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Sample records for kda regulates nucleocytoplasmic

  1. Tumor marker nucleoporin 88 kDa regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nozomi Kilsdonk, Jeroen W.J. van; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Smeets, Ruben; Bruggeman, Sophia W.M.; Alonso, Angel; Loo, Fons van de; Schneider, Matthias; Berg, Wim B. van den; Swart, Guido W.M.

    2008-09-26

    Nucleoporin 88 kDa (Nup88) is a tumor marker, overexpressed in various types of cancer. In Drosophila Nup88 (mbo) was reported to selectively mediate the nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B, an ubiquitous transcription factor involved in immune responses, apoptosis, and cancer. We addressed the function of Nup88 in mammalian cells. Selective depletion of Nup88 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent reporter gene activation and the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B without affecting the upstream activation pathway in NIH3T3 cells. In contrast, nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptor was not reduced by the depletion of Nup88. In metastatic melanoma cells overexpressing Nup88, constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B was found both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Nup88 depletion in these cells reduced TNF-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B subunits. We conclude that Nup88 regulates the activity of NF-{kappa}B at the level of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Overexpression of Nup88 in tumor cells may, thus be involved in the constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation.

  2. Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Monica N.; Corbett, Anita H.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    Proper skeletal muscle function is dependent on spatial and temporal control of gene expression in multinucleated myofibers. In addition, satellite cells, which are tissue-specific stem cells that contribute critically to repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle, are also required for normal muscle physiology. Gene expression in both myofibers and satellite cells is dependent upon nuclear proteins that require facilitated nuclear transport. A unique challenge for myofibers is controlling the transcriptional activity of hundreds of nuclei in a common cytoplasm yet achieving nuclear selectivity in transcription at specific locations such as neuromuscular synapses and myotendinous junctions. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecular cargoes is regulated by a complex interplay among various components of the nuclear transport machinery, namely nuclear pore complexes, nuclear envelope proteins, and various soluble transport receptors. The focus of this review is to highlight what is known about the nuclear transport machinery and its regulation in skeletal muscle and to consider the unique challenges that multinucleated muscle cells as well as satellite cells encounter in regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport during cell differentiation and tissue adaptation. Understanding how regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport controls gene expression in skeletal muscle may lead to further insights into the mechanisms contributing to muscle growth and maintenance throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:21621074

  3. Dual mechanisms regulate the nucleocytoplasmic localization of human DDX6

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jo-Hsi; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yen-Chun; Chang, Yi-Ling; Chu, Chia-Ying

    2017-01-01

    DDX6 is a conserved DEAD-box protein (DBP) that plays central roles in cytoplasmic RNA regulation, including processing body (P-body) assembly, mRNA decapping, and translational repression. Beyond its cytoplasmic functions, DDX6 may also have nuclear functions because its orthologues are known to localize to nuclei in several biological contexts. However, it is unclear whether DDX6 is generally present in human cell nuclei, and the molecular mechanism underlying DDX6 subcellular distribution remains elusive. In this study, we showed that DDX6 is commonly present in the nuclei of human-derived cells. Our structural and molecular analyses deviate from the current model that the shuttling of DDX6 is directly mediated by the canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nuclear export signal (NES), which are recognized and transported by Importin-α/β and CRM1, respectively. Instead, we show that DDX6 can be transported by 4E-T in a piggyback manner. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a novel nuclear targeting mechanism in which DDX6 enters the newly formed nuclei by “hitch-hiking” on mitotic chromosomes with its C-terminal domain during M phase progression. Together, our results indicate that the nucleocytoplasmic localization of DDX6 is regulated by these dual mechanisms. PMID:28216671

  4. Dual mechanisms regulate the nucleocytoplasmic localization of human DDX6.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jo-Hsi; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yen-Chun; Chang, Yi-Ling; Chu, Chia-Ying

    2017-02-20

    DDX6 is a conserved DEAD-box protein (DBP) that plays central roles in cytoplasmic RNA regulation, including processing body (P-body) assembly, mRNA decapping, and translational repression. Beyond its cytoplasmic functions, DDX6 may also have nuclear functions because its orthologues are known to localize to nuclei in several biological contexts. However, it is unclear whether DDX6 is generally present in human cell nuclei, and the molecular mechanism underlying DDX6 subcellular distribution remains elusive. In this study, we showed that DDX6 is commonly present in the nuclei of human-derived cells. Our structural and molecular analyses deviate from the current model that the shuttling of DDX6 is directly mediated by the canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nuclear export signal (NES), which are recognized and transported by Importin-α/β and CRM1, respectively. Instead, we show that DDX6 can be transported by 4E-T in a piggyback manner. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a novel nuclear targeting mechanism in which DDX6 enters the newly formed nuclei by "hitch-hiking" on mitotic chromosomes with its C-terminal domain during M phase progression. Together, our results indicate that the nucleocytoplasmic localization of DDX6 is regulated by these dual mechanisms.

  5. The Importin β Binding Domain as a Master Regulator of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Kaylen; Cingolani, Gino

    2010-01-01

    Specific and efficient recognition of import cargoes is essential to ensure nucleocytoplasmic transport. To this end, the prototypical karyopherin importin β associates with import cargoes directly or, more commonly, through import adaptors, such as importin α and snurportin. Adaptor proteins bind the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) of import cargoes while recruiting importin β via an N-terminal importin β binding (IBB) domain. The use of adaptors greatly expands and amplifies the repertoire of cellular cargoes that importin β can efficiently import into the cell nucleus and allows for fine regulation of nuclear import. Accordingly, the IBB-domain is a dedicated NLS, unique to adaptor proteins that functions as a molecular liaison between importin β and import cargoes. This review provides an overview of the molecular role played by the IBB-domain in orchestrating nucleocytoplasmic transport. Recent work has determined that the IBB-domain has specialized functions at every step of the import and export pathway. Unexpectedly, this stretch of ∼40 amino acids plays an essential role in regulating processes such as formation of the import complex, docking and translocation through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), release of import cargoes into the cell nucleus and finally recycling of import adaptors and importin β into the cytoplasm. Thus, the IBB-domain is a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, whose complex molecular function is only recently beginning to emerge. PMID:21029753

  6. Separate responses of karyopherins to glucose and amino acid availability regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2014-01-01

    The importin-β family members (karyopherins) mediate the majority of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Msn5 and Los1, members of the importin-β family, function in tRNA nuclear export. tRNAs move bidirectionally between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Nuclear tRNA accumulation occurs upon amino acid (aa) or glucose deprivation. To understand the mechanisms regulating tRNA subcellular trafficking, we investigated whether Msn5 and Los1 are regulated in response to nutrient availability. We provide evidence that tRNA subcellular trafficking is regulated by distinct aa-sensitive and glucose-sensitive mechanisms. Subcellular distributions of Msn5 and Los1 are altered upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Redistribution of tRNA exportins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm likely provides one mechanism for tRNA nuclear distribution upon glucose deprivation. We extended our studies to other members of the importin-β family and found that all tested karyopherins invert their subcellular distributions upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Glucose availability regulates the subcellular distributions of karyopherins likely due to alteration of the RanGTP gradient since glucose deprivation causes redistribution of Ran. Thus nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution of macromolecules is likely generally altered upon glucose deprivation due to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and redistribution of karyopherins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:25057022

  7. Hormone- and light-regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport in plants: current status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yew; Lee, Hak-Soo; Lee, June-Seung; Kim, Seong-Ki; Kim, Soo-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The gene regulation mechanisms underlying hormone- and light-induced signal transduction in plants rely not only on post-translational modification and protein degradation, but also on selective inclusion and exclusion of proteins from the nucleus. For example, plant cells treated with light or hormones actively transport many signalling regulatory proteins, transcription factors, and even photoreceptors and hormone receptors into the nucleus, while actively excluding other proteins. The nuclear envelope (NE) is the physical and functional barrier that mediates this selective partitioning, and nuclear transport regulators transduce hormone- or light-initiated signalling pathways across the membrane to mediate nuclear activities. Recent reports revealed that mutating the proteins regulating nuclear transport through the pores, such as nucleoporins, alters the plant's response to a stimulus. In this review, recent works are introduced that have revealed the importance of regulated nucleocytoplasmic partitioning. These important findings deepen our understanding about how co-ordinated plant hormone and light signal transduction pathways facilitate communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The roles of nucleoporin components within the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are also emphasized, as well as nuclear transport cargo, such as Ran/TC4 and its binding proteins (RanBPs), in this process. Recent findings concerning these proteins may provide a possible direction by which to characterize the regulatory potential of hormone- or light-triggered nuclear transport.

  8. Regulation of the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of viral and cellular proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao E.; Pernet, Olivier; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of many cellular proteins is regulated by nuclear import/export signals as well as post-translational modifications such as covalent conjugation of ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs). Ubiquitination and SUMOylation are rapid and reversible ways to modulate the intracellular localisation and function of substrate proteins. These pathways have been co-opted by some viruses, which depend on the host cell machinery to transport their proteins in and out of the nucleus. In this review, we will summarise our current knowledge on the ubiquitin/SUMO-regulated nuclear/subnuclear trafficking of cellular proteins and describe examples of viral exploitation of these pathways. PMID:22188262

  9. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  10. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:21463604

  11. p35 Regulates the CRM1-Dependent Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Nuclear Hormone Receptor Coregulator-Interacting Factor 1 (NIF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Su; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chien, Winnie W. Y.; Li, Zhen; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC)-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1), is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators. PMID:25329792

  12. p35 regulates the CRM1-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Su; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chien, Winnie W Y; Li, Zhen; Fu, Amy K Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC)-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1), is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators.

  13. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  14. GNL3L Is a Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Shuttling Protein: Role in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Thoompumkal, Indu Jose; Subba Rao, Malireddi Rama Krishna; Kumaraswamy, Anbarasu; Krishnan, Rehna; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    GNL3L is an evolutionarily conserved high molecular weight GTP binding nucleolar protein belonging to HSR1-MMR1 subfamily of GTPases. The present investigation reveals that GNL3L is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to Leptomycin B. Deletion mutagenesis reveals that the C-terminal domain (amino acids 501-582) is necessary and sufficient for the export of GNL3L from the nucleus and the exchange of hydrophobic residues (M567, L570 and 572) within the C-terminal domain impairs this process. Results from the protein-protein interaction analysis indicate that GNL3L interaction with CRM1 is critical for its export from the nucleus. Ectopic expression of GNL3L leads to lesser accumulation of cells in the 'G2/M' phase of cell cycle whereas depletion of endogenous GNL3L results in 'G2/M' arrest. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis followed by BrdU labeling assay indicates that significantly increased DNA synthesis occurs in cells expressing nuclear export defective mutant (GNL3L∆NES) compared to the wild type or nuclear import defective GNL3L. Furthermore, increased hyperphosphorylation of Rb at Serine 780 and the upregulation of E2F1, cyclins A2 and E1 upon ectopic expression of GNL3L∆NES results in faster 'S' phase progression. Collectively, the present study provides evidence that GNL3L is exported from the nucleus in CRM1 dependent manner and the nuclear localization of GNL3L is important to promote 'S' phase progression during cell proliferation.

  15. GNL3L Is a Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Shuttling Protein: Role in Cell Cycle Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Thoompumkal, Indu Jose; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    GNL3L is an evolutionarily conserved high molecular weight GTP binding nucleolar protein belonging to HSR1-MMR1 subfamily of GTPases. The present investigation reveals that GNL3L is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to Leptomycin B. Deletion mutagenesis reveals that the C-terminal domain (amino acids 501–582) is necessary and sufficient for the export of GNL3L from the nucleus and the exchange of hydrophobic residues (M567, L570 and 572) within the C-terminal domain impairs this process. Results from the protein-protein interaction analysis indicate that GNL3L interaction with CRM1 is critical for its export from the nucleus. Ectopic expression of GNL3L leads to lesser accumulation of cells in the ‘G2/M’ phase of cell cycle whereas depletion of endogenous GNL3L results in ‘G2/M’ arrest. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis followed by BrdU labeling assay indicates that significantly increased DNA synthesis occurs in cells expressing nuclear export defective mutant (GNL3L∆NES) compared to the wild type or nuclear import defective GNL3L. Furthermore, increased hyperphosphorylation of Rb at Serine 780 and the upregulation of E2F1, cyclins A2 and E1 upon ectopic expression of GNL3L∆NES results in faster ‘S’ phase progression. Collectively, the present study provides evidence that GNL3L is exported from the nucleus in CRM1 dependent manner and the nuclear localization of GNL3L is important to promote ‘S’ phase progression during cell proliferation. PMID:26274615

  16. Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 1 Regulates Tonicity-induced Osmotic Response Element-binding Protein/Tonicity Enhancer-binding Protein Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, SongXiao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Tong, Edith H. Y.; Chung, Stephen S. M.; Yates, John R.; Yin, YiBing; Ko, Ben C. B.

    2008-01-01

    The osmotic response element-binding protein (OREBP), also known as tonicity enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP) or NFAT5, is the only known osmo-sensitive transcription factor that mediates cellular adaptations to extracellular hypertonic stress. Although it is well documented that the subcellular localization and transactivation activity of OREBP/TonEBP are tightly regulated by extracellular tonicity, the molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of OREBP/TonEBP is regulated by the dual phosphorylation of Ser-155 and Ser-158. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that Ser-155 is an essential residue that regulates OREBP/TonEBP nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that Ser-155 and Ser-158 of OREBP/TonEBP are both phosphorylated in living cells under hypotonic conditions. In vitro phosphorylation assays further suggest that phosphorylation of the two serine residues proceeds in a hierarchical manner with phosphorylation of Ser-155 priming the phosphorylation of Ser-158 and that these phosphorylations are essential for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of the transcription factor. Finally, we have shown that the pharmacological inhibition of casein kinase 1 (CK1) abolishes the phosphorylation of Ser-158 and impedes OREBP/TonEBP nuclear export and that recombinant CK1 phosphorylates Ser-158. Knockdown of CK1α1L, a novel isoform of CK1, inhibits hypotonicity-induced OREBP/TonEBP nuclear export. Together these data highlight the importance of Ser-155 and Ser-158 in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of OREBP/TonEBP and indicate that CK1 plays a major role in regulating this process. PMID:18411282

  17. Phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 regulates tonicity-induced osmotic response element-binding protein/tonicity enhancer-binding protein nucleocytoplasmic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Xu, SongXiao; Wong, Catherine C L; Tong, Edith H Y; Chung, Stephen S M; Yates, John R; Yin, YiBing; Ko, Ben C B

    2008-06-20

    The osmotic response element-binding protein (OREBP), also known as tonicity enhancer-binding protein (TonEBP) or NFAT5, is the only known osmo-sensitive transcription factor that mediates cellular adaptations to extracellular hypertonic stress. Although it is well documented that the subcellular localization and transactivation activity of OREBP/TonEBP are tightly regulated by extracellular tonicity, the molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of OREBP/TonEBP is regulated by the dual phosphorylation of Ser-155 and Ser-158. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that Ser-155 is an essential residue that regulates OREBP/TonEBP nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that Ser-155 and Ser-158 of OREBP/TonEBP are both phosphorylated in living cells under hypotonic conditions. In vitro phosphorylation assays further suggest that phosphorylation of the two serine residues proceeds in a hierarchical manner with phosphorylation of Ser-155 priming the phosphorylation of Ser-158 and that these phosphorylations are essential for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of the transcription factor. Finally, we have shown that the pharmacological inhibition of casein kinase 1 (CK1) abolishes the phosphorylation of Ser-158 and impedes OREBP/TonEBP nuclear export and that recombinant CK1 phosphorylates Ser-158. Knockdown of CK1alpha1L, a novel isoform of CK1, inhibits hypotonicity-induced OREBP/TonEBP nuclear export. Together these data highlight the importance of Ser-155 and Ser-158 in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of OREBP/TonEBP and indicate that CK1 plays a major role in regulating this process.

  18. A nuclear export signal within the high mobility group domain regulates the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of SOX9 during sexual determination.

    PubMed

    Gasca, Stephan; Canizares, Joaquin; De Santa Barbara, Pascal; Mejean, Catherine; Poulat, Francis; Berta, Philippe; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2002-08-20

    In mammals, male sex determination starts when the Y chromosome Sry gene is expressed within the undetermined male gonad. One of the earliest effect of Sry expression is to induce up-regulation of Sox9 gene expression in the developing gonad. SOX9, like SRY, contains a high mobility group domain and is sufficient to induce testis differentiation in transgenic XX mice. Before sexual differentiation, SOX9 protein is initially found in the cytoplasm of undifferentiated gonads from both sexes. At the time of testis differentiation and anti-Müllerian hormone expression, it becomes localized to the nuclear compartment in males whereas it is down-regulated in females. In this report, we used NIH 3T3 cells as a model to examine the regulation of SOX9 nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. SOX9-transfected cells expressed nuclear and cytoplasmic SOX9 whereas transfected cells treated with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B, displayed an exclusive nuclear localization of SOX9. By using SOX9 deletion constructs in green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, we identified a functional nuclear export signal sequence between amino acids 134 and 147 of SOX9 high mobility group box. More strikingly, we show that inhibiting nuclear export with leptomycin B in mouse XX gonads cultured in vitro induced a sex reversal phenotype characterized by nuclear SOX9 and anti-Müllerian hormone expression. These results indicate that SOX9 nuclear export signal is essential for SOX9 sex-specific subcellular localization and could be part of a regulatory switch repressing (in females) or triggering (in males) male-specific sexual differentiation.

  19. A nuclear export signal within the high mobility group domain regulates the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of SOX9 during sexual determination

    PubMed Central

    Gasca, Stéphan; Cañizares, Joaquin; de Santa Barbara, Pascal; Méjean, Catherine; Poulat, Francis; Berta, Philippe; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2002-01-01

    In mammals, male sex determination starts when the Y chromosome Sry gene is expressed within the undetermined male gonad. One of the earliest effect of Sry expression is to induce up-regulation of Sox9 gene expression in the developing gonad. SOX9, like SRY, contains a high mobility group domain and is sufficient to induce testis differentiation in transgenic XX mice. Before sexual differentiation, SOX9 protein is initially found in the cytoplasm of undifferentiated gonads from both sexes. At the time of testis differentiation and anti-Müllerian hormone expression, it becomes localized to the nuclear compartment in males whereas it is down-regulated in females. In this report, we used NIH 3T3 cells as a model to examine the regulation of SOX9 nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. SOX9-transfected cells expressed nuclear and cytoplasmic SOX9 whereas transfected cells treated with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B, displayed an exclusive nuclear localization of SOX9. By using SOX9 deletion constructs in green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, we identified a functional nuclear export signal sequence between amino acids 134 and 147 of SOX9 high mobility group box. More strikingly, we show that inhibiting nuclear export with leptomycin B in mouse XX gonads cultured in vitro induced a sex reversal phenotype characterized by nuclear SOX9 and anti-Müllerian hormone expression. These results indicate that SOX9 nuclear export signal is essential for SOX9 sex-specific subcellular localization and could be part of a regulatory switch repressing (in females) or triggering (in males) male-specific sexual differentiation. PMID:12169669

  20. A Novel Nuclear Trafficking Module Regulates the Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist, P Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Oksayan, Sibil; Wiltzer, Linda; Rowe, Caitlin L.; Blondel, Danielle; Jans, David A.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins is central to cellular function and dysfunction during processes such as viral infection. Active protein trafficking into and out of the nucleus is dependent on the presence within cargo proteins of intrinsic specific modular signals for nuclear import (nuclear localization signals, NLSs) and export (nuclear export signals, NESs). Rabies virus (RabV) phospho (P) protein, which is largely responsible for antagonising the host anti-viral response, is expressed as five isoforms (P1–P5). The subcellular trafficking of these isoforms is thought to depend on a balance between the activities of a dominant N-terminal NES (N-NES) and a distinct C-terminal NLS (C-NLS). Specifically, the N-NES-containing isoforms P1 and P2 are cytoplasmic, whereas the shorter P3–P5 isoforms, which lack the N-NES, are believed to be nuclear through the activity of the C-NLS. Here, we show for the first time that RabV P contains an additional strong NLS in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), which, intriguingly, overlaps with the N-NES. This arrangement represents a novel nuclear trafficking module where the N-NLS is inactive in P1 but becomes activated in P3, concomitant with truncation of the N-NES, to become the principal targeting signal conferring nuclear accumulation. Understanding this unique switch arrangement of overlapping, co-regulated NES/NLS sequences is vital to delineating the critical role of RabV P protein in viral infection. PMID:22700958

  1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of influenza A virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Meng; Zheng, Weinan; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-05-22

    Influenza viruses transcribe and replicate their genomes in the nuclei of infected host cells. The viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex of influenza virus is the essential genetic unit of the virus. The viral proteins play important roles in multiple processes, including virus structural maintenance, mediating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the vRNP complex, virus particle assembly, and budding. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of viral proteins occurs throughout the entire virus life cycle. This review mainly focuses on matrix protein (M1), nucleoprotein (NP), nonstructural protein (NS1), and nuclear export protein (NEP), summarizing the mechanisms of their nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the regulation of virus replication through their phosphorylation to further understand the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in host adaptation of the viruses.

  2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  3. Purification and characterization of human 72-kDa gelatinase (type IV collagenase). Use of immunolocalisation to demonstrate the non-coordinate regulation of the 72-kDa and 95-kDa gelatinases by human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hipps, D S; Hembry, R M; Docherty, A J; Reynolds, J J; Murphy, G

    1991-04-01

    Human gingival fibroblast gelatinase (type IV collagenase) has been purified to homogeneity using a combination of ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and affinity chromatography. The purified proenzyme electrophoresed under reducing conditions as a single band of 72 kDa which could be activated to a species of 65 kDa. Gelatinase was activated by organomercurials by a process apparently initiated by a conformational change and involving self-cleavage. It was not activated by trypsin or plasmin unlike the other family members, collagenase and stromelysin. Gelatinase otherwise exhibited properties typical of the metalloproteinases: it was inhibited by metal chelating agents and by the specific inhibitor TIMP (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases). Its major substrate was shown to be denatured collagen although it was also able to degrade native type IV and V collagens. A polyclonal antibody was raised in a sheep using the purified enzyme as antigen. The antiserum recognised and specifically inhibited the 72-kDa gelatinase but not a 95-kDa gelatinase from pig leukocytes. It was used in immunolocalisation studies on human fibroblasts to investigate the regulation of the production of the two Mr forms of gelatinase. These studies clearly demonstrate that human fibroblasts constitutively synthesize and secrete 72-kDa gelatinase but that 95-kDa gelatinase was inducible by agents such as cytokines. The significance of these results in relation to the likely in vivo rôle of gelatinases is discussed.

  4. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of the Golgi Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase Pik1 Is Regulated by 14-3-3 Proteins and Coordinates Golgi Function with Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Demmel, Lars; Beck, Mike; Klose, Christian; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Gloor, Yvonne; Hsu, Peggy P.; Havlis, Jan; Shevchenko, Andrej; Krause, Eberhard; Kalaidzidis, Yannis

    2008-01-01

    The yeast phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase Pik1p is essential for proliferation, and it controls Golgi homeostasis and transport of newly synthesized proteins from this compartment. At the Golgi, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate recruits multiple cytosolic effectors involved in formation of post-Golgi transport vesicles. A second pool of catalytically active Pik1p localizes to the nucleus. The physiological significance and regulation of this dual localization of the lipid kinase remains unknown. Here, we show that Pik1p binds to the redundant 14-3-3 proteins Bmh1p and Bmh2p. We provide evidence that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Pik1p involves phosphorylation and that 14-3-3 proteins bind Pik1p in the cytoplasm. Nutrient deprivation results in relocation of Pik1p from the Golgi to the nucleus and increases the amount of Pik1p–14-3-3 complex, a process reversed upon restored nutrient supply. These data suggest a role of Pik1p nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in coordination of biosynthetic transport from the Golgi with nutrient signaling. PMID:18172025

  5. Reversibility in nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Kopito, Ronen Benjamine; Elbaum, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of proteins and RNAs is mediated by receptors that usher their cargo through the nuclear pores. Peptide localization signals on each cargo determine the receptors with which it will interact. Those interactions are normally regulated by the small GTPase Ran. Hydrolysis of GTP provides the chemical energy required to create a bona fide thermodynamic pump that selectively and directionally accumulates its substrates across the nuclear envelope. A common perception is that cargo delivery is irreversible, e.g., a protein imported to the nucleus does not return to the cytoplasm except perhaps via a specific export receptor. Quantitative measurements using cell-free nuclei reconstituted in Xenopus egg extract show that nuclear accumulation follows first-order kinetics and reaches steady state at a level that follows a Michaelis–Menten function of the cytoplasmic cargo concentration. This saturation suggests that receptor-mediated translocation across the nuclear pore occurs bidirectionally. The reversibility of accumulation was demonstrated directly by exchange of the cytosolic medium and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Based on our results, we offer a simple biophysical model that predicts the observed behavior. A far-reaching consequence is that the nuclear localization signal dictates the fate of a protein population rather than that of the individual molecules that bear it, which remain free to shuttle back and forth. This implies an open communication between the nucleus and cytoplasm and a ubiquitous mechanism for signaling in both directions. PMID:17646647

  6. Poliovirus 2A protease triggers a selective nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution of splicing factors to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Enrique; Castelló, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, José M

    2013-01-01

    Poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro)) obstructs host gene expression by reprogramming transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory events during infection. Here we demonstrate that expression of 2A(pro) induces a selective nucleo-cytoplasm translocation of several important RNA binding proteins and splicing factors. Subcellular fractionation studies, together with immunofluorescence microscopy revealed an asymmetric distribution of HuR and TIA1/TIAR in 2A(pro) expressing cells, which modulates splicing of the human Fas exon 6. Consistent with this result, knockdown of HuR or overexpression of TIA1/TIAR, leads to Fas exon 6 inclusion in 2A(pro)-expressing cells. Therefore, poliovirus 2A(pro) can target alternative pre-mRNA splicing by regulating protein shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  7. Two isoforms of TALDO1 generated by alternative translational initiation show differential nucleocytoplasmic distribution to regulate the global metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Shu; Nakayama, Yasumune; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Kenji; Yamada, Kohji; Bamba, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Transaldolase 1 (TALDO1) is a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is traditionally thought to occur in the cytoplasm. In this study, we found that the gene TALDO1 has two translational initiation sites, generating two isoforms that differ by the presence of the first 10 N-terminal amino acids. Notably, the long and short isoforms were differentially localised to the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. Pull-down and in vitro transport assays showed that the long isoform, unlike the short one, binds to importin α and is actively transported into the nucleus in an importin α/β-dependent manner, demonstrating that the 10 N-terminal amino acids are essential for its nuclear localisation. Additionally, we found that these two isoforms can form homo- and/or hetero-dimers with different localisation dynamics. A metabolite analysis revealed that the subcellular localisation of TALDO1 is not crucial for its activity in the pentose phosphate pathway. However, the expression of these two isoforms differentially affected the levels of various metabolites, including components of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, nucleotides, and sugars. These results demonstrate that the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of TALDO1, modulated via alternative translational initiation and dimer formation, plays an important role in a wide range of metabolic networks. PMID:27703206

  8. Nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling dynamics of the transcriptional regulators XYR1 and CRE1 under conditions of cellulase and xylanase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Lichius, Alexander; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei is a model for investigating the regulation of (hemi-)cellulase gene expression. Cellulases are formed adaptively, and the transcriptional activator XYR1 and the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1 are main regulators of their expression. We quantified the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling dynamics of GFP-fusion proteins of both transcription factors under cellulase and xylanase inducing conditions, and correlated their nuclear presence/absence with transcriptional changes. We also compared their subcellular localization in conidial germlings and mature hyphae. We show that cellulase gene expression requires de novo biosynthesis of XYR1 and its simultaneous nuclear import, whereas carbon catabolite repression is regulated through preformed CRE1 imported from the cytoplasmic pool. Termination of induction immediately stopped cellulase gene transcription and was accompanied by rapid nuclear degradation of XYR1. In contrast, nuclear CRE1 rapidly decreased upon glucose depletion, and became recycled into the cytoplasm. In mature hyphae, nuclei containing activated XYR1 were concentrated in the colony center, indicating that this is the main region of XYR1 synthesis and cellulase transcription. CRE1 was found to be evenly distributed throughout the entire mycelium. Taken together, our data revealed novel aspects of the dynamic shuttling and spatial bias of the major regulator of (hemi-)cellulase gene expression, XYR1, in T. reesei. PMID:25302561

  9. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  10. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Health and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Amani; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein found primarily in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Although TSPO is found in many tissue types, it is expressed at the highest levels under normal conditions in tissues that synthesize steroids. TSPO has been associated with cholesterol import into mitochondria, a key function in steroidogenesis, and directly or indirectly with multiple other cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, anion transport, porphyrin transport, heme synthesis, and regulation of mitochondrial function. Aberrant expression of TSPO has been linked to multiple diseases, including cancer, brain injury, neurodegeneration, and ischemia reperfusion injury. There has been an effort during the last decade to understand the mechanisms regulating tissue- and disease-specific TSPO expression and to identify pharmacological means to control its expression. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the chemicals, hormones, and molecular mechanisms regulating Tspo gene expression under physiological conditions in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The results described here provide evidence that the PKCε-ERK1/2-AP1/Stat3 signal transduction pathway is the primary regulator of Tspo gene expression in normal and pathological tissues expressing high levels of TSPO. PMID:20600583

  11. A new nucleocytoplasmic RhoGAP protein contributes to control the pathogenicity of Entamoeba histolytica by regulating EhRacC and EhRacD activity.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Flores, Araceli; Almaraz-Barrera, Ma de Jesus; Lozano-Amado, Daniela; Correa-Basurto, Jose; Rojo-Dominguez, Arturo; Luna-Rivera, Eva; Schnoor, Michael; Guillen, Nancy; Hernandez-Rivas, Rosaura; Vargas, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Small GTPases are signalling molecules that regulate important cellular processes. GTPases are deactivated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). While human GAPs have been intensively studied, no GAP has yet been characterized in Entamoeba histolytica. In this study, we identified and characterized a novel nucleocytoplasmic RhoGAP in E. histolytica termed EhRhoGAPnc. In silico analyses of the domain structure revealed a previously undescribed peptide region within the carboxy-terminal region of EhRhoGAPnc capable of interacting with phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. The full structural GAP domain showed increase GAP activity compared with the minimum region able to display GAP activity, as analysed both by experimental assays and molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we identified amino acid residues that promote interactions between EhRhoGAPnc and its target GTPases EhRacC and EhRacD. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that EhRhoGAPnc colocalized with EhRacC and EhRacD during uroid formation but not during erythrophagocytosis. Interestingly, during erythrophagocytosis of red blood cells, EhRhoGAPnc colocalized with phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. Overexpression of EhRhoGAPnc in E. histolytica led to inhibition of actin adhesion plate formation, migration, adhesion of E. histolytica to MDCK cells and consequently to an impairment of the cytopathic activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein by dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharan, N; Nair, V D; Mishra, R K

    2001-02-09

    Previous reports have shown that catecholamine regulated proteins (CRP) are central nervous system specific and covalently bind to catecholamines. In the present study, we report the subcellular localization and differential modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein (CRP40) by dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. CRP40 was found to be localized with nuclear and synaptosomal/mitochondrial and fractions. Chronic treatment with dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in rats significantly increased the levels of CRP40 in the striatum, whereas, chronic R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390) dopamine D1 receptor antagonist administration significantly decreased striatal CRP40 levels. Moreover, acute haloperidol treatment did not alter the levels of CRP40 in any of the brain regions. Despite a sequence homology with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), levels of HSP70 remained unchanged after either drug treatment, suggesting a distinct function of CRP40 than HSP70. These results further suggest that CRP40 play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal function and the dopamine D1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway may be involved in the regulation of CRP40.

  13. Expression and regulation of the 67-kda laminin-binding protein and its precursor gene in lymphoid-cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Zhang, X; Sobel, M; Kondoh, N; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1993-12-01

    The 67-kDa laminin-binding protein is a non-integrin laminin-binding protein that mediates cancer cell adhesion and migration. The expression of the 67-kDa laminin-binding protein and of its putative precursor, a 37-kDa polypeptide, was studied in peripheral T-cells and T-lymphoma cell lines. Immunofluorescence experiments detected antigen in both the cytosol and on the cell membrane. On immunoblots of T-cell protein extracts, both the 37-kDa precursor and the mature 67-kDa protein were present. The mRNA for the precursor was expressed in both immature and mature thymocytes. In three independent T-lymphoma cell lines, the mRNA levels were decreased after prolonged stimulation with phorbol esters. Since the latter directly activate protein kinase C, it appears that regulation of the 37-kDa precursor in T-cells may be mediated by the signal transduction cascade associated with protein kinase C activation.

  14. Regulated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of human aci-reductone dioxygenase (hADI1) and its potential role in mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Isamu; Uekita, Takamasa; Seiki, Motoharu

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial aci-reductone dioxygenase (ARD), a member of the cupin superfamily, has evolutionarily primitive protein folding and functions in the methionine recycling pathway. Recently, a human ARD orthologue (human ADI1, hADI1) has been identified and exhibits functions other than ARD activity. The hADI1 localizes mainly to the cytoplasm, but a substantial fraction is nuclear, suggesting functions in both cellular compartments. In this study, we report that nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of hADI1 is regulated by a non-canonical nuclear export signal (NES) located in the N-terminal region of hADI1. The NES is composed of multiple basic amino-acid residues instead of the canonical leucine-rich sequence. Nuclear export of hADI1 was not mediated by CRM1, a major transporter that binds to leucine-rich NES. Substitution of the basic residues with alanines abolished NES activity. Mutant hADI1 accumulated in the nucleus and formed speckles frequently observed with splicing factors and some transcription factors. Indeed, hADI1 specifically co-localized with the splicing factor U1-70K to the nucleus but not with another splicing factor, SC35. U1-70K over-expression induced nuclear accumulation of hADI1. Nuclear hADI1 expression significantly altered the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A mini-gene, which generates multiple alternatively spliced transcripts. Thus, hADI1 may have acquired a novel role in nuclear mRNA processing possibly by modulating U1-70K-related functions, an activity negatively regulated by a non-classical NES sequence.

  15. Translocator protein (18 kDa) as a pharmacological target in adipocytes to regulate glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    As a major regulator in obesity and its associated metabolic complications, the proper functioning of adipocytes is crucial for health maintenance, thus serving as an important target for the development of anti-obese and anti-diabetic therapies. There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial malfunction is a pivotal event in disturbing adipocyte cell homeostasis. Among major mitochondrial structure components, the high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) has shown importance across a broad spectrum of mitochondrial functions. Recent studies demonstrated the presence of TSPO in white adipocyte mitochondria of mice, and administration of TSPO drug ligands to obese mice reduced weight gain and lowered glucose level. Therefore, it is of great interest to assess whether TSPO in adipocytes could serve as a drug target to regulate adipocyte activities with potential influence on weight control and glucose metabolism. Two structurally distinct TSPO drug ligands, PK 11195 and FGIN-1-27, improved the intracellular dynamics of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, such as the production and release of adipokines, glucose uptake, and adipogenesis. TSPO knockdown in either differentiated adipocytes or preadipocytes impaired these functions. Findings from 3T3-L1 cells were related to human primary cells, where TSPO expression was tightly associated with the metabolic state of primary adipocytes and the differentiation of primary preadipocytes. These results suggest that TSPO expression is essential to safeguard healthy adipocyte functions, and that TSPO activation in adipocytes improves their metabolic status in regulating glucose homeostasis. Adipocyte TSPO may serve as a pharmacologic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  16. Regulation of G protein signaling by the 70kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K; Kanelakis, Kimon C; Neubig, Richard R

    2013-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce extracellular signals to the interior of the cell by activating membrane-bound guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). An increasing number of proteins have been reported to bind to and regulate GPCRs. We report a novel regulation of the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor (α(2A)-R) by the ubiquitous stress-inducible 70kDa heat shock protein, hsp70. Hsp70, but not hsp90, attenuated G protein-dependent high affinity agonist binding to the α(2A)-R in Sf9 membranes. Antagonist binding was unchanged, suggesting that hsp70 uncouples G proteins from the receptor. As hsp70 did not bind G proteins but complexed with the α(2A)-R in intact cells, a direct interaction with the receptor seems likely. In the presence of hsp70, α(2A)-R-catalyzed [(35)S]GTPγS binding was reduced by approximately 70%. In contrast, approximately 50-fold higher concentrations of hsp70 were required to reduce agonist binding to the stress-inducible 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)-R). In heat-stressed CHO cells, the α(2A)-R was significantly uncoupled from G proteins, coincident with an increased localization of hsp70 at the membrane. The contrasting effect of hsp70 on the α(2A)-R compared to the 5-HT(1A)-R suggests that during stress, upregulation of hsp70 may attenuate signaling from specific GPCRs as part of the stress response to foster survival.

  17. Autophagy mediates cell cycle response by regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport of PAX6 in limbal stem cells under ultraviolet-A stress.

    PubMed

    Laggner, Maria; Pollreisz, Andreas; Schmidinger, Gerald; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chen, Ying-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Limbal stem cells (LSC) account for homeostasis and regeneration of corneal epithelium. Solar ultraviolet A (UVA) is the major source causing oxidative damage in the ocular surface. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation mechanism, is essential for physiologic function and stress defense of stem cells. PAX6, a master transcription factor governing corneal homeostasis by regulating cell cycle and cell fate of LSC, responds to oxidative stress by nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Impaired autophagy and deregulated PAX6 have been reported in oxidative stress-related ocular surface disorders. We hypothesize a functional role for autophagy and PAX6 in LSC's stress response to UVA. Therefore, human LSC colonies were irradiated with a sub-lethal dose of UVA and autophagic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by CYTO-ID assay and CM-H2DCFDA live staining, respectively. Following UVA irradiation, the percentage of autophagic cells significantly increased in LSC colonies while intracellular ROS levels remained unaffected. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of ATG7 abolished UVA-induced autophagy and led to an excessive accumulation of ROS. Upon UVA exposure, LSCs displayed nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of PAX6, while ATG7KD or antioxidant pretreatment largely attenuated the intracellular trafficking event. Immunofluorescence showing downregulation of proliferative marker PCNA and induction of cell cycle regulator p21 indicates cell cycle arrest in UVA-irradiated LSC. Abolishing autophagy, adenoviral-assisted restoration of nuclear PAX6 or antioxidant pretreatment abrogated the UVA-induced cell cycle arrest. Adenoviral expression of an ectopic PAX gene, PAX7, did not affect UVA cell cycle response. Furthermore, knocking down PAX6 attenuated the cell cycle progression of irradiated ATG7KD LSC by de-repressing p21 expression. Collectively, our data suggest a crosstalk between autophagy and PAX6 in regulating cell cycle response of ocular progenitors

  18. Regulated nucleo/cytoplasmic exchange of HOG1 MAPK requires the importin beta homologs NMD5 and XPO1.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrigno, P; Posas, F; Koepp, D; Saito, H; Silver, P A

    1998-01-01

    MAP kinase signaling modules serve to transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, but little is known about how signals cross the nuclear envelope. Exposure of yeast cells to increases in extracellular osmolarity activates the HOG1 MAP kinase cascade, which is composed of three tiers of protein kinases, namely the SSK2, SSK22 and STE11 MAPKKKs, the PBS2 MAPKK, and the HOG1 MAPK. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of these kinases, we found that HOG1, PBS2 and STE11 localize to the cytoplasm of unstressed cells. Following osmotic stress, HOG1, but neither PBS2 nor STE11, translocates into the nucleus. HOG1 translocation occurs very rapidly, is transient, and correlates with the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinase by its MAPKK. HOG1 phosphorylation is necessary and sufficient for nuclear translocation, because a catalytically inactive kinase when phosphorylated is translocated to the nucleus as efficiently as the wild-type. Nuclear import of the MAPK under stress conditions requires the activity of the small GTP binding protein Ran-GSP1, but not the NLS-binding importin alpha/beta heterodimer. Rather, HOG1 import requires the activity of a gene, NMD5, that encodes a novel importin beta homolog. Similarly, export of dephosphorylated HOG1 from the nucleus requires the activity of the NES receptor XPO1/CRM1. Our findings define the requirements for the regulated nuclear transport of a stress-activated MAP kinase. PMID:9755161

  19. Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (Btk) through a Novel SH3-Dependent Interaction with Ankyrin Repeat Domain 54 (ANKRD54)

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Alamdar; Mohammad, Dara K.; Mohamed, Abdalla J.; Nguyen, Vivian; Metalnikov, Pavel; Colwill, Karen; Pawson, Tony; Nore, Beston F.

    2012-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), belonging to the Tec family of tyrosine kinases (TFKs), is essential for B-lymphocyte development. Abrogation of Btk signaling causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) and murine X-linked immunodeficiency (Xid). We employed affinity purification of Flag-tagged Btk, combined with tandem mass spectrometry, to capture and identify novel interacting proteins. We here characterize the interaction with ankryin repeat domain 54 protein (ANKRD54), also known as Lyn-interacting ankyrin repeat protein (Liar). While Btk is a nucleocytoplasmic protein, the Liar pool was found to shuttle at a higher rate than Btk. Importantly, our results suggest that Liar mediates nuclear export of both Btk and another TFK, Txk/Rlk. Liar-mediated Btk shuttling was enriched for activation loop, nonphosphorylated Btk and entirely dependent on Btk's SH3 domain. Liar also showed reduced binding to an aspartic acid phosphomimetic SH3 mutant. Three other investigated nucleus-located proteins, Abl, estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and transcription factor T-bet, were all unaffected by Liar. We mapped the interaction site to the C terminus of the Btk SH3 domain. A biotinylated, synthetic Btk peptide, ARDKNGQEGYIPSNYVTEAEDS, was sufficient for this interaction. Liar is the first protein identified that specifically influences the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Btk and Txk and belongs to a rare group of known proteins carrying out this activity in a Crm1-dependent manner. PMID:22527282

  20. Divergent regulation by growth factors and cytokines of 95 kDa and 72 kDa gelatinases and tissue inhibitors or metalloproteinases-1, -2, and -3 in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Baker, A H; Murray, E J; Booth, R F; Newby, A C

    1996-04-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during neointima formation in atherosclerosis and angioplasty restenosis is mediated by certain growth factors and cytokines, one action of which may be to promote basement-membrane degradation. To test this hypothesis further, the effects of such growth factors and cytokines on the synthesis of two basement-membrane-degrading metalloproteinases, namely the 72 kDa gelatinase (MMP-2, gelatinase A) and the 95 kDa gelatinase (MMP-9, gelatinase B) and three tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was studied in primary cultured rabbit aortic SMCs. Expression of the 95 kDa gelatinase was increased by phorbol myristate acetate, foetal calf serum, thrombin and interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha); platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB alone had no effect but acted synergistically with IL-1alpha. A selective protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro 31-8220, abolished induction of the 95 kDa gelatinase. In contrast, none of the agents tested modulated the synthesis of the 72 kDa gelatinase. We conclude that maximal up-regulation of 95 kDa gelatinase expression requires the concerted action of growth factors and inflammatory cytokines mediated, in part, by a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were highly expressed, and their synthesis was not affected by growth factors or cytokines. Expression of TIMP-3 mRNAs was, however, increased by PDGF and transforming growth factor beta, especially in combination. Divergent regulation of gelatinase and TIMP expression implies that either net synthesis or net degradation of basement membrane can be mediated by appropriate combinations of growth factors and cytokines.

  1. p53/E1b58kDa complex regulates adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, P J; Hall, A R; Myers, C J; Braithwaite, A W

    1997-10-27

    We have explored a role for the adenovirus (Ad5) E1b58kDa/p53 protein complex in adenovirus replication. This was done by using virus mutants containing different defects in the E1b58kDa gene and cell lines that express either a wild-type p53 protein or a mutant p53 protein. We find that infection of wild-type p53-containing cells with wild-type Ad5 causes a shutoff of p53 and alpha-actin protein synthesis by distinct mechanisms, but neither occurs in mutant p53 cells. Our data also indicate that the shutoff is dependent on formation of the p53/E1b complex and may also involve another virus protein, E4ORF6. Following from these observations we asked whether failure to form the complex resulted in impaired adenovirus replication. Our experiments showed that neither wild-type Ad5 nor the E1b mutant dl338 could replicate in cells expressing a mutant p53 protein, but that wild-type adenovirus replicated well in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the interaction between p53 and the E1b58kDa protein is necessary for efficient adenovirus replication. This is the first time such a direct link between the complex and virus replication has been demonstrated. These data raise serious questions about the usefulness of E1b-defective viruses in tumor therapy.

  2. Targeting nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular location and regulation of proteins within each cell is critically important and is typically deregulated in disease especially cancer. The clinical hypothesis for inhibiting the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is based on the dependence of certain key proteins within malignant cells. This includes a host of well-characterized tumor suppressor and oncoproteins that require specifc localization for their function. This aberrant localization of tumour suppressors and oncoproteins results in their their respective inactivation or over-activation. This incorrect localization occurs actively via the nuclear pore complex that spans the nuclear envelope and is mediated by transport receptors. Accordingly, given the signifcant need for novel, specifc disease treatments, the nuclear envelope and the nuclear transport machinery have emerged as a rational therapeutic target in oncology to restore physiological nucleus/cytoplasmic homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that this approach might be of substantial therapeutic use. This review summarizes the mechanisms of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, its role in cancer biology and the therapeutic potential of targeting this critical cellular process PMID:24429466

  3. 60kDa lysophospholipase, a new Sgk1 molecular partner involved in the regulation of ENaC.

    PubMed

    Menniti, Miranda; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Föller, Michael; Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Mariggiò, Stefania; Nofziger, Charity; Perri, Angela M; Amato, Rosario; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie; Corda, Daniela; Lang, Florian; Perrotti, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) is essential for hormonal regulation of ENaC-mediated sodium transport and is involved in the transduction of growth-factor-dependent cell survival and proliferation. The identification of molecular partners for Sgk1 is crucial for the understanding of its mechanisms of action. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screening based on a human kidney cDNA library to identify molecular partners of Sgk1. As a result the screening revealed a specific interaction between Sgk1 and a 60 kDa Lysophospholipase (LysoLP). LysoLP is a poorly characterized enzyme that, based on sequence analysis, might possess lysophospholipase and asparaginase activities. We demonstrate that LysoLP has indeed a lysophospholipase activity and affects metabolic functions related to cell proliferation and regulation of membrane channels. Moreover we demonstrate in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that LysoLP downregulates basal and Sgk1-dependent ENaC activity. In conclusion LysoLP may represent a new player in the regulation of ENaC and Sgk1-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cocaine treatment increases expression of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein in discrete brain regions.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Niki; Chong, Victor Z; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K; Hayes, Robert J; Gardner, Eliot L

    2003-01-01

    Previous reports from our laboratory have described brain-specific catecholamine-regulated proteins, which bind dopamine and related catecholamines. Evidence from the molecular cloning of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein (CRP40) revealed that CRP40 is dopamine-inducible and has properties similar to those of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family. The present study investigates the effects of acute and chronic cocaine treatment on CRP40 expression in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and medulla. Acute treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, whereas chronic treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens only. Neither of these treatments affected CRP40 levels in the prefrontal cortex or medulla. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping agent alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone did not attenuate cocaine-induced expression of CRP40, suggesting that the observed increases in CRP40 levels were not caused by free radicals. On the other hand, pretreatment with anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked the cocaine-induced expression of CRP40. Thus, protein synthesis may be involved in the observed CRP40 level increases. Furthermore, neither acute nor chronic cocaine treatment affected levels of inducible or constitutively expressed HSP70, which indicates a specificity of cocaine's effects on CRP40. Since cocaine has been shown to increase extracellular dopamine levels, these findings suggest that increased expression of CRP40 is associated with high extracellular levels of dopamine (or its metabolites). Elevated levels of CRP40 could play a protective role for dopamine neurons in response to increased oxidative stress that has been shown to be induced by cocaine and that can lead to apoptosis and neurodegeneration.

  5. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-09-06

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology.

  6. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  7. 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme: structure of the rat gene and regulation upon fasting and by insulin.

    PubMed

    Wing, S S; Banville, D

    1994-07-01

    Upon fasting, an increase in proteolysis occurs in rat skeletal muscle and is associated with increased levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. As this suggests that formation of conjugates may be activated upon fasting, we studied the expression of the gene encoding the 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2(14k)). A cDNA encoding rat E2(14k) was isolated and used to probe Northern blots of RNA from extensor digitorum longus muscles of fed, fasted, and refed rats. Two mRNA transcripts of 1.2 and 1.8 kb were observed. Isolation and sequencing of a genomic clone determined that these transcripts arise from differential sites of polyadenylation. The 1.2-kb transcript increased threefold upon fasting at 2 days and returned to normal with refeeding. Northern analysis of RNA from various tissues of fed and fasted rats showed that E2(14k) mRNA was expressed at high levels in testes, moderate levels in muscle, heart, and brain, but low levels in liver and kidney. Upon fasting, increases in mRNA levels were seen in muscle, heart, liver, and kidney. In vitro, in rat L6 myotubes, insulin lowered levels of E2(14k) mRNA. Because E2s catalyze the first irreversible reaction in the pathway and E2(14k) gene expression appears to change in parallel with the changes in levels of ubiquitinated proteins and rates of proteolysis, conjugation mediated by this E2 may be a rate-limiting step in the pathway. This is the first demonstration of direct hormonal regulation of a gene in the ubiquitin system and argues strongly for a role of the ubiquitin system in the metabolic response to fasting in skeletal muscle.

  8. Malignant progressive tumor cell clone exhibits significant up-regulation of cofilin-2 and 27-kDa modified form of cofilin-1 compared to regressive clone.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Wang, Yufeng; Okada, Futoshi; Baron, Byron; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Takao; Akada, Junko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    QR-32 is a regressive murine fibrosarcoma cell clone which cannot grow when they are transplanted in mice; QRsP-11 is a progressive malignant tumor cell clone derived from QR-32 which shows strong tumorigenicity. A recent study showed there to be differentially expressed up-regulated and down-regulated proteins in these cells, which were identified by proteomic differential display analyses by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Cofilins are small proteins of less than 20 kDa. Their function is the regulation of actin assembly. Cofilin-1 is a small ubiquitous protein, and regulates actin dynamics by means of binding to actin filaments. Cofilin-1 plays roles in cell migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Cofilin-2 is also a small protein, but it is mainly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. There are many reports showing the positive correlation between the level of cofilin-1 and cancer progression. We have also reported an increased expression of cofilin-1 in pancreatic cancer tissues compared to adjacent paired normal tissues. On the other hand, cofilin-2 was significantly less expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. Therefore, the present study investigated the comparison of the levels of cofilin-1 and cofilin-2 in regressive QR-32 and progressive QRsP-11cells by western blotting. Cofilin-2 was significantly up-regulated in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 cells (p<0.001). On the other hand, the difference of the intensities of the bands of cofilin-1 (18 kDa) in QR-32 and QRsP-11 was not significant. However, bands of 27 kDa showed a quite different intensity between QR-32 and QRsP-11, with much higher intensities in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 (p<0.001). These results suggested that the 27-kDa protein recognized by the antibody against cofilin-1 is a possible biomarker for progressive tumor cells.

  9. Cloning and characterization of mouse extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase 3 as a unique gene product of 100 kDa.

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, B; Saba-El-Leil, M K; Meloche, S

    2000-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that have a pivotal role in signal transduction. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a mouse homologue of extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)3. The mouse Erk3 cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 720 residues, which displays 94% identity with human ERK3. Transcription and translation of this cDNA in vitro generates a 100 kDa protein similar to the human gene product ERK3. Immunoblot analysis with an antibody raised against a unique sequence of ERK3 also recognizes a 100 kDa protein in mouse tissues. A single transcript of Erk3 was detected in every adult mouse tissue examined, with the highest expression being found in the brain. Interestingly, expression of Erk3 mRNA is acutely regulated during mouse development, with a peak of expression observed at embryonic day 11. The mouse Erk3 gene was mapped to a single locus on central mouse chromosome 9, adjacent to the dilute mutation locus and in a region syntenic to human chromosome 15q21. Finally, we provide several lines of evidence to support the existence of a unique Erk3 gene product of 100 kDa in mammalian cells. PMID:10657254

  10. Identification of Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins with Nuclear Export Activity: Cell Cycle-Regulated Transcription Factor Ace2p Shows Cell Cycle-Independent Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben Heick; Neville, Megan; Rain, Jean Christophe; McCarthy, Terri; Legrain, Pierre; Rosbash, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the NES receptor CRM1/Crm1p. We have carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen with Crm1p as a bait. The Crm1p-interacting clones were subscreened for nuclear export activity in a visual assay utilizing the Crm1p-inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB). This approach identified three Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins not previously known to have nuclear export activity. These proteins are the 5′ RNA triphosphatase Ctl1p, the cell cycle-regulated transcription factor Ace2p, and a protein encoded by the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YDR499W. Mutagenesis analysis show that YDR499Wp contains an NES that conforms to the consensus sequence for leucine-rich NESs. Mutagenesis of Ctl1p and Ace2p were unable to identify specific NES residues. However, a 29-amino-acid region of Ace2p, rich in hydrophobic residues, contains nuclear export activity. Ace2p accumulates in the nucleus at the end of mitosis and activates early-G1-specific genes. We now provide evidence that Ace2p is nuclear not only in late M-early G1 but also during other stages of the cell cycle. This feature of Ace2p localization explains its ability to activate genes such as CUP1, which are not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner. PMID:11027275

  11. Binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to the human prolactin promoter is required for its basal and hormone-regulated activity.

    PubMed

    Peers, B; Nalda, A M; Monget, P; Voz, M L; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1992-11-15

    cAMP strongly stimulates the activity of the human prolactin (hPRL) promoter. We have previously shown that two types of cis-element are required for this cAMP regulation; binding sites for the pituitary-specific factor Pit-1, and the sequence spanning nucleotides -115 to -85 (named sequence A). Sequence A contains the TGACG motif found in the consensus sequence of the cAMP-responsive element (CRE). In this study, we show that a mutation in the TGACG motif of sequence A strongly reduces not only the cAMP regulation but also the Ca2+ regulation and basal activity of the hPRL promoter. Furthermore, gel-shift assays indicate that the mutation prevents binding of a ubiquitous factor which is not the CRE-binding protein. Southwestern experiments suggest that this ubiquitous factor's molecular mass is approximately 100 kDa. We conclude that binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to sequence A is required for full basal and hormonal regulation of hPRL-promoter activity.

  12. The C9ORF72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, Aaron R.; Grima, Jonathan C.; Machamer, James B.; Steinwald, Peter; Daley, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Sean J.; Cunningham, Kathleen M.; Vidensky, Svetlana; Gupta, Saksham; Thomas, Michael A.; Hong, Ingie; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Huganir, Richard L.; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Matunis, Michael J.; Wang, Jiou; Sattler, Rita

    2016-01-01

    A GGGGCC (G4C2) hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE) in C9ORF72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies support an HRE RNA gain-of-function mechanism of neurotoxicity, and we previously identified protein interactors for the G4C2 RNA including RanGAP1. A candidate-based genetic screen in Drosophila expressing 30 G4C2 repeats identified RanGAP (Drosophila ortholog of human RanGAP1), a key regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as a potent suppressor of neurodegeneration. Enhancing nuclear import or suppressing nuclear export of proteins also suppresses neurodegeneration. RanGAP physically interacts with HRE RNA and is mislocalized in HRE-expressing flies, neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSNs), and in C9ORF72 patient brain tissue. Nuclear import is impaired as a result of HRE expression in the fly model and in C9ORF72 iPSNs, and these deficits are rescued by small molecules and antisense oligonucleotides targeting the HRE G-quadruplexes. Nucleocytoplasmic transport defects may be a fundamental pathway for ALS and FTD amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26308891

  13. Introduction to nucleocytoplasmic transport: molecules and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peters, Reiner

    2006-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the exchange of matter between nucleus and cytoplasm, plays a fundamental role in human and other eukaryotic cells, affecting almost every aspect of health and disease. The only gate for the transport of small and large molecules as well as supramolecular complexes between nucleus and cytoplasm is the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The NPC is not a normal membrane transport protein (transporter). Composed of 500 to 1000 peptide chains, the NPC features a mysterious functional duality. For most molecules, it constitutes a molecular sieve with a blurred cutoff at approx 10 nm, but for molecules binding to phenylalanine-glycine (FG) motifs, the NPC appears to be a channel of approx 50 nm diameter, permitting bidirectional translocation at high speed. To achieve this, the NPC cooperates with soluble factors, the nuclear transport receptors, which shuttle between nuclear contents and cytoplasm. Here, we provide a short introduction to nucleocytoplasmic transport by describing first the structure and composition of the nuclear pore complex. Then, mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic transport are discussed. Finally, the still essentially unresolved mechanisms by which nuclear transport receptors and transport complexes are translocated through the nuclear pore complex are considered, and a novel translocation model is suggested.

  14. Cloning, characterization, and functional studies of a human 40-kDa catecholamine-regulated protein: implications in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pontoriero, Giuseppe F.; Thomas, Nancy; Thomson, Christy A.; Skoblenick, Kevin; Pristupa, Zdenek B.; Mishra, Ram K.

    2009-01-01

    Catecholamine-regulated proteins (CRPs) have been shown to bind dopamine and other structurally related catecholamines; in particular, the 40-kDa CRP (CRP40) protein has been previously cloned and functionally characterized. To determine putative human homologs, BLAST analysis using the bovine CRP40 sequence identified a human established sequence tag (EST) with significant homology (accession #BQ224193). Using this EST, we cloned a recombinant human brain CRP40-like protein, which possessed chaperone activity. Radiolabeled dopamine binding studies with recombinant human CRP40 protein demonstrated the ability of this protein to bind dopamine with low affinity and high capacity. The full-length human CRP40 nucleotide sequence was elucidated (accession #DQ480334) with RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends polymerase chain reaction, while Northern blot hybridization suggested that human CRP40 is an alternative splice variant of the 70-kDa mitochondrial heat shock protein, mortalin. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells treated with the antipsychotic drug, haloperidol, exhibited a significant increase in CRP40 messenger RNA expression compared to untreated control cells, while other dopamine agonists/antagonists also altered CRP40 expression and immunolocalization. In conclusion, these results show that we have cloned a splice variant of mortalin with a novel catecholamine binding function and that this chaperone-like protein may be neuroprotective in dopamine-related central nervous system disorders. PMID:19280369

  15. Tissue-specific expression, hormonal regulation and 5'-flanking gene region of the rat Clara cell 10 kDa protein: comparison to rabbit uteroglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, G; Wolf, M; Katyal, S L; Singh, G; Beato, M; Suske, G

    1990-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of rat Clara Cell 10 kDa secretory protein (CC10) shows 55% identity to rabbit uteroglobin. In order to define the relationship between rat CC10 and rabbit uteroglobin in detail, the tissue-specific expression and hormonal regulation of rat CC10 mRNA was analyzed. We report that like rabbit uteroglobin, rat CC10 mRNA is expressed in lung and esophagus, as well as in uteri of estrogen- and progesterone-treated females. Expression of CC10 mRNA in lung is regulated by glucocorticoids. The similarity in expression pattern of rat CC10 mRNA and rabbit uteroglobin mRNA is reflected by a striking similarity in the 5'-flanking regions of the two genes. Despite this overall similarity, two regions of 0.3 kb and 2.1 kb are absent in the rat CC10 upstream gene region. The larger region includes a cluster of hormone receptor binding sites, believed to be responsible for differential regulation of rabbit uteroglobin by glucocorticoids and progesterone. Thus, while the sequence identities in the coding and 5'-flanking regions point towards a common ancestor for the uteroglobin and CC10 gene, later events (deletions/insertions) might have caused species-specific differences in their regulation. Images PMID:2349092

  16. P68 RNA Helicase Is A Nucleocytoplasm Shuttling Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haizhen; Gao, Xueliang; Huang, Yun; Yang, Jenny; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2009-01-01

    P68 RNA helicase is a prototypical DEAD box RNA helicase. The protein plays a very important role in early organ development and maturation. In consistence with the function of the protein in transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing, p68 was found to predominately localize in the cell nucleus. However, recent experiments demonstrate a transient cytoplasmic localization of the protein. We report here that p68 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of p68 is mediated by two nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two nuclear exporting signal (NES) sequence elements. Our experiments reveal that p68 shuttles via a classical RanGTPase dependent pathway. PMID:19786986

  17. The rules and roles of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins.

    PubMed

    Gama-Carvalho, M; Carmo-Fonseca, M

    2001-06-08

    The spatial separation of mRNA synthesis from translation, while providing eukaryotes with the possibility to achieve higher complexity through a more elaborate regulation of gene expression, has set the need for transport mechanisms through the nuclear envelope. In a simplistic view of nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear proteins are imported into the nucleus while RNAs are exported to the cytoplasm. The reality is, however, that transport of either proteins or RNAs across the nuclear envelope can be bi-directional. During the past years, an increasing number of proteins have been identified that shuttle continuously back and forth between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The emerging picture is that shuttling proteins are key factors in conveying information on nuclear and cytoplasmic activities within the cell.

  18. Regulation of Steroid Hormone Receptor Function By the 52-kDa FK506-Binding Protein (FKBP52)

    PubMed Central

    Sivils, Jeffrey C.; Storer, Cheryl L.; Galigniana, Mario D.; Cox, Marc B.

    2011-01-01

    The large FK506-binding protein FKBP52 has been characterized as an important positive regulator of androgen, glucocorticoid and progesterone receptor signaling pathways. FKBP52 associates with receptor-Hsp90 complexes and is proposed to have roles in both receptor hormone binding and receptor subcellular localization. Data from biochemical and cellular studies has been corroborated in whole animal models as fkbp52-deficient male and female mice display characteristics of androgen, glucocorticoid and/or progesterone insensitivity. FKBP52 receptor specificity and the specific phenotypes displayed by the fkbp52-deficient mice have firmly established FKBP52 as a promising target for the treatment of a variety of hormone-dependent diseases. Recent studies demonstrated that the FKBP52 FK1 domain and the proline-rich loop within this domain are functionally important for FKBP52 regulation of receptor function. Based on these data, efforts are currently underway to target the FKBP52 FK1 domain and the proline-rich loop with small molecule inhibitors. PMID:21511531

  19. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by the outer membrane does not involve the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (Translocator Protein of 18 kDa (TSPO)).

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Blachly-Dyson, Elizabeth; Sewell, Randall; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Di Lisa, Fabio; Ricchelli, Fernanda; Bernardi, Paolo; Forte, Michael

    2014-05-16

    Translocator protein of 18 kDa (TSPO) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is thought to play a key role in the mitochondrial transport of cholesterol, a key step in the generation of steroid hormones. However, it was first characterized as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor because it appears to be responsible for high affinity binding of a number of benzodiazepines to non-neuronal tissues. Ensuing studies have employed natural and synthetic ligands to assess the role of TSPO function in a number of natural and pathological circumstances. Largely through the use of these compounds and biochemical associations, TSPO has been proposed to play a role in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which has been associated with cell death in many human pathological conditions. Here, we critically assess the role of TSPO in the function of the PTP through the generation of mice in which the Tspo gene has been conditionally eliminated. Our results show that 1) TSPO plays no role in the regulation or structure of the PTP, 2) endogenous and synthetic ligands of TSPO do not regulate PTP activity through TSPO, 3) outer mitochondrial membrane regulation of PTP activity occurs though a mechanism that does not require TSPO, and 4) hearts lacking TSPO are as sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury as hearts from control mice. These results call into question a wide variety of studies implicating TSPO in a number of pathological processes through its actions on the PTP.

