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Sample records for kepler planet candidates

  1. Validating Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Torres, G.; Marcy, G.; Brown, T.; Gilliland, R.; Gautier, T. N.; Isaacson, H.; Dupree, A.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Science Team has identified more than 700 transit-like signatures in the first 43 days of data returned from the spacecraft (Borucki et al. 2010, arXiv1006.2799B). However, only 7 of these candidates have been confirmed as planets as of late September 2010. The number of true planets in this sample is clearly far larger than 7, but the sample is also 'contaminated' with false-positives, including many from eclipsing binary stars. Separating the wheat from the chaff requires a careful study of individual candidates using both Kepler photometry and spectroscopic and imaging data from the ground. Techniques that the Science Team is developing to address these issues, which include detailed analysis of the photometric data and follow-up observations with ground-based telescopes, will be presented. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Kepler Discovers Earth-size Planet Candidates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Five of th...

  3. ALMOST ALL OF KEPLER'S MULTIPLE-PLANET CANDIDATES ARE PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Adams, Elisabeth; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; and others

    2012-05-10

    We present a statistical analysis that demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) indeed represent true, physically associated transiting planets. Binary stars provide the primary source of false positives among Kepler planet candidates, implying that false positives should be nearly randomly distributed among Kepler targets. In contrast, true transiting planets would appear clustered around a smaller number of Kepler targets if detectable planets tend to come in systems and/or if the orbital planes of planets encircling the same star are correlated. There are more than one hundred times as many Kepler planet candidates in multi-candidate systems as would be predicted from a random distribution of candidates, implying that the vast majority are true planets. Most of these multis are multiple-planet systems orbiting the Kepler target star, but there are likely cases where (1) the planetary system orbits a fainter star, and the planets are thus significantly larger than has been estimated, or (2) the planets orbit different stars within a binary/multiple star system. We use the low overall false-positive rate among Kepler multis, together with analysis of Kepler spacecraft and ground-based data, to validate the closely packed Kepler-33 planetary system, which orbits a star that has evolved somewhat off of the main sequence. Kepler-33 hosts five transiting planets, with periods ranging from 5.67 to 41 days.

  4. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  5. Kepler Stars with Multiple Transiting Planet Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Kepler spacecraft was launched into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit in March of 2009. Kepler is designed to conduct a statistical census of planetary system properties using transit photometry. Among the most exciting early results from Kepler are target stars found to have photometric signatures that suggest the presence of more than one transiting planet. Individual transiting planets provide information on the size and orbital period distributions of exoplanets. Multiple transiting planets provide additional information on the spacing and flatness distributions of planetary systems. Results to d ate and plans for future analysis will be presented.

  6. Kepler Mission Discovers Trove of Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-02-01

    NASA's Kepler discovery mission is collecting more than just pennies from heaven. Results from the first 4 months of science operations of the Kepler space telescope, announced on 2 February, include the discovery of 1235 candidate planets orbiting 997 stars in a small portion of the Milky Way galaxy examined by the telescope. Follow-up observations likely could confirm about 80% of the candidates as actual planets rather than false positives, according to researchers. This new trove of possible exoplanets could greatly expand the number of known planets outside of our solar system.

  7. The Kepler Q1 - Q16 Planet Candidate Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of the Kepler planet candidate catalog based on analysis of 16 quarters of data. The addition of one more year of data over that presented by Rowe et al. (2015) yields nearly 1500 new objects of interest, from which we identify over 500 new planet candidates. These new candidates are typically smaller, and have longer orbital periods than the KOI sets from our previous work. The full catalog is available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive. We discuss a few features of the catalog that may trip up an unsuspecting user, and highlight some interesting planet candidates.

  8. ON THE LOW FALSE POSITIVE PROBABILITIES OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R{sub +} < R{sub p} < 20 R{sub +}. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal-deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  9. CANDIDATE PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONES OF KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric

    2013-06-20

    A key goal of the Kepler mission is the discovery of Earth-size transiting planets in ''habitable zones'' where stellar irradiance maintains a temperate climate on an Earth-like planet. Robust estimates of planet radius and irradiance require accurate stellar parameters, but most Kepler systems are faint, making spectroscopy difficult and prioritization of targets desirable. The parameters of 2035 host stars were estimated by Bayesian analysis and the probabilities p{sub HZ} that 2738 candidate or confirmed planets orbit in the habitable zone were calculated. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program models were compared to photometry from the Kepler Input Catalog, priors for stellar mass, age, metallicity and distance, and planet transit duration. The analysis yielded probability density functions for calculating confidence intervals of planet radius and stellar irradiance, as well as p{sub HZ}. Sixty-two planets have p{sub HZ} > 0.5 and a most probable stellar irradiance within habitable zone limits. Fourteen of these have radii less than twice the Earth; the objects most resembling Earth in terms of radius and irradiance are KOIs 2626.01 and 3010.01, which orbit late K/M-type dwarf stars. The fraction of Kepler dwarf stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable zone ({eta}{sub Circled-Plus }) is 0.46, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.31-0.64. Parallaxes from the Gaia mission will reduce uncertainties by more than a factor of five and permit definitive assignments of transiting planets to the habitable zones of Kepler stars.

  10. VALFAST: Secure Probabilistic Validation of Hundreds of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim; Petigura, E.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A.; Marcy, G. W.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Riddle, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Robo-AO Team

    2014-01-01

    The scope, scale, and tremendous success of the Kepler mission has necessitated the rapid development of probabilistic validation as a new conceptual framework for analyzing transiting planet candidate signals. While several planet validation methods have been independently developed and presented in the literature, none has yet come close to addressing the entire Kepler survey. I present the results of applying VALFAST---a planet validation code based on the methodology described in Morton (2012)---to every Kepler Object of Interest. VALFAST is unique in its combination of detail, completeness, and speed. Using the transit light curve shape, realistic population simulations, and (optionally) diverse follow-up observations, it calculates the probability that a transit candidate signal is the result of a true transiting planet or any of a number of astrophysical false positive scenarios, all in just a few minutes on a laptop computer. In addition to efficiently validating the planetary nature of hundreds of new KOIs, this broad application of VALFAST also demonstrates its ability to reliably identify likely false positives. This extensive validation effort is also the first to incorporate data from all of the largest Kepler follow-up observing efforts: the CKS survey of ~1000 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, the Robo-AO survey of >1700 KOIs, and high-resolution images obtained through the Kepler Follow-up Observing Program. In addition to enabling the core science that the Kepler mission was designed for, this methodology will be critical to obtain statistical results from future surveys such as TESS and PLATO.

  11. PLANET HUNTERS: NEW KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES FROM ANALYSIS OF QUARTER 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Schwainski, Kevin; and others

    2013-06-15

    We present new planet candidates identified in NASA Kepler Quarter 2 public release data by volunteers engaged in the Planet Hunters citizen science project. The two candidates presented here survive checks for false positives, including examination of the pixel offset to constrain the possibility of a background eclipsing binary. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 97.46 days (KIC 4552729) and 284.03 (KIC 10005758) days and the modeled planet radii are 5.3 and 3.8 R{sub Circled-Plus }. The latter star has an additional known planet candidate with a radius of 5.05 R{sub Circled-Plus} and a period of 134.49 days, which was detected by the Kepler pipeline. The discovery of these candidates illustrates the value of massively distributed volunteer review of the Kepler database to recover candidates which were otherwise uncataloged.

  12. Humans Need Not Apply: Robotization of Kepler Planet Candidate Vetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the vast majority of Kepler planet candidate vetting has been performed by a dedicated team of humans. While human expertise has been invaluable in understanding the nuances of Kepler data, human vetting is very time-consuming and can be inconsistent. Over 20,000 threshold crossing events have been produced by the latest pipeline run on all 17 quarters of Kepler mission data, and many more artificial planet transits have been injected to estimate completeness. Given these large numbers, human vetting is no longer feasible on a reasonable time-scale, and would be difficult to characterize. We have created automated vetting programs known as "robovetters" that are specifically designed to mimic the decision-making process employed by the humans. They analyze both the light curve and pixel-level data in order to produce specific reasons for identifying false positives. We present benchmark tests on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet catalog, which was vetted by humans, and present preliminary robovetter results based on a recent transit-search of the newly reprocessed Q1-Q17 data set.

  13. ARCHITECTURE AND DYNAMICS OF KEPLER'S CANDIDATE MULTIPLE TRANSITING PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Shporer, Avi; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David; Gautier, Thomas N. III; and others

    2011-11-01

    About one-third of the {approx}1200 transiting planet candidates detected in the first four months of Kepler data are members of multiple candidate systems. There are 115 target stars with two candidate transiting planets, 45 with three, 8 with four, and 1 each with five and six. We characterize the dynamical properties of these candidate multi-planet systems. The distribution of observed period ratios shows that the vast majority of candidate pairs are neither in nor near low-order mean-motion resonances. Nonetheless, there are small but statistically significant excesses of candidate pairs both in resonance and spaced slightly too far apart to be in resonance, particularly near the 2:1 resonance. We find that virtually all candidate systems are stable, as tested by numerical integrations that assume a nominal mass-radius relationship. Several considerations strongly suggest that the vast majority of these multi-candidate systems are true planetary systems. Using the observed multiplicity frequencies, we find that a single population of planetary systems that matches the higher multiplicities underpredicts the number of singly transiting systems. We provide constraints on the true multiplicity and mutual inclination distribution of the multi-candidate systems, revealing a population of systems with multiple super-Earth-size and Neptune-size planets with low to moderate mutual inclinations.

  14. Planet Hunters: Two New Confirmed Planets and the First Kepler Seven Candidate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph; Wang, J.; Jek, K.; Fischer, D.; Agol, E.; Hunters, Planet

    2014-01-01

    Planet Hunters has confirmed two new planets, PH3 b and PH3 c, through transit timing variations (TTVs) and discovered a seventh planet candidate KOI-351.07, marking the first Kepler seven candidate system. Since most Kepler multiple planet candidates are true planets, KOI-351.07 is the strongest proposed seventh planet candidate in any planetary system. KOI-351 is a very compact system; all candidates have periods < 1 year. . Although errors are large, the inner five planets appear to all be sub-Neptune, while the outer two are likely gas giants. In our new confirmed system PH3, both confirmed planets experience significant TTVs, with PH3 b having an amplitude of over 5 hours. Along with the third candidate in the system (KOI-1353.02), this system may be in a Laplace resonance: Pout/Pmid = Pmid/Pin = 1.91. These new discoveries add to Planet Hunters previous successes: two previously confirmed planets and ≈ 60 other planet candidates.

  15. Implications for Planet Formation and Evolution Processes from AO Imaging of Kepler Planet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Laughlin, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, a search for transits of solar-type stars by potentially habitable Earth-sized planets, has made enormous advances in the study of extrasolar planets over the last three years. With 1790 candidate planetary systems discovered in its first 16 months of data, Kepler promises to answer one of the most fundamental questions posed in exoplanetary research: what does the "typical" planetary system look like, if such a thing exists at all? The answer to this question provides insight into the relative importance of various processes at work in sculpting planetary systems and refines our understanding of our own place in the Galactic planetary census. Here I present high resolution imaging of the most recent Kepler planet candidate host stars observed with the Shane 3m laser guide star adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory, and I investigate the additional insight such information can provide for questions of planetary origin and evolution.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Properties of Kepler multi-planet candidate systems (Wang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, J.-W.; Barclay, T.; Fischer, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Our sample consists of bright host stars with multi-planet transiting systems from Kepler. Out of 5779 Kepler Objects of Interest (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/), we selected all the systems with a Kepler magnitude (KP) brighter than 13.5mag and with at least two planet candidates. The sample includes 343 planet candidates (see Table3) in 138 multi-planet candidate systems (see Table2) from the Kepler mission. For these systems, we used archival data from Kepler to characterize their stellar (see Table2) and orbital properties (see Table3). We used UKIRT images to calculate brightness contrast curves and to detect stellar companions around planet candidate host stars (see Table4). (3 data files).

  17. TESTING IN SITU ASSEMBLY WITH THE KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brad M. S.; Murray, Norm E-mail: murray@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-09-20

    We present a Monte Carlo model for the structure of low-mass (total mass <25 M{sub ⊕}) planetary systems that form by the in situ gravitational assembly of planetary embryos into final planets. Our model includes distributions of mass, eccentricity, inclination, and period spacing that are based on the simulation of a disk of 20 M{sub ⊕}, forming planets around a solar-mass star, and assuming a power-law surface density distribution that drops with distance a as ∝ a {sup –1.5}. The output of the Monte Carlo model is then subjected to the selection effects that mimic the observations of a transiting planet search such as that performed by the Kepler satellite. The resulting comparison of the output to the properties of the observed sample yields an encouraging agreement in terms of the relative frequencies of multiple-planet systems and the distribution of the mutual inclinations when moderate tidal circularization is taken into account. The broad features of the period distribution and radius distribution can also be matched within this framework, although the model underpredicts the distribution of small period ratios. This likely indicates that some dissipation is still required in the formation process. The most striking deviation between the model and observations is in the ratio of single to multiple systems in that there are roughly 50% more single-planet candidates observed than are produced in any model population. This suggests that some systems must suffer additional attrition to reduce the number of planets or increase the range of inclinations.

  18. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler IV: Planet Sample from Q1-Q8 (22 Months)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Mullally, F.; Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Chaplin, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cochran, William D.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Havel, Mathieu; Henze, Christopher E.; Howell, Steve B.; Huber, Daniel; Latham, David W.; Li, Jie; Morehead, Robert C.; Morton, Timothy D.; Pepper, Joshua; Quintana, Elisa; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E.; Shah, Yash; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wolfgang, Angie

    2014-02-01

    We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon nearly two years of high-precision photometry (i.e., Q1-Q8). From an initial list of nearly 13,400 threshold crossing events, 480 new host stars are identified from their flux time series as consistent with hosting transiting planets. Potential transit signals are subjected to further analysis using the pixel-level data, which allows background eclipsing binaries to be identified through small image position shifts during transit. We also re-evaluate Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) 1-1609, which were identified early in the mission, using substantially more data to test for background false positives and to find additional multiple systems. Combining the new and previous KOI samples, we provide updated parameters for 2738 Kepler planet candidates distributed across 2017 host stars. From the combined Kepler planet candidates, 472 are new from the Q1-Q8 data examined in this study. The new Kepler planet candidates represent ~40% of the sample with R P ~ 1 R ⊕ and represent ~40% of the low equilibrium temperature (T eq < 300 K) sample. We review the known biases in the current sample of Kepler planet candidates relevant to evaluating planet population statistics with the current Kepler planet candidate sample.

  19. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Winn, Joshua N.; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period Ps inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin Is and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination Is of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination Is can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations Is for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with Is = 90° suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small Is for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  20. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR INCLINATIONS FOR KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period P{sub s} inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin I{sub s} and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination I{sub s} of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination I{sub s} can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations I{sub s} for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with I{sub s} 90 Degree-Sign suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small I{sub s} for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  1. Planet Hunters Update: Many New Planet Candidates Identified by Citizen Scientists from Kepler Data, Including Several in the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph; Wang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    Since December, 2010, more than 250,000 public volunteers have searched through more than 19 million Kepler light curves hunting for transiting planets. The Kepler light curves are shown in 30 day sections, and with ~160,000 Kepler target stars, the users have contributed the equivalent of 180 years of work hours. This vetting process has resulted in over 40 new planet candidates and two new confirmed planets, including several not identified through the Kepler pipeline. Many of our candidate planets lie within their host star's habitable zone. We review the recent large release of new PH candidates in Wang et al. (2013), including one confirmed planet, and give preliminary results for our next PH candidate release.

  2. Speckle Imaging of Kepler and CoRoT Exo-planet Transit Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Sherry, William; Ciardi, David

    2010-08-01

    Kepler and CoRoT are complementary space missions dedicated to the detection of exoplanets. The primary science goal of CoRoT is to find Neptune-sized (>3 Earth radii) planets in intermediate orbits, while the prime science goal of Kepler is to find Earth-sized planets (<3 Earth radii) in year-long orbits. Both missions employ the photometric transit method and both spacecraft are performing well with nominal operation of the spacecraft, telescopes, electronics, and instruments. As with ground-based surveys, Kepler and CoRoT candidates need to be screened for background eclipsing binary stars which, when photometrically blended with the primary target, can mimic exo-planetary transits. The list of candidate transiting planets found by Kepler/CoRoT requires follow-up to ascertain probable or certain exo- planet detection. While Earth-sized (and Neptune-sized in long orbital periods) exo-planets can not currently (easily) be confirmed from the ground, many of the false positive eliminations steps can be performed by ground-based observations. Follow-up for Kepler exo-planet candidates is now aimed at Neptune-size and smaller planets in longer period orbits. This proposal aims to obtain high resolution speckle imaging to observe Kepler/CoRoT exo-planet transit candidates in order to eliminate the largest false positive contributor in any transit search - background eclipsing binary stars or faint companion stars.

  3. ON THE RELATIVE SIZES OF PLANETS WITHIN KEPLER MULTIPLE-CANDIDATE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardi, David R.; Gautier, T. N. III; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.

    2013-01-20

    We present a study of the relative sizes of planets within the multiple-candidate systems discovered with the Kepler mission. We have compared the size of each planet to the size of every other planet within a given planetary system after correcting the sample for detection and geometric biases. We find that for planet pairs for which one or both objects are approximately Neptune-sized or larger, the larger planet is most often the planet with the longer period. No such size-location correlation is seen for pairs of planets when both planets are smaller than Neptune. Specifically, if at least one planet in a planet pair has a radius of {approx}> 3 R {sub Circled-Plus }, 68% {+-} 6% of the planet pairs have the inner planet smaller than the outer planet, while no preferred sequential ordering of the planets is observed if both planets in a pair are smaller than {approx}< 3 R {sub Circled-Plus }.

  4. Piecing Together Planet Populations: How RV Super-Earth Frequency Predictions Measure up to Kepler's Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Laughlin, G.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the mass and period distributions of the super-Earths discovered by the Geneva Extrasolar Planet Search, there are expected to be planets less massive than Neptune orbiting a large fraction of main sequence stars in periods of 50 days or less. Expanding on this prediction, we employ a Monte Carlo method to create populations of super-Earths with varying compositions, mass distributions, and period distributions. We then compare the results of these simulations with the planet candidates announced by Kepler on June 15, 2010, calculating a statistical best fit to identify the radial velocity super-Earth population which is most likely to reproduce Kepler's population of planet candidates.

  5. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas Michael; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets.We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys.Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss several KOIs of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are ``coincident multiple'' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we will discuss and update the 98%-confidence evidence from our survey that third bodies in star/planet systems produce an excess of close-in giant planets.

  6. New Constraints on the False Positive Rate for Short-Period Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler space mission has discovered thousands of potential planets orbiting other stars, thereby setting the stage for in-depth studies of different populations of planets. We present new multi-wavelength transit photometry of small (Rp < 6 Earth radii), short-period (P < 6 days) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. Multi-wavelength transit photometry allows us to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and subsequently identify eclipsing binary false positives (which are especially prevalent at the shortest orbital periods). We combine these new observations of three candidates with previous results for five other candidates (Colón & Ford 2011 and Colón, Ford, & Morehead 2012) to provide new constraints on the false positive rate for small, close-in candidates. In our full sample, we identify four candidates as viable planets and four as eclipsing binary false positives. We therefore find a higher false positive rate for small, close-in candidates compared to the lower false positive rate of ~10% determined by other studies for the full sample of Kepler planet candidates (e.g. Fressin et al. 2013). We also discuss the dearth of known planets with periods less than ~2.5 days and radii between ~3 and 11 Earth radii (the so-called 'sub-Jovian desert'), since the majority of the candidates in our study are located in or around this 'desert.' The lack of planets with these orbital and physical properties is not expected to be due to observational bias, as short-period planets are generally easier to detect (especially if they are larger or more massive than Earth). We consider the implications of our results for the other ~20 Kepler planet candidates located in this desert. Characterizing these candidates will allow us to better understand the formation processes of this apparently rare class of planets.

  7. Constraining the false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates with multicolour photometry from the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.

    2012-10-01

    Using the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) instrument installed on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), we acquired multicolour transit photometry of four small (Rp≲5 R⊕) short-period (P ≲ 6 d) planet candidates recently identified by the Kepler space mission. These observations are part of a programme to constrain the false positive rate for small, short-period Kepler planet candidates. Since planetary transits should be largely achromatic when observed at different wavelengths (excluding the small colour changes due to stellar limb darkening), we use the observed transit colour to identify candidates as either false positives (e.g. a blend with a stellar eclipsing binary either in the background/foreground or bound to the target star) or validated planets. Our results include the identification of KOI 225.01 and KOI 1187.01 as false positives and the tentative validation of KOI 420.01 and KOI 526.01 as planets. The probability of identifying two false positives out of a sample of four targets is less than 1 per cent, assuming an overall false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates of 10 per cent (as estimated by Morton & Johnson). Therefore, these results suggest a higher false positive rate for the small, short-period Kepler planet candidates than has been theoretically predicted by other studies which consider the Kepler planet candidate sample as a whole. Furthermore, our results are consistent with a recent Doppler study of short-period giant Kepler planet candidates. We also investigate how the false positive rate for our sample varies with different planetary and stellar properties. Our results suggest that the false positive rate varies significantly with orbital period and is largest at the shortest orbital periods (P < 3 d), where there is a corresponding rise in the number of detached eclipsing binary stars (i.e. systems that can easily mimic planetary transits) that have been discovered by

  8. FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS USING ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Chaplin, William J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Handberg, Rasmus; Karoff, Christoffer; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fischer, Debra A.; Basu, Sarbani; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Hekker, Saskia; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Latham, David W.; and others

    2013-04-20

    We have used asteroseismology to determine fundamental properties for 66 Kepler planet-candidate host stars, with typical uncertainties of 3% and 7% in radius and mass, respectively. The results include new asteroseismic solutions for four host stars with confirmed planets (Kepler-4, Kepler-14, Kepler-23 and Kepler-25) and increase the total number of Kepler host stars with asteroseismic solutions to 77. A comparison with stellar properties in the planet-candidate catalog by Batalha et al. shows that radii for subgiants and giants obtained from spectroscopic follow-up are systematically too low by up to a factor of 1.5, while the properties for unevolved stars are in good agreement. We furthermore apply asteroseismology to confirm that a large majority of cool main-sequence hosts are indeed dwarfs and not misclassified giants. Using the revised stellar properties, we recalculate the radii for 107 planet candidates in our sample, and comment on candidates for which the radii change from a previously giant-planet/brown-dwarf/stellar regime to a sub-Jupiter size or vice versa. A comparison of stellar densities from asteroseismology with densities derived from transit models in Batalha et al. assuming circular orbits shows significant disagreement for more than half of the sample due to systematics in the modeled impact parameters or due to planet candidates that may be in eccentric orbits. Finally, we investigate tentative correlations between host-star masses and planet-candidate radii, orbital periods, and multiplicity, but caution that these results may be influenced by the small sample size and detection biases.

  9. The First Uniform Kepler Q1 - Q17 Planet Candidate Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    We present an update to the Kepler planet-candidate catalog based on the entire Kepler mission dataset. This includes all 17 quarters of data, uniformly processed from pixels to planets. We discuss improvements to our planet-candidate vetting procedure, which is now completely automated and yields specific categories of false positives. For the first time, we also inject transits into all 17 quarters of data at the pixel-level and use these results to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of our vetting procedures. Together these improvements allow us to disposition every known TCE and KOI quickly and uniformly, thus enabling accurate planet occurrence rate calculations. The current catalog is available at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu), and the light curves and pixel-level data are available at MAST (http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler).

  10. Validating the First Habitable-Zone Planet Candidates Identified by the NASA Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fressin, Francois; Ballard, Sarah; Borucki, William; Latham, David; Gilliland, Ronald; Seager, Sara; Knutson, Heather; Fortney, Jonathan; Brown, Timothy; Ford, Eric; Deming, Drake; Torres, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    At the beginning of Cycle 8, the NASA Kepler Mission will have completed two years of science observations, the minimum baseline sufficient to identify candidate transiting exoplanets orbiting within the habitable-zones of Sun-like stars. The principal task that lies ahead is to reject from this sample the false positives (blends of eclipsing binaries that precisely mimic the signal of a transiting exoplanet), and to confirm the planetary nature of the remaining candidates. For planets more massive than Neptune, the direct confirmation of their planetary status can be accomplished by radial-velocity measurements. However, such planets possess primordial envelopes of hydrogen and helium that make them unsuitable to life as we know it. The most exciting candidates -- and the ones that Kepler is specifically tasked with finding -- are super-Earth and Earth-sized planets orbiting within their stellar habitable zones. Kepler has just begun to identify such planet candidates, and it will identify many more as its baseline increases throughout the coming year. While the Kepler team has developed powerful tools to weed out the impostors, Spitzer possesses the unique ability to provide the final validation of these candidates as planets, namely by measuring the depth of the transit at infrared wavelengths. By combining the infrared and optical measurements of the transit depth with models of hypothetical stellar blends, we can definitively test the stellar-blend hypothesis. We propose to observe the transits of 20 candidate habitable-zone super-Earths to be identified by the Kepler Mission. The results from this Exploration Science Program will be twofold: First, we will definitively validate the first potentially habitable planets ever identified. Second, we will determine the rate of occurrence of impostors. This rate of false positives can then be applied to the much larger sample of candidates identified by Kepler, to deduce the true rate of planetary companions.

  11. Inferring Planet Occurrence Rates With a Q1-Q16 Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog Produced by a Machine Learning Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Burke, Christopher J.; McCauliff, Sean D.; Kepler Science Operations Center

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope monitored the photometric variations of over 170,000 stars within a ~100 square degree field in the constellation Cygnus, at half-hour cadence, over its four year prime mission. The Kepler SOC (Science Operations Center) pipeline calibrates the pixels of the target apertures for each star, corrects light curves for systematic error, and detects TCEs (threshold-crossing events) that may be due to transiting planets. Finally the pipeline estimates planet parameters for all TCEs and computes quantitative diagnostics that are used by the TCERT (Threshold Crossing Event Review Team) to produce a catalog containing KOIs (Kepler Objects of Interest). KOIs are TCEs that are determined to be either likely transiting planets or astrophysical false positives such as background eclipsing binary stars. Using examples from the Q1-Q16 TCERT KOI catalog as a training set, we created a machine-learning classifier that dispositions the TCEs into categories of PC (planet candidate), AFP (astrophysical false positive) and NTP (non-transiting phenomenon). The classifier uniformly and consistently applies heuristics developed by TCERT as well as other diagnostics to the Q1-Q16 TCEs to produce a more robust and reliable catalog of planet candidates than is possible with only human classification. In this work, we estimate planet occurrence rates, based on the machine-learning-produced catalog of Kepler planet candidates. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  12. Vetting Kepler planet candidates in the sub-Jovian desert with multiband photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-09-01

    We present new multiband transit photometry of three small (Rp ≲ 6 R⊕), short-period (P ≲ 6 d) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. These observations supplement the results presented in Colón & Ford and Colón, Ford & Morehead, where we used multicolour transit photometry of five Kepler planet candidates to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and either validate planet candidates or identify eclipsing binary false positives within our sample. In those previous studies, we provided evidence that three targets were false positives and two targets were planets. Here, we present observations that provide evidence supporting a planetary nature for Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) 439.01 and KOI 732.01, and we find that KOI 531.01, a 6 R⊕ planet candidate around an M dwarf, is likely a false positive. We also present a discussion of the purported `sub-Jovian desert' in the orbital period-planet radius plane, which cannot be easily explained by observational bias. Both KOI 439.01 and KOI 732.01 are likely planets located within the so-called desert and should be investigated with further follow-up observations. As only ˜30 of the ˜3600 currently active Kepler planet candidates are located within the sub-Jovian desert, it will be interesting to see if these candidates also survive the vetting process and fill in the gap in the period-radius plane. Confirming planets in this regime will be important for understanding planetary migration and evolution processes, and we urge additional follow-up observations of these planet candidates to confirm their nature.

  13. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Nofi, Larissa; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-12-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets. We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys. Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss plans to extend the survey to other transiting planet missions such as K2 and TESS as Robo-AO is in the process of being re-deployed to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for 3 years and a higher-contrast Robo-AO system is being developed for the 2.2-m UH telescope on Maunakea.

  14. Planet Hunters. VI. An Independent Characterization of KOI-351 and Several Long Period Planet Candidates from the Kepler Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Jek, Kian J.; Moriarty, John C.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert; LaCourse, Daryll; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Goodman, Samuel Jon; Jebson, Tony; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Paterson, David A.; Sejpka, Johann; Terentev, Ivan; Jacobs, Tom; Alsaadi, Nawar; Bailey, Robert C.; Ginman, Tony; Granado, Pete; Vonstad Guttormsen, Kristoffer; Mallia, Franco; Papillon, Alfred L.; Rossi, Franco; Socolovsky, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of 14 new transiting planet candidates in the Kepler field from the Planet Hunters citizen science program. None of these candidates overlapped with Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) at the time of submission. We report the discovery of one more addition to the six planet candidate system around KOI-351, making it the only seven planet candidate system from Kepler. Additionally, KOI-351 bears some resemblance to our own solar system, with the inner five planets ranging from Earth to mini-Neptune radii and the outer planets being gas giants; however, this system is very compact, with all seven planet candidates orbiting <~ 1 AU from their host star. A Hill stability test and an orbital integration of the system shows that the system is stable. Furthermore, we significantly add to the population of long period transiting planets; periods range from 124 to 904 days, eight of them more than one Earth year long. Seven of these 14 candidates reside in their host star's habitable zone. .

  15. Planet hunters. VI. An independent characterization of KOI-351 and several long period planet candidates from the Kepler archival data

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Moriarty, John C.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Jek, Kian J.; LaCourse, Daryll; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Goodman, Samuel Jon; Jebson, Tony; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Paterson, David A.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of 14 new transiting planet candidates in the Kepler field from the Planet Hunters citizen science program. None of these candidates overlapped with Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) at the time of submission. We report the discovery of one more addition to the six planet candidate system around KOI-351, making it the only seven planet candidate system from Kepler. Additionally, KOI-351 bears some resemblance to our own solar system, with the inner five planets ranging from Earth to mini-Neptune radii and the outer planets being gas giants; however, this system is very compact, with all seven planet candidates orbiting ≲ 1 AU from their host star. A Hill stability test and an orbital integration of the system shows that the system is stable. Furthermore, we significantly add to the population of long period transiting planets; periods range from 124 to 904 days, eight of them more than one Earth year long. Seven of these 14 candidates reside in their host star's habitable zone.

  16. The Detection of Kepler K2 Campaigns 3 and 4 Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnes, Katherine L.; Kahre, Tarryn; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Caldwell, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    The K2 mission, developed to repurpose the Kepler spacecraft, is providing light curve data quality that exceeds initial K2 design specifications despite the failure of two reaction wheels. We discuss the modification of the five modules of the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline for K2 data planet transit detection. The modified pipeline was applied to K2 Campaign 3 and 4 data sets. Despite the inherently noiser K2 light curves, which are mostly due to spacecraft roll motion, the modified pipeline proved to be effective at detecting transiting planets in K2 light curves. From the Campaign 3 data set, which consists of 70 days of observations of 16,375 targets, we present a catalog of 41 planet candidates in 33 systems. We calculate stellar radii for these 33 stars to obtain initial planet parameters. The catalog contains many systems of interest, including 26 planets with radii less than four Earth radii and two three-planet systems.

  17. A Transit Timing Posterior Distribution Catalog for all Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin; Becker, Juliette; Johnson, John

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the unprecedented precision of Kepler, the first unambiguous observations of transit timing variations (TTVs) are now in hand. TTVs have afforded us the ability to precisely characterize both transiting and non-transiting exoplanets by observing dynamical interactions in multi-transiting systems. Catalogs attempting to publish transit times of large numbers of Kepler systems exist. However, these catalogs are incomplete: for each event only a point estimate and assumed Gaussian uncertainity of the transit time is included. Moreover, published catalogs only include long-cadence data, do not cover the full Kepler observing baseline, and assume the Kepler noise is perfectly uncorrelated. Here, we present a complete TTV catalog, in which we produce full posterior distributions on the time of each transit for every Kepler planet candidate without any assumptions of Gaussianity in the transit times.

  18. Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Among the 1800 Kepler targets that have candidate planets, 20% have two or more candidate planets. While most of these objects have not yet been confirmed as true planets, several considerations strongly suggest that the vast majority of these multi-candidate systems are true planetary systems. Virtually all candidate systems are stable, as tested by numerical integrations (assuming a nominal mass-radius relationship). Statistical studies performed on these candidates reveal a great deal about the architecture of planetary systems, including the typical spacing of orbits and flatness of planetary systems. The distribution of observed period ratios shows that the vast majority of candidate pairs are neither in nor near low-order mean motion resonances. Nonetheless, there are small but statistically significant excesses of candidate pairs both in resonance and spaced slightly too far apart to be in resonance, particularly near the 2:1 resonance. The characteristics of the confirmed Kepler multi-planet systems will also be discussed.

  19. Multiplicity in transiting planet-host stars. A lucky imaging study of Kepler candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.

    2012-10-01

    Context. In the exoplanetary era, the Kepler spacecraft is causing a revolution by discovering thousands of new planet candidates. However, a follow-up program is needed to reject false candidates and fully characterize the bona-fide exoplanets. Aims: Our main aims are to 1./ detect and analyze close companions inside the typical Kepler point spread function (PSF) to study whether they are the responsible for the dimming found in Kepler light curves, 2./ study the change in the stellar and planetary parameters caused by an unresolved object, 3./ help validate the Kepler objects of interest (KOI) that do not have any object inside the Kepler PSF, and 4./ study the multiplicity rate of planet-host candidates. Such a large sample of observed planet-host candidates allows us to derive statistics for close (visual or bounded) companions to the harboring star. Methods: We present lucky imaging observations for a total of 98 KOIs. This technique is based on the acquisition of thousands of very-short-exposure-time images. A selection and combination of a small amount of the highest quality frames provides a high resolution image with objects having a 0.1 arcsec PSF. We apply this technique to carry out observations in the Sloan i and z filters of our Kepler candidates. Results: We find blended objects inside the Kepler PSF for a significant percentage of KOIs. On the one hand, only 58.2% of the hosts do not have any object within 6 arcsec. On the other hand, we find 19 companions closer than 3 arcsec in 17 KOIs. According to their magnitudes and i - z colors, 8 of them could be physically bound to the host star.

  20. THE DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSIT DURATIONS FOR KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR ORBITAL ECCENTRICITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.; Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li Jie; Quintana, Elisa; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lucas, Philip; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2011-11-01

    Doppler planet searches have discovered that giant planets follow orbits with a wide range of orbital eccentricities, revolutionizing theories of planet formation. The discovery of hundreds of exoplanet candidates by NASA's Kepler mission enables astronomers to characterize the eccentricity distribution of small exoplanets. Measuring the eccentricity of individual planets is only practical in favorable cases that are amenable to complementary techniques (e.g., radial velocities, transit timing variations, occultation photometry). Yet even in the absence of individual eccentricities, it is possible to study the distribution of eccentricities based on the distribution of transit durations (relative to the maximum transit duration for a circular orbit). We analyze the transit duration distribution of Kepler planet candidates. We find that for host stars with T{sub eff} > 5100 K we cannot invert this to infer the eccentricity distribution at this time due to uncertainties and possible systematics in the host star densities. With this limitation in mind, we compare the observed transit duration distribution with models to rule out extreme distributions. If we assume a Rayleigh eccentricity distribution for Kepler planet candidates, then we find best fits with a mean eccentricity of 0.1-0.25 for host stars with T{sub eff} {<=} 5100 K. We compare the transit duration distribution for different subsets of Kepler planet candidates and discuss tentative trends with planetary radius and multiplicity. High-precision spectroscopic follow-up observations for a large sample of host stars will be required to confirm which trends are real and which are the results of systematic errors in stellar radii. Finally, we identify planet candidates that must be eccentric or have a significantly underestimated stellar radius.

  1. PLANET HUNTERS. VIII. CHARACTERIZATION OF 41 LONG-PERIOD EXOPLANET CANDIDATES FROM KEPLER ARCHIVAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Picard, Alyssa; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Barclay, Thomas; Bowler, Brendan P.; Riddle, Reed; Jek, Kian J.; LaCourse, Daryll; Simister, Dean Joseph; Grégoire, Boscher; Babin, Sean P.; Poile, Trevor; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2015-12-20

    The census of exoplanets is incomplete for orbital distances larger than 1 AU. Here, we present 41 long-period planet candidates in 38 systems identified by Planet Hunters based on Kepler archival data (Q0–Q17). Among them, 17 exhibit only one transit, 14 have two visible transits, and 10 have more than three visible transits. For planet candidates with only one visible transit, we estimate their orbital periods based on transit duration and host star properties. The majority of the planet candidates in this work (75%) have orbital periods that correspond to distances of 1–3 AU from their host stars. We conduct follow-up imaging and spectroscopic observations to validate and characterize planet host stars. In total, we obtain adaptive optics images for 33 stars to search for possible blending sources. Six stars have stellar companions within 4″. We obtain high-resolution spectra for 6 stars to determine their physical properties. Stellar properties for other stars are obtained from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and the Kepler Stellar Catalog by Huber et al. We validate 7 planet candidates that have planet confidence over 0.997 (3σ level). These validated planets include 3 single-transit planets (KIC-3558849b, KIC-5951458b, and KIC-8540376c), 3 planets with double transits (KIC-8540376b, KIC-9663113b, and KIC-10525077b), and 1 planet with four transits (KIC-5437945b). This work provides assessment regarding the existence of planets at wide separations and the associated false positive rate for transiting observation (17%–33%). More than half of the long-period planets with at least three transits in this paper exhibit transit timing variations up to 41 hr, which suggest additional components that dynamically interact with the transiting planet candidates. The nature of these components can be determined by follow-up radial velocity and transit observations.

  2. Inferring Planet Occurrence Rates With a Q1-Q17 Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog Produced by a Machine Learning Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Jenkins, Jon Michael; McCauliff, Sean D.; Burke, Christopher; Bryson, Steve; Batalha, Natalie; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason; mullally, fergal; thompson, susan; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph; Li, Jie; morris, robert; smith, jeffrey; haas, michael; christiansen, jessie; Clarke, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope monitored the photometric variations of over 170,000 stars, at half-hour cadence, over its four-year prime mission. The Kepler pipeline calibrates the pixels of the target apertures for each star, produces light curves with simple aperture photometry, corrects for systematic error, and detects threshold-crossing events (TCEs) that may be due to transiting planets. The pipeline estimates planet parameters for all TCEs and computes diagnostics used by the Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT) to produce a catalog of objects that are deemed either likely transiting planet candidates or false positives.We created a training set from the Q1-Q12 and Q1-Q16 TCERT catalogs and an ensemble of synthetic transiting planets that were injected at the pixel level into all 17 quarters of data, and used it to train a random forest classifier. The classifier uniformly and consistently applies diagnostics developed by the Transiting Planet Search and Data Validation pipeline components and by TCERT to produce a robust catalog of planet candidates.The characteristics of the planet candidates detected by Kepler (planet radius and period) do not reflect the intrinsic planet population. Detection efficiency is a function of SNR, so the set of detected planet candidates is incomplete. Transit detection preferentially finds close-in planets with nearly edge-on orbits and misses planets whose orbital geometry precludes transits. Reliability of the planet candidates must also be considered, as they may be false positives. Errors in detected planet radius and in assumed star properties can also bias inference of intrinsic planet population characteristics.In this work we infer the intrinsic planet population, starting with the catalog of detected planet candidates produced by our random forest classifier, and accounting for detection biases and reliabilities as well as for radius errors in the detected population.Kepler was selected as the 10th mission

  3. Likely Planet Candidates Identified by Machine Learning Applied to Four Years of Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; McCauliff, S. D.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Twicken, J. D.; Klaus, T. C.; SOC, Kepler; SO, Kepler

    2013-10-01

    Over 3,200 transiting planet candidates, 134 confirmed planets, and ~2,400 eclipsing binaries have been identified by the Kepler Science pipeline since launch in March 2009. Compiling the list of candidates is an intensive manual effort as over 18,000 transit-like signatures are identified for a run across 34 months. The vast majority are caused by artifacts that mimic transits. While the pipeline provides diagnostics that can reduce the initial list down to ~5,000 light curves, this effort can overlook valid planetary candidates. The large number of diagnostics 100) makes it difficult to examine all the information available in identifying planetary candidates. The effort required for vetting all threshold-crossing events (TCEs) takes several months by many individuals associated with the Kepler Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT). We have developed a random-forest classifier that decides whether a TCE should be called `planet candidate’, `astrophysical false positive’, or `non-transiting phenomena’. Ideally a machine learning algorithm will generate a list of candidates that approximates those generated by human review, thereby allowing the humans to focus on the most interesting cases. By using a machine learning-based auto-vetting process, we have the opportunity to identify the most important metrics and diagnostics for separating signatures of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries from instrument-induced features, thereby improving the efficiency of the manual effort. We report the results of a applying a random forest classifier to four years of Kepler data. We present characteristics of the likely planet candidates identified by the auto-vetter as well as those objects classified as astrophysical false positives (eclipsing binaries and background eclipsing binaries). We examine the auto-vetter's performance through receiver operating characteristic curves for each of three classes: planet candidate, astrophysical false positive, and

  4. Multiplicity and properties of Kepler planet candidates: High spatial imaging and RV studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrado, D.; Lillo-Box, J.; Bouy, H.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S.

    2013-04-01

    The Kepler space telescope is discovering thousands of new planet candidates. However, a follow up program is needed in order to reject false candidates and to fully characterize the bona-fide exoplanets. Our main aims are: 1./ Detect and analyze close companions inside the typical Kepler PSF to study if they are the responsible of the dim in the Kepler light curves, 2./ Study the change in the stellar and planetary parameters due to the presence of an unresolved object, 3./ Help to validate those Kepler Objects of Interest that do not present any object inside the Kepler PSF and 4./ Study the multiplicity rate in planet host candidates. Such a large sample of observed planet host candidates allows us to do statistics about the presence of close (visual or bounded) companions to the harboring star. We present here Lucky Imaging observations for a total amount of 98 Kepler Objects of Interest. This technique is based on the acquisition of thousands of very short exposure time images. Then, a selection and combination of a small amount of the best quality frames provides a high resolution image with objects having a 0.1 arcsec PSF. We applied this technique to carry out observations in the Sloan i and Sloan z filters of our Kepler candidates. We find blended objects inside the Kepler PSF for a significant percentage of KOIs. On one hand, only 58.2% of the hosts do not present any object within 6 arcsec. On the other hand, we have found 19 companions closer than 3 arcsec in 17 KOIs. According to their magnitudes and i - z color, 8 of them could be physically bounded to the host star. We are also collecting high-spectral resolution spectroscopuy in order to derive the planet properties. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC)

  5. Speckle Imaging and Spectroscopy of Kepler Exo-planet Transit Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Doyle, Laurance

    2010-02-01

    The NASA Kepler mission was successfully launched on 6 March 2009 and has begun science operations. Commissioning tests done early on in the mission have shown that for the bright sources, 10-15 ppm relative photometry can be achieved. This level assures we will detect Earth- like transits if they are present. ``Hot Jupiter" and similar large planet candidates have already been discovered and will be discussed at the Jan. AAS meeting as well as in a special issue of Science magazine to appear near years end. The plethora of variability observed is astounding and includes a number of eclipsing binaries which appear to have Jupiter and smaller size objects as an orbiting their body. Our proposal consists of three highly related objectives: 1) To continue our highly successful speckle imaging program which is a major component of defense to weed out false positive candidate transiting planets found by Kepler and move the rest to probable or certain exo-planet detections; 2) To obtain low resolution ``discovery" type spectra for planet candidate stars in order to provide spectral type and luminosity class indicators as well as a first look triage to eliminate binaries and rapid rotators; and 3) to obtain ~1Aresolution time ordered spectra of eclipsing binaries that are exo-planet candidates in order to obtain the velocity solution for the binary star, allowing its signal to be modeled and removed from the Keck or HET exo-planet velocity search. As of this writing, Kepler has produced a list of 227 exo-planet candidates which require false positive decision tree observations. Our proposed effort performs much of the first line of defense for the mission.

  6. A FIRST COMPARISON OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES IN SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Carter, Joshua A.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Dunham, Edward W.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N. III

    2011-05-10

    In this Letter, we present an overview of the rich population of systems with multiple candidate transiting planets found in the first four months of Kepler data. The census of multiples includes 115 targets that show two candidate planets, 45 with three, eight with four, and one each with five and six, for a total of 170 systems with 408 candidates. When compared to the 827 systems with only one candidate, the multiples account for 17% of the total number of systems, and one-third of all the planet candidates. We compare the characteristics of candidates found in multiples with those found in singles. False positives due to eclipsing binaries are much less common for the multiples, as expected. Singles and multiples are both dominated by planets smaller than Neptune; 69{sup +2}{sub -3}% for singles and 86{sup +2}{sub -5}% for multiples. This result, that systems with multiple transiting planets are less likely to include a transiting giant planet, suggests that close-in giant planets tend to disrupt the orbital inclinations of small planets in flat systems, or maybe even prevent the formation of such systems in the first place.

  7. Likely Planet Candidates Identified by Machine Learning Applied to Four Years of Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; McCauliff, S. D.; Catanzarite, J.; Twicken, J. D.; Burke, C. J.; Campbell, J.; Seader, S.

    2014-01-01

    Over 3200 transiting planet candidates, 134 confirmed planets, and ~2,400 eclipsing binaries have been identified by the Kepler Science pipeline since launch in March 2009. Compiling the list of candidates is an intensive manual effort as over 18,000 transit-like signatures are identified for a run across 34 months. The vast majority are caused by artifacts that mimic transits. While the pipeline provides diagnostics that can reduce the initial list down to ~5,000 light curves, this effort can overlook valid planetary candidates. The large number of diagnostics 100) makes it difficult to examine all the information available. The effort required for vetting all threshold-crossing events (TCEs) takes several months by many individuals associated with the Kepler Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT). We have developed a random-forest classifier that classifies each TCE as `planet candidate’, `astrophysical false positive’, or `non-transiting phenomena’. Ideally the algorithm will generate a list of candidates that approximates those generated by human review, thereby allowing the humans to focus on the most interesting cases. By using a machine learning-based auto-vetting process, we have the opportunity to identify the most important metrics and diagnostics for separating signatures of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries from instrument-induced features, thereby improving the efficiency of the manual effort. We report the results of applying a random forest classifier to four years of Kepler data. We present characteristics of the likely planet candidates identified by the auto-vetter as well as those objects classified as astrophysical false positives (eclipsing binaries and background eclipsing binaries). We examine the auto-vetter's performance through receiver operating characteristic curves for each of three classes: planet candidate, astrophysical false positive, and non-transiting phenomena. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA

  8. High-resolution imaging of Kepler planet host candidates. A comprehensive comparison of different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The Kepler mission has discovered thousands of planet candidates. Currently, some of them have already been discarded; more than 200 have been confirmed by follow-up observations (most by radial velocity and few by other methods), and several hundreds have been validated. However, the large majority of the candidates are still awaiting for confirmation. Thus, priorities (in terms of the probability of the candidate being a real planet) must be established for subsequent radial velocity observations. Aims: The motivation of this work is to provide a set of isolated (good) host candidates to be further tested by other techniques that allow confirmation of the planet. As a complementary goal, we aim to identify close companions of the candidates that could have contaminated the light curve of the planet host due to the large pixel size of the Kepler CCD and its typical PSF of around 6 arcsec. Both goals can also provide robust statistics about the multiplicity of the Kepler hosts. Methods: We used the AstraLux North instrument located at the 2.2 m telescope in the Calar Alto Observatory (Almería, Spain) to obtain diffraction-limited images of 174 Kepler objects of interest. A sample of demoted Kepler objects of interest (with rejected planet candidates) is used as a control for comparison of multiplicity statistics. The lucky-imaging technique used in this work is compared to other adaptive optics and speckle imaging observations of Kepler planet host candidates. To that end, we define a new parameter, the blended source confidence level (BSC), to assess the probability of an object to have blended non-detected eclipsing binaries capable of producing the detected transit. Results: We find that 67.2% of the observed Kepler hosts are isolated within our detectability limits, and 32.8% have at least one visual companion at angular separations below 6 arcsec. Indeed, we find close companions (below 3 arcsec) for the 17.2% of the sample. The planet properties of

  9. Validation of Kepler's multiple planet candidates. III. Light curve analysis and announcement of hundreds of new multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Mullally, Fergal; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Haas, Michael; Huber, Daniel; Thompson, Susan E.; Quintana, Elisa; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Issacson, Howard; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Ford, Eric; Steffen, Jason H.; Gautier, T. N. III; and others

    2014-03-20

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 2500 exoplanet candidates in the first two years of spacecraft data, with approximately 40% of those in candidate multi-planet systems. The high rate of multiplicity combined with the low rate of identified false positives indicates that the multiplanet systems contain very few false positive signals due to other systems not gravitationally bound to the target star. False positives in the multi-planet systems are identified and removed, leaving behind a residual population of candidate multi-planet transiting systems expected to have a false positive rate less than 1%. We present a sample of 340 planetary systems that contain 851 planets that are validated to substantially better than the 99% confidence level; the vast majority of these have not been previously verified as planets. We expect ∼two unidentified false positives making our sample of planet very reliable. We present fundamental planetary properties of our sample based on a comprehensive analysis of Kepler light curves, ground-based spectroscopy, and high-resolution imaging. Since we do not require spectroscopy or high-resolution imaging for validation, some of our derived parameters for a planetary system may be systematically incorrect due to dilution from light due to additional stars in the photometric aperture. Nonetheless, our result nearly doubles the number verified exoplanets.

  10. Vetting Kepler Planet Candidates with Multi-Color Photometry from the Gran Telescopio Canarias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Knicole; Ford, E. B.

    2011-09-01

    We present multi-color observations of small (super-Earth to Neptune-size) planet candidates recently identified by the Kepler space mission. By applying the unique capabilities of OSIRIS (installed on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias) for near-simultaneous multi-color photometry, we use the color of Kepler candidates as measured during predicted transit events to reject candidates that are false positives (e.g., a blend with an eclipsing binary in the background or bound to the target star). Our results include the discovery of a background eclipsing binary star (KIC 7025851) near KOI-565 (KIC 7025846). Based on the location of the eclipsing binary ( 15 arcsec from KOI-565), we conclude that the eclipsing binary contaminated the light from KOI-565 to mimic the super-Earth-size transit signal that was detected by Kepler. We also compare the technique of measuring colors in two narrow (2 nm) bandpasses separated by only a few nanometers in wavelength ( 790-794 nm) with measuring colors in two wider (36-58 nm) bandpasses located at bluer ( 666 nm) and redder ( 858 nm) wavelengths. These observations are part of a program to statistically determine the likelihood that planet candidates (e.g., with a given size) ultimately end up being false positives and are complementary to a similar program using warm-Spitzer. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-0802270.

  11. Planet Hunters: the first two planet candidates identified by the public using the Kepler public archive data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris; Brewer, John; Giguere, Matt; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Sartori, Thibault; Simpson, Robert; Smith, Arfon; Spronck, Julien; Batalha, Natalie; Rowe, Jason; Jenkins, Jon; Bryson, Steve; Prsa, Andrej; Tenenbaum, Peter; Crepp, Justin; Morton, Tim; Howard, Andrew; Beleu, Michele; Kaplan, Zachary; Vannispen, Nick; Sharzer, Charlie; Defouw, Justin; Hajduk, Agnieszka; Neal, Joe P.; Nemec, Adam; Schuepbach, Nadine; Zimmermann, Valerij

    2012-02-01

    Planet Hunters is a new citizen science project designed to engage the public in an exoplanet search using NASA Kepler public release data. In the first month after launch, users identified two new planet candidates which survived our checks for false positives. The follow-up effort included analysis of Keck HIRES spectra of the host stars, analysis of pixel centroid offsets in the Kepler data and adaptive optics imaging at Keck using NIRC2. Spectral synthesis modelling coupled with stellar evolutionary models yields a stellar density distribution, which is used to model the transit orbit. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 9.8844 ± 0.0087 d (KIC 10905746) and 49.7696 ± 0.000 39 d (KIC 6185331), and the modelled planet radii are 2.65 and 8.05 R⊕. The involvement of citizen scientists as part of Planet Hunters is therefore shown to be a valuable and reliable tool in exoplanet detection. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 40 000 volunteers in the Planet Hunters project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at .

  12. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g ≤ 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g ≤ 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ∼0.1–0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  13. SETI Searches for Radio Transients from Kepler Field Planets and Astropulse Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Abhimat Krishna; Siemion, Andrew; Korpela, Eric J.; Cobb, Jeff; Lebofsky, Matt; Werthimer, Dan

    2014-06-01

    We present a search for fast radio transients in targeted observations of planet candidates in the Kepler Field and candidate Astropulse sources.Kepler Field observations were conducted in the band 1.1 and 1.9 GHz using the Green Bank Telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia and are centered on 86 stars hosting candidate planets identified by the Kepler spacecraft. These stars were chosen based on the properties of their putative planetary system thought to be conducive to the development of advanced life, including all systems known (as of May 2011) hosting a Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) with a calculated equilibrium temperature between 230 and 380 K, at least 4 KOIs or a KOI with an inferred radius < 3.0 r_earth and a period > 50 d. The Kepler Field is centered at an intermediate galactic latitude, b = 13.5°, which presents an additional opportunity to detect signals from the older population of millisecond and recycled pulsars located above the galactic plane.The Astropulse radio survey searches for brief wide-band pulses in a 2.5 MHz band centered at 1420 MHz using commensal data recorded from the Arecibo ALFA receiver. In early Astropulse analysis, 108 candidate sources were identified that passed a series of tests designed to eliminate potential sources of radio frequency interference (RFI). We have performed targeted re-observations of these sources at Arecibo over the full (1214-1536 MHz) ALFA band.We have developed a software pipeline to locate fast dispersed transients in these observations, leveraging components of the PRESTO software library. This pipeline consists of finding and removing RFI, conducting de-dispersion to remove the effects of dispersion from the interstellar medium (ISM) on the signal and identifying over- threshold events. We also perform de-dispersion at negative dispersion measures, proposed to be a potential technique for intelligent civilizations to distinguish their emission from natural sources. We carry out both a periodicity

  14. PLANET HUNTERS. V. A CONFIRMED JUPITER-SIZE PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND 42 PLANET CANDIDATES FROM THE KEPLER ARCHIVE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Barclay, Thomas; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2013-10-10

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R{sub PL} = 10.12 ± 0.56 R{sub ⊕}) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events.

  15. Planet Hunters. V. A Confirmed Jupiter-size Planet in the Habitable Zone and 42 Planet Candidates from the Kepler Archive Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Barclay, Thomas; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Jek, Kian J.; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Lynn, Stuart; Simpson, Robert; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Chopin, Mike; Herszkowicz, Rafal

    2013-10-01

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R PL = 10.12 ± 0.56 R ⊕) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events. .

