this problem by first obtaining the spherical harmonic coefficients directly from the LOS magnetic data and then reconstructing the radial magnetic chart. (5) Finally, changing the radius of the source surface, rss, in the PFSS analysis strongly affects the predicted SWS and IMF at the Earth. Our

  11. Laboratory and field experiments on the stability of wind driven water surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, W. Kendall

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of laboratory experiments on the stability of a wind-driven water surface to surface waves and Langmuir circulations. Using modern quantitative flow visualization techniques, we show that wave generation is accompanied by other phenomena, including Langmuir circulations which grow, dislocate, and provide a transition to turbulence of the surface flow. The length and velocity scales associated with transition are comparable to those of the surface wave field, providing clear evidence of the influence of Langmuir circulations on the structure of the growing wave field. Direct measurements of the modulated wave variables are qualitatively consistent with wave action conservation, but quantitative comparisons remain inconclusive. Field observations show a similar transition of the surface flow occurring over comparable length and time scales to those in the laboratory. We conclude that the observed transition rapidly disrupts the surface skin layer and efficiently mixes momentum and heat from the surface to depth. We discuss the results in the context of the available theoretical models for the interfacial fluxes of mass (gas), heat and momentum.

  12. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H.; Hawkins, C.

    1996-12-31

    Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.

  13. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. ); Hawkins, C. )

    1996-01-01

    Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.

  14. Nacelle LiDAR online wind field reconstruction applied to feedforward pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUILLEMIN, F.; DOMENICO, D. DI; NGUYEN, N.; SABIRON, G.; BOQUET, M.; GIRARD, N.; COUPIAC, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents innovative filtering and reconstruction techniques of nacelle LiDAR data, and exploitation of obtained wind anticipation capabilities for wind turbine control strategy. The implemented algorithms are applied under industrial constraints, on a MAIA EOLIS wind turbine, equipped with a LEOSPHERE 5-beams pulsed LiDAR, during experimental campaigns of SMARTEOLE collaborative project.

  15. Field Wind Tunnel Testing of Two Silt Loam Soils on the North American Central High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion is a natural process of sediment redistribution resulting from the shear force of the wind interacting with unprotected soil surfaces. Globally, wind erosion accounts for nearly half of all soil loss. Breaking of the prairie sod and mechanical tillage of agricultural soils on the semi...

  16. Katrina's Children: Social Policy Considerations for Children in Disasters. Social Policy Report. Volume 21, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.; Harris, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in a disaster of proportions not previously known in the United States. The traumatic experiences of children and families during Hurricane Katrina, the flooding that resulted from the breach of the levees, the evacuation, and the aftermath are unprecedented. In responding to the enormous mental health needs of children…

  17. Reactive Aggression and Posttraumatic Stress in Adolescents Affected by Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsee, Monica A.

    2008-01-01

    The current study tests a theoretical model illustrating a potential pathway to reactive aggression through exposure to a traumatic event (Hurricane Katrina) in 166 adolescents (61% female, 63% Caucasian) recruited from high schools on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Results support an association between exposure to Hurricane Katrina and reactive…

  18. Trends in Serious Emotional Disturbance among Youths Exposed to Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Fairbank, John A.; Gruber, Michael J.; Jones, Russell T.; Osofsky, Joy D.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and predictors of trends in "DSM-IV" serious emotional disturbance (SED) among youths exposed to Hurricane Katrina. Method: A probability sample of adult pre-hurricane residents of the areas affected by Katrina completed baseline and follow-up telephone surveys 18 to 27 months post-hurricane and 12 to 18…

  19. Out of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Researching the Katrina Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jerome E.

    2008-01-01

    The torrential rains from Hurricane Katrina, the breaking of the levees, and the subsequent flooding of New Orleans resulted in another Black Diaspora. This article focuses on Black children and families who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina but now reside in cities, towns, and suburbs outside of the Crescent City. Informed by the author's…

  20. Reflecting on "Project Katrina" and Developmentally Appropriate Practices: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellhaas, Andree; Burts, Diane C.; Aghayan, Carol

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the independent study project of a student who was a graduate assistant in a child development laboratory preschool when Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast area. Through her experiences with "Project Katrina" she deepens her understanding of developmentally appropriate practices as she learns firsthand about…

  1. How Schools Responded to Student Mental Health Needs Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a study that examined how schools in the U.S. Gulf Coast region perceived the mental health needs of students after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and how schools responded. According to the report, despite strong initial efforts to support the mental health needs of students displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many…

  2. A National Children's Resiliency Response Initiative: 2006-2007 Plan to Help Katrina's Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Alice Mae

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 National Resiliency Response Initiative for Katrina's Kids is a systematic approach to providing resiliency support to the over 200,000 children victimized by one of the worst natural disasters in American history. From the Gulf States region, children suffered trauma during and after Hurricane Katrina as they became displaced young…

  3. The Dirty Dozen: Twelve Failures of the Hurricane Katrina Response and How Psychology Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gheytanchi, Anahita; Joseph, Lisa; Gierlach, Elaine; Kimpara, Satoko; Housley, Jennifer; Franco, Zeno E.; Beutler, Larry E.

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive analysis addresses the United States' alarming lack of preparedness to respond effectively to a massive disaster as evidenced by Hurricane Katrina. First, a timeline of problematic response events during and after Hurricane Katrina orients readers to some of the specific problems encountered at different levels of government.…

  4. Cleansing the Superdome: The Paradox of Purity and Post-Katrina Guilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grano, Daniel A.; Zagacki, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    The reopening of the New Orleans Superdome after Hurricane Katrina on Monday Night Football dramatized problematic rhetorical, visual, and spatial norms of purification rituals bound up in what Burke calls the paradox of purity. Hurricane Katrina was significant as a visually traumatic event in large part because it signified the ghetto as a…

  5. Just-in-Time Training: The Lessons of Hurricane Katrina, 10 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina reshaped college workforce development programs as thoroughly as it did the coastline--but in this case, the changes were for the good of students, employers and the community. This article discusses the effects and changes made by 4 community colleges who were effected by Hurricane Katrina: (1) Louisiana Community and Technical…

  6. Satellite imagery maps Hurricane Katrina-induced flooding and oil slicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rykhus, Russell P.

    2005-01-01

    Katrina also caused major damage to the region's oil and natural gas production and refining capabilities. On 2 September 2005, the Associated Press reported that Katrina had damaged 58 oil platforms, 30 of which were reported lost; one damaged platform had been blown nearly 100 km from its original location.

  7. Vertical neutral wind in the equatorial F-region deduced from electric field and ion density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, Harri; Aggson, Thomas L.; Herrero, F. A.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Hanson, William B.

    1995-01-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field and ion density measurements near density depletion regions (that is, equatorial plasma bubbles) are used to estimate the vertical neutral wind speed. The measured zonal electric field in a series of density depletions crossed by the San Marco D satellite at 01.47-01.52 Universal Time (UT) on 25 October 1988, can be explained if a downward neutral wind of 15-30 m/s exists. Simultaneously, the F-region plasma was moving downward at a speed of 30-50 m/s. These events appear in the local time sector of 23.00-23.15 in which strong downward neutral winds may occur. Indeed, airglow measurements suggest that downward neutral velocities of 25-50 m/s are possible at time near midnight in the equatorial F-region.

  8. Anomalous Shocks on the Measured Near-Field Pressure Signatures of Low-Boom Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Unexpected shocks on wind-tunnel-measured pressure signatures prompted questions about design methods, pressure signature measurement techniques, and the quality of measurements in the flow fields near lifting models. Some of these unexpected shocks were the result of component integration methods. Others were attributed to the three-dimension nature of the flow around a lifting model, to inaccuracies in the prediction of the area-ruled lift, or to wing-tip stall effects. This report discusses the low-boom model wind-tunnel data where these unexpected shocks were initially observed, the physics of the lifting wing/body model's flow field, the wind-tunnel data used to evaluate the applicability of methods for calculating equivalent areas due to lift, the performance of lift prediction codes, and tip stall effects so that the cause of these shocks could be determined.

  9. Effect of wind-driven rain on deterioration of a tall building: Numerical modeling and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei

    Wind-driven rain is an important factor in determining the extent of calcareous stone erosion and the patterns of surface soiling on buildings. In this study, both numerical modeling and field measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of wind-driven rain on building walls. The work has been conducted at the Cathedral of Learning, a 42-story Indiana limestone building on the University of Pittsburgh campus in Pittsburgh, PA. The numerical method utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and comprises three steps: (a) using the Re-Normalization Group (RNG) k-epsilon model to calculate the airflow field around the building, (b) simulating raindrop trajectories in the flow field by solving the force balance equations, and (c) estimating driving rain fluxes on building walls by combining raindrop trajectory results and meteorological data. To validate the model, wind-driven rain fluxes have been measured at the Cathedral for a 21-month period. Comparison of model estimates and field measurements for 94 rain events show reasonably good agreement, suggesting that the numerical method is effective in predicting driving rain fluxes on building surfaces. Both model and measurement results show that wind-driven rain is strongly influenced by rainfall intensity, wind speed, wind direction, and building geometry. Qualitative comparisons of the observed soiling patterns with the modeled and measured driving rain fluxes show that white eroded areas on the building surfaces generally receive more driving rain than soiled but less eroded areas. The current soiling patterns are most likely due to the non-uniform distribution of wind-driven rain as a result of long-term trends in wind and rain that interact with the building. This work will enhance the understanding of processes involved in the erosion of buildings by providing a quantitative tool for studying the impact of wind-driven rain on building surfaces. This tool will be useful for the selection

  10. Bats avoid radar installations: could electromagnetic fields deter bats from colliding with wind turbines?

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Barry; Racey, Paul A

    2007-03-14

    Large numbers of bats are killed by collisions with wind turbines, and there is at present no direct method of reducing or preventing this mortality. We therefore determine whether the electromagnetic radiation associated with radar installations can elicit an aversive behavioural response in foraging bats. Four civil air traffic control (ATC) radar stations, three military ATC radars and three weather radars were selected, each surrounded by heterogeneous habitat. Three sampling points matched for habitat type and structure, dominant vegetation species, altitude and surrounding land class were located at increasing distances from each station. A portable electromagnetic field meter measured the field strength of the radar at three distances from the source: in close proximity (<200 m) with a high electromagnetic field (EMF) strength >2 volts/metre, an intermediate point within line of sight of the radar (200-400 m) and with an EMF strength <2 v/m, and a control site out of sight of the radar (>400 m) and registering an EMF of zero v/m. At each radar station bat activity was recorded three times with three independent sampling points monitored on each occasion, resulting in a total of 90 samples, 30 of which were obtained within each field strength category. At these sampling points, bat activity was recorded using an automatic bat recording station, operated from sunset to sunrise. Bat activity was significantly reduced in habitats exposed to an EMF strength of greater than 2 v/m when compared to matched sites registering EMF levels of zero. The reduction in bat activity was not significantly different at lower levels of EMF strength within 400 m of the radar. We predict that the reduction in bat activity within habitats exposed to electromagnetic radiation may be a result of thermal induction and an increased risk of hyperthermia.

  11. Bats Avoid Radar Installations: Could Electromagnetic Fields Deter Bats from Colliding with Wind Turbines?

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Barry; Racey, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    Large numbers of bats are killed by collisions with wind turbines, and there is at present no direct method of reducing or preventing this mortality. We therefore determine whether the electromagnetic radiation associated with radar installations can elicit an aversive behavioural response in foraging bats. Four civil air traffic control (ATC) radar stations, three military ATC radars and three weather radars were selected, each surrounded by heterogeneous habitat. Three sampling points matched for habitat type and structure, dominant vegetation species, altitude and surrounding land class were located at increasing distances from each station. A portable electromagnetic field meter measured the field strength of the radar at three distances from the source: in close proximity (<200 m) with a high electromagnetic field (EMF) strength >2 volts/metre, an intermediate point within line of sight of the radar (200–400 m) and with an EMF strength <2 v/m, and a control site out of sight of the radar (>400 m) and registering an EMF of zero v/m. At each radar station bat activity was recorded three times with three independent sampling points monitored on each occasion, resulting in a total of 90 samples, 30 of which were obtained within each field strength category. At these sampling points, bat activity was recorded using an automatic bat recording station, operated from sunset to sunrise. Bat activity was significantly reduced in habitats exposed to an EMF strength of greater than 2 v/m when compared to matched sites registering EMF levels of zero. The reduction in bat activity was not significantly different at lower levels of EMF strength within 400 m of the radar. We predict that the reduction in bat activity within habitats exposed to electromagnetic radiation may be a result of thermal induction and an increased risk of hyperthermia. PMID:17372629

  12. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Naughton, Brian Thomas; Herges, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  13. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  14. Does the magnetic field of a multipole stator winding drive flow of a ferrofluid in a cylindrical container?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    The flow of a ferrofluid in a stationary cylindrical container driven by a rotating magnetic field has received considerable attention since the inception of the field of ferrohydrodynamics. Much controversy has resulted regarding the existence, or lack thereof, of bulk flow under conditions of a rotating uniform magnetic field, which can be generated for example, using a two-pole stator winding. The original observations of flow at the interface showed counter-rotation of field and fluid, whereas recent observations of bulk flow using the ultrasound technique have shown co-rotation of field and fluid. Various theories have been advanced over the years to explain the observed phenomena, including the spin diffusion theory of Shliomis and the hypothesis that it is field non-uniformity, generated by non-ideal stator winding distributions, that actually drives the flow, as first proposed by Glazov. We have revisited this problem from an analytical perspective by solving the ferrohydrodynamic and magnetoquasistatic equations self-consistently for the case of ferrofluid in a cylindrical container, with and without an internal co-axial cylinder, and driven by the field generated by a multipole stator winding distribution. In such a winding increasing the number of poles results in increasingly non-uniform fields. It is shown that regardless of the number of poles in the stator winding the ferrohydrodynamic equations do not predict any flow in either geometry as long as the spin viscosity parameter is assumed to be zero. Velocity profiles are obtained for both geometries and arbitrary number of poles for the case of non-zero spin viscosity. It is shown that only for the case of a two-pole stator winding and ferrofluid constrained to the annular space between an inner and outer cylinder do the ferrohydrodynamic equations predict co-rotation of fluid and field close to the outer cylinder and counter-rotation of fluid and field close to the inner cylinder, in qualitative

  15. Surface wind, pressure and temperature fields near tornadic and non-tornadic narrow cold-frontal rainbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Parker, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Narrow cold frontal rainbands (NCFRs) occur frequently in the UK and other parts of northwest Europe. At the surface, the passage of an NCFR is often marked by a sharp wind veer, abrupt pressure increase and a rapid temperature decrease. Tornadoes and other instances of localised wind damage sometimes occur in association with meso-gamma-scale vortices (sometimes called misocyclones) that form along the zone of abrupt horizontal wind veer (and associated vertical vorticity) at the leading edge of the NCFR. Using one-minute-resolution data from a mesoscale network of automatic weather stations, surface pressure, wind and temperature fields in the vicinity of 12 NCFRs (five of which were tornadic) have been investigated. High-resolution surface analyses were obtained by mapping temporal variations in the observed parameters to equivalent spatial variations, using a system velocity determined by analysis of the radar-observed movement of NCFR precipitation segments. Substantial differences were found in the structure of surface wind and pressure fields close to tornadic and non-tornadic NCFRs. Tornadic NCFRs exhibited a large wind veer (near 90°) and strong pre- and post-frontal winds. These attributes were associated with large vertical vorticity and horizontal convergence across the front. Tornadoes typically occurred where vertical vorticity and horizontal convergence were increasing. Here, we present surface analyses from selected cases, and draw comparisons between the tornadic and non-tornadic NCFRs. Some Doppler radar observations will be presented, illustrating the development of misocyclones along parts of the NCFR that exhibit strong, and increasing, vertical vorticity stretching. The influence of the stability of the pre-frontal air on the likelihood of tornadoes will also be discussed.