  20. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of STAT transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Vinkemeier, Uwe

    2004-12-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have initially been described as cytoplasmic proteins that enter the nucleus only after cytokine treatment of cells. Contrary to this assumption, it was demonstrated that STATs are constantly shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm irrespective of cytokine stimulation. This happens both via carrier-dependent as well as carrier-independent transportation. Moreover, it was also recognized that cytokine stimulation triggers nuclear retention of dimeric STATs, rather than affecting the rate of nuclear import. In summary, it is increasingly being appreciated that STAT nucleocytoplasmic cycling determines the quality of cytokine signaling and also constitutes an important area for microbial intervention.

  1. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Phosphorylation Regulates Interaction of 210-kDa Myosin Light Chain Kinase N-terminal Domain with Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Vilitkevich, E L; Khapchaev, A Y; Kudryashov, D S; Nikashin, A V; Schavocky, J P; Lukas, T J; Watterson, D M; Shirinsky, V P

    2015-10-01

    High molecular weight myosin light chain kinase (MLCK210) is a multifunctional protein involved in myosin II activation and integration of cytoskeletal components in cells. MLCK210 possesses actin-binding regions both in the central part of the molecule and in its N-terminal tail domain. In HeLa cells, mitotic protein kinase Aurora B was suggested to phosphorylate MLCK210 N-terminal tail at serine residues (Dulyaninova, N. G., and Bresnick, A. R. (2004) Exp. Cell Res., 299, 303-314), but the functional significance of the phosphorylation was not established. We report here that in vitro, the N-terminal actin-binding domain of MLCK210 is located within residues 27-157 (N27-157, avian MLCK210 sequence) and is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Aurora B at serine residues 140/149 leading to a decrease in N27-157 binding to actin. The same residues are phosphorylated in a PKA-dependent manner in transfected HeLa cells. Further, in transfected cells, phosphomimetic mutants of N27-157 showed reduced association with the detergent-stable cytoskeleton, whereas in vitro, the single S149D mutation reduced N27-157 association with F-actin to a similar extent as that achieved by N27-157 phosphorylation. Altogether, our results indicate that phosphorylation of MLCK210 at distinct serine residues, mainly at S149, attenuates the interaction of MLCK210 N-terminus with the actin cytoskeleton and might serve to regulate MLCK210 microfilament cross-linking activity in cells.

  3. Discovery of a nucleocytoplasmic O-mannose glycoproteome in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Larsen, Ida Signe Bohse; Neubert, Patrick; Joshi, Hiren Jitendra; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Strahl, Sabine; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic cycling of N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on serine and threonine residues (O-GlcNAcylation) is an essential process in all eukaryotic cells except yeast, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. O-GlcNAcylation modulates signaling and cellular processes in an intricate interplay with protein phosphorylation and serves as a key sensor of nutrients by linking the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway to cellular signaling. A longstanding conundrum has been how yeast survives without O-GlcNAcylation in light of its similar phosphorylation signaling system. We previously developed a sensitive lectin enrichment and mass spectrometry workflow for identification of the human O-linked mannose (O-Man) glycoproteome and used this to identify a pleothora of O-Man glycoproteins in human cell lines including the large family of cadherins and protocadherins. Here, we applied the workflow to yeast with the aim to characterize the yeast O-Man glycoproteome, and in doing so, we discovered hitherto unknown O-Man glycosites on nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitochondrial proteins in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Such O-Man glycoproteins were not found in our analysis of human cell lines. However, the type of yeast O-Man nucleocytoplasmic proteins and the localization of identified O-Man residues mirror that of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome found in other eukaryotic cells, indicating that the two different types of O-glycosylations serve the same important biological functions. The discovery opens for exploration of the enzymatic machinery that is predicted to regulate the nucleocytoplasmic O-Man glycosylations. It is likely that manipulation of this type of O-Man glycosylation will have wide applications for yeast bioprocessing. PMID:26644575

  4. Vitamin-D dependent 9 kDa calcium-binding protein gene: cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and regulation.

    PubMed

    Thomasset, M; Desplan, C; Warembourg, M; Perret, C

    1986-01-01

    Cholecalciferol (calcitriol) the active hormonal form of vitamin D induces the synthesis of at least two intracellular calcium-binding proteins (Ka = 10(6) M-1), the cholecalcins (CaBP) in mammals. We used the synthesis of these proteins to study the genomic steroid-like action of vitamin D. The 9 kDa CaBP is mainly concentrated in the duodenum while 28 kDa CaBP is located in the kidney and cerebellum. Complementary DNA copies of rat intestinal 9 kDa CaBP mRNA were cloned in E. coli. The deduced amino acid sequence for 9 kDa CaBP contains two 'EF hand' domains corresponding to calcium-binding sites I and II. The homology observed suggests, after comparison with the structures of other intracellular CaBPs, that rat 9 kDa CaBP mRNA contains the remains of an untranslated calcium-binding site III-like structure seen in 28 kDa CaBP from kidney and cerebellum of rat. Northern blots showed that the cDNA sequence hybridizes to a homogeneous 500-600 nucleotide mRNA species from rat duodenum. Larger mRNA species encoding 28 kDa CaBP were undetectable in rat kidney and cerebellum even under low stringency conditions. These findings demonstrate that there is no cross-hybridization between 9 kDa and 28 kDa CaBP mRNAs, and Southern analysis indicates that there are distinct genes coding for each rat cholecalcin. The cDNA probe was used to analyze the specific 9 kDa CaBP gene expression along the intestine of growing rats and during gestation and fetal development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Temporal and spatial regulation of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50-kDa (EBP50) during embryo implantation in mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Xu, Wang-Ming; Yin, Tai-Lang; Zhao, Qing-Hong; Peng, Liang-Yu; Yang, Jing

    2012-12-03

    Embryo implantation is a crucial process for successful pregnancy. To date, the mechanism of embryo implantation remains unclear. Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding protein-50-kDa (EBP50) is a scaffold protein, which has been shown to play an important role in cancer development. Embryo implantation and cancer follow a similar progression. Thus, in this article, we utilized immunohistochemical staining and western blot analyses to examine the spatiotemporal expression and regulation of EBP50 both in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation as well as in other related models. We found that EBP50 was detected in epithelial cells in all of the groups used in our study. During the peri-implantation period, EBP50 mainly localized in apical membranes. At the implantation site (IS) on day 5 (D5) of pregnancy, EBP50 was mainly expressed in the nuclei of stroma cells, whereas from day 6 to day 8 (D6–D8) of pregnancy, the expression of EBP50 was noted in the cytoplasm of decidual cells. The expression of EBP50 was not significantly different in the pseudopregnant uterus and decreased in the uteri subjected to activation of delayed implantation. Artificial decidualization also decreased EBP50 expression. Thus, the expression levels and location were affected by active blastocysts and decidualization during the window of implantation.

  6. Potassium-3-beta-hydroxy-20-oxopregn-5-en-17-alpha-yl sulfate: a novel inhibitor of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein

    PubMed Central

    Mhaidat, Nizar M; Al-Balas, Qosay A; Alzoubi, Karem H; AlEjielat, Rowan F

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the central role of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in colorectal cancer (CRC) survival and chemoresistance. In the present study, we aimed to design a GRP78 inhibitor and test its potential to inhibit CRC cells growth. Materials and methods Computer-aided drug design was used to establish novel compounds as potential inhibitors of GRP78. Discovery Studio 3.5 software was used to evaluate a series of designed compounds and assess their mode of binding to the active site of the protein. The cytotoxicity of the designed compounds was evaluated using the MTT assay and the propidium iodide method. The effect of the inhibitor on the expression of GRP78 was evaluated by immunoblotting. Results Among the designed compounds, only potassium-3-beta-hydroxy-20-oxopregn-5-en-17-alpha-yl sulfate (PHOS) has a potential to inhibit the growth of CRC cells. Inhibition of cellular growth was largely attributed to downregulation of GRP78 and induction of apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These results introduce PHOS as a promising GRP78 inhibitor that could be used in future studies as a combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of CRC patients. Our ongoing studies aim to characterize PHOS safety profile as well as its mechanism of action. PMID:26893572

  7. Expression of 150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) stimulates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Shirai, Ayano; Ito, Yosuke; Namba, Takushi; Tahara, Kayoko; Yamakawa, Naoki; Mizushima, Tohru

    2012-09-07

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) involves pulmonary injury associated with inflammatory responses, fibrosis and dysfunction. Myofibroblasts and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 play major roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is induced in the lungs of IPF patients. One of ER chaperones, the 150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150), is essential for the maintenance of cellular viability under stress conditions. In this study, we used heterozygous ORP150-deficient mice (ORP150(+/-) mice) to examine the role of ORP150 in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Treatment of mice with bleomycin induced the expression of ORP150 in the lung. Bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses were slightly exacerbated in ORP150(+/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. On the other hand, bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, alteration of lung mechanics and respiratory dysfunction was clearly ameliorated in the ORP150(+/-) mice. Bleomycin-induced increases in pulmonary levels of both active TGF-β1 and myofibroblasts were suppressed in ORP150(+/-) mice. These results suggest that although ORP150 is protective against bleomycin-induced lung injury, this protein could stimulate bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by increasing pulmonary levels of TGF-β1 and myofibroblasts.

  8. Hepatitis B virus enhances cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 Kda.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Rui; Yang, HuiOu; Xiang, Qian; Jiang, Qing; He, Qi; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Huifen; Wang, Qiang; Ning, Qin; Li, Yiwu; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-07-25

    Cisplatin is a classical platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug used in the treatment of many cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The application of cisplatin is significantly limited by its toxicity, which may be affected by various biological factors. Persistence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection leads to HCC development and may be associated with higher incidence of severe hepatitis during chemotherapy. However, whether HBV alters the susceptibility of hepatocytes to cisplatin remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that HBV transfection enhanced cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 KDa (Grp78), a major stress-induced chaperone that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing Grp78 gene increased the susceptibility of HepG2 to cisplatin by activating caspase-3. Grp78 expression was down-regulated by HBV infection both in vitro and in liver tissues of patients. We compared the cisplatin sensitivity of hepatoma cells either expressing (HepG2.2.15 cells) or not expressing the entire Hepatitis B Virus genome (HepG2). HepG2.2.15 cells showed increased sensitivity to cisplatin and a higher apoptosis rate. Overexpression of Grp78 counteracted the increase of sensitivity of HepG2.215 cells to cisplatin. Furthermore, we found that HBV disrupted Grp78 synthesis in response to cisplatin stimulation, which may trigger severe and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that can induce cellular apoptosis. Our findings provide new information into the effect of HBV in the modulation of Grp78 expression, and, consequently on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity during viral infection.

  9. The expression of '150-kDa oxygen regulated protein (ORP-150)' in human brain and its relationship with duration time until death.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, Kazuya; Tsuda, Ryouichi; Kondo, Toshikazu; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ozawa, Kentaro; Ogawa, Satoshi; Nakasono, Ichiro

    2004-04-01

    The expression of oxygen regulated protein 150-kDa (ORP-150) was strongly induced in human brain under the hypoxic conditions. We examined the expression of ORP-150 in the brain samples, and discussed its significance in forensic practice. The cerebral cortexes of 31 cases (asphyxia: 9 cases, hypothermia: 4, exsanguinations: 5, CO intoxication (CO): 6, sudden cardiac death (SCD): 7) were used for this study. Each tissue section was incubated with anti-ORP-150 polyclonal antibody and the number of ORP-150 positive cells were counted. In the multiple linear regression method, the estimated regression coefficient of ORP-150 on age was significant (P=0.039) thus, we could find that the ORP-150 expression level depended on age. Using analysis of covariance, we compared the means of ORP-150, LSMEAN, which means hypothetic average value excluding influence of age, for each cause of death. The LSMEAN+/-SE was 84.74+/-9.03 in hypothermia, 57.52+/-6.34 in asphyxia, 46.68+/-6.70 in CO, 24.84+/-8.05 in exsanguinations, and 16.24+/-7.35 in SCD. As a result of the analysis, the LSMEAN of the ORP-150 expression level was related to the cause of death. There might be differences in the duration of brain ischemia before death. For example, SCD is presumed to be instant death, while brain ischemia continues for several minutes in asphyxia, CO and exsanguinations, and for several hours in hypothermia cases. Therefore, the immunohistochemical and morphometrical analysis of ORP-150 in the brain may be very useful to determine the duration of brain ischemia before death in forensic autopsy cases.

  10. Increased Serum Levels of Anti-Carbamylated 78-kDa Glucose-Regulated Protein Antibody in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lai, Pei-Hsuan; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Koo, Malcolm; Lu, Ming-Chi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence and titer of anti-carbamylated 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (anti-CarGRP78) antibody in serum from controls, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). Thirty-three RA patients, 20 SLE patients, 20 pSS patients, and 20 controls were enrolled from our outpatient clinic. GRP78 was cloned and carbamylated. Serum titers of anti- cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP), anti-GRP78, and anti-CarGRP78 were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No differences in serum titers of anti-GRP78 antibody in patients with RA, SLE, or pSS compared with the controls were observed. Serum levels of anti-carGRP78 antibody in patients with RA, but not SLE or pSS, were significantly higher compared with the controls (OD405 0.15 ± 0.08 versus 0.11 ± 0.03, p = 0.033). There was a positive correlation between the serum levels of anti-GRP78 antibody, but not anti-CarGRP78 antibody, with the levels of anti-CCP antibody in patients with RA. Both anti-GRP78 and anti-carGRP78 antibodies failed to correlate with C-reactive protein levels in patients with RA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the presence of anti-CarGRP78 antibody in patients with RA. In addition, the serum titer of anti-CarGRP78 antibody was significantly elevated in patients with RA compared with the controls. Anti-CarGRP78 antibody could also be detected in patients with SLE or pSS. PMID:27618024

  11. Increased Serum Levels of Anti-Carbamylated 78-kDa Glucose-Regulated Protein Antibody in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lai, Pei-Hsuan; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Koo, Malcolm; Lu, Ming-Chi

    2016-09-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence and titer of anti-carbamylated 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (anti-CarGRP78) antibody in serum from controls, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). Thirty-three RA patients, 20 SLE patients, 20 pSS patients, and 20 controls were enrolled from our outpatient clinic. GRP78 was cloned and carbamylated. Serum titers of anti- cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP), anti-GRP78, and anti-CarGRP78 were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No differences in serum titers of anti-GRP78 antibody in patients with RA, SLE, or pSS compared with the controls were observed. Serum levels of anti-carGRP78 antibody in patients with RA, but not SLE or pSS, were significantly higher compared with the controls (OD405 0.15 ± 0.08 versus 0.11 ± 0.03, p = 0.033). There was a positive correlation between the serum levels of anti-GRP78 antibody, but not anti-CarGRP78 antibody, with the levels of anti-CCP antibody in patients with RA. Both anti-GRP78 and anti-carGRP78 antibodies failed to correlate with C-reactive protein levels in patients with RA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the presence of anti-CarGRP78 antibody in patients with RA. In addition, the serum titer of anti-CarGRP78 antibody was significantly elevated in patients with RA compared with the controls. Anti-CarGRP78 antibody could also be detected in patients with SLE or pSS.

  12. Distinct regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 by 90-kDa heat-shock protein in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Norie; Nemoto, Takayuki; Satoh, Shinya; Maruta, Toyoaki; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Chosa, Etsuo; Wada, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways via insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 play crucial roles in health, diseases, and therapeutics (i.e., longevity, tumorigenesis, and neuroprotection). The 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) is an emerging target molecule of therapeutics, Hsp90 inhibitors being promising against various diseases (e.g., cancer, brain and cardiac ischemia, and neurodegenerative diseases). Much remains, however, unknown whether Hsp90 could regulate insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 signaling pathways. In cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we observed that 24-h treatment with 1 microM geldanamycin (an inhibitor of Hsp90) decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 level, while increasing insulin receptor substrate-2 level; besides, geldanamycin lowered phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, and Raf-1 levels, without changing extracellular signal-regulated kinase and its upstream kinase levels. Chronic (>or=12h) treatment with 0.1-10 microM Hsp90 inhibitor (geldanamycin, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin, herbimycin A, and radicicol) decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 level by approximately 66%, while increasing insulin receptor substrate-2 level by approximately 160%. These effects of geldanamycin (IC(50) 155 nM, EC(50) 177 nM) and 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (IC(50) 310 nM, EC(50) 260 nM) were time- and concentration-dependent. Geldanamycin-induced decrease of insulin receptor substrate-1 was attenuated by lactacystin, beta-lactone or MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), but not by calpastatin (calpain inhibitor) or leupeptin (lysosome inhibitor); geldanamycin did not affect heteroprotein complex formation between insulin receptor substrate-1 or -2 and Hsp90. Geldanamycin-induced increase of insulin receptor substrate-2 was prevented by cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Geldanamycin lowered insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA level by approximately 39%, while raising insulin

  13. Efficiency, Selectivity, and Robustness of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Zilman, Anton; Di Talia, Stefano; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2007-01-01

    All materials enter or exit the cell nucleus through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), efficient transport devices that combine high selectivity and throughput. NPC-associated proteins containing phenylalanine–glycine repeats (FG nups) have large, flexible, unstructured proteinaceous regions, and line the NPC. A central feature of NPC-mediated transport is the binding of cargo-carrying soluble transport factors to the unstructured regions of FG nups. Here, we model the dynamics of nucleocytoplasmic transport as diffusion in an effective potential resulting from the interaction of the transport factors with the flexible FG nups, using a minimal number of assumptions consistent with the most well-established structural and functional properties of NPC transport. We discuss how specific binding of transport factors to the FG nups facilitates transport, and how this binding and competition between transport factors and other macromolecules for binding sites and space inside the NPC accounts for the high selectivity of transport. We also account for why transport is relatively insensitive to changes in the number and distribution of FG nups in the NPC, providing an explanation for recent experiments where up to half the total mass of the FG nups has been deleted without abolishing transport. Our results suggest strategies for the creation of artificial nanomolecular sorting devices. PMID:17630825

  14. MAMMALIAN CELLS CONTAIN A SECOND NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC HEXOSAMINIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Gutternigg, Martin; Rendić, Dubravko; Voglauer, Regina; Iskratsch, Thomas; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Some thirty years ago, work on mammalian tissues suggested the presence of two cytosolic hexosaminidases in mammalian cells; one of these has been more recently characterised in recombinant form and has an important role in cellular function due to its ability to cleave β-N-acetylglucosamine residues from a variety of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. However, the molecular nature of the second cytosolic hexosaminidase, named hexosaminidase D, has remained obscure. In the present study, we molecularly characterise for the first time the human and murine recombinant forms of enzymes, encoded by HEXDC genes, which appear to correspond to hexosaminidase D in terms of substrate specificity, pH dependency and temperature stability; furthermore, a myc-tagged form of this novel hexosaminidase displays a nucleocytoplasmic localisation. Transcripts of the corresponding gene are expressed in a number of murine tissues. Based on its sequence, this enzyme represents, along with the lysosomal hexosaminidase subunits encoded by the HEXA and HEXB genes, the third class 20 glycosidase to be found from mammalian sources. PMID:19040401

  15. Role of Molecular Charge in Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Goryaynov, Alexander; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Transport of genetic materials and proteins between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). A selective barrier formed by phenylalanine-glycine (FG) nucleoporins (Nups) with net positive charges in the NPC allows for passive diffusion of signal-independent small molecules and transport-receptor facilitated translocation of signal-dependent cargo molecules. Recently, negative surface charge was postulated to be another essential criterion for selective passage through the NPC. However, the charge-driven mechanism in determining the transport kinetics and spatial transport route for either passive diffusion or facilitated translocation remains obscure. Here we employed high-speed single-molecule fluorescence microscopy with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of 9 nm and 400 µs to uncover these mechanistic fundamentals for nuclear transport of charged substrates through native NPCs. We found that electrostatic interaction between negative surface charges on transiting molecules and the positively charged FG Nups, although enhancing their probability of binding to the NPC, never plays a dominant role in determining their nuclear transport mode or spatial transport route. A 3D reconstruction of transport routes revealed that small signal-dependent endogenous cargo protein constructs with high positive surface charges that are destined to the nucleus, rather than repelled from the NPC as suggested in previous models, passively diffused through an axial central channel of the NPC in the absence of transport receptors. Finally, we postulated a comprehensive map of interactions between transiting molecules and FG Nups during nucleocytoplasmic transport by combining the effects of molecular size, signal and surface charge. PMID:24558427

  16. Mechanism of Human Nucleocytoplasmic Hexosaminidase D

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian β-hexosaminidases have been shown to play essential roles in cellular physiology and health. These enzymes are responsible for the cleavage of the monosaccharides N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) from cellular substrates. One of these β-hexosaminidases, hexosaminidase D (HexD), encoded by the HEXDC gene, has received little attention. No mechanistic studies have focused on the role of this unusual nucleocytoplasmically localized β-hexosaminidase, and its cellular function remains unknown. Using a series of kinetic and mechanistic investigations into HexD, we define the precise catalytic mechanism of this enzyme and establish the identities of key enzymic residues. The preparation of synthetic aryl N-acetylgalactosaminide substrates for HexD in combination with measurements of kinetic parameters for wild-type and mutant enzymes, linear free energy analyses of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of these substrates, evaluation of the reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, and inhibition studies collectively reveal the detailed mechanism of action employed by HexD. HexD is a retaining glycosidase that operates using a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism, has a preference for galactosaminide over glucosaminide substrates, and shows a pH optimum in its second-order rate constant at pH 6.5–7.0. The catalytically important residues are Asp148 and Glu149, with Glu149 serving as the general acid/base residue and Asp148 as the polarizing residue. HexD is inhibited by Gal-NAG-thiazoline (Ki = 420 nM). The fundamental insights gained from this study will aid in the development of potent and selective probes for HexD, which will serve as useful tools to improve our understanding of the physiological role played by this unusual enzyme. PMID:27149221

  17. Inherited human sex reversal due to impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of SRY defines a male transcriptional threshold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2013-09-17

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY (sex determining region on Y chromosome). Mutations in SRY cause gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype. Two subtle variants (V60L and I90M in the high-mobility group box) define inherited alleles shared by an XY sterile daughter and fertile father. Whereas specific DNA binding and bending are unaffected in a rat embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, the variants exhibited selective defects in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling due to impaired nuclear import (V60L; mediated by Exportin-4) or export (I90M; mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1). Decreased shuttling limits nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated (activated) SRY, in turn reducing occupancy of DNA sites regulating Sertoli-cell differentiation [the testis-specific SRY-box 9 (Sox9) enhancer]. Despite distinct patterns of biochemical and cell-biological perturbations, V60L and I90M each attenuated Sox9 expression in transient transfection assays by twofold. Such attenuation was also observed in studies of V60A, a clinical variant associated with ovotestes and hence ambiguity between divergent cell fates. This shared twofold threshold is reminiscent of autosomal syndromes of transcription-factor haploinsufficiency, including XY sex reversal associated with mutations in SOX9. Our results demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY is necessary for robust initiation of testicular development. Although also characteristic of ungulate orthologs, such shuttling is not conserved among rodents wherein impaired nuclear export of the high-mobility group box and import-dependent phosphorylation are compensated by a microsatellite-associated transcriptional activation domain. Human sex reversal due to subtle defects in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY suggests that its transcriptional activity lies near the edge of developmental ambiguity.

  18. Inherited human sex reversal due to impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of SRY defines a male transcriptional threshold

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY (sex determining region on Y chromosome). Mutations in SRY cause gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype. Two subtle variants (V60L and I90M in the high-mobility group box) define inherited alleles shared by an XY sterile daughter and fertile father. Whereas specific DNA binding and bending are unaffected in a rat embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, the variants exhibited selective defects in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling due to impaired nuclear import (V60L; mediated by Exportin-4) or export (I90M; mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1). Decreased shuttling limits nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated (activated) SRY, in turn reducing occupancy of DNA sites regulating Sertoli-cell differentiation [the testis-specific SRY-box 9 (Sox9) enhancer]. Despite distinct patterns of biochemical and cell-biological perturbations, V60L and I90M each attenuated Sox9 expression in transient transfection assays by twofold. Such attenuation was also observed in studies of V60A, a clinical variant associated with ovotestes and hence ambiguity between divergent cell fates. This shared twofold threshold is reminiscent of autosomal syndromes of transcription-factor haploinsufficiency, including XY sex reversal associated with mutations in SOX9. Our results demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY is necessary for robust initiation of testicular development. Although also characteristic of ungulate orthologs, such shuttling is not conserved among rodents wherein impaired nuclear export of the high-mobility group box and import-dependent phosphorylation are compensated by a microsatellite-associated transcriptional activation domain. Human sex reversal due to subtle defects in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY suggests that its transcriptional activity lies near the edge of developmental ambiguity. PMID:24003159

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution and dynamics of the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3.

    PubMed

    Drake, Kimberly R; Kang, Minchul; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2010-03-23

    The process of autophagy involves the formation of autophagosomes, double-membrane structures that encapsulate cytosol. Microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) was the first protein shown to specifically label autophagosomal membranes in mammalian cells, and subsequently EGFP-LC3 has become one of the most widely utilized reporters of autophagy. Although LC3 is currently thought to function primarily in the cytosol, the site of autophagosome formation, EGFP-LC3 often appears to be enriched in the nucleoplasm relative to the cytoplasm in published fluorescence images. However, the nuclear pool of EGFP-LC3 has not been specifically studied in previous reports, and mechanisms by which LC3 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm are currently unknown. In this study, we therefore investigated the regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of EGFP-LC3 in living cells. By quantitative fluorescence microscopy analysis, we demonstrate that soluble EGFP-LC3 is indeed enriched in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm in two commonly studied cell lines, COS-7 and HeLa. Although LC3 contains a putative nuclear export signal (NES), inhibition of active nuclear export or mutation of the NES had no effect on the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of EGFP-LC3. Furthermore, FRAP analysis indicates that EGFP-LC3 undergoes limited passive nucleo-cytoplasmic transport under steady state conditions, and that the diffusional mobility of EGFP-LC3 was substantially slower in the nucleus and cytoplasm than predicted for a freely diffusing monomer. Induction of autophagy led to a visible decrease in levels of soluble EGFP-LC3 relative to autophagosome-bound protein, but had only modest effects on the nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio or diffusional mobility of the remaining soluble pools of EGFP-LC3. We conclude that the enrichment of soluble EGFP-LC3 in the nucleus is maintained independently of active nuclear export or induction of autophagy. Instead, incorporation of soluble

  20. RNAi silenced Dd-grp94 (Dictyostelium discoideum glucose-regulated protein 94 kDa) cell lines in Dictyostelium exhibit marked reduction in growth rate and delay in development.

    PubMed

    Baviskar, Sandhya N; Shields, Malcolm S

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-regulated 94 kDa protein (Grp94) is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of multicellular eukaryotes. It is a constitutively expressed protein that is overexpressed in certain abnormal conditions of the cell such as depletion of glucose and calcium, and low oxygen and pH. The protein is also implicated in diseased conditions like cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, the consequences of downregulation of Grp94 were investigated at both unicellular and multicellular stages of Dictyostelium discoideum. Previous studies have shown the expression of Dd-Grp94 (Dictyostelium discoideum glucose-regulated 94 kDa protein) in wild-type cells varies during development, and overexpression of Dd-Grp94 leads to abnormal cell shape and inhibition of development (i.e., formation of fruiting bodies). Grp94 is a known calcium binding protein and an efficient calcium buffer. Therefore, in the present study we hypothesized that downregulation of Dd-Grp94 protein would affect Dictyostelium cell structure, growth, and development. We found that Dd-grp94 RNAi recombinants exhibited reduced growth rate, cell size, and a subtle change in cell motility compared to the parental cells. The recombinants also exhibited a delay in development and small fruiting bodies. These results establish that Dd-grp94 plays a crucial role in determining normal cell structure, growth and differentiation.

  1. Sox10 is an active nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein, and shuttling is crucial for Sox10-mediated transactivation.

    PubMed

    Rehberg, Stephan; Lischka, Peter; Glaser, Gabi; Stamminger, Thomas; Wegner, Michael; Rosorius, Olaf

    2002-08-01

    Sox10 belongs to a family of transcription regulators characterized by a DNA-binding domain known as the HMG box. It plays fundamental roles in neural crest development, peripheral gliogenesis, and terminal differentiation of oligodendrocytes. In accord with its function as transcription factor, Sox10 contains two nuclear localization signals and is most frequently detected in the nucleus. In this study, we report that Sox10 is an active nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein, competent of both entering and exiting the nucleus. We identified a functional Rev-type nuclear export signal within the DNA-binding domain of Sox10. Mutational inactivation of this nuclear export signal or treatment of cells with the CRM1-specific export inhibitor leptomycin B inhibited nuclear export and consequently nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Sox10. Importantly, the inhibition of the nuclear export of Sox10 led to decreased transactivation of transfected reporters and endogenous target genes, arguing that continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is essential for the function of Sox10. To our knowledge this is the first time that nuclear export has been reported and shown to be functionally relevant for any Sox protein.

  2. Functional networks of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes differentiate ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathies. A new therapeutic opportunity.

    PubMed

    Molina-Navarro, María Micaela; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure provokes alterations in the expression of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes. To elucidate the nucleocytoplasmic transport-linked functional network underlying the two major causes of heart failure, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), we examined global transcriptome profiles of left ventricular myocardium tissue samples from 31 patients (ICM, n = 10; DCM, n = 13) undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (CNT, n = 8) using RNA-Sequencing and GeneMANIA. Comparative profiling of ICM versus control and DCM versus control showed 1081 and 2440 differentially expressed genes, respectively (>1.29-fold; P<0.05). GeneMANIA revealed differentially regulated functional networks specific to ICM and DCM. In comparison with CNT, differential expression was seen in 9 and 12 nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes in ICM and DCM groups, respectively. DDX3X, KPNA2, and PTK2B were related to ICM, while SMURF2, NUP153, IPO5, RANBP3, NOXA1, and RHOJ were involved in DCM pathogenesis. Furthermore, the two pathologies shared 6 altered genes: XPO1, ARL4, NFKB2, FHL3, RANBP2, and RHOU showing an identical trend in expression in both ICM and DCM. Notably, the core of the derived functional networks composed of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes (XPO1, RANBP2, NUP153, IPO5, KPNA2, and RANBP3) branched into several pathways with downregulated genes. Moreover, we identified genes whose expression levels correlated with left ventricular mass index and left ventricular function parameters in HF patients. Collectively, our study provides a clear distinction between the two pathologies at the transcriptome level and opens up new possibilities to search for appropriate therapeutic targets for ICM and DCM.

  3. Sin3A-associated protein, 18 kDa, a novel binding partner of TRIB1, regulates MTTP expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Saho; Boonvisut, Supichaya; Ishizuka, Yuumi; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian tribbles homolog 1 (TRIB1) is a human locus that has been shown to significantly impact plasma lipid levels across several ethnic groups. In addition, the gene has been associated with the occurrence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In the present study, a yeast-two-hybrid system was used to screen for novel molecular targets of TRIB1 binding. Loci corresponding to clones that were positive for TRIB1 binding subsequently were assessed for roles in lipid metabolism in mice using adenoviral constructs to induce knockdown or overexpression. Sin3A-associated protein, 18 kDa (SAP18) was identified as a novel binding partner of TRIB1. Knockdown of the Sap18 in mouse liver decreased plasma lipid levels and increased hepatic lipid levels; SAP18 overexpression showed the opposite effects. Transcriptome analysis of the mouse liver revealed that Sap18 knockdown decreased and SAP18 overexpression increased microsomal TG transfer protein (MTTP) expression levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that halo-tagged SAP18, halo-tagged TRIB1, and anti-mSin3A antibody enriched precipitates for regulatory sequences of the MTTP gene. Enforced expression of SAP18 enhanced and SAP18 knockdown conversely attenuated the enrichment of MTTP regulatory sequences seen with anti-mSin3A antibody. These studies indicated that SAP18 expression enhanced the recruitment of mSin3A in coordination with TRIB1 to MTTP regulatory elements and increased MTTP expression. PMID:25921304

  4. Mitogenicity and down-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor by YTA-1 and YTA-2, monoclonal antibodies that recognize 75-kDa molecules on human large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y; Inamoto, T; Sugie, K; Masutani, H; Shindo, T; Tagaya, Y; Yamauchi, A; Ozawa, K; Yodoi, J

    1989-01-01

    A large number of interleukin 2 receptors lacking the Tac epitope (IL-2R/p75) were found to be constitutively expressed on the human large granular lymphocyte/natural killer cell line YT, which bears inducible IL-2R/p55 associated with Tac antigen. Two anti-YT IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, YTA-1 and YTA-2, recognizing different epitopes of the same 75- to 80-kDa molecule, were established. The 75-kDa antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies was strongly expressed on the large granular lymphocytes of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and on various lymphoid cell lines bearing IL-2R/p75. The YTA-1 and YTA-2 antibodies were mitogenic and were different from other mitogenic monoclonal antibodies such as anti-T3 (CD3), anti-T11 (CD2), and KOLT-2 (CD28). Further, they down-regulated the high-affinity IL-2R of peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 24 hr in culture. The relationship between the YTA-1/2 antigen and the IL-2R system is discussed. Images PMID:2465549

  5. Nucleocytoplasmic Transport: A Role for Nonspecific Competition in Karyopherin-Nucleoporin Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Tetenbaum-Novatt, Jaclyn; Hough, Loren E.; Mironska, Roxana; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Rout, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which in yeast is a ∼50 MDa complex consisting of ∼30 different proteins. Small molecules can freely exchange through the NPC, but macromolecules larger than ∼40 kDa must be aided across by transport factors, most of which belong to a related family of proteins termed karyopherins (Kaps). These transport factors bind to the disordered phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domains in a family of NPC proteins termed FG nups, and this specific binding allows the transport factors to cross the NPC. However, we still know little in terms of the molecular and kinetic details regarding how this binding translates to selective passage of transport factors across the NPC. Here we show that the specific interactions between Kaps and FG nups are strongly modulated by the presence of a cellular milieu whose proteins appear to act as very weak competitors that nevertheless collectively can reduce Kap/FG nup affinities by several orders of magnitude. Without such modulation, the avidities between Kaps and FG nups measured in vitro are too tight to be compatible with the rapid transport kinetics observed in vivo. We modeled the multivalent interactions between the disordered repeat binding sites in the FG nups and multiple cognate binding sites on Kap, showing that they should indeed be sensitive to even weakly binding competitors; the introduction of such competition reduces the availability of these binding sites, dramatically lowering the avidity of their specific interactions and allowing rapid nuclear transport. PMID:22357553

  6. Nucleocytoplasmic movement of fluorescent tracers microinjected into living salivary gland cells

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The permeability of the nuclear envelop of a somatic cell, the C. thummi larval salivary gland cell, was studied by intracellular microinjection of fluorescent molecular tracers. As shown previously in oocytes (4,5,15,16), the envelop is permeable to a wide variety of materials, including molecules which are large enough to possess condiderable biological specificities and to play important roles in regulation of cellular activities. The envelop exhibits transport selectivity on the basis of size in the range of naturally occurring intracellular materials and it may thus perform important controlling functions in nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The nucleus to cytoplasm movement of in vivo ribonucleoprotein particulates in these synthetically active cells probably requires conformational changes in the particulates and/or the envelope pore complexes; morphological evidence exists for such processess in these cells (20). PMID:1158974

  7. The F-box protein ZEITLUPE controls stability and nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of GIGANTEA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongsik; Geng, Ruishuang; Gallenstein, Richard A; Somers, David E

    2013-10-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of core clock components is essential for the proper operation of the circadian system. Previous work has shown that the F-box protein ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and clock element GIGANTEA (GI) heterodimerize in the cytosol, thereby stabilizing ZTL. Here, we report that ZTL post-translationally and reciprocally regulates protein levels and nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GI in Arabidopsis. We use ectopic expression of the N-terminus of ZTL, which contains the novel, light-absorbing region of ZTL (the LOV domain), transient expression assays and ztl mutants to establish that the levels of ZTL, a cytosolic protein, help govern the abundance and distribution of GI in the cytosol and nucleus. Ectopic expression of the ZTL N-terminus lengthens period, delays flowering time and alters hypocotyl length. We demonstrate that these phenotypes can be explained by the competitive interference of the LOV domain with endogenous GI-ZTL interactions. A complex of the ZTL N-terminus polypeptide with endogenous GI (LOV-GI) blocks normal GI function, causing degradation of endogenous ZTL and inhibition of other GI-related phenotypes. Increased cytosolic retention of GI by the LOV-GI complex additionally inhibits nuclear roles of GI, thereby lengthening flowering time. Hence, we conclude that under endogenous conditions, GI stabilization and cytoplasmic retention occurs naturally through a LOV domain-mediated GI-ZTL interaction, and that ZTL indirectly regulates GI nuclear pools by sequestering GI to the cytosol. As the absence of either GI or ZTL compromises clock function and diminishes the protein abundance of the other, our results highlight how their reciprocal co-stabilization is essential for robust circadian oscillations.

  8. The F-box protein ZEITLUPE controls stability and nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of GIGANTEA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongsik; Geng, Ruishuang; Gallenstein, Richard A.; Somers, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of core clock components is essential for the proper operation of the circadian system. Previous work has shown that the F-box protein ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and clock element GIGANTEA (GI) heterodimerize in the cytosol, thereby stabilizing ZTL. Here, we report that ZTL post-translationally and reciprocally regulates protein levels and nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GI in Arabidopsis. We use ectopic expression of the N-terminus of ZTL, which contains the novel, light-absorbing region of ZTL (the LOV domain), transient expression assays and ztl mutants to establish that the levels of ZTL, a cytosolic protein, help govern the abundance and distribution of GI in the cytosol and nucleus. Ectopic expression of the ZTL N-terminus lengthens period, delays flowering time and alters hypocotyl length. We demonstrate that these phenotypes can be explained by the competitive interference of the LOV domain with endogenous GI-ZTL interactions. A complex of the ZTL N-terminus polypeptide with endogenous GI (LOV-GI) blocks normal GI function, causing degradation of endogenous ZTL and inhibition of other GI-related phenotypes. Increased cytosolic retention of GI by the LOV-GI complex additionally inhibits nuclear roles of GI, thereby lengthening flowering time. Hence, we conclude that under endogenous conditions, GI stabilization and cytoplasmic retention occurs naturally through a LOV domain-mediated GI-ZTL interaction, and that ZTL indirectly regulates GI nuclear pools by sequestering GI to the cytosol. As the absence of either GI or ZTL compromises clock function and diminishes the protein abundance of the other, our results highlight how their reciprocal co-stabilization is essential for robust circadian oscillations. PMID:24004949

  9. The dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32) signaling pathway: a novel therapeutic target in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bales, James W; Yan, Hong Q; Ma, Xiecheng; Li, Youming; Samarasinghe, Ranmal; Dixon, C Edward

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes persistent neurologic deficits. Current therapies, predominantly focused upon cortical and hippocampal cellular survival, have limited benefit on cognitive outcomes. Striatal damage is associated with deficits in executive function, learning, and memory. Dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein 32 (DARPP-32) is expressed within striatal medium spiny neurons and regulates striatal function. We found that controlled cortical impact injury in rats produces a chronic decrease in DARPP-32 phosphorylation at threonine-34 and an increase in protein phosphatase-1 activity. There is no effect of injury on threonine-75 phosphorylation or on DARPP-32 protein. Amantadine, shown to be efficacious in treating post-TBI cognitive deficits, given daily for two weeks is able to restore the loss of DARPP-32 phosphorylation and reduce protein phosphatase-1 activity. Amantadine also decreases the phosphorylation of threonine-75 consistent with activity as a partial N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist and partial dopamine agonist. These data demonstrate that targeting the DARPP-32 signaling cascade represents a promising novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of persistent deficits following a TBI.

  10. Biological significance of the importin-β family-dependent nucleocytoplasmic transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-07-01

    Importin-β family proteins (Imp-βs) are nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors (NTRs) that import and export proteins and RNAs through the nuclear pores. The family consists of 14-20 members depending on the biological species, and each member transports a specific group of cargoes. Thus, the Imp-βs mediate multiple, parallel transport pathways that can be regulated separately. In fact, the spatiotemporally differential expressions and the functional regulations of Imp-βs have been reported. Additionally, the biological significance of each pathway has been characterized by linking the function of a member of Imp-βs to a cellular consequence. Connecting these concepts, the regulation of the transport pathways conceivably induces alterations in the cellular physiological states. However, few studies have linked the regulation of an importin-β family NTR to an induced cellular response and the corresponding cargoes, despite the significance of this linkage in comprehending the biological relevance of the transport pathways. This review of recent reports on the regulation and biological functions of the Imp-βs highlights the significance of the transport pathways in physiological contexts and points out the possibility that the identification of yet unknown specific cargoes will reinforce the importance of transport regulation.

  11. Modulation of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by retention in cytoplasm or nucleus.

    PubMed

    Roth, Daniela M; Harper, Ian; Pouton, Colin W; Jans, David A

    2009-08-15

    Nuclear protein transport processes have largely been studied using in vitro semi-intact cell systems where high concentrations of nuclear localizing substrates are used, and cytoplasmic components such as the microtubule (MT) network, are either absent or damaged. Here we use the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique to analyze the nucleocytoplasmic flux of distinct fluorescently tagged proteins over time in living cultured cells. FRAP was performed in different parts of the cell to analyze the kinetics of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and intranuclear/cytoplasmic mobility of the tumor suppressor Rb protein and a SV40 large tumor antigen (T-ag) derivative containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS), both fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). The results indicate that proteins carrying the T-ag NLS are highly mobile in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rb, in contrast, is largely immobile in both cellular compartments, with similar nuclear import and export kinetics. Rb nuclear export was CRM-1-mediated, with its reduced mobility in the cytoplasm in part due to association with MTs. Overall our results show that nuclear and cytoplasm retention modulates the rates of nuclear protein import and export in intact cells.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  13. Differential Role for Transcription Factor Oct4 Nucleocytoplasmic Dynamics in Somatic Cell Reprogramming and Self-renewal of Embryonic Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Masahiro; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Asally, Munehiro; Kawakami, Koichi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Oct4 is a member of the POU family of transcription factors and plays a critical role in both maintenance of the undifferentiated state of embryonic stem (ES) cells and in the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Oct4 is imported into the nucleus where it functions as a transcription factor; however, the spatiotemporal dynamic behavior of Oct4 remains largely unknown. In the present study we show that Oct4 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. Furthermore, although Oct4 mutants with altered nuclear import/export activity were able to maintain the self-renewal of ES cells, they displayed limited potential for cellular reprogramming. These results indicate that the intracellular localization of Oct4, which is dependent on nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, must be more strictly regulated for cellular reprogramming, suggesting that Oct4 plays differential roles in the self-renewal of ES cells and in somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:23580657

  14. Cloning of a functional Burkitt's lymphoma polypeptide-binding protein/78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (BiP/GRP78) gene promoter by the polymerase chain reaction, and its interaction with inducible cellular factors.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Yam, W C; Chen, L K; Lin-Chao, S

    1992-01-01

    The promoter of the human gene encoding the stress-responsive protein polypeptide-binding protein/78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (BiP/GRP78) was isolated from Burkitt's lymphoma cells by PCR. This promoter DNA segment (termed BiP670) or one of its 5' deletion derivatives was fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and introduced into HeLa cells for transient expression. BiP670 retained transcriptional activity at both the basal and Ca2+ ionophore A23187-inducible levels. However, there was no significant increase in promoter activity following a 5 h induction with 7 microM-A23187, and less than 5-fold induction at 15 h. In contrast, the steady-state mRNA level was induced by 18-fold at 5 h. The in vivo transactivation assays with BiP670 5' deletion derivatives indicate that the putative A23187-inducible element is located within a 70 bp DNA segment (i.e. spanning -39 to -107 bp upstream of the transcriptional initiation site). Using an in vitro gel mobility shift assay, A23187-inducible nuclear factors were identified from HeLa cell extracts. DNA-binding competition experiments also suggest that the 70 bp DNA segment contains a potential sequence motif for the binding of the A23187-inducible nuclear factors. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1382410

  15. Interferon-gamma down-regulates expression of the 230-kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen gene (BPAG1) in epidermal keratinocytes via novel chimeric sequences of ISRE and GAS.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takahide; Tamai, Katsuto; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Takehiko; Nakano, Hajime; Kon, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Isao; Hanada, Katsumi; Kaneda, Yasuhumi; Uitto, Jouni

    2006-04-01

    The 230-kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPAG1) is an integral component of hemidesmosomes. We have previously reported that interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) inhibits the transcription of the BPAG1 gene (1). Here we investigated the target sequences of IFNgamma-signal transduction pathway in the BPAG1 promoter in epidermal keratinocytes. Transient transfections with 5'-deletion constructs of BPAG1 promoter-luciferase reporter gene plasmids in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) allowed us to narrow the DNA region containing IFNgamma inhibitory element (IGIE) to between -1 and -89, upstream from the transcription initiation site (+1). Homology search in this region identified a chimeric sequence, consisting of IFN-stimulated responsive element (ISRE) with a partial 7-bp sequence of IFNgamma activation site (GAS), as identified in the guanylate-binding protein (GBP) gene, inserted at its center. Functional analysis of IGIE, inserted in front of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, indicated that IGIE acts as a down-regulatory element of the promoter through IFNgamma-dependent signal pathway. Transient transfection studies with BPAG1 promoter-reporter gene constructs containing mutated IGIE (with TT to GG transversions in the region of 5'ISRE, GAS, and 3'ISRE) demonstrated that disruption of the ISRE sequences, but not GAS, markedly suppressed the BPAG1 basal promoter activity and resulted in attenuated IFNgamma response in keratinocytes. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanism of IFNgamma regulation in keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation.

  16. Deficient Induction Response in a Xenopus Nucleocytoplasmic Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne, Patrick; Simpson, David E.; Gurdon, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Incompatibilities between the nucleus and the cytoplasm of sufficiently distant species result in developmental arrest of hybrid and nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) embryos. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain their lethality, including problems in embryonic genome activation (EGA) and/or nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. However, conclusive identification of the causes underlying developmental defects of cybrid embryos is still lacking. We show here that while over 80% of both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis same-species androgenetic haploids develop to the swimming tadpole stage, the androgenetic cybrids formed by the combination of X. laevis egg cytoplasm and X. tropicalis sperm nucleus invariably fail to gastrulate properly and never reach the swimming tadpole stage. In spite of this arrest, these cybrids show quantitatively normal EGA and energy levels at the stage where their initial gastrulation defects are manifested. The nucleocytoplasmic incompatibility between these two species instead results from a combination of factors, including a reduced emission of induction signal from the vegetal half, a decreased sensitivity of animal cells to induction signals, and differences in a key embryonic protein (Xbra) concentration between the two species, together leading to inefficient induction and defective convergence-extension during gastrulation. Indeed, increased exposure to induction signals and/or Xbra signalling partially rescues the induction response in animal explants and whole cybrid embryos. Altogether, our study demonstrates that the egg cytoplasm of one species may not support the development promoted by the nucleus of another species, even if this nucleus does not interfere with the cytoplasmic/maternal functions of the egg, while the egg cytoplasm is also capable of activating the genome of that nucleus. Instead, our results provide evidence that inefficient signalling and differences in the concentrations of key

  17. Role of Dopamine Type 1 Receptors and Dopamine- and cAMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein Mr 32 kDa in Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol–Mediated Induction of ΔFosB in the Mouse Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Lazenka, Matthew F.; Tomarchio, Aaron J.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc; Selley, Dana E.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of marijuana, produces motor and motivational effects via interactions with the dopaminergic system in the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. However, the molecular events that underlie these interactions after THC treatment are not well understood. Our study shows that pretreatment with dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists before repeated administration of THC attenuated induction of Δ FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (ΔFosB) in the nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. Anatomical studies showed that repeated THC administration induced ΔFosB in D1R-containing striatal neurons. Dopamine signaling in the striatum involves phosphorylation-specific effects of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein Mr 32 kDa (DARPP-32), which regulates protein kinase A signaling. Genetic deletion of DARPP-32 attenuated ΔFosB expression measured after acute, but not repeated, THC administration in both the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. THC was then acutely or repeatedly administered to wild-type (WT) and DARPP-32 knockout (KO) mice, and in vivo responses were measured. DARPP-32 KO mice exhibited enhanced acute THC-mediated hypolocomotion and developed greater tolerance to this response relative to the WT mice. Agonist-stimulated guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding showed that cannabinoid-stimulated G-protein activity did not differ between DARPP-32 KO and WT mice treated with vehicle or repeated THC. These results indicate that D1Rs play a major role in THC-mediated ΔFosB induction in the forebrain, whereas the role of DARPP-32 in THC-mediated ΔFosB induction and modulation of motor activity appears to be more complex. PMID:26099530

  18. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  19. Analysis of nucleocytoplasmic transport in digitonin-permeabilized cells under different cellular conditions.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Maiko; Kose, Shingo; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport is crucial not only for basic cellular activities but also for physiological adaptation to specific situation during the cell cycle, development, or stress. Although a wide variety of transport pathways have been identified in eukaryotic cells, the functional significance of their multiplicity remains unclear. The best-characterized nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) are the members of the importin β family (karyopherin, transportin) whose association with specific cargoes is regulated by the GTPase Ran. In this chapter, we first provide an overview of the various expression vectors used to purify recombinant NTRs. We then describe two sets of recent examples of using well-established digitonin-permeabilized cell-free transport systems in mammalian cells to mimic different cellular conditions in living cells: normal/heat-shock conditions and interphase/mitosis. In the former case, physiological regulation impacts different transport pathways in opposite ways. In the latter case, the importin β-Ran system is used at different cell-cycle stages but with the same biochemical principle to specify the nuclear localization and chromatin loading of a specific protein, respectively. This in vitro transport assay, when adapted to specific cellular conditions or particular substrates, should help to uncover specific transport pathways or transport factors function under different cellular conditions.

  20. Resveratrol suppresses hyperoxia-induced nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SIRT1 and ROS production in PBMC from preterm infants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Dong, Wen-Bin; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Li, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Lian-Yu; Zhang, Ling-Ping

    2017-04-18

    By assessing silent mating-type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), this study aimed to explore the role of SIRT1 in premature infants after exposure to hyperoxia and assess the protective effects of resveratrol (Res). Firstly, ROS levels as well as SIRT1 translocation and expression in PBMCs samples were evaluated from 40 premature infants with different oxygen amounts received at birth. Then, PBMCs, from additional 40 premature infants administered no oxygen at birth, were used to establish an in vitro model of hyperoxia. In infants that received O2 at birth, ROS and MDA levels, and SIRT1 translocation rates gradually increased in a concentration-dependent manner, while SIRT1 gradually decreased. In agreement, PBMCs cultured in vitro showed increased ROS levels after exposed to hyperoxia, SIRT1 translocation increased as well. However, treatment with Res resulted in opposite effects. Res inhibits ROS release in PBMCs from preterm infants exposed to hyperoxia, likely by preventing SIRT1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and increasing SIRT1 expression.

  1. Proteomic profiling reveals that EhPC4 transcription factor induces cell migration through up-regulation of the 16-kDa actin-binding protein EhABP16 in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Olga Hernández; Muñiz-Lino, Marcos; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Marchat, Laurence A; López-Rosas, Itzel; Ruíz-García, Erika; Astudillo-de la Vega, Horacio; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Álvarez-Sánchez, Elizbeth; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Camarillo, César

    2014-12-05

    Actin cytoskeleton is an essential structure involved in cell migration and invasion in parasites. In Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite causing human amoebiasis, the mechanisms underlying the expression of migration-related genes are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the biological effects of ectopic overexpression of EhPC4 (positive coactivator 4) in cell migration of E. histolytica trophozoites. Using differential in gel two-dimensional electrophoresis, 33 modulated proteins were detected in EhPC4-overexpressing cells. By electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) analysis, 16 of these proteins were identified. Interestingly, four up-regulated proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization and cell migration were identified. Particularly, we found the up-regulation of a 16-kDa actin-binding protein (EhABP16) which is a putative member of the cofilin/tropomyosin family involved in actin polymerization. EhPC4 overexpression induced a significant increase in migration of trophozoites and in the destruction of human SW480 colon cells. Consistently, silencing of gene expression by RNA interference of EhABP16 significantly impairs cell migration. These changes were associated to alterations in the organization of actin cytoskeleton, and suppression of uropod-like structure formation in EhABP16-deficient cells. In summary, we have uncovered novel proteins modulated by EhPC4, including EhABP16, with a potential role in cell migration, cytopathogenicity and virulence in E. histolytica. The human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica infects around 50million people worldwide resulting in 40,000-100,000 deaths annually. Cell motility is a complex trait that is critical for parasites adaptation, spread and invasion processes into host tissues; it has been associated with virulence. In this study, we used a differential proteomic approach to demonstrate that E. histolytica EhPC4 induces changes in the expression of actin cytoskeleton proteins

  2. G2E3 IS A NUCLEO-CYTOPLASMIC SHUTTLING PROTEIN WITH DNA DAMAGE RESPONSIVE LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F.

    2007-01-01

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as an ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:17239372

  3. G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with DNA damage responsive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F. . E-mail: dfc@uab.edu

    2007-02-15

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as a ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage.

  4. BAG3 affects the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Young-Hee; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kim, Soo-A.

    2015-08-21

    Bcl2-associated athoanogene (BAG) 3 is a member of the co-chaperone BAG family. It is induced by stressful stimuli such as heat shock and heavy metals, and it regulates cellular adaptive responses against stressful conditions. In this study, we identified a novel role for BAG3 in regulating the nuclear shuttling of HSF1 during heat stress. The expression level of BAG3 was induced by heat stress in HeLa cells. Interestingly, BAG3 rapidly translocalized to the nucleus upon heat stress. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 under normal and stressed conditions and co-translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress. We also demonstrated that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 via its BAG domain. Over-expression of BAG3 down-regulates the level of nuclear HSF1 by exporting it to the cytoplasm during the recovery period. Depletion of BAG3 using siRNA results in reduced nuclear HSF1 and decreased Hsp70 promoter activity. BAG3 in MEF(hsf1{sup −/−}) cells actively translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress suggesting that BAG3 plays a key role in the processing of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress. - Highlights: • The expression level of BAG3 is induced by heat stress. • BAG3 translocates to the nucleus upon heat stress. • BAG3 interacts with HSF1 and co-localizes to the nucleus. • BAG3 is a key regulator for HSF1 nuclear shuttling.

  5. Developmental potential of embryonic cells in a nucleocytoplasmic hybrid formed using a goldfish haploid nucleus and loach egg cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Sakao, Suzu; Arai, Katsutoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro

    2010-01-01

    In teleosts, viable nucleocytoplasmic hybrids, formed by combining a nucleus from one species with the egg cytoplasm of another, have been used as one of the methods for breed improvement in aquaculture, but have been little exploited for developmental biology studies. Here, we used an artificial androgenesis technique to form nucleocytoplasmic hybrids comprising a goldfish haploid nucleus and loach egg cytoplasm. These hybrids were used to investigate interactions between the nucleus and cytoplasm during embryonic development. Additionally, the developmental characteristics of embryonic cells of nucleocytoplasmic hybrids were examined in chimeras produced by transplantation of blastomeres into recipient loach or goldfish embryos. We found that the nucleocytoplasmic hybrids arrested at the dome stage of embryonic development and did not form any gastrula structures. The goosecoid (gsc) and no tail (ntl) genes were expressed normally before gastrulation in nucleocytoplasmic hybrids, similar to diploid loach. However, expression of the gsc and ntl genes was not maintained in nucleocytoplasmic hybrids. In chimeric embryos, blastomeres derived from nucleocytoplasmic hybrids were found to mix with the cells of recipient loach embryos at the gastrula stage. The transplanted blastomeres formed small clusters at the somitogenesis stage and, finally, small spots at the hatching stage. In contrast, when the blastomeres were transplanted into goldfish embryos, the transplanted blastomeres aggregated in the chimeric embryos. Thus, embryonic cells from nucleocytoplasmic hybrids that arrest before gastrulation could survive beyond the somitogenesis stage depending on the cytoplasmic environment in the recipient embryos.

  6. Respiratory virus modulation of host nucleocytoplasmic transport; target for therapeutic intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Caly, Leon; Ghildyal, Reena; Jans, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory diseases caused by rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus represent a large social and financial burden on healthcare worldwide. Although all three viruses have distinctly unique properties in terms of infection and replication, they share the ability to exploit/manipulate the host-cell nucleocytoplasmic transport system in order to replicate effectively and efficiently. This review outlines the various ways in which infection by these viruses impacts on the host nucleocytoplasmic transport system, and examples where inhibition thereof in turn decreases viral replication. The highly conserved nature of the nucleocytoplasmic transport system and the viral proteins that interact with it make this virus–host interface a prime candidate for the development of specific antiviral therapeutics in the future. PMID:26322040

  7. The analysis Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing a 14kDa self-folding protein [abstract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent study in banana identified a 14kDa protein that has been hypothesized to function in regulating the nucleation and growth of the needle-shaped crystals of calcium oxalate that accumulate within the tissues of this plant. To gain further insight in to the functional role of this 14 kDa prote...

  8. The first identified nucleocytoplasmic shuttling herpesviral capsid protein: herpes simplex virus type 1 VP19C.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Chunfu

    2012-01-01

    VP19C is a structural protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 viral particle, which is essential for assembly of the capsid. In this study, a nuclear export signal (NES) of VP19C is for the first time identified and mapped to amino acid residues 342 to 351. Furthermore, VP19C is demonstrated to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through the NES in a chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent manner involving RanGTP hydrolysis. This makes VP19C the first herpesviral capsid protein with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling property and adds it to the list of HSV-1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins.

  9. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  10. v-Src activates the expression of 92-kDa type IV collagenase gene through the AP-1 site and the GT box homologous to retinoblastoma control elements. A mechanism regulating gene expression independent of that by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kita, M; Seiki, M

    1993-11-05

    The 92-kDa type IV collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-9; MMP-9) is frequently expressed in cells showing an invasive nature during physiological and pathological processes, and the expression is strictly controlled by a variety of trans-membrane signals. Binding sites for NF-kB, Sp-1, and AP-1 are reportedly required for induction of MMP-9 gene expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Comparison of the sequence of the newly cloned mouse MMP-9 promoter region with our previous human isolate revealed that, in addition to the above mentioned elements, four units of GGGG(T/A)GGGG sequence (GT box) were conserved between the two species. In this study, we have demonstrated that one of the GT boxes located downstream of the AP-1 site is essential along with the AP-1 site for the activation of the promoter by v-Src but not by tumor necrosis factor-alpha or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Gel mobility-shift assays revealed that binding proteins for retinoblastoma control element, including Sp-1 family protein, can bind specifically to GT boxes. Thus, the v-Src signals to the AP-1 site and to the GT box homologous to retinoblastoma control element acted synergistically in transcriptional activation. These results suggest that certain v-Src-mediated signals are propagated along pathways that are independent of inflammatory cytokines.

  11. Vesicular Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport—Herpesviruses as Pioneers in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses use a vesicle-mediated transfer of intranuclearly assembled nucleocapsids through the nuclear envelope (NE) for final maturation in the cytoplasm. The molecular basis for this novel vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is beginning to be elucidated in detail. The heterodimeric viral nuclear egress complex (NEC), conserved within the classical herpesviruses, mediates vesicle formation from the inner nuclear membrane (INM) by polymerization into a hexagonal lattice followed by fusion of the vesicle membrane with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). Mechanisms of capsid inclusion as well as vesicle-membrane fusion, however, are largely unclear. Interestingly, a similar transport mechanism through the NE has been demonstrated in nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes during Drosophila neuromuscular junction formation, indicating a widespread presence of a novel concept of cellular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. PMID:27690080

  12. Characterization of molecular determinants for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of PRV UL54

    SciTech Connect

    Li Meili; Wang Shuai; Cai Mingsheng; Guo Hong; Zheng Chunfu

    2011-09-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) early protein UL54 is a homologue of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate-early protein ICP27, which is a multifunctional protein and essential for HSV-1 infection. To determine if UL54 might shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm, as has been shown for its homologues in human herpesviruses, the molecular determinants for its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling were investigated. Heterokaryon assays demonstrated that UL54 was a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein and this property could not be blocked by leptomycin B, an inhibitor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1). However, TAP/NXF1 promoted the nuclear export of UL54 and interacted with UL54, suggesting that UL54 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a TAP/NXF1, but not CRM1, dependent nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, UL54 was demonstrated to target to the nucleus through a classic Ran-, importin {beta}1- and {alpha}5-dependent nuclear import mechanism.

  13. Assessment of size and nucleo-cytoplasmic characteristics of the squamous cells of the corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to objectively assess size, nucleus and nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio features of squamous cells from the corneal epithelium The corneas of recent post-mortem sheep eyes were either glutaraldehyde-fixed for transmission electron microscopy or impression cytology samples taken, glutaraldehyde-fixed and stained with Giemsa. From the specimens for impression cytology, a representative region was photographed from 12 different samples taken from the central region and 16 different samples taken from mid-peripheral regions of the corneal epithelium. Images were subjected to morphometry after overlays were generated. Electron microscopy revealed a very distinctive stratified corneal epithelium with several superficial layers, confirming the squamous phenotype. Impression cytology from such superficial layers revealed a cell size of 60.1 ± 4.8 μm, nucleus dimension of 12.3 ± 1.5 μm, cell area of 2,419 ± 416 μm(2) and nucleus area of 131 ± 31 μm(2) . A nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio based on nucleus-to-cell length had a mean of 0.207 ± 0.022, while a cytoplasm-to-nucleus length ratio was 3.975 ± 0.474. Estimates of the nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio based on areas had a mean value of 0.059 ± 0.011. Very similar results were found for mid-peripheral corneal epithelium. The results strongly indicate that the squamous phenotype of the superficial corneal epithelial cells is characterised by a large size, large nucleus and low nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio. These morphological characteristics show a notable resemblance to data obtained from impression cytological studies on human conjunctival epithelial cells showing severe squamous metaplasia. © 2015 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  14. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA: a perilous journey from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lechardeur, Delphine; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2006-09-01

    Nonviral vectors represent a promising approach for the safe delivery of therapeutic DNA in genetic and acquired human diseases. Before synthetic vector systems can be used for clinical applications, their limited efficacy must be addressed. At the cellular level, successful gene transfer is dependent on several additional factors including DNA uptake, release from the DNA-vector complex, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. This paper reviews the major metabolic and physical impediments that plasmid DNA vectorized by synthetic vectors encounters between the cytosol and the nucleus. Plasmid DNA that escapes the endolysosomal compartment encounters the diffusional and metabolic barriers of the cytoplasm, reducing the number of intact plasmids that reach the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation of DNA requires either the disassembly of the nuclear envelope during cell division or active nuclear transport via the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, plasmid DNA is relatively stable, but its transcription and its fate during cell division are still debated. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of nonviral gene transfer during nucleocytoplasmic trafficking may provide strategies to overcome those obstacles that limit the efficiency of nonviral gene delivery. We review some of the current methods of gene transfer mediated by synthetic vectors, highlighting systems that exploit our actual knowledge of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA.

  15. Polyglutamine-Expanded Huntingtin Exacerbates Age-Related Disruption of Nuclear Integrity and Nucleocytoplasmic Transport.

    PubMed

    Gasset-Rosa, Fatima; Chillon-Marinas, Carlos; Goginashvili, Alexander; Atwal, Ranjit Singh; Artates, Jonathan W; Tabet, Ricardos; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Bang, Anne G; Cleveland, Don W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2017-04-05

    Onset of neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease, is strongly influenced by aging. Hallmarks of aged cells include compromised nuclear envelope integrity, impaired nucleocytoplasmic transport, and accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. We show that mutant huntingtin markedly accelerates all of these cellular phenotypes in a dose- and age-dependent manner in cortex and striatum of mice. Huntingtin-linked polyglutamine initially accumulates in nuclei, leading to disruption of nuclear envelope architecture, partial sequestration of factors essential for nucleocytoplasmic transport (Gle1 and RanGAP1), and intranuclear accumulation of mRNA. In aged mice, accumulation of RanGAP1 together with polyglutamine is shifted to perinuclear and cytoplasmic areas. Consistent with findings in mice, marked alterations in nuclear envelope morphology, abnormal localization of RanGAP1, and nuclear accumulation of mRNA were found in cortex of Huntington's disease patients. Overall, our findings identify polyglutamine-dependent inhibition of nucleocytoplasmic transport and alteration of nuclear integrity as a central component of Huntington's disease.

