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Sample records for keratocystic odontogenic tumors

  1. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria.

  2. The incidence of satellite cysts in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Pavelić, Boiidar; Katunarić, Marina; Segović, Sanja; Karadole, Maja Cimas; Katanec, Davor; Saban, Aida; Puhar, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Renaming of the Odontogenic Keratocyst as the Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor by the World Health Organization (WHO) is based on the aggressive nature of this lesion. Satellite cysts founded in the walls of the original cysts may give rise to a new lesion formation. The aim of this retrospecitve study was to identify the existence of specific features according incidence of satellite cysts and the pallisading of the basal layer of the epithelium and to establish their mutual correlation. The histopathologic data of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor on the basis of new WHO's classification (2005) were analized. Prominent palisade basal cell layer was found in 415 (94.75%) and partially absent palisade basal cell layer in 23 (5.25%) cases. Satellite cysts were presented in prominent palisade basal cell layer in 85 specimens (20.5%) and in cases with partial absent of the palisade basal layer in 3 spicemens (13%). The higher the frequency of pallisading was the higher the frequency of satellite cysts was (p > 0.05).

  3. Prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in children and adolescents with emphasis on dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (keratocystic odontogenic tumor).

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Gao, Xing; Xu, Ziyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Zhu, Laikuan; Wang, Jinrui; Liu, Wei

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the incidence and prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in children and adolescents and compare the features of the two most common types, dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). A retrospective review in a series of 369 patients with all histological diagnoses of developmental odontogenic cysts in children (≤12 years) and adolescents (13-18 years) was conducted. Among these, 361 (97.8%) patients were diagnosed as dentigerous cyst (n = 281) and KCOT (n = 80), with the male-to-female ratios of dentigerous cyst and KCOT both being 2:1. The average age of the patients with KCOT was older than that of those with dentigerous cyst (14.7 years vs 11.8 years, p < 0.001). Dentigerous cyst (59.1%) was more common in children, but KCOT (78.8%) was more common in adolescents (p < 0.001). Dentigerous cyst (57.6%) predominantly located on the maxilla, but KCOT (60.3%) predominantly located on the mandible (p = 0.010). Adolescent patients with lesions located on the mandible would favor KCOT over dentigerous cyst. This study aids in better knowledge of the prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in a large pediatric population, and shows that a well-supported early diagnosis is indispensable for a more adequate treatment.

  4. p53 and PCNA Expression in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Compared with Selected Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Nafarzadeh, Shima; Siadati, Sepideh; Shafaee, Shahryar; Bijani, Ali; Keshmiri, Nazanin

    2013-01-01

    p53 and PCNA expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors compared with selected odontogenic cysts Summary: The aim of this study was to evaluate p53 and PCNA expression in different odontogenic lesions regarding their different clinical behaviors. Slices prepared from 94 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks (25 radicular cysts (RC), 23 dentigerous cysts (DC), 23 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and 23 calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT)) were stained with p53 and PCNA antibodies using immunohistochemistry procedure. The highest level of p53 expression was in the basal layer of RC, and the highest level of PCNA expression was in the suprabasal layer of KCOT. The differences of p53 expression in basal and suprabasal layers as well as PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer were significant but there was no significant difference in PCNA expression in the basal layer of these lesions. The expression of p53 in the basal layer of RC was higher than in other cysts. This may be due to intensive inflammatory infiltration. Also, the high level of PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer of KCOT may justify its neoplastic nature and tendency to recurrence. KCOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors did not show similar expression of studied biomarkers. PMID:24551811

  5. Prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts and tumors on Brazilian sample after the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Filipe; de Noronha, Mariana Saturnino; Silva, Maiza Luiza Vieira; Amaral, Márcio Bruno Figueiredo; Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Carmago; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; de Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) as a tumor on the prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts (OCs) and odontogenic tumors (OTs). Two referral Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology services in Brazil were evaluated. All cases diagnosed as OCs or OTs were selected and classified according to the 1992 WHO-classification (cases before 2005 WHO classification of tumors excluding OKC) and the 2005 WHO classification of tumors, going forward including cases of odontogenic keratocyst tumor (KCOT). The frequency and prevalence of OCs and OTs were compared before and after the reclassification. Among 27,854 oral biopsies, 4920 (17.66%) were OCs and 992 (3.56%) were OTs. The prevalence of OTs before 2005 WHO classification of tumors was 2.04%, while the prevalence after 2005 WHO classification was 11.51% (p < 0.0001). Before 2006, the most frequent tumor diagnosed was odontoma with 194 cases (39.67%), and after 2005 WHO classification of tumors the KCOT was the most frequent with 207 cases (41.07%). The increase in the prevalence of OTs after 2005 WHO is related to the improvement of pathology services and to the inclusion of KCOT in the OTs group. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intramuscular keratocyst as a soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: differential diagnosis by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Essa, Ahmed; Babkair, Hamzah; Mikami, Toshihiko; Shingaki, Susumu; Kobayashi, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), a developmental jaw cyst previously referred to as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), typically arises in the jawbone. In this article, however, we report a case of KCOT located within the temporalis muscle. We compared its immunohistochemical profiles with those of authentic jaw KCOT, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, and epidermoid cyst in order to consider whether a soft tissue counterpart of KCOT could be a separate disease entity. The patient was a 46-year-old man with a well-defined cystic lesion within the left temporalis muscle. On computed tomographic images, the lesion was recognized as a cystic lesion, although KCOT was not included in the clinical differential diagnoses. The location of the lesion was not within bone but, rather, within the temporalis muscle that was attached to the jawbones. Our review of the literature has disclosed more than 20 peripheral KCOT cases of the oral mucosa and more than 10 cases of the skin, but only 1 case arising in muscle. Immunohistochemical investigation of the present intramuscular case reveals KCOT-characteristic profiles distinct from the other 3 types of cysts investigated. The results indicate that KCOT-like lesions can arise within soft tissues, although use of the term odontogenic might seem inappropriate in those cases. © 2013.