  16. Advances in the Kepler Transit Search Engine and Automated Approaches to Identifying Likely Planet Candidates in Transit Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon Michael

    2015-08-01

    Twenty years ago, no planets were known outside our own solar system. Since then, the discoveries of ~1500 exoplanets have radically altered our views of planets and planetary systems. This revolution is due in no small part to the Kepler Mission, which has discovered >1000 of these planets and >4000 planet candidates. While Kepler has shown that small rocky planets and planetary systems are quite common, the quest to find Earth’s closest cousins and characterize their atmospheres presses forward with missions such as NASA Explorer Program’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) slated for launch in 2017 and ESA’s PLATO mission scheduled for launch in 2024.These future missions pose daunting data processing challenges in terms of the number of stars, the amount of data, and the difficulties in detecting weak signatures of transiting small planets against a roaring background. These complications include instrument noise and systematic effects as well as the intrinsic stellar variability of the subjects under scrutiny. In this paper we review recent developments in the Kepler transit search pipeline improving both the yield and reliability of detected transit signatures.Many of the phenomena in light curves that represent noise can also trigger transit detection algorithms. The Kepler Mission has expended great effort in suppressing false positives from its planetary candidate catalogs. While over 18,000 transit-like signatures can be identified for a search across 4 years of data, most of these signatures are artifacts, not planets. Vetting all such signatures historically takes several months’ effort by many individuals. We describe the application of machine learning approaches for the automated vetting and production of planet candidate catalogs. These algorithms can improve the efficiency of the human vetting effort as well as quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is truly a planet. This information is crucial for obtaining valid planet

  17. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  18. THE HUNT FOR EXOMOONS WITH KEPLER (HEK). II. ANALYSIS OF SEVEN VIABLE SATELLITE-HOSTING PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Hartman, J.; Bakos, G. A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Schmitt, A. R.; Nesvorny, D.

    2013-06-20

    From the list of 2321 transiting planet candidates announced by the Kepler Mission, we select seven targets with favorable properties for the capacity to dynamically maintain an exomoon and present a detectable signal. These seven candidates were identified through our automatic target selection (TSA) algorithm and target selection prioritization (TSP) filtering, whereby we excluded systems exhibiting significant time-correlated noise and focused on those with a single transiting planet candidate of radius less than 6 R{sub Circled-Plus }. We find no compelling evidence for an exomoon around any of the seven Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) but constrain the satellite-to-planet mass ratios for each. For four of the seven KOIs, we estimate a 95% upper quantile of M{sub S} /M{sub P} < 0.04, which given the radii of the candidates, likely probes down to sub-Earth masses. We also derive precise transit times and durations for each candidate and find no evidence for dynamical variations in any of the KOIs. With just a few systems analyzed thus far in the ongoing ''Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler'' (HEK) project, projections on eta-moon would be premature, but a high frequency of large moons around Super-Earths/Mini-Neptunes would be premature, but a high frequency of large moons around Super-Earths/Mini-Neptunes would appear to be incommensurable with our results so far.

  19. Validation of Kepler's Multiple Planet Candidates. II. Refined Statistical Framework and Descriptions of Systems of Special Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Agol, Eric; Borucki, William J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Kolbl, Rea; Star, Kimberly M.; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    We extend the statistical analysis performed by Lissauer et al. in 2012, which demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) represents true transiting planets, and we develop therefrom a procedure to validate large numbers of planet candidates in multis as bona fide exoplanets. We show that this statistical framework correctly estimates the abundance of false positives already identified around Kepler targets with multiple sets of transit-like signatures based on their abundance around targets with single sets of transit-like signatures. We estimate the number of multis that represent split systems of one or more planets orbiting each component of a binary star system. We use the high reliability rate for multis to validate more than one dozen particularly interesting multi-planet systems herein. Hundreds of additional multi-planet systems are validated in a companion paper by Rowe et al. We note that few very short period (P < 1.6 days) planets orbit within multiple transiting planet systems and discuss possible reasons for their absence. There also appears to be a shortage of planets with periods exceeding a few months in multis.

  20. Validation of Kepler's multiple planet candidates. II. Refined statistical framework and descriptions of systems of special interest

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Borucki, William J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Kolbl, Rea; Agol, Eric; Carter, Joshua A.; Torres, Guillermo; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Star, Kimberly M.; Steffen, Jason H.

    2014-03-20

    We extend the statistical analysis performed by Lissauer et al. in 2012, which demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) represents true transiting planets, and we develop therefrom a procedure to validate large numbers of planet candidates in multis as bona fide exoplanets. We show that this statistical framework correctly estimates the abundance of false positives already identified around Kepler targets with multiple sets of transit-like signatures based on their abundance around targets with single sets of transit-like signatures. We estimate the number of multis that represent split systems of one or more planets orbiting each component of a binary star system. We use the high reliability rate for multis to validate more than one dozen particularly interesting multi-planet systems herein. Hundreds of additional multi-planet systems are validated in a companion paper by Rowe et al. We note that few very short period (P < 1.6 days) planets orbit within multiple transiting planet systems and discuss possible reasons for their absence. There also appears to be a shortage of planets with periods exceeding a few months in multis.

  1. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M.; Huber, D.; Hekker, S.; García, R. A.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  2. Characterization of Exoplanet Atmospheres and Kepler Planet Candidates with Multi-Color Photometry from the Gran Telescopio Canarias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Knicole; Ford, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    With over 180 confirmed transiting exoplanets and NASA's Kepler mission's recent discovery of over 1200 transiting exoplanet candidates, we can conduct detailed investigations into the (i) properties of exoplanet atmospheres and (ii) false positive rates for planet search surveys. To aid these investigations, we developed a novel technique of using the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) installed on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to acquire near-simultaneous multi-color photometry of (i) HD 80606b in bandpasses around the potassium (K I) absorption feature, (ii) GJ 1214b in bandpasses around a possible methane absorption feature and (iii) several Kepler planet candidates. For HD 80606b, we measure a significant color change during transit between wavelengths that probe the K I line core and the K I wing, equivalent to a 4.2% change in the apparent planetary radius. We hypothesize that the excess absorption may be due to K I in a high-speed wind being driven from the exoplanet's exosphere. This is one of the first detections of K I in an exoplanet atmosphere. For GJ 1214b, we compare the transit depths measured "on” and "off” a possible methane absorption feature and use our results to help resolve conflicting results from other studies regarding the composition of this super-Earth-size planet's atmosphere. For Kepler candidates, we use the color change during transit to reject candidates that are false positives (e.g., a blend with an eclipsing binary either in the background/foreground or bound to the target star). We target small planets (<6 Earth radii) with short orbital periods (<6 days), since eclipsing binaries can mimic planets in this regime. Our results include identification of two false positives and test recent predictions of the false positive rates for the Kepler sample. This research demonstrates the value of the GTC for exoplanet follow-up.

  3. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  4. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K{sub P} < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  5. A Statistical Characterization of Reflection and Refraction in the Atmospheres of sub-Saturn Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Holly A.; Deming, Drake; Arney, Giada; Meadows, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our method to detect small atmospheric signals in Kepler's close-in, sub-Saturn planet candidate light curves. We detect an average secondary eclipse for groups of super-Earth, Neptune-like, and other sub-Saturn-sized candidates by scaling and combining photometric data of the groups of candidates such that the eclipses add constructively. This greatly increases the signal-to-noise compared to combining eclipses for individual planets. We have modified our method for averaging short cadence light curves of multiple planet candidates (2014, ApJ, 794, 133), and have applied it to long cadence data, accounting for the broadening of the eclipse due to the 30 minute cadence. We then use the secondary eclipse depth to determine the average albedo for the group. In the short cadence data, we found that a group of close-in sub-Saturn candidates (1 to 6 Earth radii) was more reflective (geometric A ~ 0.22) than typical hot Jupiters (geometric A ~ 0.06 to 0.11: Demory 2014, ApJL, 789, L20). With the larger number of candidates available in long cadence, we improve the resolution in radius and consider groups of candidates with radii between 1 and 2, 2 and 4, and 4 and 6 Earth radii. We also modify our averaging technique to search for refracted light just before and after transit in the Kepler candidate light curves, as modelled by Misra and Meadows (2014, ApJL, 795, L14).

  6. Measuring Transit Signal Recovery in the Kepler Pipeline. III. Completeness of the Q1-Q17 DR24 Planet Candidate Catalogue with Important Caveats for Occurrence Rate Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Burke, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Haas, Michael R.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Kamal Uddin, AKM; Zamudio, Khadeejah; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Henze, Christopher E.

    2016-09-01

    With each new version of the Kepler pipeline and resulting planet candidate catalog, an updated measurement of the underlying planet population can only be recovered with a corresponding measurement of the Kepler pipeline detection efficiency. Here we present measurements of the sensitivity of the pipeline (version 9.2) used to generate the Q1-Q17 DR24 planet candidate catalog. We measure this by injecting simulated transiting planets into the pixel-level data of 159,013 targets across the entire Kepler focal plane, and examining the recovery rate. Unlike previous versions of the Kepler pipeline, we find a strong period dependence in the measured detection efficiency, with longer (>40 day) periods having a significantly lower detectability than shorter periods, introduced in part by an incorrectly implemented veto. Consequently, the sensitivity of the 9.2 pipeline cannot be cast as a simple one-dimensional function of the signal strength of the candidate planet signal, as was possible for previous versions of the pipeline. We report on the implications for occurrence rate calculations based on the Q1-Q17 DR24 planet candidate catalog, and offer important caveats and recommendations for performing such calculations. As before, we make available the entire table of injected planet parameters and whether they were recovered by the pipeline, enabling readers to derive the pipeline detection sensitivity in the planet and/or stellar parameter space of their choice.

  7. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KOIs. VI. H- AND K-BAND SPECTRA OF KEPLER M DWARF PLANET-CANDIDATE HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette; Price, Ellen M.; Thorp, Rachel; Riddle, Reed; Feiden, Gregory A.; Rojas-Ayala, Bárbara; Vanderburg, Andrew; Johnson, John Asher; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2014-07-01

    We present H- and K-band spectra for late-type Kepler Objects of Interest (the {sup C}ool KOIs{sup )}: low-mass stars with transiting-planet candidates discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission that are listed on the NASA Exoplanet Archive. We acquired spectra of 103 Cool KOIs and used the indices and calibrations of Rojas-Ayala et al. to determine their spectral types, stellar effective temperatures, and metallicities, significantly augmenting previously published values. We interpolate our measured effective temperatures and metallicities onto evolutionary isochrones to determine stellar masses, radii, luminosities, and distances, assuming the stars have settled onto the main sequence. As a choice of isochrones, we use a new suite of Dartmouth predictions that reliably include mid-to-late M dwarf stars. We identify five M4V stars: KOI-961 (confirmed as Kepler 42), KOI-2704, KOI-2842, KOI-4290, and the secondary component to visual binary KOI-1725, which we call KOI-1725 B. We also identify a peculiar star, KOI-3497, which has Na and Ca lines consistent with a dwarf star but CO lines consistent with a giant. Visible-wavelength adaptive optics imaging reveals two objects within a 1 arcsec diameter; however, the objects' colors are peculiar. The spectra and properties presented in this paper serve as a resource for prioritizing follow-up observations and planet validation efforts for the Cool KOIs and are all available for download online using the ''data behind the figure'' feature.

  8. Transit Timing Study of Kepler Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei

    2015-08-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. In this talk, I will talk about two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties.

  9. Kepler's First Rocky Planet: Kepler-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Ciardi, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Fressin, Francois; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Basri, Gibor S.; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie; Clarke, Bruce; Cochran, William D.; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fischer, Debra; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan; Girouard, Forrest R.; Holman, Matthew J.; Johnson, John; Isaacson, Howard; Klaus, Todd C.; Machalek, Pavel; Moorehead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph; Quinn, Samuel; VanCleve, Jeffrey; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Welsh, William F.; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan

    2011-03-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission uses transit photometry to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in or near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The mission reached a milestone toward meeting that goal: the discovery of its first rocky planet, Kepler-10b. Two distinct sets of transit events were detected: (1) a 152 ± 4 ppm dimming lasting 1.811 ± 0.024 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454964.57375+0.00060 -0.00082 + N*0.837495+0.000004 -0.000005 days and (2) a 376 ± 9 ppm dimming lasting 6.86 ± 0.07 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454971.6761+0.0020 -0.0023 + N*45.29485+0.00065 -0.00076 days. Statistical tests on the photometric and pixel flux time series established the viability of the planet candidates triggering ground-based follow-up observations. Forty precision Doppler measurements were used to confirm that the short-period transit event is due to a planetary companion. The parent star is bright enough for asteroseismic analysis. Photometry was collected at 1 minute cadence for >4 months from which we detected 19 distinct pulsation frequencies. Modeling the frequencies resulted in precise knowledge of the fundamental stellar properties. Kepler-10 is a relatively old (11.9 ± 4.5 Gyr) but otherwise Sun-like main-sequence star with T eff = 5627 ± 44 K, M sstarf = 0.895 ± 0.060 M sun, and R sstarf = 1.056 ± 0.021 R sun. Physical models simultaneously fit to the transit light curves and the precision Doppler measurements yielded tight constraints on the properties of Kepler-10b that speak to its rocky composition: M P = 4.56+1.17 -1.29 M ⊕, R P = 1.416+0.033 -0.036 R ⊕, and ρP = 8.8+2.1 -2.9 g cm-3. Kepler-10b is the smallest transiting exoplanet discovered to date. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  10. Kepler Confirmation of Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    2011-10-01

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft has detected 170 candidate multi-planet systems in the first two quarters of data released in February 2011 by Borucki et al. (2011). These systems comprise 115 double candidate systems, 45 triple candidate sys- tems, and 10 systems with 4 or more candidate planets. The architecture and dynamics of these systems were discussed by Lissauer et al. (2011), and a comparison of candidates in single- and multi-planet systems was presented by Latham et al. (2011). Proceeding from "planetary candidate" systems to confirmed and validated multi-planet systems is a difficult process, as most of these systems orbit stars too faint to obtain extremely precise (1ms-1) radial velocity confimation. Here, we discuss in detail the use of transit timing vari- ations (cf. e.g. Holman et al., 2010) to confirm planets near a mean motion resonance. We also discuss extensions to the BLENDER validation (Torres et al., 2004, 2011; Fressin et al., 2011) to validate planets in multi-planet systems. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for the Kepler Mis- sion is provided by NASA's Science Mission Direc- torate. We are deeply grateful for the very hard work of the entire Kepler team.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planet host candidates imaging (Lillo-Box+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.

    2014-09-01

    We applied the lucky imaging technique to the selected targets to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. We used the AstraLux North instrument located at the 2.2m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory (Almeria, Spain). The targets were observed along three visibility windows of the Kepler field during 2011, 2012, and 2013. The results regarding the non-isolated KOIs of observations on 2011 were published in Lillo-Box et al. (2012A&A...546A..10L, Cat. J/A+A/546/A10). In the present work, we report the results concerning the isolated candidates observed in 2011 and the new results for the 2012-2013 observing runs. (6 data files).

  12. PREDICTING PLANETS IN KEPLER MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-05-20

    We investigate whether any multi-planet systems among Kepler candidates (2011 February release) can harbor additional terrestrial-mass planets or smaller bodies. We apply the packed planetary systems hypothesis that suggests all planetary systems are filled to capacity, and use a Hill stability criterion to identify eight two-planet systems with significant gaps between the innermost and outermost planets. For each of these systems, we perform long-term numerical integrations of 10{sup 7} years to investigate the stability of 4000-8000 test particles injected into the gaps. We map out stability regions in orbital parameter space, and therefore quantify the ranges of semimajor axes and eccentricities of stable particles. Strong mean-motion resonances can add additional regions of stability in otherwise unstable parameter space. We derive simple expressions for the extent of the stability regions, which is related to quantities such as the dynamical spacing {Delta}, the separation between two planets in units of their mutual Hill radii. Our results suggest that planets with separation {Delta} < 10 are unlikely to host extensive stability regions, and that about 95 out of a total of 115 two-planet systems in the Kepler sample may have sizeable stability regions. We predict that Kepler candidate systems including KOI 433, KOI 72/Kepler-10, KOI 555, KOI 1596, KOI 904, KOI 223, KOI 1590, and KOI 139 can harbor additional planets or low-mass bodies between the inner and outer detected planets. These predicted planets may be detected by future observations.

  13. Observations of Kepler Habitable Zone Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W. F.; Orosz, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Kepler has recently revealed nine transiting circumbinary planets (CBPs) and a few more candidates are currently being worked on. While few in number, the sample exhibits some interesting trends: i) The Kepler CBPs are not seen in the shortest-period binary systems. ii) The CBPs tend to orbit very close to their host stars. If the planets were much closer, they would experience instabilities due to dynamical interactions with the binary. Excluding the outer planets of the three-planet Kepler-47 system, 9 of 12 systems have semi-major axes within a factor of two of the critical minimum orbit for stability. This tendency to reside near the instability limit is an unsolved problem. iii) As a consequence of their close-in orbits and the spectral types of their host stars, a surprisingly large fraction, roughly ~25%, of the Kepler CBPs lie within the habitable zone. In my talk I will review the observations of Kepler CBPs and will share the latest candidate planet discoveries. I will discuss the highly variable insolation the planets receive due to the binary nature of their host stars, with emphasis on their locations within the habitable zone.

  14. Preliminary Planet Population Statistics With Kepler Q1-Q16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Mullally, Fergal; Christiansen, Jessie; Huber, Daniel; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Thompson, Susan E.; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Batalha, Natalie M.

    2014-06-01

    We present preliminary extrasolar planet population statistics from analysis of the Kepler Q1-Q16 planet candidate sample. The analysis takes advantage of the recent work on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet candidate sample, extensive Monte-Carlo transit signal injection and recovery tests of the Kepler Pipeline, and updates to the stellar parameters provided by the Kepler Stellar Working Group. We also explore the sensitivity of the results to alternative inputs by considering a machine learning generated planet sample, systematics in the stellar sample properties, orbital eccentricity, and false positive rates.

  15. Revision of Earth-sized Kepler Planet Candidate Properties with High Resolution Imaging by Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Kimberly Michelle; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present the first results of our HST GO/SNAP program GO-12893 and describe how our image analysis using STScI's DrizzlePac software combined with our own empirical point spread function definition were used to re-evaluate the habitability of some of the most interesting Kepler planet candidates. We used our high resolution imaging to calibrate Kp to the F555W and F775W filters on WFC3/UVIS, and spatially resolved the stellar multiplicity of KOI-1422, KOI-2626, and KOI-3049. We found KOI-1422 to be a tight binary star system with a projected separation of 0.217’’ 90 AU). We found KOI-2626 to be a triple star system with a projected separation of 0.201’’ 110 AU) between the primary and secondary components and 0.161’’ 90 AU) between the primary and tertiary components. We found KOI-3049 to be a binary star system with a projected separation of 0.464’’ 330 AU). Using theoretical isochrones from the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database, we performed hierarchical fitting using our derived photometry and the synthetic photometry from the isochrones. Revised stellar parameters for the individual components of the systems show that the stars in these systems range from early-K dwarf to early-M dwarf spectral types. We report with high confidence that all three systems are bound and co-eval based on the tight isochrone fitting and false positive analysis. Using our best-fit stellar parameters from the isochrone matches, we solved for the properties of the planets in the three systems and found that the planets range in size from ~2REarth to ~4 REarth, placing them in the Super Earth/mini-Neptune range. Some planets analyzed here are potentially habitable depending on their stellar host and greenhouse effect level.

  16. Planet Detection: The Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2012-03-01

    The search for exoplanets is one of the hottest topics in astronomy and astrophysics in the twenty-first century, capturing the public's attention as well as that of the astronomical community. This nascent field was conceived in 1989 with the discovery of a candidate planetary companion to HD114762 [35] and was born in 1995 with the discovery of the first extrasolar planet 51 Peg-b [37] orbiting a main sequence star. As of March, 2011, over 500 exoplanets have been discovered* and 106 are known to transit or cross their host star, as viewed from Earth. Of these transiting planets, 15 have been announced by the Kepler Mission, which was launched into an Earth-trailing, heliocentric orbit in March, 2009 [1,4,6,15,18,20,22,31,32,34,36,43]. In addition, over 1200 candidate transiting planets have already been detected by Kepler [5], and vigorous follow-up observations are being conducted to vet these candidates. As the false-positive rate for Kepler is expected to be quite low [39], Kepler has effectively tripled the number of known exoplanets. Moreover, Kepler will provide an unprecedented data set in terms of photometric precision, duration, contiguity, and number of stars. Kepler's primary science objective is to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets transiting their Sun-like host stars in the habitable zone, that range of orbital distances for which liquid water would pool on the surface of a terrestrial planet such as Earth, Mars, or Venus. This daunting task demands an instrument capable of measuring the light output from each of over 100,000 stars simultaneously with an unprecedented photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) at 6.5-h intervals. The large number of stars is required because the probability of the geometrical alignment of planetary orbits that permit observation of transits is the ratio of the size of the star to the size of the planetary orbit. For Earth-like planets in 1-astronomical unit (AU) orbits† about sun-like stars

  17. Planet Hunters: Kepler by Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C.; Fischer, D.; Smith, A. M.; Boyajian, T. S.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Schmitt, J.; Simpson, R.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the pubic Kepler light curves. Planet Hunters utilizes human pattern recognition to identify planet transits that may be missed by automated detection algorithms looking for periodic events. Referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’ or ‘citizen science’, the combined assessment of many non-expert human classifiers with minimal training can often equal or best that of a trained expert and in many cases outperform the best machine-learning algorithm. Visitors to the Planet Hunters' website are presented with a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler’s ~160,000 target stars and are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits in the web interface. 5-10 classifiers review each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 260,000 volunteers world wide have participated, contributing over 20 million classifications. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project’s more than 20 planet candidates, the discovery of PH1b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a quadruple star system, and the discovery of PH2-b, a confirmed Jupiter-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. I will provide an overview of Planet Hunters, highlighting several of project's most recent exoplanet and astrophysical discoveries. Acknowledgements: MES was supported in part by a NSF AAPF under award AST-1003258 and a American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant. We acknowledge support from NASA ADAP12-0172 grant to PI Fischer.

  18. Just How Earth-like are Extrasolar Super-Earths? Constraints on H+He Envelope Fractions from Kepler's Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Lopez, E.; Kepler Team; SAMSI Bayesian Characterization of Exoplanet Populations Working Group

    2014-01-01

    With 3500 planetary candidates discovered in its first 3 years of data, the Kepler Mission promises to answer one of the most fundamental questions posed in exoplanetary research: what kinds of planets occur most often in our Galaxy? As Kepler primarily yields planetary radii and orbital periods, it has enabled numerous studies of the occurrence rate of planets as a function of these variables. Unfortunately, the full mass distribution, and thus a direct measure of these planets' possible compositions, remains elusive due to the unsuitability of these faint targets for radial velocity follow-up and the relative rareness of transit timing variations. We show, however, that relatively straightforward models of planetary evolution in an irradiated environment can make some progress without this full mass distribution towards understanding bulk compositions of the abundant Super-Earth/Sub-Neptunes that Kepler has discovered. In particular, we constrain the distribution of envelope fractions, i.e. the fraction of a planet's mass that is in a gaseous hydrogen and helium envelope around its rocky core, for this exoplanet population that has no analogs in our Solar System. This research builds on collaborations between astronomers and statisticians forged during a three week workshop on "Modern Statistical and Computational Methods for Analysis of Kepler Data" at SAMSI in June 2013.

  19. Architecture of Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack

    We propose to determine the typical characteristics of planetary systems within 1 AU of stars. We will address basic questions including: How many planets are typical? What are their orbital spacings? How do these relate to planet sizes, relative inclinations, and stellar type? These questions probe the signatures of planet formation that are recorded in the catalogs of Kepler planet candidates. We propose to update the findings Lissauer et al. (2011, ApJS 197, 8), which used the first four months of Kepler observations, and Fabrycky et al. (2014, ApJ 790, 146) to encompass the additional planet candidates that have and will be cataloged by the Kepler project. The current catalog (Coughlin et al. (2015, arXiv 1512.06149) includes four times as many planet candidates as were known in 2011, almost twice as many as the catalog used by Fabrycky et al., as well as vastly improved measures of planetary radii and stellar properties. The improved catalogs will allow us to minimize detection biases andperform independent analyses of subsets of the data to compare distributions of planet periodratios, transit durations and planet radii to determine how these vary with orbital distance orincident fluxes. Analyses of the early Kepler data also identified an excess of planets just wide of resonance and a deficit just narrow of resonance. We propose to discriminate between tidal and dynamical models for this phenomenon with improved distributions of period ratios, sorted by planet size and orbit period, since tidal effects decline rapidly with distance from the star.

  20. Planet Hunters in the Kepler Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C. J.; Fischer, D.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.; Smith, A. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Carter, J. A.; Howard, A.; Torres, G.; Crepp, J. R.; Keel, W. C.; Welsh, W. F.; Kaib, N. A.; Terrell, D.; Gagliano, R.; Jek, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the Kepler light curves. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits, with multiple independent classifiers reviewing a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's ~160,000 target stars. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 13 million classifications. With the start of the Kepler extended mission, Planet Hunters has entered a new phase. We will detail the upgrades and new features added to the project, highlighting in particular our search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting both stars in binary) in the the extended mission Quarterly data releases. We will also report on our latest planet candidates, including the characterization of our first confirmed planet candidate, a circumbinary planet in a four star system. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a National Science Foundation Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258 and in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

  1. Measurements of stellar inclinations for Kepler planet candidates. II. Candidate spin-orbit misalignments in single- and multiple-transiting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  2. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates. II. Candidate Spin-Orbit Misalignments in Single- and Multiple-transiting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Winn, Joshua N.; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  3. Constraining the oblateness of Kepler planets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Huang, Chelsea X.; Zhou, George; Lin, D. N. C.

    2014-11-20

    We use Kepler short-cadence light curves to constrain the oblateness of planet candidates in the Kepler sample. The transits of rapidly rotating planets that are deformed in shape will lead to distortions in the ingress and egress of their light curves. We report the first tentative detection of an oblate planet outside the solar system, measuring an oblateness of 0.22{sub −0.11}{sup +0.11} for the 18 M{sub J} mass brown dwarf Kepler 39b (KOI 423.01). We also provide constraints on the oblateness of the planets (candidates) HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01 to be <0.067, <0.251, and <0.186, respectively. Using the Q' values from Jupiter and Saturn, we expect tidal synchronization for the spins of HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01, and for their rotational oblateness signatures to be undetectable in the current data. The potentially large oblateness of KOI 423.01 (Kepler 39b) suggests that the Q' value of the brown dwarf needs to be two orders of magnitude larger than that of the solar system gas giants to avoid being tidally spun down.

  4. Kepler Discovers Its First Rocky Planet

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission confirmed the discovery of its first rocky planet, named Kepler-10b. Measuring 1.4 times the size of Earth, it is the smallest planet ever discovered outside our solar system....

  5. Just How Earth-like are Extrasolar Super-Earths? Constraints on H+He Envelope Fractions from Kepler's Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Lopez, E.; Kepler Team; SAMSI Bayesian Characterization of Exoplanet Populations Working Group

    2013-10-01

    With 3500 planetary candidates discovered in its first 3 years of data, the Kepler Mission promises to answer one of the most fundamental questions posed in exoplanetary research: what kinds of planets occur most often in our Galaxy? As Kepler primarily yields planetary radii and orbital periods, it has enabled numerous studies of the occurrence rate of planets as a function of these variables. Unfortunately, the full mass distribution, and thus a direct measure of these planets' possible compositions, remains elusive due to the unsuitability of these faint targets for radial velocity follow-up and the relative rareness of transit timing variations. We show, however, that relatively straightforward models of planetary evolution in an irradiated environment can make some progress without this full mass distribution towards understanding bulk compositions of the abundant Super-Earth/Sub-Neptunes that Kepler has discovered. In particular, we constrain the distribution of envelope fractions, i.e. the fraction of a planet's mass that is in a gaseous hydrogen and helium envelope around its rocky core, for this exoplanet population that has no analogs in our Solar System.

  6. Kepler-79's low density planets

    SciTech Connect

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-04-10

    Kepler-79 (KOI-152) has four planetary candidates ranging in size from 3.5 to 7 times the size of the Earth, in a compact configuration with orbital periods near a 1:2:4:6 chain of commensurability, from 13.5 to 81.1 days. All four planets exhibit transit timing variations with periods that are consistent with the distance of each planet to resonance with its neighbors. We perform a dynamical analysis of the system based on transit timing measurements over 1282 days of Kepler photometry. Stellar parameters are obtained using a combination of spectral classification and the stellar density constraints provided by light curve analysis and orbital eccentricity solutions from our dynamical study. Our models provide tight bounds on the masses of all four transiting bodies, demonstrating that they are planets and that they orbit the same star. All four of Kepler-79's transiting planets have low densities given their sizes, which is consistent with other studies of compact multiplanet transiting systems. The largest of the four, Kepler-79 d (KOI-152.01), has the lowest bulk density yet determined among sub-Saturn mass planets.

  7. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    NASA's Kepler mission is the source of more exoplanets than any other instrument, but the discovery depends on complex statistical analysis procedures embedded in the Kepler pipeline. A particular challenge is mitigating irregular stellar variability without loss of sensitivity to faint periodic planetary transits. This proposal presents a two-stage alternative analysis procedure. First, parametric autoregressive ARFIMA models, commonly used in econometrics, remove most of the stellar variations. Second, a novel matched filter is used to create a periodogram from which transit-like periodicities are identified. This analysis procedure, the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS), is confirming most of the Kepler Objects of Interest and is expected to identify additional planetary candidates. The proposed research will complete application of the KARPS methodology to the prime Kepler mission light curves of 200,000: stars, and compare the results with Kepler Objects of Interest obtained with the Kepler pipeline. We will then conduct a variety of astronomical studies based on the KARPS results. Important subsamples will be extracted including Habitable Zone planets, hot super-Earths, grazing-transit hot Jupiters, and multi-planet systems. Groundbased spectroscopy of poorly studied candidates will be performed to better characterize the host stars. Studies of stellar variability will then be pursued based on KARPS analysis. The autocorrelation function and nonstationarity measures will be used to identify spotted stars at different stages of autoregressive modeling. Periodic variables with folded light curves inconsistent with planetary transits will be identified; they may be eclipsing or mutually-illuminating binary star systems. Classification of stellar variables with KARPS-derived statistical properties will be attempted. KARPS procedures will then be applied to archived K2 data to identify planetary transits and characterize stellar variability.

  8. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R{sub ⊕}. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M

  9. A New Way to Confirm Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    What was the big deal behind the Kepler news conference yesterday? Its not just that the number of confirmed planets found by Kepler has more than doubled (though thats certainly exciting news!). Whats especially interesting is the way in which these new planets were confirmed.Number of planet discoveries by year since 1995, including previous non-Kepler discoveries (blue), previous Kepler discoveries (light blue) and the newly validated Kepler planets (orange). [NASA Ames/W. Stenzel; Princeton University/T. Morton]No Need for Follow-UpBefore Kepler, the way we confirmed planet candidates was with follow-up observations. The candidate could be validated either by directly imaging (which is rare) or obtaining a large number radial-velocity measurements of the wobble of the planets host star due to the planets orbit. But once Kepler started producing planet candidates, these approaches to validation became less feasible. A lot of Kepler candidates are small and orbit faint stars, making follow-up observations difficult or impossible.This problem is what inspired the development of whats known as probabilistic validation, an analysis technique that involves assessing the likelihood that the candidates signal is caused by various false-positive scenarios. Using this technique allows astronomers to estimate the likelihood of a candidate signal being a true planet detection; if that likelihood is high enough, the planet candidate can be confirmed without the need for follow-up observations.A breakdown of the catalog of Kepler Objects of Interest. Just over half had previously been identified as false positives or confirmed as candidates. 1284 are newly validated, and another 455 have FPP of1090%. [Morton et al. 2016]Probabilistic validation has been used in the past to confirm individual planet candidates in Kepler data, but now Timothy Morton (Princeton University) and collaborators have taken this to a new level: they developed the first code thats designed to do fully

  10. A Planet Hunters Search of the Kepler TCE Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Meg; Lintott, Chris; Fischer, Debra; Smith, Arfon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Brewer, John; Giguere, Matt; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Rob; Wang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    NASA's Kepler spacecraft has spent the past 4 years monitoring ~160,000 stars for the signatures of transiting exoplanets. Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of citizen science projects, uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project's discoveries including PH1 b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a four star system., and over 20 previously unknown planet candidates. The Kepler team has released the list of 18,406 potential transit signals or threshold-crossing events (TCEs) identified in Quarters 1-12 (~1000 days) by their automated Transit Planet Search (TPS) algorithm. The majority of these detections found by TPS are triggered by transient events and are not valid planet candidates. To identify planetary candidates from the detected TCEs, a human review of the validation reports, generated by the Kepler pipeline for each TCE, is performed by several Kepler team members. We have undertaken an independent crowd-sourced effort to perform a systematic search of the Kepler Q1-12 TCE list. With the Internet we can obtain multiple assessments of each TCE's data validation report. Planet Hunters volunteers evaluate whether a transit is visible in the Kepler light curve folded on the expected period identified by TPS. We present the first results of this analysis.

  11. Spectroscopy of Kepler Candidate Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Currently the NASA Kepler Mission has identified 3449 exoplanet candidates, one third with estimated radii R_p<2.5R_oplus and orbiting faint (m_Kep>14.5) host stars. The NASA sponsored Kepler Follow-up Program is focusing on small exoplanet candidates (R_p<2.5R_oplus) and those in habitable zone orbits. Planet radii estimates depend on estimates of host star radii. Based on spectra previously obtained at the KPNO Mayall 4-m for 220 stars with candidate exoplanets, Everett et al. (2013) have shown that many host stars are larger than originally assumed (up to factor of 2). Therefore, the exoplanet candidates they host must be larger than originally assumed, which conversely reduces the number of known Earth- sized exoplanet candidates. Determination of the frequency of such Earth-sized planets is a cornerstone Kepler mission objective and of keen general interest. These Mayall spectra were also used to confirm the Buchhave et al. (2012) result that exoplanet candidates larger than 4R_oplus in short-period orbits are preferentially associated with host stars with solar or higher metallicity, using a fainter and larger sample of stars than Buchhave et al. In short, followup Mayall optical spectroscopy is critical to confirming the detection of Earth-sized exoplanets, a Kepler cornerstone goal, as well as characterizing the relationship between host star properties and planetary system properties. Here, we propose to continue our reconnaissance survey with a focus on the smallest (most rare) exoplanet candidates orbiting the faintest Kepler host stars.

  12. Kepler Circumbinary Planets: The Best of Both Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W.

    2015-07-01

    While long anticipated in both in science and science fiction, the existence of a planet orbiting a pair of normal stars was not firmly established until the discovery of Kepler-16. With that single discovery, many questions soon arose about the nature of circumbinary planets: What kinds of orbits, masses, and radii could they have? What kinds of binary stars can host planets? How common are they? Since 2011, nine more transiting Kepler circumbinary planets have been discovered, and several more candidate systems are under investigation. While still few in number, the sample is becoming large enough that some intriguing patterns are starting to emerge, regarding the planets' radii, orbits, host star binary periods, and their proximity to the habitable zone. In this talk I will discuss the discovery and characterization of the Kepler circumbinary planets, the emerging trends, and present the latest discoveries and candidate systems.

  13. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing the occurrence rates of planets within 1AU. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. In the last year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has more than doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta-Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  14. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Team

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a funtion size, orbital period, star-type, and insolation flux. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. This year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has nearly doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta-Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  15. Progress Toward Reliable Planet Occurrence Rates with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Kepler Mission is exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems. Its legacy will be a catalog of discoveries sufficient for computing the occurrence rates of planets within 1AU. The mission has gone a long way toward achieving that goal. In the last year, the number of planet discoveries has increased by 50%, and the number of small planet candidates in the habitable zone has nearly doubled. Statistical analyses suggest that planets abound in the galaxy (with each main sequence star having at least one) and that small planets form efficiently. I will describe the ingredients necessary for determining the occurence rates of planets and report on the progress Kepler has made toward a reliable determination of eta- Earth. This singular number is arguably Kepler's most important contribution to the future of NASA's exoplanet exploration and the search for life beyond Earth.

  16. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel Antonio; Feigelson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; AR-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. The analysis procedures of the project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal of these periodic spikes. When a periodic transit is found, the model is displayed on a standard period-folded averaged light curve. Our findings to date on real

  17. Transiting circumbinary planets Kepler-34 b and Kepler-35 b.

    PubMed

    Welsh, William F; Orosz, Jerome A; Carter, Joshua A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Lissauer, Jack J; Prša, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N; Ragozzine, Darin; Short, Donald R; Torres, Guillermo; Winn, Joshua N; Doyle, Laurance R; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Bloemen, Steven; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Caroline; Caldwell, Douglas A; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Klaus, Todd C; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Mazeh, Tsevi; Quintana, Elisa V; Robertson, Paul; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Windmiller, Gur; Koch, David G; Borucki, William J

    2012-01-11

    Most Sun-like stars in the Galaxy reside in gravitationally bound pairs of stars (binaries). Although long anticipated, the existence of a 'circumbinary planet' orbiting such a pair of normal stars was not definitively established until the discovery of the planet transiting (that is, passing in front of) Kepler-16. Questions remained, however, about the prevalence of circumbinary planets and their range of orbital and physical properties. Here we report two additional transiting circumbinary planets: Kepler-34 (AB)b and Kepler-35 (AB)b, referred to here as Kepler-34 b and Kepler-35 b, respectively. Each is a low-density gas-giant planet on an orbit closely aligned with that of its parent stars. Kepler-34 b orbits two Sun-like stars every 289 days, whereas Kepler-35 b orbits a pair of smaller stars (89% and 81% of the Sun's mass) every 131 days. The planets experience large multi-periodic variations in incident stellar radiation arising from the orbital motion of the stars. The observed rate of circumbinary planets in our sample implies that more than ∼1% of close binary stars have giant planets in nearly coplanar orbits, yielding a Galactic population of at least several million.

  18. EXPLORING THE HABITABLE ZONE FOR KEPLER PLANETARY CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D.

    2011-08-01

    This Letter outlines a simple approach to evaluate habitability of terrestrial planets by assuming different types of planetary atmospheres and using corresponding model calculations. Our approach can be applied for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches. The resulting uncertainties and changes in the number of planetary candidates in the HZ for the Kepler 2011 February data release are discussed. To first order, the HZ depends on the effective stellar flux distribution in wavelength and time, the planet albedo, and greenhouse gas effects. We provide a simple set of parameters which can be used for evaluating future planet candidates from transit searches.

  19. Planet Population Statistics With Kepler Q1-Q16: Stellar Effective Temperature Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Mullally, Fergal; Christiansen, Jessie; Huber, Daniel; Seader, Shawn; Catanzarite, Joseph; Bryson, Steve; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason; Thompson, Susan E.; Clarke, Bruce; Tenenbaum, Peter; Batalha, Natalie M.; Haas, Michael R.; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Kepler Project

    2015-01-01

    We explore extrasolar planet population statistics and the dependence of planet occurrence rates on stellar effective temperature from analysis of the Kepler Q1-Q16 planet candidate sample. The analysis takes advantage of the recent work on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet candidate sample, extensive Monte-Carlo transit signal injection and recovery tests of the Kepler Pipeline, and updates to the stellar parameters provided by the Kepler Stellar Working Group. Results focus of intermediate orbital periods, 50< Porb<300 day, where astrophysical and instrumental contamination of the planet sample is low.

  20. Fast rise of 'Neptune-size' planets (4-8 R {sub ⊕}) from P ∼ 10 to ∼250 days—statistics of Kepler planet candidates up to ∼0.75 au

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2013-11-20

    We infer the period (P) and size (R{sub p} ) distribution of Kepler transiting planet candidates with R{sub p} ≥ 1 R {sub ⊕} and P < 250 days hosted by solar-type stars. The planet detection efficiency is computed by using measured noise and the observed time spans of the light curves for ∼120,000 Kepler target stars. We focus on deriving the shape of planet periods and radius distribution functions. We find that for orbital periods P > 10 days, the planet frequency dN{sub p} /dlog P for 'Neptune-size' planets (R{sub p} = 4-8 R {sub ⊕}) increases with period as ∝P {sup 0.7±0.1}. In contrast, dN{sub p} /dlog P for 'super-Earth-size' (2-4 R {sub ⊕}) as well as 'Earth-size' (1-2 R {sub ⊕}) planets are consistent with a nearly flat distribution as a function of period (∝P {sup 0.11±0.05} and ∝P {sup –0.10±0.12}, respectively), and the normalizations are remarkably similar (within a factor of ∼1.5 at 50 days). Planet size distribution evolves with period, and generally the relative fractions for big planets (∼3-10 R {sub ⊕}) increase with period. The shape of the distribution function is not sensitive to changes in the selection criteria of the sample. The implied nearly flat or rising planet frequency at long periods appears to be in disagreement with the sharp decline at ∼100 days in planet frequency for low-mass planets (planet mass m{sub p} < 30 M {sub ⊕}) recently suggested by the HARPS survey. Within 250 days, the cumulative frequencies for Earth-size and super-Earth-size planets are remarkably similar (∼28% and 25%), while Neptune-size and Jupiter-size planets are ∼7% and ∼3%, respectively. A major potential uncertainty arises from the unphysical impact parameter distribution of the candidates.

  1. DENSITY AND ECCENTRICITY OF KEPLER PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2013-07-20

    We analyze the transit timing variations (TTV) obtained by the Kepler mission for 22 sub-Jovian planet pairs (19 published, 3 new) that lie close to mean motion resonances. We find that the TTV phases for most of these pairs lie close to zero, consistent with an eccentricity distribution that has a very low root-mean-squared value of e {approx} 0.01; but about a quarter of the pairs possess much higher eccentricities, up to e {approx} 0.1-0.4. For the low-eccentricity pairs, we are able to statistically remove the effect of eccentricity to obtain planet masses from TTV data. These masses, together with those measured by radial velocity, yield a best-fit mass-radius relation M {approx} 3 M{sub Circled-Plus }(R/R{sub Circled-Plus }). This corresponds to a constant surface escape velocity of {approx}20 km s{sup -1}. We separate the planets into two distinct groups: ''mid-sized'' (those greater than 3 R{sub Circled-Plus }) and 'compact' (those smaller). All mid-sized planets are found to be less dense than water and therefore must contain extensive H/He envelopes that are comparable in mass to that of their cores. We argue that these planets have been significantly sculpted by photoevaporation. Surprisingly, mid-sized planets, a minority among Kepler candidates, are discovered exclusively around stars more massive than 0.8 M{sub Sun }. The compact planets, on the other hand, are often denser than water. Combining our density measurements with those from radial velocity studies, we find that hotter compact planets tend to be denser, with the hottest ones reaching rock density. Moreover, hotter planets tend to be smaller in size. These results can be explained if the compact planets are made of rocky cores overlaid with a small amount of hydrogen, {<=}1% in mass, with water contributing little to their masses or sizes. Photoevaporation has exposed bare rocky cores in cases of the hottest planets. Our conclusion that these planets are likely not water worlds contrasts

  2. PLANET HUNTERS: ASSESSING THE KEPLER INVENTORY OF SHORT-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Simpson, Robert J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of {>=}2 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets on short-period (<15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} Planet Hunters {>=}85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} short-period planets is nearly complete.

  3. Planet Hunters: Assessing the Kepler Inventory of Short-period Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of >=2 R ⊕ planets on short-period (<15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, >=4 R ⊕ Planet Hunters >=85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler >=4 R ⊕ planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of >=4 R ⊕ short-period planets is nearly complete.

  4. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  5. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2∶1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history. PMID:22566651

  6. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  7. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 Kepler planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as ∼0.″15, and magnitude differences Δm ≤slant 6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not been previously imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 12.6 % +/- 0.9 % at separations between 0.″15 and 4.″0. Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 26 stars with detected companions that host rocky, habitable zone candidates and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems and stellar binarity, using the combined data set of Baranec et al. and this paper. Our previous 2σ result of a low detected nearby star fraction of KOIs hosting close-in giant planets is less apparent in this larger data set. We also find a significant correlation between detected nearby star fraction and KOI number, suggesting possible variation between early and late Kepler data releases.

  8. Planet Hunters. X. Searching for Nearby Neighbors of 75 Planet and Eclipsing Binary Candidates from the K2 Kepler extended mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; LaCourse, Daryll M.; Gagliano, Robert; Tan, Arvin Joseff V.; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Omohundro, Mark R.; Venner, Alexander; Terentev, Ivan; Schmitt, Allan R.; Jacobs, Thomas L.; Winarski, Troy; Sejpka, Johann; Jek, Kian J.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Brewer, John M.; Ishikawa, Sascha T.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; Weiksnar, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a sample of 75 K2 targets from Campaigns 1-3 using speckle interferometry on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope and adaptive optics imaging at the Keck II telescope. The median SOAR I-band and Keck Ks-band detection limits at 1\\prime\\prime were {{Δ }}{m}I=4.4 mag and {{Δ }}{m}{Ks}=6.1 mag, respectively. This sample includes 37 stars likely to host planets, 32 targets likely to be eclipsing binaries (EBs), and 6 other targets previously labeled as likely planetary false positives. We find nine likely physically bound companion stars within 3\\prime\\prime of three candidate transiting exoplanet host stars and six likely EBs. Six of the nine detected companions are new discoveries. One of these new discoveries, EPIC 206061524, is associated with a planet candidate. Among the EB candidates, companions were only found near the shortest period ones (P\\lt 3 days), which is in line with previous results showing high multiplicity near short-period binary stars. This high-resolution data, including both the detected companions and the limits on potential unseen companions, will be useful in future planet vetting and stellar multiplicity rate studies for planets and binaries.

  9. Kepler-47: A Three-Planet Circumbinary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, William; Orosz, Jerome; Quarles, Billy; Haghighipour, Nader

    2015-12-01

    Kepler-47 is the most interesting of the known circumbinary planets. In the discovery paper by Orosz et al. (2012) two planets were detected, with periods of 49.5 and 303 days around the 7.5-day binary. In addition, a single "orphan" transit of a possible third planet was noticed. Since then, five additional transits by this planet candidate have been uncovered, leading to the unambiguous confirmation of a third transiting planet in the system. The planet has a period of 187 days, and orbits in between the previously detected planets. It lies on the inner edge of the optimistic habitable zone, while its outer sibling falls within the conservative habitable zone. The orbit of this new planet is precessing, causing its transits to become significantly deeper over the span of the Kepler observations. Although the planets are not massive enough to measurably perturb the binary, they are sufficiently massive to interact with each other and cause mild transit timing variations (TTVs). This enables our photodynamical model to estimate their masses. We find that all three planets have very low-density and are on remarkably co-planar orbits: all 4 orbits (the binary and three planets) are within ~2 degrees of one another. Thus the Kepler-47 system puts interesting constraints on circumbinary planet formation and migration scenarios.

  10. Kepler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Kepler mission recently announced over 1200 exoplanet candidates. While some are common Hot Jupiters, a large number are Neptune size and smaller, transit depths suggest sizes down to the radius of Earth. The Kepler project has a fairly high confidence that most of these candidates are real exoplanets. Many analysis steps and lessons learned from Kepler light curves are used during the vetting process. This talk will cover some new results in the areas of stellar variability, solar systems with multiple planets, and how transit-like signatures are vetted for false positives, especially those indicative of small planets.

  11. Planet Hunters, Undergraduate Research, and Detection of Extrasolar Planet Kepler-818 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, David; Crannell, Graham; Duncan, James; Hays, Aryn; Hendrix, Landon

    2017-01-01

    Detection of extrasolar planets provides an excellent research opportunity for undergraduate students. In Spring 2012, we searched for transiting extrasolar planets using Kepler spacecraft data in our Research Experience in Physics course at Austin College. Offered during the regular academic year, these Research Experience courses engage students in the scientific process, including proposal writing, paper submission, peer review, and oral presentations. Since 2004, over 190 undergraduate students have conducted authentic scientific research through Research Experience courses at Austin College.Zooniverse’s citizen science Planet Hunters web site offered an efficient method for rapid analysis of Kepler data. Light curves from over 5000 stars were analyzed, of which 2.3% showed planetary candidates already tagged by the Kepler team. Another 1.5% of the light curves suggested eclipsing binary stars, and 1.6% of the light curves had simulated planets for training purposes.One of the stars with possible planetary transits had not yet been listed as a planetary candidate. We reported possible transits for Kepler ID 4282872, which later was promoted to planetary candidate KOI-1325 in 2012 and confirmed to host extrasolar planet Kepler-818 b in 2016 (Morton et al. 2016). Kepler-818 b is a “hot Neptune” with period 10.04 days, flux decrease during transit ~0.4%, planetary radius 4.69 Earth radii, and semi-major axis 0.089 au.

  12. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The statistical analysis procedures of the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve, but visual inspection of the residual series shows that significant deviations from Gaussianity remain for many of them. Although the reduction in stellar signal is encouraging, it is important to note that the transit signal is also altered in the resulting residual time series. The periodogram derived from our Transit Comb Filter (TCF) is most effective for shorter period planets with quick ingress/egress times (relative to Kepler's 29-minute sample rate). We do not expect high sensitivity to periods of hundreds of days. Our findings to date on real-data tests of the KARPS methodology will be discussed including confirmation of some Kepler Team `candidate' planets, no confirmation of some `candidate' and `false positive' sytems, and suggestions of mischosen harmonics in the Kepler Team periodograms. We also present cases of new possible planetary signals.

  13. A Catalog of Kepler Habitable Zone Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hill, Michelle L.; Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Haghighipour, Nader; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Selsis, Franck; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Kepler mission ha s discovered thousands of new planetary candidates, many of which have been confirmed through follow-up observations. A primary goal of the mission is to determine the occurrence rate of terrestrial-size planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. Here we provide a list of HZ exoplanet candidates from the Kepler Q1-Q17 Data Release 24 data-vetting process. This work was undertaken as part of the Kepler HZ Working Group. We use a variety of criteria regarding HZ boundaries and planetary sizes to produce complete lists of HZ candidates, including a catalog of 104 candidates within the optimistic HZ and 20 candidates with radii less than two Earth radii within the conservative HZ. We cross-match our HZ candidates with the stellar properties and confirmed planet properties from Data Release 25 to provide robust stellar parameters and candidate dispositions. We also include false-positive probabilities recently calculated by Morton et al. for each of the candidates within our catalogs to aid in their validation. Finally, we performed dynamical analysis simulations for multi-planet systems that contain candidates with radii less than two Earth radii as a step toward validation of those systems.

  14. First Multi-Planet System Discovered by Kepler

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler Mission has discovered the first confirmed planetary system with more than one planet transiting the same star. The announcement of the discovery of the two planets, Kepler 9b and 9c,...

  15. High-resolution multi-band imaging for validation and characterization of small Kepler planets

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Crepp, Justin R.

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based optical speckle and near-infrared adaptive optics images are taken to search for stars in close angular proximity to host stars of candidate planets identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Neighboring stars are a potential source of false positive signals. These stars also blend into Kepler light curves, affecting estimated planet properties, and are important for an understanding of planets in multiple star systems. Deep images with high angular resolution help to validate candidate planets by excluding potential background eclipsing binaries as the source of the transit signals. A study of 18 Kepler Object of Interest stars hosting a total of 28 candidate and validated planets is presented. Validation levels are determined for 18 planets against the likelihood of a false positive from a background eclipsing binary. Most of these are validated at the 99% level or higher, including five newly validated planets in two systems: Kepler-430 and Kepler-431. The stellar properties of the candidate host stars are determined by supplementing existing literature values with new spectroscopic characterizations. Close neighbors of seven of these stars are examined using multi-wavelength photometry to determine their nature and influence on the candidate planet properties. Most of the close neighbors appear to be gravitationally bound secondaries, while a few are best explained as closely co-aligned field stars. Revised planet properties are derived for each candidate and validated planet, including cases where the close neighbors are the potential host stars.

  16. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  17. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonomo, A. S.; Almenara, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    As CoRoT, the Kepler space mission found a large amount of planetary transit candidates for which radial velocity follow-up is necessary in order to establish the planetary nature and then, to characterize the mass of the transiting companion. We are following up some interesting Kepler candidates with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted at the 1.93-m telescope in Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). More than one year after the first Kepler release, we will present the strategy used to select the most promising Kepler candidates, within reach of a detection with SOPHIE, using the experience of more than 4 years of CoRoT, SWASP and HAT radial velocity follow-up. We will also highlight the results of the first year of observations that led to the discovery of several new transiting exoplanets and help the understanding of the false positive rate of the Kepler mission.

  18. Kepler 453 b - The 10th Kepler Transiting Circumbinary Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Short, Donald R.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Brugamyer, Erik; Haghighipour, Nader; Buchhave, Lars A.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius; Kane, Stephen R.; Kostov, Veselin; Mazeh, Tsevi; Mills, Sean M.; Müller, Tobias W. A.; Quarles, Billy; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H.; Tal-Or, Lev; Torres, Guillermo; Windmiller, Gur; Borucki, William J.

    2015-08-01

    We present the discovery of Kepler-453 b, a 6.2 {R}\\oplus planet in a low-eccentricity, 240.5 day orbit about an eclipsing binary. The binary itself consists of a 0.94 and 0.195 {M}⊙ pair of stars with an orbital period of 27.32 days. The plane of the planet's orbit is rapidly precessing, and its inclination only becomes sufficiently aligned with the primary star in the latter portion of the Kepler data. Thus three transits are present in the second half of the light curve, but none of the three conjunctions that occurred during the first half of the light curve produced observable transits. The precession period is ˜103 years, and during that cycle, transits are visible only ˜8.9% of the time. This has the important implication that for every system like Kepler-453 that we detect, there are ˜11.5 circumbinary systems that exist but are not currently exhibiting transits. The planet's mass is too small to noticeably perturb the binary, and consequently its mass is not measurable with these data; however, our photodynamical model places a 1σ upper limit of 16 {M}\\oplus . With a period 8.8 times that of the binary, the planet is well outside the dynamical instability zone. It does, however, lie within the habitable zone of the binary, making it the third of 10 Kepler circumbinary planets to do so. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  19. Kepler Mission: A Search for Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was selected by NASA as one of the next two Discovery Missions. The mission design is based on the search for Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars, but does not preclude the discovery of larger or smaller planets in other orbits of non-solar-like stars. An overview of the mission, the scientific goals and the anticipated results will be presented.