  16. Altered nucleocytoplasmic proteome and transcriptome distributions in an in vitro model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Jeon, Gye Sun; Jung, Jung Hee; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Son, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Kim, Jong-Il; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant nucleocytoplasmic localization of proteins has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence suggests that cytoplasmic mislocalization of nuclear proteins such as transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS) may be associated with neurotoxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. This study investigated the changes in nucleocytoplasmic distributions of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. After subcellular fractionation of motor neuron-like cell lines expressing wild-type or G93A mutant hSOD1, quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) were performed for the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. A subset of the results was validated via immunoblotting. A total of 1,925 proteins were identified in either the nuclear or cytoplasmic fractions, and 32% of these proteins were quantified in both fractions. The nucleocytoplasmic distribution of 37 proteins was significantly changed in mutant cells with nuclear and cytoplasmic shifts in 13 and 24 proteins, respectively (p<0.05). The proteins shifted towards the nucleus were enriched regarding pathways of RNA transport and processing (Dhx9, Fmr1, Srsf3, Srsf6, Tra2b), whereas protein folding (Cct5, Cct7, Cct8), aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis (Farsb, Nars, Txnrd1), synaptic vesicle cycle (Cltc, Nsf), Wnt signalling (Cltc, Plcb3, Plec, Psmd3, Ruvbl1) and Hippo signalling (Camk2d, Plcb3, Ruvbl1) pathways were over-represented in the proteins shifted to the cytoplasm. A weak correlation between the changes in protein and mRNA levels was found only in the nucleus, where mRNA was relatively abundant in mutant cells. This study provides a comprehensive dataset of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. An integrated analysis of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome demonstrated multiple

  17. Subcellular Proteomics Reveals a Role for Nucleo-cytoplasmic Trafficking at the DNA Replication Origin Activation Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Claire M.; Tudzarova, Slavica; Crawford, Mark; Williams, Gareth H.; Stoeber, Kai; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of DNA replication initiation factors such as CDC7 kinase triggers the origin activation checkpoint in healthy cells and leads to a protective cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase of the mitotic cell division cycle. This protective mechanism is thought to be defective in cancer cells. To investigate how this checkpoint is activated and maintained in healthy cells, we conducted a quantitative SILAC analysis of the nuclear- and cytoplasmic-enriched compartments of CDC7-depleted fibroblasts and compared them to a total cell lysate preparation. Substantial changes in total abundance and/or subcellular location were detected for 124 proteins, including many essential proteins associated with DNA replication/cell cycle. Similar changes in protein abundance and subcellular distribution were observed for various metabolic processes, including oxidative stress, iron metabolism, protein translation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is accompanied by reduced abundance of two karyopherin proteins, suggestive of reduced nuclear import. We propose that altered nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking plays a key role in the regulation of cell cycle arrest. The results increase understanding of the mechanisms underlying maintenance of the DNA replication origin activation checkpoint and are consistent with our proposal that cell cycle arrest is an actively maintained process that appears to be distributed over various subcellular locations. PMID:23320540

  18. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport: A Coarse-Grained Model for the Functional State of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, Ruhollah; Jamali, Yousef; Karimi, Reza; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) regulates molecular traffic across the nuclear envelope (NE). Selective transport happens on the order of milliseconds and the length scale of tens of nanometers; however, the transport mechanism remains elusive. Central to the transport process is the hydrophobic interactions between karyopherins (kaps) and Phe-Gly (FG) repeat domains. Taking into account the polymeric nature of FG-repeats grafted on the elastic structure of the NPC, and the kap-FG hydrophobic affinity, we have established a coarse-grained model of the NPC structure that mimics nucleocytoplasmic transport. To establish a foundation for future works, the methodology and biophysical rationale behind the model is explained in details. The model predicts that the first-passage time of a 15 nm cargo-complex is about 2.6±0.13 ms with an inverse Gaussian distribution for statistically adequate number of independent Brownian dynamics simulations. Moreover, the cargo-complex is primarily attached to the channel wall where it interacts with the FG-layer as it passes through the central channel. The kap-FG hydrophobic interaction is highly dynamic and fast, which ensures an efficient translocation through the NPC. Further, almost all eight hydrophobic binding spots on kap-β are occupied simultaneously during transport. Finally, as opposed to intact NPCs, cytoplasmic filaments-deficient NPCs show a high degree of permeability to inert cargos, implying the defining role of cytoplasmic filaments in the selectivity barrier. PMID:21673865

  19. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E; Gehring, Niels H; Mouland, Andrew J

    2015-10-20

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. OPEN ACCESS Biomolecules 2015, 5 2809 We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking.

  20. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Gehring, Niels H.; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking. PMID:26492277

  1. Nucleus-localized 21.5-kDa myelin basic protein promotes oligodendrocyte proliferation and enhances neurite outgrowth in coculture, unlike the plasma membrane-associated 18.5-kDa isoform.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham S T; Samborska, Bożena; Hawley, Steven P; Klaiman, Jordan M; Gillis, Todd E; Jones, Nina; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2013-03-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) family of central nervous system (CNS) myelin arises from transcription start site 3 of the Golli (gene of oligodendrocyte lineage) complex and comprises splice isoforms ranging in nominal molecular mass from 14 kDa to (full-length) 21.5 kDa. We have determined here a number of distinct functional differences between the major 18.5-kDa and minor 21.5-kDa isoforms of classic MBP with respect to oligodendrocyte (OLG) proliferation. We have found that, in contrast to 18.5-kDa MBP, 21.5-kDa MBP increases proliferation of early developmental immortalized N19-OLGs by elevating the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt1 kinases and of ribosomal protein S6. Coculture of N2a neuronal cells with N19-OLGs transfected with the 21.5-kDa isoform (or conditioned medium from), but not the 18.5-kDa isoform, caused the N2a cells to have increased neurite outgrowth and process branching complexity. These roles were dependent on subcellular localization of 21.5-kDa MBP to the nucleus and on the exon II-encoded segment, suggesting that the nuclear localization of early minor isoforms of MBP may play a crucial role in regulating and/or initiating myelin and neuronal development in the mammalian CNS.

  2. Nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of the endonuclease ankyrin repeats and LEM domain-containing protein 1 (Ankle1) is mediated by canonical nuclear export- and nuclear import signals.

    PubMed

    Zlopasa, Livija; Brachner, Andreas; Foisner, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Ankyrin repeats and LEM domain containing protein 1 (Ankle1) belongs to the LEM protein family, whose members share a chromatin-interacting LEM motif. Unlike most other LEM proteins, Ankle1 is not an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane but shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It contains a GIY-YIG-type nuclease domain, but its function is unknown. The mammalian genome encodes only one other GIY-YIG domain protein, termed Slx1. Slx1 has been described as a resolvase that processes Holliday junctions during homologous recombination-mediated DNA double strand break repair. Resolvase activity is regulated in a spatial and temporal manner during the cell cycle. We hypothesized that Ankle1 may have a similar function and its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling may contribute to the regulation of Ankle1 activity. Hence, we aimed at identifying the domains mediating Ankle1 shuttling and investigating whether cellular localization is affected during DNA damage response. Sequence analysis predicts the presence of two canonical nuclear import and export signals in Ankle1. Immunofluorescence microscopy of cells expressing wild-type and various mutated Ankle1-fusion proteins revealed a C-terminally located classical monopartite nuclear localization signal and a centrally located CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal that mediate nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Ankle1. These sequences are also functional in heterologous proteins. The predominant localization of Ankle1 in the cytoplasm, however, does not change upon induction of several DNA damage response pathways throughout the cell cycle. We identified the domains mediating nuclear import and export of Ankle1. Ankle1's cellular localization was not affected following DNA damage.

  3. Kinetic and biochemical correlation between sustained p44ERK1 (44 kDa extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1) activation and lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated DNA synthesis in Rat-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, S J; McCormick, F

    1996-01-01

    Rat-1 fibroblasts were used to study the role of the sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-stimulated mitogenic signalling. Mitogenic doses of LPA, like serum, stimulated biphasic, sustained, ERK activation that persisted towards the G1/S boundary. The EC50 for LPA-stimulated ERK activation after 10 min, the time of peak response, was 2 orders of magnitude to the left of that for the sustained response after 3 h or that for DNA synthesis after 22 h, with the result that non-mitogenic doses stimulated a maximal peak response but no second phase. To complement these studies, we examined the role of different signal pathways in regulating the sustained and acute phases of ERK activation using defined biochemical inhibitors and mimetics. Activation of protein kinase C and Ca2+ fluxes played a minor and transient role in regulation of ERK1 activity by LPA in Rat-1 cells. Sustained ERK1 activation stimulated by LPA was completely inhibited by pertussis toxin, whereas the early peak response was only partly affected; this is correlated with the specific inhibition of LPA-stimulated DNA synthesis by pertussis toxin. The selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A completely inhibited sustained ERK1 activation by LPA but, again, the early phase of the response was only partially inhibited. In addition, low doses of staurosporine inhibited ERK1 activation by LPA. The effects of herbimycin A and staurosporine were selective for the response to LPA but did not affect that to epidermal growth factor. The results suggest a strong correlation between sustained ERK1 activation and DNA synthesis in LPA-stimulated Rat-1 cells. Furthermore, the two discrete phases of ERK activation by LPA are regulated by a combination of at least two different signalling pathways; the sustained activation of ERK1 in Rat-1 cells proceeds via a G1- or Gzero-mediated pathway which may also involve a tyrosine kinase. PMID:8947493

  4. 115 kDa serine protease confers sustained protection to visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani via IFN-γ induced down-regulation of TNF-α mediated MMP-9 activity.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Rajdeep; Das, Partha; De, Tripti; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by the intracellular parasite Leishmania donovani is a major public health problem in the developing world. The emergence of increasing number of L. donovani strains resistance to antimonial drugs recommended worldwide requires the intervention of effective vaccine strategy for treatment of VL. In the present study L. donovani culture derived, soluble, secretory serine protease (pSP) has been shown to be vaccine target of VL. Protection from VL could be achieved by the use of safer vaccine which generally requires an adjuvant for induction of strong Th1 response. To assess the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of pSP as vaccine candidate in mouse model we used IL-12 as adjuvant. BALB/c mice immunized with pSP+IL-12 were protected significantly from challenged infection even after four months by reducing the parasite load in liver and spleen and suppressed the development of the disease along with an increase in IgG2a antibody level in serum, enhanced delayed type hypersensitivity and strong T-cell proliferation. Groups receiving pSP+IL-12 had an augmented pSP antigen specific Th1 cytokines like IFN-γ and TNF-α response with concomitant decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 after vaccination. In this study the vaccine efficacy of pSP was further assessed for its prophylactic potential by enumerating matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) profile which has been implicated in various diseases. MMP-9 associated with different microbial infections is controlled by their natural inhibitors (TIMPS) and by some cytokines. In this study pSP was found to regulate excessive inflammation by modulating the balance between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression. This modulatory effect has also been demonstrated by IFN-γ mediated down regulation of TNF-α induced MMP-9 expression in activated murine macrophages. This is the first report where a secretory L. donovani serine protease (pSP) adjuvanted with IL-12 could also act as protective imunogen by modifying

  5. Evidence for direct regulation of myocardial Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 phosphorylation and activity by 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK): effects of the novel and specific RSK inhibitor fmk on responses to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cohen, Michael S; Taunton, Jack; Avkiran, Metin

    2007-03-01

    Multiple stimuli of physiological and pathophysiological significance, including alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists, stimulate the cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) through activation of the mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) ERK-90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling cascade. However, the individual contributions of ERK and RSK, which can each phosphorylate the NHE1 regulatory domain, to such stimulation are unknown. In the present study, we have used the novel RSK inhibitor fmk to determine the role of RSK as a direct regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity in response to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, in ventricular myocytes isolated from the adult rat heart. Initial experiments confirmed that pretreatment of myocytes with fmk before exposure to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine inhibited RSK C-terminal kinase activity and thereby RSK N-terminal kinase activation, without affecting MEK or ERK activation. Pretreatment of myocytes with fmk also inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in NHE1 phosphorylation and the rate of NHE1-mediated H+ efflux under conditions of intracellular acidosis. These findings reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that RSK is the principal regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation in adult myocardium.

  6. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of p62/SQSTM1 and Its Role in Recruitment of Nuclear Polyubiquitinated Proteins to Promyelocytic Leukemia Bodies*

    PubMed Central

    Pankiv, Serhiy; Lamark, Trond; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Øvervatn, Aud; Bjørkøy, Geir; Johansen, Terje

    2010-01-01

    p62, also known as sequestosome1 (SQSTM1), A170, or ZIP, is a multifunctional protein implicated in several signal transduction pathways. p62 is induced by various forms of cellular stress, is degraded by autophagy, and acts as a cargo receptor for autophagic degradation of ubiquitinated targets. It is also suggested to shuttle ubiquitinated proteins for proteasomal degradation. p62 is commonly found in cytosolic protein inclusions in patients with protein aggregopathies, it is up-regulated in several forms of human tumors, and mutations in the gene are linked to classical adult onset Paget disease of the bone. To this end, p62 has generally been considered to be a cytosolic protein, and little attention has been paid to possible nuclear roles of this protein. Here, we present evidence that p62 shuttles continuously between nuclear and cytosolic compartments at a high rate. The protein is also found in nuclear promyelocytic leukemia bodies. We show that p62 contains two nuclear localization signals and a nuclear export signal. Our data suggest that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of p62 is modulated by phosphorylations at or near the most important nuclear localization signal, NLS2. The aggregation of p62 in cytosolic bodies also regulates the transport of p62 between the compartments. We found p62 to be essential for accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins in promyelocytic leukemia bodies upon inhibition of nuclear protein export. Furthermore, p62 contributed to the assembly of proteasome-containing degradative compartments in the vicinity of nuclear aggregates containing polyglutamine-expanded Ataxin1Q84 and to the degradation of Ataxin1Q84. PMID:20018885

  7. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of p62/SQSTM1 and its role in recruitment of nuclear polyubiquitinated proteins to promyelocytic leukemia bodies.

    PubMed

    Pankiv, Serhiy; Lamark, Trond; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Øvervatn, Aud; Bjørkøy, Geir; Johansen, Terje

    2010-02-19

    p62, also known as sequestosome1 (SQSTM1), A170, or ZIP, is a multifunctional protein implicated in several signal transduction pathways. p62 is induced by various forms of cellular stress, is degraded by autophagy, and acts as a cargo receptor for autophagic degradation of ubiquitinated targets. It is also suggested to shuttle ubiquitinated proteins for proteasomal degradation. p62 is commonly found in cytosolic protein inclusions in patients with protein aggregopathies, it is up-regulated in several forms of human tumors, and mutations in the gene are linked to classical adult onset Paget disease of the bone. To this end, p62 has generally been considered to be a cytosolic protein, and little attention has been paid to possible nuclear roles of this protein. Here, we present evidence that p62 shuttles continuously between nuclear and cytosolic compartments at a high rate. The protein is also found in nuclear promyelocytic leukemia bodies. We show that p62 contains two nuclear localization signals and a nuclear export signal. Our data suggest that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of p62 is modulated by phosphorylations at or near the most important nuclear localization signal, NLS2. The aggregation of p62 in cytosolic bodies also regulates the transport of p62 between the compartments. We found p62 to be essential for accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins in promyelocytic leukemia bodies upon inhibition of nuclear protein export. Furthermore, p62 contributed to the assembly of proteasome-containing degradative compartments in the vicinity of nuclear aggregates containing polyglutamine-expanded Ataxin1Q84 and to the degradation of Ataxin1Q84.

  8. The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and enzymatically active in cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Metzner, Anja; Brehm, Maria A; Labiadh, Sena; Brauer, Helena; Grabinski, Nicole; Mayr, Georg W; Jücker, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in hematopoietic cells. SHIP1 mediates its regulatory function after relocalization from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane where it converts its substrate PI(3,4,5)P(3) to PI(3,4)P(2) thereby terminating PI3-kinase mediated signaling. In addition, SHIP1 converts Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) to Ins(1,3,4)P(3) thereby regulating inositol phosphate metabolism. Here we report, that SHIP1 can be detected in nuclear puncta of Jurkat cells by confocal microscopy after expression of SHIP1 from a tetracycline inducible vector. SHIP1-containing nuclear puncta partially co-localize with FLASH, a multifunctional nuclear protein that has been linked to apoptotic signaling and transcriptional control. Nuclear localization was confirmed for endogenously expressed SHIP1 in the myeloid leukemia cell line TF1. In addition, enzymatically active SHIP1 was found in nuclear fractions of Jurkat cells with a similar specific activity as cytoplasmic SHIP1. Further analysis revealed that SHIP1 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein which is actively imported into and exported out of the nucleus. Nuclear import is mediated by two canonical nuclear localization signals (NLS) i.e. K(327)KSK and K(547)KLR. Mutational inactivation of each NLS motif inhibited nuclear import and reduced the proliferation of cells indicating a functional role of nuclear SHIP1 for cell growth. Our data indicate that SHIP1 is partly localized in the nucleus and suggest that SHIP1 plays a role for nuclear phosphoinositide and/or nuclear inositol phosphate signaling.

  9. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of hexokinase II in a cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Catherine L.; Pastorino, John G.

    2010-04-16

    In yeast, the hexokinase type II enzyme (HXKII) translocates to the nucleus in the presence of excess glucose, and participates in glucose repression. However, no evidence has suggested a nuclear function for HXKII in mammalian cells. Herein, we present data showing nuclear localization of HXKII in HeLa cells, both by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation. HXKII is extruded from the nucleus, at least in part, by the activity of the exportin 1/CrmA system, as demonstrated by increased nuclear expression and decreased cytoplasmic expression after incubation with leptomycin B, a bacterially-derived exportin inhibitor. Furthermore, cytoplasmic localization of HXKII is dependent on its enzymatic activity, as inhibiting HXKII activity using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) increased nuclear localization. This effect was more significant in cells incubated in the absence of glucose for 24 h prior to addition of 2DG. Regulated translocation of HXKII to the nucleus of mammalian cells could represent a previously unknown glucose-sensing mechanism.

  10. The Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve; Jackson, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to space radiation and microgravity occurs to humans during space flight. In order to have accurate risk estimations, answering questions to whether increased DNA damage seen during space flight in modified by microgravity are important. Several studies have examined whether intercellular repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions are modified by microgravity. Results from these studies show no modification of the repair processes due to microgravity. However, it is known that in studies not involving radiation that microgravity interferes with normal development. Interestingly, there is no data that attempts to analyze the possible effects of microgravity on the trafficking of DNA repair proteins. In this study, we analyze the effects of modeled microgravity on nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the human DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1/Ref1) which is involved in base excision repair. We examined nuclear translocation of APE1 using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to APE1 as a reporter. While APE1 under normal gravity showed normal nuclear localization, APE1 nuclear localization under modeled microgravity was decreased. These results suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of APE1 is modified under modeled microgravity.

  11. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  12. Loss of Ranbp2 in motoneurons causes disruption of nucleocytoplasmic and chemokine signaling, proteostasis of hnRNPH3 and Mmp28, and development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung-In; Yoon, Dosuk; Qiu, Sunny; Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M; Wetsel, William C; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-05-01

    The pathogenic drivers of sporadic and familial motor neuron disease (MND), such amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are unknown. MND impairs the Ran GTPase cycle, which controls nucleocytoplasmic transport, ribostasis and proteostasis; however, cause-effect mechanisms of Ran GTPase modulators in motoneuron pathobiology have remained elusive. The cytosolic and peripheral nucleoporin Ranbp2 is a crucial regulator of the Ran GTPase cycle and of the proteostasis of neurological disease-prone substrates, but the roles of Ranbp2 in motoneuron biology and disease remain unknown. This study shows that conditional ablation of Ranbp2 in mouse Thy1 motoneurons causes ALS syndromes with hypoactivity followed by hindlimb paralysis, respiratory distress and, ultimately, death. These phenotypes are accompanied by: a decline in the nerve conduction velocity, free fatty acids and phophatidylcholine of the sciatic nerve; a reduction in the g-ratios of sciatic and phrenic nerves; and hypertrophy of motoneurons. Furthermore, Ranbp2 loss disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of the import and export nuclear receptors importin β and exportin 1, respectively, Ran GTPase and histone deacetylase 4. Whole-transcriptome, proteomic and cellular analyses uncovered that the chemokine receptor Cxcr4, its antagonizing ligands Cxcl12 and Cxcl14, and effector, latent and activated Stat3 all undergo early autocrine and proteostatic deregulation, and intracellular sequestration and aggregation as a result of Ranbp2 loss in motoneurons. These effects were accompanied by paracrine and autocrine neuroglial deregulation of hnRNPH3 proteostasis in sciatic nerve and motoneurons, respectively, and post-transcriptional downregulation of metalloproteinase 28 in the sciatic nerve. Mechanistically, our results demonstrate that Ranbp2 controls nucleocytoplasmic, chemokine and metalloproteinase 28 signaling, and proteostasis of substrates that are crucial to motoneuronal homeostasis and whose impairments

  13. The maintenance of nucleocytoplasmic polymorphism in a metapopulation: the case of gynodioecy.

    PubMed

    Couvet, D; Ronce, O; Gliddon, C

    1998-07-01

    In gynodioecious species, gender is generally determined by epistatic interactions between cytoplasmic and nuclear loci. However, theoretical studies suggest that, for a joint polymorphism at both cytoplasmic and nuclear loci to be maintained in a panmictic population, selection must act differently on the various genotypes that determine the same gender. Here we show that, in a metapopulation with local extinction and restricted gene flow, nucleocytoplasmic polymorphism can be maintained without these differences. We use deterministic simulations. We assume that gene flow occurred only at recolonization. Founder effects create genetic variance between populations in the metapopulation, and local population growth is faster when the local frequency of females is high. Group selection phenomena are involved in the maintenance of the joint polymorphism in the metapopulation. The frequency of females in the metapopulation at equilibrium is higher than in a panmictic population with the same genetic system. However, these conclusions hold only if nuclear alleles restoring male fertility are dominant.

  14. A functional network involved in the recycling of nucleocytoplasmic pre-60S factors

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Alice; Saveanu, Cosmin; Decourty, Laurence; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic pre-ribosomes go through cytoplasmic maturation steps before entering translation. The nucleocytoplasmic proteins participating in these late stages of maturation are reimported to the nucleus. In this study, we describe a functional network focused on Rei1/Ybr267w, a strictly cytoplasmic pre-60S factor indirectly involved in nuclear 27S pre-ribosomal RNA processing. In the absence of Rei1, the nuclear import of at least three other pre-60S factors is impaired. The accumulation in the cytoplasm of a small complex formed by the association of Arx1 with a novel factor, Alb1/Yjl122w, inhibits the release of the putative antiassociation factor Tif6 from the premature large ribosomal subunits and its recycling to the nucleus. We propose a model in which Rei1 is a key factor for the coordinated dissociation and recycling of the last pre-60S factors before newly synthesized large ribosomal subunits enter translation. PMID:16651379

  15. Modern tools to study nuclear pore complexes and nucleocytoplasmic transport in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Askjaer, Peter; Galy, Vincent; Meister, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by many features that make it highly attractive to study nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and nucleocytoplasmic transport. NPC composition and structure are highly conserved in nematodes and being amenable to a variety of genetic manipulations, key aspects of nuclear envelope dynamics can be observed in great details during breakdown, reassembly, and interphase. In this chapter, we provide an overview of some of the most relevant modern techniques that allow researchers unfamiliar with C. elegans to embark on studies of nucleoporins in an intact organism through its development from zygote to aging adult. We focus on methods relevant to generate loss-of-function phenotypes and their analysis by advanced microscopy. Extensive references to available reagents, such as mutants, transgenic strains, and antibodies are equally useful to scientists with or without prior C. elegans or nucleoporin experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. “Megavirales”, a proposed new order for eukaryotic nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; De Lamballerie, Xavier; Yutin, Natalya; Asgari, Sassan; Bigot, Yves; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Cheng, Xiao-Wen; Federici, Brian A.; Van Etten, James L.; Koonin, Eugene V.; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) comprise a monophyletic group of viruses that infect animals and diverse unicellular eukaryotes. The NCLDV group includes the families Poxviridae, Asfarviridae, Iridoviridae, Ascoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Mimiviridae and the proposed family “Marseilleviridae”. The family Mimiviridae includes the largest known viruses, with genomes in excess of one megabase, whereas the genome size in the other NCLDV families varies from 100 to 400 kilobase pairs. Most of the NCLDVs replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells, within so-called virus factories. The NCLDVs share a common ancient origin, as demonstrated by evolutionary reconstructions that trace approximately 50 genes encoding key proteins involved in viral replication and virion formation to the last common ancestor of all these viruses. Taken together, these characteristics lead us to propose assigning an official taxonomic rank to the NCLDVs as the order “Megavirales”, in reference to the large size of the virions and genomes of these viruses. PMID:23812617

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in cells with progerin-induced defective nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Storti, Barbara; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2017-10-01

    Recent data indicate that nuclear lamina (NL) plays a relevant role in many fundamental cellular functions. The peculiar role of NL in cells is dramatically demonstrated by the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an inherited laminopathy that causes premature, rapid aging shortly after birth. In HGPS, a mutant form of Lamin A (progeria) leads to a dysmorphic NL structure, but how this perturbation is transduced into cellular changes is still largely unknown. Owing to the close structural relationship between NL and the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC), in this work we test whether HGPS affects passive and active nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of cargoes by means of an established model based of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Our findings clearly demonstrate that dysmorphic NL is decoupled from the dynamic characteristics of passive and active transport towards and from the nucleus, as well as from the binding affinity of transport protein mediators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Three Cardiovirus Leader Proteins Equivalently Inhibit Four Different Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. PMID:26115166

  20. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler׳s murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anisotropic diffusion of macromolecules in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid during eukaryotic cell division.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Nisha; Donth, Claudia; Weiss, Matthias

    2014-08-18

    Character and rapidity of protein diffusion in intracellular fluids are key determinants of the dynamics and steady state of a plethora of biochemical reactions. So far, an anomalous diffusion in cytoplasmic fluids with viscoelastic and even glassy characteristics has been reported in a variety of organisms on several length scales and timescales. Here, we show that the contiguous fluid of former cytoplasm and nucleoplasm features an anisotropically varying diffusion of macromolecules during eukaryotic cell division. In metaphase, diffusion in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid appears less anomalous along the spindle axis as compared to perpendicular directions. As a consequence, the long-time diffusion of macromolecules preferentially points along the spindle axis, leading to prolonged residence of macromolecules in the spindle region. Based on our experimental data, we suggest that anisotropic diffusion facilitates the encounter and interaction of spindle-associated proteins, e.g., during the formation of a dynamic spindle matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytosolic disulfide bond formation in cells infected with large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Motti; Fass, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that have evolved to contain stabilizing disulfide bonds generally fold in a membrane-delimited compartment in the cell [i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS)]. These compartments contain sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes that catalyze the pairing and oxidation of cysteine residues. In contrast, most proteins in a healthy cytosol are maintained in reduced form through surveillance by NADPH-dependent reductases and the lack of sulfhydryl oxidases. Nevertheless, one of the core functionalities that unify the broad and diverse set of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is the ability to catalyze disulfide formation in the cytosol. The substrates of this activity are proteins that contribute to the assembly, structure, and infectivity of the virions. If the last common ancestor of NCLDVs was present during eukaryogenesis as has been proposed, it is interesting to speculate that viral disulfide bond formation pathways may have predated oxidative protein folding in intracellular organelles.

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of a GATA transcription factor functions as a development timer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huaqing; Katoh-Kurasawa, Mariko; Muramoto, Tetsuya; Santhanam, Balaji; Long, Yu; Li, Lei; Ueda, Masahiro; Iglesias, Pablo A; Shaulsky, Gad; Devreotes, Peter N

    2014-03-21

    Biological oscillations are observed at many levels of cellular organization. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, starvation-triggered multicellular development is organized by periodic cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) waves, which provide both chemoattractant gradients and developmental signals. We report that GtaC, a GATA transcription factor, exhibits rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to cAMP waves. This behavior requires coordinated action of a nuclear localization signal and reversible G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor-mediated phosphorylation. Although both are required for developmental gene expression, receptor occupancy promotes nuclear exit of GtaC, which leads to a transient burst of transcription at each cAMP cycle. We demonstrate that this biological circuit filters out high-frequency signals and counts those admitted, thereby enabling cells to modulate gene expression according to the dynamic pattern of the external stimuli.

  4. P19ARF stabilizes p53 by blocking nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Levine, Arnold J.

    1999-01-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus encodes two distinct tumor suppressors, p16INK4a and p19ARF. Whereas p16INK4a restrains cell growth through preventing phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, p19ARF acts by attenuating Mdm2-mediated degradation of p53, thereby stabilizing p53. Recent data indicate that Mdm2 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and that nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2 is essential for Mdm2’s ability to promote p53 degradation. Therefore, Mdm2 must export p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it targets p53 for degradation. We show here that coexpression of p19ARF blocks the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2. Moreover, subnuclear localization of Mdm2 changes from the nucleoplasm to the nucleolus in a shuttling time-dependent manner, whereas p19ARF is exclusively located in the nucleolus. In heterokaryons containing Mdm2 and p19ARF, the longer the Mdm2 shuttling is allowed, the more Mdm2 protein colocalizes with p19ARF in the nucleolus, implying that Mdm2 moves from the nucleoplasm to the nucleolus and then associates with p19ARF there. Furthermore, whether or not Mdm2 colocalizes with p19ARF in the nucleolus, p19ARF prevents Mdm2 shuttling. This observation suggests that Mdm2 might be exported through the nucleolus and p19ARF could inhibit the nuclear export of Mdm2 by tethering Mdm2 in the nucleolus. Taken together, p19ARF could stabilize p53 by inhibiting the nuclear export of Mdm2. PMID:10359817

  5. Higher Nucleoporin-Importinβ Affinity at the Nuclear Basket Increases Nucleocytoplasmic Import

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Several in vitro studies have shown the presence of an affinity gradient in nuclear pore complex proteins for the import receptor Importinβ, at least partially contributing to nucleocytoplasmic transport, while others have historically argued against the presence of such a gradient. Nonetheless, the existence of an affinity gradient has remained an uncharacterized contributing factor. To shed light on the affinity gradient theory and better characterize how the existence of such an affinity gradient between the nuclear pore and the import receptor may influence the nucleocytoplasmic traffic, we have developed a general-purpose agent based modeling (ABM) framework that features a new method for relating rate constants to molecular binding and unbinding probabilities, and used our ABM approach to quantify the effects of a wide range of forward and reverse nucleoporin-Importinβ affinity gradients. Our results indicate that transport through the nuclear pore complex is maximized with an effective macroscopic affinity gradient of 2000 µM, 200 µM and 10 µM in the cytoplasmic, central channel and nuclear basket respectively. The transport rate at this gradient is approximately 10% higher than the transport rate for a comparable pore lacking any affinity gradient, which has a peak transport rate when all nucleoporins have an affinity of 200 µM for Importinβ. Furthermore, this optimal ratio of affinity gradients is representative of the ratio of affinities reported for the yeast nuclear pore complex – suggesting that the affinity gradient seen in vitro is highly optimized. PMID:24282617

  6. The effect of centrifugation speeds of 11,000 g and 13,000 g on small salivary protein profiles (less than 30 kDa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, R. A.; Baskoro, B. D.; Puspitawati, R.; Redjeki, S.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research suggested that centrifugation is not necessary to see proteins <30 kDa. There is no standard procedure for regulating the centrifugation speed to separate proteins <30 kDa. The aim of this study is too determine the effect of centrifugation speeds of 11,000 g and 13,000 g on separating salivary supernatant proteins <30 kDa. After being centrifuged at 11,000 g and 13,000 g, the salivary protein profile was tested using SDS-PAGE. The frequency of salivary supernatant protein occurrence (after being centrifuged at 11,000 g and 13,000 g) were 35 and 45 with ranges of 9-27 kDa and 8-18 kDa respectively. Compared to 11,000 g, the centrifugation speed of 13,000 g separates more proteins <30 kDa with a narrower range.

  7. Modifiers of C9orf72 dipeptide repeat toxicity connect nucleocytoplasmic transport defects to FTD/ALS.

    PubMed

    Jovičić, Ana; Mertens, Jerome; Boeynaems, Steven; Bogaert, Elke; Chai, Noori; Yamada, Shizuka B; Paul, Joseph W; Sun, Shuying; Herdy, Joseph R; Bieri, Gregor; Kramer, Nicholas J; Gage, Fred H; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Robberecht, Wim; Gitler, Aaron D

    2015-09-01

    C9orf72 mutations are the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) produced by unconventional translation of the C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in cell culture and in animal models. We performed two unbiased screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified potent modifiers of DPR toxicity, including karyopherins and effectors of Ran-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport, providing insight into potential disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets.

  8. Effect of 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein molecules of age garlic extract on peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Hajimoradi, Monire; Ahmadabad, Hasan Namdar; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Roudbary, Maryam; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2011-03-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum), traditionally being used as a spice worldwide, has different applications and is claimed to possess beneficial effects in several health ailments such as tumor and atherosclerosis. Garlic is also an immunomodulator and its different components are responsible for different properties. The present work aimed to assess the effect of protein fractions of garlic on peritoneal macrophages. 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of garlic were purified. Mice peritoneal macrophages were lavaged and cultured in a microtiter plate and exposed to different concentrations of garlic proteins. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the viability of macrophage. The amount of nitric oxide (NO) was detected in culture supernatants of macrophages by Griess reagent and furthermore, the cytotoxicity study of culture supernatants was carried out on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cell line as tumor necrosis factor-α bioassay. MTT assay results for both 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of stimulated macrophages were not significant (P > 0.05). Both 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions significantly suppressed production of NO from macrophages (P = 0.007 and P = 0.003, respectively). Cytotoxicity of macrophages' supernatant on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cells was not affected by garlic protein fractions (P = 0.066 for 14-kDa and P = 0.085 for 47-kDa fractions). according to our finding, 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions of aged garlic extract are able to suppress NO production from macrophages, which can be used as a biological advantage. These molecules had no cytotoxic effect on macrophages and do not increase tumoricidal property of macrophages.

  9. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm) from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid female

  10. Ethologically based resolution of D2-like dopamine receptor agonist-versus antagonist-induced behavioral topography in dopamine- and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa "knockout" mutants congenic on the C57BL/6 genetic background.

    PubMed

    Nally, Rachel E; Kinsella, Anthony; Tighe, Orna; Croke, David T; Fienberg, Allen A; Greengard, Paul; Waddington, John L

    2004-09-01

    Given the critical role of dopamine- and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the regulation of dopaminergic function, DARPP-32-null mutant mice congenic on the inbred C57BL/6 strain for 10 generations were examined phenotypically for their ethogram of responsivity to the selective D2-like receptor agonist RU 24213 (N-n-propyl-N-phenylethyl-p-3-hydroxyphenylethylamine) and the selective D2-like receptor antagonist YM 09151-2 (cis-N-[1-benzyl-2-methyl-pyrrolidin-3-yl]-5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-methylaminobenzamide), using procedures that resolve all topographies of behavior in the natural repertoire. After vehicle challenge, levels of sniffing and rearing seated were reduced in DARPP-32 mutants; the injection procedure seems to constitute a "stressor" that reveals phenotypic effects of DARPP-32 deletion not apparent under natural conditions. Topographical effects of 0.3 to 10.0 mg/kg RU 24213, primarily induction of sniffing and ponderous locomotion with accompanying reductions in rearing, grooming, sifting and chewing, were not altered to any material extent in DARPP-32-null mice. However, topographical effects of 0.005 to 0.625 mg/kg YM 09151-2, namely, reduction in sniffing, locomotion, rearing, grooming, and chewing but not sifting, were essentially absent in DARPP-32 mutants. Thus, the D2-like receptor agonist-mediated ethogram was essentially conserved, whereas major elements of the corresponding D2-like receptor antagonist-mediated ethogram were essentially absent in DARPP-32-null mice. This suggests some relationship between 1) extent of tonic dopaminergic activation of DARPP-32 mechanisms and 2) compensatory mechanisms consequent to the developmental absence of DARPP-32, which may emerge to act differentially on individual elements of the DARPP-32 system. Critically, the present data indicate that phenotypic effects of a given gene deletion using an agonist acting on the system disrupted cannot be generalized to a

  11. Altered distributions of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related proteins in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Ito, Hidefumi; Wate, Reika; Ohnishi, Shizuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2006-12-01

    Recent investigations have indicated that the nucleocytoplasmic transport system is essential for maintaining cell viability and cellular functions and that its dysfunction could lead to certain disorders. To investigate the involvement of this system in the pathomechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we examined the immunohistochemical localization of proteins associated with nucleocytoplasmic transport in the lumbar spinal cord in a mutant SOD1 (G93A) transgenic mouse model of ALS. This model is widely used for ALS research, and the mutant mice are known to exhibit neuronal loss and Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions (LBHIs) in the anterior horns, similar to the pathology seen in familial ALS patients associated with an SOD1 mutation and in several other transgenic rodent models. Using antibodies against the importin beta family of proteins, the major carrier proteins of nucleocytoplasmic transport, and those against their adapter protein, importin alpha, we found that the immunoreactivities were decreased within the nuclei and increased within the cytoplasm of a subset of the surviving anterior horn cells of the transgenic mice. In addition, LBHIs were invariably reactive toward these antibodies. Furthermore, the immunoreactivities for histone H1 and beta-catenin, representative cargo proteins transported by importin beta-dependent and beta-independent nucleocytoplasmic transport pathways, respectively, showed distributions similar to those for importin beta family and importin alpha proteins. The altered distributions of these proteins were not associated with caspase-3 expression, suggesting that the findings are unlikely to be a manifestation of apoptotic processes. Chronological quantitative analysis of importin beta-immunostained sections from the transgenic mice revealed a statistically significant progressive decrease in the proportion of the anterior horn cells exhibiting a more intense reactivity for these proteins in the nucleus than in the

  12. A Glimpse of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus Biodiversity through the Eukaryotic Genomics Window

    PubMed Central

    Gallot-Lavallée, Lucie; Blanc, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    The nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) are a group of extremely complex double-stranded DNA viruses, which are major parasites of a variety of eukaryotes. Recent studies showed that certain eukaryotes contain fragments of NCLDV DNA integrated in their genome, when surprisingly many of these organisms were not previously shown to be infected by NCLDVs. We performed an update survey of NCLDV genes hidden in eukaryotic sequences to measure the incidence of this phenomenon in common public sequence databases. A total of 66 eukaryotic genomic or transcriptomic datasets—many of which are from algae and aquatic protists—contained at least one of the five most consistently conserved NCLDV core genes. Phylogenetic study of the eukaryotic NCLDV-like sequences identified putative new members of already recognized viral families, as well as members of as yet unknown viral clades. Genomic evidence suggested that most of these sequences resulted from viral DNA integrations rather than contaminating viruses. Furthermore, the nature of the inserted viral genes helped predicting original functional capacities of the donor viruses. These insights confirm that genomic insertions of NCLDV DNA are common in eukaryotes and can be exploited to delineate the contours of NCLDV biodiversity. PMID:28117696

  13. Clustered nuclei maintain autonomy and nucleocytoplasmic ratio control in a syncytium.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Samantha E R; Chang, Shyr-Shea; Kumar, Abhishek; Occhipinti, Patricia; Shroff, Hari; Roper, Marcus; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-07-01

    Nuclei in syncytia found in fungi, muscles, and tumors can behave independently despite cytoplasmic translation and the homogenizing potential of diffusion. We use a dynactin mutant strain of the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii with highly clustered nuclei to assess the relative contributions of nucleus and cytoplasm to nuclear autonomy. Remarkably, clustered nuclei maintain cell cycle and transcriptional autonomy; therefore some sources of nuclear independence function even with minimal cytosol insulating nuclei. In both nuclear clusters and among evenly spaced nuclei, a nucleus' transcriptional activity dictates local cytoplasmic contents, as assessed by the localization of several cyclin mRNAs. Thus nuclear activity is a central determinant of the local cytoplasm in syncytia. Of note, we found that the number of nuclei per unit cytoplasm was identical in the mutant to that in wild-type cells, despite clustered nuclei. This work demonstrates that nuclei maintain autonomy at a submicrometer scale and simultaneously maintain a normal nucleocytoplasmic ratio across a syncytium up to the centimeter scale.

  14. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE.

  15. Exploring nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses in Tara Oceans microbial metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Hingamp, Pascal; Grimsley, Nigel; Acinas, Silvia G; Clerissi, Camille; Subirana, Lucie; Poulain, Julie; Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Villar, Emilie; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Moreau, Hervé; Desdevises, Yves; Bork, Peer; Raes, Jeroen; de Vargas, Colomban; Karsenti, Eric; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Jaillon, Olivier; Not, Fabrice; Pesant, Stéphane; Wincker, Patrick; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    Nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) constitute a group of eukaryotic viruses that can have crucial ecological roles in the sea by accelerating the turnover of their unicellular hosts or by causing diseases in animals. To better characterize the diversity, abundance and biogeography of marine NCLDVs, we analyzed 17 metagenomes derived from microbial samples (0.2-1.6 μm size range) collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition. The sample set includes ecosystems under-represented in previous studies, such as the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and Indian Ocean lagoons. By combining computationally derived relative abundance and direct prokaryote cell counts, the abundance of NCLDVs was found to be in the order of 10(4)-10(5) genomes ml(-1) for the samples from the photic zone and 10(2)-10(3) genomes ml(-1) for the OMZ. The Megaviridae and Phycodnaviridae dominated the NCLDV populations in the metagenomes, although most of the reads classified in these families showed large divergence from known viral genomes. Our taxon co-occurrence analysis revealed a potential association between viruses of the Megaviridae family and eukaryotes related to oomycetes. In support of this predicted association, we identified six cases of lateral gene transfer between Megaviridae and oomycetes. Our results suggest that marine NCLDVs probably outnumber eukaryotic organisms in the photic layer (per given water mass) and that metagenomic sequence analyses promise to shed new light on the biodiversity of marine viruses and their interactions with potential hosts.

  16. Nucleocytoplasmic protein translocation during mitosis in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Budniak, Aldona

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis is a fundamental and essential life process. It underlies the duplication and survival of all cells and, as a result, all eukaryotic organisms. Since uncontrolled mitosis is a dreaded component of many cancers, a full understanding of the process is critical. Evolution has led to the existence of three types of mitosis: closed, open, and semi-open. The significance of these different mitotic species, how they can lead to a full understanding of the critical events that underlie the asexual duplication of all cells, and how they may generate new insights into controlling unregulated cell division remains to be determined. The eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum has proved to be a valuable biomedical model organism. While it appears to utilize closed mitosis, a review of the literature suggests that it possesses a form of mitosis that lies in the middle between truly open and fully closed mitosis-it utilizes a form of semi-open mitosis. Here, the nucleocytoplasmic translocation patterns of the proteins that have been studied during mitosis in the social amoebozoan D. discoideum are detailed followed by a discussion of how some of them provide support for the hypothesis of semi-open mitosis.

  17. Calpain-dependent disruption of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport in ALS motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takenari; Aizawa, Hitoshi; Teramoto, Sayaka; Akamatsu, Megumi; Kwak, Shin

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear dysfunction in motor neurons has been hypothesized to be a principal cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is disrupted in dying motor neurons in a mechanistic ALS mouse model (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) conditional knockout (AR2) mice) and in ALS patients. We showed that nucleoporins (Nups) that constituted the NPC were cleaved by activated calpain via a Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor-mediated mechanism in dying motor neurons lacking ADAR2 expression in AR2 mice. In these neurons, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport was disrupted, and the level of the transcript elongation enzyme RNA polymerase II phosphorylated at Ser2 was significantly decreased. Analogous changes were observed in motor neurons lacking ADAR2 immunoreactivity in sporadic ALS patients. Therefore, calpain-dependent NPC disruption may participate in ALS pathogenesis, and inhibiting Ca2+-mediated cell death signals may be a therapeutic strategy for ALS. PMID:28045133

  18. Hidden evolutionary complexity of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA viruses of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) constitute an apparently monophyletic group that consists of at least 6 families of viruses infecting a broad variety of eukaryotic hosts. A comprehensive genome comparison and maximum-likelihood reconstruction of the NCLDV evolution revealed a set of approximately 50 conserved, core genes that could be mapped to the genome of the common ancestor of this class of eukaryotic viruses. Results We performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these core NCLDV genes and applied the constrained tree approach to show that the majority of the core genes are unlikely to be monophyletic. Several of the core genes have been independently acquired from different sources by different NCLDV lineages whereas for the majority of these genes displacement by homologs from cellular organisms in one or more groups of the NCLDV was demonstrated. Conclusions A detailed study of the evolution of the genomic core of the NCLDV reveals substantial complexity and diversity of evolutionary scenarios that was largely unsuspected previously. The phylogenetic coherence between the core genes is sufficient to validate the hypothesis on the evolution of all NCLDV from a common ancestral virus although the set of ancestral genes might be smaller than previously inferred from patterns of gene presence-absence. PMID:22891861

  19. Exploring nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses in Tara Oceans microbial metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Hingamp, Pascal; Grimsley, Nigel; Acinas, Silvia G; Clerissi, Camille; Subirana, Lucie; Poulain, Julie; Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Villar, Emilie; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Moreau, Hervé; Desdevises, Yves; Bork, Peer; Raes, Jeroen; de Vargas, Colomban; Karsenti, Eric; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Jaillon, Olivier; Not, Fabrice; Pesant, Stéphane; Wincker, Patrick; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) constitute a group of eukaryotic viruses that can have crucial ecological roles in the sea by accelerating the turnover of their unicellular hosts or by causing diseases in animals. To better characterize the diversity, abundance and biogeography of marine NCLDVs, we analyzed 17 metagenomes derived from microbial samples (0.2–1.6 μm size range) collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition. The sample set includes ecosystems under-represented in previous studies, such as the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and Indian Ocean lagoons. By combining computationally derived relative abundance and direct prokaryote cell counts, the abundance of NCLDVs was found to be in the order of 104–105 genomes ml−1 for the samples from the photic zone and 102–103 genomes ml−1 for the OMZ. The Megaviridae and Phycodnaviridae dominated the NCLDV populations in the metagenomes, although most of the reads classified in these families showed large divergence from known viral genomes. Our taxon co-occurrence analysis revealed a potential association between viruses of the Megaviridae family and eukaryotes related to oomycetes. In support of this predicted association, we identified six cases of lateral gene transfer between Megaviridae and oomycetes. Our results suggest that marine NCLDVs probably outnumber eukaryotic organisms in the photic layer (per given water mass) and that metagenomic sequence analyses promise to shed new light on the biodiversity of marine viruses and their interactions with potential hosts. PMID:23575371

  20. A Glimpse of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus Biodiversity through the Eukaryotic Genomics Window.

    PubMed

    Gallot-Lavallée, Lucie; Blanc, Guillaume

    2017-01-20

    The nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) are a group of extremely complex double-stranded DNA viruses, which are major parasites of a variety of eukaryotes. Recent studies showed that certain eukaryotes contain fragments of NCLDV DNA integrated in their genome, when surprisingly many of these organisms were not previously shown to be infected by NCLDVs. We performed an update survey of NCLDV genes hidden in eukaryotic sequences to measure the incidence of this phenomenon in common public sequence databases. A total of 66 eukaryotic genomic or transcriptomic datasets-many of which are from algae and aquatic protists-contained at least one of the five most consistently conserved NCLDV core genes. Phylogenetic study of the eukaryotic NCLDV-like sequences identified putative new members of already recognized viral families, as well as members of as yet unknown viral clades. Genomic evidence suggested that most of these sequences resulted from viral DNA integrations rather than contaminating viruses. Furthermore, the nature of the inserted viral genes helped predicting original functional capacities of the donor viruses. These insights confirm that genomic insertions of NCLDV DNA are common in eukaryotes and can be exploited to delineate the contours of NCLDV biodiversity.

  1. Clustered nuclei maintain autonomy and nucleocytoplasmic ratio control in a syncytium

    PubMed Central

    Dundon, Samantha E. R.; Chang, Shyr-Shea; Kumar, Abhishek; Occhipinti, Patricia; Shroff, Hari; Roper, Marcus; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclei in syncytia found in fungi, muscles, and tumors can behave independently despite cytoplasmic translation and the homogenizing potential of diffusion. We use a dynactin mutant strain of the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii with highly clustered nuclei to assess the relative contributions of nucleus and cytoplasm to nuclear autonomy. Remarkably, clustered nuclei maintain cell cycle and transcriptional autonomy; therefore some sources of nuclear independence function even with minimal cytosol insulating nuclei. In both nuclear clusters and among evenly spaced nuclei, a nucleus’ transcriptional activity dictates local cytoplasmic contents, as assessed by the localization of several cyclin mRNAs. Thus nuclear activity is a central determinant of the local cytoplasm in syncytia. Of note, we found that the number of nuclei per unit cytoplasm was identical in the mutant to that in wild-type cells, despite clustered nuclei. This work demonstrates that nuclei maintain autonomy at a submicrometer scale and simultaneously maintain a normal nucleocytoplasmic ratio across a syncytium up to the centimeter scale. PMID:27193301

  2. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  3. On the cellular and developmental lethality of a Xenopus nucleocytoplasmic hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne, Patrick; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Gurdon, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) embryos result from the combination of the nucleus of one species, and the egg cytoplasm of another species. Cybrid embryos can be obtained either in the haploid state by the cross-fertilization or intra-cytoplasmic injection of an enucleated egg with sperm from another species, or in the diploid state by the technique of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). Cybrids that originate from the combination of the nucleus and the cytoplasm of distantly related species commonly expire during early embryonic development, and the cause of this arrest is currently under investigation. Here we show that cells isolated from a Xenopus cybrid (Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis haploid nucleus combined with Xenopus laevis egg cytoplasm) embryo are unable to proliferate and expand normally in vitro. We also provide evidence that the lack of nuclear donor species maternal poly(A)+ RNA-dependent factors in the recipient species egg may contribute to the developmental dead-end of distantly-related cybrid embryos. Overall, the data are consistent with the view that the development promoted by one species’ nucleus is dependent on the presence of maternally-derived, mRNA encoded, species-specific factors. These results also show that cybrid development can be improved without nuclear species mitochondria supplementation or replacement. PMID:23060954

  4. Origin and Evolution of Eukaryotic Large Nucleo-Cytoplasmic DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Yutin, Natalya

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute an apparently monophyletic group that consists of 6 families of viruses infecting a broad variety of eukaryotes. A comprehensive genome comparison and maximum-likelihood reconstruction of NCLDV evolution reveal a set of approximately 50 conserved genes that can be tentatively mapped to the genome of the common ancestor of this class of eukaryotic viruses. We address the origins and evolution of NCLDV. Results Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some of the major clades of NCLDV infect diverse animals and protists, suggestive of early radiation of the NCLDV, possibly concomitant with eukaryogenesis. The core NCLDV genes seem to have originated from different sources including homologous genes of bacteriophages, bacteria and eukaryotes. These observations are compatible with a scenario of the origin of the NCLDV at an early stage of the evolution of eukaryotes through extensive mixing of genes from widely different genomes. Conclusions The common ancestor of the NCLDV probably evolved from a bacteriophage as a result of recruitment of numerous eukaryotic and some bacterial genes, and concomitant loss of the majority of phage genes except for a small core of genes coding for proteins essential for virus genome replication and virion formation. PMID:20551680

  5. Phylogenetic evidence for extensive lateral acquisition of cellular genes by Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA viruses (NCLDV), a diverse group that infects a wide range of eukaryotic hosts, exhibit a large heterogeneity in genome size (between 100 kb and 1.2 Mb) but have been suggested to form a monophyletic group on the basis of a small subset of approximately 30 conserved genes. NCLDV were proposed to have evolved by simplification from cellular organism although some of the giant NCLDV have clearly grown by gene accretion from a bacterial origin. Results We demonstrate here that many NCLDV lineages appear to have undergone frequent gene exchange in two different ways. Viruses which infect protists directly (Mimivirus) or algae which exist as intracellular protists symbionts (Phycodnaviruses) acquire genes from a bacterial source. Metazoan viruses such as the Poxviruses show a predominant acquisition of host genes. In both cases, the laterally acquired genes show a strong tendency to be positioned at the tip of the genome. Surprisingly, several core genes believed to be ancestral in the family appear to have undergone lateral gene transfers, suggesting that the NCLDV ancestor might have had a smaller genome than previously believed. Moreover, our data show that the larger the genome, the higher is the number of laterally acquired genes. This pattern is incompatible with a genome reduction from a cellular ancestor. Conclusion We propose that the NCLDV viruses have evolved by significant growth of a simple DNA virus by gene acquisition from cellular sources. PMID:19036122

  6. Flexible phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins as entropic barriers to nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Roderick Y. H.; Huang, Ning-Ping; Köser, Joachim; Deng, Jie; Lau, K. H. Aaron; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Aebi, Ueli

    2006-01-01

    Natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-repeat domains are alleged to form the physical constituents of the selective barrier-gate in nuclear pore complexes during nucleocytoplasmic transport. Presently, the biophysical mechanism behind the selective gate remains speculative because of a lack of information regarding the nanomechanical properties of the FG domains. In this work, we have applied the atomic force microscope to measure the mechanical response of individual and clusters of FG molecules. Single-molecule force spectroscopy reveals that FG molecules are unfolded and highly flexible. To provide insight into the selective gating mechanism, an experimental platform has been constructed to study the collective behavior of surface-tethered FG molecules at the nanoscale. Measurements indicate that the collective behavior of such FG molecules gives rise to an exponentially decaying long-range steric repulsive force. This finding indicates that the molecules are thermally mobile in an extended polymer brush-like conformation. This assertion is confirmed by observing that the brush-like conformation undergoes a reversible collapse transition in less polar solvent conditions. These findings reveal how FG-repeat domains may simultaneously function as an entropic barrier and a selective trap in the near-field interaction zone of nuclear pore complexes; i.e., selective gate. PMID:16769882

  7. A deep proteomics perspective on CRM1-mediated nuclear export and nucleocytoplasmic partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Kırlı, Koray; Karaca, Samir; Dehne, Heinz Jürgen; Samwer, Matthias; Pan, Kuan Ting; Lenz, Christof; Urlaub, Henning; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    CRM1 is a highly conserved, RanGTPase-driven exportin that carries proteins and RNPs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. We now explored the cargo-spectrum of CRM1 in depth and identified surprisingly large numbers, namely >700 export substrates from the yeast S. cerevisiae, ≈1000 from Xenopus oocytes and >1050 from human cells. In addition, we quantified the partitioning of ≈5000 unique proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes. The data suggest new CRM1 functions in spatial control of vesicle coat-assembly, centrosomes, autophagy, peroxisome biogenesis, cytoskeleton, ribosome maturation, translation, mRNA degradation, and more generally in precluding a potentially detrimental action of cytoplasmic pathways within the nuclear interior. There are also numerous new instances where CRM1 appears to act in regulatory circuits. Altogether, our dataset allows unprecedented insights into the nucleocytoplasmic organisation of eukaryotic cells, into the contributions of an exceedingly promiscuous exportin and it provides a new basis for NES prediction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11466.001 PMID:26673895

  8. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE. PMID:26492198

  9. A gamma-2 herpesvirus nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein interacts with importin alpha 1 and alpha 5.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, D J; Whitehouse, A

    2001-06-08

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is the prototype gamma-2 herpesvirus. This is an increasing important subfamily of herpesviruses due to the identification of the first human gamma-2 herpesvirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The HVS open reading frame (ORF) 57 protein is a multifunctional trans-regulatory protein homologous to genes identified in all classes of herpesviruses. Recent analysis has demonstrated that ORF 57 has the ability to bind viral RNA and to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and is required for efficient nuclear export of viral transcripts. Here we have investigated the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mechanism utilized by the ORF 57 protein. The yeast two-hybrid system was employed to identify interacting cellular proteins using ORF 57 as bait. We demonstrate that ORF 57 interacts with importin alpha isoforms 1 and 5. In addition, the binding of ORF 57 to importin alpha was mediated by the importin alpha hydrophobic internal armadillo repeats. An ORF 57 amino-terminal arginine-rich sequence, which functions as a nuclear localization sequence, was also required for this interaction. Furthermore, the ORF 57 protein is responsible for the redistribution of importin alpha into the nucleoli. These results identify novel cellular interactions essential for the functioning of this important herpesvirus regulatory protein.

  10. AtGRP2, a cold-induced nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein, has a role in flower and seed development.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana Flores; Bocca, Silvia Nora; Ramos, Rose Lucia Braz; Barrôco, Rosa Maria; Magioli, Claudia; Jorge, Vanessa Cardeal; Coutinho, Tatiana Cardoso; Rangel-Lima, Camila Martins; De Rycke, Riet; Inzé, Dirk; Engler, Gilbert; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2007-05-01

    The glycine-rich protein AtGRP2 is one of the four members of the cold-shock domain (CSD) protein family in Arabidopsis. It is characterized by the presence of a nucleic acid-binding CSD domain, two glycine-rich domains and two CCHC zinc-fingers present in nucleic acid-binding proteins. In an attempt to further understand the role of CSD/GRP proteins in plants, we have proceeded to the functional characterization of the AtGRP2 gene. Here, we demonstrate that AtGRP2 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein involved in Arabidopsis development with a possible function in cold-response. Expression analysis revealed that the AtGRP2 gene is active in meristematic tissues, being modulated during flower development. Down-regulation of AtGRP2 gene, using gene-silencing techniques resulted in early flowering, altered stamen number and affected seed development. A possible role of AtGRP2 as an RNA chaperone is discussed.

  11. Multisubunit DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from Vaccinia Virus and Other Nucleocytoplasmic Large-DNA Viruses: Impressions from the Age of Structure.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Gershon, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    The past 17 years have been marked by a revolution in our understanding of cellular multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (MSDDRPs) at the structural level. A parallel development over the past 15 years has been the emerging story of the giant viruses, which encode MSDDRPs. Here we link the two in an attempt to understand the specialization of multisubunit RNA polymerases in the domain of life encompassing the large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses (NCLDV), a superclade that includes the giant viruses and the biochemically well-characterized poxvirus vaccinia virus. The first half of this review surveys the recently determined structural biology of cellular RNA polymerases for a microbiology readership. The second half discusses a reannotation of MSDDRP subunits from NCLDV families and the apparent specialization of these enzymes by virus family and by subunit with regard to subunit or domain loss, subunit dissociability, endogenous control of polymerase arrest, and the elimination/customization of regulatory interactions that would confer higher-order cellular control. Some themes are apparent in linking subunit function to structure in the viral world: as with cellular RNA polymerases I and III and unlike cellular RNA polymerase II, the viral enzymes seem to opt for speed and processivity and seem to have eliminated domains associated with higher-order regulation. The adoption/loss of viral RNA polymerase proofreading functions may have played a part in matching intrinsic mutability to genome size. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  13. Secretion of 10-kDa and 12-kDa thioredoxin species from blood monocytes and transformed leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sahaf, B; Rosén, A

    2000-01-01

    Thioredoxins (TRX) are ubiquitous, small redox-active proteins with multiple functions, including antioxidant, cytoprotective, and chemoattractant activities. In addition to a 12-kDa intracellular form, extracellular 10-kDa and 12-kDa TRX have been defined. The biological activities of the 10-kDa TRX were previously measured as eosinophil cytotoxicity enhancing activity or B-cell stimulatory activity. Cytotrophoblastic cell lines also release a 10-kDa TRX form. To study the biological role of 10-kDa TRX, we established two highly sensitive enzyme-linked immuno-spot assays (ELISPOT), which detect secreted truncated 10-kDa and full-length 12-kDa TRX at the single cell level. TRX secretion was investigated in several cell lines including the T-helper cell hybridoma MP6, the Jurkat T-cell leukemia, the U-937 myelomonocytic leukemia, and the 3B6, EBV-transformed, lymphoblastoid B-cell line. The highest number of secreting cells was found in 3B6 cultures, median = 34 (quartiles, 27-39) per well (10(5) cells). Peripheral blood monocytes isolated from healthy donors secreted significantly more TRX after stimulation with ionomycin, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), fMLP, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), compared to unstimulated cells. Oxidative stress induced by thioloxidant diamide also induced the secretion of both truncated and full-length TRX measured in ELISPOT (p = 0.047 and p = 0.031, respectively). The biological activity of the truncated and full-length forms was tested in a cell migration assay. Truncated TRX was devoid of protein disulfide reductase activity, but retained strong chemoattractant activity for human monocytes, in the same range as full-length TRX, as previously reported (Bertini et al., 1999).

  14. Purification and characterization of 94kDa and 80kDa forms of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fracek, S.P. Jr.; Venter, J.C.; Kerlavage, A.R.

    1986-05-01

    Two molecular forms of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor have been consistently observed in a variety of species, albeit in variable amounts. Proteins which are specifically labeled by (/sup 3/H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((/sup 3/H)PrBCM) were observed at 94kDa and 80kDa upon SDS-PAGE of membrane proteins prepared from brains and hearts of trout, frog, turtle, chicken, rat, and pig. They have developed a purification procedure which yields each of these proteins in a homogeneous form suitable for structural analysis. The four step procedure involves affinity chromatography on 3-(2'-aminobenzhydryloxy)tropane-sepharose, concentration on hydroxylapatite, preparative SDS-PAGE and extraction of individual bands from the gel. Limited tryptic digestion of purified (/sup 3/H)PrBCM-labeled porcine atrial muscarinic receptor yields (/sup 3/H)-labeled fragments of 75, 65, 52, 40, 35, 30, 25, and 20kDa, in close agreement with results of analogous digestions of muscarinic receptor from other species and tissues. Complete tryptic digestion and subsequent mapping by reverse-phase HPLC yields very similar profiles for (/sup 125/I)-labeled 94kDa and 80kDA receptor forms. Most peaks which elute in the hydrophobic region of the profile overlap for the two proteins while the 94kDa protein contains several additional peaks of apparent low hydrophobicity.

  15. A G-protein-coupled 130 kDa phospholipase C isozyme, PLC-beta 4, from the particulate fraction of bovine cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Min, D S; Kim, Y; Lee, Y H; Suh, P G; Ryu, S H

    1993-09-27

    A 130 kDa PLC isozyme was purified from the particulate fraction of bovine cerebellum. This PLC was recognized by a polyclonal antiserum generated against the purified 97 kDa PLC-beta 4. Reconstitution of the purified 130 kDa PLC with the membranes of C6 Bu-1 cells in the presence of GTP gamma S or AlF4- resulted in PLC activation as well as the association of PLC with the membranes. Both the association and activation were revoked when the membrane was washed with 2 M KCl. The 97 kDa PLC-beta 4 did not associate with membranes. These data suggest that the 130 kDa PLC is the intact form of PLC-beta 4 the activity of which is likely to be regulated by a G-protein on the membrane.