  7. Role of carnoy’s solution in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Belenguer, Álvaro; Sánchez-Torres, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objective The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign but aggressive neoplasm. As enucleation alone obtains high recurrence rates, some adjuvant treatments such as Carnoy’s solution have been proposed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reduction of recurrences with the use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Material and Methods An electronic search in Pubmed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases was conducted with the key words “odontogenic keratocyst”, “keratocystic odontogenic tumor”, “carnoy’s solution”, “treatment” and “enucleation”. The inclusion criteria were clinical studies using Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, published in English, including at least 10 patients. Articles with an unclear reporting of the treatment applied, nonhuman studies, case reports and lesions associated to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome were excluded. Results All the studies included were case series. The recurrence rate of enucleation ranged from 0% to 58.8%. With the only use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant treatment to the enucleation, recurrences varied from 0% to 100%. The use of ≥ 2 adjuvant treatments reduced the range between 0% and 7.9%. Conclusions The use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant therapy for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor has a grade C recommendation. Key words:Carnoy’s solution, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, treatment, recurrence. PMID:27475699

  8. Management and recurrence of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nigel R; Batstone, Martin D; Savage, Neil W

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the most up-to-date treatment modalities and respective recurrence rates for keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). A systematic review of the literature from 1999 to 2010 was undertaken examining treatment and recurrence rates for KCOT. Four inclusion criteria were defined for articles to then be analyzed against 8 standards. Of the 2736 published articles, 8 met the inclusion criteria. When merging the data, enucleation and enucleation with adjunctive measures (other than Carnoy's solution) had recurrence rates of 25.6% and 30.3%, respectively. Marsupialization with adjunctive measures produced a recurrence rate of 15.8%, whereas enucleation with Carnoy's solution presented a recurrence rate of 7.9%. Only one resection case had recurrence (6.3%). The enucleation technique with the use of adjunctive procedures (other than Carnoy's solution) provides a higher recurrence rate than any other treatment modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

    PubMed

    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  10. Endoscope-Assisted Enucleation of Mandibular Odontogenic Keratocyst Tumors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Antonio; Orabona, Giovanni D A; Abbate, Vincenzo; Maglitto, Fabio; Solari, Domenico; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) represents a rare and benign but locally aggressive developmental cystic lesion usually affecting the posterior aspect of the mandible bone, the treatment of which has always been raising debate, since Philipsen first described it as a distinct pathological entity in 1956.Recent studies have proposed the use of endoscope-assisted surgical technique, due to the possibility given by the endoscope of improving the effectiveness of the treatment of these lesions thanks to a better visualization of operative field and though a better understanding of the pathology. In this article, we would like to present our experience with the endoscope-assisted treatment of KCOT of the posterior region of the mandible.From April 2000 to April 2012, 32 patients treated for KCOT were enrolled in our retrospective study: patients were divided in 2 groups according to the type of treatment, that is, 18 were treated with traditional enucleation surgery (TES), and 14 patients underwent endoscopic assisted enucleation surgery (EES).Fischer exact test and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the outcomes between the 2 focusing on the recurrence and complication rates. In the TES group, patients we found a higher recurrence rate (39%) and higher postoperative complication rate at 5-year follow-up.Our data suggested, though, that EES seems to be a feasible alternative for the treatment of posterior mandibular KCOT. Further studies and larger series are needed to confirm these results.

  11. Evaluation of mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    de Noronha Santos Netto, Juliana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Several cell types are associated with the development of cystic and tumoral odontogenic lesions. Among inflammatory cells, mast cells can be associated with their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Tissue sections were submitted to toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry with antibody anti-tryptase (clone G3). Mast cells were quantitated using Image-Pro Plus software to obtain the mean number of mast cells in three regions: epithelial, superficial portion of the fibrous wall and deep portion of the fibrous wall from 20 periapical cysts, 20 dentigerous cysts (six non-inflamed and 14 inflamed) and 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (four non-inflamed and 16 inflamed). The mean number of mast cells detected per lesion by immunohistochemistry (4.1) was higher than by histochemistry (1.5) (P<0.0001). Inflamed dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors showed a higher mean number of mast cells than non-inflamed lesions in all regions. The deep region from all cysts showed the highest mean number of degranulated mast cells, except for non-inflamed keratocystic odontogenic tumors analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected higher number of mast cells than histochemistry. The higher number of mast cells observed in inflamed lesions could indicate the participation of these cells in the inflammatory response in odontogenic lesions. The prevalence of degranulated mast cells in the deep region suggests intense activity of these cells, possibly related to growth of cystic lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. E-cadherin regulators are differentially expressed in the epithelium and stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Carneiro Júnior, Bráulio; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista Silva; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is the process where cells lose their epithelial features and acquire properties of typical mesenchymal cells. The dissociation of tumor cells due to changes in cell-cell adhesion is one of the key principles of tumor invasion and EMT. Thus, the knowledge of the molecular features of EMT in keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT) can provide useful markers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis and perhaps contribute to an alternative therapeutic approach as it shows an aggressive clinical behavior and high recurrence rates. This study aimed to evaluate the EMT in KOT by the immunoexpression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Slug and comparing to radicular cysts and dental follicles. Thirty-two KOTs, 15 radicular cysts, and 08 dental follicles were used for immunohistochemistry, evaluating the extent, intensity, labeling pattern, cellular compartment in the epithelium and stroma, and the presence of inflammation. E-cadherin was preserved in most cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. N-cadherin was increased in the tumor epithelium, a result that was positively correlated with the heterogeneous and nuclear immunoexpression of Slug in the epithelium; Slug also correlated with high Snail immunoexpression. N-cadherin was positively correlated with Slug in the stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. The high immunoexpression of Snail and nuclear Slug in keratocystic odontogenic tumors suggests these proteins as transcription factors without necessarily participating in 'cadherin switching'. However, the knowledge of their induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in odontogenic tumors is still limited. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of protein 53, murine double minute 2, B-cell lymphoma 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Hebel Cavalcanti; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel Antonio; de Amorim, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lelia Batista

    2013-01-01

    Even though odontogenic cysts share a similar histogenesis, they show different growth and differentiation profile due to differences in the proliferative cellular activity. We perform an immunohistochemical assessment of protein 53 (p53), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), and murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor analyzing their correlation with the biological behavior of these lesions. By the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with antibodies against p53, PCNA, bcl-2, and MDM2 proteins, 11 radicular cysts, 11 dentigerous cysts, and 11 keratocystic odontogenic tumor were analyzed. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05) were used to analyze the data. Immunopositivity for PCNA was observed in all cases appraised, predominantly in the suprabasal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor epithelial lining (SD ± 19.44), but no significant differences were found among the groups of lesions. Bcl-2 immunoexpression was observed especially in the basal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PCNA LI was significantly higher than bcl-2 LI in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. MDM2 and p53 immunoexpression were not detected in the lesions studied. Among the evaluated lesions, the keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed different immunoexpression of the proliferation and apoptosis markers. The results of this study suggest that the keratocystic odontogenic tumor presents distinct biological behavior of the odontogenic cysts, as for the processes of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, reinforcing the information in favor of the neoplastic nature of this lesion.