  20. From Lightcurve to Planet: Vetting Kepler Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, William D.; Kepler Science Team

    2010-10-01

    After a possible transit-like signal is detected in a Kepler lightcurve, a large number of checks are made in order to determine whether the signal is due to a true planet or is a false-positive signal. The first steps include detailed inspection of the lightcurve itself and a search for correlation of astrometric residuals with the photometric transit signal. Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that are passed on to the Follow-up Observing Program then receive reconnaissance spectroscopy and high spatial resolution imaging. KOIs that survive these tests may then be subjected to high-precision radial velocity measurements to measure the stellar reflex orbit and thus fully confirm the existence of a planet. This last step of precise radial velocity measurement can not be used on all Kepler planets because: 1) telescope resources are limited, and 2) state-of-the-art velocity precision is insufficient to measure the stellar reflex orbit of an Earth-mass planet in a 1AU orbit around the faint Kepler targets. Examples of these verification steps will be presented.

  1. Precise Radial Velocity Measurements for Kepler Giants Hosting Planetary Candidates: Kepler-91 and KOI-1894

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hirano, Teruyuki; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Ryo; Takarada, Takuya; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Masuda, Kento

    2015-03-01

    We present results of radial-velocity follow-up observations for the two Kepler evolved stars Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) and KOI-1894, which had been announced as candidates to host transiting giant planets, with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope and the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS). By global modeling of the high-precision radial-velocity data taken with Subaru/HDS and photometric data taken by the Kepler mission accounting for orbital brightness modulations (ellipsoidal variations, reflected/emitted light, etc.) of the host stars, we independently confirmed that Kepler-91 hosts a transiting planet with a mass of 0.66 {{M}Jup}(Kepler-91b), and newly detected an offset of ˜20 m s-1 between the radial velocities taken at ˜1 yr interval, suggesting the existence of an additional companion in the system. As for KOI-1894, we detected possible phased variations in the radial velocities and light curves with 2-3σ confidence level, which could be explained as a reflex motion and ellipsoidal variation of the star caused by a transiting sub-Saturn-mass (˜0.18 {{M}Jup}) planet.

  2. Predicting the Potential Planet Yield from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Douglas A.; Dunham, E. W.; Argabright, V. S.; Borucki, W. J.; Burke, C. J.; Christiansen, J. L.; Gilliland, R. L.; Jenkins, J. M.; Rowe, J. F.; Seader, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Van Cleve, J.

    2012-05-01

    The pre-eminent scientific goal of the Kepler Mission is to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in or near the habitable zone of their stars. Two related key requirements needed to support this fundamental goal are the combined photometric precision for target stars and the mission lifetime. Kepler was designed to achieve a combined photometric precision -including intrinsic stellar variability- of 20 parts per million in 6.5 hours for 12th magnitude stars and to have a mission lifetime of 3.5 years. Based on the first 2 ½ years of data collection, we find that Kepler's precision for these stars is nearer to 30 ppm. We used the measured precision for each target to predict the detectability of habitable zone terrestrial planets based on the pipeline detection threshold of 7.1σ, the mission duration, and the measured data completeness. Combining this with the transit alignment probability and summing over all targets gives the potential planet yield for such planets. We find that the absolute value of the planet yield depends strongly on how biases in the Kepler Input Catalog values of surface gravity and effective temperature are handled, but that the relative improvement in planet yield is a factor of 2.5 to 3 in going from a 3.5 to a 7.5 year mission, largely independent of the KIC biases. Increasing the mission duration to 7.5 years makes up for the factor of 1.5 increase in noise, restoring Kepler’s ability to meet its primary mission goal.

  3. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  4. Validation and characterization of Kepler exoplanet candidates with Warm Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    I present the status and results from an ongoing project that uses 800 hours of the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of transiting extrasolar planet candidates detected by the Kepler Mission. The main purposes of this project is to validate planetary candidates, and to characterize confirmed planets. By comparing the light curves spanning times of primary transit for candidates observed with Kepler and Spitzer, we can exclude significant sources of astrophysical false positives resulting from blends (e.g. background eclipsing binaries) that mimic an exoplanetary signature in the Kepler bandpass. I show how our infrared observations can help to validate the planetary nature of several candidates with small radii, which could be rocky in composition. By combining occultation measurements of the reflected starlight in the optical with estimates of the thermal emission in the near-infrared, we are able to constrain the energy budget of a handful of hot-Jupiters and compare such constraints to those for other giant planets.

  5. ARCHITECTURE OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS BASED ON KEPLER DATA: NUMBER OF PLANETS AND COPLANARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the underlying architecture of planetary systems by deriving the distribution of planet multiplicity (number of planets) and the distribution of orbital inclinations based on the sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission. The scope of our study included solar-like stars and planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and with radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii, and was based on Kepler planet candidates detected during Quarters 1-6. We created models of planetary systems with different distributions of planet multiplicity and inclinations, simulated observations of these systems by Kepler, and compared the properties of the transits of detectable objects to actual Kepler planet detections. Specifically, we compared with both the Kepler sample's transit numbers and normalized transit duration ratios in order to determine each model's goodness of fit. We did not include any constraints from radial velocity surveys. Based on our best-fit models, 75%-80% of planetary systems have one or two planets with orbital periods less than 200 days. In addition, over 85% of planets have orbital inclinations less than 3 Degree-Sign (relative to a common reference plane). This high degree of coplanarity is comparable to that seen in our solar system. These results have implications for planet formation and evolution theories. Low inclinations are consistent with planets forming in a protoplanetary disk, followed by evolution without significant and lasting perturbations from other bodies capable of increasing inclinations.

  6. A Possible 5th Planet in the Kepler-89 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Andrew; Deck, Katherine; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Christiansen, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    Kepler-89 is a system with four known, transiting planets. We investigate a large discrepancy in the mass of the Jupiter-sized Kepler-89d between previous radial velocity (RV) and transit timing variation (TTV) measurements. We model the TTV data for the system and find evidence of a fifth planet, which we call Kepler-89f, inducing high amplitude TTVs on the outer transiting planet, Kepler-89e. We model the characteristics of this hypothetical planet and investigate how its presence may affect other system parameters, including the mass of Kepler-89d. We also analyze whether future transit observations of Kepler-89e could improve the characterization of Kepler-89f. Lastly, we explore how model results differ between fitting against TTV data versus fitting against raw transit times, and whether this could also be a contributing factor to the discrepancy between RV and TTV measurements of Kepler-89d.

  7. Compositions of Hot Super-earth Atmospheres: Exploring Kepler Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.; Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines a simple approach to evaluate the atmospheric composition of hot rocky planets by assuming different types of planetary composition and using corresponding model calculations. To explore hot atmospheres above 1000 K, we model the vaporization of silicate magma and estimate the range of atmospheric compositions according to the planet's radius and semi-major axis for the Kepler 2011 February data release. Our results show five atmospheric types for hot, rocky super-Earth atmospheres, strongly dependent on the initial composition and the planet's distance to the star. We provide a simple set of parameters that can be used to evaluate atmospheric compositions for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches.

  8. COMPOSITIONS OF HOT SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES: EXPLORING KEPLER CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.; Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2011-12-15

    This paper outlines a simple approach to evaluate the atmospheric composition of hot rocky planets by assuming different types of planetary composition and using corresponding model calculations. To explore hot atmospheres above 1000 K, we model the vaporization of silicate magma and estimate the range of atmospheric compositions according to the planet's radius and semi-major axis for the Kepler 2011 February data release. Our results show five atmospheric types for hot, rocky super-Earth atmospheres, strongly dependent on the initial composition and the planet's distance to the star. We provide a simple set of parameters that can be used to evaluate atmospheric compositions for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches.

  9. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR TROJAN PLANETS IN THE KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, Markus

    2013-09-10

    Trojans are circumstellar bodies that reside in characteristic 1:1 orbital resonances with planets. While all the trojans in our solar system are small ({approx}<100 km), stable planet-size trojans may exist in extrasolar planetary systems, and the Kepler telescope constitutes a formidable tool to search for them. Here we report on a systematic search for extrasolar trojan companions to 2244 known Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with epicyclic orbital characteristics similar to those of the Jovian trojan families. No convincing trojan candidates are found, despite a typical sensitivity down to Earth-size objects. This fact, however, cannot be used to stringently exclude the existence of trojans in this size range, since stable trojans need not necessarily share the same orbital plane as the planet, and thus may not transit. Following this reasoning, we note that if Earth-sized trojans exist at all, they are almost certainly both present and in principle detectable in the full set of Kepler data, although a very substantial computational effort would be required to detect them. Additionally, we also note that some of the existing KOIs could in principle be trojans themselves, with a primary planet orbiting outside of the transiting plane. A few examples are given for which this is a readily testable scenario.

  10. Kepler-16: a transiting circumbinary planet.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Laurance R; Carter, Joshua A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Slawson, Robert W; Howell, Steve B; Winn, Joshua N; Orosz, Jerome A; Prša, Andrej; Welsh, William F; Quinn, Samuel N; Latham, David; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fortney, Jonathan J; Shporer, Avi; Ford, Eric B; Lissauer, Jack J; Ragozzine, Darin; Rucker, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Jenkins, Jon M; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Middour, Christopher K; Hall, Jennifer R; McCauliff, Sean; Fanelli, Michael N; Quintana, Elisa V; Holman, Matthew J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Still, Martin; Stefanik, Robert P; Brown, Warren R; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Tang, Sumin; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Short, Donald R; Steffen, Jason H; Sasselov, Dimitar; Dunham, Edward W; Cochran, William D; Boss, Alan; Haas, Michael R; Buzasi, Derek; Fischer, Debra

    2011-09-16

    We report the detection of a planet whose orbit surrounds a pair of low-mass stars. Data from the Kepler spacecraft reveal transits of the planet across both stars, in addition to the mutual eclipses of the stars, giving precise constraints on the absolute dimensions of all three bodies. The planet is comparable to Saturn in mass and size and is on a nearly circular 229-day orbit around its two parent stars. The eclipsing stars are 20 and 69% as massive as the Sun and have an eccentric 41-day orbit. The motions of all three bodies are confined to within 0.5° of a single plane, suggesting that the planet formed within a circumbinary disk.

  11. Characterizing the Habitable Zone Planets of Kepler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra

    than 100 days or they use extrapolation to estimate planet occurrence rates beyond 100 days. The new detections of transit candidates at wider separations and the incompleteness analysis will be used to carry out an analysis of the architecture of exoplanetary systems from 1 5 AU. We are synthesizing a statistical description with information from short-period Kepler transits, the longer period Kepler transit candidates from this proposal, a completeness analysis of radial velocity data, and statistical information from microlensing. While our architecture analysis will only sketch out the bare bones of planetary systems (massive or large planets), this is still a novel analysis that may point to the location of rocky planets if packed planetary systems prevail. Finally, we will expand our guest scientist program for serendipitous discoveries. We have already partnered with scientists who are searching for cataclysmic variables, heartbeat stars, and exomoons. Our undergrad students have already carried out summer research as guest scientists to characterize inflated jupiters, search for Trojan planets, and to search for microlensing events.

  12. BIRTH LOCATIONS OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Silsbee, Kedron; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2015-07-20

    The Kepler mission has discovered about a dozen circumbinary planetary systems, all containing planets on ∼1 AU orbits. We place bounds on the locations in the circumbinary protoplanetary disk, where these planets could have formed through collisional agglomeration starting from small (kilometer-sized or less) planetesimals. We first present a model of secular planetesimal dynamics that accounts for the (1) perturbation due to the eccentric precessing binary, as well as the (2) gravity and (3) gas drag from a precessing eccentric disk. Their simultaneous action leads to rich dynamics, with (multiple) secular resonances emerging in the disk. We derive analytic results for size-dependent planetesimal eccentricity and demonstrate the key role of the disk gravity for circumbinary dynamics. We then combine these results with a simple model for collisional outcomes and find that in systems like Kepler-16, planetesimal growth starting with 10–100 m planetesimals is possible outside a few AU. The exact location exterior to which this happens is sensitive to disk eccentricity, density, and precession rate, as well as to the size of the first generation of planetesimals. Strong perturbations from the binary in the inner part of the disk, combined with a secular resonance at a few AU, inhibit the growth of kilometer-sized planetesimals within 2–4 AU of the binary. In situ planetesimal growth in the Kepler circumbinary systems is possible only starting from large initial planetesimals (few-kilometer-sized even assuming favorable disk properties, i.e., low surface density)

  13. Using Kepler Candidates to Examine the Properties of Habitable Zone Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur D.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the currently known exoplanets in the habitable zones (HZs) of their host stars is of interest both in the wake of the NASA Kepler mission and with prospects for expanding the known planet population through future ground- and space-based projects. In this paper, we compare the empirical distributions of the properties of stellar systems with transiting planets to those with transiting HZ planets. This comparison includes two categories: confirmed/validated transiting planet systems, and Kepler planet and candidate planet systems. These two categories allow us to present quantitative analyses on both a conservative data set of known planets and a more optimistic and numerous sample of Kepler candidates. Both are subject to similar instrumental and detection biases, and are vetted against false positive detections. We examine whether the HZ distributions vary from the overall distributions in the Kepler sample with respect to planetary radius as well as stellar mass, effective temperature, and metallicity. We find that while the evidence is strongest in suggesting a difference between the size distributions of planets in the HZ and the overall size distribution, none of the statistical results provide strong empirical evidence for HZ planets or HZ planet-hosting stars being significantly different from the full Kepler sample with respect to these properties.

  14. Transiting Planet Search in the Kepler Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; McCauliff, Sean D.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Tenebaum, Peter; Li, Jie; Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Mile T.; Middour, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission simultaneously measures the brightness of more than 160,000 stars every 29.4 minutes over a 3.5-year mission to search for transiting planets. Detecting transits is a signal-detection problem where the signal of interest is a periodic pulse train and the predominant noise source is non-white, non-stationary (1/f) type process of stellar variability. Many stars also exhibit coherent or quasi-coherent oscillations. The detection algorithm first identifies and removes strong oscillations followed by an adaptive, wavelet-based matched filter. We discuss how we obtain super-resolution detection statistics and the effectiveness of the algorithm for Kepler flight data.

  15. Passing NASA's Planet Quest Baton from Kepler to TESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J.

    Kepler vaulted into the heavens on March 7, 2009, initiating NASAs search for Earth- size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in the habitable zone, where liquid water could exist on a rocky planetary surface. In the 4 years since Kepler began science operations, a flood of photometric data on upwards of 190,000 stars of unprecedented precision and continuity has provoked a watershed of 134+ confirmed or validated planets, 3200+ planetary candidates (most sub-Neptune in size and many compara- ble to or smaller than Earth), and a resounding revolution in asteroseismology and astrophysics. The most recent discoveries include Kepler-62 with 5 planets total of which 2 are in the habitable zone with radii of 1.4 and 1.7 Re. The focus of the mission is shifting towards how to rapidly vet the 18,000+ threshold crossing events produced with each transiting planet search, and towards those studies that will allow us to understand what the data are saying about the prevalence of planets in the solar neighborhood and throughout the galaxy. This talk will provide an overview of the science results from the Kepler Mission and the work ahead to derive the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars from the treasure trove of Kepler data. NASAs quest for exoplanets continues with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satel- lite (TESS) mission, slated for launch in May 2017 by NASAs Explorer Program. TESS will conduct an all-sky transit survey to identify the 1000 best small exoplanets in the solar neighborhood for follow up observations and characterization. TESSs targets will include all F, G, K dwarfs from +4 to +12 magnitude and all M dwarfs known within ˜200 light-years. 500,000 target stars will be observed over two years with ˜500 square degrees observed continuously for a year in each hemisphere in the James Webb Space Telescopes continuously viewable zones. Since the typical TESS target star is 5 magnitudes brighter than Kepler’s and 10 times

  16. High-order harmonics in light curves of Kepler planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Caden; Rein, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    The Kepler mission was launched in 2009 and has discovered thousands of planet candidates. In a recent paper, Esteves et al. found a periodic signal in the light curves of KOI-13 and HAT-P-7, with a frequency triple the orbital frequency of a transiting planet. We found similar harmonics in many systems with a high occurrence rate. At this time, the origins of the signal are not entirely certain. We look carefully at the possibility of errors being introduced through our data processing routines but conclude that the signal is real. The harmonics on multiples of the orbital frequency are a result of non-sinusoidal periodic signals. We speculate on their origin and generally caution that these harmonics could lead to wrong estimates of planet albedos, beaming mass estimates, and ellipsoidal variations.

  17. Underlying Architecture of Planetary Systems Based on Kepler Data: Number of Planets and Coplanarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Julia; Margot, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the underlying architecture of planetary systems by deriving the distribution of planet multiplicity (number of planets) and the distribution of orbital inclinations based on the sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission. The scope of our study included solar-like stars and planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and with radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii, and was based on Kepler planet candidates detected during Quarters 1 through 6. Our analysis improves on previous work by including all available quarters, extending to 200-day periods, and fitting models to observables such as normalized transit duration ratios that contain information on mutual orbital inclinations; these improvements lend to a deeper investigation of the intrinsic distributions of planetary systems. We created models of planetary systems with different distributions of planet multiplicity and orbital inclinations, simulated observations of these systems by Kepler, and compared the number and properties of the transits of detectable objects to actual Kepler planet detections. Based on the underlying distributions of our best-fit models, 75-80% of planetary systems have 1 or 2 planets with orbital periods less than 200 days. In addition, over 85% of planets have orbital inclinations less than 3 degrees. This high degree of coplanarity is comparable to that seen in our Solar System, with the exception of Mercury. These results provide important constraints and insights into theories of planet formation and evolution.

  18. Updating the M Dwarf Planet Occurrence Rate by Injecting and Detecting Transits in Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Charbonneau, D.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of the Kepler mission is to constrain the occurrence rate of planets around stars with a range of spectral types. Previously, we estimated the M dwarf planet occurrence rate by revising the stellar parameters of the Kepler M dwarfs and analyzing the first six quarters of Kepler data. We found that there are 0.90 Earth-size (0.5-1.4 Earth radius) planets with periods <50 days per small star. We also found an occurrence rate of 0.15 Earth-size planets within the habitable zone per small star, implying a most probable distance of 13 pc to the nearest transiting potentially habitable planet. Our previous estimate of the occurrence rate assumed 100% detection efficiency at SNR=7.1 sigma, but the occurrence rate would have been underestimated if the actual detection efficiency is lower. In order to more accurately model the detection efficiency, we have developed a customized transit search pipeline tailored for application to M dwarfs. We measure the detection efficiency of our pipeline by injecting known transit signals into Kepler light curves and attempting to recover the signals. We are currently conducting a search for additional transiting planets using our pipeline and will compare our list of detected candidates to the candidates found by the Kepler team. We will then combine our more sophisticated model for the detection threshold and the list of planet candidates found using an additional ten quarters of Kepler data with our revised stellar parameters to present an updated measurement of the planet occurrence rate for M dwarfs. Our revised measurement will help enable predictions of the population of planets that will be detected by ongoing and future planet surveys such as MEarth and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite.

  19. Kepler planet-detection mission: introduction and first results.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Caldwell, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W; Dupree, Andrea K; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Kondo, Yoji; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Meibom, Søren; Kjeldsen, Hans; Lissauer, Jack J; Monet, David G; Morrison, David; Sasselov, Dimitar; Tarter, Jill; Boss, Alan; Brownlee, Don; Owen, Toby; Buzasi, Derek; Charbonneau, David; Doyle, Laurance; Fortney, Jonathan; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Rowe, Jason; Anderson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars; Ciardi, David; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Isaacson, Howard; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra; Torres, Guillermo; Johnson, John Asher; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Bryson, Stephen T; Dotson, Jessie; Haas, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D; Quintana, Elisa V; Clarke, Bruce D; Allen, Christopher; Li, Jie; Wu, Haley; Tenenbaum, Peter; Verner, Ekaterina; Bruhweiler, Frederick; Barnes, Jason; Prsa, Andrej

    2010-02-19

    The Kepler mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet's surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars, and five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 and 1.6 Jupiter radii and orbital periods from 3.2 to 4.9 days were discovered. The density of the Neptune-sized Kepler-4b is similar to that of Neptune and GJ 436b, even though the irradiation level is 800,000 times higher. Kepler-7b is one of the lowest-density planets (approximately 0.17 gram per cubic centimeter) yet detected. Kepler-5b, -6b, and -8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.

  20. Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Caldwell, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Cochran, William D.; DeVore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W.; /Lowell Observ. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet's surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars, and five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 and 1.6 Jupiter radii and orbital periods from 3.2 to 4.9 days were discovered. The density of the Neptune-sized Kepler-4b is similar to that of Neptune and GJ 436b, even though the irradiation level is 800,000 times higher. Kepler-7b is one of the lowest-density planets ({approx}0.17 gram per cubic centimeter) yet detected. Kepler-5b, -6b, and -8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.

  1. Measuring Masses and Densities of Small Planets found by NASA's Kepler Spacecraft with Radial Velocity Measurements from Keck/HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, G.; Rowe, J.; Kepler Team

    2013-06-01

    We use the Keck telescope and HIRES spectrometer to measure the masses of Kepler planet candidates. Analysis of 22 Kepler-identified planetary systems, holding 42 transiting planets (candidates) and 8 newly discovered non-transiting planets are presented herein. Combining the planet radius measurements from Kepler with mass measurements from Keck, we constrain the bulk density of short period planets that range in size from 1.0 to 3.0 Earth radii. Extensive ground based observations made by the Kepler Follow-up Program (KFOP) have provided extensive details about each KOI. Reconnaissance spectroscopy was used to refine the stellar and planet properties of each KOI at an early stage. SME spectral analysis and asteroseismology, when available, are used to obtain the final stellar properties. Adaptive Optics and speckle imaging constrain the presence of background eclipsing binaries that could masquerade as transiting planets. By combining ground based follow-up observations with Kepler photometry, a false positive probability is calculated for each KOI. An MCMC analysis that combines both Kepler photometry and Keck radial velocity measurements determines the final orbital parameters and planet properties for each system. The resulting mass vs. radius diagram for the planets reveals that radii increase with mass monotonically, well represented by a power law for the smallest planets. This M-R relationship offers key insights about the internal composition of the planets and the division between rocky and gaseous planets.

  2. SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT KEPLER MISSION EXOPLANET CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula

    2013-07-10

    Stellar properties are measured for a large set of Kepler mission exoplanet candidate host stars. Most of these stars are fainter than 14th magnitude, in contrast to other spectroscopic follow-up studies. This sample includes many high-priority Earth-sized candidate planets. A set of model spectra are fitted to R {approx} 3000 optical spectra of 268 stars to improve estimates of T{sub eff}, log (g), and [Fe/H] for the dwarfs in the range 4750 {<=} T{sub eff} {<=} 7200 K. These stellar properties are used to find new stellar radii and, in turn, new radius estimates for the candidate planets. The result of improved stellar characteristics is a more accurate representation of this Kepler exoplanet sample and identification of promising candidates for more detailed study. This stellar sample, particularly among stars with T{sub eff} {approx}> 5200 K, includes a greater number of relatively evolved stars with larger radii than assumed by the mission on the basis of multi-color broadband photometry. About 26% of the modeled stars require radii to be revised upward by a factor of 1.35 or greater, and modeling of 87% of the stars suggest some increase in radius. The sample presented here also exhibits a change in the incidence of planets larger than 3-4 R{sub Circled-Plus} as a function of metallicity. Once [Fe/H] increases to {>=} - 0.05, large planets suddenly appear in the sample while smaller planets are found orbiting stars with a wider range of metallicity. The modeled stellar spectra, as well as an additional 84 stars of mostly lower effective temperatures, are made available to the community.

  3. A Search for Lost Planets in the Kepler Multi-planet Systems and the Discovery of the Long-period, Neptune-sized Exoplanet Kepler-150 f

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2017-04-01

    The vast majority of the 4700 confirmed planets (CPs) and planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission were first found by the Kepler pipeline. In the pipeline, after a transit signal is found, all data points associated with those transits are removed, creating a “Swiss cheese”-like light curve full of holes, which is then used for subsequent transit searches. These holes could render an additional planet undetectable (or “lost”). We examine a sample of 114 stars with 3+ CPs to evaluate the effect of this “Swiss cheesing.” A simulation determines that the probability that a transiting planet is lost due to the transit masking is low, but non-negligible, reaching a plateau at ∼3.3% lost in the period range of P = 400–500 days. We then model all planet transits and subtract out the transit signals for each star, restoring the in-transit data points, and use the Kepler pipeline to search the transit-subtracted (i.e., transit-cleaned) light curves. However, the pipeline did not discover any credible new transit signals. This demonstrates the validity and robustness of the Kepler pipeline’s choice to use transit masking over transit subtraction. However, a follow-up visual search through all the transit-subtracted data, which allows for easier visual identification of new transits, revealed the existence of a new, Neptune-sized exoplanet (Kepler-150 f) and a potential single transit of a likely false positive (FP) (Kepler-208). Kepler-150 f (P = 637.2 days, {R}{{P}}={3.64}-0.39+0.52 R⊕) is confirmed with >99.998% confidence using a combination of the planet multiplicity argument, an FP probability analysis, and a transit duration analysis.

  4. Characterization and Validation of Transiting Planets in the Kepler and TESS Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twicken, Joseph; Brownston, Lee; Catanzarite, Joseph; Clarke, Bruce; Cote, Miles; Girouard, Forrest; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean; Seader, Shawn; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wohler, Bill; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Steve; Burke, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    Light curves for Kepler targets are searched for transiting planet signatures in the Transiting Planet Search (TPS) component of the Science Operations Center (SOC) Processing Pipeline. Targets for which the detection threshold is exceeded are subsequently processed in the Data Validation (DV) Pipeline component. The primary functions of DV are to (1) characterize planets identified in the transiting planet search, (2) search for additional transiting planet signatures in light curves after modeled transit signatures have been removed, and (3) perform a comprehensive suite of diagnostic tests to aid in discrimination between true transiting planets and false positive detections. DV output products include extensive reports by target, one-page report summaries by planet candidate, and tabulated planet model fit and diagnostic test results. The DV products are employed by humans and automated systems to vet planet candidates identified in the pipeline. The final revision of the Kepler SOC codebase (9.3) was released in March 2015. It will be utilized to reprocess the complete Q1-Q17 data set later this year. At the same time, the SOC Pipeline codebase is being ported to support the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission. TESS is expected to launch in 2017 and survey the entire sky for transiting exoplanets over a period of two years. We describe the final revision of the Kepler Data Validation component with emphasis on the diagnostic tests and reports. This revision also serves as the DV baseline for TESS. The diagnostic tests exploit the flux (i.e., light curve), centroid and pixel time series associated with each target to facilitate the determination of the true origin of each purported transiting planet signature. Candidate planet detections and DV products for Kepler are delivered to the Exoplanet Archive at the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI). The Exoplanet Archive is located at exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu. Funding for the Kepler

  5. Animation: Kepler-11 and Six Orbiting Planets

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler space telescope watches a star, Kepler-11. The star appears to blink in a pattern. It dims like clockwork as six "hands" of differing size orbit around it at different rates. Kepler-1...

  6. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. VII. A false-positive rate of 35% for Kepler close-in giant candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Díaz, R. F.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Deleuil, M.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-09-01

    The false-positive probability (FPP) of Kepler transiting candidates is a key value for statistical studies of candidate properties. A previous investigation of the stellar population in the Kepler field has provided an estimate for the FPP of less than 5% for most of the candidates. We report here the results of our radial velocity observations on a sample of 46 Kepler candidates with a transit depth greater than 0.4%, orbital period less than 25 days and host star brighter than Kepler magnitude 14.7. We used the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence to establish the nature of the transiting candidates. In this sample, we found five undiluted eclipsing binaries, two brown dwarfs, six diluted eclipsing binaries, and nine new transiting planets that complement the 11 already published planets. The remaining 13 candidates were not followed-up or remain unsolved due to photon noise limitation or lack of observations. From these results we computed the FPP for Kepler close-in giant candidates to be 34.8% ± 6.5%. We aimed to investigate the variation of the FPP for giant candidates with the longer orbital periods and found that it should be constant for orbital periods between 10 and 200 days. This significantly disagrees with the previous estimates. We discuss the reasons for this discrepancy and the possible extension of this work toward smaller planet candidates. Finally, taking the false-positive rate into account, we refined the occurrence rate of hot Jupiters from the Kepler data. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Figures 7, 8, and Tables 2-19 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Phase curves of the Kepler-11 multi-planet system

    SciTech Connect

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-06-01

    The Kepler mission has allowed the detection of numerous multi-planet exosystems where the planetary orbits are relatively compact. The first such system detected was Kepler-11 which has six known planets at the present time. These kinds of systems offer unique opportunities to study constraints on planetary albedos by taking advantage of both the precision timing and photometry provided by Kepler data to monitor possible phase variations. Here we present a case study of the Kepler-11 system in which we investigate the phase modulation of the system as the planets orbit the host star. We provide predictions of maximum phase modulation where the planets are simultaneously close to superior conjunction. We use corrected Kepler data for Q1-Q17 to determine the significance of these phase peaks. We find that data quarters where maximum phase peaks occur are better fit by a phase model than a 'null hypothesis' model.

  8. Kepler Mission to Detect Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    Kepler Mission to detect Earth-like planets in our Milky Way galaxy was approved by NASA in December 2001 for a 4-5 year mission. The launch is planned in about 5 years. The Kepler observatory will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit. The unique feature of the Kepler Mission is its ability to detect Earth-like planets orbiting around solar-type stars at a distance similar to that of Earth (from our Sun); such an orbit could provide an environment suitable for supporting life as we know it. The Kepler observatory accomplishes this feat by looking for the transits of planetary object in front of their suns; Kepler has a photometric precision of 10E-5 (0.00001) to achieve such detections. Other ongoing planetary detection programs (based mostly on a technique that looks for the shifting of spectral lines of the primary star due to its planetary companions' motions around it) have detected massive planets (with masses in the range of Jupiter); such massive planets are not considered suitable for supporting life. If our current theories for the formation of planetary systems are valid, we expect to detect about 50 Earth-like planets during Kepler's 4-year mission (assuming a random distribution of the planetary orbital inclinations with respect to the line of sight from Kepler). The number of detection will increase about 640 planets if the planets to be detected are Jupiter-sized.

  9. Kepler Mission to Detect Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    2003-01-01

    Kepler Mission to detect Earth-like planets in our Milky Way galaxy was approved by NASA in December 2001 for a 4-5 year mission. The launch is planned in about 5 years. The Kepler observatory will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit. The unique feature of the Kepler Mission is its ability to detect Earth-like planets orbiting around solar-type stars at a distance similar to that of Earth (from our Sun); such an orbit could provide an environment suitable for supporting life as we know it. The Kepler observatory accomplishes this feat by looking for the transits of planetary object in front of their suns; Kepler has a photometric precision of 10E-5 (0.00001) to achieve such detections. Other ongoing planetary detection programs (based mostly on a technique that looks for the shifting of spectral lines of the primary star due to its planetary companions' motions around it) have detected massive planets (with masses in the range of Jupiter); such massive planets are not considered suitable for supporting life. If our current theories for the formation of planetary systems are valid, we expect to detect about 50 Earth-like planets during Kepler's 4-year mission (assuming a random distribution of the planetary orbital inclinations with respect to the line of sight from Kepler). The number of detection will increase about 640 planets if the planets to be detected are Jupiter-sized.

  10. Kepler Planet Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morrison, David; Rowe, Jason; Bryson, Stephen T.; Dotson, Jessie; Haas,Michael; Gautier, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size and rocky planets in and near the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars. The HZ is defined to be the region of space where a rocky planet could maintain liquid water on its surface. Kepler is the 10th competitively-selected Discovery Mission and was launched on March 6, 2009. Since completing its commissioning, Kepler has observed over 156,000 stars simultaneously and near continuously to search for planets that periodically pass in front of their host star (transit). The photometric precision is approximately 23 ppm for 50% of the 12th magnitude dwarf stars for an integration period of 6.5 hours. During the first 3 months of operation the photometer detected transit-like signatures from more than 200 stars. Careful examination shows that many of these events are false-positives such as small stars orbiting large stars or blends of target stars with eclipsing binary stars. Ground-based follow-up observations confirm the discovery of five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 andl.6 Jupiter radii (R(sub J)) and orbital periods ranging from 3.2 to 4.9 days. Ground-based observations with the Keck 1, Hobby-Ebberly, Hale, WIYN, MMT, Tillinghast, Shane, and Nordic Optical Telescopes are used to vet the planetary candidates and measure the masses of the putative planets. Observations of occultations and phase variations of hot, short-period planets such as HT-P-7b provide a probe of atmospheric properties. Asteroseismic analysis already shows the presence of p-mode oscillations in several stars. Such observations will be used to measure the mean stellar density and infer the stellar size and age. For stars too dim to permit asteroseismology, observations of the centroid motion of target stars will be used to measure the parallax and be combined with photometric measurements to estimate stellar sizes. Four open clusters are being observed to determine stellar rotation rates as a function of age and

  11. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept. /NASA, Ames

    2010-06-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTV) due to gravitational interactions - though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  12. FIVE KEPLER TARGET STARS THAT SHOW MULTIPLE TRANSITING EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-12-10

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities-two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  13. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. V. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION CANDIDATES IN THE FIRST SIXTEEN MONTHS FROM POLYNOMIAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; and others

    2012-09-10

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased ({approx}68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  14. Chaos in Kepler's Multiple Planet Systems and K2s Observations of the Atmospheres of Uranus Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2016-01-01

    More than one-third of the 4700 planet candidates found by NASA's Kepler spacecraft during its prime mission are associated with target stars that have more than one planet candidate, and such "multis" account for the vast majority of candidates that have been verified as true planets. The large number of multis tells us that flat multiplanet systems like our Solar System are common. Virtually all of the candidate planetary systems are stable, as tested by numerical integrations that assume a physically motivated mass-radius relationship, but some of the systems lie in chaotic regions close to instability. The characteristics of some of the most interesting confirmed Kepler multi-planet systems will be discussed. The Kepler spacecraft's 'second life' in theK2 mission has allowed it to obtain long time-series observations of Solar System targets, including the giant planets Uranus & Neptune. These observations show variability caused by the chaotic weather patterns on Uranus & Neptune.

  15. Kepler: The Search for Earth-Size Planets Begins

    NASA Video Gallery

    Since its launch in March, 2009, the Kepler Mission has announced the discovery of 9 confirmed exoplanets (or planets outside our solar system). This video explores how the team works to combine ph...

  16. NASA's Kepler Discovers Its Smallest 'Habitable Zone' Planets to Date

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary systems that include three super-Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone," the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature o...

  17. NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Multiple Planets Orbiting Twin Suns

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered the first transiting circumbinary system -- multiple planets orbiting two suns -- 4,900 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Cygnus, proving that more t...

  18. Robotic laser adaptive optics imaging of 715 Kepler exoplanet candidates using Robo-AO

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Baranec, Christoph; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Johnson, John Asher; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2014-08-10

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are 'coincident multiple' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  19. Robotic Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates Using Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Ziegler, Carl; Johnson, John Asher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are "coincident multiple" systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  20. THE FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER AND THE OCCURRENCE OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Christiansen, Jessie; Jenkins, Jon M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-04-01

    The Kepler mission is uniquely suited to study the frequencies of extrasolar planets. This goal requires knowledge of the incidence of false positives such as eclipsing binaries in the background of the targets, or physically bound to them, which can mimic the photometric signal of a transiting planet. We perform numerical simulations of the Kepler targets and of physical companions or stars in the background to predict the occurrence of astrophysical false positives detectable by the mission. Using real noise level estimates, we compute the number and characteristics of detectable eclipsing pairs involving main-sequence stars and non-main-sequence stars or planets, and we quantify the fraction of those that would pass the Kepler candidate vetting procedure. By comparing their distribution with that of the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) detected during the first six quarters of operation of the spacecraft, we infer the false positive rate of Kepler and study its dependence on spectral type, candidate planet size, and orbital period. We find that the global false positive rate of Kepler is 9.4%, peaking for giant planets (6-22 R{sub Circled-Plus }) at 17.7%, reaching a low of 6.7% for small Neptunes (2-4 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and increasing again for Earth-size planets (0.8-1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus }) to 12.3%. Most importantly, we also quantify and characterize the distribution and rate of occurrence of planets down to Earth size with no prior assumptions on their frequency, by subtracting from the population of actual Kepler candidates our simulated population of astrophysical false positives. We find that 16.5% {+-} 3.6% of main-sequence FGK stars have at least one planet between 0.8 and 1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus} with orbital periods up to 85 days. This result is a significant step toward the determination of eta-earth, the occurrence of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of their parent stars. There is no significant dependence of the rates of planet

  1. A population of planetary systems from Kepler data that are characterized by short-period, Earth-sized planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    From an analysis of the Quarter 1-17 Kepler planet candidate catalog we compare systems with single transiting planets to systems with multiple transiting planets. We find a distinct population of exoplanetary systems that is characterized by short-period, Earth sized planets. This difference in system architecture likely indicates a different branch in the system's formation or dynamical evolution relative to the typical Kepler system. We estimate that at least 17% of systems containing a hot Earth planet are members of this population. When we account for detection efficiency, these systems occur with a frequency similar to the hot Jupiters.

  2. Kepler-1647b: The Largest and Longest-period Kepler Transiting Circumbinary Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin B.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Quarles, Billy; Short, Donald R.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Gregorio, Joao; Hinse, Tobias C.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Kane, Stephen; Kull, Ilya; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Müller, Tobias W. A.; Pepper, Joshua; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Windmiller, Gur; Borucki, William J.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of known short-period planets orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet revolving around the eclipsing binary system Kepler-1647 has a very long orbital period (˜1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission lifetime. Due to the singular configuration of the system, Kepler-1647b is not only the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing, but also one of the longest-period transiting planets. With a radius of 1.06 ± 0.01 R Jup, it is also the largest CBP to date. The planet produced three transits in the light curve of Kepler-1647 (one of them during an eclipse, creating a syzygy) and measurably perturbed the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to measure its mass, 1.52 ± 0.65 M Jup. The planet revolves around an 11-day period eclipsing binary consisting of two solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined, mildly eccentric (e bin = 0.16), spin-synchronized orbit. Despite having an orbital period three times longer than Earth’s, Kepler-1647b is in the conservative habitable zone of the binary star throughout its orbit.

  3. Architecture of Kepler's multi-transiting systems. II. New investigations with twice as many candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li, Jie; Morris, Robert L.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Geary, John C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Steffen, Jason H.; Agol, Eric; Ciardi, David R.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Shporer, Avi; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report on the orbital architectures of Kepler systems having multiple-planet candidates identified in the analysis of data from the first six quarters of Kepler data and reported by Batalha et al. (2013). These data show 899 transiting planet candidates in 365 multiple-planet systems and provide a powerful means to study the statistical properties of planetary systems. Using a generic mass-radius relationship, we find that only two pairs of planets in these candidate systems (out of 761 pairs total) appear to be on Hill-unstable orbits, indicating ∼96% of the candidate planetary systems are correctly interpreted as true systems. We find that planet pairs show little statistical preference to be near mean-motion resonances. We identify an asymmetry in the distribution of period ratios near first-order resonances (e.g., 2:1, 3:2), with an excess of planet pairs lying wide of resonance and relatively few lying narrow of resonance. Finally, based upon the transit duration ratios of adjacent planets in each system, we find that the interior planet tends to have a smaller transit impact parameter than the exterior planet does. This finding suggests that the mode of the mutual inclinations of planetary orbital planes is in the range 1.°0-2.°2, for the packed systems of small planets probed by these observations.

  4. A survey for very short-period planets in the Kepler data

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Brian; Stark, Christopher C.; Chambers, John; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Deming, Drake

    2013-12-20

    We conducted a search for very short-period transiting objects in the publicly available Kepler data set. Our preliminary survey has revealed four planetary candidates, all with orbital periods less than 12 hr. We have analyzed the data for these candidates using photometric models that include transit light curves, ellipsoidal variations, and secondary eclipses to constrain the candidates' radii, masses, and effective temperatures. Even with masses of only a few Earth masses, the candidates' short periods mean that they may induce stellar radial velocity signals (a few m s{sup –1}) detectable by currently operating facilities. The origins of such short-period planets are unclear, but we discuss the possibility that they may be the remnants of disrupted hot Jupiters. Whatever their origins, if confirmed as planets, these candidates would be among the shortest-period planets ever discovered. Such planets would be particularly amenable to discovery by the planned TESS mission.

  5. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates XI. Kepler-412 system: probing the properties of a new inflated hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Santerne, A.; Barros, S. C. C.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Bruno, G.; Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Hot Jupiters are still a fascinating exoplanet population that presents a diversity we are still far from understanding. High-precision photometric observations combined with radial velocity measurements give us a unique opportunity to constrain their properties better, on both their internal structure and their atmospheric bulk properties. Aims: We initiated a follow-up program of Kepler-released planet candidates with the goal of confirming the planetary nature of a number of them through radial velocity measurements. For those that successfully passed the radial velocity screening, we furthermore performed a detailed exploration of their properties to characterize the systems. As a byproduct, these systematic observations allow us to consolidate the exoplanets' occurrence rate. Methods: We performed a complete analysis of the Kepler-412 system, listed as planet candidate KOI-202 in the Kepler catalog, by combining the Kepler observations from Q1 to Q15, to ground-based spectroscopic observations that allowed us to derive radial velocity measurements, together with the host-star parameters and properties. We also analyzed the light curve to derive the star's rotation period and the phase function of the planet, including the secondary eclipse. Results: We secured the planetary nature of Kepler-412b. We found the planet has a mass of 0.939 ± 0.085MJup and a radius of 1.325 ± 0.043RJup, which makes it a member of the bloated giant subgroup. It orbits its G3 V host star in 1.72 days. The system has an isochronal age of 5.1 Gyr, consistent with its moderate stellar activity as observed in the Kepler light curve and the rotation of the star of 17.2 ± 1.6 days. From the detected secondary we derived the day-side temperature as a function of the geometric albedo. We estimated that the geometrical albedo Ag should be between 0.094 ± 0.015 and 0.013+0.017-0.013 and the brightness of the day side 2380 ± 40 K. The measured night-side flux corresponds to a

  6. The Kepler Mission: A Photometric Search for Earthlike Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Borucki, William; Koch, David; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    If Earth lies in or near the orbital plane of an extrasolar planet, that planet passes in front of the disk of its star once each orbit as viewed from Earth. Precise photometry can reveal such transits, which can be distinguished from rotationally-modulated starspots and intrinsic stellar variability by their periodicity, square-well shapes and relative spectral neutrality. Transit observations would provide the size and orbital period of the detected planet. Although geometrical considerations limit the fraction of planets detectable by this technique, many stars can be surveyed within the field of view of one telescope, so transit photometry is quite efficient. Scintillation in and variability of Earth's atmosphere limit photometric precision to roughly one-thousandth of a magnitude, allowing detection of transits by Jupiter-sized planets but not by Earth-sized planets from the ground. The COROT spacecraft will be able to detect Uranus-sized planets orbiting near stars. The Kepler Mission, which is being proposed to NASA's Discovery Program this year, will have a photometer with a larger aperture (1 meter) than will COROT, so it will be able to detect transits by planets as small as Earth. Moreover, the Kepler mission will examine the same star field for four years, allowing confirmation of planets with orbital periods of a year. If the Sun's planetary system is typical for single stars, Kepler should detect approximately 480 terrestrial planets. Assuming the statistics from radial velocity surveys are typical, Kepler should also detect transits of 150 inner giant planets and reflected light variations of 1400 giant planets with orbital periods of less than one week.

  7. Architecture of Kepler's Multi-transiting Systems: II. New investigations with twice as many candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; Steffen, Jason H.; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li, Jie; Morehead, Robert C.; Morris, Robert L.; Shporer, Avi; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Still, Martin; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2014-07-16

    Having discovered 885 planet candidates in 361 multiple-planet systems, Kepler has made transits a powerful method for studying the statistics of planetary systems. The orbits of only two pairs of planets in these candidate systems are apparently unstable. This indicates that a high percentage of the candidate systems are truly planets orbiting the same star, motivating physical investigations of the population. Pairs of planets in this sample are typically not in orbital resonances. However, pairs with orbital period ratios within a few percent of a first-order resonance (e.g. 2:1, 3:2) prefer orbital spacings just wide of the resonance and avoid spacings just narrow of the resonance. Finally, we investigate mutual inclinations based on transit duration ratios. We infer that the inner planets of pairs tend to have a smaller impact parameter than their outer companions, suggesting these planetary systems are typically coplanar to within a few degrees.

  8. The Frequency of Habitable Planets Around Small Stars and the Characterization of Planets Orbiting Bright Kepler Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressing, Courtney D.

    2015-01-01

    My thesis focuses on the frequency, detectability, and composition of small planets. I revised the parameters of the smallest Kepler main-sequence dwarf stars using Dartmouth Stellar Models and wrote a pipeline to search for planets in the full four-year Kepler data set. I characterized the completeness of my pipeline by injecting transiting planets and recording the fraction recovered. I refined the planet candidate sample by inspecting follow-up observations of planet host stars and correcting for transit depth dilution due to nearby stars. Accounting for possible false positive contamination, I estimated an occurrence rate of 0.2-0.8 potentially habitable planets per M dwarf; the variation in this estimated is dominated by the choice of habitable zone boundaries. For orbital periods <50 days, I measured an occurrence rate of 0.5 Earth-size (1-1.5 REarth) planets per small star.Using these results, I predicted the population of small planets accessible to current and future planet surveys. I supplemented our small star planet occurrence rate with estimates of the rate for FGK stars from the literature. I found that the nearest transiting, potentially habitable Earth-size planet is likely 10 +/- 4 pc away.I also conducted an adaptive optics imaging survey of 87 bright Kepler target stars with ARIES at the MMT to search for nearby stars that might be diluting the depths of the planetary transits. I identified visual companions within 1' for 5 targets, between 1' and 2' for 7 targets, and between 2' and 4' for 15 stars. For all stars observed, we placed limits on the presence of undetected nearby stars.Finally, I collaborated with the HARPS-N consortium to conduct an intensive observing campaign with the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma, Spain. We studied the Kepler-93 system, which contains a 1.4-Earth-radius planet in a 4.7-day orbit. Kepler-93b is a valuable addition to the exoplanet mass-radius diagram, as the physical

  9. Kepler Planet Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, D.; Basri, G.; Batalha, N. M.; Brown, T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Caldwell, J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cochran, W.; DeVore, E.; Dunham, E.; Dupree, A.; Gautier, T.; Geary, J.; Gilliland, R.; Gould, A.; Howell, S.; Jenkins, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Kondo, Y.; Latham, D.; Lissauer, J.; Marcy, G.; Meibom, S.; Monet, D.; Morrison, D.; Sasselov, D.; Tarter, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size and terrestrial size planets in and near the HZ of solar-like stars. It was competitively selected as Discovery Mission #10 and launched on March 6, 2009. Since completion of commissioning, it has continuously observed over 145,000 main sequence stars. The photometric precision reaches 20 ppm for 12th magnitude stars on the least noisy detectors in 6.5 hours. During the first month of operation, the photometer detected transit-like signatures from over 100 stars. Careful examination of these events shows many of them to be false-positives such as background eclipsing binaries. However ground-based follow up observations confirm the discovery of exoplanets with sizes ranging from 0.6 Rj to1.5Rj and orbital periods ranging from 3 to 9 days. Observations at Keck, Hobby-Eberly, Harlan-Smith, WIYN, MMT, Tillighast, Shane, and Nordic Optic telescopes are vetting many of the candidates and measuring their masses. Discovery of the HAT-P7b occultation will be used to derive atmospheric properties and demonstrates the precision necessary to detect Earth-size planets. Asteroseismic analyses of several stars show the presence of p-mode oscillations that can be used to determine stellar size and age. This effort is being organized by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium at Aarhus University in Denmark. Stellar parallaxes are determined from the centroid motion of the stellar images and will be combined with photometric measurements to get the sizes of stars too dim for asteroseismic measurement. Four open clusters are being observed to determine rotation rates with stellar age and spectral type. Many types of stellar variability are observed with unprecedented precision and over long continuous time periods. Examples of many of these discoveries are presented. Funding by the Exoplanet Exploration Program of the NASA Astrophysics Division is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. On the Nature of Small Planets around the Coolest Kepler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sébastien

    2012-02-01

    We constrain the densities of Earth- to Neptune-size planets around very cool (Te = 3660-4660 K) Kepler stars by comparing 1202 Keck/HIRES radial velocity measurements of 150 nearby stars to a model based on Kepler candidate planet radii and a power-law mass-radius relation. Our analysis is based on the presumption that the planet populations around the two sets of stars are the same. The model can reproduce the observed distribution of radial velocity variation over a range of parameter values, but, for the expected level of Doppler systematic error, the highest Kolmogorov-Smirnov probabilities occur for a power-law index α ≈ 4, indicating that rocky-metal planets dominate the planet population in this size range. A single population of gas-rich, low-density planets with α = 2 is ruled out unless our Doppler errors are >=5 m s-1, i.e., much larger than expected based on observations and stellar chromospheric emission. If small planets are a mix of γ rocky planets (α = 3.85) and 1 - γ gas-rich planets (α = 2), then γ > 0.5 unless Doppler errors are >=4 m s-1. Our comparison also suggests that Kepler's detection efficiency relative to ideal calculations is less than unity. One possible source of incompleteness is target stars that are misclassified subgiants or giants, for which the transits of small planets would be impossible to detect. Our results are robust to systematic effects, and plausible errors in the estimated radii of Kepler stars have only moderate impact. Some data were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and made possible by the financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  11. ON THE NATURE OF SMALL PLANETS AROUND THE COOLEST KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Lepine, Sebastien

    2012-02-10

    We constrain the densities of Earth- to Neptune-size planets around very cool (T{sub e} = 3660-4660 K) Kepler stars by comparing 1202 Keck/HIRES radial velocity measurements of 150 nearby stars to a model based on Kepler candidate planet radii and a power-law mass-radius relation. Our analysis is based on the presumption that the planet populations around the two sets of stars are the same. The model can reproduce the observed distribution of radial velocity variation over a range of parameter values, but, for the expected level of Doppler systematic error, the highest Kolmogorov-Smirnov probabilities occur for a power-law index {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 4, indicating that rocky-metal planets dominate the planet population in this size range. A single population of gas-rich, low-density planets with {alpha} = 2 is ruled out unless our Doppler errors are {>=}5 m s{sup -1}, i.e., much larger than expected based on observations and stellar chromospheric emission. If small planets are a mix of {gamma} rocky planets ({alpha} = 3.85) and 1 - {gamma} gas-rich planets ({alpha} = 2), then {gamma} > 0.5 unless Doppler errors are {>=}4 m s{sup -1}. Our comparison also suggests that Kepler's detection efficiency relative to ideal calculations is less than unity. One possible source of incompleteness is target stars that are misclassified subgiants or giants, for which the transits of small planets would be impossible to detect. Our results are robust to systematic effects, and plausible errors in the estimated radii of Kepler stars have only moderate impact.

  12. Very low density planets around Kepler-51 revealed with transit timing variations and an anomaly similar to a planet-planet eclipse event

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kento

    2014-03-01

    We present an analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) in the multi-transiting planetary system around Kepler-51 (KOI-620). This system consists of two confirmed transiting planets, Kepler-51b (P {sub b} = 45.2 days) and Kepler-51c (P {sub c} = 85.3 days), and one transiting planet candidate KOI-620.02 (P {sub 02} = 130.2 days), which lie close to a 1: 2: 3 resonance chain. Our analysis shows that their TTVs are consistently explained by the three-planet model, and constrains their masses as M{sub b}=2.1{sub −0.8}{sup +1.5} M{sub ⊕} (Kepler-51b), M {sub c} = 4.0 ± 0.4 M {sub ⊕} (Kepler-51c), and M {sub 02} = 7.6 ± 1.1 M {sub ⊕} (KOI-620.02), thus confirming KOI-620.02 as a planet in this system. The masses inferred from the TTVs are rather small compared to the planetary radii based on the stellar density and planet-to-star radius ratios determined from the transit light curves. Combining these estimates, we find that all three planets in this system have densities among the lowest determined, ρ {sub p} ≲ 0.05 g cm{sup –3}. With this feature, the Kepler-51 system serves as another example of low-density compact multi-transiting planetary systems. We also identify a curious feature in the archived Kepler light curve during the double transit of Kepler-51b and KOI-620.02, which could be explained by their overlapping on the stellar disk (a planet-planet eclipse). If this is really the case, the sky-plane inclination of KOI-620.02's orbit relative to that of Kepler-51b is given by ΔΩ=−25.3{sub −6.8}{sup +6.2} deg, implying significant misalignment of their orbital planes. This interpretation, however, seems unlikely because such an event that is consistent with all of the observations is found to be exceedingly rare.

  13. Planets in Wide Binaries from Kepler: Ages, Stability and Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Kolby L.; West, Andrew A.; Janes, Kenneth; Dhital, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Using the Kepler Input Catalog and the fourth U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog, we have identified 1509 common proper motion (CPM) binaries in the Kepler field of view, of which a small subset host planet candidates, or Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). We have verified the fidelity of the CPM pairs using a Galactic model and follow-up astrometric observations. We present 73 KOIs distributed over 58 CPM pairs and highlight the first wide binary system (separation > 1000 AU) where both stellar components host at least one KOI. Because our binary sample was initially targeted for a gyrochronology analysis, we also present measurements of stellar rotation periods and preliminary estimates of stellar (and planetary) ages. We use these extrapolated planetary ages to investigate longterm planet stability in wide binaries and test potential formation and evolution scenarios of these dynamically complex systems.

  14. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Ragozzine, Darin; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  15. FORMING CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF KEPLER-34

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Paardekooper, S.; Baruteau, C.; Thebault, P.

    2014-02-10

    Observations of circumbinary planets orbiting very close to the central stars have shown that planet formation may occur in a very hostile environment, where the gravitational pull from the binary should be very strong on the primordial protoplanetary disk. Elevated impact velocities and orbit crossings from eccentricity oscillations are the primary contributors to high energy, potentially destructive collisions that inhibit the growth of aspiring planets. In this work, we conduct high-resolution, inter-particle gravity enabled N-body simulations to investigate the feasibility of planetesimal growth in the Kepler-34 system. We improve upon previous work by including planetesimal disk self-gravity and an extensive collision model to accurately handle inter-planetesimal interactions. We find that super-catastrophic erosion events are the dominant mechanism up to and including the orbital radius of Kepler-34(AB)b, making in situ growth unlikely. It is more plausible that Kepler-34(AB)b migrated from a region beyond 1.5 AU. Based on the conclusions that we have made for Kepler-34, it seems likely that all of the currently known circumbinary planets have also migrated significantly from their formation location with the possible exception of Kepler-47(AB)c.

  16. They are small worlds after all: revised properties of Kepler M dwarf stars and their planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, E.; Mann, A. W.; Kraus, A. L.; Ireland, M.