  16. Two distinct SSB protein families in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Venclovas, Česlovas

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Eukaryote-infecting nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) feature some of the largest genomes in the viral world. These viruses typically do not strongly depend on the host DNA replication systems. In line with this observation, a number of essential DNA replication proteins, such as DNA polymerases, primases, helicases and ligases, have been identified in the NCLDVs. One other ubiquitous component of DNA replisomes is the single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein. Intriguingly, no NCLDV homologs of canonical OB-fold-containing SSB proteins had previously been detected. Only in poxviruses, one of seven NCLDV families, I3 was identified as the SSB protein. However, whether I3 is related to any known protein structure has not yet been established. Results: Here, we addressed the case of ‘missing’ canonical SSB proteins in the NCLDVs and also probed evolutionary origins of the I3 family. Using advanced computational methods, in four NCLDV families, we detected homologs of the bacteriophage T7 SSB protein (gp2.5). We found the properties of these homologs to be consistent with the SSB function. Moreover, we implicated specific residues in single-stranded DNA binding. At the same time, we found no evolutionary link between the T7 gp2.5-like NCLDV SSB homologs and the poxviral SSB protein (I3). Instead, we identified a distant relationship between I3 and small protein B (SmpB), a bacterial RNA-binding protein. Thus, apparently, the NCLDVs have the two major distinct sets of SSB proteins having bacteriophage and bacterial origins, respectively. Contact: venclovas@ibt.lt Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23097418

  17. GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Lu, Yubing; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kim, Nam Chul; Almeida, Sandra; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Badders, Nisha; Valentine, Marc; Miller, Bruce L; Wong, Philip C; Petrucelli, Leonard; Kim, Hong Joo; Gao, Fen-Biao; Taylor, J Paul

    2015-09-03

    The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2-repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We show that these transgenic animals display dosage-dependent, repeat-length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, as observed in patients with C9orf72-related disease. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen, ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results, we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived neurons from patients with C9orf72-related disease. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.

  18. Evolution of the Karyopherin-β Family of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Factors; Ancient Origins and Continued Specialization

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Amanda J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Macromolecular transport across the nuclear envelope (NE) is achieved through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and requires karyopherin-βs (KAP-βs), a family of soluble receptors, for recognition of embedded transport signals within cargo. We recently demonstrated, through proteomic analysis of trypanosomes, that NPC architecture is likely highly conserved across the Eukaryota, which in turn suggests conservation of the transport mechanisms. To determine if KAP-β diversity was similarly established early in eukaryotic evolution or if it was subsequently layered onto a conserved NPC, we chose to identify KAP-β sequences in a diverse range of eukaryotes and to investigate their evolutionary history. Results Thirty six predicted proteomes were scanned for candidate KAP-β family members. These resulting sequences were resolved into fifteen KAP-β subfamilies which, due to broad supergroup representation, were most likely represented in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Candidate members of each KAP-β subfamily were found in all eukaryotic supergroups, except XPO6, which is absent from Archaeplastida. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed the likely evolutionary relationships between these different subfamilies. Many species contain more than one representative of each KAP-β subfamily; many duplications are apparently taxon-specific but others result from duplications occurring earlier in eukaryotic history. Conclusions At least fifteen KAP-β subfamilies were established early in eukaryote evolution and likely before the LECA. In addition we identified expansions at multiple stages within eukaryote evolution, including a multicellular plant-specific KAP-β, together with frequent secondary losses. Taken with evidence for early establishment of NPC architecture, these data demonstrate that multiple pathways for nucleocytoplasmic transport were established prior to the radiation of modern eukaryotes but that selective pressure continues to sculpt

  19. Overexpression of the Nucleoporin CAN/NUP214 Induces Growth Arrest, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Defects, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Judith; Bonten-Surtel, Jacqueline; Grosveld, Gerard

    1998-01-01

    The human CAN gene was first identified as a target of t(6;9)(p23;q34), associated with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, which results in the expression of a DEK-CAN fusion gene. CAN, also called NUP214, is a nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein that contains multiple FG-peptide sequence motifs. It interacts at the NPC with at least two other proteins, the nucleoporin NUP88 and hCRM1 (exportin 1), which was recently shown to function as a nuclear export receptor. Depletion of CAN in knockout mouse embryonic cells results in cell cycle arrest in G2, followed by inhibition of nuclear protein import and a block of mRNA export. We overexpressed CAN and DEK-CAN in U937 myeloid precursor cells. DEK-CAN expression did not interfere with terminal myeloid differentiation of U937 cells, whereas CAN-overexpressing cells arrested in G0, accumulated mRNA in their nuclei, and died in an apoptotic manner. Interestingly, we found that hCRM1 and import factor p97/importin β colocalized with the ectopically expressed CAN protein, resulting in depletion of both factors from the NPC. Overexpression of the C-terminal FG-repeat region of CAN, which contains the binding site for hCRM1, caused sequestering of hCRM1 in the nucleoplasm and was sufficient to inhibit cell growth and to induce apoptosis. These results confirm that CAN plays a crucial role in nucleocytoplasmic transport and imply an essential role for hCRM1 in cell growth and survival. PMID:9488438

  20. Sturgeon nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA virus phylogeny and PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Clouthier, Sharon C; VanWalleghem, Elissa; Anderson, Eric D

    2015-12-09

    Sturgeon epitheliotropic nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) can cause a lethal disease of the integumentary system. These viruses have not been assigned to any currently recognized family or genus. In this study, phylogenetic analyses using the major capsid protein (MCP) showed that the sturgeon NCLDVs formed a cohesive taxonomic group, could be identified to the species or possibly sub-species level and formed a distinct evolutionary lineage within the Megavirales. The genetic relatedness of the sturgeon virus MCP allowed design of 3 PCR diagnostic tests with analytical specificity (ASp) inclusive of this group of viruses. The conventional PCR test, C1, had broader ASp than the 2 quantitative PCR tests, Q1 and Q2, and was inclusive of the sturgeon viruses as well as some viruses belonging to the families Mimi-, Phycodna-, or Iridoviridae. Q2 had broader specificity than Q1 but both tests recognized the sturgeon NCLDVs and did not cross-react with co-localizing sturgeon herpesviruses. Analytical test performance characteristics evaluated for Q1 and Q2 revealed sensitive assays with observed 50% limits of detection between 3 and 6.25 plasmid copies and high intra- and inter-assay repeatability. Q1 was used to test for sturgeon viruses in endangered populations of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens within the Winnipeg River or Nelson River drainage systems of Manitoba, Canada. Test results indicated that namao virus is endemic in the Nelson River water basin. These tests meet the analytical requirements for diagnostic testing in Canada and are useful tools for disease management in sturgeon conservation stocking programs in North America.

  1. Repair of base damage and genome maintenance in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, María L

    2014-01-22

    Among the DNA viruses, the so-called nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute a monophyletic group that currently consists of seven families of viruses infecting a very broad variety of eukaryotes, from unicellular marine protists to humans. Many recent papers have analyzed the sequence and structure of NCLDV genomes and their phylogeny, providing detailed analysis about their genomic structure and evolutionary history and proposing their inclusion in a new viral order named Megavirales that, according to some authors, should be considered as a fourth domain of life, aside from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The maintenance of genetic information protected from environmental attacks and mutations is essential not only for the survival of cellular organisms but also viruses. In cellular organisms, damaged DNA bases are removed in two major repair pathways: base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) that constitute the major pathways responsible for repairing most endogenous base lesions and abnormal bases in the genome by precise repair procedures. Like cells, many NCLDV encode proteins that might constitute viral DNA repair pathways that would remove damages through BER/NIR pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms and, specially, the biological roles of those viral repair pathways have not been deeply addressed in the literature so far. In this paper, we review viral-encoded BER proteins and the genetic and biochemical data available about them. We propose and discuss probable viral-encoded DNA repair mechanisms and pathways, as compared with the functional and molecular features of known homologs proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the Effect of the 47 kDa Protein Isolated from Aged Garlic Extract on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Namdar Ahmadabad; Zuhair, Mohammad Hassan; Safari, Elahe; Bozorgmehr, Mahmood; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Garlic (Allium sativum) is known as a potent spice and a medicine with broad therapeutic properties ranging from antibacterial to anticancer, and anticoagulant. One of the major purified garlic protein components is the 47 kDa protein. In this study, the effect of 47 kDa protein extracted from aged garlic (AGE) was evalua Materials and Methods Forty seven kDa protein was purified from AGE by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the molecular weight and purity of the isolated protein. DCs were purified from spleen of BALB/c mice by Nycodenz centrifugation and their adhesiveness to the plastic dish. The 47 kDa protein isolated from AGE was added to DCs medium during the overnight culture and the expression of DC surface markers was assessed via flowcytometry. Results The 47 kDa protein-treated DCs lowered the expression of DC maturation markers including: CD40, CD86 and MHC-II in comparison with non-treated DCs; (median of 41% versus 47%, 84% versus 91% and 83% versus 90%, respectively) but we observed no statistical difference between the two groups. Conclusion Upon treatment with DCs with 47 kDa protein, DCs down regulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC-II surface molecules, which is similar to tolerogenic DC phenotype. According to the results of the present study, we found that 47 kDa protein purified from AGE can be considered as a potential candidate to generate tolerogenic DCs in vitro. PMID:23493446

  3. C9ORF72 poly(GA) aggregates sequester and impair HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Gendron, Tania F; Grima, Jonathan C; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Katzman, Rebecca B; Gass, Jennifer; Murray, Melissa E; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Lin, Wen-Lang; Garrett, Aliesha; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Daughrity, Lillian; Tong, Jimei; Perkerson, Emilie A; Yue, Mei; Chew, Jeannie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Kurti, Aishe; Wang, Zizhao S; Liesinger, Amanda M; Baker, Jeremy D; Jiang, Jie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Bu, Guojun; Link, Christopher D; Dickey, Chad A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal inclusions of poly(GA), a protein unconventionally translated from G4C2 repeat expansions in C9ORF72, are abundant in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by this mutation. To investigate poly(GA) toxicity, we generated mice that exhibit poly(GA) pathology, neurodegeneration and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of FTD and ALS. These phenotypes occurred in the absence of TDP-43 pathology and required poly(GA) aggregation. HR23 proteins involved in proteasomal degradation and proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport were sequestered by poly(GA) in these mice. HR23A and HR23B similarly colocalized to poly(GA) inclusions in C9ORF72 expansion carriers. Sequestration was accompanied by an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and decreased xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) levels in mice, indicative of HR23A and HR23B dysfunction. Restoring HR23B levels attenuated poly(GA) aggregation and rescued poly(GA)-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures. These data demonstrate that sequestration and impairment of nuclear HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins is an outcome of, and a contributor to, poly(GA) pathology.

  4. C9ORF72 poly(GA) aggregates sequester and impair HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Gendron, Tania F; Grima, Jonathan C; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Katzman, Rebecca B; Gass, Jennifer; Murray, Melissa E; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Lin, Wen-Lang; Garrett, Aliesha; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Daughrity, Lillian; Tong, Jimei; Perkerson, Emilie A; Yue, Mei; Chew, Jeannie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Kurti, Aishe; Wang, Zizhao S; Liesinger, Amanda M; Baker, Jeremy D; Jiang, Jie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Bu, Guojun; Link, Christopher D; Dickey, Chad A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal inclusions of poly(GA), a protein unconventionally translated from G4C2 repeat expansions in C9ORF72, are abundant in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by this mutation. To investigate poly(GA) toxicity, we generated mice that exhibit poly(GA) pathology, neurodegeneration and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of FTD and ALS. These phenotypes occurred in the absence of TDP-43 pathology and required poly(GA) aggregation. HR23 proteins involved in proteasomal degradation and proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport were sequestered by poly(GA) in these mice. HR23A and HR23B similarly colocalized to poly(GA) inclusions in C9ORF72 expansion carriers. Sequestration was accompanied by an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and decreased xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) levels in mice, indicative of HR23A and HR23B dysfunction. Restoring HR23B levels attenuated poly(GA) aggregation and rescued poly(GA)-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures. These data demonstrate that sequestration and impairment of nuclear HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins is an outcome of, and a contributor to, poly(GA) pathology. PMID:26998601

  5. The high risk HPV16 L2 minor capsid protein has multiple transport signals that mediate its nucleocytoplasmic traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoor, Shahan; Onder, Zeynep; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Kwak, Kihyuck; Bordeaux, Jennifer; Crosby, Lauren; Roden, Richard B.S.; Moroianu, Junona

    2012-01-20

    In this study we examined the transport signals contributing to HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic using confocal microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-L2 (EGFP-L2) fusions expressed in HeLa cells. We confirmed that both nuclear localization signals (NLSs), the nNLS (1MRHKRSAKRTKR12) and cNLS (456RKRRKR461), previously characterized in vitro (Darshan et al., 2004), function independently in vivo. We discovered that a middle region rich in arginine residues (296SRRTGIRYSRIGNKQTLRTRS316) functions as a nuclear retention sequence (NRS), as mutagenesis of critical arginine residues within this NRS reduced the fraction of L2 in the nucleus despite the presence of both NLSs. Significantly, the infectivity of HPV16 pseudoviruses containing either RR297AA or RR297EE within the L2 NRS was strongly reduced both in HaCaT cells and in a murine challenge model. Experiments using Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor and mutation-localization analysis lead to the discovery of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal ({sub 462}LPYFFSDVSL) mediating 16L2 nuclear export. These data indicate that HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic is dependent on multiple functional transport signals.

  6. A 36 kDa monomeric protein and its complex with a 10 kDa protein both isolated from bovine aorta are calpactin-like proteins that differ in their Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding and actin-severing properties.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F; Derancourt, J; Capony, J P; Watrin, A; Cavadore, J C

    1988-01-01

    Interaction of plasma membrane with the cytoskeleton involves a large number of proteins, among them a 36 kDa protein that was found to be involved in the interaction with actin filaments. We have isolated a 36 kDa protein from bovine aorta as a monomer and in a complex with a 10 kDa protein. Partial amino acid sequence determinations show that the 36 kDa and 10 kDa proteins isolated from bovine aorta are analogous to or identical with corresponding proteins purified from bovine intestine already described by Kristensen, Saris, Hunter, Hicks, Noonan, Glenney & Tack [(1986) Biochemistry 25, 4497-4503]. We report here that the association of the 10 kDa protein with the 36 kDa protein confers specific calmodulin-binding and actin-severing properties on the complex that are not possessed by the 36 kDa monomer alone. These findings suggest that the protein complex could be involved in thin-filament-related structures or could modulate some Ca2+-regulated events mediated by calmodulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2970844

  7. A novel 29-kDa chicken heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Einat, M F; Haberfeld, A; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Hurwitz, S; Yahav, S

    1996-12-01

    The family of small heat shock proteins is the more variable among the highly conserved superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSP). Using a metabolic labeling procedure with tissue explants, we have detected in chickens a new member of the small HSP family with an apparent molecular weight of 29-kDa. This protein was induced in broiler chickens' heart muscle and lungs following an in vivo heat stress. The 29-kDa band appears after 3 h of heat stress, much later than the induction of HSP 90, HSP 70, and HSP 27. The late onset of induction suggests that HSP 29 plays a more specific role of a "second stage defense protein".

  8. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  9. The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Won Kyung . E-mail: wkkang@riken.jp; Kurihara, Masaaki . E-mail: mkuri@riken.jp; Matsumoto, Shogo . E-mail: smatsu@riken.jp

    2006-06-20

    The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) display a biphasic pattern of intracellular localization during infection. At early times, they reside in the nucleus but then show both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization as the infection proceeds. Therefore, we examined the possibility of nuclear export. Using inhibitors, we reveal that BmNPV BRO proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutations on the leucine-rich region of BRO proteins resulted in nuclear accumulation of transiently expressed proteins, suggesting that this region functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). On the contrary, mutant BRO-D with an altered NES did not show nuclear accumulation in infected cells, although protein production seemed to be reduced. RT-PCR analysis showed that the lower level of protein production was due to a reduction in RNA synthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that BRO proteins are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  10. The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, WonKyung; Kurihara, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2006-06-20

    The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) display a biphasic pattern of intracellular localization during infection. At early times, they reside in the nucleus but then show both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization as the infection proceeds. Therefore, we examined the possibility of nuclear export. Using inhibitors, we reveal that BmNPV BRO proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutations on the leucine-rich region of BRO proteins resulted in nuclear accumulation of transiently expressed proteins, suggesting that this region functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). On the contrary, mutant BRO-D with an altered NES did not show nuclear accumulation in infected cells, although protein production seemed to be reduced. RT-PCR analysis showed that the lower level of protein production was due to a reduction in RNA synthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that BRO proteins are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  11. Analysis of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of the proto-oncogene SET/I2PP2A.

    PubMed

    Lam, B Daniel; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    SET/I2PP2A is a nuclear protein that was initially identified as an oncogene in human undifferentiated acute myeloid leukemia, fused to the nuclear porin Nup-214. In addition, SET is a potent inhibitior of the phosphatase PP2A. Previously, we proposed a model in which the small GTPase Rac1 recruits SET from the nucleus to the plasma membrane to promote cell migration. This event represents an entirely novel concept in the field of cell migration. Now, fluorescent versions of the SET protein are generated to analyze its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling in live cells. Our studies showed that under steady-state conditions a fraction of the SET protein, which is primarily localized in the nucleus, translocates to the cytosol in an apparently random fashion. SET exiting the nucleus was also seen in spreading as well as dividing cells. We designed an image analysis method to quantify the frequency of nuclear exit of the SET proteins, based on 4D confocal imaging. This straightforward method was validated by analysis of SET wild-type and mutant proteins. This showed that the frequency of nuclear exit of a Ser-9 phosphomimetic mutant (S9E) is enhanced compared to wild-type SET or a S9A mutant. Thus, we have developed a novel method to analyze the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of the proto-oncogene SET dynamics in live cells. This method will also be applicable to monitor dynamic localization of other nuclear and/or cytoplasmic signaling proteins. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. Eukaryotic large nucleo-cytoplasmic DNA viruses: Clusters of orthologous genes and reconstruction of viral genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) comprise an apparently monophyletic class of viruses that infect a broad variety of eukaryotic hosts. Recent progress in isolation of new viruses and genome sequencing resulted in a substantial expansion of the NCLDV diversity, resulting in additional opportunities for comparative genomic analysis, and a demand for a comprehensive classification of viral genes. Results A comprehensive comparison of the protein sequences encoded in the genomes of 45 NCLDV belonging to 6 families was performed in order to delineate cluster of orthologous viral genes. Using previously developed computational methods for orthology identification, 1445 Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Virus Orthologous Groups (NCVOGs) were identified of which 177 are represented in more than one NCLDV family. The NCVOGs were manually curated and annotated and can be used as a computational platform for functional annotation and evolutionary analysis of new NCLDV genomes. A maximum-likelihood reconstruction of the NCLDV evolution yielded a set of 47 conserved genes that were probably present in the genome of the common ancestor of this class of eukaryotic viruses. This reconstructed ancestral gene set is robust to the parameters of the reconstruction procedure and so is likely to accurately reflect the gene core of the ancestral NCLDV, indicating that this virus encoded a complex machinery of replication, expression and morphogenesis that made it relatively independent from host cell functions. Conclusions The NCVOGs are a flexible and expandable platform for genome analysis and functional annotation of newly characterized NCLDV. Evolutionary reconstructions employing NCVOGs point to complex ancestral viruses. PMID:20017929

  13. Structural requirements to obtain highly potent and selective 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Ligands.

    PubMed

    Taliani, Sabrina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The (18 kDa) Translocator Protein (TSPO), was initially identified in 1977 as peripheral binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam and named "Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)". It is an evolutionarily well-conserved protein particularly located at the outer/inner mitochondrial membrane contact sites, in closely association with the 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), thus forming the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). TSPO is ubiquitary expressed in peripheral tissues (steroid producing tissues, liver, heart, kidney, lung, immune system) and in lower levels in the central nervous system, where it is mainly located in glial cells, and in neurons. TSPO is involved in a variety of biological processes such as cholesterol transport, steroidogenesis, calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial oxidation, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis induction, and regulation of immune functions. In the last decade, many studies have reported that TSPO basal expression is altered in a number of human pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders (Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases), as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation and anxiety. Consequently, TSPO has not only been suggested as a promising drug target for a number of therapeutic applications (anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, immunomodulating, etc.), but also as valid diagnostic marker for related-disease state and progression, prompting the development of specific labelled ligands as powerful tools for imaging techniques. A number of structurally different classes of ligands have been reported, showing high affinity and selectivity towards TSPO. Indeed, most of these ligands have been designed starting from selective CBR ligands which were structurally modified in order to shift their affinity towards TSPO. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies were performed allowing to

  14. The primary structure of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain: III. Sequence of the 22 kDa fragment and the alignment of the 23 kDa, 50 kDa, and 22 kDa fragments.

    PubMed

    Maita, T; Miyanishi, T; Matsuzono, K; Tanioka, Y; Matsuda, G

    1991-07-01

    The amino acid sequence of the 197-residue 22 kDa fragment from chicken pectoralis muscle was determined to be as follows: K-K-G-S-S-F-Q-T-V-S-A-L-F-R-E-N-L-N-K-L- M-A-N-L-R-S-T-H-P-H-F-V-R-C-I-I-P-N-E-T-K-T-P-G-A-M-E-H-E-L-V-L-H-Q-L-R- C-N-G-V- L-E-G-I-R-I-C-R-K-G-F-P-S-R-V-L-Y-A-D-F-K-Q-R-Y-R-V-L-N-A-S-A-I-P-E-G-Q- F-M-D-S- K-K-A-S-E-K-L-L-G-S-I-D-V-D-h-T-Q-Y-R-F-G-H-T-K-V-F-F-K-A-G-L-L-G-L-L-E- E-M-R-D- D-K-L-A-E-I-I-T-R-T-Q-A-R-C-R-G-F-L-M-R-V-E-Y-R-R-M-V-E-R-R-E-S-I-F-C-I- Q-Y-N-V-R-S-F-M-N-V-K-H-W-P-W-M-K-L-F-F-K, where h stands for 3-N-methylhistidine. The amino acid sequences of the 22 kDa fragment and its equivalent fragment from chicken ventricle and gizzard muscle myosins were also determined by our group. Predicted secondary structures of these 22 kDa fragment regions and of the reported chicken embryo myosin revealed some possible structural differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    SciTech Connect

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Kuisiene, Nomeda

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported.

  16. Functional competition between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and its 24-kDa apoptotic fragment in DNA repair and transcription.

    PubMed

    Yung, T M; Satoh, M S

    2001-04-06

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is a 113-kDa nuclear enzyme that binds to both damaged DNA and to RNA associated with actively transcribed regions of chromatin. Binding of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase to DNA lesions activates it, catalyzing the covalent addition of multiple ADP-ribose polymers to the enzyme (automodification). During apoptosis, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is cleaved by caspase-3, resulting in the formation of an N-terminal 24-kDa fragment, containing the DNA binding domain, and a C-terminal 89-kDa catalytic fragment. The functional relevance of this cleavage is not well understood. We therefore prepared a recombinant 24-kDa poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase fragment and investigated the role of this fragment in DNA repair and transcription. The 24-kDa fragment retained its binding affinity for both DNA breaks and RNA. In an in vitro cell-free DNA repair assay, this fragment inhibited rejoining of DNA breaks and suppressed ADP-ribose polymer formation by competing with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in binding to DNA breaks. With regard to transcription, it has recently been demonstrated that binding of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase to transcribed RNA reduces the rate of transcript elongation and that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase bound to DNA breaks results in up-regulation of transcription. We tested the 24-kDa fragment for its ability to suppress transcript elongation, and we found that it competed against the up-regulation of transcription mediated by full-length poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The ability of the 24-kDa fragment to inhibit DNA repair, ADP-ribose polymer formation, and damage-dependent up-regulation of transcription may contribute to the apoptotic shift from cell survival to cell death mode.

  17. A DEAD-box-family protein is required for nucleocytoplasmic transport of yeast mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, S; Hitomi, M; Hu, Y H; Liu, Y; Tartakoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    An enormous variety of primary and secondary mRNA structures are compatible with export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, there seems to be a mechanism for RNA export which is independent of sequence recognition. There nevertheless is likely to be some relatively uniform mechanism which allows transcripts to be packaged as ribonucleoprotein particles, to gain access to the periphery of the nucleus and ultimately to translocate across nuclear pores. To study these events, we and others have generated temperature-sensitive recessive mRNA transport (mtr) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in the nucleus at 37 degrees C. Several of the corresponding genes have been cloned. Upon depletion of one of these proteins, Mtr4p, conspicuous amounts of nuclear poly(A)+ RNA accumulate in association with the nucleolus. Corresponding dense material is also seen by electron microscopy. MTR4 is essential for growth and encodes a novel nuclear protein with a size of approximately 120 kDa. Mtr4p shares characteristic motifs with DEAD-box RNA helicases and associates with RNA. It therefore may well affect RNA conformation. It shows extensive homology to a human predicted gene product and the yeast antiviral protein Ski2p. Critical residues of Mtr4p, including the mtr4-1 point mutation, have been identified. Mtr4p may serve as a chaperone which translocates or normalizes the structure of mRNAs in preparation for export. PMID:8756671

  18. Nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation and secretion of fibroblast growth factor-2 during avian gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Riese, J; Zeller, R; Dono, R

    1995-01-01

    The expression and distribution of the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 or bFGF) proteins during early avian embryogenesis has been analysed in detail. Three FGF-2 protein isoforms of 18.5, 20.0 and 21.5 kDa are expressed during gastrulation of chicken embryos. Using whole mount immunohistochemistry, these proteins were found to be predominantly nuclear in prestreak blastodiscs during mesoderm induction. Distribution of positive cells in the epiblast was mosaic, whereas all cells of the forming hypoblast expressed the FGF-2 proteins. During primitive streak formation, the proteins started to translocate to the cytoplasm in epiblast cells but remained nuclear in the hypoblast. The FGF-2 proteins became predominantly cytoplasmic in all cells during the subsequent developmental stages. Their highest levels were detected in endodermal cells underlying Hensen's node and the newly formed notochord, the dorsal apex of all epiblast cells and, most interestingly, in the extra-cellular basal lamina separating the epiblast from newly formed mesoderm. Heparin and suramin treatment of these advanced embryos (stage 4) revealed a dose-dependent inhibition on the regression of Hensen's node and formation of mesodermal derivatives such as somites. The results are discussed with respect to current models on FGF-mediated functions during vertebrate mesoderm induction and regionalization.

  19. PX-52, A novel inhibitor of 14 kDa secretory and 85 kDa cytosolic phospholipases A2.

    PubMed

    Franson, R C; Rosenthal, M D

    1997-01-01

    Previously we reported that PGBx, a prostaglandin oligomer with anti-inflammatory activity, inhibited 14 kDa phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and blocked arachidonic acid mobilization in prelabeled human neutrophils (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1006:272-277, 278-286, 1989) This study describes a new inhibitor of phospholipase A2, PX-52, that also blocks agonist induced arachidonic acid mobilization in prelabeled cells. PX-52, a fatty acid polymer, inhibited hydrolysis of 14C-oleate labeled E.coli by a variety of 14 kDa PLA2s including human PMN, sperm, synovial fluid and disc, as well as porcine pancreas, N. naja, and bee venom in a dose-dependent manner with IC50s ranging from 1.0-3.7 uM. Inhibition of activity was comparable at different Ca2+ concentrations, but was relieved by increasing substrate concentration or by methylation of PX-52. Hydrolysis of [14C]-arachidonyl phosphatidylcholine by 85 kDa, cytosolic PLA2 from U937 cells was similarly inhibited by PX-52, the IC50 = 5 uM. Arachidonic acid mobilization induced by A23187 in prelabeled human PMNs was blocked by PX-52; IC50 = 10-15 uM while concentrations of up to 80 uM oleate had no effect. These results demonstrate that PX-52 inhibits the in vitro activity of secretory and cytosolic PLA2s and agonist-induced arachidonic acid release from human cells. Given its ability to block the arachidonic acid cascade, PX-52 may be useful in the control of inflammation.

  20. Biosynthesis, export and processing of a 45 kDa protein detected in membrane clefts of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Das, A; Elmendorf, H G; Li, W I; Haldar, K

    1994-01-01

    During its asexual life cycle, the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports numerous proteins beyond its surface to its host erythrocyte. We have studied the biosynthesis, processing and export of a 45 kDa parasite protein resident in membrane clefts in the erythrocyte cytoplasm. Our results indicate that this cleft protein is made as a single tightly membrane-bound 45 kDa polypeptide in ring- and trophozoite-infected erythrocytes (0-36 h in the life cycle). Using ring/trophozoite parasites released from erythrocytes, the 45 kDa protein is shown to be efficiently transported to the cell surface. This export is specifically blocked by the drug brefeldin A, and at 15 and 20 degrees C. These results indicate that transport blocks seen in the Golgi of mammalian cells are conserved in P. falciparum. Further, the newly synthesized 45 kDa protein passes through parasite Golgi compartments before its export to clefts in the erythrocyte. In mid-to-late-ring-infected erythrocytes, a fraction of the newly synthesized 45 kDa protein is processed to a second membrane-bound phosphorylated 47 kDa protein. The t1/2 of this processing step is about 4 h, suggesting that it occurs subsequent to protein export from the parasite. Evidence is presented that, in later trophozoite stages (24-36 h), the exported 45 and 47 kDa proteins are partially converted into soluble molecules in the intraerythrocytic space. Taken together, the results indicate that the lower eukaryote P. falciparum modulates a classical secretory pathway to support membrane export beyond its plasma membrane to clefts in the erythrocyte. Subsequent to export, phosphorylation and/or conversion into a soluble form may regulate the interactions of the 45 kDa protein with the clefts during parasite development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8093001

  1. The 15kDa selenoprotein and thioredoxin reductase 1 promote colon cancer by different pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Naranjo-Suarez, Salvador; Xu, Xue-Ming; He, Yiwen; Asaki, Esther; Seifried, Harold E; Reinhold, William C; Davis, Cindy D; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2015-01-01

    Selenoproteins mediate much of the cancer-preventive properties of the essential nutrient selenium, but some of these proteins have been shown to also have cancer-promoting effects. We examined the contributions of the 15kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) to cancer development. Targeted down-regulation of either gene inhibited anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth and formation of experimental metastases of mouse colon carcinoma CT26 cells. Surprisingly, combined deficiency of Sep15 and TR1 reversed the anti-cancer effects observed with down-regulation of each single gene. We found that inflammation-related genes regulated by Stat-1, especially interferon-γ-regulated guanylate-binding proteins, were highly elevated in Sep15-deficient, but not in TR1-deficient cells. Interestingly, components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were up-regulated in cells lacking both TR1 and Sep15. These results suggest that Sep15 and TR1 participate in interfering regulatory pathways in colon cancer cells. Considering the variable expression levels of Sep15 and TR1 found within the human population, our results provide insights into new roles of selenoproteins in cancer.

  2. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of STK16 (PKL12), a Golgi-resident serine/threonine kinase involved in VEGF expression regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guinea, Barbara; Gonzalez de la Pena, Manuel . E-mail: abernad@cnb.uam.es

    2006-01-15

    PKL12/STK16 protein is the first identified mammalian member of a ser/thr kinase subfamily that is conserved across several kingdoms, with a broad expression pattern in murine tissues and cell types. Endogenous STK16 subcellular localization was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence in NIH/3T3 and NRK cells, demonstrating a Golgi-associated pattern that appears to be independent of signals provided by integrin pathways. When cells were treated with brefeldin A (BFA) or nocodazole, drugs that promote Golgi disorganization, we observed STK16 translocation to the nuclear compartment. Constitutive overexpression of this protein by retroviral vectors also promotes accumulation of STK16 in the nuclear compartment, as shown by subfractionation studies. A kinase-dead STK16 mutant (E202A) was used to demonstrate that both the Golgi association and the nuclear translocation capabilities seem to be independent of the STK16 kinase activity. In addition, we show that STK16 overexpression in several cell lines enhances their capacity to produce and secrete VEGF. To confirm these data in vivo, we injected tumor cells overexpressing STK16 into immunodeficient BALBc/SCID mice. HT1080-derived tumors overexpressing STK16 showed increased volume and number of blood vessels compared to controls. Altogether, these data concur with previous reports suggesting a potential role for STK16 as a transcriptional co-activator.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 38-kDa antigen induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via toll-like receptor 2/4.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2015-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses play critical roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. To investigate the regulatory role of the ER stress response in 38-kDa antigen-induced apoptosis, we examined the relationship between the ER stress response and apoptosis in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (38-kDa Ag). The expression of ER molecular chaperones, including C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), glucose-regulated protein (Bip) and phosphorylated alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, was induced in BMDMs stimulated with the 38-kDa Ag. Interestingly, 38-kDa Ag-stimulation induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-12, -9 and -3. However, 38-kDa Ag-induced apoptosis was significantly reduced in TLR2- and TLR4-deficient macrophages. Because toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades, we evaluated the effect of MAPK activation on ER stress. The 38-kDa Ag activated Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 phosphorylation. MAPK signaling induced the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6. The 38-kDa Ag-induced MCP-1 was especially associated with the induction of MCP-1-induced protein (MCPIP), which increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ER stress. To investigate the role of MCPIP in ROS-induced ER stress by 38-kDa Ag stimulation, we transfected MCPIP siRNA into RAW264.7 cells before 38-kDa Ag stimulation, and measured the generation of ROS and expression of ER molecular chaperones. ROS production and CHOP expression were decreased by the silencing of MCPIP induction. Our results demonstrate that the expression of MCPIP by 38-kDa Ag stimulation is increased through a TLR-MAPK-dependent signaling pathway, and leads to ER stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, MCPIP is important for host defense mechanisms in mycobacterial pathogenesis.

  4. A 92-kDa human immunostimulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fontan, E; Briend, E; Saklani-Jusforgues, H; d'Alayer, J; Vandekerckhove, J; Fauve, R M

    1994-01-01

    We purified to apparent homogeneity a human urinary glycoprotein of 92 kDa (HGP.92) that, administered intravenously at 250 micrograms/kg, fully protected mice against a lethal inoculum of Listeria monocytogenes. Since HGP.92 protected scid mice, which lack B and T lymphocytes, this increased resistance to Listeria did not appear to be lymphocyte mediated. Furthermore, inflammatory macrophages incubated with 6 nM HGP.92 inhibited the growth of Lewis carcinoma cells in vitro. These two activities appeared to depend on an oligosaccharide moiety, as they were lost after N-Glycanase treatment of HGP.92. Thus, the biological activity of HGP.92 was in some way related to a glycan moiety. Images PMID:8078887

  5. The 70 kDa heat shock protein suppresses matrix metalloproteinases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Yeun Jung; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Won Taek; Yenari, Midori A; Giffard, Rona G

    2004-03-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is synthesized in response to a variety of stresses, including ischemia, and is thought to act as a molecular chaperone to prevent protein denaturation and facilitate protein folding. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of serine proteases, are also upregulated by ischemia and are thought to promote cell death and tissue injury. We examined the influence of Hsp70 on expression and activity of MMPs. Astrocyte cultures were prepared from neonatal mice and transfected with retroviral vectors containing hsp70 or lacZ or mock infected, then exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion. Zymograms and Western blots showed that Hsp70 over-expression suppressed MMP-2 and MMP-9. These findings suggest that Hsp70 may protect by regulating MMPs.

  6. Identification of intracellular localization signals and of mechanisms underlining the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Yuichiro Miyama, Yasuo; Takane, Yusuke; Nakahama, Takayuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2007-12-28

    Two members of the 'AhR family' (a family which is part of the bHLH-PAS superfamily), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR repressor (AhRR), originated from a common ancestor and form a regulatory circuit in xenobiotic signal transduction. AhRR is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein, harboring both a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a nuclear export signal (NES). Because NLS is dominant over NES, AhRR resides predominantly in the nuclear compartment. The NES of AhRR resembles that of AhR in sensitivity to leptomycin B, whereas the NLS of AhRR is monopartite and is, therefore, distinguished from the reported bipartite NLS of AhR. The NLS deletion mutant of GFP-AhRR was transported into the nuclear compartment in the presence of AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt), suggesting the assembly of an AhRR/Arnt heterodimer complex in the cytoplasmic compartment and Arnt-dependent nuclear translocation of this complex.

  7. G2 arrest and impaired nucleocytoplasmic transport in mouse embryos lacking the proto-oncogene CAN/Nup214.

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, J; Boer, J; Kasper, L; Grosveld, G

    1996-01-01

    The vertebrate nucleopore complex (NPC) is a 125 MDa multiprotein assembly that mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport. One of its components, CAN/Nup214, is an FXFG repeat-containing protein known to be involved in myeloid leukemia in humans. We have devised a powerful genetic approach, using maternally derived protein in murine null embryos, to show that CAN/ Nup214 is essential for NPC function in vivo. We demonstrate that CAN-/- mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are not viable and that CAN-/- embryos die in utero between 4.0 and 4.5 days postcoitum, following the depletion of their CAN from maternal sources. In 3.5-day-old mutant embryos, cultured in vitro, progressive depletion of CAN leads to cell cycle arrest in G2 phase, and eventually to blastocoel collapse, impaired NLS-mediated protein uptake and nuclear accumulation of polyadenylated RNA. Remarkably, these defective CAN-depleted embryos do not display any gross morphological abnormalities in their nuclear envelopes or NPCs. Our data suggest that CAN is critical to cell cycle progression and required for both nuclear protein import and mRNA export. Images PMID:8896451

  8. The effect of light color on the nucleocytoplasmic and chloroplast cycle of the green chlorococcal alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Cepák, V; Pribyl, P; Vítová, M

    2006-01-01

    The color of light (white, red, blue, and green) had a significant effect on the growth and reproductive processes (both in the nucleocytoplasmic and chloroplast compartment of the cells) in synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus obliquus. This effect decreased in the order red > white > blue > green. In the same order, the light phase of the cell cycle (time when first autospores started to be released) was prolonged. The length of dark phase (time when 100 % of daughters were allowed to release from mothers) was not influenced and was the same for all colors. Critical cell size for cell division in green light was shifted to a smaller size (compared with cells grown in other lights) and so was the size of released daughters. The nuclear cycle was slowed in blue and even in green light, contrary to cells grown in red and white light. At the beginning of the cell cycle, one-nucleus daughters possess approximately 10 nucleoids; during the cell cycle their number doubled in all variants before the division of nuclei. Both events were delayed in cultures grown more slowly most markedly in green light. Smaller daughters in the green variant possessed a lower number of nucleoids. Motile cells released in continuous green or blue lights but not in red one were rarely observed.

  9. shRNA library screening identifies nucleocytoplasmic transport as a mediator of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khorashad, Jamshid S.; Eiring, Anna M.; Mason, Clinton C.; Gantz, Kevin C.; Bowler, Amber D.; Redwine, Hannah M.; Yu, Fan; Kraft, Ira L.; Pomicter, Anthony D.; Reynolds, Kimberly R.; Iovino, Anthony J.; Zabriskie, Matthew S.; Heaton, William L.; Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Chenchik, Alex; Bonneau, Kyle; Ullman, Katharine S.; O’Hare, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients lacking explanatory BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations are incompletely understood. To identify mechanisms of TKI resistance that are independent of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, we introduced a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library targeting ∼5000 cell signaling genes into K562R, a CML cell line with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance expressing exclusively native BCR-ABL1. A customized algorithm identified genes whose shRNA-mediated knockdown markedly impaired growth of K562R cells compared with TKI-sensitive controls. Among the top candidates were 2 components of the nucleocytoplasmic transport complex, RAN and XPO1 (CRM1). shRNA-mediated RAN inhibition or treatment of cells with the XPO1 inhibitor, KPT-330 (Selinexor), increased the imatinib sensitivity of CML cell lines with kinase-independent TKI resistance. Inhibition of either RAN or XPO1 impaired colony formation of CD34+ cells from newly diagnosed and TKI-resistant CML patients in the presence of imatinib, without effects on CD34+ cells from normal cord blood or from a patient harboring the BCR-ABL1T315I mutant. These data implicate RAN in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent imatinib resistance and show that shRNA library screens are useful to identify alternative pathways critical to drug resistance in CML. PMID:25573989

  10. shRNA library screening identifies nucleocytoplasmic transport as a mediator of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance.

    PubMed

    Khorashad, Jamshid S; Eiring, Anna M; Mason, Clinton C; Gantz, Kevin C; Bowler, Amber D; Redwine, Hannah M; Yu, Fan; Kraft, Ira L; Pomicter, Anthony D; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Iovino, Anthony J; Zabriskie, Matthew S; Heaton, William L; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Chenchik, Alex; Bonneau, Kyle; Ullman, Katharine S; O'Hare, Thomas; Deininger, Michael W

    2015-03-12

    The mechanisms underlying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients lacking explanatory BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations are incompletely understood. To identify mechanisms of TKI resistance that are independent of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, we introduced a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library targeting ∼5000 cell signaling genes into K562(R), a CML cell line with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance expressing exclusively native BCR-ABL1. A customized algorithm identified genes whose shRNA-mediated knockdown markedly impaired growth of K562(R) cells compared with TKI-sensitive controls. Among the top candidates were 2 components of the nucleocytoplasmic transport complex, RAN and XPO1 (CRM1). shRNA-mediated RAN inhibition or treatment of cells with the XPO1 inhibitor, KPT-330 (Selinexor), increased the imatinib sensitivity of CML cell lines with kinase-independent TKI resistance. Inhibition of either RAN or XPO1 impaired colony formation of CD34(+) cells from newly diagnosed and TKI-resistant CML patients in the presence of imatinib, without effects on CD34(+) cells from normal cord blood or from a patient harboring the BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. These data implicate RAN in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent imatinib resistance and show that shRNA library screens are useful to identify alternative pathways critical to drug resistance in CML.

  11. 43 kDa and 66 kDa, two blood stage antigens induce immune response in Plasmodium berghei malaria.

    PubMed

    Pirta, Chhaya; Banyal, H S

    2014-08-01

    The hunt for an effective vaccine against malaria still continues. Several new target antigens as candidates for vaccine design are being explored and tested for their efficacy. In the present study the sera from mice immunized with 24,000 x g fraction of Plasmodium berghei has been used to identify highly immunogenic blood stage antigens. The protective antibodies present in immune sera were covalently immobilized on CNBr activated sepharose 4B and used for affinity chromatography purification of antigens present in blood stages of P. berghei. Two polypeptides of 66 and 43 kDa molecular weights proved to be highly immunogenic. They exhibited a strong humoral immune response in mice as evident by high titres in ELISA and IFA. Protective immunity by these two antigens was apparent by in vivo and in vitro studies. These two proteins could further be analysed and used as antigens in malaria vaccine design.

  12. Identification of Bovine Sperm Acrosomal Proteins that Interact with a 32kDa Acrosomal Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nagdas, Subir K; Smith, Linda; Medina-Ortiz, Ilza; Hernandez-Encarnacion, Luisa; Raychoudhury, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is accomplished by the interaction between sperm and egg. Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a stable acrosomal matrix assembly from the bovine sperm acrosome termed the outer acrosomal membrane-matrix complex (OMC). This stable matrix assembly exhibits precise binding activity for acrosin and N-acetylglucosaminidase. A highly purified OMC fraction is comprised of three major (54, 50, and 45kDa) and several minor (38–19kDa) polypeptides. The set of minor polypeptides (38–19kDa) termed “OMCrpf polypeptides” is selectively solubilized by high-pH extraction (pH 10.5) while the three major polypeptides (55, 50 and 45kDa) remain insoluble. Proteomic identification of the OMC32 polypeptide (32kDa polypeptide isolated from high-pH soluble fraction of OMC) yielded two peptides that matched the NCBI database sequence of acrosin-binding protein. Anti-OMC32 recognized an antigenically related family of polypeptides (OMCrpf polypeptides) in the 38–19kDa range with isoelectric points ranging between 4.0 and 5.1. Other than glycohydrolases, OMC32 may also be complexed to other acrosomal proteins. The present study was undertaken to identify and localize the OMC32 binding polypeptides and to elucidate the potential role of the acrosomal protein complex in sperm function. OMC32 affinity chromatography of a detergent soluble fraction of bovine cauda sperm acrosome followed by mass spectrometry-based identification of bound proteins identified acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis also demonstrated the interaction of OMC32 with acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Our immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of SPACA3 and lactadherin over the apical segment; whereas, IZUMO1 is localized over the equatorial segment of Triton X-100 permeabilized cauda sperm. Immunoblot analysis showed that a significant portion of SPACA3 was released after the lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC

  13. Identification of bovine sperm acrosomal proteins that interact with a 32-kDa acrosomal matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Nagdas, Subir K; Smith, Linda; Medina-Ortiz, Ilza; Hernandez-Encarnacion, Luisa; Raychoudhury, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian fertilization is accomplished by the interaction between sperm and egg. Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a stable acrosomal matrix assembly from the bovine sperm acrosome termed the outer acrosomal membrane-matrix complex (OMC). This stable matrix assembly exhibits precise binding activity for acrosin and N-acetylglucosaminidase. A highly purified OMC fraction comprises three major (54, 50, and 45 kDa) and several minor (38-19 kDa) polypeptides. The set of minor polypeptides (38-19 kDa) termed "OMCrpf polypeptides" is selectively solubilized by high-pH extraction (pH 10.5), while the three major polypeptides (55, 50, and 45 kDa) remain insoluble. Proteomic identification of the OMC32 polypeptide (32 kDa polypeptide isolated from high-pH soluble fraction of OMC) yielded two peptides that matched the NCBI database sequence of acrosin-binding protein. Anti-OMC32 recognized an antigenically related family of polypeptides (OMCrpf polypeptides) in the 38-19-kDa range with isoelectric points ranging between 4.0 and 5.1. Other than glycohydrolases, OMC32 may also be complexed to other acrosomal proteins. The present study was undertaken to identify and localize the OMC32 binding polypeptides and to elucidate the potential role of the acrosomal protein complex in sperm function. OMC32 affinity chromatography of a detergent-soluble fraction of bovine cauda sperm acrosome followed by mass spectrometry-based identification of bound proteins identified acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis also demonstrated the interaction of OMC32 with acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Our immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of SPACA3 and lactadherin over the apical segment, whereas IZUMO1 is localized over the equatorial segment of Triton X-100 permeabilized cauda sperm. Immunoblot analysis showed that a significant portion of SPACA3 was released after the lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced acrosome

  14. Flexible gates: dynamic topologies and functions for FG nucleoporins in nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear envelope is a physical barrier between the nucleus and cytoplasm and, as such, separates the mechanisms of transcription from translation. This compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells allows spatial regulation of gene expression; however, it also necessitates a mechanism for transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Macromolecular trafficking of protein and RNA occurs exclusively through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), specialized channels spanning the nuclear envelope. A novel family of NPC proteins, the FG-nucleoporins (FG-Nups), coordinates and potentially regulates NPC translocation. The extensive repeats of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) in each FG-Nup directly bind to shuttling transport receptors moving through the NPC. In addition, FG-Nups are essential components of the nuclear permeability barrier. In this review, we discuss the structural features, cellular functions, and evolutionary conservation of the FG-Nups.

  15. Accumulation of 52 kDa glycine rich protein in auxin-deprived strawberry fruits and its role in fruit growth. [Fragaria ananassa

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Growth of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch) receptacles can be stopped at any stage by deachening the fruits and can be resumed by exogenous application of auxin. In their earlier studies they demonstrated auxin regulated polypeptide changes at different stages of strawberry fruit development. Removal of achenes from fruits to deprive auxin resulted in the accumulation of 52 KDa polypeptide. This polypeptide is associated with cell wall and its concentration is increased in a time-dependent manner in auxin deprived receptacles. Incorporation studies with (/sup 35/S) methionine showed the promotion of labelling of 52 kDa polypeptide in the auxin-deprived receptacles within 12 h after removal of the achenes. Amino acid analysis revealed that the 52 KDa polypeptide is rich in glycine. Their studies, with normal and mutant strawberry receptacles, indicate that the synthesis and accumulation of this glycine rich protein correlates with cessation of receptacle growth. These results suggest a role for the glycine rich protein in growth.

  16. Evolving understanding of translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-09-01

    The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) has been the focus of intense research by the biomedical community and the pharmaceutical industry because of its apparent involvement in many disease-related processes. These include steroidogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, neurological disease and cancer, resulting in the use of TSPO as a biomarker and its potential as a drug target. Despite more than 30 years of study, the precise function of TSPO remains elusive. A recent breakthrough in determining the high-resolution crystal structures of bacterial homologs of mitochondrial TSPO provides new insight into the structural and functional properties at a molecular level and new opportunities for investigating the significance of this ancient and highly conserved protein family. The availability of atomic level structural information from different species also provides a platform for structure-based drug development. Here we briefly review current knowledge regarding TSPO and the implications of the new structures with respect to hypotheses and controversies in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor induces phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shawver, L.K.; Pierce, G.F.; Kawahara, R.S.; Deuel, T.F.

    1989-01-15

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulated the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein of 64 kDa (pp64) in nuclei of nontransformed normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. Low levels of phosphorylation of pp64 were observed in nuclei of serum-starved NRK cells. Fetal calf serum (FCS), PDGF, and homodimeric v-sis and PDGF A-chain protein enhanced the incorporation of 32P into pp64 over 4-fold within 30 min and over 8-fold within 2 h of exposure of NRK cells to the growth factors. In contrast, constitutive phosphorylation of 32P-labeled pp64 in nuclei of NRK cells transformed by the simian sarcoma virus (SSV) was high and only minimally stimulated by PDGF and FCS. 32P-Labeled pp64 was isolated from nuclei of PDGF-stimulated nontransformed NRK cells; the 32P of pp64 was labile in 1 M KOH, and pp64 was not significantly recognized by anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that the PDGF-induced phosphorylation of pp64 occurred on serine or on threonine residues. However, pp64 from SSV-transformed NRK cell nuclei was significantly stable to base hydrolysis and was immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that pp64 from SSV-transformed cell nuclei is phosphorylated also on tyrosine. FCS, PDGF, and PDGF A- and B-chain homodimers thus stimulate the rapid time-dependent phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein shortly after stimulation of responsive cells. The growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation of pp64 and the constitutive high levels of pp64 phosphorylation in cells transformed by SSV suggest important roles for pp64 and perhaps regulated nuclear protein kinases and phosphatases in cell division and proliferation.

  18. A 45-kDa acetylcholinesterase protoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila: purification and immunogenicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Rodríguez, L A; Fernández-Briera, A; Nieto, T P

    2002-05-21

    A rabbit antiserum to the 15-kDa acetylcholinesterase toxin neutralised the lethal effect of the 15-kDa toxin of Aeromonas hydrophila when injected into trout. However, immunisation of fish with the 15-kDa toxoid failed to induce an antibody response, and a higher molecular mass form of this toxin was purified from the extracellular products with the aim of inducing an immune response in fish. The optimal conditions for production of extracellular products by A. hydrophila strain B32 were studied to increase the concentration of this protoxin. The extracellular products were fractionated by molecular exclusion chromatography to yield a purified protoxin with an estimated molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE and which gave a positive reaction in Western blotting with the rabbit anti-15-kDa toxin serum. Since the 45-kDa protoxin showed lower specific acetylcholinesterase activity than the active 15-kDa toxin, the behaviour of the active site was studied using specific inhibitors. This 45-kDa protoxin was 13.3-fold less toxic than the 15-kDa toxin and induced antibody production in fish.

  19. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  20. Rev-Free HIV-1 Gene Delivery System for Targeting Rev-RRE-Crm1 Nucleocytoplasmic RNA Transport Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasakumar, Narasimhachar

    2011-01-01

    The use of RNA transport elements from different viruses can provide novel attributes to HIV-1-based gene delivery systems such as improved safety or Rev independence. We previously described an HIV-1 based gene delivery system that utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus Rev-response element (RRE) in place of the HIV-1 RRE. Despite the use of Rev for the production of vector stocks, we showed the utility of this system for delivery of Rev M10, a dominant-negative mutant of HIV-1 Rev, into T-cells. Here, we investigated the use of RNA transport elements from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus or MPMV for the creation of high-titered Rev-free HIV-1-based packaging systems. The HIV-1 gag/pol expression constructs containing one or more copies of MPMV constitutive RNA transport element (CTE) were used to package similarly modified gene-transfer vectors in the presence or absence of Rev. An inverse correlation between the number of CTE modules and Rev dependency was noted for vector stock production. While packaging systems containing multiple CTEs were resistant to exogenously expressed Rev M10, the titers of vectors encoding Rev M10 were nevertheless reduced in comparison to vectors encoding only green fluorescent protein (GFP). In contrast, a gene transfer vector encoding the Rev M10 transgene and containing both RNA transport elements exhibited almost no loss in titer in comparison to a corresponding vector encoding only GFP. The optimized Rev-independent gene delivery system was used for delivery of Rev M10 transgene into T-lymphocytes. Upon challenge in single round infection assays with HIV-1, the modified T-cells produced fewer virus particles than control cells expressing GFP. This Rev-free packaging system may prove useful for targeting the Rev-RRE-Crm1 nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport pathway for inhibiting HIV replication. PMID:22164294

  1. Rev-free HIV-1 gene delivery system for targeting Rev-RRE-Crm1 nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Srinivasakumar, Narasimhachar

    2011-01-01

    The use of RNA transport elements from different viruses can provide novel attributes to HIV-1-based gene delivery systems such as improved safety or Rev independence. We previously described an HIV-1 based gene delivery system that utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus Rev-response element (RRE) in place of the HIV-1 RRE. Despite the use of Rev for the production of vector stocks, we showed the utility of this system for delivery of Rev M10, a dominant-negative mutant of HIV-1 Rev, into T-cells. Here, we investigated the use of RNA transport elements from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus or MPMV for the creation of high-titered Rev-free HIV-1-based packaging systems. The HIV-1 gag/pol expression constructs containing one or more copies of MPMV constitutive RNA transport element (CTE) were used to package similarly modified gene-transfer vectors in the presence or absence of Rev. An inverse correlation between the number of CTE modules and Rev dependency was noted for vector stock production. While packaging systems containing multiple CTEs were resistant to exogenously expressed Rev M10, the titers of vectors encoding Rev M10 were nevertheless reduced in comparison to vectors encoding only green fluorescent protein (GFP). In contrast, a gene transfer vector encoding the Rev M10 transgene and containing both RNA transport elements exhibited almost no loss in titer in comparison to a corresponding vector encoding only GFP. The optimized Rev-independent gene delivery system was used for delivery of Rev M10 transgene into T-lymphocytes. Upon challenge in single round infection assays with HIV-1, the modified T-cells produced fewer virus particles than control cells expressing GFP. This Rev-free packaging system may prove useful for targeting the Rev-RRE-Crm1 nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport pathway for inhibiting HIV replication.

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of two cytosolic proteins of 50 kDa and 35 kDa in rat liver by insulin-receptor kinase in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Y C; Yip, C C

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-receptor tyrosine kinase can phosphorylate a variety of artificial substrates in vitro. Its physiological substrate(s), however, remains unknown. In the present study, we show that immobilized insulin receptors phosphorylate tyrosine residues of two cytosolic proteins of 50 kDa and 35 kDa in rat liver. Phosphorylation of these two proteins required Mn2+- or Mg2+-ATP as the phosphate donor. Phosphorylation was time- and temperature-dependent. Furthermore, the rate of phosphorylation of the two proteins was related to the autophosphorylated state of the insulin receptor. The pI of the phosphorylated 50 kDa and 35 kDa proteins was 5.4 and 5.6 respectively. These proteins were present in low abundance. They were not related to each other, nor to the insulin receptor, as demonstrated by in-gel proteolytic digestion and by immunoprecipitation using antibodies produced against them. They were specific substrates for the insulin receptor kinase, since they were not phosphorylated by epidermal-growth-factor-receptor kinase. These observations suggest that the 50 kDa and 35 kDa cytosolic proteins may be endogenous substrates for the insulin-receptor kinase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2829823

  3. Trichosporon asahii secretes a 30-kDa aspartic peptidase.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberta S; Ramos, Lívia S; Reis, Vanessa J; Ziccardi, Mariangela; Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Sodré, Cátia L; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2017-12-01

    Trichosporon asahii is a fungal opportunistic pathogen that causes superficial and deep-seated infections presenting high mortality. Very little is known about the virulence attributes produced by this fungus. Herein, aspartic peptidase production was identified in Brazilian clinical isolates of T. asahii by different methodologies. Initially, T. asahii strain 250 (from skin lesion) was inoculated in both liquid and solid culture media containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the sole nitrogenous source. A translucent halo around the fungal colony was observed from the 5th day of culture. The cell-free culture supernatant revealed that soluble BSA was hydrolyzed along the growth, generating low molecular mass polypeptides as observed by electrophoresis. Subsequently, the secretions from four clinical strains of T. asahii were analyzed by BSA-SDS-PAGE and a single proteolytic band of 30-kDa was detected under acidic pH at 37°C. The secreted aspartic peptidase of T. asahii efficiently cleaved the cathepsin D peptide substrate, but not the substrates with specificity to HIV-1 peptidase and rennin. The capability to cleave either cathepsin D substrate in a fluorogenic assay or BSA immobilized within a gel matrix varied according to the T. asahii isolate. T. asahii extracellular peptidase activity was strongly inhibited by pepstatin A and HIV peptidase inhibitors, classifying it as an aspartic-type peptidase. Human serum albumin, mucin, non-immune immunoglobulin G and gelatin induced, in different levels, the secretion of this aspartic peptidase. With these results, T. asahii must be included in the list of many human fungal opportunistic pathogens able to secrete an aspartic-type peptidase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Fanconi anemia A is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling molecule required for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) transduction of the GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Larder, Rachel; Karali, Dimitra; Nelson, Nancy; Brown, Pamela

    2006-12-01

    GnRH binds its cognate G protein-coupled GnRH receptor (GnRHR) located on pituitary gonadotropes and drives expression of gonadotropin hormones. There are two gonadotropin hormones, comprised of a common alpha- and hormone-specific beta-subunit, which are required for gonadal function. Recently we identified that Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a DNA damage repair gene, is differentially expressed within the LbetaT2 gonadotrope cell line in response to stimulation with GnRH. FANCA is mutated in more than 60% of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, endocrine tissue cancer susceptibility, and infertility. Here we show that induction of FANCA protein is mediated by the GnRHR and that the protein constitutively adopts a nucleocytoplasmic intracellular distribution pattern. Using inhibitors to block nuclear import and export and a GnRHR antagonist, we demonstrated that GnRH induces nuclear accumulation of FANCA and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FANCA before exporting back to the cytoplasm using the nuclear export receptor CRM1. Using FANCA point mutations that locate GFP-FANCA to the cytoplasm (H1110P) or functionally uncouple GFP-FANCA (Q1128E) from the wild-type nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern, we demonstrated that wild-type FANCA was required for GnRH-induced activation of gonadotrope cell markers. Cotransfection of H1110P and Q1128E blocked GnRH activation of the alphaGsu and GnRHR but not the beta-subunit gene promoters. We conclude that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of FANCA is required for GnRH transduction of the alphaGSU and GnRHR gene promoters and propose that FANCA functions as a GnRH-induced signal transducer.

  5. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of FTO Does Not Affect Starvation-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Aas, Aleksander; Isakson, Pauline; Bindesbøll, Christian; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Klungland, Arne; Simonsen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the FTO (fat mass and obesity) gene associate with body mass index in humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been firmly determined. FTO is linked to energy homeostasis via amino acid sensing and is thought to activate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, a negative regulator of autophagy. FTO localises both to the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and in this study we identify a functional nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the N-terminus of FTO, as well as nuclear localization information in its very C-terminus. Inhibition of FTO nuclear transport has no effect on autophagy and in contrast to a previously proposed role of FTO in autophagy, we find no difference in starvation-induced autophagy in control cells compared to a panel of cell types depleted of FTO. Future studies that further characterise the cellular functions of FTO will be important to understand why variants in FTO are associated with body weight.

  6. Nucleo-cytoplasmic functions of the PDZ-LIM protein family: new insights in organ development

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Camarata, Troy; Kulisz, Andre; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent work on the PDZ-LIM protein family has revealed important activities at the cellular level, mediating signals between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, with significant impact on organ development. We review and integrate current knowledge about the PDZ-LIM protein family and propose a new functional role, sequestering nuclear factors in the cytoplasm. Characterized by their PDZ and LIM domains, the PDZ-LIM family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved proteins found throughout the animal kingdom, from worms to humans. Combining two functional domains in one protein, PDZ-LIM proteins have wide-ranging and multi-compartmental cell functions during development and homeostasis while, in contrast, misregulation can lead to cancer formation and progression. New emerging roles include interactions with integrins, T-box transcription factors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. Facilitating the assembly of protein complexes, PDZ-LIM proteins can act as signal modulators, influence actin dynamics, regulate cell architecture and control gene transcription. PMID:20091751

  7. Immunoreactivity of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Jason FJ; Stabel, Judith R; Bannantine, John P

    2005-01-01

    Background The Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein has been reported to stimulate both T and B cell responses as well as induce a number of Th1 cytokines. In order to evaluate the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis) 19-kDa lipoprotein as an immunomodulator in cattle with Johne's disease, the gene encoding the 19-kDa protein (MAP0261c) was analyzed. Results MAP0261c is conserved in mycobacteria, showing a 95% amino acid identity in M. avium subspecies avium, 84% in M. intracellulare and 76% in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. MAP0261c was cloned, expressed, and purified as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP-19 kDa) in Escherichia coli. IFN-γ production was measured from 21 naturally infected and 9 control cattle after peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with a whole cell lysate (WCL) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or the recombinant MBP-19 kDa. Overall, the mean response to MBP-19 kDa was not as strong as the mean response to the WCL. By comparison, cells from control, non-infected cattle did not produce IFN-γ after stimulation with either WCL or MBP-19 kDa. To assess the humoral immune response to the 19-kDa protein, sera from cattle with clinical Johne's disease were used in immunoblot analysis. Reactivity to MBP-19 kDa protein, but not MBP alone, was observed in 9 of 14 infected cattle. Antibodies to the 19-kDa protein were not observed in 8 of 9 control cows. Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that while the 19-kDa protein from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis stimulates a humoral immune response and weak IFN-γ production in infected cattle, the elicited responses are not strong enough to be used in a sensitive diagnostic assay. PMID:15663791

  8. Chicken 15-kDa selenoprotein plays important antioxidative function in splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huijie; Deng, Tingquan; Fu, Jiaxing

    2014-12-01

    The 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) is a thioredoxin-like protein. The expression of Sep15 is regulated by dietary selenium (Se) and plays important roles in mammals. However, the structure and function of chicken Sep15 and its response to Se are still unclear. In the present study, we replicated the chicken Se deficiency models and Sep15 deficiency models in splenocytes. Then, the homology, structure analysis, and levels of Sep15 were analyzed. In addition, the oxidative stress levels were examined in Sep15 deficiency splenocytes. The results indicated that chicken Sep15 preserved high similarity with that of other 14 animals in the coding nucleotide sequences (CDS) and deduced amino acid sequence, which suggested that chicken Sep15 may be derived from the same ancestor with other animals. The predicted structure and function showed that chicken Sep15 preserved the conserved thioredoxin-like fold CxU, which suggested an antioxidative function. Chicken Sep15 was also decreased by Se deficiency in immune organs (P < 0.05). In addition, Sep15 deficiency induced the occurrence of higher oxidative stress and enhanced the sensitivity of cells to H2O2 (P < 0.05). So the in vitro study further verified its antioxidative function. Thus, similar to its mammal homolog, chicken Sep15 preserves the typical characteristic of selenoprotein and may play some roles in the redox regulation.