  14. The immunoprofile of odontogenic keratocyst (keratocystic odontogenic tumor) that includes expression of PTCH, SMO, GLI-1 and bcl-2 is similar to ameloblastoma but different from odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Vered, M; Peleg, O; Taicher, S; Buchner, A

    2009-08-01

    The aggressive biological behavior of odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), unlike that of other odontogenic cysts, has argued for its recent re-classification as a neoplasm, 'keratocystic odontogenic tumor'. Identification of mutations in the PTCH gene in some of the OKCs that were expected to produce truncated proteins, resulting in loss of control of the cell cycle, provided additional support for OKCs having a neoplastic nature. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway-related proteins, PTCH, smoothened (SMO) and GLI-1, and of the SHH-induced bcl-2 oncoprotein in a series of primary OKC (pOKC), recurrent OKC (rOKC) and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated OKCs (NBCCS-OKCs), and compared them to solid ameloblastomas (SAMs), unicystic ameloblastomas (UAMs), 'orthokeratinized' OKCs (oOKCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). All studied lesions expressed the SHH pathway-related proteins in a similar pattern. The expression of bcl-2 in OKCs (pOKCs and NBCCS-OKCs) and SAMs was significantly higher than in oOKCs, DCs and RCs (P < 0.001). The present results of the immunoprofile of OKCs (that includes the expression of the SHH-related proteins and the SHH-induced bcl-2 oncoprotein) further support the notion of OKC having a neoplastic nature. As OKCs vary considerably in their biologic behavior, it is suggested that the quality and quantity of interactions between the SHH and other cell cycle regulatory pathways are likely to work synergistically to define the individual phenotype and corresponding biological behavior of this lesion.

  15. Recurrent keratocystic odontogenic tumor of right maxillary sinus involving the right infraorbital rim.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Karthikeyan; Vasupradha, G; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Balaji, Abishek Rajaram

    2017-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with an aggressive behavior and high recurrence rate. The most common site of predilection is the posterior mandible. In contrast, KCOTs occurring in the maxillary region are relatively rare. However, the maxillary involvement poses a greater and increased threat, due to proximity to vital structures such as maxillary sinus, orbital floor, and infratemporal fossa. This report presents such a case of KCOT involving the maxillary sinus eroding the floor of the orbit and provides an account of the factors that need to be considered during management.

  16. Hemangiopericytoma associated with multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in an adolescent patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brar, Rajdeep; Kulkarni, Sunita; Sheikh, Soheyl; Jindal, Sanjeev; Brar, Prabhleen

    2008-06-01

    Hemangiopericytoma, initially described by Stout and Murray in 1942 (1), is a rare vascular tumor arising from mesenchymal cells with pericytic differentiation. Hemangiopericytomas usually occur in the 5th decade of life and account for 3-5% of all soft tissue sarcomas and 1% of all vascular tumors (2). The tumor usually occurs in the limbs, pelvis, or head and neck region; 15-30% of all hemangiopericytomas occur in the head and neck (2,3). Here we present a case of hemangiopericytoma of the submandibular region with keratocystic odontogenic tumors in an adolescent patient.

  17. Prognostic factors for keratocystic odontogenic tumor (odontogenic keratocyst): analysis of clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in cysts treated by enucleation.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Norio; Sakuma, Hidenori; Miyabe, Satoru; Machida, Junichiro; Kaetsu, Atsuo; Yokoi, Motoo; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Nagao, Toru; Shimozato, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors for the recurrence of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) following simple enucleation by examining clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical findings. Following enucleation, the frequency of recurrence among 32 subjects diagnosed with KCOT was analyzed for tumor site, radiographic and histologic features, and immunopositivity for Ki-67 and p53. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors in four out of 32 subjects (12.5%) recurred during the follow-up period (median: 33 months, range: 7-114 months). Three out of four subjects (75.0%) among recurrent group showed high expression of Ki-67 (LI >10%) in basal layer and four (4/28; 14.3%) among non-recurrence group (P = 0.025). Expression of p53 among non-recurrent group was observed in 11 subjects (11/28; 39.3%), and in three subjects (3/4; 75.0%) among the recurrent group (P = 0.295). Hazard risk for the recurrence of KCOT was 4.02 (95% CI 1.42-18.14) for high Ki-67 expression in the basal layer by the Cox proportional hazard model (P = 0.009). In our study, none of the other clinico-pathologic variables were associated with the recurrence of KCOT. The results suggested that the evaluation of Ki-67 expression in KCOT at the time of pathological diagnosis might be helpful for consideration of appropriate adjunctive surgical procedures to avoid a recurrence and may serve as a prognostic marker.

  18. Presentation of a keratocystic odontogenic tumor with agenesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed the etiopathogenetic, clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic aspects of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, particularly in association with dental anomalies of number, with the aim of providing useful information for their correct diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis within a multidisciplinary approach. Case presentation A 14-year-old Caucasian girl presented for observation of bilateral agenesis of the upper incisors, which was diagnosed by orthopantomography. Approximately one year after starting orthodontic treatment, the patient went to the emergency department because of a phlegmonous tumefaction of the lateroposterior upper left maxillary region. Diagnostic orthopantomography and axial computed tomography scan results of the facial skeleton revealed a large lesion occupying the left maxillary sinus, rhizolysis of dental elements 26 and 27, and dislocation of dental element 28. The lesion and infected sinus mucosa were removed through surgical antral-cystectomy with the Caldwell-Luc approach. Histological examination of the lesion confirmed the suspected diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. The 12-month follow-up orthopantomography and computed tomography scan results showed good trabecular bone formation in the lesion area. The 24-month follow-up results showed optimal healing in the area of the lesion, positive pulp vitality tests for teeth 26 and 27, and good periodontal tissue healing, as verified through periodontal probing. Conclusions Combined with our observations from a careful review of the literature, the results of the case study suggest that keratocystic odontogenic tumor and dental agenesis probably do not develop through a common genetic cause. More likely, they are caused by related environmental factors. Management of this case required the multidisciplinary collaboration of different specializations and careful planning to devise a correct therapeutic protocol and reach a favorable prognosis. PMID:24716509

  19. Oral pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Report of a case and review on etiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S.; Angadi, Punnya V.; Mane, Deepa R.; Hallikerimath, Seema R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulse granuloma is a distinct oral entity characterized as a foreign body reaction occurring either centrally or peripherally. It is usually seen in the periapical or in the sulcus area. Occasionally the lesions occur in the wall of the cyst, commonest being the inflammatory odontogenic cyst. Histologically, they present as eosinophilic hyaline mass with giant cell inclusions and inflammatory cells. They may show different histological characteristics, possibly related to the length of time in the tissue. Adequate recognition is important to avoid misdiagnosis. Many authors suggest that pulse granuloma results due to implantation of food particles of plant or vegetable origin into the tissue following tooth extraction. This paper aims to report a case of pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor with its histochemical and polarizing microscopic features and discuss on etiopathogenesis of pulse granuloma. PMID:23482677

  20. Vismodegib hedgehog-signaling inhibition and treatment of basal cell carcinomas as well as keratocystic odontogenic tumors in Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Booms, Patrick; Harth, Marc; Sader, Robert; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Vismodegib hedgehog signaling inhibition treatment has potential for reducing the burden of multiple skin basal cell carcinomas and jaw keratocystic odontogenic tumors. They are major criteria for the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are reported, and the relevance of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition by oral vismodegib for maxillofacial surgeons is highlighted. In summary, progressed basal cell carcinoma lesions are virtually inoperable. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors have an aggressive behavior including rapid growth and extension into adjacent tissues. Interestingly, nearly complete regression of multiple Gorlin syndrome-associated keratocystic odontogenic tumors following treatment with vismodegib. Due to radio-hypersensitivity in Gorlin syndrome, avoidance of treatment by radiotherapy is strongly recommended for all affected individuals. Vismodegib can help in those instances where radiation is contra-indicated, or the lesions are inoperable. The effect of vismodegib on basal cell carcinomas was associated with a significant decrease in hedgehog-signaling and tumor proliferation. Vismodegib, a new and approved drug for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma, is a specific oncogene inhibitor. It also seems to be effective for treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome, rendering the surgical resections less challenging.