    2016-04-01

    We classified the reddest (r - J > 2.2) stars observed by the NASA Kepler mission into main-sequence dwarf or evolved giant stars and determined the properties of 4216 M dwarfs based on a comparison of available photometry with that of nearby calibrator stars, as well as available proper motions and spectra. We revised the properties of candidate transiting planets using the stellar parameters, high-resolution imaging to identify companion stars, and, in the case of binaries, fitting light curves to identify the likely planet host. In 49 of 54 systems, we validated the primary as the host star. We inferred the intrinsic distribution of M dwarf planets using the method of iterative Monte Carlo simulation. We compared several models of planet orbital geometry and clustering and found that one where planets are exponentially distributed and almost precisely coplanar best describes the distribution of multiplanet systems. We determined that Kepler M dwarfs host an average of 2.2 ± 0.3 planets with radii of 1-4 R⊕ and orbital periods of 1.5-180 d. The radius distribution peaks at ˜1.2 R⊕ and is essentially zero at 4 R⊕, although we identify three giant planet candidates other than the previously confirmed Kepler-45b. There is suggestive but not significant evidence that the radius distribution varies with orbital period. The distribution with logarithmic orbital period is flat except for a decline for orbits less than a few days. 12 candidate planets, including two Jupiter-size objects, experience an irradiance below the threshold level for a runaway greenhouse on an Earth-like planet and are thus in a `habitable zone'.

  17. PREDICTING A THIRD PLANET IN THE KEPLER-47 CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hinse, Tobias C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Kostov, Veselin B.; Goździewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-20

    We have studied the possibility that a third circumbinary planet in the Kepler-47 planetary system is the source of the single unexplained transiting event reported during the discovery of these planets. We applied the MEGNO technique to identify regions in the phase space where a third planet can maintain quasi-periodic orbits, and assessed the long-term stability of the three-planet system by integrating the entire five bodies (binary + planets) for 10 Myr. We identified several stable regions between the two known planets as well as a region beyond the orbit of Kepler-47c where the orbit of the third planet could be stable. To constrain the orbit of this planet, we used the measured duration of the unexplained transit event (∼4.15 hr) and compared that with the transit duration of the third planet in an ensemble of stable orbits. To remove the degeneracy among the orbits with similar transit durations, we considered the planet to be in a circular orbit and calculated its period analytically. The latter places an upper limit of 424 days on the orbital period of the third planet. Our analysis suggests that if the unexplained transit event detected during the discovery of the Kepler-47 circumbinary system is due to a planetary object, this planet will be in a low eccentricity orbit with a semi-major axis smaller than 1.24 AU. Further constraining of the mass and orbital elements of this planet requires a re-analysis of the entire currently available data, including those obtained post-announcement of the discovery of this system. We present details of our methodology and discuss the implication of the results.

  18. Spacing of Kepler Planets: Sculpting by Dynamical Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Bonan; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-07-01

    We study the orbital architecture of multi-planet systems detected by the Kepler transit mission using N-body simulations, focusing on the orbital spacing between adjacent planets in systems showing four or more transiting planets. We find that the observed spacings are tightly clustered around 12 mutual Hill radii, when transit geometry and sensitivity limits are accounted for. In comparison, dynamical integrations reveal that the minimum spacing required for systems of similar masses to survive dynamical instability for as long as 1 billion yr is ∼10 if all orbits are circular and coplanar and ∼12 if planetary orbits have eccentricities of ∼0.02 (a value suggested by studies of planet transit-time variations). This apparent coincidence, between the observed spacing and the theoretical stability threshold, leads us to propose that typical planetary systems were formed with even tighter spacing, but most, except for the widest ones, have undergone dynamical instability, and are pared down to a more anemic version of their former selves, with fewer planets and larger spacings. So while the high-multiple systems (five or more transiting planets) are primordial systems that remain stable, the single or double planetary systems, abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission, may be the descendants of more closely packed high-multiple systems. If this hypothesis is correct, we infer that the formation environment of Kepler systems should be more dissipative than that of the terrestrial planets.

  19. Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-19

    Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is the region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet?s surface. During the first 6... planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on a planet’s surface. During the first 6 weeks of observations, Kepler monitored 156,000 stars...inward migration of a giant planet is expected to remove inner, smaller planets by scattering them into the star or out of the planetary system, a second

  20. THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS: LUMINOSITY CLASS, PLANET OCCURRENCE, AND PLANET-METALLICITY RELATION OF THE COOLEST KEPLER TARGET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Lepine, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the stellar parameters of late K- and early M-type Kepler target stars. We obtain medium-resolution visible spectra of 382 stars with K{sub P} - J > 2 ({approx_equal}K5 and later spectral type). We determine luminosity class by comparing the strength of gravity-sensitive indices (CaH, K I, Ca II, and Na I) to their strength in a sample of stars of known luminosity class. We find that giants constitute 96% {+-} 1% of the bright (K{sub P} < 14) Kepler target stars, and 7% {+-} 3% of dim (K{sub P} > 14) stars, significantly higher than fractions based on the stellar parameters quoted in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC effective temperatures are systematically (110{sup +15}{sub -35} K) higher than temperatures we determine from fitting our spectra to PHOENIX stellar models. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the Kepler exoplanet candidate population, we find a planet occurrence of 0.36 {+-} 0.08 when giant stars are properly removed, somewhat higher than when a KIC log g > 4 criterion is used (0.27 {+-} 0.05). Last, we show that there is no significant difference in g - r color (a probe of metallicity) between late-type Kepler stars with transiting Earth-to-Neptune-size exoplanet candidates and dwarf stars with no detected transits. We show that a previous claimed offset between these two populations is most likely an artifact of including a large number of misidentified giants.

  1. Detecting planets in Kepler lightcurves using methods developed for CoRoT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Pätzold, M.

    2011-10-01

    Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the second space telescope dedicated to the search for extrasolar planets. NASA released 150.000 lightcurves to the public in 2010 and announced that Kepler has found 1.235 candidates. The Rhenish Institute for Environmental Research (RIU-PF) is one of the detection groups from the CoRoT space mission. RIU-PF developed the software package EXOTRANS for the detection of transits in stellar lightcurves. EXOTRANS is designed for the fast automated processing of huge amounts of data and was easily adapted to the analysis of Kepler lightcurves. The use of different techniques and philosophies helps to find more candidates and to rule out others. We present the analysis of the Kepler lightcurves with EXOTRANS. Results of our filter (trend, harmonic) and detection (dcBLS) techniques are compared with the techniques used by Kepler (PDC, TPS). The different approaches to rule out false positives are discussed and additional candidates found by EXOTRANS are presented.

  2. Implications for the False-positive Rate in Kepler Planet Systems from Transit Duration Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Confirming transiting exoplanet candidates through traditional follow-up methods is challenging, especially for faint host stars. Most of Kepler's validated planets relied on statistical methods to separate true planets from false-positives. Multiple transiting planet systems (MTPS) have been previously shown to have low false-positive rates and over 851 planets in MTPSs have been statistically validated so far (Lissauer et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2014). We show that the period-normalized transit duration ratio (ξ) offers additional information that can be used to establish the planetary nature of these systems. We briefly discuss the observed distribution of ξ for the Q1-Q16 Kepler Candidate Search. We also utilize ξ to develop a Bayesian statistical framework combined with Monte Carlo methods to determine which pairs of planet candidates in a MTPS are consistent with the planet hypothesis for a sample of 676 MTPSs that include both candidate and confirmed planets. This analysis proves to be efficient and advantageous in that it only requires catalog-level bulk candidate properties and galactic population modeling to compute the probabilities of a myriad of stellar blend scenarios, without needing additional observational follow-up. Our results agree with the previous results of a low false-positive rate in the Kepler MTPSs. Out of our sample of 1,358 pairs of candidates, we find that about 100 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star, over 800 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star or another star blended in the photometric aperture. Further more, we find that well over a 1,000 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 to be planetary in nature, either orbiting the same star or separately orbiting two different stars in the aperture. This implies, independently of any other estimates, that most of the MTPSs detected by Kepler are very likely to be planetary in

  3. Characteristics of Kepler Planetary Candidates Based on the First Data Set

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-20

    include five possible multi- planet systems. One of these has two Neptune-size (2.3 and 2.5 Earth radius) candidates with near-resonant periods. Key words... planets and satellites: detection – surveys Online-only material: color figures 1. INTRODUCTION Kepler is a Discovery-class mission designed to...determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-type stars. The instrument consists of a 0.95 m aperture telescope

  4. Prevalence and Properties of Planets from Kepler and K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petigura, Erik; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew; Crossfield, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Sinukoff, Evan

    2015-12-01

    Discoveries from the prime Kepler mission demonstrated that small planets (< 3 Earth-radii) are common outcomes of planet formation around G, K, and M stars. While Kepler detected many such planets, all but a handful orbit faint, distant stars, which are not amenable to precise follow up measurements. NASA's K2 mission has the potential to increase the number of known small, transiting planets around bright stars by an order of magnitude. I will present the latest results from my team's efforts to detect, confirm, and characterize planets using the K2 mission. I will highlight some of the progress and remaining challenges involved with generating denoised K2 photometry and with detecting planets in the presence of severe instrument systematics. Among our recent discoveries are the K2-3 and K2-21 planetary systems: M dwarfs hosting multiple transiting Earth-size planets with low equilibrium temperatures. These systems offer a convenient laboratory for studying the bulk composition and atmospheric properties of small planets receiving low levels of stellar irradiation, where processes such as mass loss by photo-evaporation could play a weaker role.

  5. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Kraus, Adam

    2013-06-10

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6{sigma} confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  6. THE NEPTUNE-SIZED CIRCUMBINARY PLANET KEPLER-38b

    SciTech Connect

    Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Short, Donald R.; Windmiller, Gur; Carter, Joshua A.; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Brugamyer, Erik; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ford, Eric B.; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Haghighipour, Nader; and others

    2012-10-20

    We discuss the discovery and characterization of the circumbinary planet Kepler-38b. The stellar binary is single-lined, with a period of 18.8 days, and consists of a moderately evolved main-sequence star (M{sub A} = 0.949 {+-} 0.059 M {sub Sun} and R{sub A} = 1.757 {+-} 0.034 R {sub Sun }) paired with a low-mass star (M{sub B} = 0.249 {+-} 0.010 M {sub Sun} and R{sub B} = 0.2724 {+-} 0.0053 R {sub Sun }) in a mildly eccentric (e = 0.103) orbit. A total of eight transits due to a circumbinary planet crossing the primary star were identified in the Kepler light curve (using Kepler Quarters 1-11), from which a planetary period of 105.595 {+-} 0.053 days can be established. A photometric dynamical model fit to the radial velocity curve and Kepler light curve yields a planetary radius of 4.35 {+-} 0.11 R {sub Circled-Plus }, or equivalently 1.12 {+-} 0.03 R {sub Nep}. Since the planet is not sufficiently massive to observably alter the orbit of the binary from Keplerian motion, we can only place an upper limit on the mass of the planet of 122 M {sub Circled-Plus} (7.11 M {sub Nep} or equivalently 0.384 M {sub Jup}) at 95% confidence. This upper limit should decrease as more Kepler data become available.

  7. Kepler Planet Masses and Eccentricities from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler mission’s census of transiting exoplanets has shown that planets between one and four times the radius of Earth with short orbital periods are extremely common. Given their small sizes, the properties of these planets can be difficult or impossible to constrain via radial velocity observations. Mutual gravitational interactions in multi-planet systems induce variations in the arrival times of planets’ transits. These variations can used to probe planets’ masses and eccentricities, which in turn constrain their compositions and formation histories. I will discuss the results of our analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of 145 Kepler planets from 55 multi-planet systems. Bulk densities inferred from TTVs imply that many of these planets are covered in gaseous envelopes ranging from a few percent to ~20% of their total mass. Eccentricities in these systems are small but in a many instances definitively non-zero. These results support theoretical predictions for super-Earth/sub-Neptune planets accreting their envelopes from a depleting proto-planetary disk.

  8. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  9. PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2013-02-15

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May-2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multi-quarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis that identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T {sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R {sub P}/R {sub *}), reduced semimajor axis (d/R {sub *}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (201% for candidates smaller than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus} compared to 53% for candidates larger than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus }) and those at longer orbital periods (124% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 86% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from 13 months (Quarters 1-5) to 16 months (Quarters 1-6) even in regions of parameter space where one would have expected the previous catalogs to be complete. Analyses of planet frequencies based on previous catalogs will be affected by such incompleteness. The fraction of all planet candidate host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the habitable zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  10. A study of the shortest-period planets found with Kepler

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Rappaport, Saul; Winn, Joshua N.; Kotson, Michael C.; Levine, Alan; Mellah, Ileyk El E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: ileyk@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-05-20

    We present the results of a survey aimed at discovering and studying transiting planets with orbital periods shorter than one day (ultra-short-period, or USP, planets), using data from the Kepler spacecraft. We computed Fourier transforms of the photometric time series for all 200,000 target stars, and detected transit signals based on the presence of regularly spaced sharp peaks in the Fourier spectrum. We present a list of 106 USP candidates, of which 18 have not previously been described in the literature. This list of candidates increases the number of planet candidates with orbital periods shorter than about six hours from two to seven. In addition, among the objects we studied, there are 26 USP candidates that had been previously reported in the literature which do not pass our various tests. All 106 of our candidates have passed several standard tests to rule out false positives due to eclipsing stellar systems. A low false positive rate is also implied by the relatively high fraction of candidates for which more than one transiting planet signal was detected. By assuming these multi-transit candidates represent coplanar multi-planet systems, we are able to infer that the USP planets are typically accompanied by other planets with periods in the range 1-50 days, in contrast with hot Jupiters which very rarely have companions in that same period range. Another clear pattern is that almost all USP planets are smaller than 2 R {sub ⊕}, possibly because gas giants in very tight orbits would lose their atmospheres by photoevaporation when subject to extremely strong stellar irradiation. Based on our survey statistics, USP planets exist around approximately (0.51 ± 0.07)% of G-dwarf stars, and (0.83 ± 0.18)% of K-dwarf stars.

  11. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the solar system, are nearly coplanar, which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet–planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high-eccentricity systems and also hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually inclined (I={24}-8+11°), moderately eccentric (e≳ 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two approximately Saturn-mass planets with periods of approximately 49 and 190 days around a star with a wide (∼300 au) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  12. PLANET OCCURRENCE WITHIN 0.25 AU OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS FROM KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Latham, David W.; Torres, Guillermo; Brown, Timothy M.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; and others

    2012-08-01

    We report the distribution of planets as a function of planet radius, orbital period, and stellar effective temperature for orbital periods less than 50 days around solar-type (GK) stars. These results are based on the 1235 planets (formally 'planet candidates') from the Kepler mission that include a nearly complete set of detected planets as small as 2 R{sub Circled-Plus }. For each of the 156,000 target stars, we assess the detectability of planets as a function of planet radius, R{sub p}, and orbital period, P, using a measure of the detection efficiency for each star. We also correct for the geometric probability of transit, R{sub *}/a. We consider first Kepler target stars within the 'solar subset' having T{sub eff} = 4100-6100 K, log g 4.0-4.9, and Kepler magnitude Kp < 15 mag, i.e., bright, main-sequence GK stars. We include only those stars having photometric noise low enough to permit detection of planets down to 2 R{sub Circled-Plus }. We count planets in small domains of R{sub p} and P and divide by the included target stars to calculate planet occurrence in each domain. The resulting occurrence of planets varies by more than three orders of magnitude in the radius-orbital period plane and increases substantially down to the smallest radius (2 R{sub Circled-Plus }) and out to the longest orbital period (50 days, {approx}0.25 AU) in our study. For P < 50 days, the distribution of planet radii is given by a power law, df/dlog R = k{sub R}R{sup {alpha}} with k{sub R} = 2.9{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4}, {alpha} = -1.92 {+-} 0.11, and R {identical_to} R{sub p}/R{sub Circled-Plus }. This rapid increase in planet occurrence with decreasing planet size agrees with the prediction of core-accretion formation but disagrees with population synthesis models that predict a desert at super-Earth and Neptune sizes for close-in orbits. Planets with orbital periods shorter than 2 days are extremely rare; for R{sub p} > 2 R{sub Circled-Plus} we measure an occurrence of less than 0

  13. KEPLER-10 c: A 2.2 EARTH RADIUS TRANSITING PLANET IN A MULTIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Rowe, Jason F.; Allen, Christopher; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Henze, Christopher E.; Brown, Timothy M.; Ciardi, David R.; Deming, Drake; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier III, Thomas N.

    2011-11-01

    The Kepler mission has recently announced the discovery of Kepler-10 b, the smallest exoplanet discovered to date and the first rocky planet found by the spacecraft. A second, 45 day period transit-like signal present in the photometry from the first eight months of data could not be confirmed as being caused by a planet at the time of that announcement. Here we apply the light curve modeling technique known as BLENDER to explore the possibility that the signal might be due to an astrophysical false positive (blend). To aid in this analysis we report the observation of two transits with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 4.5 {mu}m. When combined, they yield a transit depth of 344 {+-} 85 ppm that is consistent with the depth in the Kepler passband (376 {+-} 9 ppm, ignoring limb darkening), which rules out blends with an eclipsing binary of a significantly different color than the target. Using these observations along with other constraints from high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to exclude the vast majority of possible false positives. We assess the likelihood of the remaining blends, and arrive conservatively at a false alarm rate of 1.6 x 10{sup -5} that is small enough to validate the candidate as a planet (designated Kepler-10 c) with a very high level of confidence. The radius of this object is measured to be R{sub p} = 2.227{sup +0.052}{sub -0.057} R{sub +} (in which the error includes the uncertainty in the stellar properties), but currently available radial-velocity measurements only place an upper limit on its mass of about 20 M{sub +}. Kepler-10 c represents another example (with Kepler-9 d and Kepler-11 g) of statistical 'validation' of a transiting exoplanet, as opposed to the usual 'confirmation' that can take place when the Doppler signal is detected or transit timing variations are measured. It is anticipated that many of Kepler's smaller candidates will receive a similar treatment since dynamical confirmation may be difficult or

  14. Kepler-10 c: a 2.2 Earth Radius Transiting Planet in a Multiple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fressin, François; Torres, Guillermo; Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Allen, Christopher; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Ciardi, David R.; Cochran, William D.; Deming, Drake; Dunham, Edward W.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Henze, Christopher E.; Holman, Matthew J.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Knutson, Heather; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal

    2011-11-01

    The Kepler mission has recently announced the discovery of Kepler-10 b, the smallest exoplanet discovered to date and the first rocky planet found by the spacecraft. A second, 45 day period transit-like signal present in the photometry from the first eight months of data could not be confirmed as being caused by a planet at the time of that announcement. Here we apply the light curve modeling technique known as BLENDER to explore the possibility that the signal might be due to an astrophysical false positive (blend). To aid in this analysis we report the observation of two transits with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 4.5 μm. When combined, they yield a transit depth of 344 ± 85 ppm that is consistent with the depth in the Kepler passband (376 ± 9 ppm, ignoring limb darkening), which rules out blends with an eclipsing binary of a significantly different color than the target. Using these observations along with other constraints from high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to exclude the vast majority of possible false positives. We assess the likelihood of the remaining blends, and arrive conservatively at a false alarm rate of 1.6 × 10-5 that is small enough to validate the candidate as a planet (designated Kepler-10 c) with a very high level of confidence. The radius of this object is measured to be Rp = 2.227+0.052 -0.057 R ⊕ (in which the error includes the uncertainty in the stellar properties), but currently available radial-velocity measurements only place an upper limit on its mass of about 20 M ⊕. Kepler-10 c represents another example (with Kepler-9 d and Kepler-11 g) of statistical "validation" of a transiting exoplanet, as opposed to the usual "confirmation" that can take place when the Doppler signal is detected or transit timing variations are measured. It is anticipated that many of Kepler's smaller candidates will receive a similar treatment since dynamical confirmation may be difficult or impractical with the sensitivity of

  15. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS): Exo-planet Search In Cygnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Amanda; Howell, S.; Sherry, W.; Everett, M.; von Braun, K.; Feldmeier, J.; BOKS Consortium

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of >20; continuous days of time series photometric observations of a 1.0 sq. deg field in Cygnus centered on the NASA Kepler Mission field of view. Using the Case Western Burrell Schmidt telescope located at Kitt Peak National Observatory we gathered a dataset containing light curves of roughly 30000 stars between 14planet occultations. We present a summary of our photometric project including many examples of eclipsing binaries and characterization the level and content of stellar variability in this portion of the Kepler field. We will also discuss our potential exo-planet candidates.

  16. The Robo-AO KOI Survey: Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging of Every Kepler Exoplanet Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed L.

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that pollute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present approximately 3300 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, with ~500 observed nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 16.2±0.8%. With this large dataset, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host. We then use these clues for insight into the formation and evolution of these exotic systems. Several KOIs of particular interest will be discussed, including possible quadruple star systems hosting planets and updated properties for possible rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zone.

  17. The Robo-AO KOI survey: laser adaptive optics imaging of every Kepler exoplanet candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Nofi, Larissa

    2016-07-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that dilute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present 3313 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, discovering 479 nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 14.5+/-0.8%. With this large data set, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host, providing insight into the formation and evolution of planetary systems in our galaxy. Several KOIs of particular interest will be discussed, including possible quadruple star systems hosting planets and updated properties for possible rocky planets orbiting with in their star's habitable zone.

  18. OBJECTS IN KEPLER'S MIRROR MAY BE LARGER THAN THEY APPEAR: BIAS AND SELECTION EFFECTS IN TRANSITING PLANET SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analyses of large surveys for transiting planets such as the Kepler mission must account for systematic errors and biases. Transit detection depends not only on the planet's radius and orbital period, but also on host star properties. Thus, a sample of stars with transiting planets may not accurately represent the target population. Moreover, targets are selected using criteria such as a limiting apparent magnitude. These selection effects, combined with uncertainties in stellar radius, lead to biases in the properties of transiting planets and their host stars. We quantify possible biases in the Kepler survey. First, Eddington bias produced by a steep planet radius distribution and uncertainties in stellar radius results in a 15%-20% overestimate of planet occurrence. Second, the magnitude limit of the Kepler target catalog induces Malmquist bias toward large, more luminous stars and underestimation of the radii of about one-third of candidate planets, especially those larger than Neptune. Third, because metal-poor stars are smaller, stars with detected planets will be very slightly (<0.02 dex) more metal-poor than the target average. Fourth, uncertainties in stellar radii produce correlated errors in planet radius and stellar irradiation. A previous finding, that highly irradiated giants are more likely to have 'inflated' radii, remains significant, even accounting for this effect. In contrast, transit depth is negatively correlated with stellar metallicity even in the absence of any intrinsic correlation, and a previous claim of a negative correlation between giant planet transit depth and stellar metallicity is probably an artifact.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planetary candidates. V. 3yr Q1-Q12 (Rowe+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, J. F.; Coughlin, J. L.; Antoci, V.; Barclay, T.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Burke, C. J.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Campbell, J. R.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Christiansen, J. L.; Cochran, W.; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Haas, M. R.; Helminiak, K. G.; Henze, C. E.; Hoffman, K. L.; Howell, S. B.; Huber, D.; Hunter, R. C.; Jang-Condell, H.; Jenkins, J. M.; Klaus, T. C.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lissauer, J. J.; McCauliff, S. D.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F.; Ofir, A.; Quarles, B.; Quintana, E.; Sabale, A.; Seader, S.; Shporer, A.; Smith, J. C.; Steffen, J. H.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Laerhoven, C.; Wolfgang, A.; Zamudio, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    We began with the transit-event candidate list from Tenenbaum et al. (2013ApJS..206....5T) based on a wavelet, adaptive matched filter to search 192313 Kepler targets for periodic drops in flux indicative of a transiting planet. Detections are known as Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs). Tenenbaum et al. utilized three years of Kepler photometric observations (Q1-Q12) -the same data span employed by this study based on SOC 8.3 as part of Data Release 21 (Thompson S. E., Christiansen J. L., Jenkins J. M. et al. Kepler (KSCI-19061-001)). (3 data files).

  20. The Kepler Mission: Search for Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Likins, B.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Detecting extrasolar terrestrial planets orbiting main-sequence stars is of great interest and importance. Current ground-based methods are only capable of detecting objects about the size or mass of Jupiter or larger. The difficulties encountered with direct imaging of Earth-size planets from space are expected to be resolved in the next twenty years. Spacebased photometry of planetary transits is currently the only viable method for detection of terrestrial planets (30-600 times less massive than Jupiter). This method searches the extended solar neighborhood, providing a statistically large sample and the detailed characteristics of each individual case. A robust concept has been developed and proposed as a Discovery-class mission. Its capabilities and strengths are presented.

  1. Chromosomes Emission of Planet Candidate Host Stars: A Way to Identify False Positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Albrecht, Simon; Bonanno, Alfio; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant-planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems that are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant-planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant-planet systems, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypothesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbital period.

  2. VALIDATION OF 12 SMALL KEPLER TRANSITING PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Kipping, David M.; Fressin, Francois; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Henze, Christopher E.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Everett, Mark E.; and others

    2015-02-20

    We present an investigation of 12 candidate transiting planets from Kepler with orbital periods ranging from 34 to 207 days, selected from initial indications that they are small and potentially in the habitable zone (HZ) of their parent stars. Few of these objects are known. The expected Doppler signals are too small to confirm them by demonstrating that their masses are in the planetary regime. Here we verify their planetary nature by validating them statistically using the BLENDER technique, which simulates large numbers of false positives and compares the resulting light curves with the Kepler photometry. This analysis was supplemented with new follow-up observations (high-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and speckle interferometry), as well as an analysis of the flux centroids. For 11 of them (KOI-0571.05, 1422.04, 1422.05, 2529.02, 3255.01, 3284.01, 4005.01, 4087.01, 4622.01, 4742.01, and 4745.01) we show that the likelihood they are true planets is far greater than that of a false positive, to a confidence level of 99.73% (3σ) or higher. For KOI-4427.01 the confidence level is about 99.2% (2.6σ). With our accurate characterization of the GKM host stars, the derived planetary radii range from 1.1 to 2.7 R {sub ⊕}. All 12 objects are confirmed to be in the HZ, and nine are small enough to be rocky. Excluding three of them that have been previously validated by others, our study doubles the number of known rocky planets in the HZ. KOI-3284.01 (Kepler-438b) and KOI-4742.01 (Kepler-442b) are the planets most similar to the Earth discovered to date when considering their size and incident flux jointly.

  3. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler, III: Analysis of the First 16 Months of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Brown, Timothy M.; Dupree, Andrea K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-02-01

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in sixteen months (May 2009 - September 2010) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly five thousand periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1091 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2,300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multiquarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis which identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the new candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T{sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R{sub P}/R{sub {star}}), reduced semi-major axis (d/R{sub {star}}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (197% for candidates smaller than 2R{sub {circle_plus}} compared to 52% for candidates larger than 2R{sub {circle_plus}}) and those at longer orbital periods (123% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 85% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from thirteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 5) to sixteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 6). This demonstrates the benefit of continued development of pipeline analysis software. The fraction of all host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the Habitable Zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  4. Kepler Mission: Detecting Earth-sized Planets in Habitable Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, which is presently in Phase A, is being proposed for launch in 5 years for a 4-year mission to determine the frequency of Earth-sized or larger planets in habitable zones in our galaxy. Kepler will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit to provide stable physical environments for the sensitive scientific instruments. The satellite is equipped with a photometric system with the precision of 10E-5, which should be sufficient for detecting the transits of Earth-sized or larger planets in front of dwarf stars similar to the Sun. Approximately 100,000 or more sun-like stars brighter than the 14th apparently magnitude will be monitored continuously for 4 years in a preselected region of the sky, which is about 100 square degrees in size. In addition, Kepler will have a participating scientist program that will enable research in intrinsic variable stars, interacting binaries including cataclysmic stars and X-ray binaries, and a large number of solar analogs in our galaxy. Several ten thousand additional stars may be investigated in the guest observer program open to the whole world.

  5. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE Team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  6. Eccentricity from Transit Photometry: Small Planets in Kepler Multi-planet Systems Have Low Eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Solar system planets move on almost circular orbits. In strong contrast, many massive gas giant exoplanets travel on highly elliptical orbits, whereas the shape of the orbits of smaller, more terrestrial, exoplanets remained largely elusive. Knowing the eccentricity distribution in systems of small planets would be important as it holds information about the planet's formation and evolution, and influences its habitability. We make these measurements using photometry from the Kepler satellite and utilizing a method relying on Kepler's second law, which relates the duration of a planetary transit to its orbital eccentricity, if the stellar density is known. Our sample consists of 28 bright stars with precise asteroseismic density measurements. These stars host 74 planets with an average radius of 2.6 R⊕. We find that the eccentricity of planets in Kepler multi-planet systems is low and can be described by a Rayleigh distribution with σ = 0.049 ± 0.013. This is in full agreement with solar system eccentricities, but in contrast to the eccentricity distributions previously derived for exoplanets from radial velocity studies. Our findings are helpful in identifying which planets are habitable because the location of the habitable zone depends on eccentricity, and to determine occurrence rates inferred for these planets because planets on circular orbits are less likely to transit. For measuring eccentricity it is crucial to detect and remove Transit Timing Variations (TTVs), and we present some previously unreported TTVs. Finally transit durations help distinguish between false positives and true planets and we use our measurements to confirm six new exoplanets.

  7. HOW NOT TO BUILD TATOOINE: THE DIFFICULTY OF IN SITU FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS KEPLER 16b, KEPLER 34b, AND KEPLER 35b

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Baruteau, Clement; Leinhardt, Zoee M.; Thebault, Philippe

    2012-07-20

    We study planetesimal evolution in circumbinary disks, focusing on the three systems Kepler 16, 34, and 35 where planets have been discovered recently. We show that for circumbinary planetesimals, in addition to secular forcing, eccentricities evolve on a dynamical timescale, which leads to orbital crossings even in the presence of gas drag. This makes the current locations of the circumbinary Kepler planets hostile to planetesimal accretion. We then present results from simulations including planetesimal formation and dust accretion, and show that even in the most favorable case of 100% efficient dust accretion, in situ growth starting from planetesimals smaller than {approx}10 km is difficult for Kepler 16b, Kepler 34b, and Kepler 35b. These planets were likely assembled further out in the disk, and migrated inward to their current location.

  8. A Survey for Very Short-Period Planets in the Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian K.; Stark, C. C.; Adams, E. R.; Endl, M.; Arras, P.; Boss, A.; Deming, D.

    2013-10-01

    Most gas giant exoplanets with orbital periods less than or equal to a few days are unstable against tidal decay and may be tidally disrupted before their host stars leave the main sequence. These gas giants may contain rocky and icy solid cores, and tidal disruption of the gas giants could strand these cores near their progenitors’ Roche limits (in orbital periods of a few to several hours). Whatever their origins, such short-period objects will evade the Kepler mission's transit search because it is focused on periods > 0.5 days. Motivated by these considerations, we conducted a search for very short-period transiting objects in the publicly available Kepler dataset. Our preliminary survey has revealed about a dozen planetary candidates, with periods ranging from 3.3 to 10 hours. We have analyzed the data for these candidates using photometric models that include transit light curves, as well as ellipsoidal variations and secondary eclipses, to constrain the candidates’ radii, masses, and brightness temperatures. Even with masses of only a few Earth masses, the candidates’ short periods mean they may induce stellar radial velocity signals 10 m/s) detectable by currently operating facilities. In this presentation, we will describe our survey, constraints from Kepler photometry, and plans for follow-up observations. If confirmed, these planets would be among the shortest-period planets ever discovered, and if common, such planets would be particularly amenable to discovery by the planned TESS mission, which is specifically designed to find short-period rocky planets.

  9. Two Earth-sized planets orbiting Kepler-20.

    PubMed

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Rowe, Jason F; Charbonneau, David; Rogers, Leslie A; Ballard, Sarah; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Ciardi, David R; Désert, Jean-Michel; Dressing, Courtney D; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Gautier, Thomas N; Henze, Christopher E; Holman, Matthew J; Howard, Andrew; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Quinn, Samuel N; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Seager, Sara; Barclay, Thomas; Mullally, Fergal; Seader, Shawn E; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D; Thompson, Susan E; Uddin, Kamal

    2011-12-20

    Since the discovery of the first extrasolar giant planets around Sun-like stars, evolving observational capabilities have brought us closer to the detection of true Earth analogues. The size of an exoplanet can be determined when it periodically passes in front of (transits) its parent star, causing a decrease in starlight proportional to its radius. The smallest exoplanet hitherto discovered has a radius 1.42 times that of the Earth's radius (R(⊕)), and hence has 2.9 times its volume. Here we report the discovery of two planets, one Earth-sized (1.03R(⊕)) and the other smaller than the Earth (0.87R(⊕)), orbiting the star Kepler-20, which is already known to host three other, larger, transiting planets. The gravitational pull of the new planets on the parent star is too small to measure with current instrumentation. We apply a statistical method to show that the likelihood of the planetary interpretation of the transit signals is more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of the alternative hypothesis that the signals result from an eclipsing binary star. Theoretical considerations imply that these planets are rocky, with a composition of iron and silicate. The outer planet could have developed a thick water vapour atmosphere.

  10. Kepler-21b: A Rocky Planet Around a V = 8.25 Magnitude Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Morales, Mercedes; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Zeng, Li; Buchhave, Lars A.; Giles, Helen A. C.; Affer, Laura; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Charbonneau, David; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Consentino, Rosario; Dressing, Courtney D.; Dumusque, Xavier; Figueira, Pedro; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Johnson, John Asher; Latham, David W.; Lopez, Eric D.; Lovis, Christophe; Malavolta, Luca; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emilio; Mortier, Annelies; Motalebi, Fatemeh; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Pepe, Francesco; Phillips, David F.; Piotto, Giampaolo; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Rice, Ken; Sasselov, Dimitar; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Udry, Stephane; Vanderburg, Andrew; Watson, Chris

    2016-12-01

    HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early detailed analysis by Howell et al. of the first 13 months (Q0-Q5) of Kepler light curves revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of about 1.60 ± 0.04 {R}\\oplus and an orbital period of about 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity (RV) observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2σ upper limit of 10 {M}\\oplus . Here, we present results from the analysis of 82 new RV observations of this system obtained with HARPS-N, together with the existing 14 HIRES data points. We detect the Doppler signal of Kepler-21b with a RV semiamplitude K = 2.00 ± 0.65 {{m}} {{{s}}}-1, which corresponds to a planetary mass of 5.1 ± 1.7 {M}\\oplus . We also measure an improved radius for the planet of 1.639 +0.019/-0.015 {R}\\oplus , in agreement with the radius reported by Howell et al. We conclude that Kepler-21b, with a density of 6.4 ± 2.1 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, belongs to the population of small, ≲6 {M}\\oplus planets with iron and magnesium silicate interiors, which have lost the majority of their envelope volatiles via stellar winds or gravitational escape. The RV analysis presented in this paper serves as an example of the type of analysis that will be necessary to confirm the masses of TESS small planet candidates. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescope Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  11. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Motivation & Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) models, Generalized Auto-Regressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH), and related models are flexible, phenomenological methods used with great success to model stochastic temporal behaviors in many fields of study, particularly econometrics. Powerful statistical methods are implemented in the public statistical software environment R and its many packages. Modeling involves maximum likelihood fitting, model selection, and residual analysis. These techniques provide a useful framework to model stellar variability and are used in KARPS with the objective of reducing stellar noise to enhance opportunities to find as-yet-undiscovered planets. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; ARMA-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. We apply the procedures to simulated Kepler-like time series with known stellar and planetary signals to evaluate the effectiveness of the KARPS procedures. The ARMA-type modeling is effective at reducing stellar noise, but also reduces and transforms the transit signal into ingress/egress spikes. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal

  12. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  13. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Small Kepler planets radial velocities (Marcy+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, G. W.; Isaacson, H.; Howard, A. W.; Rowe, J. F.; Jenkins, J. M.; Bryson, S. T.; Latham, D. W.; Howell, S. B.; Gautier, T. N., III; Batalha, N. M.; Rogers, L.; Ciardi, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Huber, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S.; Buchhave, L. A.; Quinn, S. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Hunter, R.; Caldwell, D. A.; van Cleve, J.; Kolbl, R.; Weiss, L. M.; Petigura, E.; Seager, S.; Morton, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Ballard, S.; Burke, C.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; MacQueen, P.; Everett, M. E.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ford, E. B.; Torres, G.; Fressin, F.; Brown, T. M.; Steffen, J. H.; Charbonneau, D.; Basri, G. S.; Sasselov, D. D.; Winn, J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Christiansen, J.; Adams, E.; Henze, C.; Dupree, A.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Fortney, J. J.; Tarter, J.; Holman, M. J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Shporer, A.; Lucas, P. W.; Welsh, W. F.; Orosz, J. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Boss, A.; Devore, E.; Gould, A.; Prsa, A.; Agol, E.; Barclay, T.; Coughlin, J.; Brugamyer, E.; Mullally, F.; Quintana, E. V.; Still, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Morrison, D.; Twicken, J. D.; Desert, J.-M.; Carter, J.; Crepp, J. R.; Hebrard, G.; Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Sobeck, C.; Hudgins, D.; Haas, M. R.; Robertson, P.; Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.

    2014-04-01

    Here we report measured masses, radii, and densities (or upper limits on those values) for 42 transiting planet candidates contained within 22 bright Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Batalha et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJS/204/24). We carried out multiple Doppler-shift measurements of the host stars using the Keck 1 telescope. From the spectroscopy and Doppler measurements, we compute self-consistent measurements of stellar and planet radii, employing either stellar structure models or asteroseismology measurements from the Kepler photometry. We also search for (and report) 7 additional non-transiting planets revealed by the precise radial velocities (RVs), for a total of 49 planets. We carried out "reconnaissance" high-resolution spectroscopy on ~1000 KOIs with spectral resolution, R~50000, and S/N=20-100 per pixel. The dual goals were searching for false positives and refining the stellar parameters. We obtained one or two such reconnaissance spectra using one of four facilities: the McDonald Observatory 2.7m, the Tillinghast 1.5m on Mt. Hopkins, the Lick Observatory 3m, and the 2.6m Nordic Optical Telescope. Speckle imaging of each of the selected 22 KOIs was obtained using the two-color DSSI speckle camera at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak. All 22 KOIs were observed with the Keck NIRC2-AO system. (3 data files).

  15. The Kepler Dichotomy in Planetary Disks: Linking Kepler Observables to Simulations of Late-stage Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John; Ballard, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    NASA’s Kepler Mission uncovered a wealth of planetary systems, many with planets on short-period orbits. These short-period systems reside around 50% of Sun-like stars and are similarly prevalent around M dwarfs. Their formation and subsequent evolution is the subject of active debate. In this paper, we simulate late-stage, in situ planet formation across a grid of planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles and total mass. We compare simulation results with observable characteristics of the Kepler sample. We identify mixture models with different primordial planetesimal disk properties that self-consistently recover the multiplicity, radius, period and period ratio, and duration ratio distributions of the Kepler planets. We draw three main conclusions. (1) We favor a “frozen-in” narrative for systems of short-period planets, in which they are stable over long timescales, as opposed to metastable. (2) The “Kepler dichotomy,” an observed phenomenon of the Kepler sample wherein the architectures of planetary systems appear to either vary significantly or have multiple modes, can naturally be explained by formation within planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles. Finally, (3) we quantify the nature of the “Kepler dichotomy” for both GK stars and M dwarfs, and find that it varies with stellar type. While the mode of planet formation that accounts for high multiplicity systems occurs in 24% ± 7% of planetary systems orbiting GK stars, it occurs in 63% ± 16% of planetary systems orbiting M dwarfs.

  16. On the Orbit of the Circumbinary Planet Kepler-16b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Leung, C. K.

    2012-05-01

    The orbit of the circumbinary planet Kepler-16b is significantly non-Keplerian because of the large secondary-to-primary mass ratio (0.29) and orbital eccentricity (0.15) of the binary, as well as the proximity of the planet to the binary (orbital period ratio 5.6). We present an analytic theory which models the motion of the planet (treated as a test particle) by the superposition of the circular motion of a guiding center, the forced oscillations due to the non-axisymmetric components of the binary's potential, the epicyclic motion, and the vertical motion. In this analytic theory, the periapse and ascending node of the planet precess at nearly equal rates in opposite directions, and the largest forced oscillation term corresponds to a forced eccentricity of 0.035. The nodal precession period (42 years) found in direct numerical orbit integration is in excellent agreement with the analytic theory, while the periapse precession period (49 years) and forced eccentricity (0.038) are slightly larger than the analytic values. The comparison with direct numerical orbit integration also shows that the planet's orbit has a nonzero epicyclic (or free) eccentricity of 0.027. This work is supported in part by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7034/09P.

  17. AN ULTRACOOL STAR'S CANDIDATE PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Shaklan, Stuart B. E-mail: stuart.shaklan@jpl.nasa.gov

    2009-07-20

    We report here the discovery of the first planet around an ultracool dwarf star. It is also the first extrasolar giant planet astrometrically discovered around a main-sequence star. The statistical significance of the detection is shown in two ways. First, there is a 2 x 10{sup -8} probability that the astrometric motion fits a parallax-and-proper-motion-only model. Second, periodogram analysis shows a false alarm probability of 3 x 10{sup -5} that the discovered period is randomly generated. The planetary mass is M {sub 2} = 6.4 (+2.6,-3.1) Jupiter-masses (M {sub J}), and the orbital period is P = 0.744 (+0.013,-0.008) yr in the most likely model. In less likely models, companion masses that are higher than the 13 M {sub J} planetary mass limit are ruled out by past radial velocity (RV) measurements unless the system RV is more than twice the current upper limits and the near-periastron orbital phase was never observed. This new planetary system is remarkable, in part, because its star, VB 10, is near the lower mass limit for a star. Our astrometric observations provide a dynamical mass measurement and will in time allow us to confront the theoretical models of formation and evolution of such systems and their members. We thus add to the diversity of planetary systems and to the small number of known M-dwarf planets. Planets such as VB 10b could be the most numerous type of planets because M stars comprise >70% of all stars. To date they have remained hidden since the dominant RV planet-discovery technique is relatively insensitive to these dim, red systems.

  18. KEPLER-7b: A TRANSITING PLANET WITH UNUSUALLY LOW DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, David W.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Brown, Timothy M.; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Howell, Steve B.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Monet, David G.

    2010-04-20

    We report on the discovery and confirmation of Kepler-7b, a transiting planet with unusually low density. The mass is less than half that of Jupiter, M {sub P} = 0.43 M {sub J}, but the radius is 50% larger, R {sub P} = 1.48 R {sub J}. The resulting density, {rho}{sub P} = 0.17 g cm{sup -3}, is the second lowest reported so far for an extrasolar planet. The orbital period is fairly long, P = 4.886 days, and the host star is not much hotter than the Sun, T {sub eff} = 6000 K. However, it is more massive and considerably larger than the Sun, M {sub *} = 1.35 M {sub sun} and R {sub *} = 1.84 R {sub sun}, and must be near the end of its life on the main sequence.

  19. A Bayesian multi-planet Kepler periodogram for exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, P. C.

    2005-12-01

    A Bayesian multi-planet Kepler periodogram has been developed for the analysis of precision radial velocity data (Gregory, Ap. J., 631, 1198, 2005). The periodogram employs a parallel tempering Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with a novel statistical control system. Examples of its use will be presented, including a re-analysis of data for HD 208487 (Gregory, 2005b, astro-ph/0509412) for which we find strong evidence for a second planet with a period of 998-62+57 days, an eccentricity of 0.19-0.18+0.05, and an M sin i = 0.46-0.13+0.05 MJ. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada at the University of British Columbia.

  20. MODELING KEPLER TRANSIT LIGHT CURVES AS FALSE POSITIVES: REJECTION OF BLEND SCENARIOS FOR KEPLER-9, AND VALIDATION OF KEPLER-9 d, A SUPER-EARTH-SIZE PLANET IN A MULTIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Charbonneau, David; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Brown, Timothy M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N. III; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2011-01-20

    Light curves from the Kepler Mission contain valuable information on the nature of the phenomena producing the transit-like signals. To assist in exploring the possibility that they are due to an astrophysical false positive, we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a 'blend' rather than a planet orbiting a star. A blend may consist of a background or foreground eclipsing binary (or star-planet pair) whose eclipses are attenuated by the light of the candidate and possibly other stars within the photometric aperture. We apply BLENDER to the case of Kepler-9 (KIC 3323887), a target harboring two previously confirmed Saturn-size planets (Kepler-9 b and Kepler-9 c) showing transit timing variations, and an additional shallower signal with a 1.59 day period suggesting the presence of a super-Earth-size planet. Using BLENDER together with constraints from other follow-up observations we are able to rule out all blends for the two deeper signals and provide independent validation of their planetary nature. For the shallower signal, we rule out a large fraction of the false positives that might mimic the transits. The false alarm rate for remaining blends depends in part (and inversely) on the unknown frequency of small-size planets. Based on several realistic estimates of this frequency, we conclude with very high confidence that this small signal is due to a super-Earth-size planet (Kepler-9 d) in a multiple system, rather than a false positive. The radius is determined to be 1.64{sup +0.19}{sub -0.14} R{sub +}, and current spectroscopic observations are as yet insufficient to establish its mass.

  1. Modeling Kepler Transit Light Curves as False Positives: Rejection of Blend Scenarios for Kepler-9, and Validation of Kepler-9 d, a Super-Earth-Size Planet in a Multiple System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David R.; Dunham, Edward W.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Gauthier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Holman, Matthew J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Monet, David G.; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2011-01-01

    Light curves from the Kepler Mission contain valuable information on the nature of the phenomena producing the transit-like signals. To assist in exploring the possibility that they are due to an astrophysical false positive we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a blend rather than a planet orbiting a star. A blend may consist of a background or foreground eclipsing binary (or star-planet pair) whose eclipses are attenuated by the light of the candidate and possibly other stars within the photometric aperture. We apply BLENDER to the case of Kepler-9 (KIC 3323887), a target harboring two previously confirmed Saturn-size planets (Kepler-9 b and Kepler-9 c) showing transit timing variations, and an additional shallower signal with a 1.59 day period suggesting the presence of a super-Earth-size planet. Using BLENDER together with constraints from other follow-up observations we are able to rule out all blends for the two deeper signals and provide independent validation of their planetary nature. For the shallower signal, we rule out a large fraction of the false positives that might mimic the transits. The false alarm rate for remaining blends depends in part (and inversely) on the unknown frequency of small-size planets. Based on several realistic estimates of this frequency, we conclude with very high confidence that this small signal is due to a super-Earth-size planet (Kepler-9 d) in a multiple system, rather than a false positive. The radius is determined to be 1.64(exp)(sub-14),R, and current spectroscopic observations are as yet insufficient to establish its mass.

  2. χ2 Discriminators for Transiting Planet Detection in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seader, Shawn; Tenenbaum, P.; Jenkins, J.

    2012-10-01

    The Kepler Mission continuously observes a host of target stars in a 115 square-degree field of view to discover Earth-like planets transiting Sun-like stars through analysis of photometric data. The Kepler Science Operations Center at NASA Ames Research Center processes the data with the Science Processing Pipeline, which is composed of several modules including the Transiting Planet Search (TPS). To search for transit signatures, TPS employs a bank of wavelet-based matched filters that form a grid on a three dimensional parameter space of transit duration, period, and epoch. Owing to non-stationary and non-Gaussian noise, uncorrected systematics, and poorly mitigated noise events of either astrophysical or non-astrophysical nature, large spurious Threshold Crossing Events (TCE’s) can be produced by the matched filtering performed in TPS. These false alarms waste resources as they propagate through the remainder of the Pipeline, and so a method to discriminate against them is crucial in maintaining the desired sensitivity to true events. Here we describe four separate χ2 tests which represent a novel application of the formalism developed by Allen for false alarm mitigation in searches for gravitational waves. The basic idea behind these vetoes is to break up the matched filter output into several contributions and compare each contribution with what is expected under the assumption that a true signal is present in the data. Vetoes can then be constructed which, under certain assumptions, have been shown to be χ2 distributed with expectation values that are independent of whether or not a true signal is present, thereby making them useful discriminators. The four different ways of breaking up the output and forming χ2 vetoes illustrated here, allow discrimination against different classes of false alarms. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

  3. PLANET-PLANET ECLIPSE AND THE ROSSITER-McLAUGHLIN EFFECT OF A MULTIPLE TRANSITING SYSTEM: JOINT ANALYSIS OF THE SUBARU SPECTROSCOPY AND THE KEPLER PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Masuda, Kento; Suto, Yasushi; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takeda, Yoichi; Aoki, Wako; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Bun'ei

    2012-11-10

    We report a joint analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect with Subaru and the Kepler photometry for the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) 94 system. The system is comprised of four transiting planet candidates with orbital periods of 22.3 (KOI-94.01), 10.4 (KOI-94.02), 54.3 (KOI-94.03), and 3.7 (KOI-94.04) days from the Kepler photometry. We performed the radial velocity (RV) measurement of the system with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope on UT 2012 August 10, covering a complete transit of KOI-94.01 for {approx}6.7 hr. The resulting RV variation due to the RM effect spectroscopically confirms that KOI-94.01 is indeed the transiting planet and implies that its orbital axis is well aligned with the stellar spin axis; the projected spin-orbit angle {lambda} is estimated as -6{sup +13}{sub -11} deg. This is the first measurement of the RM effect for a multiple transiting system. Remarkably, the archived Kepler light curve around BJD = 2455211.5 (date in UT 2010 January 14/15) indicates a 'double-transit' event of KOI-94.01 and KOI-94.03, in which the two planets transit the stellar disk simultaneously. Moreover, the two planets partially overlap with each other, and exhibit a 'planet-planet eclipse' around the transit center. This provides a rare opportunity to put tight constraints on the configuration of the two transiting planets by joint analysis with our Subaru RM measurement. Indeed, we find that the projected mutual inclination of KOI-94.01 and KOI-94.03 is estimated to be {delta} = -1.{sup 0}15 {+-} 0.{sup 0}55. Implications for the migration model of multiple planet systems are also discussed.

  4. Constraining the Masses of the Kepler-11 Planets through Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The six transiting planets of Kepler-11 have all been found to have ultra-low densities through N-body dynamical analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the six planets. Numerically reproducing TTVs has become a new method for solving the masses of planets, but this method is susceptible to certain dynamic degeneracies: the planet eccentricity is degenerate with the planet mass, and perturbations caused by non-transiting planets could be misattributed to the transiting planets. Furthermore, the masses of planets characterized by TTV analysis are systematically 2x lower than the masses (including non-detections) reported by radial velocity (RV) analysis for planets of the same radius. We address the discrepancy between the TTV- and RV-determined planet masses by measuring the RVs of Kepler-11 at opportunistic times, as determined by the ephemerides of the transiting planets. We place an upper limit on the masses of the Kepler-11 planets using RVs and preliminarily show that the RVs are consistent with the ultra-low mass scenario determined by the TTVs. The lack of disagreement between the TTVs and RVs in the Kepler-11 system bodes well for N-body simulations of TTVs for other Kepler systems that are too faint for RV follow-up.

  5. On The Existence Of Earth-like Planets In The Circumbinary System Kepler-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M.

    2012-01-01

    The newly discovered circumbinary system Kepler-16 contains a pair of low-mass stars and a Saturn-mass planet (Doyle et al. 2011) [Science 333, 1602]. A truly fascinating problem is to explore whether Earth-like planets can exist in the habitable zone (HZ) of this unique system. The HZ of this system is mainly due to the primary star and extends from 0.36 AU to 0.71 AU. We have performed extensive numerical studies of long-term orbital stability of Earth-like planets in this HZ by considering both S-type and P-type planetary orbits. The semi-major axis for S-type orbits has been determined as 0.0675 ± 0.0039 AU from the stellar primary. This distance is well inside the inner limit of habitability where the influence of the runaway greenhouse effect becomes important. Consequently, the existence of a habitable Earth-like planet in an S-type orbit is highly unlikely. However it appears possible that such a planet can exist in a P-type orbit inside the HZ thus providing a realistic possibility for long-term evolution of life in this type of system. The obtained results are of special interest because they can assist in the selection process of system candidates in future terrestrial planet search missions.

  6. Confirmation of an exoplanet using the transit color signature: Kepler-418b, a blended giant planet in a multiplanet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, B.; Parviainen, H.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.; Palle, E.; Montañés Rodriguez, P.; Murgas, F.; Alonso, R.; Bruntt, H.; Fridlund, M.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We announce confirmation of Kepler-418b, one of two proposed planets in this system. This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet based primarily on the transit color signature technique. Methods: We used the Kepler public data archive combined with multicolor photometry from the Gran Telescopio de Canarias and radial velocity follow-up using FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope for confirmation. Results: We report a confident detection of a transit color signature that can only be explained by a compact occulting body, entirely ruling out a contaminating eclipsing binary, a hierarchical triple, or a grazing eclipsing binary. Those findings are corroborated by our radial velocity measurements, which put an upper limit of ~1 MJup on the mass of Kepler-418b. We also report that the host star is significantly blended, confirming the ~10% light contamination suspected from the crowding metric in the Kepler light curve measured by the Kepler team. We report detection of an unresolved light source that contributes an additional ~30% to the target star, which would not have been detected without multicolor photometric analysis. The resulting planet-star radius ratio is 0.110 ± 0.0025, more than 25% more than the 0.087 measured by Kepler leading to a radius of 1.20 ± 0.16 RJup instead of the 0.94 RJup measured by the Kepler team. Conclusions: This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet candidate based primarily on the transit color signature, demonstrating that this technique is viable from ground for giant planets. It is particularly useful for planets with long periods such as Kepler-418b, which tend to have long transit durations. While this technique is limited to candidates with deep transits from the ground, it may be possible to confirm earth-like exoplanet candidates with a few hours of observing time with an instrument like the James Webb Space Telescope. Additionally, multicolor photometric analysis of transits can reveal unknown stellar neighbors

  7. Characterizing Low-Mass Planets in Kepler's Multi-Planet Systems with Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of planets in a regime of mass and size that is absent from the Solar System. This includes systems of high multiplicity within 1 AU, where low-mass volatile-rich planets have been observed in compact orbital configurations. Smaller, rocky planets have also been observed in such systems. The existing sample of characterized planets on the mass-radius diagram shows no abrupt transition from rocky planets to those that must be volatile-rich, but characteristic trends are beginning to emerge. More precise characterizations of planets by mass, radius, and incident flux will aid in revealing fundamental properties of a common class of exoplanets. There is a small sample of exoplanets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can be used to measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling with Kepler data probes planetary masses over orbital periods ranging from ~5-100 days, complementing the sample of RV detections. Furthermore, in select cases, dynamical fits to observed TTVs can tightly constrain the orbital eccentricity vectors, which can, alongside the transit light curve, tightly constrain the density and radius of the host star, and hence reduce the uncertainty on planetary radius. TTV studies have revealed a class of low-mass low-density objects with a substantial mass fraction in the form of a voluminous H-rich atmosphere. To these we add precise mass measurements of the outer planets of Kepler-33, a compact system with five known transiting planets, three of which show detectable transit timing variations. These results will be placed

  8. Changing Phases of Alien Worlds: Probing Atmospheres of Kepler Planets with High-precision Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2015-05-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of planetary phase variations, including possible planetary light offsets, using eighteen quarters of data from the Kepler space telescope. Our analysis found fourteen systems with significant detections in each of the phase curve components: planet’s phase function, secondary eclipse, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. We model the full phase curve simultaneously, including primary and secondary transits, and derive albedos, day- and night-side temperatures and planet masses. Most planets manifest low optical geometric albedos (< 0.25), with the exception of Kepler-10b, Kepler-91b, and KOI-13b. We find that KOI-13b, with a small eccentricity of 0.0006 ± 0.0001, is the only planet for which an eccentric orbit is favored. We detect a third harmonic for HAT-P-7b for the first time, and confirm the third harmonic for KOI-13b reported in Esteves et al.: both could be due to their spin-orbit misalignments. For six planets, we report a planetary brightness peak offset from the substellar point: of those, the hottest two (Kepler-76b and HAT-P-7b) exhibit pre-eclipse shifts or on the evening-side, while the cooler four (Kepler-7b, Kepler-8b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b) peak post-eclipse or on the morning-side. Our findings dramatically increase the number of Kepler planets with detected planetary light offsets, and provide the first evidence in the Kepler data for a correlation between the peak offset direction and the planet’s temperature. Such a correlation could arise if thermal emission dominates light from hotter planets that harbor hot spots shifted toward the evening-side, as theoretically predicted, while reflected light dominates cooler planets with clouds on the planet’s morning-side.