  16. Two-dimensional inflow-wind solution of black hole accretion with an evenly symmetric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosallanezhad, Amin; Bu, Defu; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    We solve the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations of black hole accretion with the presence of magnetic field. The field includes a turbulent component, whose role is represented by the viscosity, and a large-scale ordered component. The latter is further assumed to be evenly symmetric with the equatorial plane. The equations are solved in the r - θ plane of a spherical coordinate by assuming time-steady and radially self-similar. An inflow-wind solution is found. Around the equatorial plane, the gas is inflowing; while above and below the equatorial plane at a certain critical θ angle, θ ˜ 47°, the inflow changes its direction of radial motion and becomes wind. The driving forces are analysed and found to be the centrifugal force and the gradient of gas and magnetic pressure. The properties of wind are also calculated. The specific angular momentum of wind is found to be significantly larger than that of inflow, thus wind can transfer angular momentum outward. These analytical results are compared to those obtained by the trajectory analysis based on MHD numerical simulation data and good agreements are found.

  17. Ageostrophic winds and vertical motion fields accompanying upper level jet streak propagation during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. T.; Squires, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results are shown relating the ageostrophic wind field, through the terms of a semigeostrophic wind equation (assuming adiabatic conditions and the geostrophic momentum approximation) to both air parcel trajectories and their vertical motion fields computed from the parcels' displacement on isentropic surfaces, with respect to pressure. The analysis of results considers both upper-level (324 K) ageostrophic fields and low-level (304 K) fields. Preliminary results tend to support Uccellini and Johnson's (1979) hypothesis concerning upper-level-jet/low-level-jet (ULJ/LLJ) coupling in the exit region of the ULJ. Future plans are described briefly for research intended to clarify the mechanism behind ULJ streak propagation, LLJ development and their relationship to the initiation of severe convection.

  18. Wind-wave coupling in the atmospheric boundary layer over a reservoir: field measurements and verification of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the results of field experiments conducted at the Gorky Reservoir to test a quasi-linear model of the atmospheric boundary layer [1]. In the course of the experiment we simultaneously measured profiles of wind speed and surface wave spectra using instruments placed on the Froude buoy, which measures the following parameters: i) the module and the direction of the wind speed using ultrasonic wind sensor WindSonic Gill instruments, located on the 4 - levels from 0.1 x 5 m long; ii) profile of the surface waves with 3-channel string wave-gauge with a base of 5 cm, iii) the temperature of the water and air with a resistive sensor. From the measured profiles of wind speed, we calculated basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer: the friction velocity u*, the wind speed at the standard height of 10 m U10 and the drag coefficient CD. Data on CD(U10), obtained at the Gorky Reservoir, were compared with similar data obtained on Lake George in Australia during the Australian Shallow Water Experiment (AUSWEX) conducted in 1997 - 1999 [2,3]. A good agreement was obtained between measured data at two different on the parameters of inland waters: deep Gorky reservoir and shallow Lake George.To elucidate the reasons for this coincidence of the drag coefficients under strongly different conditions an analysis of surface waves was conducted.Measurements have shown that in both water bodies the surface wave spectra have almost the same asymptotics (spatial spectrum - k-3, the frequency spectrum -5), corresponding to the Phillips saturation spectrum.These spectra are typically observed for the steep surface waves, for which the basic dissipation mechanism is wave breaking. The similarity of the short-wave parts of the spectra can be regarded as a probable cause of coincidence of dependency of drag coefficient of the water surface on wind speed. Quantitative verification of this hypothesis was carried out in the framework of quasi-linear model of the wind

  19. Wind Field Extractions from SAR Sentinel-1 Images Using Electromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Tran Vu; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice; Nahum, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Among available wind sources, i.e. measured data, numeric weather models, the retrieval of wind vectors from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data / images is particularly preferred due to a lot of SAR systems (available data in most meteorological conditions, revisit mode, high resolution, etc.). For this purpose, the retrieval of wind vectors is principally based on the empirical (EP) models, e.g. CMOD series in C-band. Little studies have been reported about the use of the electromagnetic (EM) models for wind vector retrieval, since it is quite complicated to invert. However, the EM models can be applied for most cases of polarization, frequency and wind regime. In order to evaluate the advantages and limits of the EM models for wind vector retrieval, we compare in this study estimated results by the EM and EP models for both cases of polarization (vertical-vertical, or VV-pol and horizontal- horizontal, or HH-pol).

  20. Simulation of the Transport and Dispersion of Perfluorocarbon Tracers Released in Texas Using multiple Assimilated Meteorological Wind Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schichtel, B.; Barna, M.; Gebhart, K.; Green, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study (BRAVO) was designed to determine the causes of visibility impairment at Big Bend National Park, located in southwestern Texas. As part of BRAVO, an intensive field study was conducted during July-October 1999. Among the features of this study was the release of unique perfluorocarbon tracers from four sites within Texas, representative of industrial/urban locations. These tracers were monitored at 21 sites, throughout Texas. Other measurements collected during the field study included upper-level winds using radar profilers, and speciated fine-particulate mass concentrations. MM5 was used to simulate the regional meteorology during BRAVO, and was run in non-hydrostatic mode using a continental-scale 36km domain with nested 12km and 4km domains. MM5 employed observational nudging by incorporating the available measured wind data from the National Weather Service and data from the radar wind profilers. Meteorological data from the National Weather Service's Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS), archived at 80km grid spacing, were also available. Several models are being used to evaluate airmass transport to Big Bend, including CMAQ, REMSAD, HYSPLIT and the CAPITA Monte Carlo Model. This combination of tracer data, meteorological data and deployment of four models provides a unique opportunity to assess the ability of the model/wind field combinations to properly simulate the regional scale atmospheric transport and dispersion of trace gases over distances of 100 to 800km. This paper will present the tracer simulations from REMSAD using the 36 and 12 km MM5 wind fields, and results from HYSPLIT and the Monte Carlo model driven by the 36km MM5 and 80km EDAS wind fields. Preliminary results from HYSPLIT and the Monte Carlo model driven by the EDAS wind fields shows that these models are able to account for the primary features of tracer concentrations patterns in the Big Bend area. However, at times the

  1. Wind estimation around the shipwreck of Oriental Star based on field damage surveys and radar observations.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhiyong; Yao, Dan; Bai, Lanqiang; Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Kun; Tian, Fuyou; Wang, Mingjun

    Based on observational analyses and on-site ground and aerial damage surveys, this work aims to reveal the weather phenomena-especially the wind situation-when Oriental Star capsized in the Yangtze River on June 1, 2015. Results demonstrate that the cruise ship capsized when it encountered strong winds at speeds of at least 31 m s(-1) near the apex of a bow echo embedded in a squall line. As suggested by the fallen trees within a 2-km radius around the wreck location, such strong winds were likely caused by microburst straight-line wind and/or embedded small vortices, rather than tornadoes.

  2. Religious Coping and Psychological and Behavioral Adjustment After Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Henslee, Amber M; Coffey, Scott F; Schumacher, Julie A; Tracy, Melissa; Norris, Fran H; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Positive and negative religious coping are related to positive and negative psychological adjustment, respectively. The current study examined the relation between religious coping and PTSD, major depression, quality of life, and substance use among residents residing in Mississippi at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Results indicated that negative religious coping was positively associated with major depression and poorer quality of life and positive religious coping was negatively associated with PTSD, depression, poorer quality of life, and increased alcohol use. These results suggest that mental health providers should be mindful of the role of religious coping after traumatic events such as natural disasters.

  3. Religious Coping and Psychological and Behavioral Adjustment after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Henslee, Amber M.; Coffey, Scott F.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Tracy, Melissa; Norris, Fran; Galea, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative religious coping are related to positive and negative psychological adjustment, respectively. The current study examined the relation between religious coping and PTSD, major depression, quality of life, and substance use among residents residing in Mississippi at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Results indicated that negative religious coping was positively associated with major depression and poorer quality of life and positive religious coping was negatively associated with PTSD, depression, poorer quality of life, and increased alcohol use. These results suggest that mental health providers should be mindful of the role of religious coping after traumatic events such as natural disasters. PMID:25275223

  4. Solar Wind Magnetic Field Turbulence at Ion Kinetic Scales Measured by Cluster Using k-filtering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Roberts, O. W.; Jeska, L.; Li, B.; Lu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of turbulence at kinetic scales is important since turbulence energy is believed to dissipate as heat at these scales. Here we report our several work on the solar wind turbulence at ion kinetic scales using the k-filtering technique. We found evidence of ion cyclotron resonance in solar wind intervals. In the wave vector space, in addition to the commonly observed population of magnetic field fluctuations propagating at quasi-perpendicular angles to the global mean field B0, a population propagating at quasi-parallel angles are also observed with no local plasma instabilities identified. At low wavenumbers (kv_A/Omega_p <= 0.6 ) both components are present, and have similar powers, while at higher wavenumbers (kv_A/Omega_p> 0.6) only the perpendicular component can be identified. A statistical study of 52 intervals of solar wind finds that the turbulence is predominantly highly oblique to the magnetic field with perpendicular wavenumbers much greater than parallel wavenumbers, and propagates slowly in the plasma frame with most points having frequencies smaller than the proton gyrofrequency. Weak agreement is found that turbulence at the ion kinetic scales consists of kinetic Alfven waves and coherent structures advected with plasma bulk velocity plus some minor more compressible components. The results suggest that anti-sunward and sunward propagating magnetic fluctuations have similar nature in both the fast and slow solar wind. The fast wind was shown to have significantly more anti-sunward flux than sunward flux and the slow wind appears to be more balanced at ion kinetic scales. The fluctuated magnetic field and magnitude of the magnetic field are used to compute the power of incompressible and compressible turbulence for the fast solar wind. It is found that Taylor's frozen-in hypothesis may break down for compressible turbulence at the ion kinetic scales, suggesting that whistler waves may contribute to the compressible turbulence on the scales

  5. On the role of the magnetic field in the solar wind interaction with Venus - Expectations versus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the magnetic field near Venus suggest that elements of three different models (direct interaction, tangential discontinuity, magnetic barrier) are present. A bow shock is found to occur at an altitude of about 0.3 Venus radii at the subsolar point. The compression of the decelerated solar wind plasma behind the bow shock causes interplanetary field lines to 'pile up'. The magnetic field inside the bow shock increases from approximately twice the IMF strength at the bow shock to values in the range of approximately 40-100 gammas at altitudes between about 200 and 1,200 km. The maximum value of the piled up field, which is correlated with the dynamic pressure of the solar wind outside the bow shock, is found at lower altitudes for larger field strengths. Just Venus-ward of the maximum field, the pressure of the cold plasma increases to a level balancing the pressure of the external magnetic field. Hence, to a first approximation, the ionosphere has a diamagnetic response excluding the magnetosheath field. However, strong magnetic fields are found at times throughout the ionosphere.

  6. Stable motions of charged dust grains subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the mean interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semi-major axis.

  7. Parametric study of the solar wind interaction with the Hermean magnetosphere for a weak interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is weak, performing a parametric study for all the range of hydrodynamic values of the solar wind predicted on Mercury for the ENLIL + GONG WSA + Cone SWRC model: density from 12 to 180 cm-3, velocity from 200 to 500 km/s and temperatures from 2 ·104 to 18 ·104 K, and compare the results with a real MESSENGER orbit as reference case. We use the code PLUTO in spherical coordinates and an asymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field. The study shows for all simulations a stand off distance larger than the Mercury radius and the presence of close magnetic field lines on the day side of the planet, so the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is not high enough to push the magnetopause on the planet surface if the interplanetary magnetic field is weak. The simulations with large dynamic pressure lead to a large compression of the Hermean magnetic field modifying its topology in the inner magnetosphere as well as the plasma flows from the magnetosheath towards the planet surface.

  8. An evidence for prompt electric field disturbance driven by changes in the solar wind density under northward IMF Bz condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Diptiranjan; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Pant, Tarun K.; Veenadhari, B.; Shiokawa, K.

    2016-05-01

    Before the onset of a geomagnetic storm on 22 January 2012 (Ap = 24), an enhancement in solar wind number density from 10/cm3 to 22/cm3 during 0440-0510 UT under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) condition is shown to have enhanced the high-latitude ionospheric convection and also caused variations in the geomagnetic field globally. Conspicuous changes in ΔX are observed not only at longitudinally separated low-latitude stations over Indian (prenoon), South American (midnight), Japanese (afternoon), Pacific (afternoon) and African (morning) sectors but also at latitudinally separated stations located over high and middle latitudes. The latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the ΔX during 0440-0510 UT is shown to be consistent with the characteristics of prompt penetration electric field disturbances. Most importantly, the density pulse event caused enhancements in the equatorial electrojet strength and the peak height of the F layer (hmF2) over the Indian dip equatorial sector. Further, the concomitant enhancements in electrojet current and F layer movement over the dip equator observed during this space weather event suggest a common driver of prompt electric field disturbance at this time. Such simultaneous variations are found to be absent during magnetically quiet days. In absence of significant change in solar wind velocity and magnetospheric substorm activity, these observations point toward perceptible prompt electric field disturbance over the dip equator driven by the overcompression of the magnetosphere by solar wind density enhancement.