  1. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Mohammed Israr Ul; Shah, Ajaz A.; Ahmad, Irshad; Hasan, Shahid; Jangam, Sagar S.; Farah; Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Background Assess clinicopathological features of patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) associated with Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in our institution from 2004 to 2015. Method After histopathological analyses of KCOT related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome, 7 patients were assessed. These patients presented a total of 15 primary and 2 recurrent KCOT. Results All patients presented a multiple KCOT, and 13 lesions were located in mandible (77%) and 4 (23%) in maxilla. Most of the tumors presented a unilocular pattern (71%) and had tooth association (88%). Four patients (57%) were in the age group of 10–19 years and three patients (43%) were in the age group of 20–29 years. There were four male and three female patients. Conclusion KCOT is a frequent manifestation of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome and can be its first sign, mainly in young patients. The four patients presented with two lesions (57%) and three lesions in three patients (43%). PMID:27195205

  2. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors related to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Mohammed Israr Ul; Shah, Ajaz A; Ahmad, Irshad; Hasan, Shahid; Jangam, Sagar S; Farah; Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Assess clinicopathological features of patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in our institution from 2004 to 2015. After histopathological analyses of KCOT related to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, 7 patients were assessed. These patients presented a total of 15 primary and 2 recurrent KCOT. All patients presented a multiple KCOT, and 13 lesions were located in mandible (77%) and 4 (23%) in maxilla. Most of the tumors presented a unilocular pattern (71%) and had tooth association (88%). Four patients (57%) were in the age group of 10-19 years and three patients (43%) were in the age group of 20-29 years. There were four male and three female patients. KCOT is a frequent manifestation of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and can be its first sign, mainly in young patients. The four patients presented with two lesions (57%) and three lesions in three patients (43%).

  3. Enucleation and liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tonietto, Leonardo; Borges, Hedelson Odenir Iecher; Martins, Carlos Alberto Medeiros; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel

    2011-06-01

    This study describes the technique of lesion enucleation without capsule disruption combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the surgical treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). Eight patients (9 KOTs) were included in the study. After enucleation, liquid nitrogen was applied twice for 1 minute, with 5-minute intervals between applications. The patients were followed up for 3 to 9 years. There were no recurrences during the follow-up of 9 KOTs for up to 9 years. Only 1 patient had temporary reversible loss of lip sensation after treatment. There were no pathologic fractures. In all cases bone height at the surgical site was restored, and no patients needed bone reconstruction for post-treatment rehabilitation. This study confirmed the efficiency of KOT treatment enucleation without fragmentation combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy at the surgical site. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. "Weighted number of links" (WNL) was calculated to identify "leader genes" (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (P<0.001). Total interactions score (TIS) was also calculated using all interaction data generated by the STRING database, in order to achieve global connectivity for each gene. The topological and ontological analyses were performed using Cytoscape software and BinGO plugin. Literature review data was used to corroborate the bioinformatics data. CDK1 was identified as leader gene for AM. In KCOT group, results show PCNA and TP53 . Both tumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT.

  5. Transcriptional profiles of SHH pathway genes in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavichiolli; Carvalho, Kátia Cândido; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; de Souza, Renata Oliveira; de Faro Valverde, Ludmila; de Azevedo, Roberto Almeida; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves

    2014-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway activation has been identified as a key factor in the development of many types of tumors, including odontogenic tumors. Our study examined the expression of genes in the SHH pathway to characterize their roles in the pathogenesis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT) and ameloblastomas (AB). We quantified the expression of SHH, SMO, PTCH1, SUFU, GLI1, CCND1, and BCL2 genes by qPCR in a total of 23 KOT, 11 AB, and three non-neoplastic oral mucosa (NNM). We also measured the expression of proteins related to this pathway (CCND1 and BCL2) by immunohistochemistry. We observed overexpression of SMO, PTCH1, GLI1, and CCND1 genes in both KOT (23/23) and AB (11/11). However, we did not detect expression of the SHH gene in 21/23 KOT and 10/11 AB tumors. Low levels of the SUFU gene were expressed in KOT (P = 0.0199) and AB (P = 0.0127) relative to the NNM. Recurrent KOT exhibited high levels of SMO (P = 0.035), PTCH1 (P = 0.048), CCND1 (P = 0.048), and BCL2 (P = 0.045) transcripts. Using immunolabeling of CCND1, we observed no statistical difference between primary and recurrent KOT (P = 0.8815), sporadic and NBCCS-KOT (P = 0.7688), and unicystic and solid AB (P = 0.7521). Overexpression of upstream (PTCH1 and SMO) and downstream (GLI1, CCND1 and BCL2) genes in the SHH pathway leads to the constitutive activation of this pathway in KOT and AB and may suggest a mechanism for the development of these types of tumors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mutiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) in a patient with Gorlin syndrome: a case report with late presentation and absence of skin manifestations.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Atif Ali; Edhi, Muhammad Muzzammil; Faridi, Naveen; Hosein, Mervyn; Khan, Mehmood

    2016-07-22

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT) and falx cerebral calcifications, which occur due to mutation in PTCH gene. A 36 year old Asian patient presented with jaw swelling and pain. Radiographic examination revealed six cysts in maxilla and mandible which were excised and histologically were compatable with keratocystic odontogenic tumors. CT scan also revealed falx cerebral calcification which led to the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome confirmed on genetic testing. There was no evidence of basal cell carcinoma and other manifestations of Gorlin syndrome were absent. Multiple KCOT are hallmark of Gorlin syndrome and should always leads to its suspicion even in the absence of other manifestations and late presentation. Moreover, keratocystic odontogenic tumors have a particularly higher risk of recurrence and patients with Gorlin syndrome are prone to develop additional keratocystic odontogenic tumors from basal cells of oral epithelium. Therefore we suggest a stepwise approach to manage such patients which include a preoperative biopsy to establish a definitive diagnosis and complete removal of all keratocystic odontogenic tumors to prevent recurrence followed by close clinical follow up and early removal of any newly developed or recurrent cyst. Additionally thorough clinical examination is necessary to rule out the possibility of Gorlin syndrome in any patient with keratocystic odontogenic tumors as there are only subtle differences in histology of those cysts with a syndromic association and clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are markedly variable. Hence late occurrence of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and absence of skin manifestations like basal cell carcinoma should not preclude a diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome.