  9. CHANGING PHASES OF ALIEN WORLDS: PROBING ATMOSPHERES OF KEPLER PLANETS WITH HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; Mooij, Ernst J. W. De; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2015-05-10

    We present a comprehensive analysis of planetary phase variations, including possible planetary light offsets, using eighteen quarters of data from the Kepler space telescope. Our analysis found fourteen systems with significant detections in each of the phase curve components: planet’s phase function, secondary eclipse, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. We model the full phase curve simultaneously, including primary and secondary transits, and derive albedos, day- and night-side temperatures and planet masses. Most planets manifest low optical geometric albedos (< 0.25), with the exception of Kepler-10b, Kepler-91b, and KOI-13b. We find that KOI-13b, with a small eccentricity of 0.0006 ± 0.0001, is the only planet for which an eccentric orbit is favored. We detect a third harmonic for HAT-P-7b for the first time, and confirm the third harmonic for KOI-13b reported in Esteves et al.: both could be due to their spin–orbit misalignments. For six planets, we report a planetary brightness peak offset from the substellar point: of those, the hottest two (Kepler-76b and HAT-P-7b) exhibit pre-eclipse shifts or on the evening-side, while the cooler four (Kepler-7b, Kepler-8b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b) peak post-eclipse or on the morning-side. Our findings dramatically increase the number of Kepler planets with detected planetary light offsets, and provide the first evidence in the Kepler data for a correlation between the peak offset direction and the planet’s temperature. Such a correlation could arise if thermal emission dominates light from hotter planets that harbor hot spots shifted toward the evening-side, as theoretically predicted, while reflected light dominates cooler planets with clouds on the planet’s morning-side.

  10. Characterizing the Cool KOIs: Sub-Earth-Sized Planet Candidates Around Mid M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, Philip; Becker, J.; Vanderburg, A.; Johnson, J. A.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Covey, K. R.; Hamren, K.; Schlawin, E.; Lloyd, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    We present new results from the Cool KOI Program: a continuing infrared spectroscopic survey of M dwarfs with transiting extrasolar planet-candidates discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. We use recently developed K-band spectral indices to measure M-dwarf effective temperatures and metallicities and interpolate those values onto the 5-Gyr Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones to determine M-dwarf masses and radii. We present new stellar parameters of the M dwarfs in the 2012 Kepler catalog of extrasolar planet candidate hosts, identified as Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). We find that several mid-M dwarf KOIs host short-period, sub-Earth-sized exoplanet candidates with sizes and orbital periods similar to the satellites of Jupiter. These short-period 'sub-Earths' may represent a link between planet-formation and Jovian-satellite formation. We present future directions for measuring their frequency around mid-M dwarfs in the absence of accurate stellar parameters for the full sample of Kepler M dwarf targets.

  11. DISCOVERY OF THE TRANSITING PLANET KEPLER-5b

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morrison, David; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, John; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Howell, Steve B.; Marcy, Geoff W.

    2010-04-20

    We present 44 days of high duty cycle, ultra precise photometry of the 13th magnitude star Kepler-5 (KIC 8191672, T {sub eff}= 6300 K, log g= 4.1), which exhibits periodic transits with a depth of 0.7%. Detailed modeling of the transit is consistent with a planetary companion with an orbital period of 3.548460 {+-} 0.000032 days and a radius of 1.431{sup +0.041} {sub -0.052} R {sub J}. Follow-up radial velocity measurements with the Keck HIRES spectrograph on nine separate nights demonstrate that the planet is more than twice as massive as Jupiter with a mass of 2.114{sup +0.056} {sub -0.059} M {sub J} and a mean density of 0.894 {+-} 0.079 g cm{sup -3}.

  12. Transit shapes and self-organizing maps as a tool for ranking planetary candidates: application to Kepler and K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial step in planet hunting surveys is to select the best candidates for follow-up observations, given limited telescope resources. This is often performed by human 'eyeballing', a time consuming and statistically awkward process. Here, we present a new, fast machine learning technique to separate true planet signals from astrophysical false positives. We use self-organizing maps (SOMs) to study the transit shapes of Kepler and K2 known and candidate planets. We find that SOMs are capable of distinguishing known planets from known false positives with a success rate of 87.0 per cent, using the transit shape alone. Furthermore, they do not require any candidate to be dispositioned prior to use, meaning that they can be used early in a mission's lifetime. A method for classifying candidates using a SOM is developed, and applied to previously unclassified members of the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) list as well as candidates from the K2 mission. The method is extremely fast, taking minutes to run the entire KOI list on a typical laptop. We make PYTHON code for performing classifications publicly available, using either new SOMs or those created in this work. The SOM technique represents a novel method for ranking planetary candidate lists, and can be used both alone or as part of a larger autovetting code.

  13. FAME's Search for Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, K.

    FAME is a five year survey mission to observe the positions, proper motions, and parallaxes of 40,000,000 stars down to 15th magnitude with accuracies of 50 microarcseconds at 9th magnitude. In addition to producing an astrometric and photometric catalog unparalleled for its accuracy and size, the survey will provide significant astrophysics results and search for extrasolar planet candidates.

  14. Had the Planet Mars Not Existed: Kepler's Equant Model and Its Physical Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracco, C.; Provost, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the equant model for the motion of planets, which was the starting point of Kepler's investigations before he modified it because of Mars observations. We show that, up to first order in eccentricity, this model implies for each orbit a velocity, which satisfies Kepler's second law and Hamilton's hodograph, and a centripetal…

  15. Investigating the Orbital Period Valley of Giant Planets in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brianna P.; Birkby, Jayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Transit light curves contain a wealth of information about the basic properties of a planet, such as its radius, semi-major axis, and orbital period. For the latter property, there is a distinct lack of planets with periods between 10 to 100 days. This gap could be caused by something as simple as observational bias, or as prominent as planetary formation or migration. Here, we report an investigation into the atmosphere of planets within this orbital period valley, to search for differences that may indicate a different formation mechanism or migration path to those outside of it. We do this by searching for the secondary eclipse of planets in the valley in order to measure their albedos. We determined an optimal target for this: KOI-366 b (P ~ 75 days). However, we find that despite the exquisite precision of Kepler data, it cannot constrain the albedo for this long-orbit planet candidate. We measure a 1σ upper limit on the geometric albedo of Ag,1σ ≤ 2.0. We highlight that additional scatter in the light curve is likely caused by a ~ 2-day pulsation of the giant host star, and that further data is required to measure the secondary eclipse. KOI-366 is one of the best suited of all host stars with long period exoplanet candidates for follow-up due to its relatively bright magnitude (Kp = 11.7 mag), but the full investigation of the reflective properties of long period planets may require space-based observations from future instruments, such as WFIRST, that will be more sensitive to objects further away from their host stars. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. This work was performed in part under contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by NASA through the Sagan Fellowship Program executed by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

  16. TRIPLE-STAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE KEPLER BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Deck, K.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Levine, A.; Borkovits, T.; Carter, J.; El Mellah, I.; Kalomeni, B. E-mail: kdeck@mit.edu E-mail: aml@space.mit.edu E-mail: jacarter@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search through the photometric database of Kepler eclipsing binaries looking for evidence of hierarchical triple-star systems. The presence of a third star orbiting the binary can be inferred from eclipse timing variations. We apply a simple algorithm in an automated determination of the eclipse times for all 2157 binaries. The ''calculated'' eclipse times, based on a constant period model, are subtracted from those observed. The resulting O - C (observed minus calculated times) curves are then visually inspected for periodicities in order to find triple-star candidates. After eliminating false positives due to the beat frequency between the {approx}1/2 hr Kepler cadence and the binary period, 39 candidate triple systems were identified. The periodic O - C curves for these candidates were then fit for contributions from both the classical Roemer delay and so-called physical delay, in an attempt to extract a number of the system parameters of the triple. We discuss the limitations of the information that can be inferred from these O - C curves without further supplemental input, e.g., ground-based spectroscopy. Based on the limited range of orbital periods for the triple-star systems to which this search is sensitive, we can extrapolate to estimate that at least 20% of all close binaries have tertiary companions.

  17. ROTATIONAL SYNCHRONIZATION MAY ENHANCE HABITABILITY FOR CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: KEPLER BINARY CASE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Paul A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.; Clark, Joni M.

    2013-09-10

    We report a mechanism capable of reducing (or increasing) stellar activity in binary stars, thereby potentially enhancing (or destroying) circumbinary habitability. In single stars, stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres causes mass-loss, which is especially detrimental for late-type stars, because habitable zones are very close and activity is long lasting. In binaries, tidal rotational breaking reduces magnetic activity, thus reducing harmful levels of X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and stellar mass-loss that are able to erode planetary atmospheres. We study this mechanism for all confirmed circumbinary (p-type) planets. We find that main sequence twins provide minimal flux variation and in some cases improved environments if the stars rotationally synchronize within the first Gyr. Solar-like twins, like Kepler 34 and Kepler 35, provide low habitable zone XUV fluxes and stellar wind pressures. These wide, moist, habitable zones may potentially support multiple habitable planets. Solar-type stars with lower mass companions, like Kepler 47, allow for protected planets over a wide range of secondary masses and binary periods. Kepler 38 and related binaries are marginal cases. Kepler 64 and analogs have dramatically reduced stellar aggression due to synchronization of the primary, but are limited by the short lifetime. Kepler 16 appears to be inhospitable to planets due to extreme XUV flux. These results have important implications for estimates of the number of stellar systems containing habitable planets in the Galaxy and allow for the selection of binaries suitable for follow-up searches for habitable planets.

  18. Rotational Synchronization May Enhance Habitability for Circumbinary Planets: Kepler Binary Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Clark, Joni M.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.

    2013-09-01

    We report a mechanism capable of reducing (or increasing) stellar activity in binary stars, thereby potentially enhancing (or destroying) circumbinary habitability. In single stars, stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres causes mass-loss, which is especially detrimental for late-type stars, because habitable zones are very close and activity is long lasting. In binaries, tidal rotational breaking reduces magnetic activity, thus reducing harmful levels of X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and stellar mass-loss that are able to erode planetary atmospheres. We study this mechanism for all confirmed circumbinary (p-type) planets. We find that main sequence twins provide minimal flux variation and in some cases improved environments if the stars rotationally synchronize within the first Gyr. Solar-like twins, like Kepler 34 and Kepler 35, provide low habitable zone XUV fluxes and stellar wind pressures. These wide, moist, habitable zones may potentially support multiple habitable planets. Solar-type stars with lower mass companions, like Kepler 47, allow for protected planets over a wide range of secondary masses and binary periods. Kepler 38 and related binaries are marginal cases. Kepler 64 and analogs have dramatically reduced stellar aggression due to synchronization of the primary, but are limited by the short lifetime. Kepler 16 appears to be inhospitable to planets due to extreme XUV flux. These results have important implications for estimates of the number of stellar systems containing habitable planets in the Galaxy and allow for the selection of binaries suitable for follow-up searches for habitable planets.

  19. Search for light curve modulations among Kepler candidates. Three very low-mass transiting companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Ribas, A.; Barrado, D.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Light curve modulations in the sample of Kepler planet candidates allows the disentangling of the nature of the transiting object by photometrically measuring its mass. This is possible by detecting the effects of the gravitational pull of the companion (ellipsoidal modulations) and in some cases, the photometric imprints of the Doppler effect when observing in a broad band (Doppler beaming). Aims: We aim to photometrically unveil the nature of some transiting objects showing clear light curve modulations in the phase-folded Kepler light curve. Methods: We selected a subsample among the large crop of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) based on their chances to show detectable light curve modulations, i.e., close (a< 12 R⋆) and large (in terms of radius, according to their transit signal) candidates. We modeled their phase-folded light curves with consistent equations for the three effects, namely, reflection, ellipsoidal and beaming (known as REB modulations). Results: We provide detailed general equations for the fit of the REB modulations for the case of eccentric orbits. These equations are accurate to the photometric precisions achievable by current and forthcoming instruments and space missions. By using this mathematical apparatus, we find three close-in very low-mass companions (two of them in the brown dwarf mass domain) orbiting main-sequence stars (KOI-554, KOI-1074, and KOI-3728), and reject the planetary nature of the transiting objects (thus classifying them as false positives). In contrast, the detection of the REB modulations and transit/eclipse signal allows the measurement of their mass and radius that can provide important constraints for modeling their interiors since just a few cases of low-mass eclipsing binaries are known. Additionally, these new systems can help to constrain the similarities in the formation process of the more massive and close-in planets (hot Jupiters), brown dwarfs, and very low-mass companions.

  20. Chandra Pilot Survey of Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yohko

    2012-09-01

    We propose to detect planetary-mass companion around young nearby stars by X-ray direct imaging observations with Chandra. Our goals are to determine I. if the X-ray band can be a new probe to the exo-planet search, and II. if a planet emit detectable X-rays with a magnetic origin at a young age. This should be a challenging observation but a brand-new discovery space unique to Chandra. The abundant population of YSOs in the same field of view will enable us to obtain complete X-ray catalogues of YSOs with all categories of masses. We will also execute simultaneous deep NIR observations with IRSF/SIRIUS and Nishiharima 2m telescope to search for the other X-ray-emitting very low-mass objects near our aiming planet candidates.

  1. Assessing the True Sizes of Kepler's Smallest Planets in Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David

    2014-08-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution imaging of Kepler stars hosting earth-sized planets in multiple planetary systems, utilizing NIRC2 with the natural and laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Keck-II telescope. Because these planets are in multiple planetary systems, the chance that these are real planets and not false positives is >99%. The high spatial resolution imaging will enable us to image these stars with a resolution of <0.1 arcsec. At that resolution, >99% of the companions detected are gravitationally bound; thus, the proposed observations will enable us to sample the binary star distribution across all spectral types and down to physical separations of 8 - 10 AU. The proposed observations, coupled with on-going spectroscopic and lower sensitivity imaging efforts, will enable us to determine the binary frequency of the KOIs, and, more importantly, to determine more accurately the planet radii after accounting for the photometric blending and the! possibility that the planets orbit the secondary star rather than the primary target. We request a total of 4 nights - 2 nights of natural guide star time and 2 nights of laser guide star time.

  2. Motions of Kepler circumbinary planets in restricted three-body problem under radiating primaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dermawan, B. Hidayat, T.; Huda, I. N. Mandey, D. Utama, J. A. Tampubolon, I.; Wibowo, R. W.

    2015-09-30

    By observing continuously a single field of view in the sky, Kepler mission reveals outstanding results on discoveries of exoplanets. One of its recent progress is the discoveries of circumbinary planets. A circumbinary planet is an exoplanet that moves around a binary system. In this study we investigate motions of Kepler circumbinary planets belong to six binary systems, namely Kepler-16, -34, -35, -38, -47, and -413. The motions are considered to follow the Restricted Three-Body Problem (RTBP). Because the primaries (central massive objects) are stars, they are both radiatives, while the planet is an infinitesimal object. The primaries move in nearly circular and elliptic orbits with respect to their center of masses. We describe, in general, motions of the circumbinary planets in RTBP under radiating primaries. With respect to the averaged zero velocity curves, we show that motions of the exoplanets are stable, in accordance with their Hill stabilities.

  3. Kepler-223: A Resonant Chain of Four Sub-Neptune Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Clark Fabrycky, Daniel; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B.; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of pairs of planets in the same system which often lie near, but not exactly on, resonance. Understanding how and when they entered a resonance and were removed from it has implications for their birthplaces and planetary structure. Here we characterize Kepler-223 (KOI-730), an outstanding example of a system of small planets in resonance. We perform TTV, photodynamic, stability, and migration analyses to determine the system's most likely current parameters and resonant state. Its four sub-Neptune planets form a chain linked by 4:3, 3:2, and 2:1 resonances that cause measurable dynamical effects and imply a disk-migration origin. Tidal dissipation in the planets or wide-scale instability may eventually transform resonant chains of planets like Kepler-223 into the more common type of architecture.

  4. Oscillation frequencies for 35 Kepler solar-type planet-hosting stars using Bayesian techniques and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.; Chaplin, W. J.; Huber, D.; White, T. R.; Benomar, O.; Hekker, S.; Basu, S.; Campante, T. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Stello, D.

    2016-02-01

    Kepler has revolutionized our understanding of both exoplanets and their host stars. Asteroseismology is a valuable tool in the characterization of stars and Kepler is an excellent observing facility to perform asteroseismology. Here we select a sample of 35 Kepler solar-type stars which host transiting exoplanets (or planet candidates) with detected solar-like oscillations. Using available Kepler short cadence data up to Quarter 16 we create power spectra optimized for asteroseismology of solar-type stars. We identify modes of oscillation and estimate mode frequencies by `peak bagging' using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework. In addition, we expand the methodology of quality assurance using a Bayesian unsupervised machine learning approach. We report the measured frequencies of the modes of oscillation for all 35 stars and frequency ratios commonly used in detailed asteroseismic modelling. Due to the high correlations associated with frequency ratios we report the covariance matrix of all frequencies measured and frequency ratios calculated. These frequencies, frequency ratios, and covariance matrices can be used to obtain tight constraint on the fundamental parameters of these planet-hosting stars.

  5. CIRCUMBINARY PLANET FORMATION IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM. I. N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano

    2012-06-10

    The recently discovered circumbinary planets (Kepler-16 b, Kepler 34-b, Kepler 35-b) represent the first direct evidence of the viability of planet formation in circumbinary orbits. We report on the results of N-body simulations investigating planetesimal accretion in the Kepler-16 b system, focusing on the range of impact velocities under the influence of both stars' gravitational perturbation and friction from a putative protoplanetary disk. Our results show that planet formation might be effectively inhibited for a large range in semimajor axis (1.75 {approx}< a{sub P} {approx}< 4 AU), suggesting that the planetary core must have either migrated from outside 4 AU or formed in situ very close to its current location.

  6. The life supporting zone of Kepler-22b and the Kepler planetary candidates: KOI268.01, KOI701.03, KOI854.01 and KOI1026.01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Vrtala, Aron; Leitner, Johannes J.; Gertrude Firneis, Maria; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2012-12-01

    The concept of the life supporting zone is a generalization of the concept of the habitable zone (and therefore for water based life, i.e. life-as-we-know-it) to other solvents (and to life-as-we-do-not-know-it). We present an estimate of life supporting zones of Kepler-22b and the Kepler planetary candidates KOI268.01, KOI701.03, KOI854.01 and KOI1026.01. The life supporting zone envelopes in this study the water, sulfuric acid and water/ammonia mixture habitable zones. Planetary surface temperatures were computed with a radiative convective model for “Venus-like” and “Earth-like” atmospheric scenarios including clouds. For Kepler-22b an Earth-like planet and an ocean planet (50 wt% H2O) scenario are investigated. Restrictions on stellar and planetary input parameters are derived from the model simulations. The input parameters with the largest influence on planetary surface temperature are the stellar flux, the planets' surface albedo, the considered atmospheric scenario and cloud properties. Water and thick H2SO4-clouds lead to lower surface temperatures for small values of surface albedos and higher temperatures for higher albedos. For thin H2SO4-clouds the cooling effect dominates. All planet(ary candidate)s investigated are likely to lie in the life supporting zone. Kepler-22b and KOI701.03 are likely to lie in the water habitable zone.

  7. The mass of the super-Earth orbiting the brightest Kepler planet hosting star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; HARPS-N Team

    2016-01-01

    HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 oscillating F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early analysis of the Q0 - Q5 Kepler light curves by Howell et al. (2012) revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of 1.6 R_Earth and an orbital period of 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2s upper limit of about 10 M_Earth. Here we present 82 new radial velocity observations of this system obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph. We detect the Doppler shift signal of Kepler-21b at the 3.6s level, and measure a planetary mass of 5.9 ± 1.6 M_Earth. We also update the radius of the planet to 1.65 ± 0.08 R_Earth, using the now available Kepler Q0 - Q17 photometry for this target. The mass of Kepler-21b appears to fall on the apparent dividing line between super-Earths that have lost all the material in their outer layers and those that have retained a significant amount of volatiles. Based on our results Kepler-21b belongs to the first group. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by funding from the NASA XRP Program and the John Templeton Foundation.

  8. The Kepler Mission: A wide-field transit search for terrestrial planets [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basri, Gibor; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David

    2005-11-01

    The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery mission which will continuously monitor the brightness of at least 100,000 main sequence stars, to detect the transits of terrestrial and larger planets. It is scheduled to be launched in 2007 into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit. It is a wide-field photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and array of 42 CCDs covering the 100 square degree field-of-view. It has a 1-m aperture which enables a differential photometric precision of 2 parts in 100,000 for 12th magnitude solar-like stars over a 6.5-hour transit duration. It will continuously observe dwarf stars from 8th to 15th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation, for a period of four years, with a cadence of 4 measurements per hour. Hundreds of terrestrial planets should be detected if they are common around solar-type stars. Ground-based spectrometry of stars with planetary candidates will help eliminate false-positives, and determine stellar characteristics such as mass and metallicity. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets are rare.

  9. Constraining the Radiation and Plasma Environment of the Kepler Circumbinary Habitable-zone Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Mason, Paul A.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of many planets using the Kepler telescope includes 10 planets orbiting eight binary stars. Three binaries, Kepler-16, Kepler-47, and Kepler-453, have at least one planet in the circumbinary habitable zone (BHZ). We constrain the level of high-energy radiation and the plasma environment in the BHZ of these systems. With this aim, BHZ limits in these Kepler binaries are calculated as a function of time, and the habitability lifetimes are estimated for hypothetical terrestrial planets and/or moons within the BHZ. With the time-dependent BHZ limits established, a self-consistent model is developed describing the evolution of stellar activity and radiation properties as proxies for stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres. Modeling binary stellar rotation evolution, including the effect of tidal interaction between stars in binaries, is key to establishing the environment around these systems. We find that Kepler-16 and its binary analogs provide a plasma environment favorable for the survival of atmospheres of putative Mars-sized planets and exomoons. Tides have modified the rotation of the stars in Kepler-47, making its radiation environment less harsh in comparison to the solar system. This is a good example of the mechanism first proposed by Mason et al. Kepler-453 has an environment similar to that of the solar system with slightly better than Earth radiation conditions at the inner edge of the BHZ. These results can be reproduced and even reparameterized as stellar evolution and binary tidal models progress, using our online tool http://bhmcalc.net.

  10. CONSTRAINING THE RADIATION AND PLASMA ENVIRONMENT OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE-ZONE PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Mason, Paul A.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.

    2016-02-20

    The discovery of many planets using the Kepler telescope includes 10 planets orbiting eight binary stars. Three binaries, Kepler-16, Kepler-47, and Kepler-453, have at least one planet in the circumbinary habitable zone (BHZ). We constrain the level of high-energy radiation and the plasma environment in the BHZ of these systems. With this aim, BHZ limits in these Kepler binaries are calculated as a function of time, and the habitability lifetimes are estimated for hypothetical terrestrial planets and/or moons within the BHZ. With the time-dependent BHZ limits established, a self-consistent model is developed describing the evolution of stellar activity and radiation properties as proxies for stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres. Modeling binary stellar rotation evolution, including the effect of tidal interaction between stars in binaries, is key to establishing the environment around these systems. We find that Kepler-16 and its binary analogs provide a plasma environment favorable for the survival of atmospheres of putative Mars-sized planets and exomoons. Tides have modified the rotation of the stars in Kepler-47, making its radiation environment less harsh in comparison to the solar system. This is a good example of the mechanism first proposed by Mason et al. Kepler-453 has an environment similar to that of the solar system with slightly better than Earth radiation conditions at the inner edge of the BHZ. These results can be reproduced and even reparameterized as stellar evolution and binary tidal models progress, using our online tool http://bhmcalc.net.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transit metric for Q1-Q17 Kepler candidates (Thompson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Mullally, F.; Coughlin, J.; Christiansen, J. L.; Henze, C. E.; Haas, M. R.; Burke, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a new metric that uses machine learning to determine if a periodic signal found in a photometric time series appears to be shaped like the signature of a transiting exoplanet. This metric uses dimensionality reduction and k-nearest neighbors to determine whether a given signal is sufficiently similar to known transits in the same data set. This metric is being used by the Kepler Robovetter to determine which signals should be part of the Q1-Q17 DR24 catalog of planetary candidates. The Kepler Mission reports roughly 20000 potential transiting signals with each run of its pipeline, yet only a few thousand appear to be sufficiently transit shaped to be part of the catalog. The other signals tend to be variable stars and instrumental noise. With this metric, we are able to remove more than 90% of the non-transiting signals while retaining more than 99% of the known planet candidates. When tested with injected transits, less than 1% are lost. This metric will enable the Kepler mission and future missions looking for transiting planets to rapidly and consistently find the best planetary candidates for follow-up and cataloging. (1 data file).

  12. WATER-PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONE: ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY, OBSERVABLE FEATURES, AND THE CASE OF KEPLER-62e AND -62f

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D.; Rugheimer, S.

    2013-10-01

    Planets composed of large quantities of water that reside in the habitable zone are expected to have distinct geophysics and geochemistry of their surfaces and atmospheres. We explore these properties motivated by two key questions: whether such planets could provide habitable conditions and whether they exhibit discernable spectral features that distinguish a water-planet from a rocky Earth-like planet. We show that the recently discovered planets Kepler-62e and -62f are the first viable candidates for habitable zone water-planets. We use these planets as test cases for discussing those differences in detail. We generate atmospheric spectral models and find that potentially habitable water-planets show a distinctive spectral fingerprint in transit depending on their position in the habitable zone.

  13. Asymmetric orbital distribution near mean motion resonance: Application to planets observed by Kepler and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-05-10

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consistent with the scenario that planets formed separately then migrated toward the MMR. The location of the pileup infers a K value of 1-100 on the order of magnitude for massive planets, where K is the damping rate ratio between orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis during planet migration.

  14. Search for circum-planetary material and orbital period variations of short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Z.; Zhou, G.; Budaj, J.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    A unique short-period ({P = 0.65356(1)} d) Mercury-size Kepler exoplanet candidate KIC012557548b has been discovered recently by {Rappaport et al. (2012)}. This object is a transiting disintegrating exoplanet with a circum-planetary material-comet-like tail. Close-in exoplanets, like KIC012557548b, are subjected to the greatest planet-star interactions. This interaction may have various forms. In certain cases it may cause formation of the comet-like tail. Strong interaction with the host star, and/or presence of an additional planet may lead to variations in the orbital period of the planet. Our main aim is to search for comet-like tails similar to KIC012557548b and for long-term orbital period variations. We are curious about frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates. We concentrate on a sample of 20 close-in candidates with a period similar to KIC012557548b from the Kepler mission. We first improved the preliminary orbital periods and obtained the transit light curves. Subsequently we searched for the signatures of a circum-planetary material in these light curves. For this purpose the final transit light curve of each planet was fitted with a theoretical light curve, and the residuals were examined for abnormalities. We then searched for possible long-term changes of the orbital periods using the method of phase dispersion minimization. In 8 cases out of 20 we found some interesting peculiarities, but none of the exoplanet candidates showed signs of a comet-like tail. It seems that the frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates is very low. We searched for comet-like tails based on the period criterion. Based on our results we can conclude that the short-period criterion is not enough to cause comet-like tail formation. This result is in agreement with the theory of the thermal wind and planet evaporation (Perez-Becker & Chiang 2013). We also found 3 cases of candidates which

  15. ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGES. II. 12 KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST AND 15 CONFIRMED TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Kulesa, C.; McCarthy, D.

    2013-07-01

    All transiting planet observations are at risk of contamination from nearby, unresolved stars. Blends dilute the transit signal, causing the planet to appear smaller than it really is, or producing a false positive detection when the target star is blended with an eclipsing binary. High spatial resolution adaptive optics images are an effective way of resolving most blends. Here we present visual companions and detection limits for 12 Kepler planet candidate host stars, of which 4 have companions within 4''. One system (KOI 1537) consists of two similar-magnitude stars separated by 0.''1, while KOI 174 has a companion at 0.''5. In addition, observations were made of 15 transiting planets that were previously discovered by other surveys. The only companion found within 1'' of a known planet is the previously identified companion to WASP-2b. An additional four systems have companions between 1'' and 4'': HAT-P-30b (3.''7, {Delta}Ks = 2.9), HAT-P-32b (2.''9, {Delta}Ks = 3.4), TrES-1b (2.''3, {Delta}Ks = 7.7), and WASP-P-33b (1.''9, {Delta}Ks = 5.5), some of which have not been reported previously. Depending on the spatial resolution of the transit photometry for these systems, these companion stars may require a reassessment of the planetary parameters derived from transit light curves. For all systems observed, we report the limiting magnitudes beyond which additional fainter objects located 0.''1-4'' from the target may still exist.

  16. DISK-PLANETS INTERACTIONS AND THE DIVERSITY OF PERIOD RATIOS IN KEPLER'S MULTI-PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, Clement; Papaloizou, John C. B. E-mail: J.C.B.Papaloizou@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2013-11-20

    The Kepler mission is dramatically increasing the number of planets known in multi-planetary systems. Many adjacent planets have orbital period ratios near resonant values, with a tendency to be larger than required for exact first-order mean-motion resonances. This feature has been shown to be a natural outcome of orbital circularization of resonant planetary pairs due to star-planet tidal interactions. However, this feature holds in multi-planetary systems with periods longer than 10 days, in which tidal circularization is unlikely to provide efficient divergent evolution of the planets' orbits to explain these orbital period ratios. Gravitational interactions between planets and their parent protoplanetary disk may instead provide efficient divergent evolution. For a planet pair embedded in a disk, we show that interactions between a planet and the wake of its companion can reverse convergent migration and significantly increase the period ratio from a near-resonant value. Divergent evolution due to wake-planet interactions is particularly efficient when at least one of the planets opens a partial gap around its orbit. This mechanism could help account for the diversity of period ratios in Kepler's multiple systems from super-Earth to sub-Jovian planets with periods greater than about 10 days. Diversity is also expected for pairs of planets massive enough to merge their gap. The efficiency of wake-planet interactions is then much reduced, but convergent migration may stall with a variety of period ratios depending on the density structure in the common gap. This is illustrated for the Kepler-46 system, for which we reproduce the period ratio of Kepler-46b and c.

  17. DISCOVERY AND ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GIANT PLANET KEPLER-12b: AN INFLATED RADIUS OUTLIER

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nutzman, Philip; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Desert, Jean-Michel; Buchhave, Lars A.; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Ciardi, David; Gautier, Thomas N.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; and others

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of planet Kepler-12b (KOI-20), which at 1.695 {+-} 0.030 R{sub J} is among the handful of planets with super-inflated radii above 1.65 R{sub J}. Orbiting its slightly evolved G0 host with a 4.438 day period, this 0.431 {+-} 0.041 M{sub J} planet is the least irradiated within this largest-planet-radius group, which has important implications for planetary physics. The planet's inflated radius and low mass lead to a very low density of 0.111 {+-} 0.010 g cm{sup -3}. We detect the occultation of the planet at a significance of 3.7{sigma} in the Kepler bandpass. This yields a geometric albedo of 0.14 {+-} 0.04; the planetary flux is due to a combination of scattered light and emitted thermal flux. We use multiple observations with Warm Spitzer to detect the occultation at 7{sigma} and 4{sigma} in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bandpasses, respectively. The occultation photometry timing is consistent with a circular orbit at e < 0.01 (1{sigma}) and e < 0.09 (3{sigma}). The occultation detections across the three bands favor an atmospheric model with no dayside temperature inversion. The Kepler occultation detection provides significant leverage, but conclusions regarding temperature structure are preliminary, given our ignorance of opacity sources at optical wavelengths in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If Kepler-12b and HD 209458b, which intercept similar incident stellar fluxes, have the same heavy-element masses, the interior energy source needed to explain the large radius of Kepler-12b is three times larger than that of HD 209458b. This may suggest that more than one radius-inflation mechanism is at work for Kepler-12b or that it is less heavy-element rich than other transiting planets.

  18. Discovery and Atmospheric Characterization of Giant Planet Kepler-12b: An Inflated Radius Outlier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Désert, Jean-Michel; Rowe, Jason; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David; Gautier, Thomas N.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Nutzman, Philip; Jenkins, Jon M.; Howard, Andrew; Charbonneau, David; Knutson, Heather A.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; Fressin, François; Deming, Drake; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Miller, Neil; Seager, Sara; Fischer, Debra A.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Haas, Michael R.; Still, Martin; Lucas, Philip; Gillon, Michael; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Geary, John C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of planet Kepler-12b (KOI-20), which at 1.695 ± 0.030 R J is among the handful of planets with super-inflated radii above 1.65 R J. Orbiting its slightly evolved G0 host with a 4.438 day period, this 0.431 ± 0.041 M J planet is the least irradiated within this largest-planet-radius group, which has important implications for planetary physics. The planet's inflated radius and low mass lead to a very low density of 0.111 ± 0.010 g cm-3. We detect the occultation of the planet at a significance of 3.7σ in the Kepler bandpass. This yields a geometric albedo of 0.14 ± 0.04; the planetary flux is due to a combination of scattered light and emitted thermal flux. We use multiple observations with Warm Spitzer to detect the occultation at 7σ and 4σ in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bandpasses, respectively. The occultation photometry timing is consistent with a circular orbit at e < 0.01 (1σ) and e < 0.09 (3σ). The occultation detections across the three bands favor an atmospheric model with no dayside temperature inversion. The Kepler occultation detection provides significant leverage, but conclusions regarding temperature structure are preliminary, given our ignorance of opacity sources at optical wavelengths in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If Kepler-12b and HD 209458b, which intercept similar incident stellar fluxes, have the same heavy-element masses, the interior energy source needed to explain the large radius of Kepler-12b is three times larger than that of HD 209458b. This may suggest that more than one radius-inflation mechanism is at work for Kepler-12b or that it is less heavy-element rich than other transiting planets.

  19. ALL SIX PLANETS KNOWN TO ORBIT KEPLER-11 HAVE LOW DENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Agol, Eric; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Deck, Katherine M.; Fischer, Debra A.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Short, Donald R.; Welsh, William F.

    2013-06-20

    The Kepler-11 planetary system contains six transiting planets ranging in size from 1.8 to 4.2 times the radius of Earth. Five of these planets orbit in a tightly packed configuration with periods between 10 and 47 days. We perform a dynamical analysis of the system based upon transit timing variations observed in more than three years of Kepler photometric data. Stellar parameters are derived using a combination of spectral classification and constraints on the star's density derived from transit profiles together with planetary eccentricity vectors provided by our dynamical study. Combining masses of the planets relative to the star from our dynamical study and radii of the planets relative to the star from transit depths together with deduced stellar properties yields measurements of the radii of all six planets, masses of the five inner planets, and an upper bound to the mass of the outermost planet, whose orbital period is 118 days. We find mass-radius combinations for all six planets that imply that substantial fractions of their volumes are occupied by constituents that are less dense than rock. Moreover, we examine the stability of these envelopes against photoevaporation and find that the compositions of at least the inner two planets have likely been significantly sculpted by mass loss. The Kepler-11 system contains the lowest mass exoplanets for which both mass and radius have been measured.

  20. The Kepler-454 System: A Small, Not-rocky Inner Planet, a Jovian World, and a Distant Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettel, Sara; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Vanderburg, Andrew; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Malavolta, Luca; Pepe, Francesco; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Latham, David W.; Udry, Stéphane; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Davies, Guy R.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Kjeldsen, Hans; Bedding, Timothy R.; Lopez, Eric; Affer, Laura; Cosentino, Rosario; Figueira, Pedro; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Johnson, John Asher; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emilio; Motalebi, Fatemeh; Phillips, David F.; Piotto, Giampaolo; Queloz, Didier; Rice, Ken; Sasselov, Dimitar; Ségransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Watson, Chris; Basu, Sarbani; Campante, Tiago L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kawaler, Steven D.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia S.; Huber, Daniel; Chaplin, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Kepler-454 (KOI-273) is a relatively bright (V = 11.69 mag), Sun-like star that hosts a transiting planet candidate in a 10.6 day orbit. From spectroscopy, we estimate the stellar temperature to be 5687 ± 50 K, its metallicity to be [m/H] = 0.32 ± 0.08, and the projected rotational velocity to be v sin i < 2.4 km s-1. We combine these values with a study of the asteroseismic frequencies from short cadence Kepler data to estimate the stellar mass to be {1.028}-0.03+0.04{M}⊙ , the radius to be 1.066 ± 0.012 R⊙, and the age to be {5.25}-1.39+1.41 Gyr. We estimate the radius of the 10.6 day planet as 2.37 ± 0.13 R⊕. Using 63 radial velocity observations obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and 36 observations made with the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory, we measure the mass of this planet to be 6.8 ± 1.4 M⊕. We also detect two additional non-transiting companions, a planet with a minimum mass of 4.46 ± 0.12 MJ in a nearly circular 524 day orbit and a massive companion with a period >10 years and mass >12.1 MJ. The 12 exoplanets with radii <2.7 R⊕ and precise mass measurements appear to fall into two populations, with those <1.6 R⊕ following an Earth-like composition curve and larger planets requiring a significant fraction of volatiles. With a density of 2.76 ± 0.73 g cm-3, Kepler-454b lies near the mass transition between these two populations and requires the presence of volatiles and/or H/He gas.

  1. Kepler-432 b: a massive planet in a highly eccentric orbit transiting a red giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Lillo-Box, J.; Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Barrado, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first disclosure of the planetary nature of Kepler-432 b (aka Kepler object of interest KOI-1299.01). We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By simultaneously fitting these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that Kepler-432 b is a dense transiting exoplanet with a mass of Mp = 4.87 ± 0.48MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 ± 0.036RJup. The planet revolves every 52.5 d around a K giant star that ascends the red giant branch, and it moves on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 ± 0.030. By analysing two near-IR high-resolution images, we found that a star is located at 1.1'' from Kepler-432, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, Kepler-432 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important for constraining the evolutionary processes of planetary systems. RV data (Table A.1) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/L5

  2. ASTEROSEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF KNOWN PLANET HOSTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Brown, T. M.; Gilliland, R. L.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.

    2010-04-20

    In addition to its great potential for characterizing extra-solar planetary systems, the Kepler Mission is providing unique data on stellar oscillations. A key aspect of Kepler asteroseismology is the application to solar-like oscillations of main-sequence stars. As an example, we here consider an initial analysis of data for three stars in the Kepler field for which planetary transits were known from ground-based observations. For one of these, HAT-P-7, we obtain a detailed frequency spectrum and hence strong constraints on the stellar properties. The remaining two stars show definite evidence for solar-like oscillations, yielding a preliminary estimate of their mean densities.

  3. Detecting Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets with the Kepler Photometer via Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Doyle, L. R.; Kepler Discovery Mission Team

    2003-05-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission will be launched in 2007 primarily to search for transiting Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of solar-like stars. In addition, it will be poised to detect the reflected light component from close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) similar to 51 Peg b. Here we use the DIARAD/SOHO time series along with models for the reflected light signatures of CEGPs to evaluate Kepler's ability to detect such planets. We examine the detectability as a function of stellar brightness, stellar rotation period, planetary orbital inclination angle, and planetary orbital period, and then estimate the total number of CEGPs that Kepler will detect over its four year mission. The analysis shows that intrinsic stellar variability of solar-like stars is a major obstacle to detecting the reflected light from CEGPs. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the detection threshold required to limit the total number of expected false alarms to no more than one for a survey of 100,000 stellar light curves. Kepler will likely detect 100-760 51 Peg b-like planets by reflected light with orbital periods up to 7 days. LRD was supported by the Carl Sagan Chair at the Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, a division of the SETI Institute. JMJ received support from the Kepler Mission Photometer and Science Office at NASA Ames Research Center.

  4. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 EARTH-RADIUS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF A SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie; Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M.; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Cochran, William D.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2012-02-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 {+-} 0.060 M{sub Sun} and 0.979 {+-} 0.020 R{sub Sun }. The depth of 492 {+-} 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 {+-} 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities (RVs) obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck I over a one-year span. Although the velocities do not lead to a reliable orbit and mass determination, they are able to constrain the mass to a 3{sigma} upper limit of 124 M{sub Circled-Plus }, safely in the regime of planetary masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other than the Sun.

  5. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XVII. The physical properties of giant exoplanets within 400 days of period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Tsantaki, M.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Almenara, J.-M.; Amard, L.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bruno, G.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Demangeon, O.; Díaz, R. F.; Guillot, T.; Havel, M.; Montagnier, G.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Rey, J.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-03-01

    While giant extrasolar planets have been studied for more than two decades now, there are still some open questions as to their dominant formation and migration processes, as well as to their atmospheric evolution in different stellar environments. In this paper, we study a sample of giant transiting exoplanets detected by the Kepler telescope with orbital periods up to 400 days. We first defined a sample of 129 giant-planet candidates that we followed up with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France) in a 6-year radial velocity campaign. This allowed us to unveil the nature of these candidates and to measure a false-positive rate of 54.6 ± 6.5% for giant-planet candidates orbiting within 400 days of period. Based on a sample of confirmed or likely planets, we then derived the occurrence rates of giant planets in different ranges of orbital periods. The overall occurrence rate of giant planets within 400 days is 4.6 ± 0.6%. We recovered, for the first time in the Kepler data, the different populations of giant planets reported by radial velocity surveys. Comparing these rates with other yields, we find that the occurrence rate of giant planets is lower only for hot Jupiters but not for the longer-period planets. We also derive a first measurement of the occurrence rate of brown dwarfs in the brown-dwarf desert with a value of 0.29 ± 0.17%. Finally, we discuss the physical properties of the giant planets in our sample. We confirm that giant planets receiving moderate irradiation are not inflated, but we find that they are on average smaller than predicted by formation and evolution models. In this regime of low-irradiated giant planets, we find a possible correlation between their bulk density and the iron abundance of the host star, which needs more detections to be confirmed. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.RV data (Appendices C and D) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to

  6. Kepler: NASA's First Mission Capable of Finding Earth-Size Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Kepler, a NASA Discovery mission, is a spaceborne telescope designed to search a nearby region of our galaxy for Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars like our sun. The habitable zone is that region around a start where the temperature permits water to be liquid on the surface of a planet. Liquid water is considered essential forth existence of life. Mission Phases: Six mission phases have been defined to describe the different periods of activity during Kepler's mission. These are: launch; commissioning; early science operations, science operations: and decommissioning

  7. Kepler-7b: A Transiting Planet With Unusually Low Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    the velocity variations are due to a planetary companion. The orbital parameters are listed in Table 2. Allowing the eccentricity to be a free...the determination of the stellar and planetary parameters for Kepler-7 followed exactly the procedures reported in Koch et al. (2010) and Borucki et al...near the end of its life on the main sequence. Key words: planetary systems – stars: individual (Kepler-7, KIC 5780885, 2MASS 19141956+4105233

  8. P-type Planet–Planet Scattering: Kepler Close Binary Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yan-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    A hydrodynamical simulation shows that a circumbinary planet will migrate inward to the edge of the disk cavity. If multiple planets form in a circumbinary disk, successive migration will lead to planet–planet scattering (PPS). PPS of Kepler-like circumbinary planets is discussed in this paper. The aim of this paper is to answer how PPS affects the formation of these planets. We find that a close binary has a significant influence on the scattering process. If PPS occurs near the unstable boundary of a binary, about 10% of the systems can be completely destroyed after PPS. In more than 90% of the systems, there is only one planet left. Unlike the eccentricity distribution produced by PPS in a single star system, the surviving planets generally have low eccentricities if PPS take place near the location of the currently found circumbinary planets. In addition, the ejected planets are generally the innermost of two initial planets. The above results depend on the initial positions of the two planets. If the initial positions of the planets are moved away from the binary, the evolution tends toward statistics similar to those around single stars. In this process, the competition between the planet–planet force and the planet-binary force makes the eccentricity distribution of surviving planets diverse. These new features of P-type PPS will deepen our understanding of the formation of these circumbinary planets.

  9. A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ECLIPSE DEPTHS OF KEPLER GAS GIANT CANDIDATES AND THE METALLICITIES OF THEIR PARENT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-10

    Previous studies of the interior structure of transiting exoplanets have shown that the heavy-element content of gas giants increases with host star metallicity. Since metal-poor planets are less dense and have larger radii than metal-rich planets of the same mass, one might expect that metal-poor stars host a higher proportion of gas giants with large radii than metal-rich stars. Here I present evidence for a negative correlation at the 2.3{sigma} level between eclipse depth and stellar metallicity in the Kepler gas giant candidates. Based on Kendall's {tau} statistics, the probability that eclipse depth depends on star metallicity is 0.981. The correlation is consistent with planets orbiting low-metallicity stars being, on average, larger in comparison with their host stars than planets orbiting metal-rich stars. Furthermore, since metal-rich stars have smaller radii than metal-poor stars of the same mass and age, a uniform population of planets should show a rise in median eclipse depth with [M/H]. The fact that I find the opposite trend indicates that substantial changes in the gas giant interior structure must accompany increasing [M/H]. I investigate whether the known scarcity of giant planets orbiting low-mass stars could masquerade as an eclipse depth-metallicity correlation, given the degeneracy between metallicity and temperature for cool stars in the Kepler Input Catalog. While the eclipse depth-metallicity correlation is not yet on firm statistical footing and will require spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements for validation, it is an intriguing window into how the interior structure of planets and even the planet formation mechanism may be changing with Galactic chemical evolution.

  10. Mass, Density, and Formation Constraints in the Compact, Sub-Earth Kepler-444 System including Two Mars-mass Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-03-01

    Kepler-444 is a five-planet system around a host star approximately 11 billion years old. The five transiting planets all have sub-Earth radii and are in a compact configuration with orbital periods between 3 and 10 days. Here, we present a transit-timing analysis of the system using the full Kepler data set in order to determine the masses of the planets. Two planets, Kepler-444 d ({M}{{d}}={0.036}-0.020+0.065 {M}\\oplus ) and Kepler-444 e ({M}{{e}}={0.034}-0.019+0.059 {M}\\oplus ), have confidently detected masses due to their proximity to resonance that creates transit-timing variations. The mass ratio of these planets combined with the magnitude of possible star–planet tidal effects suggests that smooth disk migration over a significant distance is unlikely to have brought the system to its currently observed orbital architecture without significant post-formation perturbations.

  11. Evolution and magnitudes of candidate Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Esther F.; Mordasini, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Context. The recently renewed interest in a possible additional major body in the outer solar system prompted us to study the thermodynamic evolution of such an object. We assumed that it is a smaller version of Uranus and Neptune. Aims: We modeled the temporal evolution of the radius, temperature, intrinsic luminosity, and the blackbody spectrum of distant ice giant planets. The aim is also to provide estimates of the magnitudes in different bands to assess whether the object might be detectable. Methods: Simulations of the cooling and contraction were conducted for ice giants with masses of 5, 10, 20, and 50 M⊕ that are located at 280, 700, and 1120 AU from the Sun. The core composition, the fraction of H/He, the efficiency of energy transport, and the initial luminosity were varied. The atmospheric opacity was set to 1, 50, and 100 times solar metallicity. Results: We find for a nominal 10 M⊕ planet at 700 AU at the current age of the solar system an effective temperature of 47 K, much higher than the equilibrium temperature of about 10 K, a radius of 3.7 R⊕, and an intrinsic luminosity of 0.006 L♃. It has estimated apparent magnitudes of Johnson V, R, I, L, N, Q of 21.7, 21.4, 21.0, 20.1, 19.9, and 10.7, and WISE W1-W4 magnitudes of 20.1, 20.1, 18.6, and 10.2. The Q and W4 band and other observations longward of about 13 μm pick up the intrinsic flux. Conclusions: If candidate Planet 9 has a significant H/He layer and an efficient energy transport in the interior, then its luminosity is dominated by the intrinsic contribution, making it a self-luminous planet. At a likely position on its orbit near aphelion, we estimate for a mass of 5, 10, 20, and 50 M⊕ a V magnitude from the reflected light of 24.3, 23.7, 23.3, and 22.6 and a Q magnitude from the intrinsic radiation of 14.6, 11.7, 9.2, and 5.8. The latter would probably have been detected by past surveys.

  12. Planet Candidate Validation and Spin-Orbit Misalignments from Doppler Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marshall C.

    2016-01-01

    Short-period planets around intermediate-mass (~1.5-2.5 M⊙ A-mid F type) stars are a largely unexplored region of parameter space. These stars' typically rapid rotation and rotationally broadened spectral lines preclude the use of the precise radial velocity measurements that are typically used to discover planets and confirm transiting planet candidates. Nonetheless, exploring this population is important for constraining models of planet formation and migration. I have been using Doppler tomography to investigate this population. As a planet transits a rotating star, it successively obscures regions of the stellar disk with different radial velocities, resulting in a perturbation to the rotationally broadened line profile; this is the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. In Doppler tomography, I spectroscopically resolve this perturbation and its movement during the transit. This allows me to not only validate transiting planet candidates, as I can show that the transiting object orbits the target star and is not a blended background eclipsing binary, but also to measure the spin-orbit misalignments of these planets. This is the (sky-projected) angle between the stellar spin and planetary orbital angular momentum vectors, and is a statistical probe of planetary migration; different migration mechanisms predict different distributions of spin-orbit misalignments. In this dissertation talk I will discuss my work to validate Kepler planet candidates around rapidly rotating stars using Doppler tomography, and to measure the spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiters discovered by ground-based surveys. I will also discuss the use of Doppler tomography to provide additional characterization of planets and their host stars, such as the detection of planetary orbital precession and stellar differential rotation. Finally, I will highlight the potential of current and future missions such as K2 and TESS to expand our knowledge of planets around intermediate-mass stars.

  13. A REVISED ESTIMATE OF THE OCCURRENCE RATE OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONES AROUND KEPLER M-DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2013-04-10

    Because of their large numbers, low-mass stars may be the most abundant planet hosts in our Galaxy. Furthermore, terrestrial planets in the habitable zones (HZs) around M-dwarfs can potentially be characterized in the near future and hence may be the first such planets to be studied. Recently, Dressing and Charbonneau used Kepler data and calculated the frequency of terrestrial planets in the HZ of cool stars to be 0.15{sup +0.13}{sub -0.06} per star for Earth-size planets (0.5-1.4 R{sub Circled-Plus }). However, this estimate was derived using the Kasting et al. HZ limits, which were not valid for stars with effective temperatures lower than 3700 K. Here we update their result using new HZ limits from Kopparapu et al. for stars with effective temperatures between 2600 K and 7200 K, which includes the cool M stars in the Kepler target list. The new HZ boundaries increase the number of planet candidates in the HZ. Assuming Earth-size planets as 0.5-1.4 R{sub Circled-Plus }, when we reanalyze their results, we obtain a terrestrial planet frequency of 0.48{sup +0.12}{sub -0.24} and 0.53{sup +0.08}{sub -0.17} planets per M-dwarf star for conservative and optimistic limits of the HZ boundaries, respectively. Assuming Earth-size planets as 0.5-2 R{sub Circled-Plus }, the frequency increases to 0.51{sup +0.10}{sub -0.20} per star for the conservative estimate and to 0.61{sup +0.07}{sub -0.15} per star for the optimistic estimate. Within uncertainties, our optimistic estimates are in agreement with a similar optimistic estimate from the radial velocity survey of M-dwarfs (0.41{sup +0.54}{sub -0.13}). So, the potential for finding Earth-like planets around M stars may be higher than previously reported.

  14. Stability of Earth-mass Planets in the Kepler-68 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2015-11-01

    A key component of characterizing multi-planet exosystems is testing the orbital stability based on the observed properties. Such characterization not only tests the validity of how observations are interpreted but can also place additional constraints upon the properties of the detected planets. The Kepler mission has identified hundreds of multi-planet systems but there are a few that have additional non-transiting planets and also have well characterized host stars. Kepler-68 is one such system for which we are able to provide a detailed study of the orbital dynamics. We use the stellar parameters to calculate the extent of the habitable zone (HZ) for this system, showing that the outer planet lies within that region. We use N-body integrations to study the orbital stability of the system, in particular placing an orbital inclination constraint on the outer planet of i > 5°. Finally, we present the results of an exhaustive stability simulation that investigates possible locations of stable orbits for an Earth-mass planet. We show that there are several islands of stability within the HZ that could harbor such a planet, most particularly at the 2:3 mean motion resonance with the outer planet.

  15. ARE THE KEPLER NEAR-RESONANCE PLANET PAIRS DUE TO TIDAL DISSIPATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Man Hoi; Fabrycky, D.; Lin, D. N. C. E-mail: daniel.fabrycky@gmail.com

    2013-09-01

    The multiple-planet systems discovered by the Kepler mission show an excess of planet pairs with period ratios just wide of exact commensurability for first-order resonances like 2:1 and 3:2. In principle, these planet pairs could have both resonance angles associated with the resonance librating if the orbital eccentricities are sufficiently small, because the width of first-order resonances diverges in the limit of vanishingly small eccentricity. We consider a widely held scenario in which pairs of planets were captured into first-order resonances by migration due to planet-disk interactions, and subsequently became detached from the resonances, due to tidal dissipation in the planets. In the context of this scenario, we find a constraint on the ratio of the planet's tidal dissipation function and Love number that implies that some of the Kepler planets are likely solid. However, tides are not strong enough to move many of the planet pairs to the observed separations, suggesting that additional dissipative processes are at play.