  9. Hazardous substances releases associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in industrial settings, Louisiana and Texas.

    PubMed

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen F; Lanier, Kenneth; Koehler, Allison

    2008-11-15

    The scientific literature concerning the public health response to the unprecedented hurricanes striking the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005 has focused mainly on assessing health-related needs and surveillance of injuries, infectious diseases, and other illnesses. However, the hurricanes also resulted in unintended hazardous substances releases in the affected states. Data from two states (Louisiana and Texas) participating in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system were analyzed to describe the characteristics of hazardous substances releases in industrial settings associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. HSEES is an active multi-state Web-based surveillance system maintained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In 2005, 166 hurricane-related hazardous substances events in industrial settings in Louisiana and Texas were reported. Most (72.3%) releases were due to emergency shut downs in preparation for the hurricanes and start-ups after the hurricanes. Emphasis is given to the contributing causal factors, hazardous substances released, and event scenarios. Recommendations are made to prevent or minimize acute releases of hazardous substances during future hurricanes, including installing backup power generation, securing equipment and piping to withstand high winds, establishing procedures to shutdown process operations safely, following established and up-to-date start-up procedures and checklists, and carefully performing pre-start-up safety reviews.

  10. Intimate partner violence and Hurricane Katrina: predictors and associated mental health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julie A; Coffey, Scott F; Norris, Fran H; Tracy, Melissa; Clements, Kahni; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to establish the prevalence and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in the 6 months before and after Hurricane Katrina. Participants were 445 married or cohabiting persons who were living in the 23 southernmost counties of Mississippi at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Data for this study were collected as part of a larger, population-based, representative study. The percentage of women reporting psychological victimization increased from 33.6% prior to Hurricane Katrina to 45.2% following Hurricane Katrina (p < .001). The percentage of men reporting psychological victimization increased from 36.7% to 43.1% (p = .01). Reports of physical victimization increased from 4.2% to 8.3% for women (p = .01) but were unchanged for men. Significant predictors of post-Katrina victimization included pre-Katrina victimization, age, educational attainment, marital status, and hurricane-related stressors. Reports of IPV were associated with greater risk of post-Katrina depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Data from the first population-based study to document IPV following a large-scale natural disaster suggest that IPV may be an important but often overlooked public health concern following disasters.

  11. Singular-Arc Time-Optimal Trajectory of Aircraft in Two-Dimensional Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a minimum time-to-climb trajectory analysis for aircraft flying in a two-dimensional altitude dependent wind field. The time optimal control problem possesses a singular control structure when the lift coefficient is taken as a control variable. A singular arc analysis is performed to obtain an optimal control solution on the singular arc. Using a time-scale separation with the flight path angle treated as a fast state, the dimensionality of the optimal control solution is reduced by eliminating the lift coefficient control. A further singular arc analysis is used to decompose the original optimal control solution into the flight path angle solution and a trajectory solution as a function of the airspeed and altitude. The optimal control solutions for the initial and final climb segments are computed using a shooting method with known starting values on the singular arc The numerical results of the shooting method show that the optimal flight path angle on the initial and final climb segments are constant. The analytical approach provides a rapid means for analyzing a time optimal trajectory for aircraft performance.

  12. New non-Doppler remote sensing technique for 3D wind field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Gurvich, Alexander V.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to the statistical analysis of fluctuating, photon-limited signals that permits us to accumulate and process the lidar returns without averaging of the reflected energy fluctuations is developed. This approach requires recording the photocounts for each pulse in a series of pulses and then determining photocount statistics. Based on the semiclassical theory of photodetection and Mandel's formula, a relationship has been obtained between the time-space cross correlation function and the cross spectrum of the lidar returns and corresponding photocount statistics. It is shown that the relative uncertainties of measuring the cross correlation or the cross spectrum of the lidar returns is determined by the general number of photocounts, but not by their mean value. A fast-scanning lidar system, which is based on a new photocounting analysis approach, is described for 3D wind field mapping in the atmosphere at altitudes up to 5 km. A program for the experimental verification of the new approach is presented.

  13. Dynamic impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind on the tropical cyclone boundary layer wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ninghao; Xu, Xin; Song, Lili; Bai, Lina; Ming, Jie; Wang, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    This work studies the impact of the vertical shear of gradient wind (VSGW) in the free atmosphere on the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL). A new TCBL model is established, which relies on fiveforce balance including the pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, centrifugal force, turbulent friction, and inertial deviation force. This model is then employed to idealize tropical cyclones (TCs) produced by DeMaria's model, under different VSGW conditions (non-VSGW, positive VSGW, negative VSGW, and VSGW increase/decrease along the radial direction). The results show that the free-atmosphere VSGW is particularly important to the intensity of TC. For negative VSGW, the total horizontal velocity in the TCBL is somewhat suppressed. However, with the maximum radial inflow displaced upward and outward, the radial velocity notably intensifies. Consequently, the convergence is enhanced throughout the TCBL, giving rise to a stronger vertical pumping at the TCBL top. In contrast, for positive VSGW, the radial inflow is significantly suppressed, even with divergent outflow in the middle-upper TCBL. For varying VSGW along the radial direction, the results indicate that the sign and value of VSGW is more important than its radial distribution, and the negative VSGW induces stronger convergence and Ekman pumping in the TCBL, which favors the formation and intensification of TC.

  14. Modeling time-series wind fields over a semi-arid mountain catchment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spatial variability of winds is considerable over mountain landscapes producing great spatial variability in mass and energy fluxes. Variable winds are often cited for the strong heterogeneity of snow distribution in non-forested mountain locations. Distributed models capable of capturing the ...

  15. Field wind tunnel testing of two silt loam soils on the North American Central High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that threatens agricultural sustainability and environmental quality globally. Protecting the soil surface with cover crops and plant residues is a highly effective method for shielding the soil surface from the erosive forces of wind. Recently, advances in...

  16. Granger causality estimate of information flow in temperature fields is consistent with wind direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2014-05-01

    Granger causality analysis is designed to quantify whether one time series is useful in forecasting another. We apply the time domain Granger causality analysis based on autoregressive processes to gridded daily surface air temperature data. For each grid-point pair, the direction and strength of the causal influence were computed with the one-day lag, effectively assessing the direction of the information flow in the temperature field. In order to remove the influence of different distances of the grid-points in the original angularly regular grid of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the data were transformed into an equidistant geodesic grid of 642 grid points. The strongest causalities have been found in the Northern Hemisphere's extratropics, where the temperature information is flowing eastward, in agreement with the prevailing westerlies. In contrast, only weak causalities have been observed in the tropics, which may be arising from higher spatio-temporal homogeneity. In the second step, we quantitatively compared this estimate of information flow with the actual wind directions from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data transformed onto the equidistant geodesic grid of 642 points. This was done for the surface layer and for the 850, 700, 500, 300 and 100hPa layers. The direction of the information flow matches the flow of the air masses, particularly well in the Northern Hemisphere's extratropics, i.e. for the strongest causalities. This agreement holds throughout the troposphere, slightly increasing with the height up to 500hPa level, then remains the same until bottom stratosphere. The agreement between the information flow in the air temperature field and the flow of air masses suggests the Granger causality as a suitable tools for constructing directed climate networks.

  17. Improving the detection of wind fields from LIDAR aerosol backscatter using feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Brady R.; Rotthoff, Eric R.; Walters, Gage S.; Kane, Timothy J.; Mayor, Shane D.

    2016-04-01

    The tracking of winds and atmospheric features has many applications, from predicting and analyzing weather patterns in the upper and lower atmosphere to monitoring air movement from pig and chicken farms. Doppler LIDAR systems exist to quantify the underlying wind speeds, but cost of these systems can sometimes be relatively high, and processing limitations exist. The alternative is using an incoherent LIDAR system to analyze aerosol backscatter. Improving the detection and analysis of wind information from aerosol backscatter LIDAR systems will allow for the adoption of these relatively low cost instruments in environments where the size, complexity, and cost of other options are prohibitive. Using data from a simple aerosol backscatter LIDAR system, we attempt to extend the processing capabilities by calculating wind vectors through image correlation techniques to improve the detection of wind features.

  18. Field study and numerical modeling of wind and surface waves at the middle-sized water body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of field experiments on studying the wind and waves over inland waters, which were carried out at the Gorky Reservoir in 2011-2014. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. From the measured profiles of wind speed, we calculated basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer: the friction velocity u*, the wind speed at the standard height of 10 m U10 and the drag coefficient CD. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-10 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 3 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. In the range of wind speeds of 3-5 m/s CD values are even lower than the corresponding smooth flow. However, for weak winds (less than 2.5 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The main peculiarity of our measurements is very low location of the lowest sensor: 0.1 m against 0.89 m in [1] and 0.5 m in [2]. Moreover, the lowest sensor was not fixed on the mast, but was located on the float and followed the water surface. Analysis shows that the obtained parameters of profile are almost independent on the number of approximated wind speed levels if they include the lowest sensor. But excluding the lowest sensor gave larger values of CD similar to [1] and [2]. These results demonstrate importance of wind speed measuring close to the water surface. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The new surface drag parameterization was used in WAVEWATCH III model applied for modeling waves at the reservoir. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with

  19. Magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling: Effect of neutral winds on energy transfer and field-aligned current

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.; Richmond, A.D.; Emery, B.A.

    1995-10-01

    The assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) algorithm has been applied to derive the realistic time-dependent large-scale global distributions of the ionospheric convection and particle precipitation during a recent Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) campaign period: March 28-29, 1992. The AMIE outputs are then used as the inputs of the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model to estimate the electrodynamic quantities in the ionosphere and thermosphere. It is found that the magnetospheric electromagnetic energy dissipated in the high-latitude ionosphere is mainly converted into Joule heating, with only a small fraction (6%) going to acceleration of thermospheric neutral winds. This study also reveals that the thermospheric winds can have significant influence on the ionospheric electrodynamics. On the average for these 2 days, the neutral winds have approximately a 28% negative effect on Joule heating and approximately a 27% negative effect on field-aligned currents. The field-aligned currents driven by the neutral wind flow in the opposite direction to those driven by the plasma convection. On the average, the global electromagnetic energy input is about 4 times larger than the particle energy input. 65 refs., 10 figs.

  20. CMEs, the Tail of the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Distribution, and 11-yr Cosmic Ray Modulation at 1 AU. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using a recent classification of the solar wind at 1 AU into its principal components (slow solar wind, high-speed streams, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for 1972-2000, we show that the monthly-averaged galactic cosmic ray intensity is anti-correlated with the percentage of time that the Earth is imbedded in CME flows. We suggest that this correlation results primarily from a CME related change in the tail of the distribution function of hourly-averaged values of the solar wind magnetic field (B) between solar minimum and solar maximum. The number of high-B (square proper subset 10 nT) values increases by a factor of approx. 3 from minimum to maximum (from 5% of all hours to 17%), with about two-thirds of this increase due to CMEs. On an hour-to-hour basis, average changes of cosmic ray intensity at Earth become negative for solar wind magnetic field values square proper subset 10 nT.

  1. The evolution of high-latitude field-aligned currents and magnetospheric dynamics in response to solar wind drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, Yulia; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Wild, James; Korth, Haje; Lühr, Hermann; Wing, Simon; Pitout, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    While the statistical behaviour of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system is well defined by the Dungey cycle, questions remain on the behaviour of this coupled system during extreme conditions, for example during magnetic storms or periods with long lasting northward IMF, and on how, and how fast, the system reacts to abrupt changes in the solar wind driver. Field-aligned currents play a crucial role in the dynamics of this coupled system as they provide connectivity between different regions and act as channels for energy and momentum transfer. These currents have been investigated in the last decade thanks to observations from low-orbiting satellites, such as CHAMP, Ørsted, DMSP, and the Iridium constellation. However, many previous studies concentrated on the statistical behavior of the current systems or measurements from individual observatories. In this paper we will employ data from Swarm, AMPERE, DMSP, Cluster, SuperDARN and SuperMAG to perform a multi-point study of high-latitude field-aligned current systems evolution and properties and magnetospheric dynamics in response to the solar wind driver, concentrating on the intervals of changes in the IMF orientation and extreme IMF and solar wind conditions.

  2. Hurricane Katrina: medical response at the Houston Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex.

    PubMed

    Gavagan, Thomas F; Smart, Kieran; Palacio, Herminia; Dyer, Carmel; Greenberg, Stephen; Sirbaugh, Paul; Fishkind, Avrim; Hamilton, Douglas; Shah, Umair; Masi, George; Ivey, R Todd; Jones, Julie; Chiou-Tan, Faye Y; Bloodworth, Donna; Hyman, David; Whigham, Cliff; Pavlik, Valory; Feigin, Ralph D; Mattox, Kenneth

    2006-09-01

    On September 1, 2005, with only 12 hours notice, various collaborators established a medical facility--the Katrina Clinic--at the Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex in Houston. By the time the facility closed roughly two weeks later, the Katrina Clinic medical staff had seen over 11,000 of the estimated 27,000 Hurricane Katrina evacuees who sought shelter in the Complex. Herein, we describe the scope of this medical response, citing our major challenges, successes, and recommendations for conducting similar efforts in the future.

  3. Analyzing after-action reports from Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina: repeated, modified, and newly created recommendations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years after Hurricane Andrew struck Homestead, FL, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and southeastern Louisiana. Along with all its destruction, the term "catastrophic" was redefined. This article extends the literature on these hurricanes by providing a macrolevel analysis of The Governor's Disaster Planning and Response Review Committee Final Report from Hurricane Andrew and three federal after-action reports from Hurricane Katrina, as well as a cursory review of relevant literature. Results provide evidence that previous lessons have not been learned or institutionalized with many recommendations being repeated or modified. This article concludes with a discussion of these lessons, as well as new issues arising during Hurricane Katrina.