  7. Decompression of keratocystic odontogenic tumors leading to increased fibrosis, but without any change in epithelial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Awni, Sarah; Conn, Brendan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether decompression treatment induces changes in the histology or biologic behavior of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Seventeen patients with KCOT underwent decompression treatment with or without enucleation. Histologic evaluation and immunohistochemical expression of p53, Ki-67, and Bcl-2 were analyzed by using conventional microscopy. KCOT showed significantly increased fibrosis (P = .01) and a subjective reduction in mitotic activity (P = .03) after decompression. There were no statistically significant changes in the expression of proliferation markers. An increase in daughter-cysts or epithelial rests was seen after decompression (P = .04). Recurrence was noted in four of 16 cases, and expression of p53 was strongly correlated with prolonged duration of treatment (P = .01) and intense inflammatory changes (P = .02). Structural changes in the KCOT epithelium or capsule following decompression facilitate surgical removal of the tumor. There was no statistical evidence that decompression influences expression of proliferation markers in the lining, indicating that the potential for recurrence may not be restricted to the cellular level. The statistically significant increase of p53 expression with increased duration of treatment and increase of inflammation may also indicate the possibility of higher rates of recurrence with prolonged treatment and significant inflammatory changes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Odontogenic keratocyst in a cat.

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, E E B; Walker, K S; Mohr, F C; Murphy, B

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are derived from odontogenic epithelium, can be locally invasive and destructive and have been reported rarely in cats. A 16-year-old, male domestic shorthair cat had a 3-year history of a slowly progressive, right mandibular swelling. Intraoral dental radiographs revealed a multilocular, radiolucent, cystic mass within the right mandible that extended from the distal aspect of the canine tooth to the mesial aspect of the fourth premolar tooth. Radiographically, the mass was associated with distortion and regional destruction of the right mandibular bone and resorption of regional tooth roots. Histological examination of an incisional biopsy sample revealed multiple ruptured cysts lined by stratified squamous epithelium of odontogenic origin with luminal parakeratinization and a prominent palisading basal cell layer. The cyst contained abundant orthokeratotic and parakeratotic keratin. The clinical, radiographical and histological features were consistent with a diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, as seen in man. This is the first report of an odontogenic keratocyst in a cat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of vismodegib to shrink keratocystic odontogenic tumors in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ally, Mina S; Tang, Jean Y; Joseph, Timmy; Thompson, Bobbye; Lindgren, Joselyn; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Ulerio, Grace; Chanana, Anita M; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M; Bickers, David R; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-05-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) of the jaw affect more than 65% of patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Surgery frequently causes facial disfigurement and is not always curative. Most BCNS-related and some sporadic KCOTs have malignant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We examined the effect of vismodegib (an oral Hedgehog pathway inhibitor) on KCOT size in patients with BCNS enrolled in a clinical trial testing vismodegib for basal cell carcinoma prevention (NCT00957229), using pretreatment and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging. Four men and 2 women had pretreatment KCOTs (mean longest diameter, 2.0 cm; range, 0.7-3.3 cm), occurring primarily in the mandible. Patients were treated with vismodegib, 150 mg/d, for a mean (SD) of 18.0 (4.8) months (range, 11-24 months). Four patients experienced a size reduction and 2 had no change. Vismodegib reduced the mean longest diameter of KCOTs in all patients by 1.0 cm (95% CI, 0.03-1.94; P = .02) or 50% from baseline. We observed no enlargement of existing KCOTs or new KCOT development. Vismodegib shrinks some KCOTs in patients with BCNS and may offer an alternative to surgical therapy. These effects were maintained for at least 9 months after drug cessation in 1 patient. Further studies assessing long-term efficacy and optimal maintenance regimens should be performed.

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Kayikcioglu, T; Kayipmaz, S

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we propose a decision support system for effective classification of dental periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) lesions obtained via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT has been effectively used in recent years for diagnosing dental pathologies and determining their boundaries and content. Unlike other imaging techniques, CBCT provides detailed and distinctive information about the pathologies by enabling a three-dimensional (3D) image of the region to be displayed. We employed 50 CBCT 3D image dataset files as the full dataset of our study. These datasets were identified by experts as periapical cyst and KCOT lesions according to the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features. Segmentation operations were performed on the CBCT images using viewer software that we developed. Using the tools of this software, we marked the lesional volume of interest and calculated and applied the order statistics and 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix for each CBCT dataset. A feature vector of the lesional region, including 636 different feature items, was created from those statistics. Six classifiers were used for the classification experiments. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier achieved the best classification performance with 100% accuracy, and 100% F-score (F1) scores as a result of the experiments in which a ten-fold cross validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM achieved the best classification performance with 96.00% accuracy, and 96.00% F1 scores in the experiments in which a split sample validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM additionally achieved the best performance of 94.00% accuracy, and 93.88% F1 in which a leave-one-out (LOOCV) method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. Based on the results, we determined that periapical cyst and KCOT lesions can be classified with a high accuracy with the models that we built using

  11. A series of 240 odontogenic keratocysts: Should we continue to use the terminology of 'keratocystic odontogenic tumour' for the solid variant of odontogenic keratocyst?

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Devrim; Gunhan, Omer; Celasun, Bulent

    2018-04-11

    Most of the odontogenic keratocysts show an indolent behaviour like non-neoplastic lesions. For this reason, the odontogenic keratocyst was reclassified within the odontogenic cysts category in the WHO 2017 classification. Some odontogenic keratocysts may contain satellite cysts or solid squamoid islands within their wall. Recently, a solid form of odontogenic keratocyst has also been described which is composed entirely of multiple epithelial islands and small cysts in a collagenous stroma. The true nature of this variant is unclear yet. In this article, we present a series of 204 odontogenic keratocyst cases. Clinical and histologic findings of the cases in this series were described. These were also categorised according to the presence of satellite lesions. Additionally, the features of two cases of the solid form of odontogenic keratocysts were compared with those of the previous reports and other histologically similar odontogenic lesions. Current evidence suggests that this variant may be neoplastic and it differs from other odontogenic keratocysts, at least histologically. We believe diagnosing a solid lesion as a cyst is counterintuitive and the term "keratocystic odontogenic tumour" better describes this particular variant. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Odontogenic keratocyst: What is in the name?