  9. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of FTO Does Not Affect Starvation-Induced Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Aas, Aleksander; Isakson, Pauline; Bindesbøll, Christian; Alemu, Endalkachew A.; Klungland, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the FTO (fat mass and obesity) gene associate with body mass index in humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been firmly determined. FTO is linked to energy homeostasis via amino acid sensing and is thought to activate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, a negative regulator of autophagy. FTO localises both to the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and in this study we identify a functional nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the N-terminus of FTO, as well as nuclear localization information in its very C-terminus. Inhibition of FTO nuclear transport has no effect on autophagy and in contrast to a previously proposed role of FTO in autophagy, we find no difference in starvation-induced autophagy in control cells compared to a panel of cell types depleted of FTO. Future studies that further characterise the cellular functions of FTO will be important to understand why variants in FTO are associated with body weight. PMID:28288181

  10. Characterization of Androgen Receptor Structure and Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of the Rice Field Eel*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Wei; Zuo, Zhixiang; Sheng, Yue; Zhou, Xiang; Hou, Yu; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2010-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer and male sexual differentiation. We have identified AR from a primitive vertebrate with a sex reversal characteristic, the rice field eel. AR of this species (eAR) is distinct from human AR, especially in the ligand binding domain (LBD), and its expression in gonads shows an increasing tendency during gonadal transformation from ovary via ovotestis to testis. eAR has a restricted androgen-dependent transactivation function after a nuclear translocation upon dihydrotestosterone exposure. A functional nuclear localization signal was further identified in the DNA binding domain and hinge region. Although nuclear export is CRM1-independent, eAR has a novel nuclear export signal, which is negatively charged, indicating that a nuclear export pathway may be mediated by electrostatic interaction. Further, our studies have identified critical sequences for ligand binding in the C terminus. A structure of three α-helices in the LBD has been conserved from eels to humans during vertebrate evolution, despite a distinct amino acid sequence. Mutation analysis confirmed that the LBD is essential for dihydrotestosterone-induced nuclear import of eAR and following transactivation function in the nucleus. In addition, eAR interacts with both Sox9a1 and Sox9a2, and their interaction regulates transactivation of eAR. Our data suggest that the primitive species conserves and especially acquires key novel domains, the nuclear export signal and LBD, for the eAR function in spite of a rapid sequence evolution. PMID:20841357

  11. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of oncoprotein Hdm2 is required for Hdm2-mediated degradation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Levine, Arnold J.

    1999-01-01

    The Hdm2 oncoprotein inhibits p53 functions by two means: (i) it blocks p53’s transactivation activity and (ii) it targets p53 for degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Recent data indicate that Hdm2 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and that the regulation of p53 levels by Hdm2 requires its nuclear export activity. Two different models are consistent with these observations. In the first, Hdm2 binds to p53 in the nucleus and shuttles p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and then it targets p53 to the cytoplasmic proteasome. Alternatively, Hdm2 and p53 could be exported separately from the nucleus and then associate in the cytoplasm, where Hdm2 promotes the degradation of p53. To distinguish between these two models, several Hdm2 mutants were employed. Hdm2NLS lacks the ability to enter the nucleus, whereas Hdm2NES is deficient in nuclear export. Hdm2NLS, Hdm2NES, or the combination of both mutants were unable to promote p53 degradation in the cotransfected 2KO cells (which were null for both the p53 and mdm2 genes), although wild-type Hdm2 efficiently reduced p53 levels under the same conditions. This observation is not a result of the differences in expression levels or stability between Hdm2 and these mutants. Moreover, coexpression of these mutants had no effect on wild-type Hdm-2-induced p53 destabilization. Thus, Hdm2 must shuttle p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to target it for degradation in the cytoplasm. PMID:10077639

  13. The 10 kDa protein of Taenia solium metacestodes shows genus specific antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Park, S K; Yun, D H; Chung, J Y; Kong, Y; Cho, S Y

    2000-09-01

    Genus specific antigenicity of the 10 kDa protein in cyst fluid (CF) of Taenia solium metacestodes was demonstrated by comparative immunoblot analysis. When CFs from taeniid metacestodes of T. saginata, T. solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps were probed with specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against 150 kDa protein of T. solium metacestodes, specific antibody reactions were observed in 7 and 10 kDa proteins of T. solium and in 7/8 kDa of T. saginata, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps. The mAb did not react with any protein in hydatid fluid of Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis. This result revealed that the 10 kDa peptide of T. solium metacestodes and its equivalent proteins of different Taenia metacestodes are genus specific antigens that are shared among different Taenia species.

  14. Myelin management by the 18.5-kDa and 21.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M

    2013-05-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP's protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  15. Random Mutagenesis Defines a Domain of Theiler's Virus Leader Protein That Is Essential for Antagonism of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking and Cytokine Gene Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Ricour, Céline; Borghese, Fabian; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hato, Stanleyson V.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays an important role in the capacity of TMEV to establish persistent infection of the central nervous system. Mutant forms of the TMEV leader protein were generated by random mutagenesis and selected after retroviral transduction on the basis of the loss of the highly toxic nature of this protein. Selected mutations define a short C-terminal domain of the leader conserved in TMEV and Saffold virus but lacking in the EMCV leader and thus called the Theilo domain. Mutations in this domain had a dramatic impact on TMEV L protein activity. Like the zinc finger mutation, Theilo domain mutations affected all of the activities of the L protein tested: interferon gene transcription and IRF-3 dimerization antagonism, alteration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, nucleoporin 98 hyperphosphorylation, and viral persistence in vivo. This suggests that the Zn finger and the Theilo domain of the protein cooperate for function. Moreover, the fact that all of the activities tested were affected by these mutations suggests that the various leader protein functions are somehow coupled. PMID:19710133

  16. Random mutagenesis defines a domain of Theiler's virus leader protein that is essential for antagonism of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and cytokine gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ricour, Céline; Borghese, Fabian; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hato, Stanleyson V; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays an important role in the capacity of TMEV to establish persistent infection of the central nervous system. Mutant forms of the TMEV leader protein were generated by random mutagenesis and selected after retroviral transduction on the basis of the loss of the highly toxic nature of this protein. Selected mutations define a short C-terminal domain of the leader conserved in TMEV and Saffold virus but lacking in the EMCV leader and thus called the Theilo domain. Mutations in this domain had a dramatic impact on TMEV L protein activity. Like the zinc finger mutation, Theilo domain mutations affected all of the activities of the L protein tested: interferon gene transcription and IRF-3 dimerization antagonism, alteration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, nucleoporin 98 hyperphosphorylation, and viral persistence in vivo. This suggests that the Zn finger and the Theilo domain of the protein cooperate for function. Moreover, the fact that all of the activities tested were affected by these mutations suggests that the various leader protein functions are somehow coupled.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic Distribution Is Required for Activation of Resistance by the Potato NB-LRR Receptor Rx1 and Is Balanced by Its Functional Domains[W

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Erik; Roosien, Jan; Spiridon, Laurentiu N.; Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Tameling, Wladimir; Joosten, Matthieu; Pomp, Rikus; van Schaik, Casper; Dees, Robert; Borst, Jan Willem; Smant, Geert; Schots, Arjen; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska

    2010-01-01

    The Rx1 protein, as many resistance proteins of the nucleotide binding–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class, is predicted to be cytoplasmic because it lacks discernable nuclear targeting signals. Here, we demonstrate that Rx1, which confers extreme resistance to Potato virus X, is located both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Manipulating the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Rx1 or its elicitor revealed that Rx1 is activated in the cytoplasm and cannot be activated in the nucleus. The coiled coil (CC) domain was found to be required for accumulation of Rx1 in the nucleus, whereas the LRR domain promoted the localization in the cytoplasm. Analyses of structural subdomains of the CC domain revealed no autonomous signals responsible for active nuclear import. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and nuclear fractionation indicated that the CC domain binds transiently to large complexes in the nucleus. Disruption of the Rx1 resistance function and protein conformation by mutating the ATP binding phosphate binding loop in the NB domain, or by silencing the cochaperone SGT1, impaired the accumulation of Rx1 protein in the nucleus, while Rx1 versions lacking the LRR domain were not affected in this respect. Our results support a model in which interdomain interactions and folding states determine the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Rx1. PMID:21177483

  18. Evolution of DNA ligases of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA viruses of eukaryotes: a case of hidden complexity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) encode most if not all of the enzymes involved in their DNA replication. It has been inferred that genes for these enzymes were already present in the last common ancestor of the NCLDV. However, the details of the evolution of these genes that bear on the complexity of the putative ancestral NCLDV and on the evolutionary relationships between viruses and their hosts are not well understood. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-dependent and NAD-dependent DNA ligases encoded by the NCLDV reveals an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history. The NAD-dependent ligases are encoded only by a minority of NCLDV (including mimiviruses, some iridoviruses and entomopoxviruses) but phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated that all viral NAD-dependent ligases are monophyletic. Combined with the topology of the NCLDV tree derived by consensus of trees for universally conserved genes suggests that this enzyme was represented in the ancestral NCLDV. Phylogenetic analysis of ATP-dependent ligases that are encoded by chordopoxviruses, most of the phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus failed to demonstrate monophyly and instead revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectory. The ligases of the majority of phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus seem to have evolved from bacteriophage or bacterial homologs; the ligase of one phycodnavirus, Emiliana huxlei virus, belongs to the eukaryotic DNA ligase I branch; and ligases of chordopoxviruses unequivocally cluster with eukaryotic DNA ligase III. Conclusions Examination of phyletic patterns and phylogenetic analysis of DNA ligases of the NCLDV suggest that the common ancestor of the extant NCLDV encoded an NAD-dependent ligase that most likely was acquired from a bacteriophage at the early stages of evolution of eukaryotes. By contrast, ATP-dependent ligases from different prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources displaced the ancestral NAD-dependent ligase at different

  19. The 50kDa metalloproteinase TvMP50 is a zinc-mediated Trichomonas vaginalis virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Villalpando, José Luis; Villalobos-Osnaya, Alma; Vázquez-Carrillo, Laura Isabel; León-Ávila, Gloria; Ponce-Regalado, María Dolores; López-Camarillo, César; Elizalde-Contreras, Jose Miguel; Ruiz-May, Eliel; Arroyo, Rossana; Alvarez-Sánchez, María Elizbeth

    2017-09-05

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that can adapt to the trichomonicidal Zn(2+) concentrations of the male urogenital tract microenvironment. This adaptation is mediated by molecular mechanisms, including proteinase expression, that are regulated by cations such as Zn(2+). Herein, we characterized the previously identified 50kDa metalloproteinase aminopeptidase P (M24 family) member TvMP50 as a new Zn(2+)-mediated parasite virulence factor. Quantitative RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays corroborated the positive regulation of both mp50 gene expression and native TvMP50 protein overexpression in the cytoplasm and secretion products of parasites grown in the presence of Zn(2+). Furthermore, this active metalloproteinase was characterized as a new virulence factor by assaying cytotoxicity toward prostatic DU145 cell monolayers as well as the inhibition of parasite and secreted soluble protein proteolytic activity in the 50kDa proteolytic region by the specific metalloproteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline and the chelating agents EDTA and EGTA. Parasite and secreted soluble protein cytotoxicity toward DU145 cells were reduced by treatment with an α-rTvMP50 polyclonal antibody. Our results show that the metalloproteinase TvMP50 is a new virulence factor modulated by Zn(2+), which is present during male trichomoniasis, possibly explaining T. vaginalis survival even within the adverse conditions of the male urogenital microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biofortification of soybean meal: immunological properties of the 27 kDa γ-zein.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Jang, Sungchan; Kim, Won-Seok; Kerley, Monty S; Oliver, Melvin J; Trick, Harold N

    2011-02-23

    Legumes, including soybeans ( Glycine max ), are deficient in sulfur-containing amino acids, which are required for the optimal growth of monogastric animals. This deficiency can be overcome by expressing heterologous proteins rich in sulfur-containing amino acids in soybean seeds. A maize 27 kDa γ-zein, a cysteine-rich protein, has been successfully expressed in several crops including soybean, barley, and alfalfa with the intent to biofortify these crops for animal feed. Previous work has shown that the maize 27 kDa zein can withstand digestion by pepsin and elicit an immunogenic response in young pigs. By use of sera from patients who tested positive by ImmunoCAP assay for elevated IgE to maize proteins, specific IgE binding to the 27 kDa γ-zein is demonstrated. Bioinformatic analysis using the full-length and 80 amino acid sliding window FASTA searches identified significant sequence homology of the 27 kDa γ-zein with several known allergens. Immunoblot analysis using human serum that cross-reacts with maize seed proteins also revealed specific IgE-binding to the 27 kDa γ-zein in soybean seed protein extracts containing the 27 kDa zein. This study demonstrates for the first time the allergenicity potential of the 27 kDa γ-zein and the potential that this protein has to limit livestock performance when used in soybeans that serve as a biofortified feed supplement.

  1. Identification of a 170-kDa protein over-expressed in lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pincheira, R; Chen, Q; Zhang, J-T

    2001-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause for cancer death in both male and female populations. Although many molecular markers for lung cancer have been developed and useful for early detection of lung cancer, their function remains unknown. In this paper, we report our findings that a 170-kDa protein (p170) is over-expressed in all types of human lung cancers compared with normal tissues and it is identified as a subunit of translation initiation factor eIF3 by cDNA cloning. Translation initiation factors are a family of proteins that promote the initiation step of protein synthesis and are regulators of cell growth at the translational level. Further studies showed that p170 mRNA is ubiquitously expressed with higher levels in adult proliferating tissues (e.g. bone marrow) and tissues during development (e.g. fetal tissues). This study suggests that p170 and eIF3 may be important factors for cell growth, development, and tumorigenesis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11384103

  2. Isolation and functional analysis of chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Vourc'h, C; Binart, N; Chambraud, B; David, J P; Jérôme, V; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1989-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a 2652 bp derived from a chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp 90) genomic clone. This fragment contains 890 bp of the 5' flanking region and 1762 bp of structural gene sequence encoding the first 85 amino acids of the protein. The start site of transcription was determined by primer extension and RNase mapping. Two introns have been identified. The first intron presents two features in common with the unique intron of the hsp 83 of drosophila: its location just before the ATG initiation codon and its length of approximately 1.3 Kb. The 5' flanking region contains a TATAA element, a CCAAT box and several putative cis-regulatory elements that might account for the basal level of expression and developmental regulation of the gene. Functional analyses show that hsp 90 gene expression is constitutive and heat inducible and that a full heat shock response requires the cooperativity of two distinct blocks of overlapping heat shock response elements. Images PMID:2762125

  3. Antimicrobial Properties of an Immunomodulator - 15 kDa Human Granulysin

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hung-Mu; Lin, Li-Chih; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Lee, Yi-Jang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Liao, You-Di

    2016-01-01

    Granulysin, a cationic protein expressed by human natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, is a mediator for drug-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and graft-versus-host disease. Some 15 kDa granulysin are processed into 9 kDa forms and sequestered in cytolytic granules, while others are constitutively secreted into body fluids. Both 9 and 15 kDa granulysin have been shown to be a serum marker for cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, 15 kDa is able to activate monocyte differentiation. However, its antimicrobial properties have not been clearly addressed. Here, we report a novel method to prepare both the soluble 9 and 15 kDa granulysin and show that the 15 kDa form is more effective than the 9 kDa form in exerting specific antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa within a range of few micromolars. We also show that the 15 kDa granulysin is able to hyperpolarize the membrane potential and increase membrane permeability of treated bacteria. Interestingly, the bactericidal activity and membrane permeability of the granulysins were markedly reduced at lower pH (pH 5.4) as a result of probable increase in hydrophobicity of the granulysins. Additionally, we’ve also shown the granulysin to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that the 15 kDa granulysin exhibits a novel mechanism in bacteria killing in a way that’s different from most antimicrobial peptides. Our novel granulysin preparation methodology will be useful for further study of action mechanisms of other antimicrobial, cytotoxic and immunomodulating properties in granulysin-mediated diseases. PMID:27276051

  4. Informatics approaches to understanding TGFβ pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kahlem, Pascal; Newfeld, Stuart J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, informatics studies have predicted several new ways in which the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway can be post-translationally regulated. Subsequently, many of these predictions were experimentally validated. These approaches include phylogenetic predictions for the phosphorylation, sumoylation and ubiquitylation of pathway components, as well as kinetic models of endocytosis, phosphorylation and nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. We review these studies and provide a brief `how to' guide for phylogenetics. Our hope is to stimulate experimental tests of informatics-based predictions for TGFβ signaling, as well as for other signaling pathways, and to expand the number of developmental pathways that are being analyzed computationally. PMID:19855015

  5. Heat Shock 70-kDa Protein 5 (Hspa5) Is Essential for Pronephros Formation by Mediating Retinoic Acid Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Weili; Xu, Gang; Wang, Chengdong; Sperber, Steven M.; Chen, Yonglong; Zhou, Qin; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), also known as binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip) or glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78), belongs to the heat shock protein 70 kDa family. As a multifunctional protein, it participates in protein folding and calcium homeostasis and serves as an essential regulator of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. It has also been implicated in signal transduction by acting as a receptor or co-receptor residing at the plasma membrane. Its function during embryonic development, however, remains largely elusive. In this study, we used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MOs) to knock down Hspa5 activity in Xenopus embryos. In Hspa5 morphants, pronephros formation was strongly inhibited with the reduction of pronephric marker genes Lim homeobox protein 1 (lhx1), pax2, and β1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase (atp1b1). Pronephros tissue was induced in vitro by treating animal caps with all-trans-retinoic acid and activin. Depletion of Hspa5 in animal caps, however, blocked the induction of pronephros as well as reduced the expression of retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes, suggesting that knockdown of Hspa5 attenuated RA signaling. Knockdown of Hspa5 in animal caps resulted in decreased expression of lhx1, a transcription factor directly regulated by RA signaling and essential for pronephros specification. Co-injection of Hspa5MO with lhx1 mRNA partially rescued the phenotype induced by Hspa5MO. These results suggest that the RA-Lhx1 signaling cascade is involved in Hspa5MO-induced pronephros malformation. This study shows that Hspa5, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response, plays an essential role in pronephros formation, which is mediated in part through RA signaling during early embryonic development. PMID:25398881

  6. Degradation of the COL1 domain of type XIV collagen by 92-kDa gelatinase.

    PubMed

    Sires, U I; Dublet, B; Aubert-Foucher, E; van der Rest, M; Welgus, H G

    1995-01-20

    Type XIV collagen is a newly described member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACITs). Expression of this collagen has been localized to various embryonic tissues, suggesting that it has a functional role in development. All FACITs thus far described (types IX, XII, XIV, and XVI) contain a highly homologous carboxyl-terminal triple helical domain designated COL1. We have studied the capacity of various matrix metalloproteinases (interstitial collagenase, stromelysin, matrilysin, and 92-kDa gelatinase) to degrade the COL1 domain of collagen XIV. We found that only 92-kDa gelatinase cleaves COL1. Furthermore, digestion of whole native collagen XIV by the 92-kDa gelatinase indicates that this enzyme specifically attacks the carboxyl-terminal triple helix-containing region of the molecule. COL1 is cleaved by 92-kDa gelatinase at 30 degrees C, a full 5-6 degrees C below the melting temperature (Tm) of this domain; native collagen XIV is also degraded at 30 degrees C. In comparison to interstitial collagenase degradation of its physiologic native type I collagen substrate, the 92-kDa enzyme cleaved COL1 (XIV) with comparable catalytic efficacy. Interestingly, following thermal denaturation of the COL1 fragment, its susceptibility to 92-kDa gelatinase increases, but only to a degree that leaves it several orders of magnitude less sensitive to degradation than denatured collagens I and III. These data indicate that native COL1 and collagen XIV are readily and specifically cleaved by 92-kDa gelatinase. They also suggest a role for 92-kDa gelatinase activity in the structural tissue remodeling of the developing embryo.

  7. Purification and partial characterization of a 31-kDa cysteine endopeptidase from germinated barley.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Jones, B L

    1996-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes hydrolyze cereal seed storage proteins into small peptides and amino acids, which are very important for seed germination and the malting process. A cysteine-class endopeptidase was purified from 4-d-germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Morex). Four purification steps were used, carboxymethyl cellulose cation-exchange chromatography, chromatofocusing, size-exclusion chromatography, and electroelution from a polyacrylamide gel. The endopeptidase was most active at pH 4.5. It's isoelectric point (pI) was 4.4, as determined by isoelectric focusing, and it's SDS-PAGE molecular size was 31 kDa. The enzyme specifically hydrolyzed peptide bonds when the S2 site contained relatively large hydrophobic amino acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence residues (1-9) of the 31-kDa endopeptidase had high homology to those of the EP-A and EP-B cysteine proteinases reported previously. The 31-kDa endopeptidase had a hydrolytic specificity similar to that of the Morex green malt 30-kDa endopeptidase we characterized previously, and also reacted with the antibody raised against the purified 30-kDa proteinase, but the two had different mobilities on non-denaturing PAGE. The hydrolytic specificities of both 30- and 31-kDa endopeptidases are such that both would very quickly cleave hordein (barley storage) proteins to small glutamine- and proline-rich peptides that could be quickly degraded to amino acids by barley exopeptidases.

  8. The 32 kDa Enamelin Undergoes Conformational Transitions upon Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Daming; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The 32 kDa hydrophilic and acidic enamelin, the most stable cleavage fragment of the enamel specific glycoprotein, is believed to play vital roles in controlling crystal nucleation or growth during enamel biomineralization. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrate that the secondary structure of the 32 kDa enamelin has a high content of α-helix (81.5%). Quantitative analysis on the circular dichroism data revealed that the 32 kDa enamelin undergoes conformational changes with a structural preference to β-sheet as a function of calcium ions. We suggest that the increase of β-sheet conformation upon presence of Ca2+ may allow preferable interaction of the 32 kDa enamelin with apatite crystal surfaces during enamel biomineralization. The calcium association constant of the 32 kDa enamelin calculated from the fitting curve of ellipticity at 222 nm is Ka = 1.55 (±0.13) × 103 M−1, indicating a relatively low affinity. Our current biophysical studies on the 32 kDa enamelin structure provide novel insights towards understanding the enamelin-mineral interaction and subsequently the functions of enamelin during enamel formation. PMID:18508280

  9. In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenswiller, L.C.; Greenberg, B.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The 32kDa thylakoid membrane protein is an integral component of the PS II reaction centre. The protein, although stable in the dark, undergoes light dependent turnover. Light from the UV, visible and far-red spectral regions induce 32kDa protein degradation. To better understand 32kDa protein metabolism, an in vitro degradation system is being developed. It consists of isolated thylakoid membranes than contain radiolabelled protein. The 32kDa protein is actively and specifically degraded when the thylakoid preparation is exposed to UV or visible radiation. The protein is stable in the dark. The herbicides (atrazine and DCMU) inhibit degradation in the in vitro system as they do in vivo. Additionally, several methods of isolating thylakoids are being compared to optimize the 32kDa protein degradation reaction. The preparations will be evaluated based on their ability to permit light dependent degradation of the 32kDa protein without affecting the other membrane components.

  10. Regulation of Hippo pathway transcription factor TEAD by p38 MAPK-induced cytoplasmic translocation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly C; Moroishi, Toshiro; Meng, Zhipeng; Jeong, Han-Sol; Plouffe, Steven W; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Han, Jiahuai; Park, Hyun Woo; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2017-07-28

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and tissue homeostasis, with deregulation leading to cancer. The core Hippo components in mammals are composed of the upstream serine/threonine kinases Mst1/2, MAPK4Ks and Lats1/2. Inactivation of these upstream kinases leads to dephosphorylation, stabilization, nuclear translocation and thus activation of the major functional transducers of the Hippo pathway, YAP and its paralogue TAZ. YAP/TAZ are transcription co-activators that regulate gene expression primarily through interaction with the TEA domain DNA-binding family of transcription factors (TEAD). The current paradigm for regulation of this pathway centres on phosphorylation-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of YAP/TAZ through a complex network of upstream components. However, unlike other transcription factors, such as SMAD, NF-κB, NFAT and STAT, the regulation of TEAD nucleocytoplasmic shuttling has been largely overlooked. In the present study, we show that environmental stress promotes TEAD cytoplasmic translocation via p38 MAPK in a Hippo-independent manner. Importantly, stress-induced TEAD inhibition predominates YAP-activating signals and selectively suppresses YAP-driven cancer cell growth. Our data reveal a mechanism governing TEAD nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and show that TEAD localization is a critical determinant of Hippo signalling output.

  11. HASTY, the Arabidopsis ortholog of exportin 5/MSN5, regulates phase change and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bollman, Krista M; Aukerman, Milo J; Park, Mee-Yeon; Hunter, Christine; Berardini, Tanya Z; Poethig, R Scott

    2003-04-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of HASTY (HST) affect many different processes in Arabidopsis development. In addition to reducing the size of both roots and lateral organs of the shoot, hst mutations affect the size of the shoot apical meristem, accelerate vegetative phase change, delay floral induction under short days, adaxialize leaves and carpels, disrupt the phyllotaxis of the inflorescence, and reduce fertility. Double mutant analysis suggests that HST acts in parallel to SQUINT in the regulation of phase change and in parallel to KANADI in the regulation of leaf polarity. Positional cloning demonstrated that HST is the Arabidopsis ortholog of the importin beta-like nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors exportin 5 in mammals and MSN5 in yeast. Consistent with a potential role in nucleocytoplasmic transport, we found that HST interacts with RAN1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay and that a HST-GUS fusion protein is located at the periphery of the nucleus. HST is one of at least 17 members of the importin-beta family in Arabidopsis and is the first member of this family shown to have an essential function in plants. The hst loss-of-function phenotype suggests that this protein regulates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of molecules involved in several different morphogenetic pathways, as well as molecules generally required for root and shoot growth.

  12. Integrated and Functional Genomics Analysis Validates the Relevance of the Nuclear Variant ErbB380kDa in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    El Maassarani, Mahmoud; Barbarin, Alice; Fromont, Gaëlle; Kaissi, Ouafae; Lebbe, Margot; Vannier, Brigitte; Moussa, Ahmed; Séité, Paule

    2016-01-01

    The EGF-family of tyrosine-kinase receptors activates cytoplasmic pathways involved in cell proliferation, migration and differentiation in response to specific extracellular ligands. Beside these canonical pathways, the nuclear localization of the ErbB receptors in primary tumours and cancer cell lines led to investigate their role as transcriptional regulators of cancer genes. The nuclear localization of ErbB3 has been reported in various cancer tissues and cell lines but the nuclear functions and the putative correlation with tumour progression and resistance to therapy remain unclear. We first assessed ErbB3 expression in normal and tumour prostate tissues. The nuclear staining was mainly due to an isoform matching the C-terminus domain of the full length ErbB3185kDa receptor. Nuclear staining was also restricted to cancer cells and was increased in advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer when compared to localized tumours, suggesting it could be involved in the progression of prostate cancer up to the terminal castration-resistant stage. ChIP-on-chip experiments were performed on immortalized and tumour cell lines selected upon characterization of endogenous nuclear expression of an ErbB380kDa isoform. Among the 1840 target promoters identified, 26 were selected before ErbB380kDa-dependent gene expression was evaluated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, providing evidence that ErbB380kDa exerted transcriptional control on those genes. Some targets are already known to be involved in prostate cancer progression even though no link was previously established with ErbB3 membrane and/or nuclear signalling. Many others, not yet associated with prostate cancer, could provide new therapeutic possibilities for patients expressing ErbB380kDa. Detecting ErbB380kDa could thus constitute a useful marker of prognosis and response to therapy. PMID:27191720

  13. Maize 27 kDa gamma-zein is a potential allergen for early weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kerley, Monty S; Allee, Gary L; Jang, Sungchan; Kim, Won-Seok; Fu, Chunjiang J

    2010-06-23

    Soybean and maize are extensively used in animal feed, primarily in poultry, swine, and cattle diets. Soybean meal can affect pig performance in the first few weeks following weaning and elicit specific antibodies in weaned piglets. Though maize is a major component of pig feed, it is not known if any of the maize proteins can elicit immunological response in young pigs. In this study, we have identified a prominent 27 kDa protein from maize as an immunodominant protein in young pigs. This protein, like some known allergens, exhibited resistance to pepsin digestion in vitro. Several lines of evidence identify the immunodominant 27 kDa protein as a gamma-zein, a maize seed storage protein. First, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of different solubility classes of maize seed proteins revealed the presence of an abundant 27 kDa protein in the prolamin (zein) fraction. Antibodies raised against the purified maize 27 kDa gamma-zein also reacted against the same protein recognized by the young pig serum. Additionally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides generated by trypsin digestion of the immunodominant 27 kDa protein showed significant homology to the maize 27 kDa gamma-zein. Since eliminating the allergenic protein will have a great impact on the nutritive value of the maize meal and expand its use in the livestock industry, it will be highly desirable to develop maize cultivars completely lacking the 27 kDa allergenic protein.

  14. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  15. In vitro study on the interaction between the 32 kDa enamelin and amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Daming; Du, Chang; Sun, Zhi; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Enamel extracelluar matrix components play vital roles in controlling crystal nucleation and growth during enamel formation. We investigated the interaction between the 32 kDa enamelin fragment and amelogenin using immunochemical and biophysical methods. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the 32 kDa enamelin and amelogenin eluted together from a Protein A column. Dynamic light scattering results showed that the 32 kDa enamelin had a profound effect on amelogenin assembly at pH 8.0, causing partial dissociation of the nanospheres, in a dose-dependent manner. The appearance of an isodichroic point and the shifting and intensity decrease of the ellipticity minima in the circular dichroism spectra of amelogenin following the addition of the 32 kDa enamelin were indicative of conformational changes in amelogenin and of a direct interaction between the two macromolecules. Our results collectively demonstrate that the 32 kDa enamelin has a direct interaction with amelogenin in vitro. Our current studies provide novel insights into understanding possible cooperation between enamelin and amelogenin in macromolecular self-assembly and in controlling enamel mineral formation. PMID:19263522

  16. Interferon gamma induces the myristoylation of a 48-kDa protein in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Aderem, A A; Marratta, D E; Cohn, Z A

    1988-01-01

    The lymphokine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induces the selective myristoylation of a macrophage protein with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa. The myristic acid-protein bond is resistant to treatment with hydroxylamine, suggesting that the fatty acid moiety is in an amide linkage. As little as 1 unit of IFN-gamma per ml induces the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, with half-maximal myristoylation being observed with 4 units/ml. The effect is observed within 1 hr after exposure to IFN-gamma and is maximal by 3-4 hr, after which it declines. IFN-alpha does not induce the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, and IFN-beta does so very poorly. Neither IFN-alpha nor IFN-beta has any effect on IFN-gamma-induced myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein. The 48-kDa protein is constitutively myristoylated in murine macrophages that have been activated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of Corynebacterium parvum, suggesting that it may be an early intermediate in the activation of macrophages. Images PMID:3137568

  17. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis.

  18. A constitutively expressed 36 kDa exochitinase from Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1.

    PubMed

    Arora, Naresh; Ahmad, Tarannum; Rajagopal, R; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2003-08-01

    A 36 kDa chitinase was purified by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1. The chitinase production was independent of the presence of chitin in the growth medium and was produced even in the presence of glucose. The purified chitinase was active at acidic pH, had an optimal activity at pH 6.5, and showed maximum activity at 65 degrees C. Of the various substrates, the enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of the disaccharide 4-MU(GlnAc)(2) most efficiently and was therefore classified as an exochitinase. The sequence of the tryptic peptides showed extensive homology with Bacillus cereus 36 kDa exochitinase. The 1083 bp open reading frame encoding 36 kDa chitinase was amplified with primers based on the gene sequence of B. cereus 36 kDa exochitinase. The deduced amino-acid sequence showed that the protein contained an N-terminal signal peptide and consisted of a single catalytic domain. The two conserved signature sequences characteristic of family 18 chitinases were mapped at positions 105-109 and 138-145 of Chi36. The recombinant chitinase was expressed in a catalytically active form in Escherichia coli in the vector pQE-32. The expressed 36 kDa chitinase potentiated the insecticidal effect of the vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip) when used against neonate larvae of Spodoptera litura.

  19. Direct Localization of the 51 kDa and 24 kDa Subunits of Mitochondrial Complex I by Three-dimensional Difference Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Clason, Todd; Zickermann, Volker; Ruiz, Teresa; Brandt, Ulrich; Radermacher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complex I is the largest complex in the respiratory chain, and the least understood. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of complex I from Yarrowia lipolytica lacking the flavoprotein part of the N-module, which consists of the 51 kDa (NUBM) and the 24 kDa (NUHM) subunits. The reconstruction was determined by three-dimensional electron microscopy of single particles. A comparison to our earlier reconstruction of the complete Y. lipolytica complex I clearly assigns the two flavoprotein subunits to an outer lobe of the peripheral arm of complex I. Localizing the two subunits allowed us to fit the X-ray structure of the hydrophilic fragment of complex I from Thermus thermophilus. The fit that is most consistent with previous immuno-electron microscopic data predicts that the ubiquinone reducing catalytic center resides in the second peripheral lobe, while the 75 kDa subunit is placed near the previously seen connection between the peripheral arm and the membrane arm protrusions. PMID:17591445

  20. The 70 kDa Heat Shock Protein Assists during the Repair of Chilling Injury in the Insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus

    PubMed Central

    Koštál, Vladimír; Tollarová-Borovanská, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    Background The Pyrrhocoris apterus (Insecta: Heteroptera) adults attain high levels of cold tolerance during their overwintering diapause. Non-diapause reproducing adults, however, lack the capacity to express a whole array of cold-tolerance adaptations and show relatively low survival when exposed to sub-zero temperatures. We assessed the competence of non-diapause males of P. apterus for responding to heat- and cold-stresses by up-regulation of 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsps) and the role of Hsps during repair of heat- and cold-induced injury. Principal Findings The fragments of P. apterus homologues of Hsp70 inducible (PaHsp70) and cognate forms (PaHsc70) were cloned and sequenced. The abundance of mRNA transcripts for the inducible form (qPCR) and corresponding protein (Western blotting) were significantly up-regulated in response to high and low temperature stimuli. In the cognate form, mRNA was slightly up-regulated in response to both stressors but very low or no up-regulation of protein was apparent after heat- or cold-stress, respectively. Injection of 695 bp-long Pahsp70 dsRNA (RNAi) caused drastic suppression of the heat- and cold-stress-induced Pahsp70 mRNA response and the up-regulation of corresponding protein was practically eliminated. Our RNAi predictably prevented recovery from heat shock and, in addition, negatively influenced repair of chilling injuries caused by cold stress. Cold tolerance increased when the insects were first exposed to a mild heat shock, in order to trigger the up-regulation of PaHsp70, and subsequently exposed to cold stress. Conclusion Our results suggest that accumulation of PaHsp70 belongs to a complex cold tolerance adaptation in the insect Pyrrhocoris apterus. PMID:19229329

  1. Crystal structure of Bombyx mori lipoprotein 6: comparative structural analysis of the 30-kDa lipoprotein family.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Łochynska, Malgorzata; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The 30-kDa lipoprotein (LP) family of mulberry silkworm comprises major hemolymph proteins specific to the fifth instar larvae. The family consists of 46 members, 24 of which are referred to as typical 30-kDa LPs. To date, two crystal structures of 30-kDa LPs from Bombyx mori have been described (Bmlp3 and Bmlp7). Here, we present the crystal structure of Bmlp6, another 30-kDa LP member. Bmlp6 is comprised of two domains characteristic of this family, the VHS-type N-terminal domain and β-trefoil C-terminal domain. The structures of the three 30-kDa LPs have been compared and a number of differences are noted, including loop conformation, the surface electrostatic potential, and the potential binding cavities. We discuss the observed structural differences in the light of the potential different roles of the particular 30-kDa LP members in silkworm physiology.

  2. 82-kDa choline acetyltransferase and SATB1 localize to β-amyloid induced matrix attachment regions

    PubMed Central

    Winick-Ng, Warren; Caetano, Fabiana A.; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; Morey, Trevor M.; Heit, Bryan; Rylett, R. Jane

    2016-01-01

    The M-transcript of human choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) produces an 82-kDa protein (82-kDa ChAT) that concentrates in nuclei of cholinergic neurons. We assessed the effects of acute exposure to oligomeric amyloid-β1–42 (Aβ1–42) on 82-kDa ChAT disposition in SH-SY5Y neural cells, finding that acute exposure to Aβ1–42 results in increased association of 82-kDa ChAT with chromatin and formation of 82-kDa ChAT aggregates in nuclei. When measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we identified that Aβ1–42 -exposure increases 82-kDa ChAT association with gene promoters and introns. The Aβ1–42 -induced 82-kDa ChAT aggregates co-localize with special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), which anchors DNA to scaffolding/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs). SATB1 had a similar genomic association as 82-kDa ChAT, with both proteins associating with synapse and cell stress genes. After Aβ1–42 -exposure, both SATB1 and 82-kDa ChAT are enriched at the same S/MAR on the APP gene, with 82-kDa ChAT expression attenuating an increase in an isoform-specific APP mRNA transcript. Finally, 82-kDa ChAT and SATB1 have patterned genomic association at regions enriched with S/MAR binding motifs. These results demonstrate that 82-kDa ChAT and SATB1 play critical roles in the response of neural cells to acute Aβ -exposure. PMID:27052102

  3. Specific binding of victorin to a 100-kDa protein from oats

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, T.J.; Macko, V. )

    1989-06-01

    Susceptibility of oats to victoria blight, caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, and sensitivity to the host-specific toxin victorin, produced by the fungus, are controlled by the dominant allele at the Vb locus. It has been postulated that the Vb locus encodes a toxin receptor, although direct evidence for such a receptor is not available. Recent studies on structure-activity relationships of the toxin established a methodology for producing {sup 125}I-labeled victorin. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins from isogenic susceptible and resistant oat genotypes following treatment of leaves with radiolabeled victorin showed that victorin binds in a covalent and a genotype-specific manner to a 100-kDa protein only in susceptible oat leaf slices. This in vivo binding was competitively displaced by reduced victorin, a nontoxic protective compound, and appeared to be correlated with biological activity. In vitro binding to the 100-kDa protein in leaf extracts showed several differences from in vivo binding. Binding was not genotype specific and required a reducing agent that was not required for in vivo binding. Differential centrifugation showed that the 100-kDa victorin binding protein was not a cytosolic protein but was enriched in a high-speed particulate fraction. The data support the hypothesis that the 100-kDa protein is the victorin receptor.

  4. Translocation of an 89-kDa periplasmic protein is associated with Holospora infection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Koichi; Dohra, Hideo; Lang, B. Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Hori, Manabu; Fujishima, Masahiro . E-mail: fujishim@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-02

    The symbiotic bacterium Holospora obtusa infects the macronucleus of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. After ingestion by its host, an infectious form of Holospora with an electron-translucent tip passes through the host digestive vacuole and penetrates the macronuclear envelope with this tip. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this process, we raised a monoclonal antibody against the tip-specific 89-kDa protein, sequenced this partially, and identified the corresponding complete gene. The deduced protein sequence carries two actin-binding motifs. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy shows that during escape from the host digestive vacuole, the 89-kDa proteins translocates from the inside to the outside of the tip. When the bacterium invades the macronucleus, the 89-kDa protein is left behind at the entry point of the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of fine fibrous structures that co-localize with the antibody-labeled regions of the bacterium. Our findings suggest that the 89-kDa protein plays a role in Holospora's escape from the host digestive vacuole, the migration through the host cytoplasm, and the invasion into the macronucleus.

  5. Deconstructing honeybee vitellogenin: novel 40 kDa fragment assigned to its N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Halskau, Øyvind; Skjaerven, Lars; Smedal, Bente; Amdam, Gro V.

    2011-01-01

    Vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein precursor common to oviparous animals, is found abundantly in honeybee workers – a caste of helpers that do not usually lay eggs. Instead, honeybee vitellogenin (180 kDa) participates in processes other than reproduction: it influences hormone signaling, food-related behavior, immunity, stress resistance and longevity. The molecular basis of these functions is largely unknown. Here, we establish and compare the molecular properties of vitellogenin from honeybee hemolymph (blood) and abdominal fat body, two compartments that are linked to vitellogenin functions. Our results reveal a novel 40 kDa vitellogenin fragment in abdominal fat body tissue, the main site for vitellogenin synthesis and storage. Using MALDI-TOF combined with MS/MS mass-spectroscopy, we assign the 40 kDa fragment to the N terminus of vitellogenin, whereas a previously observed 150 kDa fragment corresponded to the remainder of the protein. We show that both protein units are N glycosylated and phosphorylated. Focusing on the novel 40 kDa fragment, we present a homology model based on the structure of lamprey lipovitellin that includes a conserved β-barrel-like shape, with a lipophilic cavity in the interior and two insect-specific loops that have not been described before. Our data indicate that the honeybee fat body vitellogenin experiences cleavage unlike hemolymph vitellogenin, a pattern that can suggest a tissue-specific role. Our experiments advance the molecular understanding of vitellogenin, of which the multiple physiological and behavioral effects in honeybees are well established. PMID:21270306

  6. Expression of the 60 kDa and 71 kDa heat shock proteins and presence of antibodies against the 71 kDa heat shock protein in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Yuan, Mingchun; Ding, Fuyue; Yang, Dongliang; Wang, Ruibo; Li, Jianxin; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by platelet destruction resulting from autoantibodies against platelet proteins, particularly platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) have been shown to be major antigenic determinants in some autoimmune diseases. Antibodies to Hsps have also been reported to be associated with a number of pathological states. Methods Using western blot, we measured the levels of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) and of the inducible 71 kDa member of the Hsp70 family (Hsp71) in lymphocytes and the presence of antibodies against these hsps in plasma of 29 pediatric patients with ITP before the treatment and in 6 other patients before and after treatment. Results Interestingly only one out of 29 patients showed detectable Hsp60 in lymphocytes while this heat shock protein was detected in the 30 control children. Hsp71 levels were slightly lower in lymphocytes of patients with ITP than in controls (1567.8 ± 753.2 via 1763.2 ± 641.8 integrated optical density (IOD) units). There was a small increase of Hsp71 after recovery from ITP. The titers of plasma antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp71 were also examined. Antibodies against Hsp71 were more common in ITP patients (15/29) than in control children (5/30). The titer of anti-Hsp71 was also higher in children patients with ITP. The prevalence of ITP children with antibodies against Hsp71 (51.7%) was as high as those with antibodies against platelet membrane glycoproteins (58.3%). Conclusions In summary, pediatric patients with ITP showed no detectable expression of Hsp60 in lymphocytes and a high prevalence of antibody against Hsp71 in plasma. These changes add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP and may be important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of ITP. PMID:15070425

  7. Clinical equivalence of conventional OnabotulinumtoxinA (900 KDa) and IncobotulinumtoxinA (neurotoxin free from complexing proteins - 150 KDa): 2012 multidisciplinary French consensus in aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Bernard; Trevidic, Patrick; Clave, Micheline; Aharoni, Claude; Baspeyras, Martine; Bui, Patrick; Cartier, Hugues; Charavel, Marie-Helene; Coulon, Pierre; Dahan, Serge; Dallara, Jean-Marie; Delonca, Denis; Dumas, Laurent; Essayagh, Eric; Galatoire, Olivier; Georgieu, Nicolas; Grangier, Yann; Humbert, Philippe; Le Pillouer-Prost, Anne; Mojallal, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most popular non-surgical treatments for aesthetic indications, but there is uncertainty about whether certain formulations are comparable in efficacy and safety and can be substituted for one another by a simple one to one dose conversion ratio. An expert panel of French practitioners was convened to establish a consensus on the clinical equivalence in efficacy and safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA (900 KDa) and IncobotulinumtoxinA (neurotoxin free from complexing proteins - 150 KDa). The consensus was divided into three sections incorporating a biological, bibliographic and clinical analysis of the two toxins. This included a review of the published data that have directly compared the two toxins for aesthetic indications and a survey of the panel's extensive clinical experience with the two toxins in terms of efficacy and safety. All panel members reviewed and endorsed the content of each section. Among this expert panel of French aesthetic physicians and biologists there was consensus that OnabotulinumtoxinA and IncobotulinumtoxinA are clinically equivalent in terms of efficacy and safety, and that a switch from one drug to the other can be made using a simple 1:1 conversion ratio.

  8. Modulations of 92kDa gelatinase B and its inhibitors are associated with HIV-1 infection in human macrophage cultures.

    PubMed

    Chapel, C; Camara, V; Clayette, P; Salvat, S; Mabondzo, A; Leblond, V; Marcé, D; Lafuma, C; Dormont, D

    1994-11-15

    The macrophage-secreted 92-kDa type IV collagenase and metalloproteinases play a critical role in cell microenvironment regulation and cell movement. HIV infection of macrophages might be capable of deregulating the expression of these gelatinases. Hence, human monocyte-derived-macrophages were infected by lymphotropic HIV-1/Lai and monocytropic HIV-1/DAS isolates. Gelatinase activity and gelatinase and inhibitor (TIMP, alpha 2M) biosyntheses were evaluated in supernatants and cellular extracts. Our data suggest that HIV infection facilitates gelatinase secretion and intracellular inhibitor retention. These argue for the increase of free proteinase that could degrade barriers, which would permit cell movement and viral dissemination into tissues.

  9. Merging high-quality biochemical fractionation with a refined flow cytometry approach to monitor nucleocytoplasmic protein expression throughout the unperturbed mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Schipany, Katharina; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2013-03-01

    This protocol describes a method for nucleocytoplasmic protein tracking during normal cell cycle progression using unmanipulated, asynchronous cells. In contrast with prevalent traditional methods, our approach does not require time-consuming, perturbing cell synchronization or separation. To this end, we chose a single-cell approach and developed a flow cytometry assay that is applied to whole cells and isolated nuclei. Our protocol involves a stepwise biochemical fractionation procedure to purify nuclei from whole cells, conventional DNA and indirect immunostaining techniques for the dual labeling of cells and nuclei for DNA and protein, and a refined concept of flow cytometric data processing and calculation: through the specific combination of DNA and cell size analyses, G1, S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle are further dissected to establish a high-resolution map of cell cycle progression, to which protein expression in cells or nuclei is correlated. In a final data analysis step, cell cycle-related, cytoplasmic protein expression is calculated on the basis of results obtained for whole cells and isolated nuclei. A minimum of 8 h is required to complete the procedure. As the approach does not require cell type-restricting pretreatments, numerous cell types of different origin can be readily studied. Human amniotic fluid stem cells, primary human fibroblasts, immortalized mouse fibroblasts and transformed tumor cells are analyzed at comparable efficiencies, demonstrating low intercell assay variability.

  10. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

  11. [Hyperoxia induces reactive oxygen species production and promotes SIRT1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in premature infants in vitro].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Dong, Wenbin; Li, Qingping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiaoping; Zhang, Lianyu; Lu, Youying; Zhai, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    To explore the relationship between deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after oxygen therapy in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the premature infants. According to the fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2), premature infants diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (gestational age <32 weeks), were divided into three groups: low dosage oxygen group (FiO2 <300 mL/L), moderate dosage oxygen group (FiO2; 300 mL/L-400 mL/L), high dosage oxygen group (FiO2 >400 mL/L). After 48 hours of oxygen treatment, PBMCs and serum were collected from the peripheral blood. Then the intracellular ROS level was detected by MitoSOX(TM) Red labeling combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy; the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the serum was determined by the whole spectrum spectrophotometer; the SIRT1 localization was observed by immunofluorescence staining; and the SIRT1 levels in PBMCs were examined by Western blotting. With the increase of FiO2, the ROS, MDA content and the rate of SIRT1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of PBMCs gradually increased and SIRT1 protein expression was significantly lowered. Hyperoxia induces ROS production in premature infants, promotes SIRT1 to cross from nucleus to cytoplasm, inhibits the resistant ability of SIRT1 to oxidative stress.

  12. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 Is Required for Circadian Periodicity through the Promotion of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic mRNA Export in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Dana R.; Gould, Peter; Foreman, Julia; Griffiths, Jayne; Bird, Susannah; Page, Rhiannon; Stewart, Kelly; Steel, Gavin; Young, Jack; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Millar, Andrew J.; Halliday, Karen J.; Hall, Anthony J.; Penfield, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation has been shown to be attenuated by the degradation of the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 protein by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1). However, recent work has suggested that HOS1 may have a wider range of roles in plants than previously appreciated. Here, we show that hos1 mutants are affected in circadian clock function, exhibiting a long-period phenotype in a wide range of temperature and light environments. We demonstrate that hos1 mutants accumulate polyadenylated mRNA in the nucleus and that the circadian defect in hos1 is shared by multiple mutants with aberrant mRNA export, but not in a mutant attenuated in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of microRNAs. As revealed by RNA sequencing, hos1 exhibits gross changes to the transcriptome with genes in multiple functional categories being affected. In addition, we show that hos1 and other previously described mutants with altered mRNA export affect cold signaling in a similar manner. Our data support a model in which altered mRNA export is important for the manifestation of hos1 circadian clock defects and suggest that HOS1 may indirectly affect cold signaling through disruption of the circadian clock. PMID:24254125

  13. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 is required for circadian periodicity through the promotion of nucleo-cytoplasmic mRNA export in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Dana R; Gould, Peter; Foreman, Julia; Griffiths, Jayne; Bird, Susannah; Page, Rhiannon; Stewart, Kelly; Steel, Gavin; Young, Jack; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Millar, Andrew J; Halliday, Karen J; Hall, Anthony J; Penfield, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Cold acclimation has been shown to be attenuated by the degradation of the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 protein by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1). However, recent work has suggested that HOS1 may have a wider range of roles in plants than previously appreciated. Here, we show that hos1 mutants are affected in circadian clock function, exhibiting a long-period phenotype in a wide range of temperature and light environments. We demonstrate that hos1 mutants accumulate polyadenylated mRNA in the nucleus and that the circadian defect in hos1 is shared by multiple mutants with aberrant mRNA export, but not in a mutant attenuated in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of microRNAs. As revealed by RNA sequencing, hos1 exhibits gross changes to the transcriptome with genes in multiple functional categories being affected. In addition, we show that hos1 and other previously described mutants with altered mRNA export affect cold signaling in a similar manner. Our data support a model in which altered mRNA export is important for the manifestation of hos1 circadian clock defects and suggest that HOS1 may indirectly affect cold signaling through disruption of the circadian clock.

  14. Nuclear pore localization and nucleocytoplasmic transport of eIF-5A: evidence for direct interaction with the export receptor CRM1.

    PubMed

    Rosorius, O; Reichart, B; Krätzer, F; Heger, P; Dabauvalle, M C; Hauber, J

    1999-07-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is the only cellular protein known to contain the unusual amino acid hypusine. The exact in vivo function of eIF-5A, however, is to date unknown. The finding that eIF-5A is an essential cofactor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev RNA transport factor suggested that eIF-5A is part of a specific nuclear export pathway. In this study we used indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy to demonstrate that eIF-5A accumulates at nuclear pore-associated intranuclear filaments in mammalian cells and Xenopus oocytes. We are able to show that eIF-5A interacts with the general nuclear export receptor, CRM1. Furthermore, microinjection studies in somatic cells revealed that eIF-5A is transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and that this nuclear export is blocked by leptomycin B. Our data demonstrate that eIF-5A is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein.

  15. Differential effect of acute and persistent Junin virus infections on the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking and expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins type A and B.

    PubMed

    Maeto, Cynthia A; Knott, María E; Linero, Florencia N; Ellenberg, Paula C; Scolaro, Luis A; Castilla, Viviana

    2011-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A and B (hnRNPs A/B), cellular RNA-binding proteins that participate in splicing, trafficking, translation and turnover of mRNAs, have been implicated in the life cycles of several cytoplasmic RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that silencing of hnRNPs A1 and A2 significantly reduces the replication of the arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV), the aetiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever. While acute JUNV infection did not modify total levels of expression of hnRNPs A/B in comparison with uninfected cells, non-cytopathic persistent infection exhibited low levels of these cell proteins. Furthermore, acutely infected cells showed a cytoplasmic relocalization of overexpressed hnRNP A1, probably related to the involvement of this protein in virus replicative cycle. This cytoplasmic accumulation was also observed in cells expressing viral nucleoprotein (N), and co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed the interaction between hnRNP A1 and N protein. By contrast, a predominantly nuclear distribution of overexpressed hnRNP A1 was found during persistent infection, even in the presence of endogenous or overexpressed N protein, indicating a differential modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking in acute and persistent JUNV infections.

  16. A novel transferable nuclear export signal mediates CRM1-independent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the human cytomegalovirus transactivator protein pUL69

    PubMed Central

    Lischka, Peter; Rosorius, Olaf; Trommer, Erik; Stamminger, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The best studied nuclear export processes are mediated by classical leucine-rich nuclear export signals that specify recognition by the CRM1 export receptor. However, details concerning alternative nuclear export signals and pathways are beginning to emerge. Within the family of Herpesviridae, a set of homologous regulatory proteins that are exemplified by the ICP27 of herpes simplex virus were described recently as nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins. Here we report that pUL69 of the β-herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus is a nuclear protein that is able to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm independently of virus-encoded cofactors. In contrast to proteins containing a leucine-rich export signal, the shuttling activity of pUL69 was not affected by leptomycin B, indicating that pUL69 trafficking is not mediated by the export receptor CRM1. Importantly, we identified and characterized a novel type of transferable, leptomycin B-insensitive export signal that is distinct from other export signals described previously and is required for pUL69-mediated activation of gene expression. These data suggest that pUL69 is exported via a novel nuclear export pathway, based on a so far unique nuclear export signal of 28 amino acids. PMID:11743003

  17. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-05

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  18. Subunit Heterogeneity of Cytoplasmic Dynein: Differential Expression of 14 kDa Dynein Light Chains in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Jen-Zen; Milner, Teresa A.; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a multi-subunit protein complex in which each subunit is encoded by a few genes. How these subunit isoforms are assembled and regulated to mediate the diverse functions of cytoplasmic dynein is unknown. We previously have shown that two highly conserved 14 kDa dynein light chains, Tctex-1 and RP3, have different cargo-binding abilities. In this report, coimmunoprecipitation revealed that Tctex-1 and RP3 were present in mutually exclusive dynein complexes of brain. Two specific antibodies were used to examine the localization of these two dynein light chains in adult rat hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex. By light microscopy, Tctex-1 and RP3 immunoreactivities exhibited distinct and almost complementary distribution patterns in both brain regions. In hippocampal formation, Tctex-1 immunoreactivity was most enriched in somata of newly generated granule cells and scant in the mature granule and pyramidal cell somata. In contrast, RP3 immunoreactivity was abundant in pyramidal and granule cell somata. Ultrastructural analysis of the dentate gyrus revealed both dynein light chains were associated with various membranous organelles that often were affiliated with microtubules. In addition, Tctex-1 and RP3 immunoreactivities were preferentially and highly enriched on membranous organelles and/or vesicles of axon terminals and dendritic spines, respectively. These results suggest that dynein complexes with different subunit composition, and possibly function, are expressed differentially in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Furthermore, Tctex-1 and RP3 may play important roles in synaptic functions. PMID:11466421

  19. Cardioprotective effects of 70-kDa heat shock protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, N B; Fina, M; Benjamin, I J; Moreadith, R W; Graves, K H; Zhao, P; Gavva, S; Wiethoff, A; Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Williams, R S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are proposed to limit injury resulting from diverse environmental stresses, but direct metabolic evidence for such a cytoprotective function in vertebrates has been largely limited to studies of cultured cells. We generated lines of transgenic mice to express human 70-kDa heat shock protein constitutively in the myocardium. Hearts isolated from these animals demonstrated enhanced recovery of high energy phosphate stores and correction of metabolic acidosis following brief periods of global ischemia sufficient to induce sustained abnormalities of these variables in hearts from nontransgenic littermates. These data demonstrate a direct cardioprotective effect of 70-kDa heat shock protein to enhance postischemic recovery of the intact heart. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8637874

  20. Antigenic secreted proteins from Haemophilus paragallinarum. A 110-kDa putative RTX protein.

    PubMed

    Mena-Rojas, Erika; Vázquez Cruz, Candelario; Vaca Pacheco, Sergio; García González, Octavio; Pérez-Márquez, Víctor M; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; de la Garza, Mireya; Zenteno, Edgar; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2004-03-12

    Haemophilus paragallinarum is the causal agent of infectious coryza, an economically important disease for the poultry industry. This bacterium secreted proteins of 25-110 kDa during its growth in brain heart infusion, tryptic soy broth, or Luria-Bertani glucose phosphate media, all lacking serum. Some of these proteins were recognized by sera from chickens experimentally infected with H. paragallinarum. A 110-kDa protein was recognized by a serum pool from convalescent-phase pigs naturally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and also by a rabbit polyclonal serum against Apx I as well as a rabbit serum against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, suggesting the presence of an RTX-like protein in H. paragallinarum. H. paragallinarum secreted proteins could be important immunogens in the control of infectious coryza.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a 22 kDa protein with antifungal properties from maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Q K; Borgmeyer, J R; Zobel, J F

    1992-01-15

    We have purified a 22 kDa protein from maize seeds to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, chitin extraction and Mono-S column chromatography. The purified protein inhibited the growth of the agronomically important pathogens of potato wilt (Fusarium oxysporum) and tomato early blight (Alternaria solani). Sequence analysis of the purified protein showed that it has 52% homology with the sweet protein thaumatin (Edens, L., Hselinga, L., Klok, R., Ledeboer, A. M., Maat, J., Toonen, M. Y., Visser, C., and Verrips, C. (1982) Gene 18, 1-12), 57% homology with the pathogenesis-related protein (Cornelissen, B. J. C., Huijsduijnen, R. A. M., and Bol, J. F. (1986) Nature 321, 531-532) and 99% homology with the 22 kDa trypsin/alpha-amylase inhibitor (Richardson, M., Valdes-Rodriguez, S., and Blanco-Labra, A. (1987) Nature 327, 432-434).

  2. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  3. Diagnostic epitope variability within Taenia solium 8 kDa antigen family: implications for cysticercosis immunodetection.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Elizabeth; Sánchez, Jipsy; Milano, Adriana; Alvarez, Suhei; La Rosa, Rosamelia; Lares, María; González, Luís Miguel; Cortéz, María Milagros; Dávila, Iris; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Gárate, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    To study diagnostic epitopes within the Taenia solium 8 kDa antigen family, six overlapping synthetic peptides from an 8 kDa family member (Ts8B2) were synthesized and evaluated by ELISA and MABA with sera from patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), from infected pigs and from rabbits immunized with recombinant Ts8B2 protein. The pre-immune rabbit sera and the Ts8B2 recombinant protein served as negative and positive controls, respectively. A similar analysis was done with the already described antigenic peptides from another member of the 8 kDa family, highly similar to Ts8B2, the CyDA antigen. Surprisingly, neither the Ts8B2 peptides nor the CyDA peptides were recognized by infected human and porcine sera. However, the entire Ts8B2 recombinant, as well as amino and carboxy-terminal halves were recognized by the positive serum samples. The observed lack of recognition of linear Ts8B2 peptides suggests that the principal serological response to the Ts8B2 family is focused on conformational epitopes in contrast to the previously observed antigenicity of the CyDA peptides. This differential antigenicity of 8 kDa family peptides could be related with parasite antigenic variability. The fact that rabbits experimentally immunized with Ts8B2 did make anti-peptide antibodies to peptides Ts8B2-6 and CyDA-6, located in the carboxy-terminal region demonstrated that the Ts8B2 peptides are not intrinsically non-immunogenic.

  4. A 23-kDa protein as a substrate for protein kinase C in bovine neutrophils. Purification and partial characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stasia, M.J.; Dianoux, A.C.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1989-12-12

    In {sup 32}P{sub i}-loaded bovine neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), radioactivity was preferentially incorporated into a protein of low molecular mass, suggesting a PKC-dependent phosphorylation. This protein, termed 23-kDa protein, was predominantly localized in the cytosol. The apparent molecular mass of the purified protein range between 20 and 23 kDa. In the absence of mercaptoethanol, a dimer accumulated. Homogeneity of the 23-kDa protein was verified by 2D-PAGE analysis. Gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the purified 23-kDa protein followed by Coomassie blue staining allowed the visualization of our discrete protein bands with isoelectric points ranging between pH 6.3 and 6.7. Phosphorylation of the 23-kDa protein by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence of bovine neutrophil PKC supplemented with Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol or with PMA occurred on serine and required the presence of mercaptoethanol. IEF of the {sup 32}P-labeled 23-kDa protein followed by autoradiography revealed for discrete bands with distinct isoelectric points similar to those of the bands stained by Coomassie blue after IEF on nonlabeled 23-kDa protein. The bands of the 23-kDa protein resolved by IEF and transfered to nitrocellulose showed ability to bind ({sup 35}S)GTP-{gamma}-S. The immunoreactivity of antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine neutrophil 23-kDa protein was demonstrated on immunoblots after SDS-PAGE. The 23-kDa protein differed also from several other proteins of similar molecular mass that have been identified in neutrophils, namely, calmodulin, the small subunit of the low-potential cytochrome b, and a low molecular weight protein which is ADP-ribosylated by the botulinum toxin.

  5. Identification of the 49-kDa autoantigen associated with lymphocytic hypophysitis as alpha-enolase.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Damien T; Smith, A Ian; Matthew, Mary L; Andronicos, Nicholas M; Ranson, Marie; Robinson, Phillip J; Crock, Patricia A

    2002-02-01

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis is part of the spectrum of organ-specific autoimmune diseases, and although its histopathology is well documented, its pathogenesis is unclear. Serum autoantibodies directed against a 49-kDa cytosolic protein are detected by immunoblotting in 70% of patients with biopsy-proven lymphocytic hypophysitis. Here we report the purification and identification of this first target autoantigen in lymphocytic hypophysitis. The autoantigen has a molecular mass of 49 kDa, a cytosolic localization, and a ubiquitous tissue distribution. The 49-kDa protein was purified from monkey brain and human placental cytosol. Limited amino acid sequencing after proteolytic digestion of the human placental protein showed identity with alpha-enolase. The identification was confirmed using sera from patients with pituitary autoimmunity, which strongly reacted with recombinant human alpha-enolase and yeast enolase, but not with rabbit muscle beta- enolase. This indicates that the immunoreactive epitopes are largely conserved from yeast to human, but are not present in beta-enolase. alpha-Enolase autoantibodies are not specific to pituitary autoimmune disease and have been reported in other autoimmune diseases. However, this study is the first to indicate a role for alpha-enolase as an autoantigen in lymphocytic hypophysitis.

  6. Pacifastin, a novel 155-kDa heterodimeric proteinase inhibitor containing a unique transferrin chain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zicai; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Aspán, Anna; Hall, Martin; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    A 155-kDa proteinase inhibitor, pacifastin, from plasma of the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, was found to be composed of two covalently linked subunits. The two subunits are encoded by two different mRNAs, which were cloned and sequenced. The heavy chain of pacifastin (105 kDa) is related to transferrins, containing three transferrin lobes, two of which seem to be active for iron binding. The light chain of pacifastin (44 kDa) is the inhibitory subunit, and has nine cysteine-rich inhibitory domains that are homologous to each other and to low molecular weight proteinase inhibitors isolated from the grasshopper, Locusta migratoria. The nine light chain domains and the Locusta inhibitors share a characteristic cysteine array (Cys-Xaa9–12-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa-Cys-Xaa6–8-Cys-Xaa4-Cys) distinct from any described proteinase inhibitor family, suggesting that they constitute a new family of proteinase inhibitors. Pacifastin is the first known protein that has combined properties of a transferrin-like molecule and a proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9192625

  7. Development of 116 kDa Fraction for Detecting Experimental Toxoplasma gondii Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    HASSANAIN, Mohey Abdel-Hafez; ABDEL-RAHMAN, Eman Hussien; TOALEB, Nagwa Ibrahim; SHAAPAN, Raafat Mohamed; ELFADALY, Hasan Ali; HASSANAIN, Nawal Abdel-Hafez

    2013-01-01

    Background Serological diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection using crude antigens may not be more accurate. To increase the diagnostic potency of antigens, isolation of their immunogenic fractions could be useful. The current research adopted to obtain an affinity isolated fraction from RH strain using CNBr Sepharose 4B column coupled with infected mice sera helping in detection of IgM and IgG of toxoplasmosis due to RH strain and other strains. Methods The isolated fraction was characterized by SDS-PAGE. Moreover, the diagnostic potency of the fraction was assessed by indirect ELISA in mice experimentally infected with RH strain and two other local strains; one of sheep origin and the other of human origin. Results The fraction was found to be consisted of a single band of 116 kDa compared with 17 bands ranged from 116 to 16 kDa associated with crude extract. The fraction proved potent diagnostic potentials of acute and chronic mice toxoplasmosis. Where it was detected both IgM and IgG antibodies as early as two days and as late as 2 months post experimental infection with any of the three strains. The level of detected IgM and IgG by RH fraction was higher in mice infected with RH strain than with local strains except IgM due to sheep strain parasite. Conclusions The 116 kDa fraction of T. gondii tachyzoites can be considered as a candidate in improving of serodiagnosisof Toxoplasma infections. PMID:24454439

  8. Essential functions of the 32 kDa subunit of yeast replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Anne M.; Krasikova, Yulia; Pestryakov, Pavel; Lavrik, Olga; Wold, Marc S.