  4. Engineering education in the wake of hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marybeth

    2007-10-10

    Living through hurricane Katrina and its aftermath and reflecting on these experiences from technical and non-technical standpoints has led me to reconsider my thoughts and philosophy on engineering education. I present three ideas regarding engineering education pedagogy that I believe will prepare future engineers for problem-solving in an increasingly complex world. They are (1) we must practice radical (to the root) engineering, (2) we must illustrate connections between engineering and public policy, and (3) we will join the charge to find sustainable solutions to problems. Ideas for bringing each of these concepts into engineering curricula through methods such as case study, practicing broad information gathering and data interpretation, and other methods inside and outside the classroom, are discussed. I believe that the consequences of not considering the root issues of problems to be solved, and of not including policy and sustainability considerations when problems to be solved are framed will lead our profession toward well meaning but insufficient utility. Hurricane Katrina convinced me that we must do better as educators to prepare our students for engineering for a sustainable world.

  5. Environmental impacts of Major Flood Events: Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reible, D. D.

    2008-05-01

    The flooding of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina provides many lessons for the environmental and engineering communities and raises serious public policy questions about risk management. Although serious environmental and waste management concerns were highlighted as a result of the flooding, many were not observed in the extensive environmental sampling that occurred. The potential environmental consequences were of concern because of the many chemical plants, petroleum facilities, and contaminated sites, including Superfund sites, in the areas covered by floodwaters. The potential sources of toxics and environmental contaminants included metal-contaminated soils typical of old urban areas. Compounding these concerns is the presence of hazardous chemicals commonly stored in households and commercial establishments and the fuel and motor oil in approximately 350,000 flooded automobiles. Uncontrolled biological wastes from both human and animal sources also contributed to the pollutant burden. There were concerns associated with the immediate impacts of the flooding, the disposal of the debris and wastes in the aftermath, as well as the long- term legacy associated with contaminants in homes and yards. This discussion focuses on successes and failures in responding to each of these concerns as well as lessons learned for future major flooding events. Special attention is paid to some of the unique hazards posed by Katrina, including water quality impacts associated with debris disposal, high indoor concentrations of contaminants due to fractionation from outdoor soils, and mold.

  6. Needs Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees Residing Temporarily in Dallas.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Polatin, Peter B; Hogan, David; Downs, Dana L; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the psychosocial needs of Hurricane Katrina evacuees temporarily residing in Dallas, TX, after sheltering but prior to their permanent resettlement. Common trauma exposures were physical exposure to flood water, seeing corpses, witnessing death, and loss of family, friends, or home. Fewer than 10 % met symptom criteria for disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More than one-fourth met major depressive disorder (MDD) symptom criteria post-disaster but only 15 % had a new (incident) MDD episode after the disaster. Specific trauma exposures and some hurricane-related stressors contributed to risk for both Katrina-related PTSD symptom criteria and incident MDD, but other hurricane-related stressors were uniquely associated with incident MDD. Referral to mental health services was associated with meeting symptom criteria for PTSD and with incident MDD, but only about one-third of these individuals received a referral. Understanding the needs of disaster-exposed population requires assessing trauma exposures and identifying pre-disaster and post-disaster psychopathology.

  7. Engineering education in the wake of hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Marybeth

    2007-01-01

    Living through hurricane Katrina and its aftermath and reflecting on these experiences from technical and non-technical standpoints has led me to reconsider my thoughts and philosophy on engineering education. I present three ideas regarding engineering education pedagogy that I believe will prepare future engineers for problem-solving in an increasingly complex world. They are (1) we must practice radical (to the root) engineering, (2) we must illustrate connections between engineering and public policy, and (3) we will join the charge to find sustainable solutions to problems. Ideas for bringing each of these concepts into engineering curricula through methods such as case study, practicing broad information gathering and data interpretation, and other methods inside and outside the classroom, are discussed. I believe that the consequences of not considering the root issues of problems to be solved, and of not including policy and sustainability considerations when problems to be solved are framed will lead our profession toward well meaning but insufficient utility. Hurricane Katrina convinced me that we must do better as educators to prepare our students for engineering for a sustainable world. PMID:18271988

  8. A survey of the occurrence of Bacillus anthracis in North American soils over two long-range transects and within post-Katrina New Orleans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Petrosky, T.; Morman, S.A.; Luna, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil samples were collected along a north-south transect extending from Manitoba, Canada, to the US-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas in 2004 (104 samples), a group of sites within New Orleans, Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (19 samples), and a Gulf Coast transect extending from Sulphur, Louisiana, to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, in 2007 (38 samples). Samples were collected from the top 40 cm of soil and were screened for the presence of total Bacillus species and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), specifically using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using an assay with a sensitivity of ???170 equivalent colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 field moist soil, the prevalence rate of Bacillus sp./B. anthracis in the north-south transect and the 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina sample set were 20/5% and 26/26%, respectively. Prevalence in the 2007 Gulf Coast sample set using an assay with a sensitivity of ???4 CFU g-1 of soil was 63/0%. Individual transect-set data indicate a positive relation between occurrences of species and soil moisture or soil constituents (i.e., Zn and Cu content). The 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina data indicated that B. anthracis is readily detectable in Gulf Coast soils following flood events. The data also indicated that occurrence, as it relates to soil chemistry, may be confounded by flood-induced dissemination of germinated cells and the mixing of soil constituents for short temporal periods following an event.

  9. A survey of the occurrence of Bacillus anthracis in North American soils over two long-range transects and within post-Katrina New Orleans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Petrosky, Terry; Morman, Suzette A.; Luna, Vicki A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil samples were collected along a north-south transect extending from Manitoba, Canada, to the US-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas in 2004 (104 samples), a group of sites within New Orleans, Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (19 samples), and a Gulf Coast transect extending from Sulphur, Louisiana, to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, in 2007 (38 samples). Samples were collected from the top 40 cm of soil and were screened for the presence of total Bacillus species and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), specifically using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using an assay with a sensitivity of ~170 equivalent colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 field moist soil, the prevalence rate of Bacillus sp./B. anthracis in the north-south transect and the 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina sample set were 20/5% and 26/26%, respectively. Prevalence in the 2007 Gulf Coast sample set using an assay with a sensitivity of ~4 CFU g-1 of soil was 63/0%. Individual transect-set data indicate a positive relation between occurrences of species and soil moisture or soil constituents (i.e., Zn and Cu content). The 2005 New Orleans post-Katrina data indicated that B. anthracis is readily detectable in Gulf Coast soils following flood events. The data also indicated that occurrence, as it relates to soil chemistry, may be confounded by flood-induced dissemination of germinated cells and the mixing of soil constituents for short temporal periods following an event.

  10. Using Wind and Temperature Fields to Study Dehydration Mechanisms in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna; Miller, Timothy; Robertson, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    The tropics are the main region for troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST) of air. One of the dominant mechanisms that control tropical TST of water vapor is freeze-drying by the cold tropical tropopause. This mechanism is supported by evidence from satellite observations of the "tape recorder", where seasonal changes in stratospheric water vapor are in phase with seasonal changes in tropopause temperatures in the tropics. Over the last few years, however, the concept of the tropical tropopause has evolved from a single material surface to a layer called the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). A recent hypothesis on dehydration mechanisms suggests that dehydration and entry point into the stratosphere are not always co-located (Holton and Gettelman, 2001). Instead, dehydration can occur during horizontal advection through Lagrangian 'cold pools', or coldest regions along a parcel's trajectory, as air ascends within the TTL while the entry point into the stratosphere occurs at a different geographical location. In this study, we investigate the impact that these Lagrangian cold pools have on TTL moisture. For this purpose, we use in situ measurements of TTL water vapor obtained aboard NASA's WB-57 aircraft over the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and we compare these measurements to minimum saturation water vapor mixing ratios obtained from three-dimensional backward trajectory calculations. Aircraft measurements show frequent unsaturated conditions, which suggest that the entry value of stratospheric water vapor in this region was not set by local saturation conditions. Trajectory calculations, driven by both ECMWF operational analysis and reanalysis winds and temperature fields, are used to explore the impact (e.g., geographical location, timing, dehydration magnitude) of the Lagrangian cold pools intercepted by the parcels sampled by the aircraft. We find noteworthy differences in the location of the Lagrangian cold pools using the two ECMWF data sets, namely

  11. Generation of high-resolution wind fields from the dense meteorological station network WegenerNet in South-Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Christoph; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Fuchsberger, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    To investigate weather and climate on a local scale as well as for evaluating regional climate models (RCMs) the Wegener Center at the University of Graz established the long-term field experiment WegenerNet Feldbach region, a dense grid of 153 meteorological stations. The observations of these stations are managed by an automatic WegenerNet Processing system. This system includes a quality check of collected observations and a Data Product Generator (DPG), among other subsystems. Products already implemented in the DPG are gridded weather and climate products, generated from the main parameters temperature, precipitation and relative humidity (Kirchengast et. al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 95, 227-242, 2014). Missing elements are gridded wind fields from wind observations. Wind is considered as one of the most difficult meteorological variables to model and depends on many different parameters such as topography and surface roughness. Therefore a simple interpolation can only be performed in case of uniform characteristics of landscape. The presentation introduces our method of generation of wind fields from near real-time observations of the WegenerNet. Purpose of this work is to provide a database with 3D wind fields in a high spatial and time resolution as addition to the existing products, for evaluating convection permitting climate models as well as investigating weather and climate on a local scale. Core of the application is the diagnostic California Meteorological Model (CALMET). This model computes 3D wind fields based on meteorological observational data, a digital elevation model and land use categories. The application generates the required input files from meteorological stations of the WegenerNet Feldbach region and triggers the start of the CALMET model with these input files. In a next step the modeled wind fields are stored automatically every 30 minutes with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 m in the WegenerNet database. To verify the

  12. Calculation of geopotential and temperature fields from an array of nearly continuous wind observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Anthes, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy is studied of temperature estimates derived from the divergence equation when wind observations of various spatial and temporal resolutions and accuracies are available. The basic data set used is the high resolution model data set used by Kuo and Anthes (1984a) in observing systems simulation experiments (OSSE) designed to estimate the errors in heat and moisture budgets (Kuo and Anthes, 1984b) calculated from the AVE-SESAME-1979 spatial observational network. This model data set is modified in ways to simulate wind observations that appear feasible from an operational regional network of wind profilers.

  13. Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar Field on High Speed Streams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    solar wind model (Arge and Pizzo, 2000), based on daily updating solar magnetic field synoptic maps, is then used to map the outflows from the corona ...worldwide. University of California Peer Reviewed Title: Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind

  14. Quantifying wind blown landscapes using time-series airborne LiDAR at White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Wind blown landscapes are a default geomorphic and sedimentary environment in our solar system. Wind sand dunes are ubiquitous features on the surfaces of Earth, Mars and Titan and prevalent within the aeolian rock records of Earth and Mars. Dunes are sensitive to environmental and climatic changes and a complete understanding of this system promises a unique, robust and quantitative record of paleoclimate extending to the early histories of these worlds. However, our understanding of how aeolian dune landscapes evolve and how the details of the wind are recorded in cross-strata is limited by our lack of understanding of three-dimensional dune morphodynamics related to changing boundary conditions such as wind direction and magnitude and sediment source area. We use airborne LiDAR datasets over 40 km2 of White Sands Dune Field collected from June 2007, June 2008, January 2009, September 2009 and June 2010 to quantify 1) three-dimensional dune geometries, 2) annual and seasonal patterns of erosion and deposition across dune topography, 3) spatial changes in sediment flux related to position within the field, 4) spatial changes in sediment flux across sinuous crestlines and 5) morphologic changes through dune-dune interactions. In addition to measurements, we use the LiDAR data along with wind data from two near-by weather stations to develop a simple model that predicts depositional and stratigraphic patterns on dune lee slopes. Several challenges emerged using time series LiDAR data sets at White Sands Dune Field. The topography upon which the dunes sit is variable and rises by 16 meters over the length of the dune field. In order to compare individual dune geometries across the field and between data sets a base surface was interpolated from local minima and subtracted from the dune topography. Co-registration and error calculation between datasets was done manually using permanent vegetated features within the active dune field and structures built by the

  15. Transient behavior of a flare-associated solar wind. I - Gas dynamics in a radial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is conducted into the way in which a solar wind model initially satisfying both steady state and energy balance conditions is disturbed and deformed, under the assumption of heating that correspoonds to the energy release of solar flares of an importance value of approximately 1 which occur in radial open field regions. Flare-associated solar wind transient behavior is modeled for 1-8 solar radii. The coronal temperature around the heat source region rises, and a large thermal conductive flux flows inward to the chromosphere and outward to interplanetary space along field lines. The speed of the front of expanding chromospheric material generated by the impingement of the conduction front on the upper chromosphere exceeds the local sound velocity in a few minutes and eventually exceeds 100 million cm/sec.

  16. Surface Wind Fields in the Vicinity of Meso-Convective Storms as Derived from Radar Observations: Non-Tornadic Storms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    figure verified that the higher value correlation coefficients were now dominating the whole field. At the 40-series SAM complex at 2009 CST (Fig. 4.9) the...rebounded and stabilized at about 334 K at approximately 2145 CST. At the 40-series complex at 2007 CST, ee dropped from around 360 K to 336 K at 2009 CST...Smythe, G. R., 1981: Correlation of Doppler-radar velocities and reflectivities with application to retrieving the transverse wind. CIMMS Report No

  17. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  18. Buoyancy effects on the scaling characteristics of atmospheric boundary-layer wind fields in the mesoscale range.

    PubMed

    Kiliyanpilakkil, V P; Basu, S; Ruiz-Columbié, A; Araya, G; Castillo, L; Hirth, B; Burgett, W

    2015-09-01

    We have analyzed long-term wind speed time series from five field sites up to a height of 300 m from the ground. Structure function-based scaling analysis has revealed that the scaling exponents in the mesoscale regime systematically depend on height. This anomalous behavior is likely caused by the buoyancy effects. In the framework of the extended self-similarity, the relative scaling exponents portray quasiuniversal behavior.

  19. Tracing Trajectories of Air Parcels Transported through Spatially Resolved Horizontal Neutral Wind Fields Observed in the Thermosphere above Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.