  16. A closely packed system of low-mass, low-density planets transiting Kepler-11.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Borucki, William J; Fressin, Francois; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Orosz, Jerome A; Rowe, Jason F; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F; Batalha, Natalie M; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Joshua A; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie L; Cochran, William D; Desert, Jean-Michel; Dunham, Edward W; Fanelli, Michael N; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Lopez, Eric; McCauliff, Sean; Miller, Neil; Morehead, Robert C; Quintana, Elisa V; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Short, Donald R; Steffen, Jason H

    2011-02-03

    When an extrasolar planet passes in front of (transits) its star, its radius can be measured from the decrease in starlight and its orbital period from the time between transits. Multiple planets transiting the same star reveal much more: period ratios determine stability and dynamics, mutual gravitational interactions reflect planet masses and orbital shapes, and the fraction of transiting planets observed as multiples has implications for the planarity of planetary systems. But few stars have more than one known transiting planet, and none has more than three. Here we report Kepler spacecraft observations of a single Sun-like star, which we call Kepler-11, that reveal six transiting planets, five with orbital periods between 10 and 47 days and a sixth planet with a longer period. The five inner planets are among the smallest for which mass and size have both been measured, and these measurements imply substantial envelopes of light gases. The degree of coplanarity and proximity of the planetary orbits imply energy dissipation near the end of planet formation.

  17. The Properties of Exomoons Around the Habitable Zone Planets, Kepler 22b and HD160691b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokorney, Jake; Fuse, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger study to understand the formation, evolution, and stability of exoplanet satellites, we have examined the Kepler 22 and HD160691 systems. Habitable zone planets (Kopparapu et al. 2013) are found in each system, with Kepler 22b at 0.85 AU and HD160691b at 1.5 AU. While these planets may be habitable, systems of satellites also hold the potential of supporting life. A series of N-body simulations were performed to examine the most stable configuration of moons orbiting each planet. A moonlet disk was designed to span 10 - 80% of the planet's Hill sphere (Ksting et al. 1993). The 100 bodies (mdisk/mplanet = 2 × 10-4) within the disk were randomly placed around each planet. Simulations were run for 500 kyrs, with the star, planets, and moonlets allowed to gravitationally evolve. The Kepler 22b system was able to retain three to four moons in 96% of the simulations, while the HD160691b systems had a stable pair of moons in 73% of the simulations. The remaining simulations produced systems with moons on highly eccentric orbits.

  18. KEPLER-68: THREE PLANETS, ONE WITH A DENSITY BETWEEN THAT OF EARTH AND ICE GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Rowe, Jason F.; Henze, Christopher E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rogers, Leslie; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Desert, Jean-Michel; Lopez, Eric D.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Handberg, Rasmus; Jenkins, Jon M.; Basu, Sarbani; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hekker, Saskia; and others

    2013-03-20

    NASA's Kepler Mission has revealed two transiting planets orbiting Kepler-68. Follow-up Doppler measurements have established the mass of the innermost planet and revealed a third Jovian-mass planet orbiting beyond the two transiting planets. Kepler-68b, in a 5.4 day orbit, has M{sub P}=8.3{sup +2.2}{sub -2.4} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P}=2.31{sup +0.06}{sub -0.09} R{sub Circled-Plus }, and {rho}{sub P}=3.32{sup +0.86}{sub -0.98} g cm{sup -3}, giving Kepler-68b a density intermediate between that of the ice giants and Earth. Kepler-68c is Earth-sized, with a radius R{sub P}=0.953{sup +0.037}{sub -0.042} R{sub Circled-Plus} and transits on a 9.6 day orbit; validation of Kepler-68c posed unique challenges. Kepler-68d has an orbital period of 580 {+-} 15 days and a minimum mass of M{sub P}sin i = 0.947 {+-} 0.035M{sub J} . Power spectra of the Kepler photometry at one minute cadence exhibit a rich and strong set of asteroseismic pulsation modes enabling detailed analysis of the stellar interior. Spectroscopy of the star coupled with asteroseismic modeling of the multiple pulsation modes yield precise measurements of stellar properties, notably T{sub eff} = 5793 {+-} 74 K, M{sub *} = 1.079 {+-} 0.051 M{sub Sun }, R{sub *} = 1.243 {+-} 0.019 R{sub Sun }, and {rho}{sub *} = 0.7903 {+-} 0.0054 g cm{sup -3}, all measured with fractional uncertainties of only a few percent. Models of Kepler-68b suggest that it is likely composed of rock and water, or has a H and He envelope to yield its density {approx}3 g cm{sup -3}.

  19. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XIV. A joint photometric, spectroscopic, and dynamical analysis of the Kepler-117 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Santerne, A.; Diaz, R. F.; Deleuil, M.; Damiani, C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Montagnier, G.

    2015-01-01

    As part of our follow-up campaign of Kepler planets, we observed Kepler-117 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. This F8-type star hosts two transiting planets in non-resonant orbits. The planets, Kepler-117 b and c, have orbital periods ≃ 18.8 and ≃ 50.8 days, and show transit-timing variations (TTVs) of several minutes. We performed a combined Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fit on transits, radial velocities, and stellar parameters to constrain the characteristics of the system. We included the fit of the TTVs in the MCMC by modeling them with dynamical simulations. In this way, consistent posterior distributions were drawn for the system parameters. According to our analysis, planets b and c have notably different masses (0.094 ± 0.033 and 1.84 ± 0.18MJ) and low orbital eccentricities (0.0493 ± 0.0062 and 0.0323 ± 0.0033). The uncertainties on the derived parameters are strongly reduced if the fit of the TTVs is included in the combined MCMC. The TTVs allow measuring the mass of planet b although its radial velocity amplitude is poorly constrained. Finally, we checked that the best solution is dynamically stable. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgRadial velocity tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A124

  20. Orbital Architectures of Planet-hosting Binaries. I. Forming Five Small Planets in the Truncated Disk of Kepler-444A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Isaacson, Howard; Mann, Andrew W.; Ireland, Michael J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Huber, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from our Keck program investigating the orbital architectures of planet-hosting multiple star systems. Kepler-444 is a metal-poor triple star system that hosts five sub-Earth-sized planets orbiting the primary star (Kepler-444A), as well as a spatially unresolved pair of M dwarfs (Kepler-444BC) at a projected distance of 1.8'' (66 AU). We combine our Keck/NIRC2 adaptive optics astrometry with multi-epoch Keck/HIRES RVs of all three stars to determine a precise orbit for the BC pair around A, given their empirically constrained masses. We measure minimal astrometric motion (1.0 ± 0.6 mas yr-1, or 0.17 ± 0.10 km s-1), but our RVs reveal significant orbital velocity (1.7 ± 0.2 km s-1) and acceleration (7.8 ± 0.5 m s-1 yr-1). We determine a highly eccentric stellar orbit (e=0.864+/- 0.023) that brings the tight M dwarf pair within {5.0}-1.0+0.9 AU of the planetary system. We validate that the system is dynamically stable in its present configuration via n-body simulations. We find that the A-BC orbit and planetary orbits are likely aligned (98%) given that they both have edge-on orbits and misalignment induces precession of the planets out of transit. We conclude that the stars were likely on their current orbits during the epoch of planet formation, truncating the protoplanetary disk at ≈2 AU. This truncated disk would have been severely depleted of solid material from which to form the total ≈1.5 M⊕ of planets. We thereby strongly constrain the efficiency of the conversion of dust into planets and suggest that the Kepler-444 system is consistent with models that explain the formation of most close-in Kepler planets in more typical, not truncated, disks. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by

  1. A Probabilistic Mass-Radius Relationship for Sub-Neptune-Sized Planets: Implications for Missions Post-Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie; Ford, Eric B.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of planets with radii between 1 and 4 R_Earth, paving the way for the first statistical studies of the dynamics, formation, and evolution of planets in a size range where there are no Solar System analogs. Masses are an important physical property for these theoretical studies, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. Therefore, a key practical concern is how to most accurately map a measured sub-Neptune radius to a mass estimate given the existing observations. This issue is also highly relevant to devising the most efficient follow-up programs of future transiting exoplanet detection missions such as TESS. Here we present a probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) evaluated within a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which both accounts for the anticipated intrinsic dispersion in these planets' compositions and quantifies the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters. Assuming that the M-R relation can be described as a power law with a dispersion that is constant and normally distributed, we find that M/M_Earth = 2.7 (R/R_Earth)^1.3 and a scatter in mass of 1.9 M_Earth is the "best-fit" probabilistic M-R relation for the sample of RV-measured transiting sub-Neptunes (R_pl < 4 R_Earth; Wolfgang, Rogers, & Ford, in review). The probabilistic nature of this M-R relation has several advantages: not only does its use automatically account for a significant source of uncertainty in the comparison between planet formation theory and observation, but it can predict the yield of future transit missions' follow-up programs under the observed range of planet compositions at a given radius. We demonstrate the latter with TESS as a case study, building on Sullivan et al. 2015 to provide the RV semi-amplitude distribution predicted by this more general M-R relation and a more detailed treatment of the underlying planet population as derived from Kepler. The uncertainties in the

  2. A Probabilistic Mass-Radius Relationship for Sub-Neptune-Sized Planets: Implications for Missions Post-Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie A.; Ford, Eric B.; Laughlin, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of planets with radii between 1 and 4 R_Earth, paving the way for the first statistical studies of the dynamics, formation, and evolution of planets in a size range where there are no Solar System analogs. Masses are an important physical property for these theoretical studies, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. Therefore, a key practical concern is how to most accurately map a measured sub-Neptune radius to a mass estimate given the existing observations. This issue is also highly relevant to devising the most efficient follow-up programs of future transiting exoplanet detection missions such as TESS. Here we present a probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) evaluated within a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which both accounts for the anticipated intrinsic dispersion in these planets' compositions and quantifies the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters. Assuming that the M-R relation can be described as a power law with a dispersion that is constant and normally distributed, we find that M/M_Earth = 2.7 (R/R_Earth)^1.3 and a scatter in mass of 1.9 M_Earth is the "best-fit" probabilistic M-R relation for the sample of RV-measured transiting sub-Neptunes (R_pl < 4 R_Earth; Wolfgang, Rogers, & Ford, in review). The probabilistic nature of this M-R relation has several advantages: not only does its use automatically account for a significant source of uncertainty in the comparison between planet formation theory and observation, but it can predict the yield of future transit missions' follow-up programs under the observed range of planet compositions at a given radius. We demonstrate the latter with TESS as a case study, building on Sullivan et al. 2015 to provide the RV semi-amplitude distribution predicted by this more general M-R relation and a more detailed treatment of the underlying planet population as derived from Kepler. The uncertainties in the

  3. In Situ and Ex Situ Formation Models of Kepler 11 Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We present formation simulations of the six Kepler 11 planets. Models assume either in situ or ex situ assembly, the latter with migration, and are evolved to the estimated age of the system, ≈ 8 {{Gyr}}. Models combine detailed calculations of both the gaseous envelope and the condensed core structures, including accretion of gas and solids, of the disk’s viscous and thermal evolution, including photo-evaporation and disk-planet interactions, and of the planet’s evaporative mass loss after disk dispersal. Planet-planet interactions are neglected. Both sets of simulations successfully reproduce measured radii, masses, and orbital distances of the planets, except for the radius of Kepler 11b, which loses its entire gaseous envelope shortly after formation. Gaseous (H+He) envelopes account for ≲ 18% of the planet masses, and between ≈ 35 and ≈ 60% of the planet radii. In situ models predict a very massive inner disk, whose solid surface density ({σ }Z) varies from over 104 to ≈ {10}3 {{g}} {{cm}}-2 at stellocentric distances 0.1≲ r≲ 0.5 {{au}}. Initial gas densities would be in excess of {10}5 {{g}} {{cm}}-2 if solids formed locally. Given the high disk temperatures (≳ 1000 {{K}}), planetary interiors can only be composed of metals and highly refractory materials. Sequestration of hydrogen by the core and subsequent outgassing is required to account for the observed radius of Kepler 11b. Ex situ models predict a relatively low-mass disk, whose initial {σ }Z varies from ≈ 10 to ≈ 5 {{g}} {{cm}}-2 at 0.5≲ r≲ 7 {{au}} and whose initial gas density ranges from ≈ {10}3 to ≈ 100 {{g}} {{cm}}-2. All planetary interiors are expected to be rich in H2O, as core assembly mostly occurs exterior to the ice condensation front. Kepler 11b is expected to have a steam atmosphere, and H2O is likely mixed with H+He in the envelopes of the other planets. Results indicate that Kepler 11g may not be more massive than Kepler 11e.

  4. INITIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF KEPLER LONG CADENCE DATA FOR DETECTING TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Twicken, Joseph D.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Klaus, Todd C.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission seeks to detect Earth-size planets transiting solar-like stars in its {approx}115 deg{sup 2} field of view over the course of its 3.5 year primary mission by monitoring the brightness of each of {approx}156,000 Long Cadence stellar targets with a time resolution of 29.4 minutes. We discuss the photometric precision achieved on timescales relevant to transit detection for data obtained in the 33.5 day long Quarter 1 (Q1) observations that ended 2009 June 15. The lower envelope of the photometric precision obtained at various timescales is consistent with expected random noise sources, indicating that Kepler has the capability to fulfill its mission. The Kepler light curves exhibit high precision over a large dynamic range, which will surely permit their use for a large variety of investigations in addition to finding and characterizing planets. We discuss the temporal characteristics of both the raw flux time series and the systematic error-corrected flux time series produced by the Kepler Science Pipeline, and give examples illustrating Kepler's large dynamic range and the variety of light curves obtained from the Q1 observations.

  5. Know the Planet, Know the Star: Precise Stellar Parameters with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, Emily; Kipping, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler space telescope has revolutionized exoplanetary science with unprecedentedly precise photometric measurements of the light curves of transiting planets. In addition to information about the planet and its orbit, encoded in each Kepler transiting planet light curve are certain properties of the host star, including the stellar density and the limb darkening profile. For planets with strong prior constraints on orbital eccentricity (planets to which we refer as “stellar anchors”), we may measure these stellar properties directly from the light curve. This method promises to aid greatly in the characterization of transiting planet host stars targeted by the upcoming NASA TESS mission and any long-period, singly-transiting planets discovered in the same systems. Using Bayesian inference, we fit a transit model, including a nonlinear limb darkening law, to a large sample of transiting planet hosts to measure their stellar properties. We present the results of our analysis, including posterior stellar density distributions for each stellar host, and show how the method yields superior precision to literature stellar properties in the majority of cases studied.

  6. The Five Planets in the Kepler-296 Binary System All Orbit the Primary: An Application of Importance Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa; Adams, Fred; Ciardi, David; Huber, Daniel; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Montet, Benjamin Tyler; Caldwell, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    Kepler-296 is a binary star system with two M-dwarf components separated by 0.2 arcsec. Five transiting planets have been confirmed to be associated with the Kepler-296 system; given the evidence to date, however, the planets could in principle orbit either star. This ambiguity has made it difficult to constrain both the orbital and physical properties of the planets. Using both statistical and analytical arguments, this paper shows that all five planets are highly likely to orbit the primary star in this system. We performed a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulation using a five transiting planet model, leaving the stellar density and dilution with uniform priors. Using importance sampling, we compared the model probabilities under the priors of the planets orbiting either the brighter or the fainter component of the binary. A model where the planets orbit the brighter component, Kepler-296A, is strongly preferred by the data. Combined with our assertion that all five planets orbit the same star, the two outer planets in the system, Kepler-296 Ae and Kepler-296 Af, have radii of 1.53 ± 0.26 and 1.80 ± 0.31 R⊕, respectively, and receive incident stellar fluxes of 1.40 ± 0.23 and 0.62 ± 0.10 times the incident flux the Earth receives from the Sun. This level of irradiation places both planets within or close to the circumstellar habitable zone of their parent star.

  7. The Five Planets in the Kepler-296 Binary System All Orbit the Primary: A Statistical and Analytical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa V.; Adams, Fred C.; Ciardi, David R.; Huber, Daniel; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Montet, Benjamin T.; Caldwell, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    Kepler-296 is a binary star system with two M-dwarf components separated by 0.″2. Five transiting planets have been confirmed to be associated with the Kepler-296 system; given the evidence to date, however, the planets could in principle orbit either star. This ambiguity has made it difficult to constrain both the orbital and physical properties of the planets. Using both statistical and analytical arguments, this paper shows that all five planets are highly likely to orbit the primary star in this system. We performed a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulation using a five transiting planet model, leaving the stellar density and dilution with uniform priors. Using importance sampling, we compared the model probabilities under the priors of the planets orbiting either the brighter or the fainter component of the binary. A model where the planets orbit the brighter component, Kepler-296A, is strongly preferred by the data. Combined with our assertion that all five planets orbit the same star, the two outer planets in the system, Kepler-296 Ae and Kepler-296 Af, have radii of 1.53 ± 0.26 and 1.80 ± 0.31 {R}\\oplus , respectively, and receive incident stellar fluxes of 1.40 ± 0.23 and 0.62 ± 0.10 times the incident flux the Earth receives from the Sun. This level of irradiation places both planets within or close to the circumstellar habitable zone of their parent star.

  8. Eccentricities & Resonances among Planetary Systems Identified by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    NASA's Kepler mission has identified over 1200 transiting planet candidates, including 170 sets of transiting planet candidates with a common host stars. First, we compare the distribution of transit durations for single and multiple planet candidate systems to investigate the potential differences in the eccentricity distributions between these populations. Second, we compare the frequency of pairs of planets (or planet candidates in the case of Kepler) in or near mean-motion resonances based on Kepler and Doppler planet searches. This comparison helps to address a long-standing question regarding the frequency of small planets in mean-motion resonances that are difficult to identify from Doppler data alone. Finally, we compare the frequency of pairs of planet candidates in or near mean-motion resonances with the frequency of transit timing variations in systems with a single or widely separated planet candidates.

  9. THE MASS OF Kepler-93b AND THE COMPOSITION OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Charbonneau, David; Dumusque, Xavier; Gettel, Sara; Latham, David W.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Johnson, John Asher; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane; Lovis, Christophe; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Molinari, Emilio; Cosentino, Rosario; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Affer, Laura; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Figueira, Pedro; and others

    2015-02-20

    Kepler-93b is a 1.478 ± 0.019 R {sub ⊕} planet with a 4.7 day period around a bright (V = 10.2), astroseismically characterized host star with a mass of 0.911 ± 0.033 M {sub ☉} and a radius of 0.919 ± 0.011 R {sub ☉}. Based on 86 radial velocity observations obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and 32 archival Keck/HIRES observations, we present a precise mass estimate of 4.02 ± 0.68 M {sub ⊕}. The corresponding high density of 6.88 ± 1.18 g cm{sup –3} is consistent with a rocky composition of primarily iron and magnesium silicate. We compare Kepler-93b to other dense planets with well-constrained parameters and find that between 1 and 6 M {sub ⊕}, all dense planets including the Earth and Venus are well-described by the same fixed ratio of iron to magnesium silicate. There are as of yet no examples of such planets with masses >6 M {sub ⊕}. All known planets in this mass regime have lower densities requiring significant fractions of volatiles or H/He gas. We also constrain the mass and period of the outer companion in the Kepler-93 system from the long-term radial velocity trend and archival adaptive optics images. As the sample of dense planets with well-constrained masses and radii continues to grow, we will be able to test whether the fixed compositional model found for the seven dense planets considered in this paper extends to the full population of 1-6 M {sub ⊕} planets.

  10. Kepler-15b: A Hot Jupiter Enriched in Heavy Elements and the First Kepler Mission Planet Confirmed with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Cochran, William D.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Rowe, Jason; Lucas, Phillip; Isaacson, Howard; Bryson, Steve; Howell, Steve B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hansen, Terese; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Ciardi, David R.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Everett, Mark; Ford, Eric B.; Haas, Michael R.; Holman, Matthew J.; Horch, Elliott; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Machalek, Pavel; Still, Martin; Welsh, William F.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of Kepler-15b (KOI-128), a new transiting exoplanet detected by NASA's Kepler mission. The transit signal with a period of 4.94 days was detected in the quarter 1 (Q1) Kepler photometry. For the first time, we have used the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to determine the mass of a Kepler planet via precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. The 24 HET/HRS RVs and 6 additional measurements from the Fibre-fed Échelle Spectrograph spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope reveal a Doppler signal with the same period and phase as the transit ephemeris. We used one HET/HRS spectrum of Kepler-15 taken without the iodine cell to determine accurate stellar parameters. The host star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.36 ± 0.07) G-type main-sequence star with T eff = 5515 ± 124 K. The semi-amplitude K of the RV orbit is 78.7+8.5 -9.5 m s-1, which yields a planet mass of 0.66 ± 0.1 M Jup. The planet has a radius of 0.96 ± 0.06 R Jup and a mean bulk density of 0.9 ± 0.2 g cm-3. The radius of Kepler-15b is smaller than the majority of transiting planets with similar mass and irradiation level. This suggests that the planet is more enriched in heavy elements than most other transiting giant planets. For Kepler-15b we estimate a heavy element mass of 30-40 M ⊕. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  11. KEPLER-15b: A HOT JUPITER ENRICHED IN HEAVY ELEMENTS AND THE FIRST KEPLER MISSION PLANET CONFIRMED WITH THE HOBBY-EBERLY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Cochran, William D.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Rowe, Jason; Lucas, Phillip; Isaacson, Howard; Bryson, Steve; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hansen, Terese; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark; Ford, Eric B.; and others

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of Kepler-15b (KOI-128), a new transiting exoplanet detected by NASA's Kepler mission. The transit signal with a period of 4.94 days was detected in the quarter 1 (Q1) Kepler photometry. For the first time, we have used the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to determine the mass of a Kepler planet via precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. The 24 HET/HRS RVs and 6 additional measurements from the Fibre-fed Echelle Spectrograph spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope reveal a Doppler signal with the same period and phase as the transit ephemeris. We used one HET/HRS spectrum of Kepler-15 taken without the iodine cell to determine accurate stellar parameters. The host star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.36 {+-} 0.07) G-type main-sequence star with T{sub eff} = 5515 {+-} 124 K. The semi-amplitude K of the RV orbit is 78.7{sup +8.5}{sub -9.5} m s{sup -1}, which yields a planet mass of 0.66 {+-} 0.1 M{sub Jup}. The planet has a radius of 0.96 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Jup} and a mean bulk density of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 g cm{sup -3}. The radius of Kepler-15b is smaller than the majority of transiting planets with similar mass and irradiation level. This suggests that the planet is more enriched in heavy elements than most other transiting giant planets. For Kepler-15b we estimate a heavy element mass of 30-40 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  12. HABITABILITY OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS AND MOONS IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, B.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M. E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that habitable Earth-mass planets and moons can exist in the Kepler-16 system, known to host a Saturn-mass planet around a stellar binary, by investigating their orbital stability in the standard and extended habitable zone (HZ). We find that Earth-mass planets in satellite-like (S-type) orbits are possible within the standard HZ in direct vicinity of Kepler-16b, thus constituting habitable exomoons. However, Earth-mass planets cannot exist in planetary-like (P-type) orbits around the two stellar components within the standard HZ. Yet, P-type Earth-mass planets can exist superior to the Saturnian planet in the extended HZ pertaining to considerably enhanced back-warming in the planetary atmosphere if facilitated. We briefly discuss the potential detectability of such habitable Earth-mass moons and planets positioned in satellite and planetary orbits, respectively. The range of inferior and superior P-type orbits in the HZ is between 0.657-0.71 AU and 0.95-1.02 AU, respectively.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey. II. (Baranec+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Morton, T.; Riddle, R.; Atkinson, D.; Schonhut, J.; Crepp, J.

    2016-10-01

    We selected targets that we had not previously observed from the KOI Catalog based on the Q1-Q12 Kepler data (Rowe et al. 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/16). These targets were added to the Robo-AO intelligent observing queue and observed during the summer of 2013. We obtained high angular resolution images of 956 Kepler planet candidate host stars with the Robo-AO robotic laser AOs system over the course of 19 nights between 2013 July 21 and 2013 October 25, detailed in Table5. We also include 13 images from 2012 (2012 July 16-September 13) that required additional confirmation of the KOI position in the Robo-AO field of view. All the observations were performed in a queue-scheduled mode in combination with other science programs using the Robo-AO autonomous laser AO system mounted on the robotic 1.5m telescope at Palomar Observatory (exposure time: 90s; observation wavelengths: 600-950nm; FWHM resolution: 0.12''-0.15''; field of view: 44''*44''; pixel scale: 43.1mas/pix; detector format: 10242 pixels; targets observed/hour: 20). We obtained images of 50 KOIs with the NIRC2 instrument behind the Keck II AO system that were previously observed with Robo-AO and had evidence of a companion. Observations were conducted on 2013 June 25, 2013 August 24 and 25, 2014 August 17, and 2015 July 25 in the K, Ks, or Kp filters, and in the narrow mode of NIRC2 (9.952mas/pixel). (4 data files).

  14. Had the planet Mars not existed: Kepler's equant model and its physical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, C.; Provost, J.-P.

    2009-09-01

    We examine the equant model for the motion of planets, which was the starting point of Kepler's investigations before he modified it because of Mars observations. We show that, up to first order in eccentricity, this model implies for each orbit a velocity, which satisfies Kepler's second law and Hamilton's hodograph, and a centripetal acceleration with an r-2 dependence on the distance to the Sun. If this dependence is assumed to be universal, Kepler's third law follows immediately. This elementary exercise in kinematics for undergraduates emphasizes the proximity of the equant model coming from ancient Greece with our present knowledge. It adds to its historical interest a didactical relevance concerning, in particular, the discussion of the Aristotelian or Newtonian conception of motion.

  15. Planetesimal Scattering and its Implications for the Period-Ratio Distribution of Kepler Planet Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Krantzler, Seth O.; Ford, Eric B.; Tasker, Elizabeth; Rasio, Fred

    2015-12-01

    Period ratios of most adjacent planet pairs in Kepler's multiplanet systems seem random. However, there is a clear excess and dearth of systems just exterior and interior to major mean motion resonances, respectively. We show that dynamical interactions between initially resonant planet pairs and planetesimals in a planetesimal disk can naturally produce the observed asymmetric abundances in period ratios of near-resonant pairs for a wide variety of planet and planetesimal disk properties (Chatterjee & Ford 2015). We further extend this study to include planet pairs initially not in resonance. We will present our key results from this large suite of simulations. We will also discuss implications of planetesimal scattering for the observable properties of these planets including their TTV signal and mass-radius properties as a result of planetesimal accretion.

  16. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF STARS WITH SMALL PLANETS DISCOVERED BY KEPLER. I. THE FIRST SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, Simon C.; Vaz, Zachary A.; Santrich, Orlando J. Katime; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; King, Jeremy R.; Teske, Johanna K.; Ghezzi, Luan; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard E-mail: zachary.vaz@spartans.ut.edu E-mail: kcunha@noao.edu E-mail: jking2@clemson.edu E-mail: lghezzi@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: hisaacson@berkeley.edu

    2015-12-10

    We present newly derived stellar parameters and the detailed abundances of 19 elements of seven stars with small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. Each star, save one, has at least one planet with a radius ≤1.6 R{sub ⊕}, suggesting a primarily rocky composition. The stellar parameters and abundances are derived from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy obtained with the 10 m Keck I telescope and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer using standard spectroscopic techniques. The metallicities of the seven stars range from −0.32 to +0.13 dex, with an average metallicity that is subsolar, supporting previous suggestions that, unlike Jupiter-type giant planets, small planets do not form preferentially around metal-rich stars. The abundances of elements other than iron are in line with a population of Galactic disk stars, and despite our modest sample size, we find hints that the compositions of stars with small planets are similar to stars without known planets and with Neptune-size planets, but not to those of stars with giant planets. This suggests that the formation of small planets does not require exceptional host-star compositions and that small planets may be ubiquitous in the Galaxy. We compare our derived abundances (which have typical uncertainties of ≲0.04 dex) to the condensation temperature of the elements; a correlation between the two has been suggested as a possible signature of rocky planet formation. None of the stars demonstrate the putative rocky planet signature, despite at least three of the stars having rocky planets estimated to contain enough refractory material to produce the signature, if real. More detailed abundance analyses of stars known to host small planets are needed to verify our results and place ever more stringent constraints on planet formation models.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Final Kepler transiting planet search (DR25) (Twicken+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twicken, J. D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Seader, S. E.; Tenenbaum, P.; Smith, J. C.; Brownston, L. S.; Burke, C. J.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Clarke, B. D.; Cote, M. T.; Girouard, F. R.; Klaus, T. C.; Li, J.; McCauliff, S. D.; Morris, R. L.; Wohler, B.; Campbell, J. R.; Uddin, A. K.; Zamudio, K. A.; Sabale, A.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Coughlin, J. L.; Haas, M. R.; Henze, C. E.; Sanderfer, D. T.; Thompson, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is in an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit and maintained a boresight pointing centered on α=19h22m40s, δ=+44.5° during the primary mission. The Kepler photometer acquired data on a 115-square-degree region of the sky. The data were acquired on 29.4-minute intervals, colloquially known as "long cadences". Long-cadence pixel values were obtained by accumulating 270 consecutive 6.02s exposures. Science acquisition of Q1 data began at 2009-05-13 00:01:07Z, and acquisition of Q17 data concluded at 2013-05-11 12:16:22Z. This time period contains 71427 long-cadence intervals. A total of 198709 targets observed by Kepler were searched for evidence of transiting planets in the final Q1-Q17 pipeline run (see Table1). The results of past Kepler Mission transiting planet searches have been presented in Tenenbaum et al. 2012 (Cat. J/ApJS/199/24) for Quarter 1 through Quarter 3 (i.e., Q1-Q3), Tenenbaum et al. 2013ApJS..206....5T for Q1-Q12, Tenenbaum et al. 2014ApJS..211....6T for Q1-Q16, and Seader et al. 2015 (Cat. J/ApJS/217/18) for Q1-Q17. We now present results of the final Kepler transiting planet search encompassing the complete 17-quarter primary mission. The data release for the final Q1-Q17 pipeline processing is referred to as Data Release 25 (DR25). (3 data files).

  18. The Orbit and Mass of the Third Planet in the Kepler-56 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otor, Oderah Justin; Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher; Charbonneau, David; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Latham, David W.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Piotto, Giampaolo; Phillips, David F.; Queloz, Didier; Rice, Ken; Sasselov, Dimitar; Ségransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Udry, Stéphane; Watson, Chris

    2016-12-01

    While the vast majority of multiple-planet systems have orbital angular momentum axes that align with the spin axis of their host star, Kepler-56 is an exception: its two transiting planets are coplanar yet misaligned by at least 40° with respect to the rotation axis of their host star. Additional follow-up observations of Kepler-56 suggest the presence of a massive, non-transiting companion that may help explain this misalignment. We model the transit data along with Keck/HIRES and HARPS-N radial velocity data to update the masses of the two transiting planets and infer the physical properties of the third, non-transiting planet. We employ a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler to calculate the best-fitting orbital parameters and their uncertainties for each planet. We find the outer planet has a period of 1002 ± 5 days and minimum mass of 5.61 ± 0.38 {M}{Jup}. We also place a 95% upper limit of 0.80 m s-1 yr-1 on long-term trends caused by additional, more distant companions.

  19. Kepler-62: a five-planet system with planets of 1.4 and 1.6 Earth radii in the habitable zone.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J; Agol, Eric; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rowe, Jason; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra; Batalha, Natalie; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fabrycky, Daniel; Désert, Jean-Michel; Bryson, Stephen T; Barclay, Thomas; Bastien, Fabienne; Boss, Alan; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Chris; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Josh; Charbonneau, David; Crepp, Justin R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gould, Alan; Haas, Michael; Henze, Christopher; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kolbl, Rea; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Latham, David W; Lee, Brian L; Lopez, Eric; Mullally, Fergal; Orosz, Jerome A; Prsa, Andrej; Quintana, Elisa V; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Sasselov, Dimitar; Seader, Shawn; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Welsh, William F; Winn, Joshua N

    2013-05-03

    We present the detection of five planets--Kepler-62b, c, d, e, and f--of size 1.31, 0.54, 1.95, 1.61 and 1.41 Earth radii (R⊕), orbiting a K2V star at periods of 5.7, 12.4, 18.2, 122.4, and 267.3 days, respectively. The outermost planets, Kepler-62e and -62f, are super-Earth-size (1.25 R⊕ < planet radius ≤ 2.0 R⊕) planets in the habitable zone of their host star, respectively receiving 1.2 ± 0.2 times and 0.41 ± 0.05 times the solar flux at Earth's orbit. Theoretical models of Kepler-62e and -62f for a stellar age of ~7 billion years suggest that both planets could be solid, either with a rocky composition or composed of mostly solid water in their bulk.

  20. Validation of Candidate Multiple-Transiting Planet Systems and Assessing Possible False Positives based on Photometric Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert; Ford, E. B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Planetary systems with multiple planets that transit their host star are of great interest for studying the architecture of planetary systems (Steffen et al. 2010; Holman et al. 2010). Even space-based exoplanet transit surveys, such as CoRoT and Kepler, must be careful to exclude astrophysical false positives that can mimic the photometric signature of multiple-transiting planet system (MTPS). Due to large point spread functions, a putative MTPS might actually be: 1) a true MTPS, 2) a blend of an eclipsing binary and a star with a single transiting planet, 3) a blend of two eclipsing binaries, or 4) two stars each with a single transiting planet. Assessing the relative probability for each of these possibilities is important both for validating potential planets and for prioritizing the limited follow-up resources that can contribute to validation or confirmation of such systems. We introduce new observable parameters based on ratios of the measured transit durations in MTPSs, as well as the measured orbital periods and (when available) impact parameters. We explore the utility of these parameters for validating candidate MTPSs and/or rejecting false positives. For multiple planets around the same star, these parameters have values near one. The distribution of these parameters for certain blend scenarios can be markedly different. We investigate these distributions through Monte Carlo simulations of three different types of blends; planet-binary, binary-binary, and planet-planet and compare these to the distribution for true MTPSs. We present results based on previously released Kepler data and simulations using multiple distributions for the orbital inclinations, eccentricities, and binary star population. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate

  1. A Dynamical Analysis of the Kepler-80 System of Five Transiting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Mariah G.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Lopez, Eric D.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Rogers, Leslie; Rowe, Jason F.; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Kepler has discovered hundreds of systems with multiple transiting exoplanets which hold tremendous potential both individually and collectively for understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Many of these systems consist of multiple small planets with periods less than ∼50 days known as Systems with Tightly spaced Inner Planets, or STIPs. One especially intriguing STIP, Kepler-80 (KOI-500), contains five transiting planets: f, d, e, b, and c with periods of 1.0, 3.1, 4.6, 7.1, and 9.5 days, respectively. We provide measurements of transit times and a transit timing variation (TTV) dynamical analysis. We find that TTVs cannot reliably detect eccentricities for this system, though mass estimates are not affected. Restricting the eccentricity to a reasonable range, we infer masses for the outer four planets (d, e, b, and c) to be {6.75}-0.51+0.69, {4.13}-0.95+0.81, {6.93}-0.70+1.05, and {6.74}-0.86+1.23 Earth masses, respectively. The similar masses but different radii are consistent with terrestrial compositions for d and e and ∼2% H/He envelopes for b and c. We confirm that the outer four planets are in a rare dynamical configuration with four interconnected three-body resonances that are librating with few degree amplitudes. We present a formation model that can reproduce the observed configuration by starting with a multi-resonant chain and introducing dissipation. Overall, the information-rich Kepler-80 planets provide an important perspective into exoplanetary systems.

  2. The Eccentric Response of Kepler's Circumbinary Planets to Common-Envelope Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keavin; Veselin B. Kostov, Daniel Tamayo, Ray Jayawardhana, Stephen A. Rinehart

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the recent Kepler discoveries of circumbinary planets orbiting close binary stars, we explore the fate of the former as the latter evolve off the main sequence. By combining binary stellar evolutionary models and dynamical simulations using numerical integration, we study the orbital evolution of these planets as a result of the common-envelope stages of their host binaries. Half of the Kepler systems experiences at least one common-envelope stage using their default physical parameters. During the common-envelope stage, the binary stars either shrink to very short orbits or coalesce; one system may trigger a double-degenerate supernova explosion. As the common-envelope stage is a complex and still-uncertain process, we test multiple efficiency parameters for each system. Much of the uncertainty in circumbinary systems is believed to be a result of tidal effects, and so we also vary the tides within our simulations. We find that, for common-envelope mass-loss rates of 1 solar mass per year, their planets predominantly remain gravitationally bound to the system at the end of this stage, migrate to larger orbits, and gain significant eccentricity. This orbital expansion can be up to an order of magnitude, and occurs over the course of a single planetary orbit. Some systems retain their planets even in the runaway regime of instantaneous mass loss. For slower mass loss rates of 0.1 solar masses per year, our results indicate an adiabatic orbital expansion for all except Kepler-1647, where this mass loss corresponds to the transition regime. Interestingly, the planets can experience both adiabatic and non-adiabatic orbital expansion if the host binaries experience multiple common-envelope stages (i.e. Kepler-1647); multiplanet circumbinary systems like Kepler-47 can experience both modes simultaneously during the same common-envelope stage. Our results show that, unlike Mercury, a circumbinary planet with the same semi-major axis can survive the common

  3. The Kepler Mission: A Search for Terrestrial Planets - Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, W.; Mayer, D.; Caldwell, D.; Jenkens, J.; Dunham, E.; Geary, J.; Bachtell, E.; Deininger, W.; Philbrick, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have embarked on a mission to detect terrestrial planets. The space mission has been optimized to search for earth-size planets (0.5 to 10 earth masses) in the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars. Given this design, the mission will necessarily be capable of not only detecting Earth analogs, but a wide range of planetary types and characteristics ranging from Mercury-size objects with orbital periods of days to gas-giants in decade long orbits that have undeniable signatures even with only one transit detected. The mission is designed to survey the full range of spectral-type dwarf stars. The approach is to detect the periodic signal of transiting planets. Three or more transits of a star exceeding a combined threshold of eight sigma with a statistically consistent period, brightness change and duration provide a rigorous method of detection. From the relative brightness change the planet size can be calculated. From the period the orbital size can be calculated and its location relative to the HZ determined. Presented here are: the mission goals, the top level system design requirements derived from these goals that drive the flight system design, a number of the trades that have lead to the mission concept, expected photometric performance dependence on stellar brightness and spectral type based on the system 'noise tree' analysis. Updated estimates are presented of the numbers of detectable planets versus size, orbit, stellar spectral type and distances based on a planet frequency hypothesis. The current project schedule and organization are given.

  4. Beyond Kepler: Direct Imaging of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2012-01-01

    Is there another Earth out there? Is there life on it? People have been asking these questions for over two thousand years, and we finally stand on the verge of answering them. The Kepler space telescope is NASA's first mission designed to study Earthlike exoplanets (exo-Earths), and it will soon tell us how often exo-Earths occur in the habitable zones of their stars. The next natural step after Kepler is spectroscopic characterization of exo-Earths, which would tell us whether they possess an atmosphere, oxygen, liquid water, as well as other biomarkers. In order to do this, directly imaging an exo-Earth may be necessary (at least for Sun-like stars). Directly imaging an exo-Earth is challenging and likely requires a flagship-size optical space telescope with an unprecedented imaging system capable of achieving contrasts of 1(exp 10) very close to the diffraction limit. Several coronagraphs and external occulters have been proposed to meet this challenge and are in development. After first overviewing the history and current state of the field, my talk will focus on the work proceeding at the Ames Coronagraph Experiment (ACE) at the NASA Ames Research Center, where we are developing the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph in a collaboration with JPL. PIAA is a powerful technique with demonstrated aggressive performance that defines the state of the art at small inner working angles. At ACE, we have achieved contrasts of 2(exp -8) with an inner working angle of 2 lambda/D and 1(exp -6) at 1.4 lambda/D. On the path to exo-Earth imaging, we are also pursuing a smaller telescope concept called EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer), which was recently selected for technology development (Category III) by NASA's Explorer program. EXCEDE will do fundamental science on debris disks as well as serve as a technological and scientific pathfinder for an exo-Earth imaging mission.

  5. A Statistical Reconstruction of the Planet Population around Kepler Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silburt, Ari; Gaidos, Eric; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-02-01

    Using the cumulative catalog of planets detected by the NASA Kepler mission, we reconstruct the intrinsic occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-size (1-4 R ⊕) planets and their distributions with radius and orbital period. We analyze 76,711 solar-type (0.8 < R */R ⊙ < 1.2) stars with 430 planets on 20-200 day orbits, excluding close-in planets that may have been affected by the proximity to the host star. Our analysis considers errors in planet radii and includes an "iterative simulation" technique that does not bin the data. We find a radius distribution that peaks at 2-2.8 Earth radii, with lower numbers of smaller and larger planets. These planets are uniformly distributed with logarithmic period, and the mean number of such planets per star is 0.46 ± 0.03. The occurrence is ~0.66 if planets interior to 20 days are included. We estimate the occurrence of Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone" (defined as 1-2 R ⊕, 0.99-1.7 AU for solar-twin stars) as 6.4+3.4-1.1 %. Our results largely agree with those of Petigura et al., although we find a higher occurrence of 2.8-4 Earth-radii planets. The reasons for this excess are the inclusion of errors in planet radius, updated Huber et al. stellar parameters, and also the exclusion of planets that may have been affected by proximity to the host star.

  6. A STATISTICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE PLANET POPULATION AROUND KEPLER SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Silburt, Ari; Wu, Yanqin; Gaidos, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Using the cumulative catalog of planets detected by the NASA Kepler mission, we reconstruct the intrinsic occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-size (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) planets and their distributions with radius and orbital period. We analyze 76,711 solar-type (0.8 < R {sub *}/R {sub ☉} < 1.2) stars with 430 planets on 20-200 day orbits, excluding close-in planets that may have been affected by the proximity to the host star. Our analysis considers errors in planet radii and includes an ''iterative simulation'' technique that does not bin the data. We find a radius distribution that peaks at 2-2.8 Earth radii, with lower numbers of smaller and larger planets. These planets are uniformly distributed with logarithmic period, and the mean number of such planets per star is 0.46 ± 0.03. The occurrence is ∼0.66 if planets interior to 20 days are included. We estimate the occurrence of Earth-size planets in the ''habitable zone'' (defined as 1-2 R {sub ⊕}, 0.99-1.7 AU for solar-twin stars) as 6.4{sub −1.1}{sup +3.4}%. Our results largely agree with those of Petigura et al., although we find a higher occurrence of 2.8-4 Earth-radii planets. The reasons for this excess are the inclusion of errors in planet radius, updated Huber et al. stellar parameters, and also the exclusion of planets that may have been affected by proximity to the host star.

  7. The discovery of a planetary candidate around the evolved low-mass Kepler giant star HD 175370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrudková, M.; Hatzes, A.; Karjalainen, R.; Lehmann, H.; Hekker, S.; Hartmann, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Prins, S.; Van Winckel, H.; De Nutte, R.; Dumortier, L.; Frémat, Y.; Hensberge, H.; Jorissen, A.; Lampens, P.; Laverick, M.; Lombaert, R.; Pápics, P. I.; Raskin, G.; Sódor, Á.; Thoul, A.; Van Eck, S.; Waelkens, C.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a planetary companion candidate with a minimum mass M sin i = 4.6 ± 1.0 MJupiter orbiting the K2 III giant star HD 175370 (KIC 007940959). This star was a target in our programme to search for planets around a sample of 95 giant stars observed with Kepler. This detection was made possible using precise stellar radial velocity measurements of HD 175370 taken over five years and four months using the coudé echelle spectrograph of the 2-m Alfred Jensch Telescope and the fibre-fed echelle spectrograph High Efficiency and Resolution Mercator Echelle Spectrograph of the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Our radial velocity measurements reveal a periodic (349.5 ± 4.5 d) variation with a semi-amplitude K = 133 ± 25 m s- 1, superimposed on a long-term trend. A low-mass stellar companion with an orbital period of ˜88 yr in a highly eccentric orbit and a planet in a Keplerian orbit with an eccentricity e = 0.22 are the most plausible explanation of the radial velocity variations. However, we cannot exclude the existence of stellar envelope pulsations as a cause for the low-amplitude radial velocity variations and only future continued monitoring of this system may answer this uncertainty. From Kepler photometry, we find that HD 175370 is most likely a low-mass red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch star.

  8. Comparing HARPS and Kepler surveys. The alignment of multiple-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Marmier, M.; Boué, G.; Lovis, C.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Udry, S.; Pepe, F.; Mayor, M.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The recent results of the HARPS and Kepler surveys provided us with a bounty of extrasolar systems. While the two teams extensively analyzed each of their data-sets, little work has been done comparing the two. Aims: We study a subset of the planetary population whose characterization is simultaneously within reach of both instruments. We compare the statistical properties of planets in systems with msini > 5-10 M⊕ and R > 2 R⊕, as inferred from the HARPS and Kepler surveys, respectively. If we assume that the underlying population has the same characteristics, the different detection sensitivity to the orbital inclination relative to the line of sight allows us to probe the planets' mutual inclination. Methods: We considered the frequency of systems with one, two, and three planets as dictated by HARPS data. We used Kepler's planetary period and host mass and radius distributions (corrected from detection bias) to model planetary systems in a simple, yet physically plausible way. We then varied the mutual inclination between planets in a system according to different prescriptions (completely aligned, Rayleigh distributions, and isotropic) and compared the transit frequencies with one, two, or three planets with those measured by Kepler. Results: The results show that the two datasets are compatible, a remarkable result especially because there are no tunable knobs other than the assumed inclination distribution. For msini cutoffs of 7-10 M⊕, which are those expected to correspond to the radius cutoff of 2 R⊕, we conclude that the results are better described by a Rayleigh distribution with a mode of 1° or smaller. We show that the best-fit scenario only becomes a Rayleigh distribution with a mode of 5° if we assume a quite extreme mass-radius relationship for the planetary population. Conclusions: These results have important consequences for our understanding of the role of several proposed formation and evolution mechanisms. They confirm that

  9. Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was arguably the most innovative astronomical theorist in the millennium and a half from Claudius PTOLEMY's Almagest (c. AD 150) to Isaac NEWTON's Principia (1687). Before Kepler, planetary and lunar theory had consisted in combining circular motions, either strictly uniform or angularly uniform about an off-center `equant' point, so as to `save the appearances'. T...

  10. The dynamics of the multi-planet system orbiting Kepler-56

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gongjie; Naoz, Smadar; Johnson, John Asher; Valsecchi, Francesca; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: snaoz@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-20

    Kepler-56 is a multi-planet system containing two coplanar inner planets that are in orbits misaligned with respect to the spin axis of the host star, and an outer planet. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the broad distribution of spin-orbit angles among exoplanets, and these theories fall under two broad categories. The first is based on dynamical interactions in a multi-body system, while the other assumes that disk migration is the driving mechanism in planetary configuration and that the star (or disk) is titled with respect to the planetary plane. Here we show that the large observed obliquity of Kepler 56 system is consistent with a dynamical origin. In addition, we use observations by Huber et al. to derive the obliquity's probability distribution function, thus improving the constrained lower limit. The outer planet may be the cause of the inner planets' large obliquities, and we give the probability distribution function of its inclination, which depends on the initial orbital configuration of the planetary system. We show that even in the presence of precise measurement of the true obliquity, one cannot distinguish the initial configurations. Finally we consider the fate of the system as the star continues to evolve beyond the main sequence, and we find that the obliquity of the system will not undergo major variations as the star climbs the red giant branch. We follow the evolution of the system and find that the innermost planet will be engulfed in ∼129 Myr. Furthermore we put an upper limit of ∼155 Myr for the engulfment of the second planet. This corresponds to ∼3% of the current age of the star.

  11. KIC-5473556: the largest and longest-period Kepler transiting circumbinary planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of short-period CBPs orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet in the KIC-5473556 system has a very long orbital period (~1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission -- making it the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing. With a radius of nearly 12 REarth, it is also the largest such planet to date. It produced three transits in the light curve of KIC 5473556, one of them during a syzygy. The planet revolves around an ~11-day Eclipsing Binary consisting of two Solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined to the line of sight, mildly eccentric (ebin = 0.16) orbit. The CBP measurably perturbs the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to constrain its mass well. Here we present our spectroscopic and photometric observations of the target, discuss our analysis of the system, and outline the theoretical implications of our discovery.

  12. BUILDING TATOOINE: SUPPRESSION OF THE DIRECT SECULAR EXCITATION IN KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2013-02-10

    Circumbinary planetary systems recently discovered by Kepler represent an important testbed for planet formation theories. Planetesimal growth in disks around binaries has been expected to be inhibited interior to {approx}10 AU by secular excitation of high relative velocities between planetesimals, leading to their collisional destruction (rather than agglomeration). Here we show that gravity of an axisymmetric gaseous circumbinary disk in which planets form drives fast precession of both the planetesimal and binary orbits, resulting in strong suppression of planetesimal eccentricities beyond 2-3 AU and making possible the growth of 1-10{sup 2} km objects in this region. The precise location of the boundary of the accretion-friendly region depends on the size of the inner disk cavity cleared by the binary torques and on the disk mass (even 0.01 M{sub Sun} disk strongly suppresses planetesimal excitation), among other things, but this zone does not extend to present orbits of Kepler circumbinary planets. The precession of the orbit of the central binary, enhanced by the mass concentration that is naturally present at the inner edge of a circumbinary disk, plays a key role in this suppression, which is a feature specific to the circumbinary planet formation.

  13. THE HUNT FOR EXOMOONS WITH KEPLER (HEK). III. THE FIRST SEARCH FOR AN EXOMOON AROUND A HABITABLE-ZONE PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Forgan, D.; Hartman, J.; Bakos, G. Á.; Nesvorný, D.; Schmitt, A.; Buchhave, L.

    2013-11-10

    Kepler-22b is the first transiting planet to have been detected in the habitable zone of its host star. At 2.4 R{sub ⊕}, Kepler-22b is too large to be considered an Earth analog, but should the planet host a moon large enough to maintain an atmosphere, then the Kepler-22 system may yet possess a telluric world. Aside from being within the habitable zone, the target is attractive due to the availability of previously measured precise radial velocities and low intrinsic photometric noise, which has also enabled asteroseismology studies of the star. For these reasons, Kepler-22b was selected as a target-of-opportunity by the 'Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler' (HEK) project. In this work, we conduct a photodynamical search for an exomoon around Kepler-22b leveraging the transits, radial velocities, and asteroseismology plus several new tools developed by the HEK project to improve exomoon searches. We find no evidence for an exomoon around the planet and exclude moons of mass M{sub S} > 0.5 M{sub ⊕} to 95% confidence. By signal injection and blind retrieval, we demonstrate that an Earth-like moon is easily detected for this planet even when the time-correlated noise of the data set is taken into account. We provide updated parameters for the planet Kepler-22b, including a revised mass of M{sub P} < 53 M{sub ⊕} to 95% confidence and an eccentricity of 0.13{sub -0.13}{sup +0.36} by exploiting Single-body Asterodensity Profiling. Finally, we show that Kepler-22b has a >95% probability of being within the empirical habitable zone but a <5% probability of being within the conservative habitable zone.

  14. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler. VII. The First Fully Uniform Catalog Based on the Entire 48-month Data Set (Q1-Q17 DR24)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, Susan E.; Rowe, Jason F.; Burke, Christopher J.; Latham, David W.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Ofir, Aviv; Quarles, Billy L.; Henze, Christopher E.; Wolfgang, Angie; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Shporer, Avi; Catanzarite, Joseph; Akeson, Rachel; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li, Jie; Patil-Sabale, Anima; Quintana, Elisa V.; Ramirez, Solange; Seader, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Zamudio, Khadeejah A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the seventh Kepler planet candidate (PC) catalog, which is the first catalog to be based on the entire, uniformly processed 48-month Kepler data set. This is the first fully automated catalog, employing robotic vetting procedures to uniformly evaluate every periodic signal detected by the Q1-Q17 Data Release 24 (DR24) Kepler pipeline. While we prioritize uniform vetting over the absolute correctness of individual objects, we find that our robotic vetting is overall comparable to, and in most cases superior to, the human vetting procedures employed by past catalogs. This catalog is the first to utilize artificial transit injection to evaluate the performance of our vetting procedures and to quantify potential biases, which are essential for accurate computation of planetary occurrence rates. With respect to the cumulative Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog, we designate 1478 new KOIs, of which 402 are dispositioned as PCs. Also, 237 KOIs dispositioned as false positives (FPs) in previous Kepler catalogs have their disposition changed to PC and 118 PCs have their disposition changed to FPs. This brings the total number of known KOIs to 8826 and PCs to 4696. We compare the Q1-Q17 DR24 KOI catalog to previous KOI catalogs, as well as ancillary Kepler catalogs, finding good agreement between them. We highlight new PCs that are both potentially rocky and potentially in the habitable zone of their host stars, many of which orbit solar-type stars. This work represents significant progress in accurately determining the fraction of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The full catalog is publicly available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive.

  15. Systems engingeering for the Kepler Mission : a search for terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, Riley M.; Dragon, Karen; Gunter, Steve Z.; Gautier, Nick; Koch, Dave; Harvey, Adam; Enos, Alan; Borucki, Bill; Sobeck, Charlie; Mayer, Dave; Jenkins, Jon; Thompson, Rick; Bachtell, Eric; Peters, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The Kepler mission will launch in 2007 and determine the distribution of earth-size planets (0.5 to 10 earth masses) in the habitable zones (HZs) of solar-like stars. The mission will monitor > 100,000 dwarf stars simultaneously for at least 4 years. Precision differential photometry will be used to detect the periodic signals of transiting planets. Kepler will also support asteroseismology by measuring the pressure-mode (p-mode) oscillations of selected stars. Key mission elements include a spacecraft bus and 0.95 meter, wide-field, CCD-based photometer injected into an earth-trailing heliocentric orbit by a 3-stage Delta II launch vehicle as well as a distributed Ground Segment and Follow-up Observing Program. The project is currently preparing for Preliminary Design Review (October 2004) and is proceeding with detailed design and procurement of long-lead components. In order to meet the unprecedented photometric precision requirement and to ensure a statistically significant result, the Kepler mission involves technical challenges in the areas of photometric noise and systematic error reduction, stability, and false-positive rejection. Programmatic and logistical challenges include the collaborative design, modeling, integration, test, and operation of a geographically and functionally distributed project. A very rigorous systems engineering program has evolved to address these challenges. This paper provides an overview of the Kepler systems engineering program, including some examples of our processes and techniques in areas such as requirements synthesis, validation & verification, system robustness design, and end-to-end performance modeling.