    2009-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric (70, 32 and 14 kDa subunits), single-stranded DNA-binding protein required for cellular DNA metabolism. All subunits of RPA are essential for life, but the specific functions of the 32 and 14 kDa subunits remains unknown. The 32 kDa subunit (RPA2) has multiple domains, but only the central DNA-binding domain (called DBD D) is essential for life in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To define the essential function(s) of RPA2 in S. cerevisiae, a series of site-directed mutant forms of DBD D were generated. These mutant constructs were then characterized in vitro and in vivo. The mutations had minimal effects on the overall structure and activity of the RPA complex. However, several mutants were shown to disrupt crosslinking of RPA2 to DNA and to dramatically lower the DNA-binding affinity of a RPA2-containing subcomplex. When introduced into S. cerevisiae, all DBD D mutants were viable and supported normal growth rates and DNA replication. These findings indicate that RPA2–DNA interactions are not essential for viability and growth in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that DNA-binding activity of RPA2 is dispensable in yeast and that the essential function of DBD D is intra- and/or inter-protein interactions. PMID:19244309

  9. Resolution of phosphoglucomatase and the 62-kDA acceptor for the glucosylphosphotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Marchase, R.B.; Richardson, K.L.; Srisomsap, C.; Drake, R.R.; Haley, B.E. )

    1990-07-01

    The radioactive, photoactivatable labeling probe (beta-32P)5-azidouridine 5'-diphosphoglucose has recently been shown to label a 62-kDa protein in crude homogenates and in partially purified enzyme preparations without photoactivation. Here, we report that a portion of this radioactivity is due to labeling of phosphoglucomutase by contaminating levels of (32P)alpha Glc-1-P initially present at less than 1% of the total 32P. This conclusion is based in part on the ability of excess unlabeled alpha Glc-1-P and Glc-6-P, but not UDP-Glc, to block the labeling. In addition, the labeled protein in liver homogenates had a tryptic peptide pattern similar to that of authentic phosphoglucomutase. These findings, however, raised a second question. Assays for the UDP-Glc: glycoprotein glucosyl phosphotransferase (Glc phosphotransferase) have utilized (beta-32P)UDP-Glc and have resulted in the labeling of a small number of acceptors, including one of approximately 62 kDa. Despite the fact that these assays had routinely been performed in the presence of 1 mM alpha Glc-1-P, the coincidence in molecular weights led to these further studies. We conclude that the acceptor of approximately 62 kDa is distinct from phosphoglucomutase. This conclusion is based on differences in the time courses of incorporation, the specificity of blocking agents, the presence of covalently linked glucose, the products of acid hydrolysis and of beta-elimination, and isoelectric points.

  10. Cryptic chemotactic activity of fibronectin for human monocytes resides in the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell-binding fragment.

    PubMed

    Clark, R A; Wikner, N E; Doherty, D E; Norris, D A

    1988-08-25

    Monocytes and lymphocytes form a second wave of infiltrating blood leukocytes in areas of tissue injury. The mechanisms for monocyte accumulation at these sites are not completely understood. Recently, however, fragments from extracellular matrix proteins including collagen, elastin, and fibronectin have been shown to induce monocyte chemotaxis. In this report we demonstrate that chemotactic activity for human monocytes is expressed when a 120-kDa fragment containing the RGDS cell-binding peptide is released from intact fibronectin or from larger fibronectin fragments. Monocytes, either from mononuclear cell Ficoll-Hypaque preparations (10-20% monocytes, 89-90% lymphocytes) or from elutriation preparations (95% monocytes, 5% lymphocytes), but not lymphocytes, migrated toward 120-kDa fragment preparations (10(-7) M) in blind-end chambers when the cells were separated from the chemoattractant by a 5-micron pore polycarbonate filter either alone or overlying a 0.45-micron pore nitrocellulose filter. Neutrophils migrated toward zymosan-activated serum but not toward 10(-5)-10(-8) M concentrations of the 120-kDa fragment. Intact fibronectin had no chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Fibronectin was isolated from citrated human plasma by sequential gelatin-Sepharose affinity and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography in the presence of buffers containing 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride to prevent fragmentation. Controlled enzymatic digestion with thermolysin cleaved fibronectin into 30 kDa fibrin, 45 kDa collagen, and 150/160-kDa cell and heparin domains. Upon prolonged digestion, purified 150/160-kDa fragments were cleaved into 120-kDa cell and 30/40-kDa heparin-binding fragments. Even though the intact fibronectin molecule, the 150/160-kDa fragments, and the 120-kDa fragment, have cell binding activity for Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, only the 120-kDa fragment expressed chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Thus, the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell

  11. Accumulation of a 31-kDa glycoprotein in association with the expression of embryogenic potential by spinach callus in culture.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takuma; Megumi, Chiaki; Komai, Fuminori; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Oosawa, Katsuji

    2002-01-01

    Calli grown from segments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) root in the presence of gibberellic acid (GA3) plus auxin, differentiated to yield somatic embryos after transfer to a medium without growth regulators, while calli formed in the absence of GA3 failed to generate any embryos. We extracted proteins from the two types of callus and analysed them by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Compared with the proteins from calli formed on medium that contained only naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) as a growth regulator, the proteins from calli grown in the presence of GA3 included appreciably higher levels of a 31-kDa basic protein (pI = 8.8). The protein resembled type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (EC 3.2.2.22) in terms of molecular mass, isoelectric point, sequence of amino-terminal amino acids and extent of glycosylation. The 31-kDa protein was barely detectable in extracts of various tissues from seedlings. Thus, it is possible that an increase in the relative level of this protein might be associated with the expression of embryogenic potential expressed by spinach callus.

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of luciferase gene mRNA requires CRM1/Exportin1 and RanGTPase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tominori; Hashimoto, Iwao; Nishikawa, Masao; Yamada, Hisao

    2009-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev (regulator of the expression of the virion) protein was shown to reduce the expression level of the co-transfected luciferase reporter gene (luc+) introduced to monitor transfection efficiency. We studied the mechanism of the inhibitory Rev effect. The effect, caused by nuclear retention of luc+ mRNA, was reversed if rev had a point mutation that makes its nuclear export signal (NES) unable to associate with cellular transport factors. The Rev NES receptor CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-specific inhibitor, leptomycin B, blocked luc+ mRNA export. This finding was also supported by the overexpression of delta CAN, another specific CRM1 inhibitor that caused inhibition of luciferase gene expression. Experiments involving tsBN2 cells, which have a temperature-sensitive RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) allele, demonstrated that luc+ expression required generation of the GTP-bound form of RanGTPase (RanGTP) by RCC1. The constitutive transport element (CTE)-mediated nuclear export of luc+ mRNA was found to also depend upon RanGTP. Nuclear export of luc+ mRNA is thus suggested to involve CRM1 and RanGTP, which Rev employs to transport viral mRNA. The Rev effect is therefore considered to involve competition between two molecules for common transport factors.

  13. Changes in phosphorylation of 50 and 53 kDa soluble proteins in graviresponding oat (Avena sativa) shoots.

    PubMed

    Chang, Soo Chul; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Kim, Seong-Ki; Lee, June Seung; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B

    2003-03-01

    The present work indicates that phosphorylation of a 50 kDa soluble protein is involved in the gravitropic response in graviresponsive pulvini of oat (Avena sativa) stems. This 50 kDa protein shows a differential pattern of phosphorylation between lower and upper halves of pulvini both in vivo and in vitro. The differential phosphorylation of this protein is detected only when stem segments are gravistimulated for short and long time periods. The differential phosphorylation of the 50 kDa protein occurs as early as 5 min after the initiation of gravistimulation. This corresponds closely to the presentation time of 5.2 min. This differential phosphorylation pattern was changed by treatments with cycloheximide, implying that a newly-synthesized protein is involved in the differential phosphorylation during the gravitropic response. An autophosphorylation experiment shows that the 50 kDa protein has kinase activity. The phosphorylation patterns of a 53 kDa protein were similar to those of the 50 kDa protein, but were only expressed in vitro. These findings indicate that the differential phosphorylation of the 50 (and 53 kDa) soluble proteins in graviresponding oat shoots may be an important component of the gravity signal transduction pathway.

  14. An avian 40 KDa nucleoprotein binds preferentially to a promoter sequence containing one single pair of methylated CpG.

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, A; Bryans, M; Jost, J P

    1991-01-01

    In vitro transcription competition with oligonucleotides has shown that a down regulating factor can be displaced by a methylated oligonucleotide covering a specific region of the avian vitellogenin II gene promoter (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA, (1990) 87, 3047-3051). Gel mobility shift and competition assays show that a protein binding preferentially to methylated DNA (MDBP-2) is present in fractionated hen and rooster nuclear extracts. The protein(s) bind to the methylated sequence 5' TTCACCTTmCGCTATG-AGGGGGATCATACTGG' 3' (nucleotide positions +2 to +32) of the vitellogenin II promoter and not to other methylated DNA sequences. Contact points of the MDBP-2 with DNA were studied by DNA binding interference experiments with partially depurinated and depyrimidinated oligonucleotides. The protein has an approximate molecular weight of 40 KDa and is mainly found in the liver and oviduct. Proteolytic clipping bandshift assays of the MDBP-2 from rooster and hen liver nuclear extracts indicate that the protein from the two sources are different. In vitro transcription experiments show that the addition of a purified nuclear fraction containing the addition of a purified nuclear dependent manner the transcription of vitellogenin II gene. Images PMID:2020543

  15. Monocytes stimulated by 110-kDa fibronectin fragments suppress proliferation of anti-CD3-activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, Holly H; Porter, Wendy J; Trial, JoAnn; Rossen, Roger D

    2005-09-01

    One hundred ten to 120-kDa fragments of fibronectin (FNf), generated by proteases released in the course of tissue injury and inflammation, stimulate monocytes to produce proinflammatory cytokines, promote mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) transendothelial migration, up-regulate monocyte CD11b and CD86 expression, and induce monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation. To investigate whether the proinflammatory consequences of FNf are offset by responses that can suppress proliferation of activated T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of FNf-treated MNL on autologous T lymphocytes induced to proliferate by substrate-immobilized anti-CD3. FNf-stimulated MNL suppressed anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation through both contact-dependent and contact-independent mechanisms. Contact-independent suppression was mediated, at least in part, by IL-10 and TGF-beta released by the FNf-stimulated MNL. After 24-48 h exposure to FNf, activated T cells and monocytes formed clusters displaying CD25, CD14, CD3, and CD4 that were not dissociable by chelation of divalent cations. Killing monocytes with l-leucine methyl ester abolished these T cell-monocyte clusters and the ability of the FNf-stimulated MNL to suppress anti-CD3 induced T cell proliferation. Thus, in addition to activating MNL and causing them to migrate to sites of injury, FNf appears to induce suppressor monocytes.

  16. Interferon-stimulated gene 20-kDa protein (ISG20) in infection and disease: Review and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Interferon-stimulated exonuclease gene 20 (ISG20) is an RNA exonuclease in the yeast RNA exonuclease 4 homolog (REX4) subfamily and the DEDDh exonuclease family, and this gene codes for a 20-kDa protein. Those exonucleases are involved in cleaving single-stranded RNA and DNA. ISG20 is also referred to as HEM45 (HeLa estrogen-modulated, band 45). Expression of ISG20 can be induced or regulated by both type I and II interferons (IFNs) in various cell lines. ISG20 plays a role in mediating interferon's antiviral activities. In addition, ISG20 may be a potential susceptibility biomarker or pharmacological target in some inflammatory conditions. Exonucleases are useful components of many physiological processes. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the functions of ISG20, much work remains to be done with regard to uncovering the mechanism of action of ISG20 in specific diseases and adapting ISG20 for use as a biomarker of disease. This review describes current information on ISG20 and its potential use in marking disease. This review describes several research achievements thus far and it seeks to provide some new ideas for future related research. PMID:28357179

  17. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in

  18. A 63 kDa phosphoprotein undergoing rapid dephosphorylation during exocytosis in Paramecium cells shares biochemical characteristics with phosphoglucomutase.

    PubMed

    Treptau, T; Kissmehl, R; Wissmann, J D; Plattner, H

    1995-07-15

    We have enriched phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 5.4.2.2) approximately 20-fold from Paramecium tetraurelia cells by combined fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel filtration and anion-exchange chromatography yielding two PGM peaks. Several parameters affecting PGM enzymic activity, molecular mass and pI were determined. Phosphorylation studies were done with isolated endogenous protein kinases. Like the 63 kDa phosphoprotein PP63, which is dephosphorylated within 80 ms during synchronous trichocyst exocytosis [Höhne-Zell, Knoll, Riedel-Gras, Hofer and Plattner (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 843-849], PGM has a molecular mass of 63 kDa and forms of identical pI. Since mammalian PGM activity depends on the presence of glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (Glc-1,6-P2) (which is lost during anion-exchange chromatography), we analysed this aspect with Paramecium PGM. In this case PGM activity was shown not to be lost, due to p-nitrophenyl phosphate-detectable phosphatase(s) (which we have separated from PGM), but also due to loss of Glc-1,6-P2. Like PGM from various vertebrate species, PGM activity from Paramecium can be fully re-established by addition of Glc-1,6-P2 at 10 nM, and it is also stimulated by bivalent cations and insensitive to chelating or thiol reagents. The PGM which we have isolated can be phosphorylated by endogenous cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase or by endogenous casein kinase. This results in three phosphorylated bands of identical molecular mass and pI values, as we have shown to occur with PP63 after phosphorylation in vivo (forms with pI 6.05, 5.95, 5.85). In ELISA, antibodies raised against PGM from rabbit skeletal muscle were reactive not only with original PGM but also with PGM fractions from Paramecium. Therefore, PGM and PP63 seem to be identical with regard to widely different parameters, i.e. co-elution by chromatography, molecular mass, phosphorylation by the two protein kinases tested, pI values of isoforms, and immuno-binding. Recent claims that

  19. A 63 kDa phosphoprotein undergoing rapid dephosphorylation during exocytosis in Paramecium cells shares biochemical characteristics with phosphoglucomutase.

    PubMed Central

    Treptau, T; Kissmehl, R; Wissmann, J D; Plattner, H

    1995-01-01

    We have enriched phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 5.4.2.2) approximately 20-fold from Paramecium tetraurelia cells by combined fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel filtration and anion-exchange chromatography yielding two PGM peaks. Several parameters affecting PGM enzymic activity, molecular mass and pI were determined. Phosphorylation studies were done with isolated endogenous protein kinases. Like the 63 kDa phosphoprotein PP63, which is dephosphorylated within 80 ms during synchronous trichocyst exocytosis [Höhne-Zell, Knoll, Riedel-Gras, Hofer and Plattner (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 843-849], PGM has a molecular mass of 63 kDa and forms of identical pI. Since mammalian PGM activity depends on the presence of glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (Glc-1,6-P2) (which is lost during anion-exchange chromatography), we analysed this aspect with Paramecium PGM. In this case PGM activity was shown not to be lost, due to p-nitrophenyl phosphate-detectable phosphatase(s) (which we have separated from PGM), but also due to loss of Glc-1,6-P2. Like PGM from various vertebrate species, PGM activity from Paramecium can be fully re-established by addition of Glc-1,6-P2 at 10 nM, and it is also stimulated by bivalent cations and insensitive to chelating or thiol reagents. The PGM which we have isolated can be phosphorylated by endogenous cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase or by endogenous casein kinase. This results in three phosphorylated bands of identical molecular mass and pI values, as we have shown to occur with PP63 after phosphorylation in vivo (forms with pI 6.05, 5.95, 5.85). In ELISA, antibodies raised against PGM from rabbit skeletal muscle were reactive not only with original PGM but also with PGM fractions from Paramecium. Therefore, PGM and PP63 seem to be identical with regard to widely different parameters, i.e. co-elution by chromatography, molecular mass, phosphorylation by the two protein kinases tested, pI values of isoforms, and immuno-binding. Recent claims that

  20. Crystal structure of the 500-kDa yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-10-12

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope7, 8. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250-kilodalton (kDa), multi-domain enzymes and function as homodimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80-kDa central region that shares no homology with other proteins. Although the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known1, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, there is currently no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500-kDa holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is remarkably different from that of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of the BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes reveal why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A15, 16 and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just before the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis.

  1. Purification and characterization of the maize amyloplast stromal 112-kDa starch phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Mu, H H; Yu, Y; Wasserman, B P; Carman, G M

    2001-04-01

    A plastidic 112-kDa starch phosphorylase (SP) has been identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction of maize. This starch phosphorylase was purified 310-fold from maize endosperm and characterized with respect to its enzymological and kinetic properties. The purification procedure included ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephacryl 300 HR chromatography, affinity starch adsorption, Q-Sepharose, and Mono Q chromatography. The procedure resulted in a nearly homogeneous enzyme preparation as determined by native and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Anti-SP antibodies recognized the purified 112-kDa SP enzyme and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis confirmed that the purified enzyme is the amyloplast stromal 112-kDa SP. Analysis of the purified enzyme by Superose 6 gel filtration chromatography indicated that the native enzyme consisted of two identical subunits. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 6.0 in the synthetic direction and 5.5 in the phosphorolytic direction. SP activity was inhibited by thioreactive agents, diethyl pyrocarbonate, phenylglyoxal, and ADP-glucose. The activation energies for the synthetic and phosphorolytic reactions were 11.1 and 16.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and the enzyme was thermally labile above 50 degrees C. Results of kinetic experiments indicated that the enzyme catalyzes its reaction via a sequential Bi Bi mechanism. The Km value for amylopectin was eight-fold lower than that of glycogen. A kinetic analysis indicated that the phosphorolytic reaction was favored over the synthetic reaction when malto-oligosaccharides (4 to 7 units) were used as substrates. The specificity constants (Vmax/Km) of the enzyme measured in either the synthetic or the phosphorolytic directions increased with increasing chain length.

  2. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the Mg2+-induced 90-kDa heat shock protein oligomers.

    PubMed

    Moullintraffort, Laura; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Nazabal, Alexis; Allegro, Diane; Giudice, Emmanuel; Zal, Franck; Peyrot, Vincent; Barbier, Pascale; Thomas, Daniel; Garnier, Cyrille

    2010-05-14

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) is involved in the regulation and activation of numerous client proteins essential for diverse functions such as cell growth and differentiation. Although the function of cytosolic Hsp90 is dependent on a battery of cochaperone proteins regulating both its ATPase activity and its interaction with client proteins, little is known about the real Hsp90 molecular mechanism. Besides its highly flexible dimeric state, Hsp90 is able to self-oligomerize in the presence of divalent cations or under heat shock. In addition to dimers, oligomers exhibit a chaperone activity. In this work, we focused on Mg(2+)-induced oligomers that we named Type I, Type II, and Type III in increasing molecular mass order. After stabilization of these quaternary structures, we optimized a purification protocol. Combining analytical ultracentrifugation, size exclusion chromatography coupled to multiangle laser light scattering, and high mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, we determined biochemical and biophysical characteristics of each Hsp90 oligomer. We demonstrate that Type I oligomer is a tetramer, and Type II is an hexamer, whereas Type III is a dodecamer. These even-numbered structures demonstrate that the building brick for oligomerization is the dimer up to the Type II, whereas Type III probably results from the association of two Type II. Moreover, the Type II oligomer structure, studied by negative stain transmission electron microscopy tomography, exhibits a "nest-like" shape that forms a "cozy chaperoning chamber" where the client protein folding/protection could occur.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a 25 kDa antifungal protein from flax seeds.

    PubMed

    Borgmeyer, J R; Smith, C E; Huynh, Q K

    1992-08-31

    We have purified a 25 kDa protein from flax seeds to homogeneity by polyethyleneimine precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, chitin extraction, Mono S cation exchange and C18 reversed phase column chromatographies. The purified protein strongly inhibited the growth of the agronomically important pathogen Alternaria solani, the causative agent of tomato early blight and in synergy with nikkomycin Z strongly inhibited the human pathogen Candida albicans. Amino terminal sequence analysis of the purified protein indicated that it has a high degree of homology to other reported pathogenesis-related antifungal proteins.

  4. Identification of the sequence determinants mediating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of TIAR and TIA-1 RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Delestienne, Nathalie; Huez, Georges; Kruys, Véronique; Gueydan, Cyril

    2005-12-01

    TIAR and TIA-1 are two closely related RNA-binding proteins which possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) followed by an auxiliary region. These proteins are involved in several mechanisms of RNA metabolism, including alternative hnRNA splicing and regulation of mRNA translation. Here we characterize the subcellular localization of these proteins in somatic cells. We demonstrate that TIAR and TIA-1 continuously shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and belong to the class of RNA-binding proteins whose nuclear import is transcription-dependent. We identified RRM2 and the first half of the auxiliary region as important determinants for TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation. In contrast, the nuclear export of TIAR and TIA-1 is mediated by RRM3. Both RRMs contribute to TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation or export by their RNA-binding capacity. Indeed, whereas mutations of the highly conserved RNP2 or RNP1 peptides in RRM2 redistribute TIAR to the cytoplasm, similar modifications in RRM3 abolish TIAR nuclear export. Moreover, TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation is a Ran-GTP-dependent pathway, in contrast to its nuclear export which is unaffected by Ran-GTP depletion and which is independent of the major CRM1-exporting pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of TIAR and TIA-1 RNA-binding domains for their subcellular localization and provides the first evidence for distinct functions of TIAR and TIA-1 RRMs.

  5. The human actin-related protein hArp5: nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and involvement in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Kumiko; Kamo, Mariko; Oma, Yukako; Matsuda, Ryo; Uchida, Takafumi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Winsor, Barbara; Harata, Masahiko

    2009-01-15

    Certain actin-related proteins (Arps) of budding yeast are localized in the nucleus, and have essential roles as stoichiometric components of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and chromatin remodeling complexes. On the other hand, identification of vertebrate nuclear Arps and their functional analyses are just beginning. We show that human Arp5 (hArp5) proteins are localized in the nucleus, and that arp5Delta yeast cells are partially complemented by hArp5. Thus, hArp5 is a novel member of the nuclear Arps of vertebrates, which possess evolutionarily conserved functions from yeast to humans. We show here that hArp5 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, after the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), cell growth and the accumulation of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) are impaired by hArp5 depletion. Association of hArp5 with the hIno80 chromatin remodeling enzyme and decrease of chromatin-bound hIno80 by hArp5-depletion indicate that hArp5 may have a role in the recruitment of the hINO80 complex to chromatin. Overexpression of hArp5 and hIno80 enhanced gamma-H2AX accumulation. These observations suggest that hArp5 is involved in the process of DSB repair through the regulation of the chromatin remodelling machinery.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of garlic 14-kDa protein on LPS-stimulated-J774A.1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Shahrzad Zamani Taghizadeh; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Siadat, Zahra; Rastin, Maryam; Rabe, Shahin Zamani Taghizadeh; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    Garlic 14-kDa protein is purified from garlic (Allium sativum L.) which is used in traditional medicine and exerts various immunomodulatory activities. The present study investigated the suppressive effect of garlic 14-kDa protein on LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and underlying mechanism in inflammatory macrophages. J774A.1 macrophages were treated with 14-kDa protein (5-30 μg/ml) with/without LPS (1 μg/ml) and the production of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, and IL-1β released were measured using ELISA. Nitric oxide (NO) production was determined using the Griess method. The anti-inflammatory activity of 14-kDa protein was examined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 proteins using western blot. The expression of nuclear NF-κB p65 subunit was assessed by western blot. Garlic 14-kDa protein significantly inhibited the excessive production of NO, PGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774A.1 macrophages in a concentration-related manner without cytotoxic effect. Western blot analysis demonstrated that garlic 14-kDa protein suppressed corresponding inducible NO synthase expression and activated cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression. The inhibitory effect was mediated partly by a reduction in the activity and expression of transcription factor NF-κB protein. Our results suggested, for the first time, garlic 14-kDa protein exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages possibly by suppressing the inflammatory mediators via the inhibition of transcription factor NF-κB signaling pathway. The traditional use of garlic as anti-inflammatory remedy could be ascribed partly to 14-kDa protein content. This protein might be a useful candidate for controlling inflammatory diseases and further investigations in vivo.

  7. Identification and purification of a novel 120-kDa protein that recognizes the cAMP-responsive element

    SciTech Connect

    Andrisani, O.; Dixon, J.E. )

    1990-02-25

    The TGACGTCA (CRE) motif required for function by a number of cellular (somatostatin, enkephalin, alpha-human chorionic gonadotropin) and viral (Ad5 E1A-inducible, HTLV-1 TAX-inducible) genes is the site of interaction of multiple sequence-specific complexes. A protocol has been developed for the fractionation and purification of these activities. We report here the purification from HeLa nuclear extracts of a novel 120-kDa polypeptide which by Southwestern blots, gel retardation, and UV cross-linking assays displays CRE-specific binding. The CRE-affinity purified 120-kDa protein displays properties distinct from those of the 43-kDa CREB/ATF polypeptide. The 120-kDa protein is readily phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C but not by protein kinase A, suggesting that this molecule may mediate cellular signals distinct from the cAMP-responsive pathway. In vitro transcription-complementation assays utilizing the purified 120-kDa protein failed to transactivate the cAMP-responsive somatostatin promoter suggesting that the mode of action of this 120-kDa polypeptide may require an activation step distinct from the cAMP-signaling pathway.

  8. Low molecular mass phosphoproteins from the frog rod outer segments form a complex with 48 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Krapivinsky, G B; Malenyov, A L; Zaikina, I V; Fesenko, E E

    1992-09-01

    Upon separation of cAMP-dependent low molecular mass phosphoproteins [Components I and II; Polans et al. (1979) J. gen. Physiol. 74, 595-613] from the frog rod outer segments by gel-chromatography, isoelectric focusing, non-denaturating electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography, they behave like subunits of the oligomeric complex. Apparent molecular mass of the complex determined by gel-chromatography is 52-57 kDa and by non-denaturating gradient electrophoresis is 62-66 kDa. The isoelectric point of the complex is 5.5. The elution profile of Components I and II upon gel-chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography coincides with that of major rod outer segment 48 kDa protein. The isoelectric point for them also coincides with the isoelectric point of 48 kDa protein. The amount of low molecular mass phosphoproteins is sealed rods is equal to one molecule per 60 rhodopsin molecules and coincides with that of a 48 kDa protein. It is suggested that in solution Components I and II form an oligomeric complex with 48 kDa protein.

  9. PCSK9-mediated degradation of the LDL receptor generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDL receptor fragment.

    PubMed

    Tveten, Kristian; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2013-06-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the LDL receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and reroutes the internalized LDLR to intracellular degradation. In this study, we have shown that PCSK9-mediated degradation of the full-length 160 kDa LDLR generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment. This fragment was not generated from mutant LDLRs resistant to PCSK9-mediated degradation or when degradation was prevented by chemicals such as ammonium chloride or the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor E64d. The observation that the 17 kDa fragment was only detected when the cells were cultured in the presence of the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT indicates that this 17 kDa fragment undergoes γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. The failure to detect the complementary 143 kDa ectodomain fragment is likely to be due to its rapid degradation in the endosomal lumen. The 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment was also generated from a Class 5 mutant LDLR undergoing intracellular degradation. Thus, one may speculate that an LDLR with bound PCSK9 and a Class 5 LDLR with bound LDL are degraded by a similar mechanism that could involve ectodomain cleavage in the endosome.

  10. Evaluation of the immunomodulatory effect of the 14 kDa protein isolated from aged garlic extract on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmadabad, Hasan Namdar; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Safari, Elahe; Bozorgmehr, Mahmood; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Garlic is used all over the world for treatment of different diseases. A wide range of biological activities of garlic has been verified in vitro and in vivo. One of major proteins of garlic which has been isolated and purified is the 14 kDa protein. This protein has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects. In this study, the effect of the 14 kDa protein isolated from aged garlic extract (AGE) was investigated on maturation and immunomodulatory activity of dendritic cells (DC). Proteins were purified from AGE by biochemical method; the semi-purified 14 kDa protein was run on gel filtration Sephadex G50 and its purity was checked by SDS-PAGE. DC were isolated from spleen of BALB/c mice by Nycodenz centrifugation and their adhesiveness to plastic dish. 14 kDa protein from AGE was added to overnight culture of DC medium and the expression percentage of CD40, CD86, and MHC-II was evaluated by flowcytometric analysis. Also, proliferation of T-cells was measured by allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) test. The purified 14 kDa protein isolated from AGE increased the expression of CD40 molecule on DC, but it did not influence CD86 and MHCII molecules. Furthermore, no significant differences were noticed in the pulsed-DC with 14 kDa protein and non-pulsed DC on the MLR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of a 48-kDa protease (AMP48) from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, J; Thammasirirak, S; Samosornsuk, W

    2012-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) is a latex producing plant. Plant latex is produced from secretory cells and contains many intergradients. It also has been used in folk medicine. This study aimed to purify and characterize the biological activities of a protease from jackfruit latex. A protease was isolated and purified from crude latex of a jackfruit tree by acid precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The proteolytic activities of protein were tested using gelatin- and casein-zymography. The molecular weight and isoelectric point (pl) of protein were analysed by SDS/12.5% PAGE and 2D-PAGE, respectively. Antimicrobial activity of protein was analysed by broth microdilution method. In addition, the antibacterial activity of protein against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was observed and measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The purified protein contained protease activity by digesting gelatin- and casein-substrates. The protease was designated as antimicrobial protease-48 kDa or AMP48 due to its molecular mass on SDS-PAGE was approximately 48 kDa. The isoelectric point (pl) of AMP48 was approximately 4.2. In addition, AMP48 contained antimicrobial activities by it could inhibit the growths of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and clinical isolated Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 2.2 mg/ml and Minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) 8.8 mg/ml. AFM image also supported the antimicrobial activities of AMP48 by the treated bacterial morphology and size were altered from normal.

  12. [Diagnostic value of IgG antibody levels against 38 kDa mycobacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Demkow, U; Zielonka, T M; Strzałkowski, J; Michałowska-Mitczuk, D; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Białas-Chromiec, B; Kuś, J; Skopińska-Rózewska, E; Zwolska, Z

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis diagnosis bases on clinical and radiological symptoms and identification of mycobacteria. Accuracy of both methods is limited. Therefore reliable serological test would have considerable advantage. The present study was aimed at evaluating IgG-mediated immune response against specific mycobacterial antigens 38 kDa in group of 200 patients and control subjects. Our material consisted of 104 tuberculosis patients, 25 with sarcoidosis, 24 with lung cancer, 13 with bacterial or fungal pulmonary infection, 8 with mycobacterial infections other than tuberculosis and 26 healthy persons. We used commercially available ELISA based kits (Pathozyme TB-complex). Specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 49% was achieved. Sensitivity increased to 59% in chronic cases and to 52% in culture positive cases. Sensitivity decreased to only 14% in group of new culture negative cases. Measurement of IgG serum level against 38 kDa can be helpful in tuberculosis diagnosis. As the test lacks falsely positive results it indicates its high positive predictive value.

  13. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  14. Characterization and localization of a 77 kDa protein related to the dystrophin gene family.

    PubMed

    Fabbrizio, E; Nudel, U; Hugon, G; Robert, A; Pons, F; Mornet, D

    1994-04-15

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene gives rise to transcripts of several lengths. These mRNAs differ in their coding content and tissue distribution. The 14 kb mRNA encodes dystrophin, a 427 kDa protein found in muscle and brain, and the short transcripts described encode DP71, a 77 kDa protein found in various organs. These short transcripts have many features common to the deduced primary structure of dystrophin, especially in the cysteine-rich specific C-terminal domains. The dystrophin C-terminal domain could be involved in membrane anchorage via the glycoprotein complex, but such a functional role for these short transcript products has yet to be demonstrated. Here we report the first isolation of a short transcript product from saponin-solubilized cardiac muscle membranes using alkaline buffer and affinity chromatography procedures. This molecule was found to be glycosylated and could be easily dissociated from cardiac muscle and other non-muscle tissues such as brain and liver. DP71-specific monoclonal antibody helped to identify this molecule as being related to the dystrophin gene family. Immunofluorescence analysis of bovine or chicken cardiac muscle showed a periodic distribution of DP71 in transverse T tubules and this protein was co-localized with the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in the Z-disk area.

  15. A conserved 19-kDa Eimeria tenella antigen is a profilin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Jenkins, M C; Barfield, R C

    2004-12-01

    A wide range of recombinant proteins from Eimeria species have been reported to offer some degree of protection against infection and disease, but the specific biological function of these proteins is largely unknown. Previous studies have demonstrated a 19-kDa protein of unknown function designated SZ-1 in sporozoites and merozoites of Eimeria acervulina that can be used to confer partial protection against coccidiosis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the gene for SZ-1 is expressed by all the asexual stages of Eimeria tenella. Rabbit antisera to recombinant SZ-1 recognized an approximately 19-kDa protein from extracts of E. tenella sporozoites, merozoites, sporulated oocysts, and oocysts in various stages of sporulation. Immunofluorescence antibody staining indicated specific staining of E. tenella sporozoites and merozoites. Staining was most intense in the cytoplasm of the posterior end of the parasite. The primary amino acid sequence of the gene for E. tenella SZ-1 deduced from the E. tenella genome indicated a conserved domain for the actin-regulatory protein profilin. A conserved binding site for poly-L-proline (PLP), characteristic of profilin was also observed. SZ-1 was separated from soluble extract of E. tenella proteins by affinity chromatography using a PLP ligand, confirming the ability of SZ-1 to bind PLP. SZ-1 also partially inhibited the polymerization of actin. The current results are consistent with the classification of SZ-1 as a profilin-related protein.

  16. Identification of a 115kDa MAP-kinase activated by freezing and anoxic stresses in the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-06-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade regulates changes in gene transcription by transmitting extracellular stimuli from the plasma membrane to the cell nucleus and has an important role to play in organismal responses to environmental stresses. The activities of MAPKs were investigated in the marine gastropod mollusk, Littorina littorea, a species that tolerates both extracellular freezing and long term oxygen deprivation. In-gel kinase assays revealed the presence of two MAPKs in foot muscle and hepatopancreas, a 42 and a 115kDa protein. Immunoblot analysis showed that both were MAPK proteins and that one was the periwinkle homologue of p42(ERK2). Size exclusion chromatography confirmed the 115kDa size of the novel snail MAPK and its role as the dominant MAPK activity in foot muscle. In-gel kinase assays, immunoblotting with phospho-specific ERK antibody, as well as kinase activity profiles from hydroxyapatite chromatography demonstrated that p115 MAPK kinase activity was increased in foot muscle in response to in vivo freezing or anoxia exposures. The results suggest a role for this novel kinase in environmental stress response.

  17. Tissue Localization of Lymphocystis Disease Virus (LCDV) Receptor-27.8 kDa and Its Expression Kinetics Induced by the Viral Infection in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xiuzhen; Wu, Ronghua; Tang, Xiaoqian; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    The 27.8 kDa membrane protein expressed in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) gill cells was proved to be a receptor mediating lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) infection. In this study, SDS-PAGE and Western blotting demonstrated that 27.8 kDa receptor (27.8R) was shared by flounder and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA) and immunohistochemistry showed that 27.8R was widely expressed in tested tissues of healthy turbot. The indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that 27.8R expression was relatively higher in stomach, gill, heart, and intestine, followed by skin, head kidney, spleen, blood cells, kidney and liver, and lower in ovary and brain in healthy turbot, and it was significantly up-regulated after LCDV infection. Meanwhile, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that LCDV was detected in heart, peripheral blood cells, and head kidney at 3 h post infection (p.i.), and then in other tested tissues at 12 h p.i. LCDV copies increased in a time-dependent manner, and were generally higher in the tissues with higher 27.8R expression. Additionally, IIFA showed that 27.8R and LCDV were detected at 3 h p.i. in some leukocytes. These results suggested that 27.8R also served as a receptor in turbot, and LCDV can infect some leukocytes which might result in LCDV spreading to different tissues in turbot. PMID:26556346

  18. A 102 kDa subunit of a Golgi-associated particle has homology to beta subunits of trimeric G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Lavoie, K J; Lewis, V A; Hynes, G M; Collison, K S; Nutland, E; Willison, K R

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a 102 kDa protein, p102, which is found on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes, exocytic transport vesicles and in the cytosol. A monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts with p102 is able to immunoprecipitate a 500-600 kDa protein complex containing p102 and additional subunits. The composition of this p102-containing protein complex resembles that of the Golgi coatomer complex, which constitutes the coat of non-clathrin coated vesicles. One of the subunits of the p102 complex reacts with a monoclonal antibody that detects beta-COP, a subunit of the Golgi coatomer complex. Like beta-COP, p102 exists in a brefeldin A-sensitive association with Golgi membranes. The sequence of p102 contains an N-terminal domain composed of six repeats which are similar to those found in the beta subunit of trimeric G proteins and other regulatory proteins. We suggest that p102 may be involved in regulating membrane traffic in the constitutive exocytic pathway. Images PMID:8335000

  19. Crystallization and X-ray data analysis of the 10 kDa C-terminal lid subdomain from Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Liam; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2006-09-01

    Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa lid subdomain from the C. elegans chaperone Hsp70 have been obtained that diffract X-rays to ∼3.5 Å and belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Analysis of X-ray data and initial heavy-atom phasing reveals 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit related by 432 non-crystallographic symmetry. Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of protein folding. Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa helical lid domain (residues 542–640) from a Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70 homologue have been produced that diffract X-rays to ∼3.4 Å. Crystals belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 197, c = 200 Å. The Matthews coefficient, self-rotation function and Patterson map indicate 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit, showing non-crystallographic 432 symmetry. Molecular-replacement studies using the corresponding domain from rat, the only eukaryotic homologue with a known structure, failed and a mercury derivative was obtained. Preliminary MAD phasing using SHELXD and SHARP for location and refinement of the heavy-atom substructure and SOLOMON for density modification produced interpretable maps with a clear protein–solvent boundary. Further density-modification, model-building and refinement are currently under way.

  20. The 133-kDa N-terminal domain enables myosin 15 to maintain mechanotransducing stereocilia and is essential for hearing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qing; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Mustapha, Mirna; Riordan, Gavin P; Dolan, David F; Friedman, Thomas B; Belyantseva, Inna A; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Camper, Sally A; Bird, Jonathan E

    2015-01-01

    The precise assembly of inner ear hair cell stereocilia into rows of increasing height is critical for mechanotransduction and the sense of hearing. Yet, how the lengths of actin-based stereocilia are regulated remains poorly understood. Mutations of the molecular motor myosin 15 stunt stereocilia growth and cause deafness. We found that hair cells express two isoforms of myosin 15 that differ by inclusion of an 133-kDa N-terminal domain, and that these isoforms can selectively traffic to different stereocilia rows. Using an isoform-specific knockout mouse, we show that hair cells expressing only the small isoform remarkably develop normal stereocilia bundles. However, a critical subset of stereocilia with active mechanotransducer channels subsequently retracts. The larger isoform with the 133-kDa N-terminal domain traffics to these specialized stereocilia and prevents disassembly of their actin core. Our results show that myosin 15 isoforms can navigate between functionally distinct classes of stereocilia, and are independently required to assemble and then maintain the intricate hair bundle architecture. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08627.001 PMID:26302205

  1. The 20kDa and 22kDa forms of human growth hormone (hGH) exhibit different intracellular signalling profiles and properties.

    PubMed

    Yao-Xia, Liu; Jing-Yan, Chen; Xia-Lian, Tang; Ping, Chen; Min, Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Human Growth Hormone (hGH) includes two main variants. The first is 22kDa GH (22K-GH), which is predominant in the blood circulation. The second most abundant variant is 20K-GH, which makes up 5-10% of the blood circulation. Both bind and activate the same receptor, called the human growth hormone receptor (GHR). However, the reason why 22K-GH and 20K-GH exhibit similar, but not identical physiological activities remains poorly understood. In this article, the intracellular signalling profiles between these two hormones were examined. Western blot analyses were performed in 3T3-F442A and CHO cells transfected with GHR (CHO-GHR). The results revealed that both 22K-GH and 20K-GH can activate Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1, 3 and 5 (STATs 1/3/5). Both induced tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT/1/3/5 in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. However, there were significant differences in the intracellular signalling properties between 22K-GH and 20K-GH. In particular, the kinetics of signalling shown by 22K-GH and 20K-GH is different. In addition, we found that the 20K-GH-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signalling proteins was weaker than that of 22K-GH. Together, these observations indicate that the levels and kinetics of phosphorylation mediated by the main signalling proteins triggered by 22K-GH or 20K-GH were not exactly the same. This may provide a possible explanation for the different biological activities exhibited by 22K-GH and 20K-GH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recognition of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor cytoplasmic domain by 47-kDa tail-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Orsel, Joke G.; Sincock, Paul M.; Krise, Jeffrey P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2000-01-01

    Tail-interacting 47-kDa protein (TIP47) binds the cytoplasmic domains of the cation-dependent (CD) and cation-independent (CI) mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) and is required for their transport from endosomes to the Golgi complex. TIP47 recognizes a phenylalanine-tryptophan signal in the CD-MPR. We show here that TIP47 interaction with the 163-residue CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain is highly conformation dependent and requires CI-MPR residues that are proximal to the membrane. CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain residues 1–47 are dispensable, whereas residues 48–74 are essential for high-affinity binding. However, residues 48–74 are not sufficient for high-affinity binding; residues 75–163 alone display weak affinity for TIP47, yet they contribute to the presentation of residues 48–74 in the intact protein. Independent competition binding experiments confirm that TIP47 interacts with the membrane-proximal portion of the CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain. TIP47 binding is competed by the binding of the AP-2 clathrin adaptor at (and near) residues 24–29 but not by AP-1 binding at (and near) residues 160–161. Finally, TIP47 appears to recognize a putative loop generated by the sequence PPAPRPG and other hydrophobic residues in the membrane-proximal domain. Although crystallography will be needed to define the precise interaction interface, these data provide an initial structural basis for TIP47–CI-MPR association. PMID:10908666

  3. STRADalpha regulates LKB1 localization by blocking access to importin-alpha, and by association with Crm1 and exportin-7.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Julia; Macara, Ian G

    2008-04-01

    LKB1, a serine/threonine kinase, regulates cell polarity, metabolism, and cell growth. The activity and cellular distribution of LKB1 are determined by cofactors, STRADalpha and MO25. STRADalpha induces relocalization of LKB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and stimulates its catalytic activity. MO25 stabilizes the STRADalpha/LKB1 interaction. We investigated the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport of LKB1 in response to its cofactors. Although LKB1 is imported into the nucleus by importin-alpha/beta, STRADalpha and MO25 passively diffuse between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. STRADalpha induces nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of LKB1. STRADalpha facilitates nuclear export of LKB1 by serving as an adaptor between LKB1 and exportins CRM1 and exportin7. STRADalpha inhibits import of LKB1 by competing with importin-alpha for binding to LKB1. MO25 stabilizes the LKB1-STRADalpha complex but it does not facilitate its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Strikingly, the STRADbeta, isoform which differs from STRADalpha in the N- and C-terminal domains that are responsible for interaction with export receptors, does not efficiently relocalize LKB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These results identify a multifactored mechanism to control LKB1 localization, and they suggest that the STRADbeta-LKB1 complex might possess unique functions in the nucleus.

  4. Novel nuclear localization signal regulated by ambient tonicity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H Moo

    2008-08-15

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution.

  5. Novel Nuclear Localization Signal Regulated by Ambient Tonicity in Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H. Moo

    2008-01-01

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution. PMID:18579527

  6. Trichinella spiralis: strong antibody response to a 49 kDa newborn larva antigen in infected rats.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Tobon, Maria Del Rosario; Navarrete-Leon, Anaid; Mendez-Loredo, Blanca Esther; Esquivel-Aguirre, Dalia; Martínez-Abrajan, Dulce Maria; Hernandez-Sanchez, Javier

    2007-02-01

    In this work, we analyzed the kinetics of anti-Trichinella spiralis newborn larva (NBL) antibodies (Ab) and the antigenic recognition pattern of NBL proteins and its dose effects. Wistar rats were infected with 0, 700, 2000, 4000 and 8000 muscle larvae (ML) and bled at different time intervals up to day 31 post infection (p.i.). Ab production was higher with 2000 ML dose and decreased with 8000, 4000 and 700 ML. Abs were not detected until day 10, peaked on day 14 for the 2000 ML dose and on day 19 for the other doses and thereafter declined slowly from 19 to 31 days p.i. In contrast, Abs to ML increased from day 10, peaked on day 19 and remained high until the end of the study. Abs bound strongly at least to three NBL components of 188, 205 and 49 kDa. NBL antigen of 188 and 205 kDa were recognized 10-26 days p.i. and that of 49 kDa from day 10 to day 31 p.i. A weak recognition towards antigens of 52, 54, 62 and 83 kDa was also observed during the infection. An early recognition of 31, 43, 45, 55, 68 and 85 kDa ML antigens was observed whereas the response to those of 43, 45, 48, 60, 64 and 97 kDa (described previously as TSL-1 antigens) occurred late in the infection. A follow-up of antigen recognition up to day 61 with the optimal immunization dose (2000 ML) evidenced a decline of Ab production to the 49 kDa NBL antigen 42 days p.i., which suggested antigenic differences with the previously reported 43 kDa ML antigen strongly recognized late in the infection. To analyze the stage-specificity of the 49 kDa NBL antigen, polyclonal antibodies (PoAb) were obtained in rats immunized with 49 kDa NBL antigen. PoAb reacted strongly with the 49 kDa NBL component in NBL total soluble extract but no reactivity was observed with soluble antigen of the other T. spiralis stages. Albeit with less intensity, the 49 kDa component was also recognized by PoAb together with other antigens of 53, 97 and 107 kDa, in NBL excretory-secretory products (NBL-ESP). Thus, our results reveal

  7. The ductus arteriosus migratory smooth muscle cell phenotype processes tropoelastin to a 52-kDa product associated with impaired assembly of elastic laminae.

    PubMed

    Hinek, A; Rabinovitch, M

    1993-01-15

    We established the identity of a 52-kDa protein secreted by fetal lamb ductus arteriosus (DA) smooth muscle cells (SMC) and suggest how it might be related to structural changes unique to DA development, i.e. reduced assembly of elastic laminae and associated formation of intimal cushions. We produced a monoclonal antibody (HI-20) to the 52-kDa protein and observed, by electron microscopy, immunogold labeling of elastin in both DA and aorta vessel walls. Western immunoblotting showed that HI-20, as well as antibodies to tropoelastin, reacted with the 52-kDa protein secreted by DA SMC, as well as with 68-kDa tropoelastin. The highly specific antibody to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of tropoelastin failed, however, to recognize the 52-kDa protein, although it reacted well with the 68-kDa tropoelastin. Amino acid analysis and sequencing data confirmed the identity of the affinity-purified 52-kDa protein as truncated tropoelastin with an intact amino terminus. Cell-free translation of mRNA extracted from DA and aorta SMC produced a 68-kDa, but not a 52-kDa, immunoprecipitated tropoelastin. When DA and aorta SMC were pulsed with [14C]valine, we immunoprecipitated, after only a 15-min chase, both 68-kDa and 52-kDa tropoelastin from cell extracts of DA SMC, but only the 68-kDa tropoelastin was present in aorta SMC. There was no evidence of proteolytic degradation of radiolabeled aorta 68-kDa tropoelastin to a 52-kDa species when mixed with DA SMC conditioned medium. This suggests that the 52-kDa tropoelastin is the result of cell-associated processing or degradation of an original 68-kDa product of translation. Furthermore, pulse-chase experiments showed initial secretion of equivalent amounts of 68-kDa and 52-kDa tropoelastins by cultured DA SMC with increasing accumulation of the 52-kDa species, suggesting its impaired insolubilization. The production, in high concentration, of a 52-kDa tropoelastin product that lacks the carboxyl terminus, may prevent its alignment

  8. Immune labeling and purification of a 71-kDa glutamate-binding protein from brain synaptic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.W.; Cunningham, M.D.; Galton, N.; Michaelis, E.K.

    1988-01-05

    Immunoblot studies of synaptic membranes isolated from rat brain using antibodies raised against a previously purified glutamate-binding protein (GBP) indicated labeling of an approx. 70-kDa protein band. Since the antibodies used were raised against a 14-kDa GBP, the present studies were undertaken to explore the possibility that the 14-kDa protein may have been a proteolytic fragment of a larger M/sub r/ protein in synaptic membranes. The major protein enriched in the most highly purified fractions was a 71-kDa glycoprotein, but a 63-kDa protein was co-purified during most steps of the isolation procedure. The glutamate-binding characteristics of these isolated protein fractions were very similar to those previously described for the 14-kDa GBP, including estimated dissociation constants for L-glutamate binding of 0.25 and 1 /sup +/M, inhibition of glutamate binding by azide and cyanide, and a selectivity of the ligand binding site for L-glutamate and L-aspartate. The neuroexcitatory analogs of L-glutamate and L-aspartate, ibotenate, quisqualate, and D-glutamate, inhibited L(/sup 3/H)glutamate binding to the isolated proteins, as did the antagonist of L-glutamate-induced neuronal excitation, L-glutamate diethylester. On the basis of the lack of any detectable glutamate-related enzyme activity associated with the isolated proteins and the presence of distinguishing sensitivities to analogs that inhibit glutamate transport carriers in synaptic membranes, it is proposed that the 71-kDa protein may be a component of a physiologic glutamate receptor complex in neuronal membranes.

  9. Mimosine, a novel inhibitor of DNA replication, binds to a 50 kDa protein in Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, P J; Lin, H B; Hamlin, J L

    1995-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the plant amino acid, mimosine, is an extremely efficacious inhibitor of DNA replication in mammalian cells [P. A. Dijkwel and J. L. Hamlin (1992) Mol. Cell. Biol. 12, 3715-3722; P. J. Mosca et al. (1992) Mol. Cell. Biol. 12, 4375-4383]. Several of its properties further suggested that mimosine might target initiation at origins of replication, which would make it a unique and very useful inhibitor for studying the regulation of DNA synthesis. However, mimosine is known to chelate iron, a cofactor for ribonucleotide reductase. Thus, the possibility arose that mimosine functions in vivo simply by lowering intracellular deoxyribonucleotide pools. In the present study, we show that, in fact, it is possible to override mimosine inhibition in vivo by adding excess iron; however, copper, which is not a substitute for iron in ribonucleotide reductase, is equally effective. Evidence is presented that mimosine functions instead by binding to an intracellular protein. We show that radiolabeled mimosine can be specifically cross-linked to a 50 kDa polypeptide (termed p50) in vitro. Binding to p50 is virtually undetectable in CHO cells selected for resistance to 1 mM mimosine, arguing that p50 is the biologically relevant target. p50 is not associated with the cellular membrane fraction and, hence, is probably not a channel protein. Furthermore, the binding activity does not vary markedly as a function of cell cycle position, arguing that p50 is not a cyclin. Finally, both iron and copper are able to reverse the mimosine-p50 interaction in vitro, probably explaining why both metal ions are able to overcome mimosine's inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis in vivo. Images PMID:7862531

  10. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  11. Human autoantibodies against the 54 kDa protein of the signal recognition particle block function at multiple stages

    PubMed Central

    Römisch, Karin; Miller, Frederick W; Dobberstein, Bernhard; High, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The 54 kDa subunit of the signal recognition particle (SRP54) binds to the signal sequences of nascent secretory and membrane proteins and it contributes to the targeting of these precursors to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). At the ER membrane, the binding of the signal recognition particle (SRP) to its receptor triggers the release of SRP54 from its bound signal sequence and the nascent polypeptide is transferred to the Sec61 translocon for insertion into, or translocation across, the ER membrane. In the current article, we have characterized the specificity of anti-SRP54 autoantibodies, which are highly characteristic of polymyositis patients, and investigated the effect of these autoantibodies on the SRP function in vitro. We found that the anti-SRP54 autoantibodies had a pronounced and specific inhibitory effect upon the translocation of the secretory protein preprolactin when analysed using a cell-free system. Our mapping studies showed that the anti-SRP54 autoantibodies bind to the amino-terminal SRP54 N-domain and to the central SRP54 G-domain, but do not bind to the carboxy-terminal M-domain that is known to bind ER signal sequences. Nevertheless, anti-SRP54 autoantibodies interfere with signal-sequence binding to SRP54, most probably by steric hindrance. When the effect of anti-SRP autoantibodies on protein targeting the ER membrane was further investigated, we found that the autoantibodies prevent the SRP receptor-mediated release of ER signal sequences from the SRP54 subunit. This observation supports a model where the binding of the homologous GTPase domains of SRP54 and the α-subunit of the SRP receptor to each other regulates the release of ER signal sequences from the SRP54 M-domain. PMID:16469117

  12. A 24 kDa Excretory-Secretory Protein of Anisakis simplex Larvae Could Elicit Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Yun Seong; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Min Ki; Ock, Mee Sun; Cha, Hee Jae

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that a 24 kDa protein (22U homologous; As22U) of Anisakis simplex larvae could elicit several Th2-related chemokine gene expressions in the intestinal epithelial cell line which means that As22U may play a role as an allergen. In order to determine the contribution of As22U to allergic reactions, we treated mice with 6 times intra-nasal application of recombinant As22U (rAs22U). In the group challenged with rAs22U and ovalbumin (OVA), the number of eosinophils in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was significantly increased, as compared to the group receiving only OVA. In addition, mice treated with rAs22U and OVA showed significantly increased airway hyperresponsiveness. Thus, severe inflammation around the airway and immune cell recruitment was observed in mice treated with rAs22U plus OVA. The levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 cytokines in the BALF increased significantly after treatment with rAs22U and OVA. Similarly, the levels of anti-OVA specific IgE and IgG1 increased in mice treated with rAs22U and OVA, compared to those treated only with OVA. The Gro-α (CXCL1) gene expression in mouse lung epithelial cells increased instantly after treatment with rAs22U, and allergy-specific chemokines eotaxin (CCL11) and thymus-and-activation-regulated-chemokine (CCL17) gene expressions significantly increased at 6 hr after treatment. In conclusion, rAs22U may induce airway allergic inflammation, as the result of enhanced Th2 and Th17 responses. PMID:22355204

  13. The 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein in gliomas: from the bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Janczar, Karolina; Su, Zhangjie; Raccagni, Isabella; Anfosso, Andrea; Kelly, Charlotte; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gerhard, Alexander; Roncaroli, Federico

    2015-08-01

    The 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) is known to be highly expressed in several types of cancer, including gliomas, whereas expression in normal brain is low. TSPO functions in glioma are still incompletely understood. The TSPO can be quantified pre-operatively with molecular imaging making it an ideal candidate for personalized treatment of patient with glioma. Studies have proposed to exploit the TSPO as a transporter of chemotherapics to selectively target tumour cells in the brain. Our studies proved that positron emission tomography (PET)-imaging can contribute to predict progression of patients with glioma and that molecular imaging with TSPO-specific ligands is suitable to stratify patients in view of TSPO-targeted treatment. Finally, we proved that TSPO in gliomas is predominantly expressed by tumour cells. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  14. Evaluation of Babesia bigemina 200 kDa recombinant antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Altangerel, Khukhuu; Alhassan, Andy; Iseki, Hiroshi; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2009-07-01

    A truncated fragment of the gene encoding the 200-kDa protein (P200) of Babesia bigemina was cloned into a plasmid vector, pGEX-4 T-1 and expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione-S-transferase fused protein. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the rp200/CT detected specific antibodies in cattle experimentally infected with B. bigemina. Furthermore, the antigen did not cross-react with antibodies to Babesia bovis, a closely related Babesia parasite indicating that rp200/CT is a specific antigen for the diagnosis of B. bigemina infection. Additionally, ELISA using p200/CT and polymerase chain reaction were conducted on serum and corresponding DNA samples obtained from field cattle to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the p200/CT antigen. Results from the current study suggest that p200/CT ELISA is a sensitive and specific method for improved serodiagnosis of B. bigemina infection.

  15. Quantitation and Identification of Thousands of Human Proteoforms below 30 kDa.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Kenneth R; Fornelli, Luca; Fellers, Ryan T; Doubleday, Peter F; Narita, Masashi; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-03-04

    Top-down proteomics is capable of identifying and quantitating unique proteoforms through the analysis of intact proteins. We extended the coverage of the label-free technique, achieving differential analysis of whole proteins <30 kDa from the proteomes of growing and senescent human fibroblasts. By integrating improved control software with more instrument time allocated for quantitation of intact ions, we were able to collect protein data between the two cell states, confidently comparing 1577 proteoform levels. To then identify and characterize proteoforms, our advanced acquisition software, named Autopilot, employed enhanced identification efficiency in identifying 1180 unique Swiss-Prot accession numbers at 1% false-discovery rate. This coverage of the low mass proteome is equivalent to the largest previously reported but was accomplished in 23% of the total acquisition time. By maximizing both the number of quantified proteoforms and their identification rate in an integrated software environment, this work significantly advances proteoform-resolved analyses of complex systems.

  16. A 43 kDa recombinant plasmepsin elicits immune response in mice against Plasmodium berghei malaria.

    PubMed

    Pirta, Chhaya; Sharma, Nitya Nand; Banyal, H S

    2016-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic parasites degrade haemoglobin to make available nutrients for their growth and maturation. Plasmepsins, the aspartic proteases of Plasmodium play a significant role in haemoglobin degradation and are proposed as attractive drug targets. In the present study the gene which encodes plasmepsin in rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, was cloned and expressed. The gene was sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 and a recombinant plasmepsin of molecular weight 43 kDa was obtained. The sequence obtained was analysed and compared with plasmepsins of other Plasmodium spp. Mice immunized with the recombinant plasmepsin induced a strong humoral immune response. ELISA and IFA performed on the serum of immunized mice showed high antibody titres. Along with this, in vivo study exhibited partial protection against P. berghei infection suggesting role of plasmepsin in malaria control.

  17. Locus- and Site-Specific DNA Methylation of 19 kDa Zein Genes in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Miclaus, Mihai; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    An interesting question in maize development is why only a single zein gene is highly expressed in each of the 19-kDa zein gene clusters (A and B types), z1A2-1 and z1B4, in the immature endosperm. For instance, epigenetic marks could provide a structural difference. Therefore, we investigated the DNA methylation of the arrays of gene copies in both promoter and gene body regions of leaf (non-expressing tissue as a control), normal endosperm, and cultured endosperm. Although we could show that expressed genes have much lower methylation levels in promoter regions than silent ones in both leaf and normal endosperm, there was surprisingly also a difference in the pattern of the z1A and z1B gene clusters. The expression of z1B gene is suppressed by increased DNA methylation and activated with reduced DNA methylation, whereas z1A gene expression is not. DNA methylation in gene coding regions is higher in leaf than in endosperm, whereas no significant difference is observed in gene bodies between expressed and non-expressed gene copies. A median CHG methylation (25–30%) appears to be optimal for gene expression. Moreover, tissue-cultured endosperm can reset the DNA methylation pattern and tissue-specific gene expression. These results reveal that DNA methylation changes of the 19-kDa zein genes is subject to plant development and tissue culture treatment, but varies in different chromosomal locations, indicating that DNA methylation changes do not apply to gene expression in a uniform fashion. Because tissue culture is used to produce transgenic plants, these studies provide new insights into variation of gene expression of integrated sequences. PMID:26741504

  18. Salivary Anti-50 kDa Antibodies as a Useful Biomarker for Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever.

    PubMed

    Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Chin, Kai Ling; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Ismail, Asma; Balaram, Prabha; Phua, Kia Kien

    2017-06-01

    Typhoid fever remains a scourge of humanity, especially in developing and under-developed countries due to poor sanitation and food hygiene. Diagnostic methods available for detection of this disease are not satisfactory due to a lack of sensitive, specific, rapid and convenient diagnostic test kits available in the market. To evaluate the feasibility of a Dot-EIA method for Ig-class specific salivary antibody detection for diagnosis of typhoid fever. Paired saliva and serum samples were collected in the year 2010 from patients and normal volunteers in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia, which is endemic for typhoid fever. A total of 11 culture-confirmed typhoid fever patients, 43 non-typhoid fever patients and 53 normal human control subjects were evaluated for antibodies against a 50 kDa antigen specific for Salmonella Typhi using Dot-EIA. Ig class-specific screening of the test samples showed a higher sensitivity for IgA (90.9%) compared to either IgG (72.7%) or IgM (72.7%) antibodies in saliva, but for serum, IgG (90.9%) had a higher degree of sensitivity compared to IgA (36.4%) and IgM (63.6%). Combining all isotypes (IgA, IgG or IgM), serum showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%) compared to saliva (90.9%). Also, the specificity for serum (100.0%) was much higher than saliva (85.4%). Salivary IgA anti-50kDa antibody was found to be more suitable biomarker for routine screening, whereas serum IgG was more suitable for confirmatory test as it has higher specificity. Nevertheless, salivary IgA Dot-EIA is a convenient method for rapid testing, such as for Point-of-Care Diagnostics (POCD) and field epidemiological studies, due to its non-invasive nature and ease of use.

  19. Diffusion into human islets is limited to molecules below 10 kDa.

    PubMed

    Williams, S J; Schwasinger-Schmidt, T; Zamierowski, D; Stehno-Bittel, L

    2012-10-01

    Isolated islets are important tools in diabetes research and are used for islet transplantation as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Yet these cell clusters have a dramatic diffusion barrier that leads to core cell death. Computer modeling has provided theoretical size limitations, but little has been done to measure the actual rate of diffusion in islets. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the diffusion barrier in intact human islets and determine its role in restricting insulin secretion. Impeded diffusion into islets was monitored with fluorescent dextran beads. Dextran beads of 10-70 kDa failed to diffuse into the core of the intact islets, while 0.9 kDa probe was observed within the core of smaller islets. Diffusion of the fluorescent form of glucose, 2-NBDG, had similar diffusion limitations as the beads, with an average intra-islet diffusion rate of 1.5 ± 0.2 μm/min. The poor diffusion properties were associated with core cell death from necrosis, not apoptosis. Short-term exposure to a mild papain/0 Ca(2+) cocktail, dramatically reduced the diffusion barrier so that all cells within islets were exposed to media components. Lowering the diffusion barrier increased the immediate and long-term viability of islet cells, and tended to increase the amount of insulin released, especially in low glucose conditions. However, it failed to improve the large islet's glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, the islet diffusion barrier leads to low viability and poor survival of large islets, but is not solely responsible for the reduced insulin secretion of large isolated islets.

  20. Agarose and Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis Methods for Molecular Mass Analysis of 5–500 kDa Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Bhilocha, Shardul; Amin, Ripal; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; LoBello, Jaclyn; Shytuhina, Anastasia; Wang, Wenlan; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; de la Motte, Carol; Cowman, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems for the molecular mass-dependent separation of hyaluronan (HA) in the size range of approximately 5–500 kDa have been investigated. For agarose-based systems, the suitability of different agarose types, agarose concentrations, and buffers systems were determined. Using chemoenzymatically synthesized HA standards of low polydispersity, the molecular mass range was determined for each gel composition, over which the relationship between HA mobility and logarithm of the molecular mass was linear. Excellent linear calibration was obtained for HA molecular mass as low as approximately 9 kDa in agarose gels. For higher resolution separation, and for extension to molecular masses as low as approximately 5 kDa, gradient polyacrylamide gels were superior. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in a sample, and calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The methods were validated for polydisperse HA samples with viscosity-average molecular masses of 112, 59, 37, and 22 kDa, at sample loads of 0.5 µg (for polyacrylamide) to 2.5 µg (for agarose). Use of the methods for electrophoretic mobility shift assays was demonstrated for binding of the HA-binding region of aggrecan (recombinant human aggrecan G1-IGD-G2 domains) to a 150 kDa HA standard. PMID:21684248

  1. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-05-03

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding.