    2014-12-01

    Transport by fluid flow is a very complex problem. Any type of velocity gradient introduces distortion of the original air masses which, over time, can become extraordinarily severe. In Earth's thermosphere, it is however widely presumed that viscosity hinders both horizontal and vertical wind shears, and hence rapidly attenuates any gradients that might occur over distances shorter than synoptic scales. As a result, particle trajectories predicted by current models are often relatively simple, so that transport effects only slowly disperse and mix air masses. This means that regions of perturbed chemical composition, formed for example by intense aurora, would be expected to remain intact for many hours or even days. However, our observations show that this simple picture does not hold in practice; wind fields in the thermosphere have much more local-scale structure than predicated by models, at least in the auroral zone. These local small scale structures complicate air parcel trajectories enormously, relative to typical expectations. In Alaska, three Scanning Doppler Imaging Fabry-Perot interferometers are currently in operation. A single SDI instrument can simultaneously observe the thermospheric wind's line-of-sight component in 115 (typically) independent look directions. From these data it is possible to reconstruct time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the horizontal vector wind field, and use these to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories over time. Tracing parcel trajectories through a given geographic location maps where they will go from there (forward tracing in time) and where they come from previously (history of parcels or tracing back in time). Results show that transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local scale wind gradients that are actually observed is far more complicated than what current models typically predict.

  20. The impact of changes in the Antarctic wind field on the Southern Ocean sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Verena; Iovino, Dorotea; Masina, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations show an enlargement of the sea ice extent of the Southern Ocean in the last decades. A possible trigger for the increase is a change in the atmospheric circulation, which leads to a southward shift and intensification of the westerlies around Antarctica. We performed a sensitivity study with an eddy-permitting sea ice-ocean model forced by ERA-Interim data. We compare a set of numerical simulations with simple manipulations of the wind velocities in the forcing data and investigate the response of sea ice and on-shelf water properties. In our results, increases of the zonal wind component lead to the onset of deep convection in the Weddell Sea within 10 years (with one exception) and a reduction of sea ice. Manipulations of the meridional wind component can lead to an increase of ice extent and volume, but only if regions of strengthened northward wind alternate with regions of increased southward wind. The convergent drift against the shoreline is necessary to thicken the sea ice. Without it, enhanced northward drift leads to an exhanced ice extent during winter but combined with a loss of sea ice thickness which entails a strongly reduced ice extent during summer. For increases of the westward/eastward wind component at the Antarctic coastline, the on-shelf water temperatures increase/decrease due to Ekman pumping. Except for regions with more southerly winds, the manipulated forcing in all cases increases the sea ice production at the coastline and therefore the on-shelf waters are more saline. After a period of 10 years in all the experiments the increased wind results in a higher density of the on-shelf water column.

  1. Evaluation of the Revised Lagrangian Particle Model GRAL Against Wind-Tunnel and Field Observations in the Presence of Obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettl, Dietmar

    2015-05-01

    A revised microscale flow field model has been implemented in the Lagrangian particle model Graz Lagrangian Model (GRAL) for computing flows around obstacles. It is based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions and the widely used standard turbulence model. Here we focus on evaluating the model regarding computed concentrations by use of a comprehensive wind-tunnel experiment with numerous combinations of building geometries, stack positions, and locations. In addition, two field experiments carried out in Denmark and in the U.S were used to evaluate the model. Further, two different formulations of the standard deviation of wind component fluctuations have also been investigated, but no clear picture could be drawn in this respect. Overall the model is able to capture several of the main features of pollutant dispersion around obstacles, but at least one future model improvement was identified for stack releases within the recirculation zone of buildings. Regulatory applications are the bread-and-butter of most GRAL users nowadays, requiring fast and robust modelling algorithms. Thus, a few simplifications have been introduced to decrease the computational time required. Although predicted concentrations for the two field experiments were found to be in good agreement with observations, shortcomings were identified regarding the extent of computed recirculation zones for the idealized wind-tunnel building geometries, with approaching flows perpendicular to building faces.

  2. A field evaluation of remote sensor measurements of wind, temperature, and moisture for ARM integrated sounding system research

    SciTech Connect

    Martner, B.E.; Westwater, E.R.; Strauch, R.G.

    1993-10-01

    Remote sensing systems were operated in Colorado in February and March 1991 to obtain detailed profiles of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere for the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research program. The instruments included wind profilers, Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (PASS), microwave and infrared radiometers, an infrared spectrometer, ceilometers, radiosondes, surface meteorological stations, and other equipment. A mesoscale data assimilation model will be used to combine the data into dynamically consistent four-dimensional fields as part of an integrated data assimilation sounding system. This report evaluates the performance of the NOAA remote sensors used in the 1991 field data collection. These included five different wind profilers, each equipped with RASS capability for temperature profiling, and microwave radiometers for measurements of pathintegrated water vapor and liquid water content. The design and initial testing of a Fourier-transform InfraRed Sounder (FIRS) for humidity profiling is also described. The ranges of height coverage and measurement accuracies for each wind profiler/RASS are examined. Specific recommendations for optimizing the design and configuration of similar instruments are made for the ARM cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, based on results of the 1991 field work and earlier tests. Examples of routine processed data products are presented for three intensive operating period studies to further illustrate the remote sensors` capabilities.

  3. Solar Wind Electron Interaction with the Dayside Lunar Surface and Crustal Magnetic Fields: Evidence for Precursor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, Jasper S.; Poppe, A.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; Horanyi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Electron distributions measured by Lunar Prospector above the dayside lunar surface in the solar wind often have an energy dependent loss cone, inconsistent with adiabatic magnetic reflection. Energy dependent reflection suggests the presence of downward parallel electric fields below the spacecraft, possibly indicating the presence of a standing electrostatic structure. Many electron distributions contain apparent low energy (<100 eV) upwardgoing conics (58% of the time) and beams (12% of the time), primarily in regions with non-zero crustal magnetic fields, implying the presence of parallel electric fields and/or wave-particle interactions below the spacecraft. Some, but not all, of the observed energy dependence comes from the energy gained during reflection from a moving obstacle; correctly characterizing electron reflection requires the use of the proper reference frame. Nonadiabatic reflection may also play a role, but cannot fully explain observations. In cases with upward-going beams, we observe partial isotropization of incoming solar wind electrons, possibly indicating streaming and/or whistler instabilities. The Moon may therefore influence solar wind plasma well upstream from its surface. Magnetic anomaly interactions and/or non-monotonic near surface potentials provide the most likely candidates to produce the observed precursor effects, which may help ensure quasi-neutrality upstream from the Moon.

  4. A non-CFD modeling system for computing 3D wind and concentration fields in urban environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Matthew A; Brown, Michael J; Williams, Michael D; Gowardhan, Akshay; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2010-01-01

    The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) Dispersion Modeling System has been developed to rapidly compute the transport and dispersion of toxic agent releases in the vicinity of buildings. It is composed of an empirical-diagnostic wind solver, an 'urbanized' Lagrangian random-walk model, and a graphical user interface. The code has been used for homeland security and environmental air pollution applications. In this paper, we discuss the wind solver methodology and improvements made to the original Roeckle schemes in order to better capture flow fields in dense built-up areas. The mode1-computed wind and concentration fields are then compared to measurements from several field experiments. Improvements to the QUIC Dispersion Modeling System have been made to account for the inhomogeneous and complex building layouts found in large cities. The logic that has been introduced into the code is described and comparisons of model output to full-scale outdoor urban measurements in Oklahoma City and New York City are given. Although far from perfect, the model agreed fairly well with measurements and in many cases performed equally to CFD codes.

  5. Field Testing of LIDAR-Assisted Feedforward Control Algorithms for Improved Speed Control and Fatigue Load Reduction on a 600-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avishek A.; Bossanyi, Ervin A.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul; Boquet, Mathieu; Krishnamurthy, Raghu

    2015-12-14

    A severe challenge in controlling wind turbines is ensuring controller performance in the presence of a stochastic and unknown wind field, relying on the response of the turbine to generate control actions. Recent technologies such as LIDAR, allow sensing of the wind field before it reaches the rotor. In this work a field-testing campaign to test LIDAR Assisted Control (LAC) has been undertaken on a 600-kW turbine using a fixed, five-beam LIDAR system. The campaign compared the performance of a baseline controller to four LACs with progressively lower levels of feedback using 35 hours of collected data.

  6. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow baseline and suppressor nozzles. Volume 2: Forward speed effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A model scale flight effects test was conducted in the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to investigate the effect of aircraft forward speed on single flow jet noise characteristics. The models tested included a 15.24 cm baseline round convergent nozzle, a 20-lobe and annular nozzle with and without lined ejector shroud, and a 57-tube nozzle with a lined ejector shroud. Nozzle operating conditions covered jet velocities from 412 to 640 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. Wind tunnel speeds were varied from near zero to 91.5 m/s. Measurements were analyzed to (1) determine apparent jet noise source location including effects of ambient velocity; (2) verify a technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field; (3) determine flight effects in the near and far field for baseline and suppressor nozzles; and (4) establish the wind tunnel as a means of accurately defining flight effects for model nozzles and full scale engines.

  7. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J.; Pantellini, F.; Velli, M.

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  8. A lesson from Katrina: pastoral care from an Asian theological perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacob Hee Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Situating pastoral caregivers in the dramatic catastrophe caused by hurricane "Katrina" in New Orleans, this article attempts to address some appropriate pastoral responses toward the disaster from an Asian theological perspective. The article highlights the significance of remembrance and connection rather than repression and forgetfulness in order to bring justice to all victims of Katrina. It builds on Jacoby's "social amnesia," calls for redefining the meaning of community, and attempts to address the human predicaments on the surface of Katrina through an Asian perspective. In order to address pastoral responses, the article builds upon Martin Luther King, Jr.'s concept of interrelatedness and shared destiny. It critically examines Jung Young Lee's theology of marginality, and draws the pastoral implications of this theology of marginality with respect to Katrina.

  9. Information Technology Management: Hurricane Katrina Disaster Recovery Efforts Related to Army Information Technology Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-19

    Information Technology Management Department of Defense Office of Inspector General October 19, 2006 AccountabilityIntegrityQuality Hurricane...00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Information Technology Management : Hurricane Katrina Disaster Recovery Efforts Related to Army Information

  10. Report: EPA Provided Quality and Timely Information on Hurricane Katrina Hazardous Material Releases and Debris Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2006-P-00023, May 2, 2006. After Hurricane Katrina, EPA was the agency with lead responsibility to prevent, minimize, or mitigate threats to public health and the environment caused by hazardous materials and oil spills in inland zones.

  11. A new algorithm for evaluating the fields associated with HVDC power transmission lines in the presence of corona and strong wind

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ming; Kuffel, E. )

    1993-03-01

    A new algorithm for calculating HVDC fields in the presence of corona and strong wind based on boundary element method is presented. The new algorithm uses an auxiliary Poisson's equation for updating the space charge density during the iteration. The iteration process is convergent for wind velocities tested up to 12 m/s.

  12. A Comparison of the Nursing Home Evacuation Experience between Hurricanes Katrina (2005) and Gustav (2008)

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Gary; Dosa, David

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the tragic legacies of Hurricane Katrina was the loss of life among Louisiana (LA) nursing home (NH) residents. Katrina revealed a staggering lack of emergency preparation and understanding of how to safely evacuate frail populations. Three years later, LA braced for Hurricane Gustav, a storm heralded to rival Katrina's power. Though its magnitude of destruction ultimately paled to Katrina, the warnings and predicted path preceding Gustav yielded a process of NH evacuations similar to Katrina. The goal of this paper was to ascertain whether NH administrative directors (ADs) felt more prepared to evacuate before Gustav. Methods In 2006, Dosa, et. al. (JAMDA, 3/07), interviewed 20 NH ADs by qualitative telephone survey to evaluate their lessons learned from Katrina. Administrators at these 20 participating nursing homes were contacted and asked to participate in a follow-up survey to compare hurricane preparedness between 2005 and 2008. Specifically, ADs were asked if they evacuated prior to Gustav, their destination, and about logistical issues with evacuation (e.g., transportation, injuries). ADs were asked to rate their confidence with state assistance, hurricane transportation, and evacuation preparedness on a 10-point scale (10=most confident) and compare their preparedness to Katrina. Results Sixteen of the 20 NHs that participated in 2006 agreed to be surveyed – 11 of whom held the same position before Katrina. Unlike Katrina, when only 45% evacuated prior to the storm, all 16 NHs evacuated before Gustav. (56% to another NH and 46% to a church, gym, college, or other facility). Overall, ADs rated their confidence in preparedness for Gustav as a mean of 8.3 (range 5 to 10) – compared with a mean of 5.4 (range 3 to 8) for Katrina, a 54% improvement. Of the 11 ADs employed pre-Katrina, 73% reported improved collaboration with the state and 55% noted improved transportation. Nevertheless, seven ADs noted significant logistical problems during

  13. The Mississippi Katrina experience: applying lessons learned to augment daily operations in disaster preparation and management.

    PubMed

    Darsey, Damon A; Carlton, Frederick B; Wilson, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the US Gulf Coast, causing catastrophic damage to communities and the medical infrastructure throughout the lower half of Mississippi. Substantial power outages, widespread communication failures, and a sustained medical surge of patients provided a unique challenge for the medical care delivery system in Mississippi for weeks after the hurricane. In the 7 years since Hurricane Katrina struck, many lessons have been learned in medical planning, preparation, and response to disasters that have affected Mississippi.

  14. Evaluating Wind Fields from a Diagnostic Model Over Complex Terrain in the Phoenix Region and Implications to Dispersion Calculations for Regional Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Shaw, William J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper compares the wind field from a diagnostic model (CALMET) over complex terrain in the Phoenix region in the USA with observations that are gridded by a state-of-the-art Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) system. The wind difference between the CALMET and FDDA wind fields is larger at night than in the day. The magnitude of the wind difference can be smaller than 5% of the mean wind speed at low levels in areas with dense observational stations, while it can be larger than 80% in areas without observational stations or at high altitudes. The vector-mean wind direction difference over the domain is 15 deg on the surface level and 25 deg between 10 and 1500 m. To evaluate the effects of the wind difference on dispersion calculations, dispersion of a hypothetical passive tracer released from surface point sources is simulated by the second-order closure integrated puff (SCIPUFF) model driven by the CALMET and FDDA wind fields, respectively. Differences in the two simulated tracer concentration fields increase with time due to accumulation of effects of the wind differences both near the surface and at higher altitudes. Even for the release in the area with the densest distribution of surface stations, the relative difference in the peak surface concentration from CALMET-SCIPUFF and from FDDA-SCIPUFF is less than 10% only within 0.5 hr after the release in the afternoon, and increases to 70% at 1.5 hr; this is because of large differences in wind above the surface. For the release in the area with few stations, the difference can be larger than 100% or even larger after 1.5 hr from the release. To improve dispersion simulations driven by the CALMET wind in the region, observations at upper-air stations are needed and the current surface observation network needs to be reorganized or more stations are needed to account for the influence of terrain.