  16. The Dependence of the Kepler Planet Population on Host Star Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs Dirk; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has monitored stars with a wide range of masses and metallicities for transiting planets. These stellar properties trace the conditions in the protoplanetary disk at the time of planet formation, and leave an imprint on the exoplanet population. We derive planet occurrence rates as a function of stellar mass and metallicity. In contrasts to giant planets, whose occurrence scales positively with both quantities, the occurrence of super-earths is anti-correlated with stellar mass and does not depend on metallicity except at orbital periods less than 10 days.The higher average mass of planetary systems around low-mass M dwarfs compared to sun-like stars indicates migration of planetary building blocks is stellar-mass dependent and plays a prominent role in the planet formation process. The excess of hot super-earths around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge which is metallicity-dependent.

  17. Spectro-thermometry of M dwarfs and their candidate planets: Too hot, too cool, or just right?

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Ansdell, Megan; Gaidos, Eric

    2013-12-20

    We use moderate-resolution spectra of nearby late K and M dwarf stars with parallaxes and interferometrically determined radii to refine their effective temperatures, luminosities, and metallicities. We use these revised values to calibrate spectroscopic techniques to infer the fundamental parameters of more distant late-type dwarf stars. We demonstrate that, after masking out poorly modeled regions, the newest version of the PHOENIX atmosphere models accurately reproduce temperatures derived bolometrically. We apply methods to late-type hosts of transiting planet candidates in the Kepler field, and calculate effective temperature, radius, mass, and luminosity with typical errors of 57 K, 7%, 11%, and 13%, respectively. We find systematic offsets between our values and those from previous analyses of the same stars, which we attribute to differences in atmospheric models utilized for each study. We investigate which of the planets in this sample are likely to orbit in the circumstellar habitable zone. We determine that four candidate planets (KOI 854.01, 1298.02, 1686.01, and 2992.01) are inside of or within 1σ of a conservative definition of the habitable zone, but that several planets identified by previous analyses are not (e.g., KOI 1422.02 and KOI 2626.01). Only one of the four habitable-zone planets is Earth sized, suggesting a downward revision in the occurrence of such planets around M dwarfs. These findings highlight the importance of measuring accurate stellar parameters when deriving parameters of their orbiting planets.

  18. KOI-2700b—a planet candidate with dusty effluents on a 22 hr orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, Saul; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin; Rowe, Jason E-mail: rsanchis86@gmail.com E-mail: martin.d.still@nasa.gov E-mail: jasonfrowe@gmail.com

    2014-03-20

    Kepler planet candidate KOI-2700b (KIC 8639908b), with an orbital period of 21.84 hr, exhibits a distinctly asymmetric transit profile, likely indicative of the emission of dusty effluents, and reminiscent of KIC 1255b. The host star has T {sub eff} = 4435 K, M ≅ 0.63 M {sub ☉}, and R ≅ 0.57 R {sub ☉}, comparable to the parameters ascribed to KIC 12557548. The transit egress can be followed for ∼25% of the orbital period and, if interpreted as extinction from a dusty comet-like tail, indicates a long lifetime for the dust grains of more than a day. We present a semiphysical model for the dust tail attenuation and fit for the physical parameters contained in that expression. The transit is not sufficiently deep to allow for a study of the transit-to-transit variations, as is the case for KIC 1255b; however, it is clear that the transit depth is slowly monotonically decreasing by a factor of ∼2 over the duration of the Kepler mission. We infer a mass-loss rate in dust from the planet of ∼2 lunar masses per Gyr. The existence of a second star hosting a planet with a dusty comet-like tail would help to show that such objects may be more common and less exotic than originally thought. According to current models, only quite small planets with M{sub p} ≲ 0.03 M {sub ⊕} are likely to release a detectable quantity of dust. Thus, any 'normal-looking' transit that is inferred to arise from a rocky planet of radius greater than ∼1/2 R {sub ⊕} should not exhibit any hint of a dusty tail. Conversely, if one detects an asymmetric transit due to a dusty tail, then it will be very difficult to detect the hard body of the planet within the transit because, by necessity, the planet must be quite small (i.e., ≲ 0.3 R {sub ⊕}).

  19. Wavelet-based filter methods for the detection of small transiting planets: Application to Kepler and K2 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Paetzold, Martin; KEST

    2016-10-01

    The Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung (RIU-PF) has developed the software package EXOTRANS for the detection of transits of exoplanets in stellar light curves. This software package was in use during the CoRoT space mission (2006-2013). EXOTRANS was improved by different wavelet-based filter methods during the following years to separate stellar variation, orbital disturbances and instrumental effects from stellar light curves taken by space telescopes (Kepler, K2, TESS and PLATO). The VARLET filter separates faint transit signals from stellar variations without using a-priori information about the target star. VARLET considers variations by frequency, amplitude and shape simultaneously. VARLET is also able to extract most instrumental jumps and glitches. The PHALET filter separates periodic features independent of their shape and is used with the intention to separate diluting stellar binaries. It is also applied for the multi transit search. Stellar light curves of the K2 mission are constructed from the processing of target pixel files which corrects disturbances caused by the reduced pointing precision of the Kepler telescope after the failure of two gyroscopes. The combination of target pixel file processing with both filter techniques and the proven detection pipeline EXOTRANS lowers the detection limit, reduces false alarms and simplifies the detection of faint transits in light curves of the K2 mission. Using EXOTRANS many new candidates were detected in K2 light curves by using EXOTRANS which were successfully confirmed by ground-based follow-up observation of the KEST collaboration. New candidates and confirmed planets are presented.

  20. Kepler Mission: A Mission to Find Earth-size Planets in the Habitable Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer Schmidt-type telescope with an array of 42 CCDs. It has a 0.95 m aperture and 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 2 parts in 10(exp 5) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6 hr transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main-sequence stars from 9th to 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4/hour. An additional 250 stars can be monitored at a cadence of l/minute to do astro-seismology of stars brighter than 11.5 mv. The photometer is scheduled to be launched into heliocentric orbit in 2007. When combined with ground-based spectrometric observations of these stars, the positions of the planets relative to the habitable zone can be found. The spectra of the stars are also used to determine the relationships between the characteristics of terrestrial planets and the characteristics of the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. Based on the results of the current Doppler-velocity discoveries, over a thousand giant planets will also be found. Information on the albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of Earth-size planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ are very rare and that life might also be quite rare.

  1. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-05-20

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018{sub −0.004}{sup +0.005}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕}. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm{sup –3} × (R/3 R {sub ⊕}){sup –2.3} for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Rowe, Jason F.; Carter, Joshua A.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  3. Densities and Eccentricities of 139 Kepler Planets from Transit Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-05-01

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018^{+0.005}_{-0.004}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R ⊕ are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R ⊕. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm-3 × (R/3 R ⊕)-2.3 for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R ⊕ are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  4. Mass Determination Of Directly Imaged Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Neuhauser, R.; Seifahrt, A.

    2011-09-01

    About 20 sub-stellar companions with large separations (> 50 AU) to their young primary stars and brown dwarfs are confirmed by both common proper motion and late-M / early-L type spectra. The origin and early evolution of these objects is still under debate. While often these sub-stellar companions are regarded as brown dwarfs, they could possibly also be massive planets, the mass estimates are very uncertain so far. They are companions to primary stars or brown dwarfs in young associations and star forming regions like Taurus, Upper Scorpius, the TW Hya association, Beta Pic moving group, TucHor association, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon, hence their ages and distances are well known, in contrast to free-floating brown dwarfs. Here we present how mass estimates of such young directly imaged companions can be derived, using e.g. evolutionary models, which are however currently almost uncalibrated by direct mass measurements of young objects. An empirical classification by medium-resolution spectroscopy is currently not possible, because a spectral sequence that is taking the lower gravity into account, is not existing. This problem leads to an apparent mismatch between spectra of old field type objects and young low-mass companions at the same effective temperature, hampering a determination of temperature and surface gravity independent from models. We show that from spectra of the objects, using the advantages of light concentration by an AO-assisted integral field spectrograph, temperature, extinction, metallicity and surface gravity can be derived using non-equilibrium radiative transfer atmosphere models as comparison and that this procedure as well allows a mass determination in combination with the luminosities found by the direct observations, as has recently been done by us for several young sub-stellar companions, as e.g. GQ Lup, CT Cha or UScoCTIO 108.

  5. Identifying Young Kepler Planet Host Stars from Keck-HIRES Spectra of Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Travis Allen; Howard, Andrew; Boesgaard, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    The lithium doublet at 6708 A provides an age diagnostic for FGK stars. We measured the abundance of lithium in 1149 stars with detected transiting planets from the Kepler Mission using high resolution spectroscopy. Our catalog of lithium measurements from this sample have a range of abundance from A(Li) = 3.13 +/- 0.05 to a lower limit of -0.79. For a magnitude-limited sample that comprises 930 of the 1149 stars, our Keck-HIRES spectra have a median S/N = 45 per pixel at spectral resolution R = 55,000. We identify 79 young stars that have A(Li) values greater than the Hyades at their respective effective temperatures; these stars are younger than ~650 Myr old, the approximate age of the Hyades. We then compare the distribution of A(Li) with planet size, disposition, multiplicity, orbital period, and insolation flux.

  6. The Kepler Mission: A Transit-Photometry Mission to Discover Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Devore, Edna; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Thomas; Geary, John; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve; Jenkins, Jon

    The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 main sequence stars to detect the transit of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and an array of 42 CCDs covering the 100 sq. degree field-of-view (FOV). It has a 0.95 m aperture and a 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6.5-hour transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main sequence stars from 9th to 15th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4 measurements per hour. Kepler is Discovery Mission #10 and is on schedule for launch in 2007 into heliocentric orbit. A ground-based program to classify all 450,000 stars brighter than 15th magnitude in the FOV and to conduct a detailed examination of a subset of the stars that show planetary companions is also planned. Hundreds of Earth-size planets should be detected if they are common around solarlike stars. Ground-based spectrometric observations of those stars with planetary companions will be made to determine the dependences of the frequency and size of terrestrial planets on stellar characteristics such as type and metallicity. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets are rare.

  7. A 1.9 Earth Radius Rocky Planet and the Discovery of a Non-transiting Planet in the Kepler-20 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Dressing, Courtney D.; Dumusque, Xavier; Rice, Ken; Vanderburg, Andrew; Mortier, Annelies; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Lopez, Eric; Lundkvist, Mia S.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Affer, Laura; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Charbonneau, David; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Cosentino, Rosario; Figueira, Pedro; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Johnson, John Asher; Latham, David W.; Lovis, Christophe; Malavolta, Luca; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emilio; Motalebi, Fatemeh; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Pepe, Francesco; Phillips, David F.; Piotto, Giampaolo; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Sasselov, Dimitar; Ségransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Udry, Stéphane; Watson, Chris

    2016-12-01

    Kepler-20 is a solar-type star (V = 12.5) hosting a compact system of five transiting planets, all packed within the orbital distance of Mercury in our own solar system. A transition from rocky to gaseous planets with a planetary transition radius of ˜1.6 {R}\\oplus has recently been proposed by several articles in the literature. Kepler-20b ({R}p ˜ 1.9 {R}\\oplus ) has a size beyond this transition radius; however, previous mass measurements were not sufficiently precise to allow definite conclusions to be drawn regarding its composition. We present new mass measurements of three of the planets in the Kepler-20 system that are facilitated by 104 radial velocity measurements from the HARPS-N spectrograph and 30 archival Keck/HIRES observations, as well as an updated photometric analysis of the Kepler data and an asteroseismic analysis of the host star ({M}\\star = 0.948+/- 0.051 {M}⊙ and {R}\\star = 0.964+/- 0.018 {R}⊙ ). Kepler-20b is a {1.868}-0.034+0.066 {R}\\oplus planet in a 3.7 day period with a mass of {9.70}-1.44+1.41 {M}\\oplus , resulting in a mean density of {8.2}-1.3+1.5 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, indicating a rocky composition with an iron-to-silicate ratio consistent with that of the Earth. This makes Kepler-20b the most massive planet with a rocky composition found to date. Furthermore, we report the discovery of an additional non-transiting planet with a minimum mass of {19.96}-3.61+3.08 {M}\\oplus and an orbital period of ˜34 days in the gap between Kepler-20f (P ˜ 11 days) and Kepler-20d (P ˜ 78 days). Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofísica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  8. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95-cm Schmidt telescope to survey 100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to ˜ 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1,000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, will also be found. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%.

  9. Kepler Systems That Show Multiple Transiting Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Exoplanetary systems that have multiple transiting planets provide unique and important insight into the formation, evolution, and dynamics of exoplanetary systems. Kepler has announced the discovery of a confirmed planetary system with multiple transiting planets (Kepler 9, Holman et al. 2010) as well as several candidate planetary systems that show multiple transiting objects (Steffen et al. 2010). Kepler 9 shows deviations from a constant period due to the ongoing dynamical interactions between the confirmed planets. From these transit timing variations (TTV) one can measure the planetary masses from the photometric data alone. The presence of several systems with multiple transiting candidates from the first quarter of data indicate that Kepler should continue to find systems with multiple transiting planets. Such systems will provide important, general information about the histories of planetary systems.

  10. A High False Positive Rate for Kepler Planetary Candidates of Giant Stars using Asterodensity Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-01

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ~= 70% ± 30%. Based on archival data of the Kepler telescope.

  11. Detection of Potential Transit Signals in 17 Quarters of Kepler Data: Results of the Final Kepler Mission Transiting Planet Search (DR25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Brownston, Lee S.; Burke, Christopher J.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Klaus, Todd C.; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Morris, Robert L.; Wohler, Bill; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Kamal Uddin, Akm; Zamudio, Khadeejah A.; Sabale, Anima; Bryson, Steven T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Thompson, Susan E.

    2016-12-01

    We present results of the final Kepler Data Processing Pipeline search for transiting planet signals in the full 17-quarter primary mission data set. The search includes a total of 198,709 stellar targets, of which 112,046 were observed in all 17 quarters and 86,663 in fewer than 17 quarters. We report on 17,230 targets for which at least one transit signature is identified that meets the specified detection criteria: periodicity, minimum of three observed transit events, detection statistic (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio) in excess of the search threshold, and passing grade on three statistical transit consistency tests. Light curves for which a transit signal is identified are iteratively searched for additional signatures after a limb-darkened transiting planet model is fitted to the data and transit events are removed. The search for additional planets adds 16,802 transit signals for a total of 34,032; this far exceeds the number of transit signatures identified in prior pipeline runs. There was a strategic emphasis on completeness over reliability for the final Kepler transit search. A comparison of the transit signals against a set of 3402 well-established, high-quality Kepler Objects of Interest yields a recovery rate of 99.8%. The high recovery rate must be weighed against a large number of false-alarm detections. We examine characteristics of the planet population implied by the transiting planet model fits with an emphasis on detections that would represent small planets orbiting in the habitable zone of their host stars.

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. II. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: Martin.Still@nasa.gov

    2011-07-20

    On 2011 February 1 the Kepler mission released data for 156,453 stars observed from the beginning of the science observations on 2009 May 2 through September 16. There are 1235 planetary candidates with transit-like signatures detected in this period. These are associated with 997 host stars. Distributions of the characteristics of the planetary candidates are separated into five class sizes: 68 candidates of approximately Earth-size (R{sub p} < 1.25 R{sub +}), 288 super-Earth-size (1.25 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 2 R{sub +}), 662 Neptune-size (2 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 6 R{sub +}), 165 Jupiter-size (6 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 15 R{sub +}), and 19 up to twice the size of Jupiter (15 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 22 R{sub +}). In the temperature range appropriate for the habitable zone, 54 candidates are found with sizes ranging from Earth-size to larger than that of Jupiter. Six are less than twice the size of the Earth. Over 74% of the planetary candidates are smaller than Neptune. The observed number versus size distribution of planetary candidates increases to a peak at two to three times the Earth-size and then declines inversely proportional to the area of the candidate. Our current best estimates of the intrinsic frequencies of planetary candidates, after correcting for geometric and sensitivity biases, are 5% for Earth-size candidates, 8% for super-Earth-size candidates, 18% for Neptune-size candidates, 2% for Jupiter-size candidates, and 0.1% for very large candidates; a total of 0.34 candidates per star. Multi-candidate, transiting systems are frequent; 17% of the host stars have multi-candidate systems, and 34% of all the candidates are part of multi-candidate systems.

  13. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  14. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Welsh, William F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Ciardi, David R.; Prsa, Andrej

    2012-09-10

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  15. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.

    2007-07-01

    The Kepler mission will use a space based, 95 cm Schmidt telescope to survey >100,000 late type dwarf stars for transiting Earth-sized planets over a period of 4 years. Up to 2000 such planets might be detected along with a hundred or more transiting giant planets. About 1000 false positive planet detections, due mainly to eclipsing binary stars, are also expected. A ground based follow-up program is planned to observe all of the planet candidates found by Kepler to weed out these false positives and produce a final catalog with a reliability greater than 95%. In addition, follow-up observations will, where possible, measure the mass of confirmed planets and look for any non-transiting giant planets. The Kepler Project is Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a Discovery Mission.

  16. Catching Shadows: Kepler's Year-Two Transit Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie

    2011-04-01

    Launched in March, 2009, NASA's Kepler Mission is poised to determine the abundance of earth-size planets in the Galaxy. The project has hosted two major data releases, providing the astronomical community with four months of nearly continuous, high-precision photometry of all stars targeted as part of the Kepler planet search. A catalog of nearly 1,000 stars with transiting planet candidates, more than 70% of which are smaller than Neptune, accompanied the data release (Borucki et al. 2011). Ground-based follow-up observations, transit timing observations, and blend analyses have all played a major role in validating the planet interpretation, leading to major mission milestones such as the discovery of Kepler's first rocky planet, Kepler-10b, and the discovery of six transiting planets orbiting the same star, Kepler-11. Multiple transiting planet candidate systems are abundant in the released data. Dynamical studies suggest that the false-positive rate for these systems will likely be less than 10%, and the potential for determining planet masses via transit timing variations hold much promise for confirming the smallest planet candidates. I will present an overview of Kepler's recent discoveries and our progress towards the ultimate objective which is to determine the frequency of habitable, earth-size planets.

  17. Kepler-539: A young extrasolar system with two giant planets on wide orbits and in gravitational interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Lillo-Box, J.; Southworth, J.; Borsato, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Ciceri, S.; Barrado, D.; Brahm, R.; Henning, Th.

    2016-05-01

    We confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-539 b (aka Kepler object of interest K00372.01), a giant transiting exoplanet orbiting a solar-analogue G2 V star. The mass of Kepler-539 b was accurately derived thanks to a series of precise radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph mounted on the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. A simultaneous fit of the radial-velocity data and Kepler photometry revealed that Kepler-539 b is a dense Jupiter-like planet with a mass of Mp = 0.97 ± 0.29 MJup and a radius of Rp = 0.747 ± 0.018 RJup, making a complete circular revolution around its parent star in 125.6 days. The semi-major axis of the orbit is roughly 0.5 au, implying that the planet is at ≈0.45 au from the habitable zone. By analysing the mid-transit times of the 12 transit events of Kepler-539 b recorded by the Kepler spacecraft, we found a clear modulated transit time variation (TTV), which is attributable to the presence of a planet c in a wider orbit. The few timings available do not allow us to precisely estimate the properties of Kepler-539 c and our analysis suggests that it has a mass between 1.2 and 3.6 MJup, revolving on a very eccentric orbit (0.4 planet c is the probable cause of the TTV modulation of planet b. The analysis of the CAFE spectra revealed a relatively high photospheric lithium content, A(Li) = 2.48 ± 0.12 dex, which, together with both a gyrochronological and isochronal analysis, suggests that the parent star is relatively young. RV/BVS measurements are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A112

  18. Kepler-413B: A slightly misaligned, Neptune-size transiting circumbinary planet

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, V. B.; McCullough, P. R.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Carter, J. A.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Hébrard, G.; Hinse, T. C.; Mazeh, T.; Orosz, J. A.; Welsh, W. F.

    2014-03-20

    We report the discovery of a transiting, R{sub p} = 4.347 ± 0.099R {sub ⊕}, circumbinary planet (CBP) orbiting the Kepler K+M eclipsing binary (EB) system KIC 12351927 (Kepler-413) every ∼66 days on an eccentric orbit with a{sub p} = 0.355 ± 0.002 AU, e{sub p} = 0.118 ± 0.002. The two stars, with M{sub A} = 0.820 ± 0.015 M {sub ☉}, R{sub A} = 0.776 ± 0.009 R {sub ☉} and M{sub B} = 0.542 ± 0.008 M {sub ☉}, R{sub B} = 0.484 ± 0.024 R {sub ☉}, respectively, revolve around each other every 10.11615 ± 0.00001 days on a nearly circular (e {sub EB} = 0.037 ± 0.002) orbit. The orbital plane of the EB is slightly inclined to the line of sight (i {sub EB} = 87.°33 ± 0.°06), while that of the planet is inclined by ∼2.°5 to the binary plane at the reference epoch. Orbital precession with a period of ∼11 yr causes the inclination of the latter to the sky plane to continuously change. As a result, the planet often fails to transit the primary star at inferior conjunction, causing stretches of hundreds of days with no transits (corresponding to multiple planetary orbital periods). We predict that the next transit will not occur until 2020. The orbital configuration of the system places the planet slightly closer to its host stars than the inner edge of the extended habitable zone. Additionally, the orbital configuration of the system is such that the CBP may experience Cassini State dynamics under the influence of the EB, in which the planet's obliquity precesses with a rate comparable to its orbital precession. Depending on the angular precession frequency of the CBP, it could potentially undergo obliquity fluctuations of dozens of degrees (and complex seasonal cycles) on precession timescales.

  19. Reduced Activity and Large Particles from the Disintegrating Planet Candidate KIC 12557548b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, E.; Herter, T.; Zhao, M.; Teske, J. K.; Chen, H.

    2016-08-01

    The intriguing exoplanet candidate KIC 12557548b is believed to have a comet-like tail of dusty debris trailing a small rocky planet. The tail of debris scatters up to 1.3% of the stellar light in the Kepler observatory’s bandpass (0.42-0.9 μm). Observing the tail’s transit depth at multiple wavelengths can reveal the composition and particle size of the debris, constraining the makeup and lifetime of the sub-Mercury planet. Early dust particle size predictions from the scattering of the comet-like tail pointed toward a dust size of ˜0.1 μm for silicate compositions. These small particles would produce a much deeper optical transit depth than near-infrared transit depth. We measure a transmission spectrum for KIC 12557548b using the SpeX spectrograph (covering 0.8-2.4 μm) simultaneously with the MORIS imager taking r‧ (0.63 μm) photometry on the Infrared Telescope Facility for eight nights and one night in H band (1.63 μm) using the Wide-field IR Camera at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. The infrared spectra are plagued by systematic errors, but we argue that sufficient precision is obtained when using differential spectroscopic calibration when combining multiple nights. The average differential transmission spectrum is flat, supporting findings that KIC 12557548b’s debris is likely composed of larger particles ≳0.5 μm for pyroxene and olivine and ≳0.2 μm for iron and corundum. The r‧ photometric transit depths are all below the average Kepler value, suggesting that the observations occurred during a weak period or that the mechanisms producing optical broadband transit depths are suppressed.

  20. ATMOSPHERE AND SPECTRAL MODELS OF THE KEPLER-FIELD PLANETS HAT-P-7b AND TrES-2

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-10-10

    We develop atmosphere models of two of the three Kepler-field planets that were known prior to the start of the Kepler mission (HAT-P-7b and TrES-2). We find that published Kepler and Spitzer data for HAT-P-7b appear to require an extremely hot upper atmosphere on the dayside, with a strong thermal inversion and little day-night redistribution. The Spitzer data for TrES-2 suggest a mild thermal inversion with moderate day-night redistribution. We examine the effect of nonequilibrium chemistry on TrES-2 model atmospheres and find that methane levels must be adjusted by extreme amounts in order to cause even mild changes in atmospheric structure and emergent spectra. Our best-fit models to the Spitzer data for TrES-2 lead us to predict a low secondary eclipse planet-star flux ratio ({approx}<2 x 10{sup -5}) in the Kepler bandpass, which is consistent with what very recent observations have found. Finally, we consider how the Kepler-band optical flux from a hot exoplanet depends on the strength of a possible extra optical absorber in the upper atmosphere. We find that the optical flux is not monotonic in optical opacity, and the non-monotonicity is greater for brighter, hotter stars.

  1. The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK): V. A Survey of 41 Planetary Candidates for Exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Schmitt, A. R.; Huang, X.; Torres, G.; Nesvorný, D.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hartman, J.; Bakos, G. Á.

    2015-11-01

    We present a survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) for exomoons using Bayesian photodynamics, more than tripling the number of KOIs surveyed with this technique. We find no compelling evidence for exomoons although 13 KOIs yield spurious detections driven by instrumental artifacts, stellar activity, and/or perturbations from unseen bodies. Regarding the latter, we find seven KOIs exhibiting >5 σ evidence of transit timing variations, including the “mega-Earth” Kepler-10c, likely indicating an additional planet in that system. We exploit the moderately large sample of 57 unique KOIs surveyed to date to infer several useful statistics. For example, although there is a diverse range in sensitivities, we find that we are sensitive to Pluto-Charon mass-ratio systems for ≃40% of KOIs studied and Earth-Moon mass-ratios for 1 in 8 cases. In terms of absolute mass, our limits probe down to 1.7 Ganymede masses, with a sensitivity to Earth-mass moons for 1 in 3 cases studied and to the smallest moons capable of sustaining an Earth-like atmosphere (0.3 M⨁) for 1 in 4. Despite the lack of positive detections to date, we caution against drawing conclusions yet, since our most interesting objects remain under analysis. Finally, we point out that had we searched for the photometric transit signals of exomoons alone, rather than using photodynamics, we estimate that 1 in 4 KOIs would have erroneously been concluded to harbor exomoons due to residual time correlated noise in the Kepler data, posing a serious problem for alternative methods. Based on archival data of the Kepler telescope.

  2. Measurements of Kepler Planet Masses and Eccentricities from Transit Timing Variations: Analytic and N-body Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2015-12-01

    Several Kepler planets reside in multi-planet systems where gravitational interactions result in transit timing variations (TTVs) that provide exquisitely sensitive probes of their masses of and orbits. Measuring these planets' masses and orbits constrains their bulk compositions and can provide clues about their formation. However, inverting TTV measurements in order to infer planet properties can be challenging: it involves fitting a nonlinear model with a large number of parameters to noisy data, often with significant degeneracies between parameters. I present results from two complementary approaches to TTV inversion: Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations that use N-body integrations to compute transit times and a simplified analytic model for computing the TTVs of planets near mean motion resonances. The analytic model allows for straightforward interpretations of N-body results and provides an independent estimate of parameter uncertainties that can be compared to MCMC results which may be sensitive to factors such as priors. We have conducted extensive MCMC simulations along with analytic fits to model the TTVs of dozens of Kepler multi-planet systems. We find that the bulk of these sub-Jovian planets have low densities that necessitate significant gaseous envelopes. We also find that the planets' eccentricities are generally small but often definitively non-zero.

  3. Stable five-body orbits in the Kepler-47 exoplanet system: Predicting stable orbits of a possible third circumbinary planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinse, Tobias Cornelius

    2014-09-01

    Kepler-47 is the first multi-body circumbinary planetary system detected by the Kepler space telescope. The two planets were detected by the transit method. In the discovery paper, the authors report on the presence of an additional transit-like signal in their data set, which cannot be explained by a four-body (binary + 2 planets) system. Therefore, it is likely that the unexplained signal could be due to a third planet. I will present recent results from a dynamical investigation of the five-body system (binary + 3 planets). We have applied the MEGNO technique to detect regions of quasi- or near-quasi-periodic orbits of a hypothetical third planet. Quasiperiodic regions exist for a third planet and the long-term stability has been tested. Although the existence of a third planet is most likely to be confirmed from transit photometry we calculate transit-timing variation (TTV) signals due to the third planet, which also can be used to infer its presence.

  4. Discovery of Two Jovian Planet Candidates Around AU Mic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Tanner, Angelle M.; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Kane, Stephen R.; White, Russel; Johnson, John A.; Hall, Ryan; Giddens, Frank; Zilberman, Perri; Huber, Joe; Nishimoto, America; Cancino, Andrew; Weigand, Denise; Klenke, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We present a pair of candidate Jovian exoplanets discovered with the radial velocity (RV) technique in the near-infrared (NIR) orbiting the young M dwarf star AU Mic (a ~ 0.3 and 3.5 AU; M_p ~ 1.5 and 6 M_J). Data were obtained at 2.3 microns from 2010-2016 with the R=46,000 CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, and from 2005-2007 with the R=25,000 NIRSPEC spectrograph at the Keck Observatory. AU Mic possesses long-lived BY Draconis type polar starspots with a known rotation period of 4.865 days. No signal in the NIR RVs is identified that is consistent with the rotation period of the star, but stellar activity remains a possible explanation for the observed NIR RV variability. The outer Jovian planet candidate offers a plausible dynamical explanation for the observed debris disk dynamics of moving "clumps" on several year time-scales. It may be possible to directly image the outer planet candidate with the current generation of high contrast imaging instruments. If confirmed, this discovery would demonstrate the utility of RV precursor observations for informing direct imaging surveys and the utility of NIR RV searches for planets around young and/or active stars. These results also point to the promise of future NIR precise RVs, including iSHELL, SPIRou, HPF and CARMENES, which will operate at higher precision and with larger spectral grasp than CSHELL.

  5. SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT FOR THE CIRCUMBINARY PLANET HOST KEPLER-16 A

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Cochran, William D.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra; Doyle, Laurance; Welsh, William; Orosz, Jerome; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Shporer, Avi; Howell, Steve B.; Prsa, Andrej

    2011-11-01

    Kepler-16 is an eccentric low-mass eclipsing binary with a circumbinary transiting planet. Here, we investigate the angular momentum of the primary star, based on Kepler photometry and Keck spectroscopy. The primary star's rotation period is 35.1 {+-} 1.0 days, and its projected obliquity with respect to the stellar binary orbit is 1.{sup 0}6 {+-} 2.{sup 0}4. Therefore, the three largest sources of angular momentum-the stellar orbit, the planetary orbit, and the primary's rotation-are all closely aligned. This finding supports a formation scenario involving accretion from a single disk. Alternatively, tides may have realigned the stars despite their relatively wide separation (0.2 AU), a hypothesis that is supported by the agreement between the measured rotation period and the 'pseudosynchronous' period of tidal evolution theory. The rotation period, chromospheric activity level, and fractional light variations suggest a main-sequence age of 2-4 Gyr. Evolutionary models of low-mass stars can match the observed masses and radii of the primary and secondary stars to within about 3%.

  6. {chi}{sup 2} DISCRIMINATORS FOR TRANSITING PLANET DETECTION IN KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Seader, Shawn; Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Burke, Christopher J. E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov E-mail: christopher.j.burke@nasa.gov

    2013-06-01

    The Kepler spacecraft observes a host of target stars to detect transiting planets. Requiring a 7.1{sigma} detection in three years of data yields over 100,000 detections, many of which are false alarms. After a second cut is made on a robust detection statistic, some 50,000 or more targets still remain. These false alarms waste resources as they propagate through the remainder of the software pipeline and so a method to discriminate against them is crucial in maintaining the desired sensitivity to true events. This paper describes a {chi}{sup 2} test which represents a novel application of an existing formalism developed for false alarm mitigation in searches for gravitational waves. Using this technique, the false alarm rate can be lowered to {approx}5%.

  7. STELLAR ROTATION PERIODS OF THE KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST: A DEARTH OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS AROUND FAST ROTATORS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2013-09-20

    We present a large sample of stellar rotation periods for Kepler Objects of Interest, based on three years of public Kepler data. These were measured by detecting periodic photometric modulation caused by star spots, using an algorithm based on the autocorrelation function of the light curve, developed recently by McQuillan, Aigrain and Mazeh (2013). Of the 1919 main-sequence exoplanet hosts analyzed, robust rotation periods were detected for 737. Comparing the detected stellar periods to the orbital periods of the innermost planet in each system reveals a notable lack of close-in planets around rapid rotators. It appears that only slowly spinning stars with rotation periods longer than 5-10 days host planets on orbits shorter than 2 or 3 days, although the mechanism(s) that lead(s) to this is not clear.

  8. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XII. KOI-1257 b: a highly eccentric three-month period transiting exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Hébrard, G.; Deleuil, M.; Havel, M.; Correia, A. C. M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Alonso, R.; Arnold, L.; Barros, S. C. C.; Behrend, R.; Bernasconi, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Bruno, G.; Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Gravallon, D.; Guillot, T.; Labrevoir, O.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.; Rinner, C.; Santos, N. C.; Abe, L.; Audejean, M.; Bendjoya, P.; Gillier, C.; Gregorio, J.; Martinez, P.; Michelet, J.; Montaigut, R.; Poncy, R.; Rivet, J.-P.; Rousseau, G.; Roy, R.; Suarez, O.; Vanhuysse, M.; Verilhac, D.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report a new transiting warm giant planet: KOI-1257 b. It was first detected in photometry as a planet-candidate by the Kepler space telescope and then validated thanks to a radial velocity follow-up with the SOPHIE spectrograph. It orbits its host star with a period of 86.647661 d ± 3 s and a high eccentricity of 0.772 ± 0.045. The planet transits the main star of a metal-rich, relatively old binary system with stars of mass of 0.99 ± 0.05 M⊙ and 0.70 ± 0.07 M⊙ for the primary and secondary, respectively. This binary system is constrained thanks to a self-consistent modelling of the Kepler transit light curve, the SOPHIE radial velocities, line bisector and full-width half maximum (FWHM) variations, and the spectral energy distribution. However, future observations are needed to confirm it. The PASTIS fully-Bayesian software was used to validate the nature of the planet and to determine which star of the binary system is the transit host. By accounting for the dilution from the binary both in photometry and in radial velocity, we find that the planet has a mass of 1.45 ± 0.35 M⊙ , and a radius of 0.94 ± 0.12 R⊙ , and thus a bulk density of 2.1 ± 1.2 g cm-3. The planet has an equilibrium temperature of 511 ± 50 K, making it one of the few known members of the warm-Jupiter population. The HARPS-N spectrograph was also used to observe a transit of KOI-1257 b, simultaneously with a joint amateur and professional photometric follow-up, with the aim of constraining the orbital obliquity of the planet. However, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect was not clearly detected, resulting in poor constraints on the orbital obliquity of the planet. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, and with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish

  9. Direct Imaging discovery of a second planet candidate around the possibly transiting planet host CVSO 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T. O. B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Briceño, C.; Vogt, N.; Raetz, St.; Seifahrt, A.; Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Buder, S.; Adam, C.; Hauschildt, P.; Witte, S.; Helling, Ch.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Direct imaging has developed into a very successful technique for the detection of exoplanets in wide orbits, especially around young stars. Directly imaged planets can be both followed astrometrically on their orbits and observed spectroscopically and thus provide an essential tool for our understanding of the early solar system. Aims: We surveyed the 25 Ori association for direct-imaging companions. This association has an age of only few million years. Among other targets, we observed CVSO 30, which has recently been identified as the first T Tauri star found to host a transiting planet candidate. Methods: We report on photometric and spectroscopic high-contrast observations with the Very Large Telescope, the Keck telescopes, and the Calar Alto observatory. They reveal a directly imaged planet candidate close to the young M3 star CVSO 30. Results: The JHK-band photometry of the newly identified candidate is at better than 1σ consistent with late-type giants, early-T and early-M dwarfs, and free-floating planets. Other hypotheses such as galaxies can be excluded at more than 3.5σ. A lucky imaging z' photometric detection limit z' = 20.5 mag excludes early-M dwarfs and results in less than 10 MJup for CVSO 30 c if bound. We present spectroscopic observations of the wide companion that imply that the only remaining explanation for the object is that it is the first very young (<10 Myr) L - T-type planet bound to a star, meaning that it appears bluer than expected as a result of a decreasing cloud opacity at low effective temperatures. Only a planetary spectral model is consistent with the spectroscopy, and we deduce a best-fit mass of 4-5 Jupiter masses (total range 0.6-10.2 Jupiter masses). Conclusions: This means that CVSO 30 is the first system in which both a close-in and a wide planet candidate are found to have a common host star. The orbits of the two possible planets could not be more different: they have orbital periods of 10.76 h and about 27

  10. The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N., III; Dunham, E. W.; Gilliland, R.; Jenkins, J.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Cochran, W. D.; Howell, S.; Koch, D.; Latham, D.; Marcy, G.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission to find Earth-size exoplanets was launched on March 6, 2009, began science observations on May 11, 2009 and is now in full operation. Many planet candidates have been identified and ground based follow-up observations are weeding out false positive planet detections and beginning to confirm true planets. False positive identification techniques planned during the pre-flight phase of Kepler are proving to work well. The fraction of false positive planet detections due to binary stars sent for ground based follow-up appears small.

  11. Kepler Mission: a mission to find Earth-size planets in the habitable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Devore, Edna; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Thomas; Geary, John; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve; Jenkins, Jon

    2003-10-01

    The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 main sequence stars to detect the transit of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and an array of 42 CCDs covering the 100 sq. degree field-of-view (FOV). It has a 0.95 m aperture and a 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6.5-hour transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main sequence stars from 9th to 15th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4 measurements per hour. The photometer is scheduled to be launched in 2007 into heliocentric orbit. A ground-based program to classify all 450,000 stars brighter than 15th magnitude in the FOV and to conduct a detailed examination of a subset of the stars that show planetary companions is also planned. Hundreds of Earth-size planets should be detected if they are common around solar-like stars. Ground-based spectrometric observations of those stars with planetary companions will be made to determine the dependences of the frequency and size of terrestrial planets on stellar characteristics such as type and metallicity. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets are rare.

  12. A high false positive rate for Kepler planetary candidates of giant stars using asterodensity profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-20

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ≅ 70% ± 30%.

  13. Modeling Kepler Transit Light Curves as False Positives: Rejection of Blend Scenarios for Kepler-9, and Validation of Kepler-9 d, a Super-Earth-Size Planet in a Multiple System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-20

    imaging, centroid measurements, and photometry (colors). Therefore, even ignoring the evidence from TTVs, these results fully support the planetary ...inclinations. The light-curve parameters we obtain for Kepler-9 d by modeling the photometry using the formalism of Mandel & Agol (2002) are summarized in Table...an astrophysical false positive, we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a “blend” rather than a planet orbiting a star

  14. Transiting planet candidates with ASTEP 400 at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mékarnia, D.; Guillot, T.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schmider, F.-X.; Abe, L.; Gonçalves, I.; Agabi, A.; Crouzet, N.; Fruth, T.; Barbieri, M.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Zhou, G.; Aristidi, E.; Szulagyi, J.; Daban, J.-B.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Gouvret, C.; Erikson, A.; Rauer, H.; Bouchy, F.; Gerakis, J.; Bouchez, G.

    2016-11-01

    ASTEP 400, the main instrument of the ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) programme, is a 40 cm telescope, designed to withstand the harsh conditions in Antarctica, achieving a photometric accuracy of a fraction of millimagnitude on hourly time-scales for planet-hosting southern bright (R ˜ 12 mag) stars. We review the performances of this instrument, describe its operating conditions, and present results from the analysis of observations obtained during its first three years (2010-2012) of operation, before its repatriation in 2014. During this time, we observed a total of 22 stellar fields (1° × 1° field of view). Each field, in which we measured stars up to magnitude R = 18 mag, was observed continuously during ˜7 to ˜30 d. More than 200 000 frames were recorded and 310 000 stars processed, using an implementation of the optimal image subtraction photometry algorithm. We found 43 planetary transit candidates. 20 of these candidates were observed using spectroscopic follow-ups including four targets classified as good planet candidates. Our results demonstrate that accurate near-continuous photometric observations are achievable from the Concordia station at Dome C in Antarctica, even if we were not able to reach the nominal photometric precision of the instrument. We conducted a correlation analysis between the rms noise and a large number of external parameters and found that source of the ˜1 mmag correlated noise is not obvious and does not depend on a single parameter. However, our analysis provided some hints and guidance to increase the photometric accuracy of the instrument. These improvements should equip any future telescope operating in Antarctica.

  15. THE HUNT FOR EXOMOONS WITH KEPLER (HEK). V. A SURVEY OF 41 PLANETARY CANDIDATES FOR EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Huang, X.; Hartman, J.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Nesvorný, D.; Schmitt, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    We present a survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) for exomoons using Bayesian photodynamics, more than tripling the number of KOIs surveyed with this technique. We find no compelling evidence for exomoons although 13 KOIs yield spurious detections driven by instrumental artifacts, stellar activity, and/or perturbations from unseen bodies. Regarding the latter, we find seven KOIs exhibiting >5 σ evidence of transit timing variations, including the “mega-Earth” Kepler-10c, likely indicating an additional planet in that system. We exploit the moderately large sample of 57 unique KOIs surveyed to date to infer several useful statistics. For example, although there is a diverse range in sensitivities, we find that we are sensitive to Pluto–Charon mass-ratio systems for ≃40% of KOIs studied and Earth–Moon mass-ratios for 1 in 8 cases. In terms of absolute mass, our limits probe down to 1.7 Ganymede masses, with a sensitivity to Earth-mass moons for 1 in 3 cases studied and to the smallest moons capable of sustaining an Earth-like atmosphere (0.3 M{sub ⨁}) for 1 in 4. Despite the lack of positive detections to date, we caution against drawing conclusions yet, since our most interesting objects remain under analysis. Finally, we point out that had we searched for the photometric transit signals of exomoons alone, rather than using photodynamics, we estimate that 1 in 4 KOIs would have erroneously been concluded to harbor exomoons due to residual time correlated noise in the Kepler data, posing a serious problem for alternative methods.

  16. Planet Hunters. VII. Discovery of a New Low-mass, Low-density Planet (PH3 C) Orbiting Kepler-289 with Mass Measurements of Two Additional Planets (PH3 B and D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Margossian, Charles; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; Simpson, Robert; Smith, Arfon M.

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R P = 2.68 ± 0.17 R ⊕) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R P = 2.15 ± 0.10 R ⊕) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R P = 11.59 ± 0.10 R ⊕), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (~1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (~1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M * = 1.08 ± 0.02 M ⊙, R * = 1.00 ± 0.02 R ⊙, and T eff = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (~5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M ⊕, 4.0 ± 0.9M ⊕, and M = 132 ± 17 M ⊕, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ρ = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm-3 for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1+0.8-0.3% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets. .

  17. Mercury-T: A new code to study tidally evolving multi-planet systems. Applications to Kepler-62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmont, Emeline; Raymond, Sean N.; Leconte, Jeremy; Hersant, Franck; Correia, Alexandre C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of observed planetary systems contain several planets in a compact orbital configuration, and often harbor at least one close-in object. These systems are then most likely tidally evolving. We investigate how the effects of planet-planet interactions influence the tidal evolution of planets. We introduce for that purpose a new open-source addition to the MercuryN-body code, Mercury-T, which takes into account tides, general relativity and the effect of rotation-induced flattening in order to simulate the dynamical and tidal evolution of multi-planet systems. It uses a standard equilibrium tidal model, the constant time lag model. Besides, the evolution of the radius of several host bodies has been implemented (brown dwarfs, M-dwarfs of mass 0.1 M⊙, Sun-like stars, Jupiter). We validate the new code by comparing its output for one-planet systems to the secular equations results. We find that this code does respect the conservation of total angular momentum. We applied this new tool to the planetary system Kepler-62. We find that tides influence the stability of the system in some cases. We also show that while the four inner planets of the systems are likely to have slow rotation rates and small obliquities, the fifth planet could have a fast rotation rate and a high obliquity. This means that the two habitable zone planets of this system, Kepler-62e ad f are likely to have very different climate features, and this of course would influence their potential at hosting surface liquid water. The code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/583/A116

  18. Kepler-91b: a planet at the end of its life. Planet and giant host star properties via light-curve variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Moya, A.; Montesinos, B.; Montalbán, J.; Bayo, A.; Barbieri, M.; Régulo, C.; Mancini, L.; Bouy, H.; Henning, T.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The evolution of planetary systems is intimately linked to the evolution of their host stars. Our understanding of the whole planetary evolution process is based on the wide planet diversity observed so far. Only a few tens of planets have been discovered orbiting stars ascending the red giant branch. Although several theories have been proposed, the question of how planets die remains open owing to the small number statistics, making it clear that the sample of planets around post-main sequence stars needs to be enlarged. Aims: In this work we study the giant star Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) in order to determine the nature of a transiting companion. This system was detected by the Kepler Space Telescope, which identified small dims in its light curve with a period of 6.246580 ± 0.000082 days. However, its planetary confirmation is needed due to the large pixel size of the Kepler camera, which can hide other stellar configurations able to mimic planet-like transit events. Methods: We analysed Kepler photometry to 1) re-calculate transit parameters; 2) study the light-curve modulations; and 3) to perform an asteroseismic analysis (accurate stellar parameter determination) by identifying solar-like oscillations on the periodogram. We also used a high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph (CAFE) to measure stellar properties. Additionally, false-positive scenarios were rejected by obtaining high-resolution images with the AstraLux lucky imaging camera on the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory. Results: We confirm the planetary nature of the object transiting the star Kepler-91 by deriving a mass of Mp=0.88+0.17-0.33 MJup and a planetary radius of Rp=1.384+0.011-0.054 RJup. Asteroseismic analysis produces a stellar radius of R⋆ = 6.30 ± 0.16 R⊙ and a mass of M⋆ = 1.31 ± 0.10 M⊙. We find that its eccentric orbit (e=0.066+0.013-0.017) is just 1.32+0.07-0.22 R⋆ away from

  19. KEPLER'S OPTICAL SECONDARY ECLIPSE OF HAT-P-7b AND PROBABLE DETECTION OF PLANET-INDUCED STELLAR GRAVITY DARKENING

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Brett M.; Deming, Drake; Mandell, Avi M.

    2013-02-20

    We present observations spanning 355 orbital phases of HAT-P-7 observed by Kepler from 2009 May to 2011 March (Q1-9). We find a shallower secondary eclipse depth than initially announced, consistent with a low optical albedo and detection of nearly exclusively thermal emission, without a reflected light component. We find an approximately 10 ppm perturbation to the average transit light curve near phase -0.02 that we attribute to a temperature decrease on the surface of the star, phased to the orbit of the planet. This cooler spot is consistent with planet-induced gravity darkening, slightly lagging the sub-planet position due to the finite response time of the stellar atmosphere. The brightness temperature of HAT-P-7b in the Kepler bandpass is T{sub B} = 2733 {+-} 21 K and the amplitude of the deviation in stellar surface temperature due to gravity darkening is approximately -0.18 K. The detection of the spot is not statistically unequivocal due its small amplitude, though additional Kepler observations should be able to verify the astrophysical nature of the anomaly.

  20. ``Planetário e Teatro Digital Johannes Kepler'' and its Institutional Pedagogical Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, R. Z.; Calil, M. R.; Perez, E. R.; Kanashiro, M.; Silva, L. C. P.; Calipo, F.

    2014-10-01

    This work relates the reception of schools, started on August 2012, in the astronomic laboratory of the "Planetário e Teatro Digital Johannes Kepler", located in the "Sabina - Escola Parque do Conhecimento" in Santo André, São Paulo. The idealization of this project, authorship of Marcos Calil, PhD, consists in four apprenticeship environments disposed around the planetary dome. They make reference to the System Sun - Earth - Moon (Tellurium), Solar System, Astronautic and Stars. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays the astronomic laboratory is used by Santo André municipal schools for focused lessons, being possible on Thursdays scheduling for private and public schools. On weekends and holidays is opened for the visitors. Since the inauguration to the beginning of activities with students, the monitor team was guided and trained on contents of Astronomy and Aeronautic to execute the schools service. This is done in four stages, which are: reception, course trough the astronomic laboratory, dome session and activities closure. During the reception the acquaintance rules are passed on for a better visit. Before starting the course the monitors do a survey about the previous knowledge of the students. On the astronomic laboratory resources of the environment are used to explain the contents of Astronomy and Astronautic, always considering the age group and the curriculum developed in classroom. After the course the students watch a planetary session supporting the contents seen on the astronomic laboratory. At the end a feedback is done with the students about the subject discussed. During the visit the teachers fulfill an evaluation about the place and the service. From August 2012 to November 2012 were attended between municipal, public and private schools. From the 4932 students attended, 92% belonged to the municipal network, 5% to the private network and 3% to the public network. From the 189 evaluations done by the teachers, 97.8% were satisfied, 2.1% partially

  1. Kepler-423b: a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting a very old solar-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, D.; Parviainen, H.; Deeg, H. J.; Lanza, A. F.; Fridlund, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Alonso, R.; Augusteijn, T.; Cabrera, J.; Evans, T.; Geier, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Holczer, T.; Hoyer, S.; Kangas, T.; Mazeh, T.; Pagano, I.; Tal-Or, L.; Tingley, B.

    2015-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of the Kepler object of interest KOI-183.01 (Kepler-423b), a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting an old solar-like star every 2.7 days. Our analysis is the first to combine the full Kepler photometry (quarters 1-17) with high-precision radial velocity measurements taken with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We simultaneously modelled the photometric and spectroscopic data-sets using Bayesian approach coupled with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We found that the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve of Kepler-423 exhibits quarter-to-quarter systematic variations of the transit depth, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~4.3% and seasonal trends reoccurring every four quarters. We attributed these systematics to an incorrect assessment of the quarterly variation of the crowding metric. The host star Kepler-423 is a G4 dwarf with M⋆ = 0.85 ± 0.04 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.95 ± 0.04 R⊙, Teff= 5560 ± 80 K, [M/H] = - 0.10 ± 0.05 dex, and with an age of 11 ± 2 Gyr. The planet Kepler-423b has a mass of Mp= 0.595 ± 0.081MJup and a radius of Rp= 1.192 ± 0.052RJup, yielding a planetary bulk density of ρp = 0.459 ± 0.083 g cm-3. The radius of Kepler-423b is consistent with both theoretical models for irradiated coreless giant planets and expectations based on empirical laws. The inclination of the stellar spin axis suggests that the system is aligned along the line of sight. We detected a tentative secondary eclipse of the planet at a 2σ confidence level (ΔFec = 14.2 ± 6.6 ppm) and found that the orbit might have asmall non-zero eccentricity of 0.019+0.028-0.014. With a Bond albedo of AB = 0.037 ± 0.019, Kepler-423b is one of the gas-giant planets with the lowest albedo known so far. Based on observations obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 4 Kepler systems transit timing observations (Steffen+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, J. H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Carter, J. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Fressin, F.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Moorhead, A. V.; Rowe, J. F.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bryson, S.; Caldwell, D. A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D. R.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Everett, M. E.; Gautier, T. N., III; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Jenkins, J. M.; Horch, E.; Howell, S. B.; Isaacson, H.; Klaus, T. C.; Koch, D. G.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lucas, P.; MacQueen, P. J.; Marcy, G. W.; McCauliff, S.; Middour, C. K.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F. R.; Quinn, S. N.; Quintana, E. V.; Shporer, A.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Cleve, J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate. (4 data files).

  3. Enabling the Kepler Exoplanet Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler mission, with its unrivaled photometric precision and nearly continuous monitoring, provides an unprecedented opportunity for an exoplanet census. However, while it has identified thousands of transiting planet candidates, only relatively few have yet been dynamically confirmed as bona fide planets, with only a handful more even conceivably amenable to future dynamical confirmation. As a result, the ability to draw detailed conclusions about the diversity of exoplanet systems from Kepler detections relies critically on assigning false positive probabilities to thousands of unconfirmed candidates. I have developed a procedure to calculate these probabilities using only the Kepler photometry, optionally including available follow-up observations. Using this, I can often statistically validate a candidate signal using two single-epoch observations: a stellar spectrum and a high-resolution image. Accordingly, I have applied this procedure to the publicly released Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) using results from several large follow-up campaigns: spectroscopic surveys of >100 KOIs with TripleSpec at the Palomar 200-in and >700 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, and imaging surveys of >60 KOIs with Keck/NIRC2 and nearly 1000 KOIs with the Palomar Robo-AO system. This has enabled me to identify hundreds of Kepler candidates as newly secure planets, identify some as likely false positives, and prescribe the most useful follow-up observations for the rest of the KOIs. These results will enable Kepler to fulfill its promise as a mission to study the statistics of exoplanet systems. In addition, this new approach to transit survey follow-up---detailed probabilistic assessment of large numbers of candidates in order to inform the application of relatively scarce follow-up resources---will remain fruitful as transit surveys continue to produce many more candidates than can be followed up with traditional strategies.

  4. High-precision stellar limb-darkening measurements. A transit study of 38 Kepler planetary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H. M.; Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.; Wolter, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Planetary transit light curves are influenced by a variety of fundamental parameters, such as the orbital geometry and the surface brightness distribution of the host star. Stellar limb darkening (LD) is therefore among the key parameters of transit modeling. In many applications, LD is presumed to be known and modeled based on synthetic stellar atmospheres. Aims: We measure LD in a sample of 38 Kepler planetary candidate host stars covering effective temperatures between 3000 K and 8900 K with a range of surface gravities from 3.8 to 4.7. In our study we compare our measurements to widely used theoretically predicted quadratic limb-darkening coefficients (LDCs) to check their validity. Methods: We carried out a consistent analysis of a unique stellar sample provided by the Kepler satellite. We performed a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) modeling of low-noise, short-cadence Kepler transit light curves, which yields reliable error estimates for the LD measurements in spite of the highly correlated parameters encountered in transit modeling. Results: Our study demonstrates that it is impossible to measure accurate LDCs by transit modeling in systems with high impact parameters (b ≳ 0.8). For the majority of the remaining sample objects, our measurements agree with the theoretical predictions, considering measurement errors and mutual discrepancies between the theoretical predictions. Nonetheless, theory systematically overpredicts our measurements of the quadratic LDC u2 by about 0.07. Systematic errors of this order for LDCs would lead to an uncertainty on the order of 1% for the derived planetary parameters. Conclusions: We find that it is adequate to set the commonly used theoretical LDCs as fixed parameters in transit modeling. Furthermore, it is even indispensable to use theoretical LDCs in the case of transiting systems with a high impact parameter, since the host star's LD cannot be determined from their transit light curves. Table 3 and appendices

  5. Exoplanet Science from NASA’s Kepler Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason

    2012-09-12

    NASA's exoplanet mission is the world's premier instrument for the discovery and study of planets orbiting distant stars. As the nominal mission comes to a close, Kepler has discovered nearly 2500 planet candidates, confirmed dozens of multi-planet systems, provided important insights into the orbital architectures of planetary systems, identified specific systems that challenge theories of planet formation and dynamical evolution, has revolutionized our understanding of stellar interiors, and is gearing to measure the frequency of Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars in its extended mission phase. I present the most recent results from the Kepler mission.