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Meghanand T.; Singh, Anjali; Singhvi, Abhishek; Sharma, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    The classification of odontogenic cysts is complicated and can create confusion for both clinicians and pathologists. The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is an enigmatic developmental cyst that deserves special attention. It has characteristic histopathological and clinical features; but, what makes this cyst special is its aggressive behavior and high recurrence rate. Despite of many classifications and nomenclature, unfortunately the clinicians still have to face difficulties in the management of this commonly found jaw lesion. This article is an effort to provide an overview of various aspects of OKC with emphasis on nomenclature, recurrence, molecular aspects, and management of OKC. PMID:24082717

  13. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings

    PubMed Central

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction. PMID:23505078

  14. Non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurdekar, Raghavendra S.; Prakash, Jeevan; Rana, A. S.; Kalra, Puneet

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are one of the most frequent features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). It is linked with mutation in the PTCH gene (human homolog of the drosophila segment polarity gene, “patched”,). Partial expression of the gene may result in occurrence of only multiple recurring OKC without any associated systemic findings. A rare case of multiple odontogenic keratocysts unassociated with any syndrome is reported, so as to add to the growing number of such cases in the literature. The possibility of this case being a partial expression of the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is discussed. PMID:24163561

  15. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dixit, S; Acharya, S; Dixit, P B

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with a predisposition to cancer. Features like basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, calcification of falx cerebri, bifid ribs, pits on palms and soles and hypertelorism are evident. A case of this rare disease seen on a 13 year old female patient is presented here, where multiple odontogenic keratocysts were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the lower teeth.

  16. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  17. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Verzola, Mario H.; Pires, Luana C.; Mascarenhas, Vinicius I.; da Silva, Rodrigo B.; Cirelli, Joni A.; Barbeiro, Roberto H.

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed. PMID:25821360

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging: a useful tool to distinguish between keratocystic odontogenic tumours and odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Probst, F A; Probst, M; Pautke, Ch; Kaltsi, E; Otto, S; Schiel, S; Troeltzsch, M; Ehrenfeld, M; Cornelius, C P; Müller-Lisse, U G

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to odontogenic cysts, keratocystic odontogenic tumours often recur and require more aggressive surgical treatment, so we tried to find features that distinguished between them on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Without knowing the diagnosis, two radiologists reviewed intensity (low, intermediate, or high) and homogeneity (homogeneous or heterogeneous) of signals in short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR), T1- and T2-weighted, and fat-suppressed, contrast-enhanced MRI in 20 consecutive patients with oval, radiolucent lesions of the mandible on panoramic radiography, and who were subsequently confirmed histopathologically to have either an odontogenic cyst or a keratocystic odontogenic tumour (n=10 in each group). Fisher's exact test was statistically significant at p<0.05. Delineation of a contrast-enhanced wall of a cyst with high signal intensity distinguished odontogenic cysts (9/10 and 8/10, respectively) from keratocystic odontogenic tumours (3/10, p=0.02, and 1/10, p=0.01, respectively). One radiologist found odontogenic cysts were more likely to be homogeneous on unenhanced T1-weighted images (odontogenic cysts 9/10, keratocystic odontogenic tumours 3/10, p=0.02) and one on contrast-enhanced MRI, when the cyst wall was enhanced (odontogenic cysts 7/9, keratocystic odontogenic tumours 0/3, p=0.01). There were no other significant distinguishing features on MRI. In conclusion, the signal intensity of the enhanced wall seems to be a feature on contrast-enhanced MRI that differentiates odontogenic cysts from keratocystic odontogenic tumours. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nigel R; Gannon, Orla M; Savage, Neil W; Batstone, Martin D

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review of the literature from 1993 to 2011 was undertaken examining frequency data of the most common odontogenic cysts and tumors. Seven inclusion criteria were met for the paper to be incorporated. In the preliminary search 5231 papers were identified, of these 26 papers met the inclusion criteria. There were 18 297 odontogenic cysts reported. Of these there were 9982 (54.6%) radicular cysts, 3772 (20.6%) dentigerous cysts and 2145 (11.7%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors. With the reclassification of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in 2005 as an odontogenic tumor, there were 8129 odontogenic tumors reported with 3001 (36.9%) ameloblastomas, 1163 (14.3%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 533 (6.5%) odontogenic myxomas, 337 (4.1%) adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and 127 (1.6%) ameloblastic fibromas. This systematic review found that odontogenic cysts are 2.25 times more frequent than odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cyst and tumor were the radicular cyst and ameloblastoma respectively. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Simultaneous adenomatoid odontogenic and keratocystic odontogenic tumours in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shephard, M; Shepard, M; Coleman, H

    2014-03-01

    Gorlin and Goltz described a syndrome in which multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and bifid ribs occurred in combination. The jaw keratocysts are a consistent feature of 'Gorlin-Goltz' or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Central nervous system and ocular involvement occurred together with the fairly typical facial features of frontal bossing and hypertelorism. This case report documents the pathology associated with an impacted maxillary canine tooth in a boy with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The patient presented for investigation of the failure of eruption of the right permanent maxillary canine tooth. Radiographic investigation showed the presence of a well circumscribed radiolucency located around the crown of an impacted right maxillary canine tooth. The patient's medical history revealed a medulloblastoma that was treated 13 years ago. The right maxillary canine tooth and associated peri-coronal tissue were removed under general anaesthetic. A diagnosis of a keratocystic odontogenic tumour with an associated adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was made. The common differential diagnoses for a peri-coronal radiolucency in the maxilla that need to be considered by dentists include a dentigerous cyst, follicular keratocystic odontogenic tumour and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. A rare case of both keratocystic odontogenic tumour and associated follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is described in a patient with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Keratocyst of the buccal mucosa: is it odontogenic?

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-11-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) of the buccal mucosa, the diagnosis of which is based on subjective histologic evaluation, is a controversial entity of questionable existence. This report describes 2 rare cases of parakeratinized cyst arising from the buccal mucosa. Case 1 was a 60-year-old man with a 3-cm cyst and case 2 was a 16-year-old boy with a microcyst incidentally discovered on histology. Both lesions were essentially identical in histologic appearance and immunophenotype to intraosseous and gingival OKC, but they were clearly different from orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts and buccal mucosal epidermoid cysts. Step sections failed to reveal any kind of odontogenic tissue or skin adnexa in the cyst wall. These microscopic characteristics reflexively lead to the diagnosis of OKC, if the extragingival occurrence in the buccal mucosa cannot be considered. An alternative nonodontogenic origin includes a keratocyst of the skin, ie, an unusual mucosal presentation of cutaneous keratocyst. Because its true nature, either odontogenic or epidermal, cannot be conclusively proven at this time, we propose a more descriptive and noncommittal term, "mucosal keratocyst," for a particular cyst in a buccal location that is morphologically indistinguishable from OKC. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Syndromic Recurrent Multiple Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bartake, AR.; Shreekanth, NG.; Prabhu, S.; Gopalkrishnan, K.

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are one of the most frequent features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBS). It is linked with mutation in the PTCH gene. Partial expression of the gene may result in occurrence of only multiple recurring OKC. Our patient presented with nine cysts with multiple recurrences over a period of 11 years without any other manifestation of the syndrome. PMID:21998815

  3. [Therapy and course of recurrent odontogenic keratocyst. A case report].