  15. Corollary discharge inhibition of wind-sensitive cercal giant interneurons in the singing field cricket.

    PubMed

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Crickets carry wind-sensitive mechanoreceptors on their cerci, which, in response to the airflow produced by approaching predators, triggers escape reactions via ascending giant interneurons (GIs). Males also activate their cercal system by air currents generated due to the wing movements underlying sound production. Singing males still respond to external wind stimulation, but are not startled by the self-generated airflow. To investigate how the nervous system discriminates sensory responses to self-generated and external airflow, we intracellularly recorded wind-sensitive afferents and ventral GIs of the cercal escape pathway in fictively singing crickets, a situation lacking any self-stimulation. GI spiking was reduced whenever cercal wind stimulation coincided with singing motor activity. The axonal terminals of cercal afferents showed no indication of presynaptic inhibition during singing. In two ventral GIs, however, a corollary discharge inhibition occurred strictly in phase with the singing motor pattern. Paired intracellular recordings revealed that this inhibition was not mediated by the activity of the previously identified corollary discharge interneuron (CDI) that rhythmically inhibits the auditory pathway during singing. Cercal wind stimulation, however, reduced the spike activity of this CDI by postsynaptic inhibition. Our study reveals how precisely timed corollary discharge inhibition of ventral GIs can prevent self-generated airflow from triggering inadvertent escape responses in singing crickets. The results indicate that the responsiveness of the auditory and wind-sensitive pathway is modulated by distinct CDIs in singing crickets and that the corollary discharge inhibition in the auditory pathway can be attenuated by cercal wind stimulation.

  16. Competition between winds and electric fields in the formation of blanketing sporadic E layers at equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Batista, Inez Staciarini; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Carrasco, Alexander José; de Fátima Andrioli, Vânia; Moro, Juliano; Batista, Paulo Prado; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we analyze the competition between tidal winds and electric fields in the formation of blanketing sporadic E layers (Esb) over São Luís, Brazil (2° 31' S, 44° 16' W), a quasi-equatorial station. To investigate this competition, we have used an ionospheric E region model (MIRE) that is able to model the Esb layers taking into account the E region winds and electric fields. The model calculates the densities for the main molecular and metallic ions by solving the continuity and momentum equations for each of the species. Thus, the main purpose of this analysis is to verify the electric fields role in the occurrence or disruption of Esb layers through simulations. The first results of the simulations show that the Esb layer is usually present when only the tidal winds were considered. In addition, when the zonal component of the electric field is introduced in the simulation, the Esb layers do not show significant changes. However, the simulations show the disruption of the Esb layers when the vertical electric field is included. In this study, we present two specific cases in which Esb layers appear during some hours over São Luís. We can see that these layers appear when the vertical electric field was weak, which means that the tidal components were more effective during these hours. Therefore, the vertical component of the electric field is the main agent responsible for the Esb layer disruption. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: Ionograms from São Luís on January 5, 2005, show a clear case of the competition between electric fields and wind effects in the Es layer formation. In ionograms, the Esq trace is clearly seen and identified by a blue arrow. Besides the Esq, we can identify another Es trace at 1415 UT (identified by a black arrow) that persists until 1600 UT. This layer becomes stronger in each ionogram, as can be seen by its effect on partially blocking the reflection from the low-frequency end of F region above

  17. Charged Dust Grain Dynamics Subject to Solar Wind, Poynting-Robertson Drag, and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason, we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of an averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the unaveraged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semimajor axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semimajor axis on secular timescales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain, as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semimajor axis.

  18. Solar wind measurements of the spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations at scales between the ion and electron gyro-radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements in the range from 1 Hz to 100 Hz enable improved studies of solar wind fluctuations between ion and electron kinetic scales. Theory predicts that a turbulent energy cascade supported by Alfvenic fluctuations or Alfven waves at inertial range scales is supported predominantly by obliquely propagating kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) or kinetic Alfven fluctuations at scales ranging from approximately the thermal proton gyro-radius to the electron gyro-radius. The phase speed of KAWs with highly oblique, nearly perpendicular wave-vectors is roughly on the order of the Alfven speed and, since it is much less than the solar wind speed, Taylor's frozen-in flow hypothesis implies that the frequency spectrum observed in the spacecraft frame can be interpreted as the wavenumber spectrum in the plasma frame. Studies by Sahraoui and coworkers have shown that the magnetic field fluctuations typically exhibit a power-law spectrum with a spectral index near 2.7; and recent studies by Chen and coworkers have shown that the spectrum of electron density fluctuations typically follows the behavior of the magnetic field spectrum with a spectral index near 2.7. These observations are consistent with theories and simulations of KAW turbulence which predict that electron density fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations should both follow the same scaling law. Here, I present new measurements of solar wind magnetic field spectra obtained using the search coil magnetometers on board the Artemis (previously Themis) spacecraft and compare these results with previously published measurements.

  19. Effect of wind averaging time on wind erosivity estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) and Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ) are widely used for estimating the wind-induced soil erosion at a field scale. Wind is the principal erosion driver in the two models. The wind erosivity, which describes the capacity of wind to cause soil erosion is ...

  20. The design of a low-speed wind tunnel for studying the flow field of insects' flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-yan; Zhang, Peng-fei; Ma, Yun; Ning, Jian-guo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, low-speed smoke wind tunnel has been designed and fabricated for the insects' flow field visualization. The test section and the contraction section of the tunnel are optimized and determined as to size by the method of computational fluid dynamics. And fairing devices are equipped in different sections to reduce the turbulence intensity and increase the flow uniformity in the experimental sections. For the smoke visualization of small insects, the smokeemitting equipment has been specially designed and carefully debugged. Composed of wind tunnel, light source and high-speed camera, experimental platform for visualization and filming of insect flight flow field has been established. Besides, the feasible and stable method for insect fixing has been designed. With the smoke wind tunnel, flow filed visualization experiment for the honeybee's flapping was conducted and smoke flow filed in the experiment was recorded and analyzed. Near-filed and far-filed vortex structure when the honeybee fly can be recorded clearly. The experimental results indicate that the experimental platform is appropriate for flow filed study on insects flapping.

  1. The relationship among air quality, mixing heights, and winds observed during the entire TexAQS-II field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Knoderer, C. A.; Zahn, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS-II) was designed to provide support for State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions. The SIP revisions outline strategies for improving air quality to meet the new federal 8-hr ozone standard and regional haze requirements. As part of TexAQS-II, a field study was conducted to collect air quality and meteorological data throughout eastern Texas from May 1, 2005, through October 15, 2006. As part of the field study, various organizations made upper-air meteorological measurements at several locations. These measurements were collected by twelve 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs), three 404 MHz RWPs, nine Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS), two sodars, and one lidar. These instruments provide vertically, horizontally, and temporally resolved wind, virtual temperature (Tv), and mixing height information. This presentation will address the three-dimensional and temporal characteristics of these parameters throughout the study domain for the entire study period and how these characteristic vary by season, month, and synoptic weather pattern. The presentation will also address how these characteristics influence regional and local air quality conditions throughout the study domain, including the relationship among various transport statistics, mixing height characteristics (e.g., time of peak mixing, morning mixing height growth rate, peak mixing height, average morning mixing height, etc.) and air quality. In addition, case studies will illustrate the finer-scale details of the relationship among the evolution of mixing heights, diurnal variability of winds, and air quality.

  2. Latino social network dynamics and the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Barrington, Clare; Lacy, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative research was to examine the dynamics of existing and emerging social networks among Latino survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Data were generated through individual, in-depth interviews conducted with 65 Latinos within six months of the storm striking the Gulf Coast of the United States in August 2005. The findings illustrated both the role of social networks in gathering information, making decisions and accessing resources, and how these existing social networks were disrupted and strained by overwhelming needs. Broader structural issues, including poverty and a lack of transportation, combined with marginalised status as immigrants, further constrained access to essential information and resources. In response, new, if temporary, social networks emerged, based primarily on shared nationality, language, and a sense of collective commitment. Practice implications include the need to consider the social network dynamics of marginalised groups in developing innovative strategies to overcome structural barriers to accessing resources essential for disaster preparedness and survival.

  3. COMMUNITY COLLEGE RE-ENROLLMENT AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    PubMed Central

    LOWE, SARAH R.; RHODES, JEAN E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored predictors of community college re-enrollment after Hurricane Katrina among a sample of low-income women (N = 221). It was predicted that participants’ pre-hurricane educational optimism would predict community college re-enrollment a year after the hurricane. The influence of various demographic and additional resources (e.g., social support, childcare, hours of employment, psychological well-being) was also explored. High levels of pre- and post-hurricane educational optimism were significant predictors of re-enrollment, as were lower post-hurricane psychological distress and fewer post-hurricane hours employed. In addition, experiencing a greater number of moves since the hurricane was a marginally significant predictor of post-hurricane re-enrollment. PMID:23457425

  4. Transformative experiences for Hurricanes Katrina and Rita disaster volunteers.

    PubMed

    Clukey, Lory

    2010-07-01

    The massive destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 provided an opportunity for many volunteers to be involved with disaster relief work. Exposure to devastation and personal trauma can have long-lasting and sometimes detrimental effects on people providing help. This qualitative study explored the experience of volunteer relief workers who provided disaster relief services after the hurricanes. Three major themes emerged: emotional reactions that included feelings of shock, fatigue, anger and grief as well as sleep disturbances; frustration with leadership; and life-changing personal transformation. Stress reactions were noted but appeared to be mitigated by feelings of compassion for the victims and personal satisfaction in being able to provide assistance. Suggestions are provided for further research.

  5. Mold exposure and health effects following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Deborah N; Grimsley, L Faye; White, LuAnn E; El-Dahr, Jane M; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The extensive flooding in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita created conditions ideal for indoor mold growth, raising concerns about the possible adverse health effects associated with indoor mold exposure. Studies evaluating the levels of indoor and outdoor molds in the months following the hurricanes found high levels of mold growth. Homes with greater flood damage, especially those with >3 feet of indoor flooding, demonstrated higher levels of mold growth compared with homes with little or no flooding. Water intrusion due to roof damage was also associated with mold growth. However, no increase in the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has been observed in published reports to date. This article considers reasons why studies of mold exposure after the hurricane do not show a greater health impact.

  6. Campaign contributions, lobbying and post-Katrina contracts.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Michael J; Long, Michael A; Stretesky, Paul B

    2010-07-01

    This research explores the relationship between political campaign contributions, lobbying and post-Hurricane Katrina cleanup and reconstruction contracts. Specifically, a case-control study design is used to determine whether campaign contributions to national candidates in the 2000-04 election cycles and/or the employment of lobbyists and lobbying firms increased a company's probability of receiving a post-hurricane contract. Results indicate that both a campaign contribution dichotomous variable and the dollar amount of contributions are significantly related to whether a company received a contract, but that lobbying activity was not. These findings are discussed in the context of previous research on the politics of natural disasters, government contracting and governmental and corporate deviance.

  7. Coastal-change impacts during hurricane katrina: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, Asbury; Wright, C. Wayne; Lillycrop, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    As part of an ongoing cooperative effort between USGS, NASA and USACE, the barrier islands within the right-front quadrant of Hurricane Katrina were surveyed with airborne lidar both before and after landfall. Dauphin Island, AL was located the farthest from landfall and wave runup intermittently overtopped its central and western sections. The Gulf-side of the island experienced severe erosion, leaving the first row of houses in the sea, while the bayside accreted. In contrast, the Chandeleur Islands, LA did not experience, this classic `rollover'. Rather, the island chain was completely stripped of sand, transforming a 40-km-long sandy island chain into a discontinuous series of muddy marsh islets. Models indicate that storm surge likely submerged the entire Chandeleur Island chain, at least during the latter part of the storm. The net result was destructive coastal change for the Chandeleur Islands, while Dauphin Island tended to maintain its form through landward migration.

  8. Multivariate reconstruction of missing data in sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and wind satellite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvera-AzcáRate, A.; Barth, A.; Beckers, J.-M.; Weisberg, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    An empirical orthogonal function-based technique called Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) is used in a multivariate approach to reconstruct missing data. Sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration, and QuikSCAT winds are used to assess the benefit of a multivariate reconstruction. In particular, the combination of SST plus chlorophyll, SST plus lagged SST plus chlorophyll, and SST plus lagged winds have been studied. To assess the quality of the reconstructions, the reconstructed SST and winds have been compared to in situ data. The combination of SST plus chlorophyll, as well as SST plus lagged SST plus chlorophyll, significantly improves the results obtained by the reconstruction of SST alone. All the experiments correctly represent the SST, and an upwelling/downwelling event in the West Florida Shelf reproduced by the reconstructed data is studied.

  9. Solar wind polytropic index estimates based on single spacecraft plasma and interplanetary magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartalev, M.; Dryer, M.; Grigorov, K.; Stoimenova, E.

    2006-10-01

    We propose an approach for estimating the polytropic index in the solar wind. This is an artificially introduced parameter simplifying essentially the gasdynamic or magnetogasdynamic modeling of the interplanetary plasma. The problem in the straightforward utilization of the polytropic equation is to find sufficient homogeneous fragments of the solar wind flow, observed by single spacecraft only, where the application of this polytropic equation is correct. We propose an algorithm for following the plasma data time series to ensure the separation of data segments that belong, with high probability, to the same plasma flow flux tube. A linear regression model between logarithms of plasma density and temperature within such a segment provides an estimate for the polytropic index. Some preliminary applications of the algorithm to real data from spacecraft crossings of different solar wind structures are performed for the Bastille event of 14-16 July 2000.

  10. Droplet evaporation from porous surfaces; model validation from field and wind tunnel experiments for sand and concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, R. F.; Roberts, I. D.