  6. KEPLER-20: A SUN-LIKE STAR WITH THREE SUB-NEPTUNE EXOPLANETS AND TWO EARTH-SIZE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, Thomas N. III; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Rogers, Leslie A.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the discovery of the Kepler-20 planetary system, which we initially identified through the detection of five distinct periodic transit signals in the Kepler light curve of the host star 2MASS J19104752+4220194. From high-resolution spectroscopy of the star, we find a stellar effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5455 {+-} 100 K, a metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.01 {+-} 0.04, and a surface gravity of log g = 4.4 {+-} 0.1. We combine these estimates with an estimate of the stellar density derived from the transit light curves to deduce a stellar mass of M{sub *} = 0.912 {+-} 0.034 M{sub Sun} and a stellar radius of R{sub *} = 0.944{sup +0.060}{sub -0.095} R{sub Sun }. For three of the transit signals, we demonstrate that our results strongly disfavor the possibility that these result from astrophysical false positives. We accomplish this by first identifying the subset of stellar blends that reproduce the precise shape of the light curve and then using the constraints on the presence of additional stars from high angular resolution imaging, photometric colors, and the absence of a secondary component in our spectroscopic observations. We conclude that the planetary scenario is more likely than that of an astrophysical false positive by a factor of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} (Kepler-20b), 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} (Kepler-20c), and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} (Kepler-20d), sufficient to validate these objects as planetary companions. For Kepler-20c and Kepler-20d, the blend scenario is independently disfavored by the achromaticity of the transit: from Spitzer data gathered at 4.5 {mu}m, we infer a ratio of the planetary to stellar radii of 0.075 {+-} 0.015 (Kepler-20c) and 0.065 {+-} 0.011 (Kepler-20d), consistent with each of the depths measured in the Kepler optical bandpass. We determine the orbital periods and physical radii of the three confirmed planets to be 3.70 days and 1.91{sup +0.12}{sub -0.21} R{sub Circled-Plus} for Kepler-20b, 10

  7. Kepler Circumbinary Planet KIC 9632895b: Implications of Planet’s Orbital Inclination for its Origin and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Orosz, Jerome; welsh, William

    2014-11-01

    To date, there are eight published transiting circumbinary planets (CBPs) discovered by the Kepler space telescope. The transiting nature of these objects unambiguously confirms their presence as the third orbiting body. The detection of multiple transits in these systems points to the co-planarity of the planet-binary orbits. However, due to dynamical interactions, the orbit of a transiting CBP may develop slight inclination and the planet may not always transit. The planet KIC 9632895b is one of such CBPs. The photodynamical models predict the inclinations of the planet and binary oscillate with a period of approximately 100 years. In this rocking back and forth, the orbital inclination of the planet varies by a few degrees causing the planet to be outside the transit-visible window for more than about 90% of the times. An interesting implication of this finding is that because of the limitations in the duration of observations, for every CBP system that transits (similar to KIC 9632895), there are approximately 12 similar systems that do not transit (therefore, we do not see them). This occasional transit phenomenon has immediate implications for the formation, dynamical evolution, and population of CBPs. Combined with the fact that the majority of the currently known CBPs are close to the boundary of orbital stability, this suggests that, similar to planet formation around single stars, CBPs form in multiples and at large distances in the circumbinary disk. These planets may migrate through their interactions with the disk, and may be scattered into inclined orbits via planet-planet scattering. The fact that such CBPs transit their host binaries for only a certain amount of time strongly implies that many more CBPs may exist in each of these systems. I will discuss the KIC 9632895 system in detail with emphasis on the models of the formation, migration, and dynamical evolution of planets around binary stars.

  8. THE SDSS-HET SURVEY OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARIES: SPECTROSCOPIC DYNAMICAL MASSES OF THE KEPLER-16 CIRCUMBINARY PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Chad F.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Wright, Jason T.; Roy, Arpita; Terrien, Ryan C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Fleming, Scott W.

    2012-06-01

    We have used high-resolution spectroscopy to observe the Kepler-16 eclipsing binary as a double-lined system and measure precise radial velocities for both stellar components. These velocities yield a dynamical mass ratio of q = 0.2994 {+-} 0.0031. When combined with the inclination, i 90.{sup 0}3401{sup +0.0016}{sub -0.0019}, measured from the Kepler photometric data by Doyle et al. (D11), we derive dynamical masses for the Kepler-16 components of M{sub A} = 0.654 {+-} 0.017 M{sub Sun} and M{sub B} = 0.1959 {+-} 0.0031 M{sub Sun }, a precision of 2.5% and 1.5%, respectively. Our results confirm at the {approx}2% level the mass-ratio derived by D11 with their photometric-dynamical model (PDM), q = 0.2937 {+-} 0.0006. These are among the most precise spectroscopic dynamical masses ever measured for low-mass stars and provide an important direct test of the results from the PDM technique.

  9. Kepler Orrery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation showing all the multiple-planet systems discovered by Kepler as of 2/2/2011; orbits go through the entire mission (3.5 years). Hot colors to cool colors (Red to yellow to green to cyan to...

  10. The XO Project: Searching for Transiting Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Stys, J. E.; Valenti, J. A.; Fleming, S. W.; Janes, K. A.; Heasley, J. N.

    2005-08-01

    The XO project's first objective is to find hot Jupiters transiting bright stars (i.e., V<12) by precision differential photometry. Two XO cameras have been operating since 2003 September on the 10,000 foot Haleakala summit on Maui. Each XO camera consists of a 200 mm f/1.8 lens coupled to a 1024×1024 pixel, thinned CCD operated by drift-scanning. In its first year of routine operation, XO has observed 6.6% of the sky within six 7° wide strips scanned from 0° to +63° of declination and centered at R.A. = 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 hr. Autonomously operating, XO records 1 billion pixels per clear night, calibrates them photometrically and astrometrically, performs aperture photometry, archives the pixel data, and transmits the photometric data to the Space Telescope Science Institute for further analysis. From the first year of operation, the resulting database consists of photometry of ~100,000 stars at more than 1000 epochs per star, with differential photometric precision better than 1% per epoch. Analysis of the light curves of those stars produces transiting-planet candidates requiring detailed follow-up, described elsewhere, culminating in spectroscopy to measure radial velocity variation in order to differentiate genuine planets from the more numerous impostors, primarily eclipsing binary and multiple stars.

  11. KEPLER-18b, c, AND d: A SYSTEM OF THREE PLANETS CONFIRMED BY TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS, LIGHT CURVE VALIDATION, WARM-SPITZER PHOTOMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, William D.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2011-11-01

    We report the detection of three transiting planets around a Sun-like star, which we designate Kepler-18. The transit signals were detected in photometric data from the Kepler satellite, and were confirmed to arise from planets using a combination of large transit-timing variations (TTVs), radial velocity variations, Warm-Spitzer observations, and statistical analysis of false-positive probabilities. The Kepler-18 star has a mass of 0.97 M{sub sun}, a radius of 1.1 R{sub sun}, an effective temperature of 5345 K, and an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = +0.19. The planets have orbital periods of approximately 3.5, 7.6, and 14.9 days. The innermost planet 'b' is a 'super-Earth' with a mass of 6.9 {+-} 3.4 M{sub +}, a radius of 2.00 {+-} 0.10 R{sub +}, and a mean density of 4.9 {+-} 2.4 g cm{sup 3}. The two outer planets 'c' and 'd' are both low-density Neptune-mass planets. Kepler-18c has a mass of 17.3 {+-} 1.9 M{sub +}, a radius of 5.49 {+-} 0.26 R{sub +}, and a mean density of 0.59 {+-} 0.07 g cm{sup 3}, while Kepler-18d has a mass of 16.4 {+-} 1.4 M{sub +}, a radius of 6.98 {+-} 0.33 R{sub +} and a mean density of 0.27 {+-} 0.03 g cm{sup 3}. Kepler-18c and Kepler-18d have orbital periods near a 2:1 mean-motion resonance, leading to large and readily detected TTVs.

  12. THE ORBITAL PHASES AND SECONDARY TRANSITS OF KEPLER-10b. A PHYSICAL INTERPRETATION BASED ON THE LAVA-OCEAN PLANET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rouan, D.; Deeg, H. J.; Demangeon, O.; Samuel, B.; Cavarroc, C.; Leger, A.; Fegley, B.

    2011-11-10

    The Kepler mission has made an important observation: the first detection of photons from a terrestrial planet by observing its phase curve (Kepler-10b). This opens a new field in exoplanet science: the possibility of obtaining information about the atmosphere and surface of rocky planets, objects of prime interest. In this Letter, we apply the Lava-ocean model to interpret the observed phase curve. The model, a planet without atmosphere and a surface partially made of molten rocks, has been proposed for planets of the class of CoRoT-7b, i.e., rocky planets very close to their star (at a few stellar radii). Kepler-10b is a typical member of this family. It predicts that the light from the planet has an important emission component in addition to the reflected one, even in the Kepler spectral band. Assuming an isotropical reflection of light by the planetary surface (Lambertian-like approximation), we find that a Bond albedo of {approx}50% can account for the observed amplitude of the phase curve, as opposed to a first attempt where an unusually high value was found. We propose a physical process to explain this still large value of the albedo. The overall interpretation can be tested in the future with instruments such as the James Webb Space Telescope or the Exoplanet Characterization Observatory. Our model predicts a spectral dependence that is clearly distinguishable from that of purely reflected light and from that of a planet at a uniform temperature.

  13. KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C.; Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R.; Lund, Mikkel N.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Everett, Mark E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Horch, Elliott P.; and others

    2013-09-20

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m{sub Kp} = 11.6, T{sub eff} = 5576 K, M{sub *} = 0.98 M{sub ☉}). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 ± 0.2 R{sub ⊕}, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M{sub ⊕} (3σ). The host star has a high obliquity (ψ = 104°), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.

  14. The Kepler-10 planetary system revisited by HARPS-N: A hot rocky world and a solid Neptune-mass planet

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, Xavier; Buchhave, Lars A.; Latham, David W.; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Gettel, Sara; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Horne, Keith; Malavolta, Luca; Ségransan, Damien; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane; Molinari, Emilio; Cosentino, Rosario; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Figueira, Pedro; and others

    2014-07-10

    Kepler-10b was the first rocky planet detected by the Kepler satellite and confirmed with radial velocity follow-up observations from Keck-HIRES. The mass of the planet was measured with a precision of around 30%, which was insufficient to constrain models of its internal structure and composition in detail. In addition to Kepler-10b, a second planet transiting the same star with a period of 45 days was statistically validated, but the radial velocities were only good enough to set an upper limit of 20 M{sub ⊕} for the mass of Kepler-10c. To improve the precision on the mass for planet b, the HARPS-N Collaboration decided to observe Kepler-10 intensively with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo on La Palma. In total, 148 high-quality radial-velocity measurements were obtained over two observing seasons. These new data allow us to improve the precision of the mass determination for Kepler-10b to 15%. With a mass of 3.33 ± 0.49 M{sub ⊕} and an updated radius of 1.47{sub −0.02}{sup +0.03} R{sub ⊕}, Kepler-10b has a density of 5.8 ± 0.8 g cm{sup –3}, very close to the value predicted by models with the same internal structure and composition as the Earth. We were also able to determine a mass for the 45-day period planet Kepler-10c, with an even better precision of 11%. With a mass of 17.2 ± 1.9 M{sub ⊕} and radius of 2.35{sub −0.04}{sup +0.09} R{sub ⊕}, Kepler-10c has a density of 7.1 ± 1.0 g cm{sup –3}. Kepler-10c appears to be the first strong evidence of a class of more massive solid planets with longer orbital periods.

  15. Stellar parameters of main sequence turn-off star candidates observed with LAMOST and Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Qian; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Zhang, Xian-Fei; Li, Tan-Da; Bi, Shao-Lan; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Fu, Jian-Ning; Huang, Yang; Tian, Zhi-Jia; Liu, Kang; Ge, Zhi-Shuai; He, Xin; Zhang, Jing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Main sequence turn-off (MSTO) stars have advantages as indicators of Galactic evolution since their ages can be robustly estimated from atmospheric parameters. Hundreds of thousands of MSTO stars have been selected from the LAMOST Galactic survey to study the evolution of the Galaxy, and it is vital to derive accurate stellar parameters. In this work, we select 150 MSTO star candidates from the MSTO star sample of Xiang that have asteroseismic parameters and determine accurate stellar parameters for these stars by combining asteroseismic parameters deduced from Kepler photometry and atmospheric parameters deduced from LAMOST spectra. With this sample, we examine the age determination as well as the contamination rate of the MSTO star sample. A comparison of age between this work and Xiang shows a mean difference of 0.53 Gyr (7%) and a dispersion of 2.71 Gyr (28%). The results show that 79 of the candidates are MSTO stars, while the others are contaminations from either main sequence or sub-giant stars. The contamination rate for the oldest stars is much higher than that for younger stars. The main cause for the high contamination rate is found to be the relatively large systematic bias in the LAMOST surface gravity estimates.

  16. Planet hunters. VII. Discovery of a new low-mass, low-density planet (PH3 C) orbiting Kepler-289 with mass measurements of two additional planets (PH3 B and D)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Margossian, Charles; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; and others

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R {sub P} = 2.68 ± 0.17 R {sub ⊕}) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R {sub P} = 2.15 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R {sub P} = 11.59 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (∼1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (∼1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M {sub *} = 1.08 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉}, R {sub *} = 1.00 ± 0.02 R {sub ☉}, and T {sub eff} = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (∼5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M {sub ⊕}, 4.0 ± 0.9M {sub ⊕}, and M = 132 ± 17 M {sub ⊕}, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ρ = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm{sup –3} for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1{sub −0.3}{sup +0.8}% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets.

  17. Advances in the Kepler Transit Search Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2016-10-01

    Twenty years ago, no planets were known outside our own solar system. Since then, the discoveries of ~1500 exoplanets have radically altered our views of planets and planetary systems. This revolution is due in no small part to the Kepler Mission, which has discovered >1000 of these planets and >4000 planet candidates. While Kepler has shown that small rocky planets and planetary systems are quite common, the quest to find Earth's closest cousins and characterize their atmospheres presses forward with missions such as NASA Explorer Program's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) slated for launch in 2017 and ESA's PLATO mission scheduled for launch in 2024. These future missions pose daunting data processing challenges in terms of the number of stars, the amount of data, and the difficulties in detecting weak signatures of transiting small planets against a roaring background. These complications include instrument noise and systematic effects as well as the intrinsic stellar variability of the subjects under scrutiny. In this paper we review recent developments in the Kepler transit search pipeline improving both the yield and reliability of detected transit signatures. Many of the phenomena in light curves that represent noise can also trigger transit detection algorithms. The Kepler Mission has expended great effort in suppressing false positives from its planetary candidate catalogs. Over 18,000 transit-like signatures can be identified for a search across 4 years of data. Most of these signatures are artifacts, not planets. Vetting all such signatures historically takes several months' effort by many individuals. We describe the application of machine learning approaches for the automated vetting and production of planet candidate catalogs. These algorithms can improve the efficiency of the human vetting effort as well as quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is truly a planet. This information is crucial for obtaining valid planet occurrence

  18. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. I. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li Jie; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Koch, David G.; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; McCauliff, Sean

    2011-11-01

    The architectures of multiple planet systems can provide valuable constraints on models of planet formation, including orbital migration, and excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. NASA's Kepler mission has identified 1235 transiting planet candidates. The method of transit timing variations (TTVs) has already confirmed seven planets in two planetary systems. We perform a transit timing analysis of the Kepler planet candidates. We find that at least {approx}11% of planet candidates currently suitable for TTV analysis show evidence suggestive of TTVs, representing at least {approx}65 TTV candidates. In all cases, the time span of observations must increase for TTVs to provide strong constraints on planet masses and/or orbits, as expected based on N-body integrations of multiple transiting planet candidate systems (assuming circular and coplanar orbits). We find the fraction of planet candidates showing TTVs in this data set does not vary significantly with the number of transiting planet candidates per star, suggesting significant mutual inclinations and that many stars with a single transiting planet should host additional non-transiting planets. We anticipate that Kepler could confirm (or reject) at least {approx}12 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates via TTVs. Thus, TTVs will provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets and characterizing the orbital dynamics of low-mass planets. If Kepler observations were extended to at least seven years, then TTVs would provide much more precise constraints on the dynamics of systems with multiple transiting planets and would become sensitive to planets with orbital periods extending into the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  19. EXOPLANET CHARACTERIZATION BY PROXY: A TRANSITING 2.15 R{sub Circled-Plus} PLANET NEAR THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE LATE K DWARF KEPLER-61

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sarah; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Irwin, Jonathan; Newton, Elisabeth; Desert, Jean-Michel; Crepp, Justin R.; Shporer, Avi; Mann, Andrew W.; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Everett, Mark E.

    2013-08-20

    We present the validation and characterization of Kepler-61b: a 2.15 R{sub Circled-Plus} planet orbiting near the inner edge of the habitable zone of a low-mass star. Our characterization of the host star Kepler-61 is based upon a comparison with a set of spectroscopically similar stars with directly measured radii and temperatures. We apply a stellar prior drawn from the weighted mean of these properties, in tandem with the Kepler photometry, to infer a planetary radius for Kepler-61b of 2.15 {+-} 0.13 R{sub Circled-Plus} and an equilibrium temperature of 273 {+-} 13 K (given its period of 59.87756 {+-} 0.00020 days and assuming a planetary albedo of 0.3). The technique of leveraging the physical properties of nearby ''proxy'' stars allows for an independent check on stellar characterization via the traditional measurements with stellar spectra and evolutionary models. In this case, such a check had implications for the putative habitability of Kepler-61b: the planet is 10% warmer and larger than inferred from K-band spectral characterization. From the Kepler photometry, we estimate a stellar rotation period of 36 days, which implies a stellar age of >1 Gyr. We summarize the evidence for the planetary nature of the Kepler-61 transit signal, which we conclude is 30,000 times more likely to be due to a planet than a blend scenario. Finally, we discuss possible compositions for Kepler-61b with a comparison to theoretical models as well as to known exoplanets with similar radii and dynamically measured masses.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planetary candidates. VII. 48-month (Coughlin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J. L.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E.; Rowe, J. F.; Burke, C. J.; Latham, D. W.; Batalha, N. M.; Ofir, A.; Quarles, B. L.; Henze, C. E.; Wolfgang, A.; Caldwell, D. A.; Bryson, S. T.; Shporer, A.; Catanzarite, J.; Akeson, R.; Barclay, T.; Borucki, W. J.; Boyajian, T. S.; Campbell, J. R.; Christiansen, J. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Haas, M. R.; Howell, S. B.; Huber, D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Li, J.; Patil-Sabale, A.; Quintana, E. V.; Ramirez, S.; Seader, S.; Smith, J. C.; Tenenbaum, P.; Twicken, J. D.; Zamudio, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This catalog is based on Kepler's 24th data release (DR24), which includes the processing of all data utilizing version 9.2 of the Kepler pipeline (Jenkins et al. 2010ApJ...724.1108J). This marks the first time that all of the Kepler mission data have been processed consistently with the same version of the Kepler pipeline. Over a period of 48 months (2009 May 13 to 2013 May 11), subdivided into 17 quarters (Q1-Q17), a total of 198646 targets were observed. (7 data files).

  1. KEPLER-4b: A HOT NEPTUNE-LIKE PLANET OF A G0 STAR NEAR MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Howell, Steve B.; Monet, David

    2010-04-20

    Early time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft has revealed a planet transiting the star we term Kepler-4, at R.A. = 19{sup h}02{sup m}27.{sup s}68, {delta} = +50{sup 0}08'08.''7. The planet has an orbital period of 3.213 days and shows transits with a relative depth of 0.87 x 10{sup -3} and a duration of about 3.95 hr. Radial velocity (RV) measurements from the Keck High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer show a reflex Doppler signal of 9.3{sup +1.1} {sub -1.9} m s{sup -1}, consistent with a low-eccentricity orbit with the phase expected from the transits. Various tests show no evidence for any companion star near enough to affect the light curve or the RVs for this system. From a transit-based estimate of the host star's mean density, combined with analysis of high-resolution spectra, we infer that the host star is near turnoff from the main sequence, with estimated mass and radius of 1.223{sup +0.053} {sub -0.091} M {sub sun} and 1.487{sup +0.071} {sub -0.084} R {sub sun}. We estimate the planet mass and radius to be {l_brace}M {sub P}, R {sub P}{r_brace} = {l_brace}24.5 {+-} 3.8 M {sub +}, 3.99 {+-} 0.21 R {sub +}{r_brace}. The planet's density is near 1.9 g cm{sup -3}; it is thus slightly denser and more massive than Neptune, but about the same size.

  2. Optical Phase Curves of Kepler Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R sstarf < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 ± 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 ± 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  3. OPTICAL PHASE CURVES OF KEPLER EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-07-20

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R{sub *} < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 {+-} 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  4. THE KEPLER-19 SYSTEM: A TRANSITING 2.2 R{sub Circled-Plus} PLANET AND A SECOND PLANET DETECTED VIA TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sarah; Fressin, Francois; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Torres, Guillermo; Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Marcy, Geoffrey; Isaacson, Howard; Burke, Christopher J.; Henze, Christopher; Howell, Steven B.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Steffen, Jason H.; Ciardi, David R.; Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute and others

    2011-12-20

    We present the discovery of the Kepler-19 planetary system, which we first identified from a 9.3 day periodic transit signal in the Kepler photometry. From high-resolution spectroscopy of the star, we find a stellar effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5541 {+-} 60 K, a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.13 {+-} 0.06, and a surface gravity log(g) = 4.59 {+-} 0.10. We combine the estimate of T{sub eff} and [Fe/H] with an estimate of the stellar density derived from the photometric light curve to deduce a stellar mass of M{sub *} = 0.936 {+-} 0.040 M{sub Sun} and a stellar radius of R{sub *} = 0.850 {+-} 0.018 R{sub Sun} (these errors do not include uncertainties in the stellar models). We rule out the possibility that the transits result from an astrophysical false positive by first identifying the subset of stellar blends that reproduce the precise shape of the light curve. Using the additional constraints from the measured color of the system, the absence of a secondary source in the high-resolution spectrum, and the absence of a secondary source in the adaptive optics imaging, we conclude that the planetary scenario is more than three orders of magnitude more likely than a blend. The blend scenario is independently disfavored by the achromaticity of the transit: we measure a transit depth with Spitzer at 4.5 {mu}m of 547{sup +113}{sub -110} ppm, consistent with the depth measured in the Kepler optical bandpass of 567 {+-} 6 ppm (corrected for stellar limb darkening). We determine a physical radius of the planet Kepler-19b of R{sub p} = 2.209 {+-} 0.048 R{sub Circled-Plus }; the uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty in the stellar parameters. From radial velocity observations of the star, we find an upper limit on the planet mass of 20.3 M{sub Circled-Plus }, corresponding to a maximum density of 10.4 g cm{sup -3}. We report a significant sinusoidal deviation of the transit times from a predicted linear ephemeris, which we conclude is due to an additional perturbing body in

  5. First Science Results From Planethunters.org: A Citizen Science Analysis Of Kepler Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris; Schwamb, M.; Fischer, D.; Giguere, M.; Lynn, S.; Brewer, J.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.; Smith, A.; Spronck, J.

    2012-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse collection of citizen science projects, enlists the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler data via the World Wide Web. The human eye and brain are well suited to picking out most transits that cannot be detected in periodograms and are missed by the automated search algorithms. With over 53,000 volunteers examining the light curves on the Planet Hunters interface, we have the ability to visually inspect the entire public dataset for signatures of exoplanet transits. Planet Hunters is thus a novel and complementary technique to the automated transit detection algorithms, providing an independent assessment of the completeness of the Kepler exoplanet inventory. For each of the 150,000 Kepler-monitored stars, approximately 10 users examine 30-day segments of the star's light curve, identifying potential transits. Planet Hunters classifications are processed through a pipeline which uses simulated transit light curves to assess the capabilities of individual volunteers. Weightings are assigned to individuals and an iterative process is used to converge on final classifications and identify planet candidates. We present the results from analyzing the first three quarters of Kepler observations ( 120 days of observations) and present planet candidates identified by Planet Hunters comparing to the Kepler team's published lists of planet candidates. In particular, we discuss the abundance of large planets (> 2 earth radii) on short period (< 15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections.

  6. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  7. TransitSOM: Self-Organizing Map for Kepler and K2 transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.

    2017-03-01

    A self-organizing map (SOM) can be used to identify planetary candidates from Kepler and K2 datasets with accuracies near 90% in distinguishing known Kepler planets from false positives. TransitSOM classifies a Kepler or K2 lightcurve using a self-organizing map (SOM) created and pre-trained using PyMVPA (ascl:1703.009). It includes functions for users to create their own SOMs.

  8. Radial Velocity Observations and Light Curve Noise Modeling Confirm that Kepler-91b is a Giant Planet Orbiting a Giant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Endl, Michael; Huber, Daniel; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2015-02-01

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M Jup planet orbiting a red giant star. Based partly on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  9. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  10. KEPLER Mission: development and overview.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J

    2016-03-01

    The Kepler Mission is a space observatory launched in 2009 by NASA to monitor 170,000 stars over a period of four years to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, the size and orbital distributions of these planets, and the types of stars they orbit. Kepler is the tenth in the series of NASA Discovery Program missions that are competitively-selected, PI-directed, medium-cost missions. The Mission concept and various instrument prototypes were developed at the Ames Research Center over a period of 18 years starting in 1983. The development of techniques to do the 10 ppm photometry required for Mission success took years of experimentation, several workshops, and the exploration of many 'blind alleys' before the construction of the flight instrument. Beginning in 1992 at the start of the NASA Discovery Program, the Kepler Mission concept was proposed five times before its acceptance for mission development in 2001. During that period, the concept evolved from a photometer in an L2 orbit that monitored 6000 stars in a 50 sq deg field-of-view (FOV) to one that was in a heliocentric orbit that simultaneously monitored 170,000 stars with a 105 sq deg FOV. Analysis of the data to date has detected over 4600 planetary candidates which include several hundred Earth-size planetary candidates, over a thousand confirmed planets, and Earth-size planets in the habitable zone (HZ). These discoveries provide the information required for estimates of the frequency of planets in our galaxy. The Mission results show that most stars have planets, many of these planets are similar in size to the Earth, and that systems with several planets are common. Although planets in the HZ are common, many are substantially larger than Earth.

  11. 197 Candidates and 104 Validated Planets in K2’s First Five Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Ciardi, David R.; Petigura, Erik A.; Sinukoff, Evan; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Howard, Andrew W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Isaacson, Howard; Dressing, Courtney D.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Lépine, Sébastien; Weiss, Lauren; Hirsch, Lea; Livingston, John; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed; Ziegler, Carl; Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Everett, Mark; Teske, Johanna; Martinez, Arturo O.; Obermeier, Christian; Benneke, Björn; Scott, Nic; Deacon, Niall; Aller, Kimberly M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Mancini, Luigi; Ciceri, Simona; Brahm, Rafael; Jordán, Andrés; Knutson, Heather A.; Henning, Thomas; Bonnefoy, Michaël; Liu, Michael C.; Crepp, Justin R.; Lothringer, Joshua; Hinz, Phil; Bailey, Vanessa; Skemer, Andrew; Defrere, Denis

    2016-09-01

    We present 197 planet candidates discovered using data from the first year of the NASA K2 mission (Campaigns 0-4), along with the results of an intensive program of photometric analyses, stellar spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and statistical validation. We distill these candidates into sets of 104 validated planets (57 in multi-planet systems), 30 false positives, and 63 remaining candidates. Our validated systems span a range of properties, with median values of R P = 2.3 {R}\\oplus , P = 8.6 days, {T}{eff} = 5300 K, and Kp = 12.7 mag. Stellar spectroscopy provides precise stellar and planetary parameters for most of these systems. We show that K2 has increased by 30% the number of small planets known to orbit moderately bright stars (1-4 R ⊕, Kp = 9-13 mag). Of particular interest are 76 planets smaller than 2 R ⊕, 15 orbiting stars brighter than Kp = 11.5 mag, 5 receiving Earth-like irradiation levels, and several multi-planet systems—including 4 planets orbiting the M dwarf K2-72 near mean-motion resonances. By quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is a planet we demonstrate that our candidate sample has an overall false positive rate of 15%-30%, with rates substantially lower for small candidates (\\lt 2{R}\\oplus ) and larger for candidates with radii \\gt 8{R}\\oplus and/or with P\\lt 3 {{days}}. Extrapolation of the current planetary yield suggests that K2 will discover between 500 and 1000 planets in its planned four-year mission, assuming sufficient follow-up resources are available. Efficient observing and analysis, together with an organized and coherent follow-up strategy, are essential for maximizing the efficacy of planet-validation efforts for K2, TESS, and future large-scale surveys.

  12. BENEFITS OF GROUND-BASED PHOTOMETRIC FOLLOW-UP FOR TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER AND CoRoT

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, Knicole D.; Ford, Eric B.

    2009-09-20

    Currently, over 40 transiting planets have been discovered by ground-based photometric surveys, and space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT are expected to detect hundreds more. Follow-up photometric observations from the ground will play an important role in constraining both orbital and physical parameters for newly discovered planets, especially those with small radii (R{sub p} {approx}< 4R{sub +}) and/or intermediate-to-long orbital periods (P{approx}> 30 days). Here, we simulate transit light curves (LCs) from Kepler-like photometry and ground-based observations in the near-infrared (NIR) to determine how jointly modeling space-based and ground-based LCs can improve measurements of the transit duration and planet-star radius ratio. We find that adding observations of at least one ground-based transit to space-based observations can significantly improve the accuracy for measuring the transit duration and planet-star radius ratio of small planets (R{sub p} {approx}< 4R{sub +}) in long-period ({approx}1 year) orbits, largely thanks to the reduced effect of limb darkening in the NIR. We also demonstrate that multiple ground-based observations are needed to gain a substantial improvement in the measurement accuracy for small planets with short orbital periods ({approx}3 days). Finally, we consider the role that higher ground-based precisions will play in constraining parameter measurements for typical Kepler targets. Our results can help inform the priorities of transit follow-up programs (including both primary and secondary transit of planets discovered with Kepler and CoRoT), leading to improved constraints for transit durations, planet sizes, and orbital eccentricities.

  13. CAN PLANETARY INSTABILITY EXPLAIN THE KEPLER DICHOTOMY?

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.; Holmelin, Viktor

    2012-10-10

    The planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission provide a rich sample to constrain the architectures and relative inclinations of planetary systems within approximately 0.5 AU of their host stars. We use the triple-transit systems from the Kepler 16 months data as templates for physical triple-planet systems and perform synthetic transit observations, varying the internal inclination variation of the orbits. We find that all the Kepler triple-transit and double-transit systems can be produced from the triple-planet templates, given a low mutual inclination of around 5 Degree-Sign . Our analysis shows that the Kepler data contain a population of planets larger than four Earth radii in single-transit systems that cannot arise from the triple-planet templates. We explore the hypothesis that high-mass counterparts of the triple-transit systems underwent dynamical instability to produce a population of massive double-planet systems of moderately high mutual inclination. We perform N-body simulations of mass-boosted triple-planet systems and observe how the systems heat up and lose planets by planet-planet collisions, and less frequently by ejections or collisions with the star, yielding transits in agreement with the large planets in the Kepler single-transit systems. The resulting population of massive double-planet systems nevertheless cannot explain the additional excess of low-mass planets among the observed single-transit systems and the lack of gas-giant planets in double-transit and triple-transit systems. Planetary instability of systems of triple gas-giant planets can be behind part of the dichotomy between systems hosting one or more small planets and those hosting a single giant planet. The main part of the dichotomy, however, is more likely to have arisen already during planet formation when the formation, migration, or scattering of a massive planet, triggered above a threshold metallicity, suppressed the formation of other planets in sub-AU orbits.

  14. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XIII. KOI-189 b and KOI-686 b: two very low-mass stars in long-period orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. F.; Montagnier, G.; Leconte, J.; Bonomo, A. S.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J. M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bouchy, F.; Bruno, G.; Damiani, C.; Hébrard, G.; Moutou, C.; Santerne, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present the radial-velocity follow-up of two Kepler planetary transiting candidates (KOI-189 and KOI-686) carried out with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. These data promptly discard these objects as viable planet candidates and show that the transiting objects are in the regime of very low-mass stars, where a strong discrepancy between observations and models persists for the mass and radius parameters. By combining the SOPHIE spectra with the Kepler light curve and photometric measurements found in the literature, we obtain a full characterization of the transiting companions, their orbits, and their host stars. The two companions are in significantly eccentric orbits with relatively long periods (30 days and 52.5 days), which makes them suitable objects for a comparison with theoretical models, since the effects invoked to understand the discrepancy with observations are weaker for these orbital distances. KOI-189 b has a mass M = 0.0745 ± 0.0033 M⊙ and a radius R = 0.1025 ± 0.0024 R⊙. The density of KOI-189 b is significantly lower than expected from theoretical models for a system of its age. We explore possible explanations for this difference. KOI-189 b is the smallest hydrogen-burning star with such a precise determination of its fundamental parameters. KOI-686 b is larger and more massive (M = 0.0915 ± 0.0043 M⊙; R = 0.1201 ± 0.0033 R⊙), and its position in the mass-radius diagram agrees well with theoretical expectations. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France (programs 11A.PNP.MOUT and 11B.PNP.MOUT).Tables 1, 2, and 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Kepler-36: a pair of planets with neighboring orbits and dissimilar densities.

    PubMed

    Carter, Joshua A; Agol, Eric; Chaplin, William J; Basu, Sarbani; Bedding, Timothy R; Buchhave, Lars A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Deck, Katherine M; Elsworth, Yvonne; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan J; Hale, Steven J; Handberg, Rasmus; Hekker, Saskia; Holman, Matthew J; Huber, Daniel; Karoff, Christopher; Kawaler, Steven D; Kjeldsen, Hans; Lissauer, Jack J; Lopez, Eric D; Lund, Mikkel N; Lundkvist, Mia; Metcalfe, Travis S; Miglio, Andrea; Rogers, Leslie A; Stello, Dennis; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Steve; Christiansen, Jessie L; Cochran, William D; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer; Howard, Andrew W; Jenkins, Jon M; Klaus, Todd; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; MacQueen, Phillip J; Sasselov, Dimitar; Steffen, Jason H; Twicken, Joseph D; Winn, Joshua N

    2012-08-03

    In the solar system, the planets' compositions vary with orbital distance, with rocky planets in close orbits and lower-density gas giants in wider orbits. The detection of close-in giant planets around other stars was the first clue that this pattern is not universal and that planets' orbits can change substantially after their formation. Here, we report another violation of the orbit-composition pattern: two planets orbiting the same star with orbital distances differing by only 10% and densities differing by a factor of 8. One planet is likely a rocky "super-Earth," whereas the other is more akin to Neptune. These planets are 20 times more closely spaced and have a larger density contrast than any adjacent pair of planets in the solar system.

  16. Circumbinary planet formation in the Kepler-16 system. II. A toy model for in situ planet formation within a debris belt

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano

    2014-07-20

    Recent simulations have shown that the formation of planets in circumbinary configurations (such as those recently discovered by Kepler) is dramatically hindered at the planetesimal accretion stage. The combined action of the binary and the protoplanetary disk acts to raise impact velocities between kilometer-sized planetesimals beyond their destruction threshold, halting planet formation within at least 10 AU from the binary. It has been proposed that a primordial population of 'large' planetesimals (100 km or more in size), as produced by turbulent concentration mechanisms, would be able to bypass this bottleneck; however, it is not clear whether these processes are viable in the highly perturbed circumbinary environments. We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamical and N-body simulations to show that kilometer-sized planetesimals and collisional debris can drift and be trapped in a belt close to the central binary. Within this belt, planetesimals could initially grow by accreting debris, ultimately becoming 'indestructible' seeds that can accrete other planetesimals in situ despite the large impact speeds. We find that large, indestructible planetesimals can be formed close to the central binary within 10{sup 5} yr, therefore showing that even a primordial population of 'small' planetesimals can feasibly form a planet.

  17. Demographic studies of extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy

    Uncovering the demographics of extrasolar planets is crucial to understanding the processes of their formation and evolution. In this thesis, we present four studies that contribute to this end, three of which relate to NASA's Kepler mission, which has revolutionized the field of exoplanets in the last few years. In the pre-Kepler study, we investigate a sample of exoplanet spin-orbit measurements---measurements of the inclination of a planet's orbit relative to the spin axis of its host star---to determine whether a dominant planet migration channel can be identified, and at what confidence. Applying methods of Bayesian model comparison to distinguish between the predictions of several different migration models, we find that the data strongly favor a two-mode migration scenario combining planet-planet scattering and disk migration over a single-mode Kozai migration scenario. While we test only the predictions of particular Kozai and scattering migration models in this work, these methods may be used to test the predictions of any other spin-orbit misaligning mechanism. We then present two studies addressing astrophysical false positives in Kepler data. The Kepler mission has identified thousands of transiting planet candidates, and only relatively few have yet been dynamically confirmed as bona fide planets, with only a handful more even conceivably amenable to future dynamical confirmation. As a result, the ability to draw detailed conclusions about the diversity of exoplanet systems from Kepler detections relies critically on understanding the probability that any individual candidate might be a false positive. We show that a typical a priori false positive probability for a well-vetted Kepler candidate is only about 5-10%, enabling confidence in demographic studies that treat candidates as true planets. We also present a detailed procedure that can be used to securely and efficiently validate any individual transit candidate using detailed information of the

  18. Transit Timing Study with Kepler and its synergy with LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST: http://www.lamost.org) provides mass and radius measurements of the stars thus helps with modeling transit timing. Here, we will show two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties by combining Kepler and LAMOST.

  19. Automated Astrophysical False Positive Analysis of Transiting Planet Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Beginning with Kepler, but continuing with K2 and TESS, transiting planet candidates are now found at a much faster rate than follow-up observations can be obtained. Thus, distinguishing true planet candidates from astrophysical false positives has become primarily a statistical exercise. I will describe a new publicly available open-source Python package for analyzing the astrophysical false positive probabilities of transiting exoplanet signals. In addition, I will present results of applying this analysis to both Kepler and K2 planet candidates, resulting in the probabilistic validation of thousands of exoplanets, as well as identifying many likely false positives.

  20. Statistical eclipses of close-in Kepler sub-Saturns

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, Holly A.; Deming, Drake

    2014-10-20

    We present a method to detect small atmospheric signals in Kepler's planet candidate light curves by averaging light curves for multiple candidates with similar orbital and physical characteristics. Our statistical method allows us to measure unbiased physical properties of Kepler's planet candidates, even for candidates whose individual signal-to-noise precludes the detection of their secondary eclipse. We detect a secondary eclipse depth of 3.83{sub −1.11}{sup +1.10} ppm for a group of 31 sub-Saturn (R < 6 R {sub ⊕}) planet candidates with the greatest potential for a reflected light signature ((R{sub p} /a){sup 2} > 10 ppm). Including Kepler-10b in this group increases the depth to 5.08{sub −0.72}{sup +0.71} ppm. For a control group with (R{sub p} /a){sup 2} < 1 ppm, we find a depth of 0.36 ± 0.37 ppm, consistent with no detection. We also analyze the light curve of Kepler-10b and find an eclipse depth of 7.08 ± 1.06 ppm. If the eclipses are due solely to reflected light, this corresponds to a geometric albedo of 0.22 ± 0.06 for our group of close-in sub-Saturns, 0.37 ± 0.05 if including Kepler-10b in the group, and 0.60 ± 0.09 for Kepler-10b alone. Including a thermal emission model does not change the geometric albedo appreciably, assuming A{sub B} = (3/2)*A{sub g} . Our result for Kepler-10b is consistent with previous works. Our result for close-in sub-Saturns shows that Kepler-10b is unusually reflective, but our analysis is consistent with the results of Demory for super-Earths. Our results also indicate that hot Neptunes are typically more reflective than hot Jupiters.

  1. Kepler's Planetary Systems in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows an overhead view of the orbital position of the planets in systems with multiple transiting planets discovered by NASA's Kepler mission as of Jan. 2012. All the colored planets ...

  2. The Kepler Mission: A Mission to Determine the Frequency of Inner Planets Near the Habitable Zone of a Wide Range of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Dunham, E. W.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The surprising discovery of giant planets in inner orbits around solar-like stars has brought into question our understanding of the development and evolution of planetary systems, including our solar system. To make further progress, it is critical to detect and obtain data on the frequency and characteristics of Earth-class planets. The Kepler Mission is designed to be a quick, low-cost approach to accomplish that objective. Transits by Earth-class planets produce a fractional change. in stellar brightness of 5 x 10(exp -5) to 40 x 10(exp -5) lasting for 4 to 16 hours. From the period and depth of the transits, the orbit and size of the planets can be calculated. The proposed instrument is a one-meter aperture photometer with a 12 deg. field-of-view (FOV). To obtain the required precision and to avoid interruptions caused by day-night and seasonal cycles, the photometer will be launched into a heliocentric orbit. It will continuously and simultaneously monitor the flux from 80,000 dwarf stars brighter than 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation. The mission tests the hypothesis that the formation of most stars produces Earth-class planets in inner orbits. Based on this assumption and the recent observations that 2% of the stars have giant planets in inner orbits, several types of results are expected from the mission: 1. From transits of Earth-class planets, about 480 planet detections and 60 cases where two or more planets are found in the same system. 2. From transits of giant planets, about 160 detections of inner-orbit planets and 24 detections of outer-orbit planets. 3. From the phase modulation of the reflected light from giant planets, about 1400 planet detections with periods less than a week, albedos for 160 of these giant planets, and densities for seven planets.

  3. The Kepler Mission: A Mission to Determine the Frequency of Inner Planets Neat the Habitable Zone of a Wide Range of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Dunham, E. W.; Jenkins, J. M.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The surprising discovery of giant planets in inner orbits around solar-like stars has brought into question our understanding of the development and evolution of planetary systems, including our solar system. To make further progress, it is critical to detect and obtain data on the frequency and characteristics of Earth-class planets. The Kepler Mission is designed to be a quick, low-cost approach to accomplish that objective. Transits by Earth-class planets produce a fractional change in stellar brightness of 5 x 10(exp -5) to 40 x 10(exp -5) lasting for 4 to 16 hours, From the period and depth of the transits, the orbit and size of the planets can be calculated. The proposed instrument is a one-meter aperture photometer with a 12 deg field-of-view (FOV). To obtain the required precision and to avoid interruptions caused by day-night and seasonal cycles, the photometer will be launched into a heliocentric orbit. It will continuously and simultaneously monitor the flux from 80,000 dwarf stars brighter than 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation. The mission tests the hypothesis that the formation of most stars produces Earth-class planets in inner orbits. Based on this assumption and the recent observations that 2% of the stars have giant planets in inner orbits, several types of results are expected from the mission: 1. From transits of Earth-class planets, about 480 planet detections and 60 cases where two or more planets are found in the same system. 2. From transits of giant planets, about 160 detections of inner-orbit planets and 24 detections of outer-orbit planets. 3. From the phase modulation of the reflected light from giant planets, about 1400 planet detections with periods less than a week, albedos for 160 of these giant planets, and densities for seven planets.

  4. Planet Hunters: A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Orosz, J. A.; Carter, J. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Crepp, J. R.; Welsh, W. F.; Kaib, N. A.; Lintott, C. J.; Terrell, D.; Jek, K. J.; Gagliano, R.; Parrish, M.; Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org) citizen science project uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. Planet Hunters uses the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) platform to present visitors to the Planet Hunters website with a randomly selected 30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's 160,000 target stars. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits with multiple independent classifiers reviewing each 30-day light curve segment. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 12.5 million classifications searching the 1 1/2 years of publicly released Kepler observations. Planet Hunters is a novel and complementary technique to the automated transit detection algorithms, providing an independent assessment of the completeness of the Kepler exoplanet inventory. We report the latest results from Planet Hunters, highlighting in particular our latest efforts to search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting a binary star) and single transit events in the first 1.5 years of public Kepler data. We will present a status report of our search of the first 6 Quarters of Kepler data, introducing our new planet candidates and sharing the results of our observational follow-up campaign to characterize these planetary systems. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258. This is research is supported in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

  5. Identifying non-resonant Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-02-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered a plethora of multiple transiting planet candidate exosystems, many of which feature putative pairs of planets near mean motion resonance commensurabilities. Identifying potentially resonant systems could help guide future observations and enhance our understanding of planetary formation scenarios. We develop and apply an algebraic method to determine which Kepler two-planet systems cannot be in a first-fourth order resonance, given the current, publicly available data. This method identifies when any potentially resonant angle of a system must circulate. We identify and list 70 near-resonant systems which cannot actually reside in resonance, assuming a widely used formulation for deriving planetary masses from their observed radii and that these systems do not contain unseen bodies that affect the interactions of the observed planets. This work strengthens the argument that a high fraction of exoplanetary systems may be near resonance but not actually in resonance.

  6. A PSF-based approach to Kepler/K2 data - II. Exoplanet candidates in Praesepe (M 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libralato, M.; Nardiello, D.; Bedin, L. R.; Borsato, L.; Granata, V.; Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Ochner, P.; Cunial, A.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we keep pushing K2 data to a high photometric precision, close to that of the Kepler main mission, using a point-spread function (PSF)-based, neighbour-subtraction technique, which also overcome the dilution effects in crowded environments. We analyse the open cluster M 44 (NGC 2632), observed during the K2 Campaign 5, and extract light curves of stars imaged on module 14, where most of the cluster lies. We present two candidate exoplanets hosted by cluster members and five by field stars. As a by-product of our investigation, we find 1680 eclipsing binaries and variable stars, 1071 of which are new discoveries. Among them, we report the presence of a heartbeat binary star. Together with this work, we release to the community a catalogue with the variable stars and the candidate exoplanets found, as well as all our raw and detrended light curves.

  7. Stability of habitable exomoons of circumbinary planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman; Haghighipour, Nader; Quarles, Billy

    2015-12-01

    Among the currently known Kepler circumbinary planets, three, namely Kepler-453b, Kepler-16b, and Kepler-47c are in the binary habitable zone (HZ). Given the large sizes of these planets, it is unlikely that they would be habitable. However, similar to the giant planets in our solar system, these planets may have large moons, which orbit their host planets while in the HZ. These exomoons, if exist, present viable candidates for habitability. As a condition for habitability, the planet-moon system has to maintain its orbital stability for long time. Usually, the empirical formula by Holeman & Wiegert (1999) is used as a measure of orbital stability in circumbinary systems. However, this formula was obtained by assuming planets to be test particles and therefore does not include possible perturbation of the planet on the binary. In this work, we present results of more realistic calculations of stability of circumbinary planets where the interactions between planets and their central binaries are taken into account. We map the region of stability, which in this case will be specific to each system, and determine the range of the orbital parameters of the moons for which their orbits will be long-term stable.

  8. Spitzer Observations Suggest a Low Kepler False Postive Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Ballard, S.; Kepler Team

    2011-09-01

    I present the results from a large project that uses 800 hours of the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Object of Interest (KOI). The project's main purposes are to validate the planetary status of the Kepler candidates and to estimate observationally the Kepler false positive rate. A small amount of this telescope time is also dedicated to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets. I revue the project and introduce our target sample which is composed of 34 candidates selected amongst the first 400 KOIs. This list contains mainly sub-Neptune sizes candidates orbiting a wide range of spectral type stars. I present the analysis of the complete sample. By comparing the transit light curves of candidates observed with Kepler and Spitzer, we can exclude significant sources of astrophysical false positives resulting from blends (eclipsing binaries, hierarchical triples, etc...) that can mimic an exoplanetary signature in the Kepler bandpass. I show that our measured Spitzer transit depths are almost entirely in agreement with the Kepler depths. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate is extremely low.

  9. Kepler as a Binary Star Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Rosanne

    2010-12-01

    The Kepler observatory was designed to discover transits by Earth-like planets orbiting Sun-like stars. Its first major discoveries, however, are hot objects in close orbits around main-sequence stars. These are likely to be white-dwarf remnants of stars that have transferred mass to the present-day main sequence stars. These particular main-sequence stars are among the Kepler targets because they are bright. The question is: how many of the other Kepler target stars are also orbited by white dwarfs? We have shown that several hundred white dwarfs are likely to transit the Kepler target stars during the mission. In some cases, the signature will be dominated by gravitational lensing, producing distinctive ``antitransits''. Neutron stars and black holes may also be discovered this way. The lensing signature provides a measurement of the gravitational mass of the compact object. Through the discovery of both transits and antitransits caused by white dwarfs, Kepler will discover and study binaries that have already experienced a phase of mass transfer or a common envelope phase. Thus, Kepler will become a premier tool for the study of interacting binaries. During the next phase of interaction, some of the Kepler binaries may become nuclear-burning white dwarfs, and may be candidates for Type Ia supernovae or accretion-induced collapse.

  10. HD 91669B: A NEW BROWN DWARF CANDIDATE FROM THE MCDONALD OBSERVATORY PLANET SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Ramirez, Ivan; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Shetrone, Matthew; Reffert, Sabine

    2009-03-15

    We report the detection of a brown dwarf candidate orbiting the metal-rich K dwarf HD 91669, based on radial-velocity data from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search. HD 91669b is a substellar object in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.45) at a separation of 1.2 AU. The minimum mass of 30.6M {sub Jup} places this object firmly within the brown dwarf desert for inclinations i {approx}> 23{sup 0}. This is the second rare close-in brown dwarf candidate discovered by the McDonald planet search program.

  11. Most sub-arcsecond companions of Kepler exoplanet candidate host stars are gravitationally bound

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Using the known detection limits for high-resolution imaging observations and the statistical properties of true binary and line-of-sight companions, we estimate the binary fraction of Kepler exoplanet host stars. Our speckle imaging programs at the WIYN 3.5 m and Gemini North 8.1 m telescopes have observed over 600 Kepler objects of interest and detected 49 stellar companions within ∼1 arcsec. Assuming binary stars follow a log-normal period distribution for an effective temperature range of 3000-10,000 K, then the model predicts that the vast majority of detected sub-arcsecond companions are long period (P > 50 yr), gravitationally bound companions. In comparing the model predictions to the number of real detections in both observational programs, we conclude that the overall binary fraction of host stars is similar to the 40%-50% rate observed for field stars.

  12. A Kepler Mission, A Search for Habitable Planets: Concept, Capabilities and Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, Jack; Dunham, Edward; Jenkins, Jon; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The detection of extrasolar terrestrial planets orbiting main-sequence stars is of great interest and importance. Current ground-based methods are only capable of detecting objects about the size or mass of Jupiter or larger. The technological challenges of direct imaging of Earth-size planets from space are expected to be resolved over the next twenty years. Spacebased photometry of planetary transits is currently the only viable method for detection of terrestrial planets (30-600 times less massive than Jupiter). The method searches the extended solar neighborhood, providing a statistically large sample and the detailed characteristics of each individual case. A robust concept has been developed and proposed as a Discovery-class mission. The concept, its capabilities and strengths are presented.

  13. Kepler Reliability and Occurrence Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler mission has produced tables of exoplanet candidates (``KOI table''), as well as tables of transit detections (``TCE table''), hosted at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu). Transit detections in the TCE table that are plausibly due to a transiting object are selected for inclusion in the KOI table. KOI table entries that have not been identified as false positives (FPs) or false alarms (FAs) are classified as planet candidates (PCs, Mullally et al. 2015). A subset of PCs have been confirmed as planetary transits with greater than 99% probability, but most PCs have <99% probability of being true planets. The fraction of PCs that are true transiting planets is the PC reliability rate. The overall PC population is believed to have a reliability rate >90% (Morton & Johnson 2011).

  14. A RESOLVED DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE CANDIDATE PLANET-HOSTING STAR HD 95086

    SciTech Connect

    Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs.; Kóspál, Á.; Apai, D.; Pascucci, I.; Balog, Z.; Henning, Th.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Juhász, A.; Szulágyi, J.; Vavrek, R.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, β Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ∼6.''0 × 5.''4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of ∼25°. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  15. A Resolved Debris Disk Around the Candidate Planet-hosting Star HD 95086

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kospal, A.; Szabo, Gy. M.; Apai, D.; Balog, Z.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Henning, Th.; Juhasz, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Pasucci, I.; Szulagyi, J.; Vavrek, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of approx. 6.0 × 5.4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of approx 25 deg. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  16. Kepler-454b: Rocky or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Small exoplanets tend to fall into two categories: the smallest ones are predominantly rocky, like Earth, and the larger ones have a lower-density, more gaseous composition, similar to Neptune. The planet Kepler-454b was initially estimated to fall between these two groups in radius. So what is its composition?Small-Planet DichotomyThough Kepler has detected thousands of planet candidates with radii between 1 and 2.7 Earth radii, we have only obtained precise mass measurements for 12 of these planets.Mass-radius diagram (click for a closer look!) for planets with radius 2.7 Earth radii and well-measured masses. The six smallest planets (and Venus and Earth) fall along a single mass-radius curve of Earth-like composition. The six larger planets (including Kepler-454b) have lower-density compositions. [Gettel et al. 2016]These measurements, however, show an interesting dichotomy: planets with radii less than 1.6 Earth radii have rocky, Earth-like compositions, following a single relation between their mass and radius. Planets between 2 and 2.7 Earth radii, however, have lower densities and dont follow a single mass-radius relation. Their low densities suggest they contain a significant fraction of volatiles, likely in the form of a thick gas envelope of water, hydrogen, and/or helium.The planet Kepler-454b, discovered transiting a Sun-like star, was initially estimated to have a radius of 1.86 Earth radii placing it in between these two categories. A team of astronomers led by Sara Gettel (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have since followed up on the initial Kepler detection, hoping to determine the planets composition.Low-Density OutcomeGettel and collaborators obtained 63 observations of the host stars radial velocity with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, and another 36 observations with the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory. These observations allowed them to do several things:Obtain a more accurate radius estimate

  17. HAT-P-11b: A SUPER-NEPTUNE PLANET TRANSITING A BRIGHT K STAR IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Torres, G.; Pal, A.; Hartman, J.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Sipocz, B.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Kovacs, Gabor; Fernandez, J.; Kovacs, Geza; Moor, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Isaacson, H.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-11b, the smallest radius transiting extrasolar planet (TEP) discovered from the ground, and the first hot Neptune discovered to date by transit searches. HAT-P-11b orbits the bright (V = 9.587) and metal rich ([Fe/H] = +0.31 +- 0.05) K4 dwarf star GSC 03561-02092 with P = 4.8878162 +- 0.0000071 days and produces a transit signal with depth of 4.2 mmag, the shallowest found by transit searches that is due to a confirmed planet. We present a global analysis of the available photometric and radial velocity (RV) data that result in stellar and planetary parameters, with simultaneous treatment of systematic variations. The planet, like its near-twin GJ 436b, is somewhat larger than Neptune (17 M{sub +}, 3.8 R{sub +}) both in mass M{sub p} = 0.081 +- 0.009 M{sub J}(25.8 +- 2.9 M{sub +}) and radius R{sub p