  2. Affinity of human erythrocyte transglutaminase for a 42-kDa gelatin-binding fragment of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Radek, J T; Jeong, J M; Murthy, S N; Ingham, K C; Lorand, L

    1993-01-01

    Complex formation between the human erythrocyte transglutaminase (protein-glutamine:amine gamma-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13) and fibronectin or its fragments was examined by immunoanalytical procedures and by fluorescence polarization. A 42-kDa gelatin-binding structure, obtained from human plasma fibronectin by thermolytic digestion, showed as high an affinity for the cytosolic enzyme as the parent fibronectin chains themselves. A 21-kDa fragment comprising type I modules 8 and 9, the last two modules in the 42-kDa fragment, bound with an affinity 100-fold less than the 42-kDa fragment. Binding was remarkably specific and could be exploited for the affinity purification of transglutaminase directly from the hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte lysate. In spite of the high affinity, it was possible to elute active enzyme from the 42-kDa fragment column with 0.25% monochloroacetic acid. This solvent might have general applicability in other systems involving separation of tightly bound ligands. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8097314

  3. Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods for molecular mass analysis of 5- to 500-kDa hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Bhilocha, Shardul; Amin, Ripal; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; LoBello, Jaclyn; Shytuhina, Anastasia; Wang, Wenlan; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; de la Motte, Carol; Cowman, Mary K

    2011-10-01

    Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems for the molecular mass-dependent separation of hyaluronan (HA) in the size range of approximately 5-500 kDa were investigated. For agarose-based systems, the suitability of different agarose types, agarose concentrations, and buffer systems was determined. Using chemoenzymatically synthesized HA standards of low polydispersity, the molecular mass range was determined for each gel composition over which the relationship between HA mobility and logarithm of the molecular mass was linear. Excellent linear calibration was obtained for HA molecular mass as low as approximately 9 kDa in agarose gels. For higher resolution separation, and for extension to molecular masses as low as approximately 5 kDa, gradient polyacrylamide gels were superior. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in a sample as well as calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The methods were validated for polydisperse HA samples with viscosity-average molecular masses of 112, 59, 37, and 22 kDa at sample loads of 0.5 μg (for polyacrylamide) to 2.5 μg (for agarose). Use of the methods for electrophoretic mobility shift assays was demonstrated for binding of the HA-binding region of aggrecan (recombinant human aggrecan G1-IGD-G2 domains) to a 150-kDa HA standard.

  4. The first echinoderm poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60) from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization, inducible expression and involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Sun, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiao; Hu, Chaoqun; Qian, Jing; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60), also known as Ro RNA binding protein (RoBPI) and FBP interacting repressor (FIR), is a multifunctional protein that is involved in a variety of nuclear processes including pre-mRNA splicing, apoptosis and transcription regulation. In this study, the first echinoderm PUF60 named StmPUF60 was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmPUF60 cDNA is 4503 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 2963 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1506 bp that encoding a protein of 501 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 54.15 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.15. The putative StmPUF60 protein possesses all the main characteristics of known PUF60 proteins, including two RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2), a C-terminal PUMP domain and two conserved nucleic acid-binding ribonucleoprotein sequences (RNP1 and RNP2). For the gene structure, StmPUF60 contains nine exons separated by eight introns. In addition, the highest level of StmPUF60 mRNA expression was noticed in the gonad, followed by coelomocytes, intestine, respiratory tree and body wall. In in vivo experiments, the expression of StmPUF60 mRNA in coelomocytes and intestine was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge, suggesting that the sea cucumber PUF60 might play critical roles in the innate immune defense against bacterial infections. Moreover, we further confirmed that overexpressed StmPUF60 could induce apoptosis, and this function of StmPUF60 may be one of the innate immune defense mechanisms for sea cucumber against pathogen infections.

  5. A relevant IgE-reactive 28kDa protein identified from Salsola kali pollen extract by proteomics is a natural degradation product of an integral 47kDa polygalaturonase.

    PubMed

    Mas, Salvador; Oeo-Santos, Carmen; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Colás, Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Barber, Domingo; Rodríguez, Rosalía; de Los Ríos, Vivian; Barderas, Rodrigo; Villalba, Mayte

    2017-08-01

    A highly prevalent IgE-binding protein band of 28kDa is observed when Salsola kali pollen extract is incubated with individual sera from Amaranthaceae pollen sensitized patients. By an immunoproteomic analysis of S. kali pollen extract, we identified this protein band as an allergenic polygalacturonase enzyme. The allergen, named Sal k 6, exhibits a pI of 7.14 and a molecular mass of 39,554.2Da. It presents similarities to Platanaceae, Poaceae, and Cupressaceae allergenic polygalacturonases. cDNA-encoding sequence was subcloned into the pET41b vector and produced in bacteria as a His-tag fusion recombinant protein. The far-UV CD spectrum determined that rSal k 6 was folded. Immunostaining of the S. kali pollen protein extract with a rSal k 6-specific pAb and LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses confirmed the co-existence of the 28kDa band together with an allergenic band of about 47kDa in the pollen extract. Therefore, the 28kDa was assigned as a natural degradation product of the 47kDa integral polygalacturonase. The IgE-binding inhibition to S. kali pollen extract using rSal k 6 as inhibitor showed that signals directed to both protein bands of 28 and 47kDa were completely abrogated. The average prevalence of rSal k 6 among the three populations analyzed was 30%, with values correlating well with the levels of grains/m(3) of Amaranthaceae pollen. Sal k 6 shares IgE epitopes with Oleaceae members (Fraxinus excelsior, Olea europaea and Syringa vulgaris), with IgE-inhibition values ranging from 20% to 60%, respectively. No IgE-inhibition was observed with plant-derived food extracts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A candidate molecule for the matrix assembly receptor to the N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin in chick myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Moon, K Y; Shin, K S; Song, W K; Chung, C H; Ha, D B; Kang, M S

    1994-03-11

    Myoblast surface proteins with binding activity toward the N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin were identified by two different experimental techniques: one involves radioiodination of the cell surface proteins, followed by solubilization with Triton X-100 and affinity purification on a Sepharose column conjugated with the 29-kDa fragment, and the other involves cross-linking of the 29-kDa fragment to the cells metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-29-kDa IgG. Both approaches revealed that primary cultures of chick myoblasts contain the 66- and 48-kDa proteins that bind to the 29-kDa fragment. These binding proteins were then purified to apparent homogeneity by two successive chromatographies of the solubilized extracts of 12-day-old embryonic muscle on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and 29-kDa fragment-Sepharose columns. However, the 48-kDa protein was found to be derived from contaminating fibroblasts upon immunoblot analysis of the myogenic cell lines, rat L8E63 and mouse C2A3, and cultured fibroblasts using the antibody raised against the 66-kDa protein. Anti-66-kDa IgG inhibited the binding of the 125I-29-kDa protein to the primary culture of myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, the same antibody showed little or no effect on the initial binding of 125I-fibronectin to the cell surface, but dramatically inhibited its incorporation into deoxycholate-insoluble matrices. Furthermore, Fab fragments of anti-66-kDa IgG completely blocked the incorporation of fluoresceinated fibronectin into matrices but not its binding to the cell surface. These results suggest that fibronectin matrix assembly is mediated at least in part by the interaction of the 66-kDa protein with the N-terminal type I domain of fibronectin.

  7. Purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of 26kDa protein, a major allergen from Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Sandeep; Gupta, Rinkesh Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, Kriti; Giridhar, B H; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2016-06-01

    Chickpea (CP), a legume of the family Fabaceae, is an important nutrient-rich food providing protein, essential amino acids, vitamins, dietary fibre, and minerals. Unfortunately, several IgE-binding proteins in CP have been detected that are responsible for allergic manifestations in sensitized population. Therefore, the prevalence of CP induced allergy prompted us towards purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of a major ∼26kDa protein from chickpea crude protein extract (CP-CPE). Purification of CP 26kDa protein was done using a combination of fractionation and anion exchange chromatography. This protein was further characterized as "Chain A, crystal structure of a plant albumin" from Cicer arietinum with Mol wt 25.8kDa by Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Further, allergenic potential of purified 25.8kDa protein was assessed using in vivo and in vitro model. Purified protein showed IgE-binding capacity with sensitized BALB/c mice and CP allergic patient's sera. Enhanced levels of specific and total IgE, MCP-1, MCPT-1, myeloperoxidase, histamine, prostaglandin D2, and cysteinyl leukotriene were found in sera of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. Further, expressions of Th2 cytokines (i.e. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), transcription factors (i.e. GATA-3, STAT-6, SOCS-3) and mast cell signaling proteins (Lyn, cFgr, Syk, PLC-γ2, PI-3K, PKC) were also found increased at mRNA and protein levels in the intestines of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. In addition, enhanced release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, cysteinyl leukotriene and prostaglandin D2 were observed in RBL2H3 cell line when treated (125μg) with CP 26kDa protein. Conclusively, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed the allergenic potential of purified CP 26kDa protein. Being a potential allergen, plant albumin may play a pivotal role in CP induced allergenicity. Current study will be helpful for better development of therapeutic approaches to

  8. Cloning and sequencing of 28 kDa outer membrane protein gene of Brucella melitensis Rev. 1.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Pallab; Kumar, S Vinoth; Prasad, Rajeev; Srivastava, S K; Yadav, M P

    2005-09-01

    Brucella melitensis is an organism of paramount zoonotic importance. The 28 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) is one of the immunodominant antigens of B. melitensis. The gene encoding 28 kDa OMP (omp28) has been amplified from B. melitensis Rev. 1 strain. A PCR product of 753 bp, encoding complete omp28 gene of B. melitensis, was obtained. The gene was further cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of B. melitensis Rev. 1 strain showed substitution of 2 nucleotides from that of 16M strain.

  9. Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, P.B.; Grieninger, G.; Tosato, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the conference entitled Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses: Interleukin-L. Topics covered include: Interferon-B{sub 2}/26kDa Protein, Regulation of acute phase liver gene expression, and Genetics and regulation of expression of IL-6.

  10. Salivary Anti-50 kDa Antibodies as a Useful Biomarker for Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever

    PubMed Central

    Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Chin, Kai Ling; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Ismail, Asma; Balaram, Prabha

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Typhoid fever remains a scourge of humanity, especially in developing and under-developed countries due to poor sanitation and food hygiene. Diagnostic methods available for detection of this disease are not satisfactory due to a lack of sensitive, specific, rapid and convenient diagnostic test kits available in the market. Aim To evaluate the feasibility of a Dot-EIA method for Ig-class specific salivary antibody detection for diagnosis of typhoid fever. Materials and Methods Paired saliva and serum samples were collected in the year 2010 from patients and normal volunteers in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia, which is endemic for typhoid fever. A total of 11 culture-confirmed typhoid fever patients, 43 non-typhoid fever patients and 53 normal human control subjects were evaluated for antibodies against a 50 kDa antigen specific for Salmonella Typhi using Dot-EIA. Results Ig class-specific screening of the test samples showed a higher sensitivity for IgA (90.9%) compared to either IgG (72.7%) or IgM (72.7%) antibodies in saliva, but for serum, IgG (90.9%) had a higher degree of sensitivity compared to IgA (36.4%) and IgM (63.6%). Combining all isotypes (IgA, IgG or IgM), serum showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%) compared to saliva (90.9%). Also, the specificity for serum (100.0%) was much higher than saliva (85.4%). Conclusion Salivary IgA anti-50kDa antibody was found to be more suitable biomarker for routine screening, whereas serum IgG was more suitable for confirmatory test as it has higher specificity. Nevertheless, salivary IgA Dot-EIA is a convenient method for rapid testing, such as for Point-of-Care Diagnostics (POCD) and field epidemiological studies, due to its non-invasive nature and ease of use. PMID:28764158

  11. The RNA 3' cleavage factors CstF 64 kDa and CPSF 100 kDa are concentrated in nuclear domains closely associated with coiled bodies and newly synthesized RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schul, W; Groenhout, B; Koberna, K; Takagaki, Y; Jenny, A; Manders, E M; Raska, I; van Driel, R; de Jong, L

    1996-01-01

    The cleavage stimulation factor (CstF), and the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) are necessary for 3'-terminal processing of polyadenylated mRNAs. To study the distribution of 3' cleavage factors in the nuclei of human T24 cells, monoclonal antibodies against the CstF 64 kDa subunit and against the CPSF 100 kDa subunit were used for immunofluorescent labelling. CstF 64 kDa and CPSF 100 kDa were distributed in a fibrogranular pattern in the nucleoplasm and, in addition, were concentrated in 1-4 bright foci. Double immunofluorescence labelling experiments revealed that the foci either overlapped with, or resided next to, a coiled body. Inhibition of transcription with alpha-amanitin or 5,6-dichloro-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) resulted in the complete co-localization of coiled bodies and foci containing 3' cleavage factors. Electron microscopy on immunogold double-labelled cells revealed that the foci represent compact spherical fibrous structures, we named 'cleavage bodies', intimately associated with coiled bodies. We found that approximately 20% of the cleavage bodies contained a high concentration of newly synthesized RNA, whereas coiled bodies were devoid of nascent RNA. Our results suggest that the cleavage bodies that contain RNA are those that are adjacent to a coiled body. These findings reveal a dynamic and transcription-dependent interaction between different subnuclear domains, and suggest a relationship between coiled bodies and specific transcripts. Images PMID:8654386

  12. Oral Administration of High Molecular Weight Hyaluronan (900 kDa) Controls Immune System via Toll-like Receptor 4 in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Asari, Akira; Kanemitsu, Tomoyuki; Kurihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Low molecular weight hyaluronan enhances or induces inflammation through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4).However, the effects of high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA900) on TLR-4 are unknown. In this study, HA900 (900 kDa) was administered orally to MRL-lpr/lpr mice, a Th-1-type autoimmune disease model. Lymphoaccumulation of double-negative T cells, which is enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines, was suppressed by HA900 treatment. Cytokine array analysis showed that HA900 treatment enhanced production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and down-regulated chemokine production. HA900 colocalized with TLR-4 on the luminal surface of epithelial cells in the large intestine. These cells are parts of the immune system and express cytokines. DNA array analysis of the tissue from the large intestine showed that HA900 treatment up-regulated suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression and down-regulated pleiotrophin expression. Treatment of cultured double-negative T cells from MRL-lpr/lpr mice with pleiotrophin rescued these cells. SOCS3, which is known to suppress inflammation, was enhanced by HA900 treatment. In TLR-4 knockdown HT29 cells (a cell line derived from large intestinal cells), HA900 did not bind to HT29 cells and did not up-regulate SOCS3 expression. Our results suggest that oral administration of HA900 modulates Th-1-type autoimmune disease and inflammation by up-regulating SOCS3 expression and down-regulating pleiotrophin expression via TLR-4 in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20504769

  13. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells.

  14. The 32 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA) participates in the DNA replication of Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) by interacting with the viral Rep protein

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a member of genus begomoviridae and its genome comprises of bipartite (two components, namely DNA-A and DNA-B), single-stranded, circular DNA of about 2.7 kb. During rolling circle replication (RCR) of the DNA, the stability of the genome and maintenance of the stem–loop structure of the replication origin is crucial. Hence the role of host single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), in the RCR of MYMIV was examined. Two RPA subunits, namely the RPA70 kDa and RPA32 kDa, were isolated from pea and their roles were validated in a yeast system in which MYMIV DNA replication has been modelled. Here, we present evidences that only the RPA32 kDa subunit directly interacted with the carboxy terminus of MYMIV-Rep both in vitro as well as in yeast two-hybrid system. RPA32 modulated the functions of Rep by enhancing its ATPase and down regulating its nicking and closing activities. The possible role of these modulations in the context of viral DNA replication has been discussed. Finally, we showed the positive involvement of RPA32 in transient replication of the plasmid DNA bearing MYMIV replication origin using an in planta based assay. PMID:17182628

  15. The 32 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA) participates in the DNA replication of Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) by interacting with the viral Rep protein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a member of genus begomoviridae and its genome comprises of bipartite (two components, namely DNA-A and DNA-B), single-stranded, circular DNA of about 2.7 kb. During rolling circle replication (RCR) of the DNA, the stability of the genome and maintenance of the stem-loop structure of the replication origin is crucial. Hence the role of host single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), in the RCR of MYMIV was examined. Two RPA subunits, namely the RPA70 kDa and RPA32 kDa, were isolated from pea and their roles were validated in a yeast system in which MYMIV DNA replication has been modelled. Here, we present evidences that only the RPA32 kDa subunit directly interacted with the carboxy terminus of MYMIV-Rep both in vitro as well as in yeast two-hybrid system. RPA32 modulated the functions of Rep by enhancing its ATPase and down regulating its nicking and closing activities. The possible role of these modulations in the context of viral DNA replication has been discussed. Finally, we showed the positive involvement of RPA32 in transient replication of the plasmid DNA bearing MYMIV replication origin using an in planta based assay.

  16. Translocator protein (18 kDa) TSPO: an emerging therapeutic target in neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lecanu, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces physical, cognitive, and psychosocial deficits that affect millions of patients. TBI activates numerous cellular mechanisms and molecular cascades that produce detrimental outcomes, including neuronal death and loss of function. The mitochondrion is one of the major targets of TBI, as seen by increased mitochondrial activity in activated and proliferating microglia (due to high energy requirements and/or calcium overload) as well as increased reactive oxygen species, changes in mitochondrial permeability transition, release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, reduced ATP levels, and cell death in neurons. Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa outer mitochondrial membrane protein that interacts with the mitochondria permeability transition pore and binds with high affinity to cholesterol and various classes of drug ligands, including some benzodiazepines such as 4′-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864). Although TSPO levels in the brain are low, they are increased after brain injury and inflammation. This finding has led to the proposed use of TSPO expression as a marker of brain injury and repair. TSPO drug ligands have been shown to participate in the control of mitochondrial respiration and function, mitochondrial steroid and neurosteroid formation, as well as apoptosis. This review and commentary will outline our current knowledge of the benefits of targeting TSPO for TBI treatment and the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of TSPO drug ligands in neurotrauma. PMID:19409385

  17. Chimeric Avidin – NMR Structure and Dynamics of a 56 kDa Homotetrameric Thermostable Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin–bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin–free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl–detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model–free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin–bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding. PMID:24959850

  18. Emerging roles for the Ro 60 kDa autoantigen in noncoding RNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soyeong; Wolin, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    All cells contain an enormous variety of ribonucleoprotein complexes that function in diverse processes. Although the mechanisms by which many of these RNPs contribute to cell metabolism are well understood, the roles of others are only now beginning to be revealed. A member of this latter category, the Ro 60 kDa protein and its associated noncoding Y RNAs, was discovered because the protein component is a frequent target of the autoimmune response in patients with the rheumatic diseases systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome. Recent studies have shown that Ro is ring-shaped, binds the single-stranded ends of misfolded noncoding RNAs in its central cavity, and may function in noncoding RNA quality control. Although Ro is not present in yeast, many bacterial genomes contain potential Ro orthologs. In the radiation-resistant eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, the Ro ortholog functions with exoribonucleases during stress-induced changes in RNA metabolism. Moreover, in both D. radiodurans and animal cells, Ro is involved in the response to multiple types of environmental stress. Finally, Y RNAs can influence the subcellular location of Ro, inhibit access of the central cavity to other RNAs and may also act as binding sites for proteins that influence Ro function. PMID:21823229

  19. Chimeric Avidin--NMR structure and dynamics of a 56 kDa homotetrameric thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A E; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P; Kulomaa, Markku S; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin-bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin-free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl-detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model-free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin-bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding.

  20. An 18 kDa acid phosphatase from chicken heart possesses phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rubina; Saeed, Asma; Saeed, Ahmad

    2006-02-01

    A low molecular weight acid phosphatase was purified to homogeneity from chicken heart with a specific activity of 42 U/mg and a recovery of about 1%. Nearly 800 fold purification was achieved. The molecular weight was estimated to be 18 kDa by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Para-nitrophenyl phosphate, phenyl phosphate and flavin mononucleotide were efficiently hydrolysed by the enzyme and found to be good substrates. Fluoride and tartrate had no inhibitory effect while phosphate, vanadate and molybdate strongly inhibited the enzyme. The acid phosphatase was stimulated in the presence of glycerol, ethylene glycol, methanol, ethanol and acetone, which reflected the phosphotransferase activity. When phosphate acceptors such as ethylene glycol concentrations were increased, the ratio of phosphate transfer to hydrolysis was also increased, demonstrating the presence of a transphosphorylation reaction where an acceptor can compete with water in the rate limiting step involving hydrolysis of a covalent phospho enzyme intermediate. Partition experiments carried out with two substrates, para-nitrophenyl phosphate and phenyl phosphate, revealed a constant product ratio of 1.7 for phosphotransfer to ethylene glycol versus hydrolysis, strongly supporting the existence of common covalent phospho enzyme intermediate. A constant ratio of K (cat)/K (m), 4.3 x 10(4), found at different ethylene glycol concentrations, also supported the idea that the rate limiting step was the hydrolysis of the phospho enzyme intermediate.

  1. Cloning of the bovine 215-kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lobel, P; Dahms, N M; Breitmeyer, J; Chirgwin, J M; Kornfeld, S

    1987-01-01

    Four overlapping cDNA clones encoding a partial sequence of the cation-independent 215-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor have been identified by screening a fetal calf liver cDNA library with oligonucleotide probes. RNA hybridization analysis showed that the length of the mRNA is approximately 9.5 kilobases. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the clones consist of 4647 contiguous nucleotides and contain an open reading frame coding for a polypeptide of 1461 amino acids, which we estimate represents greater than 75% of the primary structure of the receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that the receptor has a carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain of 163 amino acids that is rich in acidic residues, a 23-amino acid transmembrane segment, and an extracellular domain containing at least eight homologous repeats of approximately 145 amino acids. One of the repeats contains an additional 43-residue segment that is similar to the type II repeat of fibronectin. Each repeat contains a highly conserved 13-amino acid unit bordered by cysteine residues that may be functionally important. Images PMID:2951738

  2. Characterization of a 21kDa protein from Trypanosoma cruzi associated with mammalian cell invasion.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Claudio V; Kawashita, Silvia Y; Probst, Christian M; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Cruz, Mário C; da Silva, Erika A; Souto-Padrón, Thaís C B S; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Briones, Marcelo R S; Andrews, Norma W; Mortara, Renato A

    2009-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi genomic database was screened for hypothetical proteins that showed high probability of being secreted or membrane anchored and thus, likely involved in host-cell invasion. A sequence that codes for a 21kDa protein that showed high probability of being secreted was selected. After cloning this protein sequence, the results showed that it was a ubiquitous protein and secreted by extracellular amastigotes. The recombinant form (P21-His(6)) adhered to HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of host cells with P21-His(6) inhibited cell invasion by extracellular amastigotes from G and CL strains. On the other hand, when the protein was added to host cells at the same time as amastigotes, an increase in cell invasion was observed. Host-cell pretreatment with P21-His(6) augmented invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes. Moreover, polyclonal antibody anti-P21 inhibited invasion only by extracellular amastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes from G strain. These results suggested that P21 might be involved in T. cruzi cell invasion. We hypothesize that P21 could be secreted in the juxtaposition parasite-host cell and triggers signaling events yet unknown that lead to parasite internalization.

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel ~18 kDa antioxidant protein from Ginkgo biloba seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Xijuan; Wang, Chengzhang; Ye, Jianzhong; Chen, Hongxia

    2012-12-11

    Ginkgo biloba seeds are widely used as a food and traditional medicine in China. In the present study, a novel antioxidant protein named GBSP was purified from Ginkgo biloba seeds. The protein (GBSP) was purified by homogenization of Ginkgo biloba seed powder in saline solution, 70% ammonium sulphate precipitation, filtration on a DEAE-Cellulose52 anion exchange column, gel filtration on a Sephadex G-50 column, and preparative chromatography on a C(18) column using RP-HPLC. GBSP showed an apparent molecular weight of 18 kDa by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/MS analyses. The amino acid sequence obtained by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis showed GBSP was a novel protein, as no matching protein in was found the database. The protein exhibited significant antioxidant activities against free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS and superoxide anion and showed higher activity than α-tocopherol in a linoleic acid emulsion assay system. Furthermore, GBSP exhibited notable reducing power and a strong chelating effect on Cu(2+) and Fe(2+). Therefore, the present study demonstrates, for the first time, that this novel protein from Ginkgo biloba seeds is an excellent antioxidant.

  4. Quantitation and Identification of Thousands of Human Proteoforms below 30 kDa

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Kenneth R.; Fornelli, Luca; Fellers, Ryan T.; Doubleday, Peter F.; Narita, Masashi; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Top-down proteomics is capable of identifying and quantitating unique proteoforms through the analysis of intact proteins. We extended the coverage of the label-free technique, achieving differential analysis of whole proteins <30 kDa from the proteomes of growing and senescent human fibroblasts. By integrating improved control software with more instrument time allocated for quantitation of intact ions, we were able to collect protein data between the two cell states, confidently comparing 1577 proteoform levels. To then identify and characterize proteoforms, our advanced acquisition software, named Autopilot, employed enhanced identification efficiency in identifying 1180 unique Swiss-Prot accession numbers at 1% false-discovery rate. This coverage of the low mass proteome is equivalent to the largest previously reported but was accomplished in 23% of the total acquisition time. By maximizing both the number of quantified proteoforms and their identification rate in an integrated software environment, this work significantly advances proteoform-resolved analyses of complex systems. PMID:26795204

  5. A new alternative transcript encodes a 60 kDa truncated form of integrin beta 3.

    PubMed Central

    Djaffar, I; Chen, Y P; Creminon, C; Maclouf, J; Cieutat, A M; Gayet, O; Rosa, J P

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA for integrin beta 3 isolated from a human erythroleukaemia (HEL) cell library contained a 340 bp insert at position 1281. This mRNA, termed beta 3c, results from the use of a cryptic AG donor splice site in intron 8 of the beta 3 gene, and is different from a previously described alternative beta 3 mRNA. The predicted open reading frame of beta 3C stops at a TAG stop codon 69 bp downstream from position 1281. It starts with the signal peptide and the 404 N-terminal extracellular residues of beta 3, encompassing the ligand binding sites, followed by 23 C-terminal intron-derived residues, corresponding to a truncated form of beta 3 lacking the cysteine-rich, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Expression of beta 3C mRNA was demonstrated in human platelets, megakaryocytes, endothelial cells and HEL cells by reverse transcriptase/PCR. The beta 3C transcript was also demonstrated in the mouse, suggesting its conservation through evolution. Finally, a 60 kDa polypeptide corresponding to the beta 3C alternative transcript was demonstrated in platelets by Western blotting using a polyclonal antibody raised against a synthetic peptide designed from the beta 3C intronic sequence. Taken together, these results suggest a biological role for beta 3C, the first alternative transcript showing an altered extracellular domain of a beta integrin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8198553

  6. 70-kDa Heat Shock Protein Downregulates Dynamin in Experimental Stroke: A New Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kim, Nuri; Zheng, Zhen; Lee, Jong Eun; Yenari, Midori A

    2016-08-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) protects brain cells in models of cerebral ischemia. Proteomic screening of mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion identified dynamin as a major downregulated protein in Hsp70-overexpressing mice (Hsp70 transgenic mice). Dynamin-1 is expressed in neurons and participates in neurotransmission, but also transports the death receptor Fas to the cell surface, where it can be bound by its ligand and lead to apoptosis. Mice were subjected to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuro-2a cells were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation. Hsp70 transgenic and Hsp70-deficient (Hsp70 knockout) mice were compared with wild-type mice for histological and behavioral outcomes. Some mice and neuro-2a cell cultures were given dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor. Hsp70 transgenic mice had better outcomes, whereas Hsp70 knockout mice had worse outcomes compared with wild-type mice. This correlated with decreased and increased dynamin expression, respectively. Dynamin colocalized to neurons and Fas, with higher Fas levels and increased caspase-8 expression. Hsp70 induction in neuro-2a cells was protected from oxygen glucose deprivation, while downregulating dynamin and Fas expression. Further, dynamin inhibition was found to be neuroprotective. Dynamin may facilitate Fas-mediated apoptotic death in the brain, and Hsp70 may protect by preventing this trafficking. Dynamin should be explored as a new therapeutic target for neuroprotection. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Congenital deficiency of a 20-kDa subunit of mitochondrial complex I in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Slipetz, D M; Goodyer, P R; Rozen, R

    1991-01-01

    The first component of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain is especially complex, consisting of 19 nuclear and seven mitochondrion-encoded subunits. Accordingly, a wide range of clinical manifestations are produced by the various mutations occurring in human populations. In this study, we analyze the subunit structure of complex I in fibroblasts from two patients who have distinct clinical phenotypes associated with complex I deficiency. The first patient died in the second week of life from overwhelming lactic acidosis. Severe complex I deficiency was evident in her fibroblasts, since alanine oxidation was markedly reduced whereas succinate oxidation was normal. Absence of a 20-kDa subunit was demonstrable when newly synthesized proteins were immunoprecipitated from pulse-labeled fibroblasts by anti-complex I antibody. Disordered assembly or decreased stability of the complex was suggested by deficiency of multiple subunits on Western immunoblots. The second patient exhibited a milder clinical phenotype, characterized by moderate lactic acidosis and developmental delay in childhood and by onset of seizures at 8 years of age. Oxidation studies demonstrated expression of the complex I deficiency in fibroblasts, but no subunit abnormalities were detected by immunoprecipitation or Western immunoblotting. This report demonstrates the utility of cultured fibroblasts in studying mutations affecting synthesis and assembly of complex I. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1903590

  8. A central functional role for the 49-kDa subunit within the catalytic core of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Poor, N; Zwicker, K; Kerscher, S; Brandt, U

    2001-06-29

    We have analyzed a series of eleven mutations in the 49-kDa protein of mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) from Yarrowia lipolytica to identify functionally important domains in this central subunit. The mutations were selected based on sequence homology with the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenases. None of the mutations affected assembly of complex I, all decreased or abolished ubiquinone reductase activity. Several mutants exhibited decreased sensitivities toward ubiquinone-analogous inhibitors. Unexpectedly, seven mutations affected the properties of iron-sulfur cluster N2, a prosthetic group not located in the 49-kDa subunit. In three of these mutants cluster N2 was not detectable by electron-paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The fact that the small subunit of hydrogenase is homologous to the PSST subunit of complex I proposed to host cluster N2 offers a straightforward explanation for the observed, unforeseen effects on this iron-sulfur cluster. We propose that the fold around the hydrogen reactive site of [NiFe] hydrogenase is conserved in the 49-kDa subunit of complex I and has become part of the inhibitor and ubiquinone binding region. We discuss that the fourth ligand of iron-sulfur cluster N2 missing in the PSST subunit may be provided by the 49-kDa subunit.

  9. Isolation of a 19-kDa mycobacterium, bovis-specific antigen, different from MPB70/80, by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Varela, Elvira; Massó, Felipe; Páez, Araceli; Zenteno, Roberto; Zenteno, Edgar; Montaño, Luis F

    2002-11-01

    Two antigens, 19-kDa each, were purified from Mycobacterium bovis culture filtrate protein extract by chromatofocusing. Antigen I had a 4.5 pI, and its amino terminal (DPVDAVINTTCNYGQVVAALNATDP) showed a 100% homology with the hypothetical protein Rv1174c. Antigen II had a pI of 6.0 pI and its amino terminal (GDLVGPGCAEYAAANPTGPASVQGM) showed a 100% homology with M. bovis MPB70/80. Antigen I is a hetero-dimer formed by a glycosylated, 10.5-kDa, monomer and a non-glycosylated 8-kDa monomer with identical amino terminal sequences. Both antigens were recognized by the sera of PPD+ animals, but antigen I did not crossreact with sera of human PPD+ individuals. Antigen I was a weak inducer of lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma production. Our results show that M. bovis expresses a 19 kDa glycoprotein, homologue to the product of M. tuberculosis gen Rv1174c, which may prove useful for bovine TB diagnostic assays.

  10. Taenia crassiceps cysticerci: Characterization of the 14-kDa glycoprotein with homologies to antigens from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Regina H; Espíndola, Noeli M; Pardini, Alessandra X; Iha, Alberto H; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R; Vaz, Adelaide J; Peralta, José M

    2010-03-01

    Glycoproteins from the total vesicular fluid of Taenia crassiceps (VF-Tc) were prepared using three different purification methods, consisting of ConA-lectin affinity chromatography (ConA-Tc), preparative electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) (14 gp-Tc), and monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography (18/14-Tc). The complex composition represented by the VF-Tc and ConA-Tc antigens revealed peptides ranging from 101- to 14-kDa and from 92- to 12-kDa, respectively. Immunoblotting using lectins confirmed glucose/mannose (glc/man) residues in the 18- and 14-kDa peptides, which are considered specific and immunodominant for the diagnosis of cysticercosis, and indicated that these fractions are glycoproteins. Serum antibodies from a patient with neurocysticercosis that reacted to the 14 gp band from T. crassiceps (Tc) were eluted from immunoblotting membranes and showed reactivity to 14 gp from Taenia solium. In order to determine the similar peptide sequence, the N-terminal amino acid was determined and analyzed with sequences available in public databases. This sequence revealed partial homology between T. crassiceps and T. solium peptides. In addition, mass spectrometry along with theoretical M(r) and pI of the 14 gp-Tc point suggested a close relationship to some peptides of a 150-kDa protein complex of the T. solium previously described. The identification of these common immunogenic sites will contribute to future efforts to develop recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides for immunological assays.

  11. Topology and dynamics of the 10 kDa C-terminal domain of DnaK in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, E. B.; Zhou, H.; Lowry, D. F.; Flynn, G. C.; Dahlquist, F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hsp70 molecular chaperones contain three distinct structural domains, a 44 kDa N-terminal ATPase domain, a 17 kDa peptide-binding domain, and a 10 kDa C-terminal domain. The ATPase and peptide binding domains are conserved in sequence and are functionally well characterized. The function of the 10 kDa variable C-terminal domain is less well understood. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the C-terminal domain from the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, in solution by high-resolution NMR. The domain was shown to be comprised of a rigid structure consisting of four helices and a flexible C-terminal subdomain of approximately 33 amino acids. The mobility of the flexible region is maintained in the context of the full-length protein and does not appear to be modulated by the nucleotide state. The flexibility of this region appears to be a conserved feature of Hsp70 architecture and may have important functional implications. We also developed a method to analyze 15N nuclear spin relaxation data, which allows us to extract amide bond vector directions relative to a unique diffusion axis. The extracted angles and rotational correlation times indicate that the helices form an elongated, bundle-like structure in solution. PMID:10048327

  12. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm.

  13. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  14. Activation of Dynein-Mediated in Vitro Microtubule Translocation via Phosphorylation of a 29kDa Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Toshikazu; Simon, Inpakala; Barkalow, Kurt; Satir, Peter

    1995-01-01

    To explain how a substoichiometric amount of phosphorylation of a 29-kDa dynein light chain (p29) activates microtubule translocation in vitro, we constructed a “pacemaker” hypothesis. An example of a translocating microtubule that follows the hypothesis is demonstrated.

  15. An 11-kDa form of human immunodeficiency virus protease expressed in Escherichia coli is sufficient for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M C; Lim, J J; Heimer, E P; Kramer, R A

    1988-01-01

    In order to define the protease domain of human immunodeficiency virus 1, various regions of the pol open reading frame were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Antiserum directed against the conserved retroviral protease active site was used to identify pol precursor and processed species containing the presumed protease domain. The smallest product that accumulates is about 11 kDa as measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE. This size agrees with that predicted from the presence in this region of two Phe-Pro sequences, which is one of the cleavage sites recognized by HIV protease. DNA encoding only the predicted 11-kDa protein was cloned, bypassing the need for autoprocessing, and the protein was expressed to a high level in E. coli. This form is active as demonstrated by its ability to specifically cleave protease-deficient pol protein in vivo in E. coli. Extracts of E. coli containing the 11-kDa protease also process human immunodeficiency virus gag substrates in vitro. These results demonstrate that the 11-kDa protease is sufficient for enzymatic activity and are consistent with a major role for this form in virus maturation. Images PMID:3282230

  16. Geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), elicits unfolded protein response and coordinates cellular fate independently of HSP70.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Okamura, Maro; Kasai, Ayumi; Tagawa, Yasuhiro; Sawada, Norifumi; Yao, Jian; Kitamura, Masanori

    2007-11-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an antiulcer agent, has the ability to induce 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) in various cell types and to protect cells from apoptogenic insults. However, little is known about effects of GGA on other HSP families of molecules. We found that, at concentrations >/=100 microM, GGA caused selective expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), an HSP70 family member inducible by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, without affecting the level of HSP70 in various cell types. Induction of ER stress by GGA was also evidenced by expression of another endogenous marker, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP); decreased activity of ER stress-responsive alkaline phosphatase; and unfolded protein response (UPR), including activation of the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) pathway and the inositol-requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1-X-box-binding protein 1 (IRE1-XBP1) pathway. Incubation of mesangial cells with GGA caused significant apoptosis, which was attenuated by transfection with inhibitors of caspase-12 (i.e., a dominant-negative mutant of caspase-12 and MAGE-3). Dominant-negative suppression of IRE1 or XBP1 significantly attenuated apoptosis without affecting the levels of CHOP and GRP78. Inhibition of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, the molecule downstream of IRE1, by 1,9-pyrazoloanthrone (SP600125) did not improve cell survival. Blockade of ATF6 by 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride enhanced apoptosis by GGA, and it was correlated with attenuated induction of both GRP78 and CHOP. Overexpression of GRP78 or dominant-negative inhibition of CHOP significantly attenuated GGA-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that GGA triggers both proapoptotic (IRE1-XBP1, ATF6-CHOP) and antiapoptotic (ATF6-GRP78) UPR and thereby coordinates cellular fate even without induction of HSP70.

  17. A 295-kDA intermediate filament-associated protein in radial glia and developing muscle cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chanas-Sacré, G; Thiry, M; Pirard, S; Rogister, B; Moonen, G; Mbebi, C; Verdière-Sahuqué, M; Leprince, P

    2000-12-01

    The RC2 antibody is frequently used to label mouse radial glial cells in all parts of the nervous system where neuronal migration occurs during embryonic and early postnatal life. The antigen recognized by this antibody still needs to be identified. We have characterized further its localization in vivo, its expression and subcellular localization in vitro, as well as its molecular nature. Histologic investigations of whole mouse embryos reveal an equally intense expression of RC2 immunostaining in radial glial cells in brain and spinal cord and in skeletal muscle. In glial cells cultures, the RC2 antibody recognizes an epitope located on the glial cytoskeleton and identified as an intermediate filament associated protein (IFAP) at the ultrastructural level. RC2 immunostaining in those cells is strongly dependent on the presence of a serum-derived activity. Serum-removal causes a decrease of the staining while adding serum back to the cells induces reexpression of RC2 immunoreactivity. By Western blotting, we find that in intermediate filament (IF) preparations obtained from cultured cerebellar glia, the RC2 antibody recognizes a 295-kDa protein whose expression is also dependent on the presence of serum in culture medium. In developing muscle cells, RC2 immunostaining is observed from the myoblast stage and disappears after complete myotube fusion. Both in vivo and in vitro, staining is first seen as a loose capping around myoblasts nuclei and progressively concentrates into Z-disks in association with the muscle IF protein desmin. The RC2 antibody also recognizes a 295-kDa protein band in muscle tissue protein extracts. Thus, the RC2 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated cytoskeletal protein that is expressed, like other previously identified IFAPs, by cells of the glial and myogenic lineages and whose expression in vitro seems to be controlled by a signaling mechanism known to modulate astroglial morphology. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding. PMID:27092004

  19. Carboxy terminus of secreted phosphoprotein-24 kDa (spp24) is essential for full inhibition of BMP-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Brochmann, Elsa J; Simon, Robert J; Jawien, Janusz; Behnam, Keyvan; Sintuu, Chananit; Wang, Jeffrey C; Murray, Samuel S

    2010-09-01

    Secreted phosphoprotein-24 kDa (spp24) is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-binding protein isolated from bone. It exists in a number of size forms and is hypothesized to function as a BMP latency protein and/or a "slow release" mechanism for BMPs involved in bone turnover and repair. We have examined the hypothesis that proteolytic modification of the C-terminus of spp24 affects its BMP-2-binding properties and bioactivity in the BMP-2-stimulated ectopic bone forming bioassay. Three different size forms of recombinant spp24 that correspond to predicted 18.1 kDa, 16.0 kDa, and 14.5 kDa proteolytic products were compared to full-length (fl) spp24. One of these forms (spp18.1) we hypothesize to be the protein which Urist initially, but apparently inaccurately, called "BMP." Only full-length spp24 completely inhibited BMP-2-induced bone formation. The 18.1 kDa truncated isoform of spp24 which we hypothesize to be Urist's protein did not. The inhibitory capacity of the proteins was correlated with their kinetic constants, assessed by surface plasmon resonance. At the highest, inhibitory, dose of spp24 and its derivatives, k(d) ("stability") best predicted the extent of ectopic bone formation whereas at the lowest dose, which was not inhibitory, k(a) ("recognition") best predicted the extent of ectopic bone formation. We conclude that proteolytic processing of spp24 affects the interaction of this protein with BMP-2 and this affects the function of the protein. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Characterization of a 70-kDa, EBV gp350/220-binding protein on HSB-2 T cells.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, J A; Lao, Z; Lipps, S G; Wang, Y; Todd, S C; Lambris, J D; Tsoukas, C D

    1994-11-15

    EBV binds and infects HSB-2 T cells via a receptor distinct from CD21. To further study this novel EBV receptor, we expressed the first 470 amino acids of the EBV-gp350/220 using the baculovirus expression system. The recombinant gp350/220(1-470) has a m.w. of 95 kDa, reacts with anti-gp350/220 Abs, and binds CD21 in ELISA. Radiolabeled gp350/220(1-470) binds both HSB-2 and Raji cells. The gp350/220(1-470) protein also inhibits EBV binding to both HSB-2 and Raji, detected by flow cytometry. Lysates of HSB-2 cells compete with CD21 for binding to gp350/220(1-470), suggesting that the two receptors bind related epitopes on the recombinant protein. Scatchard analysis reveals that gp350/220(1-470) binds to 34,000 high affinity sites/HSB-2 cell (Kd = 0.92 x 10(-8) M) compared with the 97,000 high affinity sites bound/Raji cell (Kd = 1.78 x 10(-8) M). Utilizing a gp350/220(1-470)-affinity matrix, we identify a 70-kDa (55-kDa nonreduced) protein on the surfaces of 125I-labeled HSB-2 cells. Binding of this protein to the matrix is inhibited by anti-gp350/220 Ab 72A1. In summary, we characterize a novel EBV-binding molecule on HSB-2 cells, compare its reactivity with gp350/220 to that of CD21, and provide evidence of a gp350/220-reactive, 70-kDa protein on the surfaces of HSB-2 cells. In view of previous evidence of HSB-2 infectivity by EBV, we propose that the 70 kDa protein represents the novel EBV receptor.

  1. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates.

  2. Three-dimensional solution structure of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, M; Cai, M; Kaufman, J; Stahl, S J; Wingfield, P T; Covell, D G; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of the ectodomain of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gp41 (e-gp41), consisting of residues 27-149, has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. SIV e-gp41 is a symmetric 44 kDa trimer with each subunit consisting of antiparallel N-terminal (residues 30-80) and C-terminal (residues 107-147) helices connected by a 26 residue loop (residues 81-106). The N-terminal helices of each subunit form a parallel coiled-coil structure in the interior of the complex which is surrounded by the C-terminal helices located on the exterior of the complex. The loop region is ordered and displays numerous intermolecular and non-sequential intramolecular contacts. The helical core of SIV e-gp41 is similar to recent X-ray structures of truncated constructs of the helical core of HIV-1 e-gp41. The present structure establishes unambiguously the connectivity of the N- and C-terminal helices in the trimer, and characterizes the conformation of the intervening loop, which has been implicated by mutagenesis and antibody epitope mapping to play a key role in gp120 association. In conjunction with previous studies, the solution structure of the SIV e-gp41 ectodomain provides insight into the binding site of gp120 and the mechanism of cell fusion. The present structure of SIV e-gp41 represents one of the largest protein structures determined by NMR to date. PMID:9707417

  3. [Protein 70 kDa in control of sleep and thermoregulation].

    PubMed

    Pastukhov, Iu F; Ekimova, I V; Khudik, K A; Guzhova, I V

    2008-01-01

    Studies of expression of molecular chaperones of the family of Heat Shock Proteins 70 kDa (HSP70) in the mouse and rat brain during sleep deprivation do not answer the question whether the HSP70 produce somnogenic effect. In the present work there are studied effects of exogenous Hsp70 that is known to be able to penetrate into living cells in vitro and to acquire properties of endogenous chaperone. Hsp70 was microinjected into the third brain ventricle of rats and pigeons at the beginning of the inactive period of the day when under natural conditions the sleep duration increases and the somato-visceral parameters decrease. Hsp70 was found to enhance this natural process and to produce an additional increase in the total time of slow-wave sleep, a more pronounced inhibition of the muscle contractive activity, and a deeper decrease in the brain temperature. A similarity in effects of Hsp70 in rats and pigeons was revealed. In both species the somnogenic effect of Hsp70 in is realized by activation of mechanisms of maintenance of in longer episodes of in slow-wave sleep. The hypothermic Hsp70 effect seems to be associated with a decrease in the muscle contractive activity level, rather than with an enhancement in peripheral vasodilation and with an increase of heat loss. A hypothesis is put forward that the neuroleptic effect of Hsp70 that includes the somnogenic, myorelaxing, and hypothermic effects is mediated by activation of GABAA receptors of the main inhibitory brain system.

  4. A novel 58-kDa protein associates with the Golgi apparatus and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Bloom, G S; Brashear, T A

    1989-09-25

    With the aim of identifying proteins involved in linking microtubules to other cytoplasmic structures, microtubule-binding proteins were isolated from rat liver extracts by a taxol-dependent procedure. The major non-tubulin component, a 58-kDa protein (designated 58K), was purified to homogeneity by gel filtration chromatography. To aid further characterization of 58K, purified preparations of the protein were used as immunogen for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Five different monoclonals were obtained, and each of these reacted on immunoblots of liver homogenates with a single band that comigrated with 58K. Based on the results of immunochemical, peptide mapping, and microsequencing experiments, 58K was found to be unrelated structurally to similarly sized cytoskeleton-associated proteins, such as tubulin, tau, vimentin, or keratin, and to represent a new protein species. Several in vitro properties of 58K were found to be characteristic of microtubule-associated proteins. For instance, 58K cosedimented quantitatively with microtubules out of liver extracts, stimulated polymerization of tubulin, and bound to microtubules in a saturable manner. In contrast to traditional microtubule-associated proteins, however, 58K was not found to be distributed uniformly along microtubules in cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy of cultured hepatoma cells revealed, instead, that 58K is associated principally with the Golgi apparatus. Moreover, Golgi membranes isolated from rat liver were observed by immunoblotting to contain significant levels of 58K, which, upon subfractionation of the membranes, partitioned as if it were a peripheral membrane protein exposed to the cytoplasmic side of the Golgi. These collective results have been evaluated in terms of earlier evidence that the intracellular position and structural integrity of the Golgi relies on the presence and organization of microtubules. In that context, the observations reported here suggest that the in vivo

  5. An 18 kDa Scaffold Protein Is Critical for Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zobiak, Melanie; Büttner, Henning; Franke, Gefion; Christner, Martin; Saß, Katharina; Zobiak, Bernd; Henke, Hanae A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Bischoff, Markus; Bur, Stephanie; Hartmann, Torsten; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Fey, Paul D.; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Virulence of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis is crucially linked to formation of adherent biofilms on artificial surfaces. Biofilm assembly is significantly fostered by production of a bacteria derived extracellular matrix. However, the matrix composition, spatial organization, and relevance of specific molecular interactions for integration of bacterial cells into the multilayered biofilm community are not fully understood. Here we report on the function of novel 18 kDa Small basic protein (Sbp) that was isolated from S. epidermidis biofilm matrix preparations by an affinity chromatographic approach. Sbp accumulates within the biofilm matrix, being preferentially deposited at the biofilm–substratum interface. Analysis of Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants demonstrated the importance of Sbp for sustained colonization of abiotic surfaces, but also epithelial cells. In addition, Sbp promotes assembly of S. epidermidis cell aggregates and establishment of multilayered biofilms by influencing polysaccharide intercellular-adhesin (PIA) and accumulation associated protein (Aap) mediated intercellular aggregation. While inactivation of Sbp indirectly resulted in reduced PIA-synthesis and biofilm formation, Sbp serves as an essential ligand during Aap domain-B mediated biofilm accumulation. Our data support the conclusion that Sbp serves as an S. epidermidis biofilm scaffold protein that significantly contributes to key steps of surface colonization. Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants showed no attenuated virulence in a mouse catheter infection model. Nevertheless, the high prevalence of sbp in commensal and invasive S. epidermidis populations suggests that Sbp plays a significant role as a co-factor during both multi-factorial commensal colonization and infection of artificial surfaces. PMID:25799153

  6. An 18 kDa scaffold protein is critical for Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rahel; Burdelski, Christoph; Zobiak, Melanie; Büttner, Henning; Franke, Gefion; Christner, Martin; Saß, Katharina; Zobiak, Bernd; Henke, Hanae A; Horswill, Alexander R; Bischoff, Markus; Bur, Stephanie; Hartmann, Torsten; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Fey, Paul D; Rohde, Holger

    2015-03-01

    Virulence of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis is crucially linked to formation of adherent biofilms on artificial surfaces. Biofilm assembly is significantly fostered by production of a bacteria derived extracellular matrix. However, the matrix composition, spatial organization, and relevance of specific molecular interactions for integration of bacterial cells into the multilayered biofilm community are not fully understood. Here we report on the function of novel 18 kDa Small basic protein (Sbp) that was isolated from S. epidermidis biofilm matrix preparations by an affinity chromatographic approach. Sbp accumulates within the biofilm matrix, being preferentially deposited at the biofilm-substratum interface. Analysis of Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants demonstrated the importance of Sbp for sustained colonization of abiotic surfaces, but also epithelial cells. In addition, Sbp promotes assembly of S. epidermidis cell aggregates and establishment of multilayered biofilms by influencing polysaccharide intercellular-adhesin (PIA) and accumulation associated protein (Aap) mediated intercellular aggregation. While inactivation of Sbp indirectly resulted in reduced PIA-synthesis and biofilm formation, Sbp serves as an essential ligand during Aap domain-B mediated biofilm accumulation. Our data support the conclusion that Sbp serves as an S. epidermidis biofilm scaffold protein that significantly contributes to key steps of surface colonization. Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants showed no attenuated virulence in a mouse catheter infection model. Nevertheless, the high prevalence of sbp in commensal and invasive S. epidermidis populations suggests that Sbp plays a significant role as a co-factor during both multi-factorial commensal colonization and infection of artificial surfaces.

  7. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Gu, Yuan; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis. Methods and Findings The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES) products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1) formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27%) and muscle larvae burden (42.1%) after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (p<0.01). The rTs-ES-1-induced protection was associated with a high level of specific anti-Ts-ES-1 IgG antibodies and a Th1/Th2 mixed immune response. Conclusion The newly identified rTs-ES-1 is an immunodominant protein secreted by Trichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis. PMID:26288365

  8. Extraribosomal Functions Associated with the C Terminus of the 37/67 kDa Laminin Receptor are Required for Maintaining Cell Viability

    SciTech Connect

    J Scheiman; K Jamieson; J Ziello; J Tseng; D Meruelo

    2011-12-31

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LAMR) is a multifunctional protein, acting as an extracellular receptor, localizing to the nucleus, and playing roles in rRNA processing and ribosome assembly. LAMR is important for cell viability; however, it is unclear which of its functions are essential. We developed a silent mutant LAMR construct, resistant to siRNA, to rescue the phenotypic effects of knocking down endogenous LAMR, which include inhibition of protein synthesis, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In addition, we generated a C-terminal-truncated silent mutant LAMR construct structurally homologous to the Archaeoglobus fulgidus S2 ribosomal protein and missing the C-terminal 75 residues of LAMR, which displays more sequence divergence. We found that HT1080 cells stably expressing either silent mutant LAMR construct still undergo arrest in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle when treated with siRNA. However, the expression of full-length silent mutant LAMR rescues cell viability, whereas the expression of the C-terminal-truncated LAMR does not. Interestingly, we also found that both silent mutant constructs restore protein translation and localize to the nucleus. Our findings indicate that the ability of LAMR to regulate viability is associated with its C-terminal 75 residues. Furthermore, this function is distinct from its role in cell proliferation, independent of its ribosomal functions, and may be regulated by a nonnuclear localization.

  9. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation.

    PubMed

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s).

  10. Conservation of Expression and N-Terminal Sequences of the Pasteurella haemolytica 31-Kilodalton and Pasteurella trehalosi 29-Kilodalton Periplasmic Iron-Regulated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Frank, Glynn H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the conservation of expression of a 31-kDa iron-regulated protein by serotypes of Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi associated with pasteurellosis of cattle and sheep. A polyclonal antibody prepared against the purified 31-kDa periplasmic iron-regulated protein from P. haemolytica serotype A1 showed that all P. haemolytica serotypes expressed similar 31-kDa proteins with identical N-terminal sequences, whereas P. trehalosi serotypes expressed immunologically different 29-kDa proteins with a different N-terminal sequence. Antibody to the 31-kDa iron-regulated protein was a useful tool to distinguish similarities and differences of the iron-regulated proteins of P. haemolytica and P. trehalosi. PMID:10391874

  11. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  12. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits TLR4 signaling through the 67-kDa laminin receptor on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Choi, Han-Gyu; Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expressions of CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II were inhibited by EGCG via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG-treated DCs inhibited LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG-treated DCs inhibited MAPKs activation and NF-{kappa}B p65 translocation via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG elevated the expression of the Tollip protein through 67LR in DCs. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major active polyphenol of green tea, has been shown to down-regulate inflammatory responses in dendritic cells (DCs); however, the underlying mechanism has not been understood. Recently, we identified the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR) as a cell-surface EGCG receptor. In this study, we showed the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by EGCG in DCs. The expressions of CD80, CD86, and MHC class I and II, which are molecules essential for antigen presentation by DCs, were inhibited by EGCG via 67LR. In addition, EGCG-treated DCs inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-{alpha}, interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, and IL-6) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), e.g., extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 translocation through 67LR. Interestingly, we also found that EGCG markedly elevated the expression of the Tollip protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, through 67LR. These novel findings provide new insight into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and consequent inflammatory responses that are implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  13. 82-kDa choline acetyltransferase is in nuclei of cholinergic neurons in human CNS and altered in aging and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sandeep K; Ishak, Margaret; Dobransky, Tomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Davis, Kenneth L; Rylett, R Jane

    2007-07-01

    Cholinergic neurons express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which synthesizes acetylcholine. We show here for the first time that primate-specific 82-kDa ChAT is expressed in nuclei of cholinergic neurons in human brain and spinal cord; isoform-specific antibodies were used to compare localization patterns and temporal expression of the more abundant 69-kDa ChAT and primate-specific 82-kDa ChAT in necropsy tissues. The 82-kDa ChAT co-localizes with 69-kDa ChAT in well-characterized cholinergic areas, but is also found in the claustrum which does not contain 69-kDa ChAT. Cholinergic neuron function changes with increasing age and are targeted in neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, thus we compared expression and subcellular localization of 69- and 82-kDa ChAT in necropsy brain samples from control subjects of varying ages and from Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects. The 82-kDa ChAT protein was expressed in cholinergic neurons in brain from birth until the eighth decade of life and in AD, but the subcellular staining pattern and proportion of neurons that were immunopositive changed with increasing age and in AD.

  14. Mixed-Affinity Binding in Humans with 18-kDa Translocator Protein Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David R.J.; Gunn, Roger N.; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Bennacef, Idriss; Fujita, Masahiro; Kreisl, William C.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.; Reynolds, Richard; Matthews, Paul M.; Parker, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    11C-PBR28 PET can detect the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) expressed within macrophages. However, quantitative evaluation of the signal in brain tissue from donors with multiple sclerosis (MS) shows that PBR28 binds the TSPO with high affinity (binding affinity [Ki], ~4 nM), low affinity (Ki, ~200 nM), or mixed affinity (2 sites with Ki, ~4 nM and ~300 nM). Our study tested whether similar binding behavior could be detected in brain tissue from donors with no history of neurologic disease, with TSPO-binding PET ligands other than 11C-PBR28, for TSPO present in peripheral blood, and with human brain PET data acquired in vivo with 11C-PBR28. Methods The affinity of TSPO ligands was measured in the human brain post-mortem from donors with a history of MS (n = 13), donors without any history of neurologic disease (n = 20), and in platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 13). Binding potential estimates from thirty-five 11C-PBR28 PET scans from an independent sample of healthy volunteers were analyzed using a gaussian mixture model. Results Three binding affinity patterns were found in brains from subjects without neurologic disease in similar proportions to those reported previously from studies of MS brains. TSPO ligands showed substantial differences in affinity between subjects classified as high-affinity binders (HABs) and low-affinity binders (LABs). Differences in affinity between HABs and LABs are approximately 50-fold with PBR28, approximately 17-fold with PBR06, and approximately 4-fold with DAA1106, DPA713, and PBR111. Where differences in affinity between HABs and LABs were low (~4-fold), distinct affinities were not resolvable in binding curves for mixed-affinity binders (MABs), which appeared to express 1 class of sites with an affinity approximately equal to the mean of those for HABs and LABs. Mixed-affinity binding was detected in platelets from an independent sample (HAB, 69%; MAB, 31%), although LABs were not detected. Analysis of 11C-PBR28 PET

  15. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a human 372-kDA protein localized in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Sohda, M; Misumi, Y; Fujiwara, T; Nishioka, M; Ikehara, Y

    1994-12-15

    Autoantibodies from a patient with chronic rheumatoid arthritis recognized an antigen localized in the Golgi complex of various cells from different tissues and species. The autoantibodies were used as a probe for screening human QGP-1 cDNA library, resulting in identification of a 10.3-kb cDNA. The cDNA insert contained an open reading frame which encodes a 3225-residue protein with a calculated mass of 372 kDa. The predicted protein was found to have no NH2-terminal signal sequence but a single hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus. These results indicate that the 372-kDa antigen is cytoplasmically disposed and anchored to the Golgi membrane by the COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain.

  16. Inhibition of heat shock protein (molecular weight 90 kDa) attenuates proinflammatory cytokines and prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Aditya; Catalano, Donna; Lim, Arlene; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2012-05-01

    Endotoxin-mediated proinflammatory cytokines play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver diseases. Heat shock protein 90 (molecular weight, 90 kDa) (hsp90) functions as an important chaperone of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling and is required for the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that inhibition of hsp90 would prevent LPS-induced liver injury by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines. C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with an hsp90 inhibitor, 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), and LPS. Parameters of liver injury, proinflammatory cytokines, and associated mechanisms were studied by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Inhibition of hsp90 by 17-DMAG prevented LPS-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase activity and significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) protein as well as messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. Enhanced DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) and induction of target gene heat shock protein 70 (molecular weight, 70 kDa) confirmed hsp90 inhibition in liver. 17-DMAG treatment decreased cluster of differentiation 14 mRNA and LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) DNA binding without affecting Toll-like receptor 4 mRNA in liver. Mechanistic studies revealed that 17-DMAG-mediated inhibition of TNFα showed no effect on LPS-induced NFκB promoter-driven reporter activity, but significantly decreased TNFα promoter-driven reporter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that 17-DMAG enhanced HSF1 binding to the TNFα promoter, but not the IL-6 promoter, suggesting HSF1 mediated direct inhibition of TNFα, but not IL-6. We show that HSF1 indirectly regulates IL-6 by the induction of another transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3. Inhibition of HSF1, using small interfering RNA, prevented 17-DMAG-mediated down-regulation

  17. Identification and characterization of a 44 kDa protein that binds specifically to the 3'-untranslated region of CYP2a5 mRNA: inducibility, subcellular distribution and possible role in mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Geneste, O; Raffalli, F; Lang, M A

    1996-01-01

    Stabilization of mRNA is important in the regulation of CYP2a5 expression but the factors involved in the process are not known [Aida and Negishi (1991) Biochemistry 30, 8041-8045]. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, a protein that binds specifically to the 3'-untranslated region of CYP2a5 mRNA and which is inducible by pyrazole, a compound known to increase the half-life of CYP2a5 mRNA. We also demonstrate that pyrazole treatment causes an elongation of the CYP2a5 mRNA poly(A) tail, and that phenobarbital, which is transcriptional activator of the CYP2a5 gene that does not affect the mRNA half-life, neither induces the RNA-binding protein nor affects the poly(A) tail size. SDS/PAGE of the UV-cross-linked RNA-protein complex demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein has an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa. The protein-binding site was localized to a 70-nucleotide region between bases 1585 and 1655. Treatment of cytoplasmic extracts with an SH-oxidizing agent, diamide, an SH-blocking agent, N-ethylmaleimide or potato acid phosphatase abolished complex-formation, suggesting that the CYP2a5 mRNA-binding protein is subject to post-translational regulation. Subcellular fractionation showed that the 44 kDa protein is present in polyribosomes and nuclei, and that its apparent induction is much stronger in polyribosomes than in nuclear extracts. We propose that this 44 kDa RNA-binding protein is involved in the stabilization of CYP2a5 mRNA by controlling the length of the poly(A) tail. PMID:8611142

  18. Photolabeling of a 150-kDa (Na + K + Cl) cotransport protein from dog kidney with a bumetanide analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.; Forbush, B. III

    1987-08-01

    (Na + K + Cl) cotransport is the major mechanism of salt transport across the apical membrane of the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop of mammalian kidney and the site of action of loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide. We have identified a 150-kDa protein in membranes from dog kidney cortex that is photolabeled by a radiolabeled, benzophenone analogue of bumetanide, (/sup 3/H)4-benzoyl-5-sulfamoyl-3-(3-thenyloxy)benzoic acid ((/sup 3/H)BSTBA). Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that this 150-kDa protein is at least part of the (Na + K + Cl) cotransport system. 1) Photoincorporation of (/sup 3/H)BSTBA into this protein is completely blocked by inclusion of 10 microM unlabeled bumetanide in the photolysis medium. 2) Photoincorporation of (/sup 3/H)BSTBA into this protein shows a saturable dependence on (/sup 3/H)BSTBA concentration, with a K 1/2 (approximately 0.1 microM) very similar to that for reversible (/sup 3/H)BSTBA binding to kidney membranes. 3) Photolabeling of this protein by (/sup 3/H)BSTBA requires the simultaneous presence of Na, K, and Cl in the photolysis medium. 4) When crude membranes from dog kidney cortex are centrifuged on sucrose density gradients, saturable (/sup 3/H)bumetanide binding and photoincorporation of (/sup 3/H)BSTBA in the 150-kDa region show a very similar distribution among the 15 gradient fractions collected. (/sup 3/H)BSTBA is also photoincorporated into at least two lower molecular mass proteins, the largest of which is approximately 50 kDa.