    The evaporation model of Roberts and Griffiths (1995 Atmospheric Environment 29, 1307-1317) has been subjected to an extensive validation exercise based on a major campaign of field experiments on evaporation from surfaces composed of sand and of concrete. This complements the previous validation which was limited to wind tunnel experiments on sand surfaces. Additionally, the validation using wind tunnel data has been extended to include concrete surfaces. The model describes the constant-rate and falling-rate periods that characterise evaporation from porous media. During the constant-rate period, the evaporation is solely determined by the vapour transport rate into the air. During the falling-rate period, the process in the porous medium is modelled as a receding evaporation front, the overall evaporation rate being determined by the combined effects of vapour transport through the pore network and subsequently into the air. The field trials programme was conducted at sites in the USA and the UK, and examined the evaporation of diethyl malonate droplets from sand and concrete surfaces. Vapour concentrations at several heights in the plume were measured at the centre of a 1 m radius annular source (of width 10 cm) contaminated by uniformly sized droplets (2.4 or 4.1 mm in diameter), key meteorological data being measured at the same time. The evaporation was quantified by coupling concentration and wind speed data. In all, 22 trials were performed on sand and concrete; a further 8 were performed on non-porous surfaces (aluminium foil and slate) as references. The model performance was evaluated against the experimental data in terms of two quantities, the initial evaporation rate of the embedded droplets, and the mass-fraction remaining in the substrate at intervals over the evaporation episode. Overall, the model performance was best in the case of the field experiments for concrete, and the wind tunnel experiments for sand; the performance for wind tunnel

  11. Ground magnetic response to sudden changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitar, Robert John

    1999-12-01

    Most, if not all, of the early research on impulsive magnetic events at high latitudes focused on first identifying the events in ground magnetic recordings and then examining the solar wind properties in search of a common link between different events. The results of these types of studies were often inconclusive and open to debate. The work presented here attacks the problem from the opposite point of view, namely by identifying changes within the solar wind and then examining the resulting ground magnetic signatures. This is accomplished using a combination of ground-based magnetic measurements from arrays of magnetometers located in Greenland and IMP 8 satellite measurements of the solar wind velocity, density, and magnetic field orientation. The study of solar wind dynamic pressure changes uses data collected by the IMP 8 satellite during 1991 and 1992 and focuses on step changes in dynamic pressure of |Dp|>2 nPa occurring on a timescale of Dt<15 min. It has been observed that the ground response does not consistently conform to existing theoretical models of field-aligned currents generated by changes in dynamic pressure. No explicit dependence on interplanetary magnetic field orientation (IMF) has been found. The relationship between IMF orientation changes and magnetic impulse events is highlighted by a case study of an IMF orientation change occurring on July 24, 1996. The effects of the IMF orientation change are observed in ground magnetometer data, incoherent scatter radar measurements, and auroral ultraviolet emissions. It is believed the ground observations result from the interaction of a hot flow anomaly with the magnetopause. These observations are the first of their kind and provide a mechanism to tie an IMF orientation change into the existing theory that traveling convection vortices result from a deformation of the magnetopause. The study of IMF orientation changes uses data from the IMP 8 satellite collected between 1992 and 1995. We have

  12. Predictors of business return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nina S N; Arenas, Helbert; Pace, Kelley; LeSage, James; Campanella, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the business reopening process in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, which hit the region on August 29, 2005, to better understand what the major predictors were and how their impacts changed through time. A telephone survey of businesses in New Orleans was conducted in October 2007, 26 months after Hurricane Katrina. The data were analyzed using a modified spatial probit regression model to evaluate the importance of each predictor variable through time. The results suggest that the two most important reopening predictors throughout all time periods were the flood depth at the business location and business size as represented by its wages in a logarithmic form. Flood depth was a significant negative predictor and had the largest marginal effects on the reopening probabilities. Smaller businesses had lower reopening probabilities than larger ones. However, the nonlinear response of business size to the reopening probability suggests that recovery aid would be most effective for smaller businesses than for larger ones. The spatial spillovers effect was a significant positive predictor but only for the first nine months. The findings show clearly that flood protection is the overarching issue for New Orleans. A flood protection plan that reduces the vulnerability and length of flooding would be the first and foremost step to mitigate the negative effects from climate-related hazards and enable speedy recovery. The findings cast doubt on the current coastal protection efforts and add to the current debate of whether coastal Louisiana will be sustainable or too costly to protect from further land loss and flooding given the threat of sea-level rise. Finally, a plan to help small businesses to return would also be an effective strategy for recovery, and the temporal window of opportunity that generates the greatest impacts would be the first 6∼9 months after the disaster.

  13. Field-wind Distribution and Eruption Columns: Colima Volcano, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R.; Martin, A. L.; Perez, I.

    2006-12-01

    Colima Volcano (19º51'N 103º62'W) is characterized by explosive behaviour. Recently this volcano has shown an increase in explosive activity suggesting the possibility of a subplinian event in the next future like the ones occurred in 1818 and 1913. They were characterized by eruptive columns higher than 20 Km. Considering the possibility of a new explosive event we carried out a wind study based on the radiosonde balloon data set (1980-1995) with 15 atmospheric levels. This data set was collected by Global Gridded Upper Air Statistics (GGUAS) of the European Centre for Médium Range Weather Forecast (ECMRWF). The data was processed with a cinematic model for the study of global atmospheric wind circulation. In this model the current function (vorticity) and a potential function (convergency and/or divergency) was calculated with the Poison equation, utilizing a spectral numeric model. Dominant wind direction in January-May and October-December is toward the East with variations to the East/South East. On the contrary during July-September the dominant wind direction is toward the West, South-West, North-East; East and North-East. The fluctuations related to anticyclonic circulation occur in May, July, September and November at the altitude between 5 and 18 Km. The wind model allows identification of the wind horizontal circulation during the whole year at different atmospheric levels. Moreover, the perturbations of the normal circulation have also been identified. These results are applied to an a ash fall map for ash-fall hazard zonification.

  14. Characteristics of wind-induced loss of solid precipitation derived from a Norwegian field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen-Øverleir, Asgeir; Wolff, Mareile; Isaksen, Ketil; Ødemark, Karianne; Reitan, Trond; Brækkan, Ragnar

    2016-04-01

    Solid precipitation measurements are known to be plagued by under-catch in windy conditions. Adjustment techniques, either based on a dynamic relationship between under-catch and measured determinants or static corrections, are then typically invoked. Such adjustment procedures, especially if the adjustment algorithm is unfit, introduce notable uncertainties that impact hydrological modelling in snow-dominated regions. In 2010, a test-site was established at a mountain plateau in Haukeli, Telemark, Southern Norway. Precipitation data of automatic gauges were compared with a precipitation gauge located in a Double Fence Inter-comparison Reference (DFIR) wind shield construction that served as the reference. A large number of sensors were additionally monitoring supportive meteorological parameters. The study presented in this poster considers data from three winters that were used to study and determine the wind-induced loss of solid precipitation. A general model framework was proposed, and Bayesian methods were used to objectively choose the most plausible sub-model to describe the loss ratio - wind speed - temperature relationship from the Haukeli data. The derived adjustment function is continuous and accounts for measurements of all types of winter precipitation (from rain to dry snow). The analysis shows a non-linear relationship between the loss ratio and wind speed during significant precipitation events, and there is a clear temperature dependency, believed to be mostly related to the precipitation type. The data also displayed a distinctive scatter that is believed to be an artefact mainly caused by neglecting the varying aerodynamic characteristics of the precipitation particles (for a given temperature) as a determinant. The adjustment formula allowed for the first time to derive an adjustment function with a data-tested validity beyond 8-9 m/s and proved a stabilisation of the wind-induced precipitation loss for higher wind speeds. Preliminary tests of

  15. Field studies of the potential for wind transport of plutonium- contaminated soils at sites in Areas 6 and 11, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.; Metzger, S.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes and documents a series of field experiments carried out in Areas 6 and 11 of the Nevada Test Site in June and July 1994 to determine parameters of boundary layer winds, surface characteristics, and vegetation cover that can be used to predict dust emissions from the affected sites. Aerodynamic roughness of natural sites is determined largely by the lateral cover of the larger and more permanent roughness elements (shrubs). These provide a complete protection of the surface from wind erosion. Studies using a field-portable wind tunnel demonstrated that natural surfaces in the investigated areas of the Nevada Test Site are stable except at very high wind speeds (probably higher than normally occur, except perhaps in dust devils). However, disturbance of silty-clay surfaces by excavation devices and vehicles reduces the entrainment threshold by approximately 50% and makes these areas potentially very susceptible to wind erosion and transport of sediments.

  16. Spectral Discrete Probability Density Function of Measured Wind Turbine Noise in the Far Field

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  17. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources.

  18. Unveiling the solar wind - Earth's magnetic field coupling and storm/substorm relationship by information-theoretic multivariate causality measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Donner, Reik; Daglis, Ioannis; Kurths, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    The identification of directed interdependencies between variables related to causal relationships in various geoscientific processes is necessary for an improved process-based understanding of the coupling between different variables or even systems. Especially in geomagnetism, the time-dependent coupling between solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field as well as the relationship between magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms are of paramount importance for the development of appropriate numerical simulation models of space weather. Here we utilize an information-theoretic method of directional, multivariate causality measures using graphical models that goes beyond bivariate transfer entropy approaches and allows for the identification and statistical evaluation of linear as well as nonlinear causality between variables. In this study, we present and discuss results from an application of this method to the time series of various solar wind parameters as well as the AE and SYM-H geomagnetic activity indices.

  19. The Dependence of the Strength and Thickness of Field-Aligned Currents on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R.; Wing, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Sheared plasma flows at the low-latitude boundary layer correlate well with early afternoon auroral arcs and eld-aligned currents [Sonnerup, 1980; Lundin and Evans, 1985]. We present a simple analytic model that relates solar wind and ionospheric parameters to the strength and thickness of field-aligned currents in a region of sheared velocity, such as the low latitude boundary layer. We compare the predictions of the model with DMSP observations and nd remarkably good scaling of the currents with solar wind and ionospheric parameters. The sheared boundary layer thickness is inferred to be around 3000km consistent with observational studies. The analytic model provides a simple way to organize data and to infer boundary layer structures from ionospheric data.

  20. A Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of the Solar Wind for a Tilted-Dipole Magnetic Field on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional MHD model, we simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar corona and solar wind for a dipole magnetic field on the Sun inclined by 30 degrees to the solar rotation axis. This represents the solar conditions typical for a declining phase of solar cycle. The computations can extend from the coronal base out to 100-AU and at large heliospheric distances includes the effects of interstellar neutral hydrogen and their interaction with solar wind protons. The simulations can model the formation of corotating interaction regions and the heliospheric current sheet. The simulations are also capable of describing very strong rarefaction regions that include embedded sub-Alfvenic regions that form on the trailing edge of a fast flows.

  1. Possible origins of time variability in Jupiter's outer magnetosphere. I - Variations in solar wind dynamic pressure. II - Variations in solar wind magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Kennel, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is given to the effect of changes in the dynamic pressure of the solar wind on the structure of a centrifugally driven planetary wind from Jupiter. It is suggested that dynamic pressure variations can induce a transition between a super-Alfvenic wind and a sub-Alfvenic wind breeze on Jupiter's dayside. This could possibly account for the observed large-scale changes in the structure of Jupiter's outer magnetosphere. An attempt is then made to conceptually merge planetary wind models of Jupiter's outer magnetosphere with reconnection models of Jupiter's outer magnetosphere.

  2. Analysis of the Uncertainty in Wind Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Doppler Lidar during XPIA: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob

    2016-03-01

    In March and April of 2015, the ARM Doppler lidar that was formerly operated at the Tropical Western Pacific site in Darwin, Australia (S/N 0710-08) was deployed to the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) for the eXperimental Planetary boundary-layer Instrument Assessment (XPIA) field campaign. The goal of the XPIA field campaign was to investigate methods of using multiple Doppler lidars to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional measurements of winds and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, and to characterize the uncertainties in these measurements. The ARM Doppler lidar was one of many Doppler lidar systems that participated in this study. During XPIA the 300-m tower at the BAO site was instrumented with well-calibrated sonic anemometers at six levels. These sonic anemometers provided highly accurate reference measurements against which the lidars could be compared. Thus, the deployment of the ARM Doppler lidar during XPIA offered a rare opportunity for the ARM program to characterize the uncertainties in their lidar wind measurements. Results of the lidar-tower comparison indicate that the lidar wind speed measurements are essentially unbiased (~1cm s-1), with a random error of approximately 50 cm s-1. Two methods of uncertainty estimation were tested. The first method was found to produce uncertainties that were too low. The second method produced estimates that were more accurate and better indicators of data quality. As of December 2015, the first method is being used by the ARM Doppler lidar wind value-added product (VAP). One outcome of this work will be to update this VAP to use the second method for uncertainty estimation.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Study of Wind and Turbulence in a Near-Field Dispersion Campaign at an Inhomogeneous Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao; Dupont, Eric; Gilbert, Eric; Musson-Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed experimental and numerical study of the local flow field for a pollutant dispersion experimental program conducted at SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique), a complex and intensively instrumented site in a southern suburb of Paris. Global analysis of continuous measurements over 2 years highlights the impact of terrain heterogeneity on wind and turbulence. It shows that the forest to the north of the experimental field induces strong directional shear and wind deceleration below the forest canopy height. This directional shear is stronger with decreasing height and decreasing distance from the forest edge. Numerical simulations are carried out using Code_Saturne, a computational fluid dynamics code, in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode with a standard k{-}ɛ closure and a canopy model, in neutral and stable stratifications. These simulations are shown to reproduce globally well the characteristics of the mean flow, especially the directional wind shear in northeasterly and northwesterly cases and the turbulent kinetic energy increase induced by the forest. However, they slightly underestimate wind speed and the directional shear of the flow below the forest canopy height. Sensitivity studies are performed to investigate the influence of leaf area density, inlet stability condition, and roughness length. These studies show that the typical features of the canopy flow become more pronounced as canopy density increases. Performance statistics indicate that the impact of the forest and adequate inlet profiles are the most important factors in the accurate reproduction of flow at the site, especially under stable stratification.

  4. Pressure Probe Designs for Dynamic Pressure Measurements in a Supersonic Flow Field. [conducted in the Glenn Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor stall and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  5. Field Wind Tunnel Testing of Two Silt Loam Soils in the North American Central High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The change from conventional tillage to no-till cropping systems and the emergence of cropping systems with fewer and shorter fallow periods has resulted in reduced wind erosion on the North American Central High Plains. This reduction has been attributed primarily to increased surface coverage by ...