    PubMed

    Schultz, Christoph B; Pajarola, Gion F; Grätz, Klaus W

    2005-01-01

    Recurrence following the surgical treatment of keratocysts of the jaws may present a major problem to the oral surgeon. The surgical treatment of patients with odontogenic keratocysts is concerning the high recurrence rate demanding and difficult. It has been suggested that recurrence is a consequence of technical of microcysts in the mucosa overlying the recurrent lesions. Attemps have been made to reduce this high recurrence rate by improved surgical techniques, such as removal of superadjacent mucosa, smoothing of the osseous wall of the cystic cavity, resection of neighboring parts of the mandible, tanning of the epithelial lining of the cyst with Carnoy's solution and marsupialisation. On the basis of a case report it was the aim of the authors to present the surgical treatment of odontogenic, recurrent keratocysts at the Clinic for Maxillo-Facial Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, from the primary operation following the Brosch-procedure in 1971 up to the latest cystectomy in 2004.

  4. Biochemical and Cytological Comparison of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours to Nonkeratinising Odontogenic Cysts Fluid.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Madhvika; Shetty, Pushparaj; Patidar, Nitesh; Mittal, Sugandh; Singh, Hanspal; Chethna

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes in the cystic fluid for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning of keratocystic odontogenic tumours and other non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. Fifteen keratocystic odontogenic tumour and 15 controls were studied. The cystic fluid was aspirated and analysed to determine the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and the presence of keratinocytes. The data collected was statistically evaluated using Mann Whitney U-Test and Student's t-test. A highly significant difference (p<0.0001) was seen when a comparison of Prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes was made between keratocystic odontogenic tumour and non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. The presence of albumin also showed a significant difference (p<0.01). A combined analysis of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, inorganic phosphorous and detection of epithelial squames may be used as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a minimally invasive and highly accurate fashion.

  5. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel PTCH1 gene mutation in a pediatric patient associated multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Gozde; Balta, Burhan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Etoz, Osman A; Martinuzzi, Claudia; Kara, Ozlem; Pastorino, Lorenza; Kocoglu, Fatma; Ulker, Omer; Erdogan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder which comprises the triad of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformations. Besides this triad, neurological, ophthalmic, endocrine, and genital manifestations are known to be variable. It is occasionally associated with aggressive BCC and internal malignancies. This report documents a case of GGS with a novel mutation in the PTCH1 gene in an 11-year-old child. The clinical, radiographic, histopathologic and molecular findings of this condition, and treatment are described, and a review of GGS was carried out.

  7. Cytokeratin 19 Expression Patterns of Dentigerous Cysts and Odontogenic Keratocysts

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, KP; Vidya, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although numerous investigators have studied the pattern of keratin expression in different odontogenic cysts, the results have been variable. Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the pattern of expression of cytokeratin 19 (CK 19) in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts. Materials and Methods: The epithelial layers showing expression of the epithelial marker CK 19 was determined by immunohistochemical methods in 15 tissue specimens each of histopathologically confirmed cases of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts. Statistical analysis was done to compare the CK 19 expression between dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst using the Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: All specimens of dentigerous cysts were positive for CK 19 with 20% (3/15) of the specimens showing expression only in a single layer of the epithelium, 40% (6/15) of the specimens showing expression in more than one layer but not the entire thickness of the epithelium, and the remaining 40% (6/15) showing expression throughout the entire thickness of the epithelium. In the case of odontogenic keratocysts, 40% (6/15) of the specimens were negative for CK 19, 40% (6/15) of the specimens showed expression only in a single layer of the epithelium, and 20% (3/15) of the specimens showed expression in more than one layer, but not the entire thickness of the epithelium. The observed differences in CK 19 expression by the two lesions were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The differences in CK 19 expression by these cysts may be utilized as a diagnostic tool in differentiating between these two lesions. PMID:25861531

  8. Odontogenic cysts in three dogs: one odontogenic keratocyst and two dentigerous cysts.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Taketo; Takagi, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kenji; Kimura, Takashi; Okumura, Masahiro; Fujinaga, Toru

    2004-09-01

    Odontogenic cysts, which showed cystic radiolucency in the jaw bone by radiographic examination and computed tomography, were enucleated by operation in 3 dogs. One dog had a odontogenic keratocyst in the incisive bone of the right maxilla and another 2 cases revealed dentigerous cysts in the mandible. These cyst walls were enucleated or transpired by semiconductor laser. Afterwards, osteogenesis was confirmed at the defective part of jaw bone by extirpation of the cyst in all cases, and no recurrence has been noted in any cases. Odontogenic cyst is a disease which should be treated by surgical extirpation or transpiration.

  9. Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kei; Morita, Kei-Ichi; Shimada, Yasuyuki; Omura, Ken; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst (POKC) is a rare gingival cyst showing histologic features identical to those of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A rare case of POKC associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is presented. A 24-year-old woman with NBCCS presented with a pigmented papule, 3 mm in size, involving the lingual gingiva of the right canine area of the mandible. Based on a clinical diagnosis of benign pigmentation, an excisional biopsy was performed, and a histopathologic diagnosis of POKC was rendered. The lining cells were positive for the proteins GLI2, BCL2, keratin 8, keratin 17, and mTOR. TP53 and Ber-EP4 were also weakly positive. Gene mutational analysis on a buccal swab sample revealed 2 missense mutations in the PTCH1 gene. This case is a distinctive example of a genuine soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor, in which an aberrant PTCH1-GLI pathway played a considerable role in the pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors.

  11. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  12. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  14. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Md; Charan, Cr; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

  15. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, MD; Charan, CR; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. Study Design: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. Results: The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. Conclusion: AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors. PMID:25364178

  16. Odontogenic keratocyst: The role of the orthodontist in the diagnosis of initial lesions.

    PubMed

    Leandro Santos, Raphaela Silva; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Silva, Gleyson Kleber do Amaral; Rocha, André Caroli; Prado, José Divaldo; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2017-10-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are locally infiltrative odontogenic cysts that are usually diagnosed during routine radiographic examinations. Therefore, it is critical that dental practitioners, in particular orthodontists, recognize and diagnose OKCs to recommend appropriate treatment. This report describes a patient whose OKC was not initially identified during orthodontic pretreatment. In addition, this report discusses the clinical and radiographic features of OKCs, as well as the differential diagnoses of these lesions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. P53 Protein Expression in Dental Follicle, Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Inflammatory Subtypes of Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Fatemeh, Mashhadiabbas; Sepideh, Arab; Sara, Bagheri Seyedeh; Nazanin, Mahdavi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with aggressive clinical behavior. This cyst shows a different growth mechanism from the more common dentigerous cyst and now has been renamed as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Inflammation can assist tumor growth via different mechanisms including dysregulation of the p53 gene. This study aims to assess and compare the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 in inflamed and non-inflamed types of OKC and dentigerous cyst. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of p53 was assessed in 14 cases of dental follicle, 34 cases of OKC (including 18 inflamed OKCs), and 31 cases of dentigerous cyst (including 16 inflamed cysts). Results The mean percentage of p53 positive cells was 0.7% in dental follicles, 5.4% in non-inflamed OKCs, 17.3% in inflamed OKCs, 1.2% in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and 2.2% in inflamed dentigerous cysts. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.050) except for the difference between inflamed and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and between dental follicle and non-inflamed dentigerous cyst. Conclusions The difference in p53 expression in OKC and dentigerous cyst can explain their different growth mechanism and clinical behavior. Inflammation is responsible for the change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC via p53 overexpression. PMID:28584604