  19. Detection of a novel 20 kDa shrimp allergen showing cross-reactivity to house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Villalta, D; Tonutti, E; Visentini, D; Bizzaro, N; Roncarolo, D; Amato, S; Mistrello, G

    2010-02-01

    Allergy to crustacean shellfish is one of the most common IgE-mediated food allergies, and tropomyosin has been identified as the major allergen. However, not all subjects affected by this allergy are IgE-positive to tropomyosin. To evaluate whether sera of patients with shrimp allergy but negative for tropomyosin react to other allergen(s); and to evaluate the role such allergen(s) may play in cross-reactivity between crustaceans and house dust mites (HDMs). Three different pools of sera-one from subjects with shellfish allergy and HDMs positivity, but negative for recombinant and native tropomyosin (rPen a 1 and nPen m 1) (Pool 2); a second from subjects with tropomyosin and HDMs positivity (Pool 1); and the last from subjects allergic only to HDMs (Pool 3) were submitted to immunoblotting. Subsequently, a 20 kDa protein- enriched fraction of shrimp extract was used at two different concentrations (10 and 100 microg/mL) to pre-absorb the Pool 2 serum and to evaluate, by ELISA assay, the level of inhibition on shrimp and HDMs-coated wells, respectively. The Pool 2 serum showed IgE reactivity against a 20 kDa component. Its pre-absorption with an enriched fraction of 20 kDa protein caused an inhibition of 56% in IgE binding to shrimp extract at a concentration of 100 microg/mL, and of 14% and 35% to HDMs extract at concentrations of 10 and 100 microg/mL, respectively, as measured by ELISA assay. The 20 kDa component seems to be a new crustacean allergen and it could play a role in cross-reactivity with HDMs.

  20. Fasciola gigantica: immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis by detection of circulating 28.5 kDa tegumental antigen.

    PubMed

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Chawengkirtikul, Runglawan; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Sobhon, Prasert

    2009-12-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MoAb)-based sandwich ELISA was developed for the detection of circulating 28.5 kDa tegumental antigen (28.5 kDa TA) in the sera from mice experimentally infected with Fasciola gigantica. The MoAb was immobilized on a microtiter plate, and the antigen in the serum was captured and detected with biotinylated polyclonal rabbit anti TA antibody. The test could detect 28.5 kDa in the extracts of tegument (TA), whole body (WB) and excretory-secretory (ES) fractions at the concentrations of these crude antigens as low as 600 pg/ml, 16 and 60 ng/ml, respectively. This sandwich ELISA assay could detect the infection from day 1 to 35 post infection and showed that circulating level of 28.5 kDa TA peaked at day 1 post infection. In contrast, the antibody detection by indirect ELISA could only demonstrate the antibody level from 35 days post infection. The reliability of the assay method was evaluated using sera from mice infected with F. gigantica or Schistosoma mansoni, and hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini, as well as healthy mice and hamsters. The sandwich ELISA exhibited a sensitivity and specificity at 94.55% and 100%, respectively, and with a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 97.39%, false positive rate of 0%, false negative rate of 5.50% and an accuracy of 98.2%. Thus, this detection method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity as well as could be used for early diagnosis of fasciolosis by F. gigantica.

  1. An Active 32-kDa Cathepsin L Is Secreted Directly from HT 1080 Fibrosarcoma Cells and Not via Lysosomal Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoko; Kondo, Chihiro; Katunuma, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin L [EC 3.4.22.15] is secreted via lysosomal exocytosis by several types of cancer cells, including prostate and breast cancer cells. We previously reported that human cultured fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells secrete cathepsin L into the medium; this secreted cathepsin is 10-times more active than intracellular cathepsin. This increased activity was attributed to the presence of a 32-kDa cathepsin L in the medium. The aim of this study was to examine how this active 32-kDa cathepsin L is secreted into the medium. To this end, we compared the secreted active 32-kDa cathepsin L with lysosomal cathepsin L by using a novel gelatin zymography technique that employs leupeptin. We also examined the glycosylation and phosphorylation status of the proteins by using the enzymes endoglycosidase H [EC 3.2.1.96] and alkaline phosphatase [EC 3.1.3.1]. Strong active bands corresponding to the 32-kDa and 34-kDa cathepsin L forms were detected in the medium and lysosomes, respectively. The cell extract exhibited strong active bands for both forms. Moreover, both forms were adsorbed onto a concanavalin A-agarose column. The core protein domain of both forms had the same molecular mass of 30 kDa. The 32-kDa cathepsin L was phosphorylated, while the 34-kDa lysosomal form was dephosphorylated, perhaps because of the lysosomal marker enzyme, acid phosphatase. These results suggest that the active 32-kDa form does not enter the lysosomes. In conclusion, our results indicate that the active 32-kDa cathepsin L is secreted directly from the HT 1080 cells and not via lysosomal exocytosis. PMID:26674348

  2. Transdermal delivery of a approximately 13 kDa protein--an in vivo comparison of physical enhancement methods.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Sahitya; Li, Guohua; Badkar, Advait; Banga, Ajay K

    2010-02-01

    The availability of several enhancement techniques has made it possible to study delivery of macromolecules through skin. This study was conducted to evaluate the transdermal delivery of a ~13 kDa protein using iontophoresis, sonophoresis, and microneedles alone or in combination. In vivo delivery experiments were carried out using hairless rats with daniplestim (DP) as the model protein (molecular weight: 12.760 kDa; isoelectric point, 6.2). Delivery enhancement abilities of the above techniques were evaluated at two different drug concentrations in the patch: 2 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL. At a drug loading concentration of 2 mg/mL maximum delivery was seen with the combination of microneedles and iontophoresis. At 5 mg/mL, sonophoresis alone gave a C(max) of 8.22 +/- 5.9 ng/mL and a combination of sonophoresis and iontophoresis gave a C(max) of 4.9 +/- 1.8 ng/mL. The results of this study suggest that combination of microneedles and iontophoresis was the most effective approach in delivering a 13 kDa protein through the skin.

  3. Two different 8 kDa monomers are involved in the oligomeric organization of the native Echinococcus granulosus antigen B.

    PubMed

    González, G; Nieto, A; Fernández, C; Orn, A; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U

    1996-12-01

    The present work describes the purification and characterization of antigen B (AgB), the thermostable lipoprotein from E. granulosus. Native AgB was purified to homogeneity by a new strategy involving adsorption on DEAE-Sepharose, followed by immunopurification. The purified antigen was analysed using mapped monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and peptide isolation by in situ digestion in gels after SDS-PAGE. Epitope mapping of 7 MoAbs using PEPSCAN, synthetic peptides and competition studies, revealed that six of them defined epitopes which clustered the N-terminal extension of a 8 kDa subunit of AgB, whilst the remaining one reacted against the stretch RGLIAEGE, corresponding to the C-terminus. The epitopes defined by the seven MoAbs were found to be present in all the subunits. Furthermore, the similarities of the peptide finger prints obtained by HPLC analysis and amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides isolated from the 8, 16 and 24 kDa subunits, indicated that they have most if not all the amino acid sequence in common. We also found evidence that the band representing a component of an apparent molecular weight of 8 kDa in SDS-PAGE, believed to be the smallest subunit of AgB, contained at least two components, which may constitute the building blocks of the higher molecular weight subunits.

  4. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E G; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-03-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants.

  5. The Transition of the 37-Kda Laminin Receptor (Rpsa) to Higher Molecular Weight Species: Sumoylation or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Vincent; Gando, Ivan A; Venticinque, Lisa; Hurtado, Alicia; Meruelo, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA.

  6. [Stimulation of cell cultures recovery after cryopreservation by the cattle cord blood FRACTION (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin].

    PubMed

    Gulevskiĭ, A K; Trifonova, A V; Lavrik, A A

    2013-01-01

    The capacities of the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) and Actovegin (the vealer blood fraction (below 5 kDa)) for recovering functions of cell cultures after cryopreservation compared. Their influence proliferation of the flozen-thawed cell cultures, certain stages of their growth, cell attachment, rate of cell spreading, and mitotic regiment has been studied. Both the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin were shown to stimulate growth of the cell cultures after cryopreservation more efficiently at the concentration of 224 μg/ml. However, despite the stimulating effect discovered, their application did not bring proliferative indices on the 1st passage after cryopreservation to the values of the native culture. The effects of the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin on the human fibroblast culture were identical by the following parameters: cell attachment, rates of cell spreading and proliferation. In culture BHK-21 clone 13/04 the efficiency of Actovegin was low, while the cord blood low-molecular fraction has a conspicuous stimulating effect on its adhesion and proliferation. The investigations carried out can serve as a basis for the development of regenerative media containing the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin as active components at the concentration of 224 μg/ml with the purpose of fast recovery of culture prolifetative properties after cryopreservation.

  7. Identification of a 24-kDa cytokine that is required for development of cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cernetti, C; Steinman, R M; Granelli-Piperno, A

    1988-03-01

    It is known that the production of cytolytic T lymphocytes requires growth factors such as interleukins 2 and 4 (IL-2 and IL-4). Elsewhere we have described bioassays that detect a cytokine that operates in concert with growth factor to generate cytolytic T lymphocytes. The factor that is termed cytolytic T-lymphocyte differentiation factor (CDF), together with IL-2 and lectin, mediates the formation of CD8+ killer cells in 2 days from thymocyte or peripheral lymphoid precursors. CDF is not mimicked by natural or recombinant sources of interferons, colony-stimulating factors, and IL-1 to IL-4. Here we use these bioassays to isolate and further characterize a single 24-kDa CDF protein from the conditioned medium of stimulated human blood mononuclear cells. CDF is first enriched by three successive chromatographic procedures that utilize anion exchange, hydroxyapatite, and phenyl-Superose. A single 24-kDa band with CDF activity is then isolated on 12% NaDodSO4/PAGE and clearly distinguished from the 17-kDa band of IL-2. The apparent molecular mass is similar under reducing and nonreducing conditions. After elution from NaDodSO4/PAGE the cytokine is maximally active at 0.25 nM in the CDF assay and has no growth factor activity for T lymphoblasts. To generate cytolytic CD8+, CD4- cells from spleen and lymph node T lymphocytes, IL-2 and small numbers of accessory dendritic cells must be applied together with CDF.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 38-kDa immunodominant antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, A.; Vyas, M. N.; Vyas, N. K.; Chang, Z.; Quiocho, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The 38-kDa lipoprotein is one of the most potent cell surface immunogens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in antibody-and T cell-mediated reactions. Using a pure recombinant form of the protein, we have recently shown that it binds phosphate much like that of the phosphate-binding protein (M(r) = 34.4 kDa) that is localized in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is involved as an initial receptor for active transport of phosphate. The purified 38-kDa protein has been crystallized in 2 forms that are suitable for high-resolution structural analyses. One form belongs to the monoclinic space group P2(1) with unit cell dimensions of a = 67.42 A, b = 113.38 A, c = 42.68 A, and beta = 108.53 degrees. The other is of orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2 with a = 125.46 A, b = 72.27 A, and c = 73.43 A. Both crystal forms diffract to about 2 A resolution on a fine focus rotating anode. PMID:7756999

  9. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E.G.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-01-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants. PMID:15270076

  10. Isolation and characterization of the 32.5 kDa protein from the venom of an endoparasitic wasp.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T; Jones, D

    1990-07-20

    The major venom proteins from the endoparasitic wasp were analyzed for distribution in the venom gland. A 32.5 kDa protein was purified from the venom gland of the Chelonus near curvimaculatus wasp. The protein accounts for about 25% of the total protein content of the venom and each gland contains 3-6 pmol of this component. The protein is acidic in nature and anion-exchange chromatography facilitated the purification of the protein to apparent homogeneity. On testing the purified protein by in vivo bioassay, it was found to elicit an effect comparable with the complete venom. The protein does not appear to have any disulfide bonds of major structural importance exposed under SDS-denaturing conditions. Products of chemical partial digest of the purified protein at the methionyl residues by cyanogen bromide were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The 27.6 kDa fragment retained an epitope to an antibody raised against total Chelonus venom proteins, whereas no epitopes were detected for 4.9 and 0.6 kDa fragments.

  11. [Heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family in the cells of free living and amphizoic amoeboid organisms].

    PubMed

    Podlipaeva, Iu I; Gudkov, A V

    2009-01-01

    The content of constitutive from of 70 kDa family heat shock pritein (Hsp70) was determined by the method of immunoblotting. 9 strains of representatives of the genus Acanthamoeba including 8 amphizoic (facultative parasitic) strains and one free-living (isolated from upper horizons of Arctic soils) were studied. We also examined 15 strains of free-living freshwater amoebae of various geographic origin, age and species. 14 of them belonging to the genus Amoeba and one to the genus Trichamoeba. The presence of Hsp70 was demonstrated in the cells of all 25 freshwater amoeba strains, whereas it was shown only for 2 of amphizoic acanthamoebae strains. In all these cases, the position of zone at the blot, revealed by monoclonal anti-HSP70 antibodies, corresponded to polypeptide with molecular mass about 70 kDa. We also found rather high level of constitutive Hsp70 in the cells of contemporary free-living tundra soil representative. However, in this case, the stained zone occupied the position corresponding to MW about 60 kDa which was just the same as earlier obtained for the ancient tundra acanthamoebae strain from permafrost.

  12. THE TRANSITION OF THE 37-kDa LAMININ RECEPTOR (RPSA) TO HIGHER MOLECULAR WEIGHT SPECIES: SUMOylation OR ARTIFACT?

    PubMed Central

    DIGIACOMO, VINCENT; GANDO, IVAN A.; VENTICINQUE, LISA; HURTADO, ALICIA; MERUELO, DANIEL

    2017-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA. PMID:26146125

  13. Two distinct light regulated G-proteins in octopus photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Tsuda, T

    1990-04-09

    Two distinct light-regulated G-proteins were found in octopus photoreceptors. Gip, a 41 kDa protein from washed microvilli, was ADP ribosylated by pertussis toxin in the presence of GDP in the dark. Light and GTP analogues were inhibitory as with transducin (Gt; G-protein in vertebrate photoreceptors). G34, a 34 kDa protein from fresh octopus retina, was ADP ribosylated by both cholera and pertussis toxin in the dark. Light inhibited labeling of the 34 kDa protein by both toxins. Unlike Gip, G34 is soluble and is very labile to heat, freezing and thawing. Prolonged incubation of octopus retina with cholera toxin and labeled NAD produced an additional radioactive band at 46 kDa. Labeling of the 46 kDa protein, Gsp, was greatly enhanced by GTP analogues, but inhibited by a GDP analogue as with Gs in hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase. In contrast to Gip and G34, labeling of the 46 kDa protein (Gsp) was not influenced by light. The two distinct light-regulated G-proteins, Gip and G34, found in octopus photoreceptors might be involved in either phototransduction or photoadaptation. The function of Gsp is not known.

  14. Myotubularin-related proteins 3 and 4 interact with polo-like kinase 1 and centrosomal protein of 55 kDa to ensure proper abscission.

    PubMed

    St-Denis, Nicole; Gupta, Gagan D; Lin, Zhen Yuan; Gonzalez-Badillo, Beatriz; Pelletier, Laurence; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The myotubularins are a family of phosphatases that dephosphorylate the phosphatidylinositols phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-phosphate. Several family members are mutated in disease, yet the biological functions of the majority of myotubularins remain unknown. To gain insight into the roles of the individual enzymes, we have used affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein-protein interactions for the myotubularins. The myotubularin interactome comprises 66 high confidence (false discovery rate ≤1%) interactions, including 18 pairwise interactions between individual myotubularins. The results reveal a number of potential signaling contexts for this family of enzymes, including an intriguing, novel role for myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 in the regulation of abscission, the final step of mitosis in which the membrane bridge remaining between two daughter cells is cleaved. Both depletion and overexpression of either myotubularin-related protein 3 or myotubularin-related protein 4 result in abnormal midbody morphology and cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 do not exert their effects through lipid regulation at the midbody, but regulate abscission during early mitosis, by interacting with the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1, and with centrosomal protein of 55 kDa (CEP55), an important regulator of abscission. Structure-function analysis reveals that, consistent with known intramyotubularin interactions, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 interact through their respective coiled coil domains. The interaction between myotubularin-related protein 3 and polo-like kinase 1 relies on the divergent, nonlipid binding Fab1, YOTB, Vac1, and EEA1 domain of myotubularin-related protein 3, and myotubularin-related protein 4 interacts with CEP55 through a short GPPXXXY motif, analogous to

  15. Characterization of a cDNA clone coding for a mouse 85 kDa heat shock protein from a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.K.; Robinson, E.A.; Ullrich, S.J.; Appella, E.

    1986-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsp) of approx. 85 kDa have been found associated with steroid hormone receptors and with the src oncogene product. Recently, the authors have shown that a mouse tumor-associated transplantation antigen from a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced tumor shares amino acid sequence homology with the 85 kDa hsp. Amino acid sequence of peptides from this antigen were used to synthesize oligonucleotide probes to screen a mouse cDNA library. A cDNA clone coding for a 85 kDa mouse hsp has been isolated and its sequence determined. Predicted amino acid sequences from this cDNA clone share significant homology to the published 90 kDa hsp of Saccaromyces cerevisiae and to the 83 kDa hsp of Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, the predicted amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminus shares identity with that of the 70 kDa hsp from various species as well as that of the Escherichia coli dnaK gene product. Northern blot analysis indicates that the mouse 85 kDa hsp is coded for by a kb mRNA. The size of the mRNA is indistinguishable between normal and malignant cells.

  16. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Flint, S J; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  17. The Chlamydomonas IDA7 Locus Encodes a 140-kDa Dynein Intermediate Chain Required to Assemble the I1 Inner Arm Complex

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Catherine A.; Yang, Pinfen; O’Toole, Eileen; Sale, Winfield S.; Porter, Mary E.

    1998-01-01

    To identify new loci that are involved in the assembly and targeting of dynein complexes, we have screened a collection of motility mutants that were generated by insertional mutagenesis. One such mutant, 5B10, lacks the inner arm isoform known as the I1 complex. This isoform is located proximal to the first radial spoke in each 96-nm axoneme repeat and is an important target for the regulation of flagellar motility. Complementation tests reveal that 5B10 represents a new I1 locus, IDA7. Biochemical analyses confirm that ida7 axonemes lack at least five I1 complex subunits. Southern blots probed with a clone containing the gene encoding the 140-kDa intermediate chain (IC) indicate that the ida7 mutation is the result of plasmid insertion into the IC140 gene. Transformation with a wild-type copy of the IC140 gene completely rescues the mutant defects. Surprisingly, transformation with a construct of the IC140 gene lacking the first four exons of the coding sequence also rescues the mutant phenotype. These studies indicate that IC140 is essential for assembly of the I1 complex, but unlike other dynein ICs, the N-terminal region is not critical for its activity. PMID:9843574

  18. Roles of the 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) in redox homeostasis and cataract development revealed by the analysis of Sep 15 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kasaikina, Marina V; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M; Lachke, Salil A; Qiu, Wenya; Moncaster, Juliet A; Zhang, Jie; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Malinouski, Mikalai; Schweizer, Ulrich; Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Maas, Richard L; Lou, Marjorie F; Goldstein, Lee E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2011-09-23

    The 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) is a thioredoxin-like, endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein involved in the quality control of glycoprotein folding through its interaction with UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase. Expression of Sep15 is regulated by dietary selenium and the unfolded protein response, but its specific function is not known. In this study, we developed and characterized Sep15 KO mice by targeted removal of exon 2 of the Sep15 gene coding for the cysteine-rich UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase-binding domain. These KO mice synthesized a mutant mRNA, but the shortened protein product could be detected neither in tissues nor in Sep15 KO embryonic fibroblasts. Sep15 KO mice were viable and fertile, showed normal brain morphology, and did not activate endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. However, parameters of oxidative stress were elevated in the livers of these mice. We found that Sep15 mRNA was enriched during lens development. Further phenotypic characterization of Sep15 KO mice revealed a prominent nuclear cataract that developed at an early age. These cataracts did not appear to be associated with severe oxidative stress or glucose dysregulation. We suggest that the cataracts resulted from an improper folding status of lens proteins caused by Sep15 deficiency.

  19. Exercise-induced extracellular 72 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72) stimulates neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities via TLR-2.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Esther; Martin-Cordero, Leticia; Garcia, Juan Jose; Gehrmann, Mathias; Gerhmann, Mathias; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ortega, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) in the interaction of 72 kDa extracellular heat shock protein (Hsp72, a stress-inducible protein) with neutrophils and the participation on TLR-2 in the stimulation of neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities by post-exercise physiological concentrations of Hsp72. Human peripheral blood neutrophils were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Hsp72, and were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Both methods revealed an interaction of Hsp72 with neutrophils. In addition, when neutrophils were pre-incubated with an anti-TLR-2 antibody this interaction was clearly decreased. Post-exercise circulating concentration of Hsp72 (8.6 ng/ml) stimulated the phagocytic and fungicidal capacities of neutrophils and this effect could be also blocked using an antibody against TLR-2. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the nuclear transcription factor kappa beta (NF-kappabeta) were found to be involved in the signaling process, confirming the participation of TLR-2 in the stimulation of neutrophil function by Hsp72. In conclusion, TLR-2 is involved at least in part, in the stimulation of neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities induced by post-exercise physiological concentrations of Hsp72.

  20. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  1. Phosphoprotein Enriched in Astrocytes 15 kDa (PEA-15) Reprograms Growth Factor Signaling by Inhibiting Threonine Phosphorylation of Fibroblast Receptor Substrate 2α

    PubMed Central

    Haling, Jacob R.; Wang, Fen

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cellular expression of phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes of 15 kDa (PEA-15) are linked to insulin resistance, tumor cell invasion, and cellular senescence; these changes alter the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. Here, we define the mechanism whereby increased PEA-15 expression promotes and sustains ERK1/2 activation. PEA-15 binding prevented ERK1/2 membrane recruitment and threonine phosphorylation of fibroblast receptor substrate 2α (FRS2α), a key link in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor activation of ERK1/2. This reduced threonine phosphorylation led to increased FGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2α, thereby enhancing downstream signaling. Conversely, short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of endogenous PEA-15 led to reduced FRS2α tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, PEA-15 interrupts a negative feedback loop that terminates growth factor receptor signaling downstream of FRS2α. This is the dominant mechanism by which PEA-15 activates ERK1/2 because genetic deletion of FRS2α blocked the capacity of PEA-15 to activate the MAP kinase pathway. Thus, PEA-15 prevents ERK1/2 localization to the plasma membrane, thereby inhibiting ERK1/2-dependent threonine phosphorylation of FRS2α to promote activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:20032303

  2. A variant in the nuclear dot protein 52kDa gene increases the risk for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Philipp; Krämer, Benjamin; Kaczmarek, Dominik J; Hübner, Marc P; Langhans, Bettina; Appenrodt, Beate; Lammert, Frank; Nattermann, Jacob; Hoerauf, Achim; Strassburg, Christian P; Spengler, Ulrich; Nischalke, Hans Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is frequently a fatal infection in patients with liver cirrhosis. We investigated if nuclear dot protein 52kDa (NDP52), a negative regulator of toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling and autophagy adaptor protein, might be involved. Two cohorts comprising 152 (derivation cohort) and 198 patients (validation cohort) with decompensated liver cirrhosis and 168 healthy controls were genotyped for the rs2303015 polymorphism in the NDP52 gene and prospectively followed-up for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Overall, 57 (38%) patients in the derivation cohort and 77 (39%) in the validation cohort had spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Cirrhosis was due to alcohol abuse in 57% of the derivation and 66% of the validation cohort. In patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis had an increased frequency of the NDP52 rs2303015 minor variant in the derivation (p=0.04) and in the validation cohort (p=0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed this minor variant (odds ratio 4.7, p=0.002) and the TLR2 -16934 TT variant (odds ratio 2.5, p=0.008) as risk factors for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. In addition, presence of the NDP52 minor variant affected survival negatively. Presence of the NDP52 rs2303015 minor variant increases the risk for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystallization and X-ray data analysis of the 10 kDa C-terminal lid subdomain from Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Liam; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D

    2006-09-01

    Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of protein folding. Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa helical lid domain (residues 542-640) from a Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70 homologue have been produced that diffract X-rays to approximately 3.4 A. Crystals belong to space group I2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 197, c = 200 A. The Matthews coefficient, self-rotation function and Patterson map indicate 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit, showing non-crystallographic 432 symmetry. Molecular-replacement studies using the corresponding domain from rat, the only eukaryotic homologue with a known structure, failed and a mercury derivative was obtained. Preliminary MAD phasing using SHELXD and SHARP for location and refinement of the heavy-atom substructure and SOLOMON for density modification produced interpretable maps with a clear protein-solvent boundary. Further density-modification, model-building and refinement are currently under way.

  4. The heliothis virescens 170 kDa aminopeptidase functions as "receptor A" by mediating specific Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A delta-endotoxin binding and pore formation.

    PubMed

    Luo, K; Sangadala, S; Masson, L; Mazza, A; Brousseau, R; Adang, M J

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac delta-endotoxin binding and pore formation was investigated using a purified 170 kDa aminopeptidase N (APN) from Heliothis virescens brush border membranes. Aminopeptidases with molecular sizes of 110, 140 and 170 kDa were eluted from a Cry1Ac toxin affinity column using N-acetylgalactosamine. The 140 kDa aminopeptidase has a cross-reacting determinant typical of a cleaved glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. After mild base treatment to de-acylate the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage and incubation in phosphatidyl inositol phospholipase C, anti-cross-reacting determinant antibody recognized the 170 kDa protein. Kinetic binding characteristics of Cry1A toxins to purified 170 kDa APN were determined using surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac, but not Cry1C and Cry1E toxins recognized 170 kDa APN. Each Cry1A toxin recognized two binding sites: a high affinity site with KD ranging from 41 to 95 nM and a lower affinity site with KD in the 325 to 623 nM range. N-acetylgalactosamine inhibited Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa and Cry1Ab binding to 170 kDa APN. When reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, the 170 kDa APN promoted toxin-induced 86Rb+ release for Cry1A toxins, but not Cry1C toxin. Furthermore Cry1Ac, the Cry protein most toxic to H. virescens larvae, caused 86Rb+ release at lower concentrations, and to a greater extent than Cry1Aa and Cry1Ab toxins. The correlation between toxin-binding specificity and 86Rb+ release strongly suggests that the purified 170 kDa APN is the functional receptor A in the H. virescens midgut epithelial cell brush border membranes.

  5. Importins and exportins regulating allergic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankita; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES) on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  6. Characterization, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of 5kDa mPEG modified tetrameric canine uricase variant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Fan, Kai; Luo, Hua; Ma, Xuefeng; Liu, Riyong; Yang, Li; Hu, Chunlan; Chen, Zhenmin; Min, Zhiqiang; Wei, Dongzhi

    2012-07-01

    PEGylated uricase is a promising anti-gout drug, but the only commercially marketed 10kDa mPEG modified porcine-like uricase (Pegloticase) can only be used for intravenous infusion. In this study, tetrameric canine uricase variant was modified by covalent conjugation of all accessible ɛ amino sites of lysine residues with a smaller 5kDa mPEG (mPEG-UHC). The average modification degree and PEGylation homogeneity were evaluated. Approximately 9.4 5 kDa mPEG chains were coupled to each monomeric uricase and the main conjugates contained 7-11 mPEG chains per subunit. mPEG-UHC showed significantly therapeutic or preventive effect on uric acid nephropathy and acute urate arthritis based on three different animal models. The clearance rate from an intravenous injection of mPEG-UHC varied significantly between species, at 2.61 mL/h/kg for rats and 0.21 mL/h/kg for monkeys. The long elimination half-life of mPEG-UHC in non-human primate (191.48 h, intravenous injection) indicated the long-term effects in humans. Moreover, the acceptable bioavailability of mPEG-UHC after subcutaneous administration in monkeys (94.21%) suggested that subcutaneous injection may be regarded as a candidate administration route in clinical trails. Non-specific tissue distribution was observed after administration of (125)I-labeled mPEG-UHC in rats, and elimination by the kidneys into the urine is the primary excretion route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E. ); Flores, B.M. ); Hagen, F.S. )

    1990-08-01

    A {lambda}gt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically {sup 35}S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-{sup 125}I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4{degree}C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested.

  8. Diagnostic potential of 16 kDa (HspX, α-crystalline) antigen for serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Amit; Singh, Urvashi B.; Porwal, Chhavi; Venugopal, Shwetha J.; Mohan, Anant; Krishnan, Anand; Goyal, Vinay; Banavaliker, Jayant N.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a public health problem worldwide. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis is crucial to facilitate early treatment of infectious cases and to reduce its spread. The present study was aimed to evaluation of 16 kDa antigen as a serodiagnostic tool in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients in an effort to improve diagnostic algorithm for tuberculosis. Methods: In this study, 200 serum samples were collected from smear positive and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, 30 tubercular pleural effusions and 21 tubercular meningitis (TBM) patients. Serum samples from 36 healthy, age matched controls (hospital staff), along with 60 patients with non-tubercular respiratory diseases were also collected and evaluated. Humoral response (both IgG and IgA) was looked for 16 kDa antigen using indirect ELISA. Results: Sensitivity of detection in various categories of pulmonary TB patients ranged between 73.8 and 81.2 per cent. While in the extra-pulmonary TB samples the sensitivity was 42.8 per cent (TBM) and 63.3 per cent (tubercular pleural effusion). The test specificity in both the groups was high (94.7%). All of the non-disease controls were negative. Among non-tubercular disease controls, five patients gave a positive humoral response against 16 kDa. Interpretation & conclusions: Serodiagnostic tests for TB have always had drawbacks of suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. The antigen used in this study gave encouraging results in pulmonary TB only, while in extra-pulmonary TB (tubercular meningitis and tubercular pleural effusion), this has shown a limited role in terms of sensitivity. Further work is required to validate its role in serodiagnosis of TB especially extra-pulmonary TB. PMID:22771611

  9. Immunogenicity of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Inayat Hussain; Kaushal, Deep C; Chandra, Deepak; Kaushal, Nuzhat A

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the second major human malaria parasite that inflicts debilitating morbidity and consequent economic impact in South-East Asian countries. The relapsing nature of P. vivax along with the emergence of drug-resistant P. vivax strains has emphasized the urgent need for a vaccine. However, the development of an effective vivax vaccine is seriously hampered due to the diversity and variation in parasite antigens and non-availability of suitable animal models. DNA based vaccines represent an alternative approach in inducing immunity to multiple targets from different stages of malaria parasite. DNA prime-boosting strategies induce both antibody mediated and cell-mediated immune responses that are the major mechanisms of protection against malaria parasites. We have earlier studied the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the soluble and refolded forms of recombinant 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (PvMSP-142) using P. cynomolgi rhesus monkey model. In the present study, we have constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of P. vivax MSP-1 and studied the immunogenicity of PvMSP-142 DNA vaccine construct in mice. The 42kDa gene fragment of PvMSP-1 was PCR amplified using gene specific primers and subcloned into pcDNA 3.1 (+) eukaryotic expression vector. In vitro expression of PvMSP-142 plasmid construct was checked by transfection in COS-1 cell line. Indirect immunofluorescence of transfected COS-1 cells probed with monoclonal antibodies against PvMSP-142 exhibited positive fluorescence. Immunization of BALB/c mice with PvMSP-142-pcDNA vaccine construct revealed the immunogenicity of recombinant vaccine plasmid that can be enhanced by prime boosting with recombinant protein corresponding to the DNA vaccine as evidenced by significant elevation of antibody and the cytokines responses.

  10. Interferon stimulated exonuclease gene 20kDa links psychiatric events to distinct Hepatitis C Virus responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Katsounas, Antonios; Rasimas, Joseph J.; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Rosenstein, Donald L.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection occurs frequently in patients with preexisting mental illness. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C using interferon formulations often increases risk for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Pegylated-Interferon-α (PegIFN-α) remains crucial for attaining sustained virologic response (SVR); however, PegIFN-α based treatment is associated with psychiatric adverse effects, which require dose reduction and/or interruption. This study's main objective was to identify genes induced by PegIFN-α and expressed in the central nervous system and immune system, which could mediate the development of psychiatric toxicity in association with antiviral outcome. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/HCV co-infected donors (N=28), DNA microarray analysis was performed and 21 differentially regulated genes were identified in patients with psychiatric toxicity vs. those without. Using these 21 expression profiles a two-way-ANOVA was performed to select genes based on antiviral outcome and occurrence of neuropsychiatric adverse events. Microarray analysis demonstrated that Interferon-stimulated-exonuclease-gene 20kDa (ISG20) and Interferon-alpha-inducible-protein 27 (IFI27) were the most regulated genes (P<0.05) between three groups that were built by combining antiviral outcome and neuropsychiatric toxicity. Validation by bDNA assay confirmed that ISG20 expression levels were significantly associated with these outcomes (P<0.035). Baseline levels and induction of ISG20 correlated independently with no occurrence of psychiatric adverse events and non-response to therapy (P<0.001). Among the 21 genes that were associated with psychiatric adverse events and 20 Interferon-inducible genes (IFIGs) used as controls, only ISG20 expression was able to link PegIFN-α related neuropsychiatric toxicity to distinct HCV-responses in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV in vivo. PMID:24782267

  11. KU135, a Novel Novobiocin-Derived C-Terminal Inhibitor of the 90-kDa Heat Shock Protein, Exerts Potent Antiproliferative Effects in Human Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Shary N.; Shawgo, Mary E.; Matthews, Shawna B.; Lu, Yuanming; Donnelly, Alison C.; Szabla, Kristen; Tanol, Mehmet; Vielhauer, George A.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Matts, Robert L.; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) assists in the proper folding of numerous mutated or overexpressed signal transduction proteins that are involved in cancer. Consequently, there is considerable interest in developing chemotherapeutic drugs that specifically disrupt the function of Hsp90. Here, we investigated the extent to which a novel novobiocin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated KU135, induced antiproliferative effects in Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The results indicated that KU135 bound directly to Hsp90, caused the degradation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and induced more potent antiproliferative effects than the established N-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). Closer examination of the cellular response to KU135 and 17-AAG revealed that only 17-AAG induced a strong up-regulation of Hsp70 and Hsp90. In addition, KU135 caused wild-type cells to undergo G2/M arrest, whereas cells treated with 17-AAG accumulated in G1. Furthermore, KU135 but not 17-AAG was found to be a potent inducer of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as evidenced, in part, by the fact that cell death was inhibited to a similar extent by Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpression or the depletion of apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (Apaf-1). Together, these data suggest that KU135 inhibits cell proliferation by regulating signaling pathways that are mechanistically different from those targeted by 17-AAG and as such represents a novel opportunity for Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:19741006

  12. Cytokinin-binding protein (70 kDa) from etioplasts and amyloplasts of etiolated maize seedlings and chloroplasts of green plants and its putative function.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Fedor A; Vasil'eva, Victoria S; Lushnikova, Antonina L; Selivankina, Svetlana Yu; Karavaiko, Natalia N; Boziev, Khanafy M; Shepelyakovskaya, Anna O; Moshkov, Dmitry A; Pavlik, Liubov L; Kusnetsov, Victor V; Kulaeva, Olga N

    2010-07-01

    Cytokinins regulate chloroplast differentiation and functioning, but their targets in plastids are not known. In this connection, the plastid localization of the 70 kDa cytokinin-binding protein (CBP70) was studied immunocytochemically in 4-d-old etiolated maize seedlings (Zea mays L., cv. Elbrus) using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CBP70 recognizing this protein not only in nuclei and cytoplasm, but also in plastids. CBP70 was detected in the amyloplasts of the root cap and etioplasts of the mesocotyl, stem apex, and leaves encircling the stem axis in the node. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated CBP70 localization in amyloplasts outside starch grains and revealed a dependence of CBP70 content in etioplasts on the degree of their inner membrane differentiation: the low CBP70 amount in etioplasts at the early stages of membrane development, the high content in etioplasts with actively developing membranes, and a considerable decrease in plastids with the formed prolamellar body. This suggests that CBP70 is involved in etioplast structure development. CBP70 was also observed in chloroplasts of the bundle sheath of green maize leaves. CBP70 purified from etioplasts mediated trans-zeatin-dependent activation of transcription elongation in vitro in the transcription systems of maize etioplasts and barley chloroplasts, suggesting that CBP70 is a plastid transcription elongation factor or a modulator of plastid elongation factor activity. CBP70 involvement in the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plastid transcription elongation could be essential for the cytokinin control of the biogenesis of this organelle.

  13. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-upstream sequence governing the cell cycle-dependent transcription of mouse DNA polymerase alpha 68 kDa subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, N S; Izumi, M; Uchida, H; Yokoi, M; Miyazawa, H; Hanaoka, F

    2000-04-01

    We have isolated the genomic DNA fragment spanning the 5-end and the first four exons encoding the 68 kDa subunit (p68) of the mouse DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex [corrected]. The p68 promoter region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains a GC-rich sequence, two palindrome sequences and two putative E2F-binding sites [corrected]. A series of transient expression assays using a luciferase reporter gene indicated that a region from nucleotide position -89 to -30 (-89/-30) with respect to the transcription initiation site is crucial for basal transcription of the p68 gene in proliferating NIH 3T3 cells. In particular, part of the GC-rich sequence (-57/-46) and the palindrome (-81/-62) elements were necessary for promoter activity, both of which share homology with the E-box sequence. Gel mobility shift assays using NIH 3T3 nuclear extracts revealed that the upstream stimulatory factor, known as an E-box-binding protein, binds to these sites. Moreover, we observed binding of E2F to two sites near the transcription initiation site (-11/-3 and +9/+16). A transient luciferase expression assay using synchronized NIH 3T3 cells in G(0)phase revealed that these E2F sites are essential for transcription induction of the p68 gene after serum stimulation, but are dispensable for basal transcription. These results indicate that growth-dependent regulation of transcription of the mouse p68 and p180 genes is mediated by a common factor, E2F; however, basal transcription of the genes, interestingly, is regulated by different transcription factors.

  14. Cloning and characterization of the 5′-upstream sequence governing the cell cycle-dependent transcription of mouse DNA polymerase α 68 kDa subunit gene

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Naoko S.; Izumi, Masako; Uchida, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Masayuki; Miyazawa, Hiroshi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated and determined the structure of the gene encoding the 68 kDa subunit (p68) of the mouse DNA polymerase α–primase complex. The p68 gene consists of four exons and the p68 promoter region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains a GC-rich sequence, two palindrome sequences and two putative E2F-binding sites. A series of transient expression assays using a luciferase reporter gene indicated that a region from nucleotide position –89 to –30 (–89/–30) with respect to the transcription initiation site is crucial for basal transcription of the p68 gene in proliferating NIH 3T3 cells. In particular, part of the GC-rich sequence (–57/–46) and the palindrome (–81/–62) elements were necessary for promoter activity, both of which share homology with the E-box sequence. Gel mobility shift assays using NIH 3T3 nuclear extracts revealed that the upstream stimulatory factor, known as an E-box-binding protein, binds to these sites. Moreover, we observed binding of E2F to two sites near the transcription initiation site (–11/–3 and +9/+16). A transient luciferase expression assay using synchronized NIH 3T3 cells in G0 phase revealed that these E2F sites are essential for transcription induction of the p68 gene after serum stimulation, but are dispensable for basal transcription. These results indicate that growth-dependent regulation of transcription of the mouse p68 and p180 genes is mediated by a common factor, E2F; however, basal transcription of the genes, interestingly, is regulated by different transcription factors. PMID:10710418

  15. Focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in chondrocyte activation by the 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment.

    PubMed

    Gemba, Takefumi; Valbracht, Jean; Alsalameh, Saifeddin; Lotz, Martin

    2002-01-11

    The 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment (FN-f) has a potent chondrolytic effect and is thought to be involved in cartilage degradation in arthritis. However, little is known about signal transduction pathways that are activated by FN-f. Here we demonstrated that FN-f induced nitric oxide (NO) production from human articular chondrocytes. Expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and NO production were observed at 6 and 48 h after FN-f treatment, respectively. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA up-regulation was stimulated by FN-f in human chondrocytes. To address the possibility that FN-f-induced NO release is mediated by IL-1beta production, the effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was determined. IL-1ra partially inhibited FN-f-induced NO release although it almost completely inhibited IL-1beta-induced NO release. Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase was induced transiently by FN-f treatment. Blocking antibodies to alpha(5) or beta(1) integrin and Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptides did not inhibit FN-f-induced NO production. PP2, a Src family kinase inhibitor, or cytochalasin D, which selectively disrupts the network of actin filaments, inhibited both FAK phosphorylation and NO production induced by FN-f, but the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin had no effect. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) showed activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. High concentrations of SB203580, which inhibit both JNK and p38 MAPK, and PD98059 a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2 that blocks ERK activation, inhibited FN-f induced NO production. These data suggest that focal adhesion kinase and MAPK mediate FN-f induced activation of human articular chondrocytes.

  16. Involvement of a Botulinum Toxin-Sensitive 22-kDa G Protein in Stimulated Exocytosis of Human Neutrophils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS ]involvement -of -a Botulinun toxin -sesftUv&2_2At6-d -- Protein in stinulated exocytosis of humnan neutrophi1s. WICD I. AUTHOR(S) Nath...Botulinum Toxin -Sensitive 22-kDa G Protein in Stimulated Exocytosis of Human Neutrophils jaymaree Nath,’ Annette Powledge, and Daniel G. Wright2...observed. Although both peslussis toxin and ST-O Inhibited excocytosis In FlMvLP-stimvulated PMNs, the inhibitory effects o( the two toxins were found to be

  17. Development of a competitor DNA template of the 38 kDa gene for molecular quantification of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, A; Sehajpal, P K

    2005-12-01

    The molecular quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) from clinical samples can improve the management of TB. Competitive polymerase chain reaction (C-PCR) is an accepted technique often used for this purpose, and IS6110 is the most popular target in such studies. As the number of these elements varies from 0 to 16 in clinical isolates, it is prone to give inconsistent results. A simple PCR-based approach is described in this study to generate a novel competitor for a single copy 38 kDa gene for the development of C-PCR for the quantification of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  18. Identification of an 11-kDa FKBP12-rapamycin-binding domain within the 289-kDa FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein and characterization of a critical serine residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zheng, X F; Brown, E J; Schreiber, S L

    1995-05-23

    Complexed with its intracellular receptor, FKBP12, the natural product rapamycin inhibits G1 progression of the cell cycle in a variety of mammalian cell lines and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Previously, a mammalian protein that directly associates with FKBP12-rapamycin has been identified and its encoding gene has been cloned from both human (designated FRAP) [Brown, E.J., Albers, M.W., Shin, T.B., Ichikawa, K., Keith, C.T., Lane, W.S. & Schreiber, S.L. (1994) Nature (London) 369, 756-758] and rat (designated RAFT) [Sabatini, D.M., Erdjument-Bromage, H., Lui, M., Tempst, P. & Snyder, S.H. (1994) Cell 78, 35-43]. The full-length FRAP is a 289-kDa protein containing a putative phosphatidylinositol kinase domain. Using an in vitro transcription/translation assay method coupled with proteolysis studies, we have identified an 11-kDa FKBP12-rapamycin-binding domain within FRAP. This minimal binding domain lies N-terminal to the kinase domain and spans residues 2025-2114. In addition, we have carried out mutagenesis studies to investigate the role of Ser2035, a potential phosphorylation site for protein kinase C within this domain. We now show that the FRAP Ser2035-->Ala mutant displays similar binding affinity when compared with the wild-type protein, whereas all other mutations at this site, including mimics of phosphoserine, abolish binding, presumably due to either unfavorable steric interactions or induced conformational changes.

  19. Prevalence of bands other than 160 and 130 kDa in pemphigus sera (a multicenter immunoblotting study). Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia (GISED).

    PubMed

    Cozzani, E; Parodi, A; Rebora, A

    1998-05-01

    Patients with pemphigus may produce antibodies against molecules other than the classical transmembranal ones. Recently, for example antibodies to 230 kDa antigens have been found in association with antibodies to intercellular substance. To better understand their prevalence, clinical correlates and prognostic significance of bands other than 130 and 160 kDa, we studied 67 pemphigus sera. About one-fourth of patients revealed multiple heterogeneous bands and 13% the 230 kDa band. When challenged with the recombinant protein rBP55, the carbossiterminal portion of bullous pemphigoid major antigen, all 230 kDa-positive-sera proved negative. Caution is to be recommended in interpreting pemphigus sera with a band migrating at the 230 kDa level.

  20. Induction of a cytosolic 54 kDa protein in rat liver that is highly homologous to selenium-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Tasaki, K; Fukuda, A; Ishii, Y; Oguri, K

    1998-12-01

    We have previously shown that a 54 kDa protein in rat liver is highly homologous to selenium-binding protein (SeBP) or acetaminophen-binding protein (APBP) in mice and is highly inducible by treatment with 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl or 3-methylcholanthrene. In this study, we examine the effect of six typical inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), isosafrole (ISO), phenobarbital (PB), dexamethasone (DEX), clofibrate (CLO), pyrazole (PYR) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), on the expression level of this 54 kDa protein. Male Wistar rats were given each inducer following a predetermined schedule. Among these inducers, the 54 kDa protein was inducible by MC and BHT. The response to MC and BHT was compared with that of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities. The induction mechanisms and physiological role of the 54 kDa protein are discussed in the light of our results.

  1. 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in prolactin-producing rat pituitary tumor cells (GH4C1 cells)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.; Hogset, A.; Alestrom, P.; Gautvik, K.M.

    1988-12-30

    A thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) binding protein of 64 kDa has been identified by covalently crosslinking (/sup 3/H)TRH to GH4C1 cells by ultraviolet illumination. The crosslinkage of (/sup 3/H)TRH is UV-dose dependent and is inhibited by an excess of unlabeled TRH. A 64 kDa protein is also detected on immunoblots using an antiserum raised against GH4C1 cell surface epitopes. In a closely related cell line (GH12C1) which does not bind (/sup 3/H)TRH, the 64 kDa protein cannot be demonstrated by (/sup 3/H)TRH crosslinking nor by immunoblotting. These findings indicate that the 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a TRH-receptor protein in GH4C1 cells.

  2. Induction of in vitro heart block is not restricted to affinity purified anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibody from mothers of children with neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Viana, V S; Garcia, S; Nascimento, J H; Elkon, K B; Brot, N; Campos de Carvalho, A C; Bonfá, E

    1998-01-01

    The ability of affinity purified anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibody from patients without obstetric history of neonatal lupus to cause heart block using an experimental model was investigated. IgG-enriched fractions from sera of 20 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and one Sjögren's syndrome (SS) all positives for anti-Ro/SSA antibodies as detected by CIE, were perfused on isolated whole rabbit hearts. Only six (29%) samples induced A-V block, five of them presenting low anti-Ro/SSA titre. All of them recognized the 52 kDa isoform on ELISA whereas only one had a concomitant binding to the 60 kDa protein. Moreover, affinity purified antibodies from two sera previously known to induce A-V block were obtained by affinity chromatography using a column containing the full-length 52 kDa Ro/SSA fusion protein. Paired eluate and effluent devoid of anti-52 kDa activity from the same patient were individually perfused in whole hearts. The ability to cause cardiac blockade was restricted to the affinity anti-52 kDa eluates. In addition, anti-52 kDa eluates from three IgG fractions that primarily failed to induce blockade remained ineffective. The present study has added to our knowledge that affinity anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibodies from mothers with healthy infants are capable of causing in vitro cardiac conduction disturbances. A prospective follow up of these patients will better delineate the clinical usefulness of this experimental model.

  3. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  4. 78 kDa receptor for Man6P-independent lysosomal enzyme targeting: Biosynthetic transport from endoplasmic reticulum to 'high-density vesicles'

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso . E-mail: gonor@biomedicas.unam.mx; Ortega Cuellar, Daniel D.; Michalak, Colette

    2006-04-15

    Recent work has shown that the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate and the 78 kDa receptors for lysosomal enzyme targeting are located in different cell compartments. While the mannose 6-phosphate receptor is enriched in the Percoll fractions that contain Golgi apparatus, most of the 78 kDa receptor is localized in a heavy fraction at the bottom of the Percoll gradient. This report presents the biosynthetic transport of the 78 kDa receptor. Newly synthesized 78 kDa receptor was transported to Golgi from endoplasmic reticulum with a half life of 5 min. From the Golgi apparatus, the receptor takes two routes; about 15-25% is transported to the plasma membrane, and the rest migrates to late endosomes, subsequently to prelysosomes and finally to the dense vesicles. The 78 kDa receptor starts appearing at the dense vesicles 120 min after biosynthesis and reaches a maximum of 40-50% of the total receptor. Treatment of cells with NH{sub 4}Cl causes depletion of the receptor from the dense vesicles and prelysosomes and corresponding augmentation in endosomes and plasma membrane. These results suggest that the 78 kDa receptor cycles between compartments and that the dense vesicles seem to represent the most distal compartment in the biosynthetic pathway of this receptor.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel 530-kDa protein complex (PC530) capable of associating with the 20S proteasome from starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Takagi Sawada, M; Morinaga, C; Yokosawa, H; Sawada, H

    2000-02-15

    A novel protein complex called PC530 was purified concomitantly with proteasomes from oocytes of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera, by chromatography with DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose, Mono Q, and Superose 6 columns. The molecular mass of this complex was estimated to be 530 kDa by Ferguson plot analysis and about 500 kDa by Superose 6 gel filtration. Since the 1500-kDa proteasome fractions contain the PC530 subunits as well as the 20S proteasomal subunits, and also since the purified PC530 and the 20S proteasome were cross-linked with a bifunctional cross-linking reagent, it is thought that PC530 is able to associate with the 20S proteasome. The PC530 comprises six main subunits with molecular masses of 105, 70, 50, 34, 30, and 23 kDa. The 70-kDa subunit showed a sequence similarity to the S3/p58/Sun2/Rpn3p subunit of the 26S proteasome, whereas the other subunits showed little or no appreciable similarity to the mammalian and yeast regulatory subunits. These results indicate that starfish oocytes contain a novel 530-kDa protein complex capable of associating with the 20S proteasome, which is distinctly different from PA700 or the 19S regulatory complex in molecular size and subunit composition. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Identification of a 34 kDa protein altered in the LF-1 mutant as the herbicide-binding D1 protein of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, J.; Pakrasi, H.; Seibert, M.; Arntzen, C.

    1986-04-01

    The LF-1 mutant of Scenedesmus has a complete block on the oxidizing side of its PSII reaction center. However, the reaction center as well as the reducing side of PSII is fully functional in this mutant. Compared to the wildtype (WT) the only detected protein difference in the PSII complex of LF-1 is the change in mobility of a 34 kDa protein to 36 kDa. This protein has been implicated to have a major role in Mn-binding and water-oxidation. The authors have recently shown that photoaffinity labeling of thylakoids with azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine tags the 34 kDa protein in WT and the 36 kDa protein in LF-1. It has been shown that the azido-atrazine labeled protein, called D1, functions in herbicide binding and Q/sub A/ to Q/sub B/ electron transfer on the reducing side of PSII. Polyclonal antibodies directed against the D1 protein of Amaranthus hybridus (Ohad, et al., EMBOJ 1985) were found to recognize the Scenedesmus 34 kDa (WT) and 36 kDa (LF-1) proteins. The implied dual function for the D1 protein on the reducing as well as the oxidizing side of PSII reaction center will be discussed.

  7. 20-kDa protein associated with the murine T-cell antigen receptor is phosphorylated in response to activation by antigen or concanavalin A

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, L.E.; Harford, J.; Schwartz, R.H.; Klausner, R.D.

    1985-04-01

    Antigen or concanavalin A activation of a murine T-cell hybrid specific for pigeon cytochrome resulted in phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that was specifically coprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody binding the T-cell antigen receptor. There was no evidence for phosphorylation of the antigen receptor itself. The phosphorylation of the 20-kDa polypeptide was dependent on the concentration of antigen or lectin used to activate the T-cell hybrid and reached a maximum 40 min after the addition of antigen. The 20-kDa protein was also radioiodinated with a hydrophobic photoactivatable labeling reagent. The amount of iodinated 20-kDa protein immunoprecipitable with the anti-receptor antibody did not increase with T-cell activation, indicating that the phosphorylation occurred on a molecule that was constitutively associated with the antigen receptor. Concanavalin A also induced phosphorylation of a 20-kDa polypeptide in a second antigen-specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybrid. Again, the phosphorylated polypeptide was precipitated only by a monoclonal antibody specific for the antigen receptor on this hybrid. Thus, the antigen or concanavalin A-induced activation of T-cell hybrids results in the rapid phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that is associated with the T-cell receptor.

  8. The Biological Function of DMP-1 in Osteocyte Maturation Is Mediated by Its 57-kDa C-terminal Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongbo; Yuan, Baozhi; Qin, Chunlin; Cao, Zhengguo; Xie, Yixia; Dallas, Sarah L; McKee, Marc D; Drezner, Marc K; Bonewald, Lynda F; Feng, Jian Q

    2011-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) is a key molecule in controlling osteocyte formation and phosphate homeostasis. Based on observations that full-length DMP-1 is not found in bone, but only cleaved fragments of 37 and 57 kDa are present, and in view of the finding that mutations in the 57-kDa fragment result in disease, we hypothesized that the 57-kDa C-terminal fragment is the functional domain of DMP-1. To test this hypothesis, a 3.6-kb type I collagen promoter was used to express this 57-kDa C-terminal fragment for comparison with full-length DMP-1 in Dmp1 null osteoblasts/osteocytes. Not only did expression of the full-length DMP-1 in bone cells fully rescue the skeletal abnormalities of Dmp1 null mice, but the 57-kDa fragment also had similar results. This included rescue of growth plate defects, osteomalacia, abnormal osteocyte maturation, and the abnormal osteocyte lacunocanalicular system. In addition, the abnormal fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) expression in osteocytes, elevated circulating FGF-23 levels, and hypophosphatemia were rescued. These results show that the 57-kDa C-terminal fragment is the functional domain of DMP-1 that controls osteocyte maturation and phosphate metabolism. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20734454

  9. Targeting the 18-kDa translocator protein: recent perspectives for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Giacomelli, Chiara; Barresi, Elisabetta; Costa, Barbara; Taliani, Sabrina; Passetti, Federico Da Settimo; Martini, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO, 18 kDa), mainly localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane of steroidogenic tissues, is involved in several cellular functions. TSPO level alterations have been reported in a number of human disorders, particularly in cancer, psychiatric and neurological diseases. In the central nervous system (CNS), TSPO is usually expressed in glial cells, but also in some neuronal cell types. Interestingly, the expression of TSPO on glial cells rises after brain injury and increased TSPO expression is often observed in neurological disorders, gliomas, encephalitis and traumatic injury. Since TSPO is up-regulated in brain diseases, several structurally different classes of ligands targeting TSPO have been described as potential diagnostic or therapeutic agents. Recent researches have reported that TSPO ligands might be valuable in the treatment of brain diseases. This review focuses on currently available TSPO ligands, as useful tools for the treatment of neurodegeneration, neuro-inflammation and neurotrauma. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates degradation of an mRNA transcript encoding the 14 kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Bedard, N

    1996-01-01

    Upon fasting, the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system is activated in skeletal muscle in parallel with the increases in rates of proteolysis. Levels of mRNA encoding the 14 kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2(14K)), which can catalyse the first irreversible reaction in this pathway, rise and fall in parallel with the rates of proteolysis [Wing and Banville (1994) Am.J. Physiol. 267, E39-E48], indicating that the conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins is a regulated step. To characterize the mechanisms of this regulation, we have examined the effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and des(1-3) insulin-like growth factor I (DES-IGF-I), which does not bind IGF-binding proteins, on E2(14K) mRNA levels in L6 myotubes. Insulin suppressed levels of E2(14K) mRNA with an IC50 of 4 x 10(-9) M, but had no effects on mRNAs encoding polyubiquitin and proteasome subunits C2 and C8, which, like E2(14K), also increase in skeletal muscle upon fasting. Reduction of E2(14K) mRNA levels was more sensitive to IGF-I with an IC50 of approx. 5 x 10(-10) M. During the incubation of these cells for 12 h there was significant secretion of IGF-I-binding proteins into the medium. DES-IGF-I, which has markedly reduced affinity for these binding proteins, was found to potently reduce E2(14K) mRNA levels with an IC50 of 3 x 10(-11) M. DES-IGF-I did not alter rates of transcription of the E2(14K) gene, but enhanced the rate of degradation of the 1.2 kb mRNA transcript. The half-life of the 1.2 kb transcript was approximately one-third that of the 1.8 kb transcript and can explain the more marked regulation of this transcript observed previously. This indicates that the additional 3' non-coding sequence in the 1.8 kb transcript confers stability. These observations suggest that IGF-I is an important regulator of E2(14K) expression and demonstrate, for the first time, stimulation of degradation of a specific mRNA transcript by this hormone, while overall RNA accumulates. PMID

  11. Dot-ELISA Rapid Test Using Recombinant 56-kDa Protein Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chao, Chien-Chung; Huber, Erin; Bodhidatta, Dharadhida; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Grieco, John; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Kityapan, Manerat; Lewis, Michael; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2015-01-01

    We developed a rapid dot–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) using the combination of recombinant 56-kDa protein antigens that exhibited broad reactivity with serum antibodies against the four most prevalent strains (Karp, Kato, Gilliam, and TA763) of Orientia tsutsugamushi. The assay is rapid (30 minutes), and can be done at room temperature, and results can be read by the naked eye. Only a simple shaker is required to wash the membrane. Sera from 338 patients suspected of being ill with scrub typhus from rural hospitals around Thailand were tested using this dot-ELISA. Seventy-five (22.2%) patients were found to be positive. The sensitivity and specificity of dot-ELISA were determined using the indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) test as the gold standard, with the cutoff titer of immunoglobulin peroxidase conjugate M (IgM)/G (IgG) greater than 1:400/1:400. The dot-ELISA had a sensitivity of 98.5%, a specificity of 96.3%, a positive predictive value of 86.7%, and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for the acute-phase specimens. The results indicate that dot-ELISA rapid test using recombinant 56-kDa protein antigen was comparable with the IFA test and may be very useful for the diagnosis of scrub typhus in rural hospitals, where IFA is not available. PMID:25802430

  12. Transiently expressed short hairpin RNA targeting 126 kDa protein of tobacco mosaic virus interferes with virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Min; An, De-Rong; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Guang-Hua; He, Zu-Hua; Chen, Jiang-Ye

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by guiding mRNA degradation in a sequence-specific fashion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA), an intermediate of the RNAi pathway, has been shown to be very effective in inhibiting virus infection in mammalian cells and cultured plant cells. Here, we report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could inhibit tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA accumulation by targeting the gene encoding the replication-associated 126 kDa protein in intact plant tissue. Our results indicate that transiently expressed shRNA efficiently interfered with TMV infection. The interference observed is sequence-specific, and time- and site-dependent. Transiently expressed shRNA corresponding to the TMV 126 kDa protein gene did not inhibit cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), an unrelated tobamovirus. In order to interfere with TMV accumulation in tobacco leaves, it is essential for the shRNA constructs to be infiltrated into the same leaves as TMV inoculation. Our results support the view that RNAi opens the door for novel therapeutic procedures against virus diseases. We propose that a combination of the RNAi technique and Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression could be employed as a potent antiviral treatment in plants.nt antiviral treatment in plants.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 24-kDa gene

    SciTech Connect

    Coo, J. de; Buddiger, P.; Kessel, A.G. van

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) of the respiratory chain is composed of at least 41 individual proteins. Seven are encoded for by the mitochondrial genome and 34 are of nuclear origin. Mutations in the mitochondrial encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. In order to investigate the contribution of mutations in the nuclearly encoded subunits, we started to characterize the human gene for the 24 kDa flavoprotein fragment, one of the three key subunits of complex I. Two gene loci were detected with a human cDNA as a probe using somatic cell hybrids, one on chromosome 18 and one on chromosome 19. Cosmid clones were isolated containing the two genes. Using FISH analysis the map position was further refined to 18p11.2-18p11.31 and 19qter, respectively. RNA studies showed that only the chromosome 18 gene was expressed. This gene spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons. Exon and flanking intron sequences were characterized. The pseudogene differs from the intact cDNA by the lack of the methionine initiator codon. Currently, we are testing patients with complex I deficiencies for mutations in their 24 kDa gene.

  14. A new photosystem II reaction center component (4.8 kDa protein) encoded by chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, M; Inoue, Y

    1988-12-05

    The photosystem II reaction center complex, so-called D1-D2-cytochrome b-559 complex, isolated from higher plants contains a new component of about 4.8 kDa [(1988) Plant Cell Physiol. 29, 1233-1239]. The partial amino acid sequence of this component from spinach was determined after release of N-terminal blockage. The determined sequence matched an open reading frame (ORF36) of the chloroplast genome from tobacco and liverwort, which is located downstream from the psbK gene and forms an operon with psbK. The predicted product consists of 36 amino acid residues and has a single membrane-spanning segment. High homology between the tobacco and liverwort genes, and its presence in the reaction center complex suggest an important role for this component in the photosystem II complex. Since this gene corresponds to a part of the formerly designated psbI gene, we propose to revise the definition of psbI as the gene encoding the 4.8 kDa reaction center component.

  15. Automated resonance assignment of the 21 kDa stereo-array isotope labeled thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Elena; Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Löhr, Frank; Buchner, Lena; Ito, Yutaka; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The automated chemical shift assignment algorithm FLYA has been extended for use with stereo-array isotope labeled (SAIL) proteins to determine the sequence-specific resonance assignments of large proteins. Here we present the assignment of the backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the 21 kDa thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA from Escherichia coli that were determined with the SAIL-FLYA algorithm in conjunction with automated peak picking. No manual corrections of peak lists or assignments were applied. The assignments agreed with manually determined reference assignments in 95.4% of the cases if 16 input spectra were used, 94.1% if only 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY, CBCA(CO)NH, and 2D [13C/15N,1H]-HSQC were used, and 86.8% if exclusively 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY spectra were used. Considering only the assignments that are classified as reliable by the SAIL-FLYA algorithm, the degrees of agreement increased to 97.5%, 96.5%, and 94.2%, respectively. With our approach it is thus possible to automatically obtain almost complete and correct assignments of proteins larger than 20 kDa.

  16. Presence and active synthesis of the 67 kDa elastin-receptor in human circulating white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Anis; Levesque, Georges; Robert, Ladislas; Gagné, Daniéle; Douziech, Nadine; Fülöp, Tamas

    2005-07-08

    Early after the identification of the elastin-receptor (El-R) on mesenchymal cells, it was demonstrated that phagocytic cells and lymphocytes could also respond to elastin peptides. Nevertheless, the level of El-R expression has never been demonstrated on immune cells and no data exist whether these cells actively synthesize this El-R. Thus, our aim in the present work was to study the expression and number of El-R on white blood cells (WBC) using a specific 67 kDa El-R antibody and to demonstrate the presence of mRNA corresponding to the gene coding for El-R. Our results show that messenger RNA corresponding to the presumptive gene coding for the 67 kDa El-R subunit could be detected in all three WBC-types investigated. On all of these WBC, the presence of El-R could be demonstrated, however their number and their function varied following the cell type. The presence of El-R is very important for the interaction of circulating cell with the matrix as these cells intervene during atherosclerosis and in host defence.

  17. ST101 induces a novel 17 kDa APP cleavage that precludes Aβ generation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Green, Kim N; Khashwji, Hasan; Estrada, Tatiana; Laferla, Frank M

    2011-05-01

    Inhibiting Aβ generation is a prime therapeutic goal for preventing or treating Alzheimer disease. Here we sought to identify any disease-modifying properties of an azaindolizinone derivative, spiro[imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3,2-idan]-2(3H)-one (ST101 or ZSET1446). The effects of ST101 were studied in 3xTg-AD mice and young cynomolgus monkeys using a combination of biochemical and histological analyses. Here we describe that ST101 induces cleavage of APP protein at a novel site, generating a 17 kDa C-terminal fragment. This 17 kDa APP cleavage product does not appear to be a substrate for either α- or β-secretase, and thus bypasses generation of Aβ. ST101 is orally active, efficacious at low doses, improves memory function, and robustly reduces brain Aβ in transgenic mice and nonhuman primates. Using rodent and nonhuman primate models, we show that ST101 represents a novel class of small molecules that reduce central nervous system levels of Aβ by inducing an alternate pathway of APP cleavage. Copyright © 2010 American Neurological Associa