  6. Portable wind tunnels for field testing of soils and natural surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large stationary wind tunnels have been used to test the erodibility of soils and to study in detail the processes controlling erosion rates. These tunnels require the use of disturbed soil samples which may result in parameter estimations that are not consistent with the natural surface. Several ...

  7. Statiscal Downscaling of a surface wind field over northeastern North America: annual to centennial variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; García-Bustamante, Elena; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The region of North Eastern North America is located in a privileged geographical position that allows for interesting relationships between various large-scale circulation modes and the seasonal surface wind. This is a region where the large-scale configurations foster the transit of tropical cyclonic events during the summer season and even more intense extratropical cyclones during winter. In this work we present a statistical downscaling method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) that exploits the relationships among the main modes of circulation over the North Atlantic and Pacific Sectors and the behaviour of surface wind. The statistical technique has been implemented with predictor variables (mean sea level pressure and geopotential height at different levels) provided by all the reanalysis products available to date. The regional scale data consist of a set of 526 sites distributed over North Eastern North America that span over a period of about 60 years (1953-2010). These data have been previously subjected to an exhaustive quality control process, height standardization and wind direction homogenization. Several decades of observations allow for the study of intra to multidecadal variability. Also, the sensitivity of the downscaling methodology to the selection of a systematic sampling of model parameter values has been explored. The statistical relationship obtained by this method also allows for the reconstruction of the regional wind behaviour back to the mid 19th century through various 20th century reanalysis and instrumental sea level pressure datasets.

  8. Solar wind density controlling penetration electric field at the equatorial ionosphere during a saturation of cross polar cap potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Wan, W.; Zhao, B.; Hong, M.; Ridley, A.; Ren, Z.; Fraenz, M.; Dubinin, E.; He, M.

    2012-09-01

    The most important source of electrodynamic disturbances in the equatorial ionosphere during the main phase of a storm is the prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) originating from the high-latitude region. It has been known that such an electric field is correlated with the magnetospheric convection or interplanetary electric field. Here we show a unique case, in which the electric field disturbance in the equatorial ionosphere cannot be interpreted by this concept. During the superstorm on Nov. 20-21, 2003, the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturated at least for 8.2 h. The CPCP reconstructed by Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure suggested that the PPEF at the equatorial ionosphere still correlated with the saturated CPCP, but the CPCP was controlled by the solar wind density instead of the interplanetary electric field. However, the predicted CPCPs by Hill-Siscoe-Ober (HSO) model and Boyle-Ridley (BR) model were not fully consistent with the AMIE result and PPEF. The PPEF also decoupled from the convection electric field in the magnetotail. Due to the decoupling, the electric field in the ring current was not able to comply with the variations of PPEF, and this resulted in a long-duration electric field penetration without shielding.

  9. Satellite optical and radar data used to track wetland forest impact and short-term recovery from Hurricane Katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, A.; Middleton, B.; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Satellite Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and RADARSAT-1 (radar) satellite image data collected before and after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina in the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area on the Louisiana-Mississippi border, USA, were applied to the study of forested wetland impact and recovery. We documented the overall similarity in the radar and optical satellite mapping of impact and recovery patterns and highlighted some unique differences that could be used to provide consistent and relevant ecological monitoring. Satellite optical data transformed to a canopy foliage index (CFI) indicated a dramatic decrease in canopy cover immediately after the storm, which then recovered rapidly in the Taxodium distichum (baldcypress) and Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo) forest. Although CFI levels in early October indicated rapid foliage recovery, the abnormally high radar responses associated with the cypress forest suggested a persistent poststorm difference in canopy structure. Impact and recovery mapping results showed that even though cypress forests experienced very high wind speeds, damage was largely limited to foliage loss. Bottomland hardwoods, experiencing progressively lower wind speeds further inland, suffered impacts ranging from increased occurrences of downed trees in the south to partial foliage loss in the north. In addition, bottomland hardwood impact and recovery patterns suggested that impact severity was associated with a difference in stand structure possibly related to environmental conditions that were not revealed in the prehurricane 25-m optical and radar image analyses. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  10. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  11. Variation in wind and piscivorous predator fields affecting the survival of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedland, K.D.; Manning, J.P.; Link, Jason S.; Gilbert, J.R.; Gilbert, A.T.; O'Connell, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Observations relevant to the North American stock complex of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., suggest that marine mortality is influenced by variation in predation pressure affecting post-smolts during the first months at sea. This hypothesis was tested for Gulf of Maine (GOM) stocks by examining wind pseudostress and the distribution of piscivorous predator fields potentially affecting post-smolts. Marine survival has declined over recent decades with a change in the direction of spring winds, which is likely extending the migration of post-smolts by favouring routes using the western GOM. In addition to changes in spring wind patterns, higher spring sea surface temperatures have been associated with shifting distributions of a range of fish species. The abundance of several pelagic piscivores, which based on their feeding habits may predate on salmon post-smolts, has increased in the areas that serve as migration corridors for post-smolts. In particular, populations of silver hake, Merluccius bilinearis (Mitchell), red hake, Urophycis chuss (Walbaum), and spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias L., increased in size in the portion of the GOM used by post-smolts. Climate variation and shifting predator distributions in the GOM are consistent with the predator hypothesis of recruitment control suggested for the stock complex.

  12. The role of wind in the evolution of glaciated mountain ranges: Field observations and insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklehurst, S. H.; MacGregor, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Prevailing winds appear to exert a major control on the evolution of glaciated mountain ranges, particularly those oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind. The presumed cause of this is the redistribution of wind-blown snow, which has the opposite effect from orographic precipitation in non-glaciated ranges. While fluvially-eroded ranges tend to be exhumed more on the windward side, glacially-eroded ranges seem to experience greater erosion on the leeward side. The Sangre de Cristo Range of southern Colorado runs close to north-south, cross-cutting the prevailing winds from the west (which have formed the Great Sand Dunes of the National Monument adjacent to the west side of the range). Drainage basins on both sides of the range cover similar drainage areas, but moraines are much more substantial on the eastern side of the range, indicating greater glacial incision, which we suggest reflects snow blown over the range crest. The highest peaks of the Bitterroot Range on the Idaho-Montana border lie substantially to the east of the modern drainage divide, while the moraines are again much more substantial on the eastern side of the range. We suggest that the cause of this is greater glacial erosion of both the headwalls and valley floors on the eastern side, linked to wind-blown snow from the west side of the range. Glen Avon, incised into the Cairngorm plateau in Scotland, contains a large, elongated glacially-carved lake immediately downstream of a modest cirque. We suggest that the glacier responsible for carving the lake must have had its mass balance supplemented by substantial amounts of snow blown in from the plateau above. Numerical modelling supports these field-based inferences. A 1-D numerical model of glacial longitudinal profile evolution indicates the importance of wind-blown snow. A plateau region above the valley head from which snow can blow into the valley allows substantially larger and longer-lived glaciers compared with a valley of the same

  13. Functioning of the avalanche starting zones which undergo snow-transport by wind: Field observations and computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivardière, F.; Castelle, T.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Mérindol, L.; Buisson, L.

    1995-11-01

    For two years, three French and Swiss laboratories have been making field observations and measurements on two high altitude slopes in a Northern French Alps site. The aim of this work is to study the functioning of the avalanche sites which, in their starting zones, undergo snow-transport by wind. The experimental site is located in the French Alps, at 2,800 m, above Grenoble. It is an open area, equipped with an automatic meteorological station and an altitude laboratory. The two slopes that are studied face East. One of them is artificially released but the other has a natural avalanche activity. The investigations concern: -snow deposition in avalanche starting zones; -temporal evolution of the snowpack characteristics; -avalanche release. For the field observations and measurements, continuous recording of the meteorological conditions on the site, photogrammetrical techniques and two snow depth profiles, as well as stratigraphical snow profiles and video are used. The computer modeling is based on existing computer models developed by the CEMAGREF-Nivologie (ELSA) and the CEN/Météo-France (SAFRAN-CROCUS-MEPRA), which analyse the snowpack and its stability. The field observations and measurements aim at improving snow-transport by wind modeling modules, in order to improve their whole analysis.

  14. Three Dimensional Wind Speed and Flux Measurement over a Rain-fed Soybean Field Using Orthogonal and Non-orthogonal Sonic Anemometer Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T.; Suyker, A.; Burba, G. G.; Billesbach, D.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance method for estimating fluxes of trace gases, energy and momentum in the constant flux layer above a plant canopy fundamentally relies on accurate measurements of the vertical wind speed. This wind speed is typically measured using a three dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. These anemometers incorporate designs with transducer sets that are aligned either orthogonally or non-orthogonally. Previous studies comparing the two designs suggest differences in measured 3D wind speed components, in particular vertical wind speed, from the non-orthogonal transducer relative to the orthogonal design. These differences, attributed to additional flow distortion caused by the non-orthogonal transducer arrangement, directly affect fluxes of trace gases, energy and momentum. A field experiment is being conducted over a rain-fed soybean field at the AmeriFlux site (US-Ne3) near Mead, Nebraska. In this study, ultrasonic anemometers featuring orthogonal transducer sets (ATI Vx Probe) and non-orthogonal transducer sets (Gill R3-100) collect high frequency wind vector and sonic temperature data. Sensible heat and momentum fluxes and other key sonic performance data are evaluated based on environmental parameters including wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and angle of attack. Preliminary field experiment results are presented.

  15. Upper Thermosphere Winds and Temperatures in the Geomagnetic Polar Cap: Solar Cycle, Geomagnetic Activity, and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Won, Y.-I.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Burns, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers located at Thule, Greenland (76.5 deg. N, 69.0 deg. W, lambda = 86 deg.) and at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland (67.0 deg. N, 50.9 deg. W, lambda = 74 deg.) have monitored the upper thermospheric (approx. 240-km altitude) neutral wind and temperature over the northern hemisphere geomagnetic polar cap since 1983 and 1985, respectively. The thermospheric observations are obtained by determining the Doppler characteristics of the (OI) 15,867-K (630.0-nm) emission of atomic oxygen. The instruments operate on a routine, automatic, (mostly) untended basis during the winter observing seasons, with data coverage limited only by cloud cover and (occasional) instrument failures. This unique database of geomagnetic polar cap measurements now extends over the complete range of solar activity. We present an analysis of the measurements made between 1985 (near solar minimum) and 1991 (near solar maximum), as part of a long-term study of geomagnetic polar cap thermospheric climatology. The measurements from a total of 902 nights of observations are compared with the predictions of two semiempirical models: the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model of Killeen et al. (1987) and the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM) of Hedin et al. (1991). The results are also analyzed using calculations of thermospheric momentum forcing terms from the Thermosphere-ionosphere General Circulation Model TGCM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The experimental results show that upper thermospheric winds in the geomagnetic polar cap have a fundamental diurnal character, with typical wind speeds of about 200 m/s at solar minimum, rising to up to about 800 m/s at solar maximum, depending on geomagnetic activity level. These winds generally blow in the antisunward direction, but are interrupted by episodes of modified wind velocity and altered direction often associated with changes in the orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The

  16. Emergency wind erosion control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  17. Production of 3D wind field near the surface using WRF and MUKLIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukjun, L.

    2015-12-01

    The extreme weather conditions become frequent and severe with global warming. To prevent and cope forest disaster like a forest fire, we need an accurate micrometeorological prediction system for mountainous regions. This study addressed the forest fires occurred at Bonghwa and Gangneung in March, 2013. We constructed and optimized the prediction system that were required to interpret and simulate the forest micrometeorology. At first, we examined WRF physical sensitivity. Subsequently, KMA AWS observation data were assimilated using three-dimensional variation data assimilation method. The effectiveness of the assimilation was examined by using AWS observations enhanced with the Forest Research Institute observations. Finally, The 100 meters spatial resolution wind data were obtained by using the MUKLIMO for the given wind vector from WRF.

  18. N.A.C.A. Langley Field Wind Tunnel Apparatusthe Tilting Manometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    A description is given of a tilting manometer designed to meet the requirements of a manometer for use in the wind tunnel at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. This gauge was designed to meet the requirements of a manometer in use in connection with a static pressure plate to indicate the wind speed in the tunnel. The requirements are noted. The sensitivity of the gauge must be made inversely proportional to the pressure to be measured. The gauge must be accurately and quickly set for any desired pressure. When set at the desired pressure, the extent of variation between the existing and the desired pressures may be readily estimated. In fact, this manometer is quick to adjust, is easy to read, always has the meniscus in the same position, and accurately indicates a large range of air speeds on what is a comparatively compact instrument.

  19. Shape, zonal winds and gravitational field of Jupiter: a fully self-consistent, multi-layered model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke

    2016-10-01

    We construct a three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, multi-layered,non-spheroidal model of Jupiter consisting of an inner core, a metallic electrically conducting dynamo region and an outer molecular electrically insulating envelope. We assume that the Jovian zonal winds are on cylinders parallel to the rotation axis but, due to the effect of magnetic braking, are confined within the outer molecular envelope. Two related calculations are carried out. The first provides an accurate description of the shape and internal density profile of Jupiter; the effect of rotational distortion is not treated as a small perturbation on a spherically symmetric state. This calculation determines the density, size and shape of the inner core, the irregular shape of the 1-bar pressure level, and the internal structure of Jupiter; the full effect of rotational distortion, without the influence of the zonal winds, is accounted for. Our multi-layered model is able to produce the known mass, the known equatorial and polar radii, and the known zonal gravitational coefficient J2 of Jupiter within their error bars; it also yields the coefficients J4 and J6 within about 5% accuracy, and the core equatorial radius 0.09RJ containing 3.73 Earth masses.The second calculation determines the variation of the gravitational field caused solely by the effect of the zonal winds on the rotationally distorted non-spheroidal Jupiter. Four different cases, ranging from a deep wind profile to a very shallow profile, are considered and implications for accurate interpretation of the zonal gravitational coefficients expected from the Juno mission are discussed.

  20. Katrina's Castaways: Driven Far from Their Gulf Coast Homes by Hurricane Katrina, Six Children and Their Families Struggle to Pick Up Their Lives at Home and in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina, the disastrous storm that struck the Gulf Coast in late August of 2006, displaced an estimated 1 million people. Historians are already calling the resulting exodus of families from hard-hit communities in Louisiana and Mississippi the greatest mass migration in the United States since the Civil War. The diaspora extended north…