  18. P53 Protein Expression in Dental Follicle, Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Inflammatory Subtypes of Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Fatemeh, Mashhadiabbas; Sepideh, Arab; Sara, Bagheri Seyedeh; Nazanin, Mahdavi

    2017-05-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with aggressive clinical behavior. This cyst shows a different growth mechanism from the more common dentigerous cyst and now has been renamed as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Inflammation can assist tumor growth via different mechanisms including dysregulation of the p53 gene. This study aims to assess and compare the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 in inflamed and non-inflamed types of OKC and dentigerous cyst. Immunohistochemical expression of p53 was assessed in 14 cases of dental follicle, 34 cases of OKC (including 18 inflamed OKCs), and 31 cases of dentigerous cyst (including 16 inflamed cysts). The mean percentage of p53 positive cells was 0.7% in dental follicles, 5.4% in non-inflamed OKCs, 17.3% in inflamed OKCs, 1.2% in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and 2.2% in inflamed dentigerous cysts. The differences between the groups were statistically significant ( p < 0.050) except for the difference between inflamed and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and between dental follicle and non-inflamed dentigerous cyst. The difference in p53 expression in OKC and dentigerous cyst can explain their different growth mechanism and clinical behavior. Inflammation is responsible for the change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC via p53 overexpression.

  19. Histomorphometric comparative study of blood vessels and their pattern in follicular cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, and ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Safora; Feizi, Farideh; Khafri, Thoraya; Aram, Mehrdad

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed at assessment and histomorphometric analysis of intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) blood vessels in odontogenic lesions and their pattern on their clinical behavior by immunohistochemistry and morphometry. In a descriptive and analytical cross-sectional study, 45 paraffin blocks of ameloblastoma, odontogenic keratocyst, and follicular cyst were selected and stained immunohistochemically for CD34. In each slide, images of 3 microscopic fields with the highest microvessel density in intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) areas were captured at 40× magnification with attached camera system. Inner vascular diameter (IVD) and outer vascular diameter (OVD), cross-sectional area (CSA), and the wall thickness (WT) of the vessels were measured with Motic Plus 2 software. The vascular pattern in odontogenic lesions was analyzed. Outer vascular diameter, IVD, and CSA of the vessels in peritumoral (cystic) areas were greater in ameloblastoma than keratocyst (P = 0.001) and follicular cyst (P < 0.001). However, WT of the blood vessels did not show any significant statistical difference among the 3 odontogenic lesions (P = 0.05). The differences in OVD, IVD (P = 0.8), CSA (P = 0.6), and WT (P = 0.4) of the blood vessels in intratumoral (cystic) areas were not statistically significant. The blood vessel pattern was circumferential in ameloblastoma, and it was directional in keratocyst and follicular cyst. Morphometric specifications of blood vessels (IVD, OVD, CSA) and their pattern in peritumoral (cystic) areas may influence the aggressive clinical behavior of ameloblastoma in comparison with keratocyst and follicular cyst.

  20. A Clinicopathological Study of Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors in Hamadan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Fahimeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Najmi, Hamidreza; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most frequent osseous destructive lesions of the jaws; however, there is little information regarding the relative frequency of these lesions among the Iranian population. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of clinically and histologically- diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors during a period of 13 years in Hamadan, and also its correlation with age, gender, and the site of the lesion. Materials and Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 413 oral and maxillofacial specimens during 1996 to 2008.The age and the gender of patients, as well as the site of lesion were recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Totally, 70 specimens were recorded as odontogenic cysts and 11 specimens were diagnosed as odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cysts (27.2%), followed by radicular cysts (18.6%) and odontogenic keratocysts (18.6%). In addition, cysts were more frequent in male than female individuals. Ameloblastoma was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (64%). Conclusion: Odontogenic cysts were in correlation with age, gender and location. These results showed that dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst were more frequent than other studies. More investigations should be performed to determine the frequency of odontogenic tumors in Iran. PMID:25469355

  1. A clinicopathological study of odontogenic cysts and tumors in hamadan, iran.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Fahimeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Najmi, Hamidreza; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most frequent osseous destructive lesions of the jaws; however, there is little information regarding the relative frequency of these lesions among the Iranian population. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of clinically and histologically- diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors during a period of 13 years in Hamadan, and also its correlation with age, gender, and the site of the lesion. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 413 oral and maxillofacial specimens during 1996 to 2008.The age and the gender of patients, as well as the site of lesion were recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Totally, 70 specimens were recorded as odontogenic cysts and 11 specimens were diagnosed as odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cysts (27.2%), followed by radicular cysts (18.6%) and odontogenic keratocysts (18.6%). In addition, cysts were more frequent in male than female individuals. Ameloblastoma was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (64%). Odontogenic cysts were in correlation with age, gender and location. These results showed that dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst were more frequent than other studies. More investigations should be performed to determine the frequency of odontogenic tumors in Iran.

  2. Expression of p73 and TRAIL in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Mascitti, Marco; Santarelli, Andrea; Zizzi, Antonio; Procaccini, Maurizio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Rubini, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are a group of lesions arising from the odontogenic apparatus. Although the mechanism of oncogenesis and tumor progression in these lesions remains unknown, certain proteins, such as those involved in apoptosis, seem to be involved in the differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of p73 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in odontogenic tumors and cysts, and to clarify changes in the expression of these proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 21 ameloblastomas, 15 keratocystic odontogenic tumors and 15 dentigerous cysts. We carried out quantitative assessment of p73 and TRAIL expression by determining the percentages of positive cells on a continuous scale. Five cases of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst were also examined. The percentages of cells immunohistochemically positive for p73 were 52.6 ± 25.4% in ameloblastomas, 76.0 ± 13.1% in keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and 26.7 ± 30.7% in odontogenic cysts, whereas the corresponding figures for TRAIL were 57.6 ± 16.1%, 8.9 ± 10.0%, and 1.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. Imbalance of the apoptosis pathway, with dysregulation of p73 and TRAIL, seems to play a role in the oncogenesis of odontogenic tumors.(J Oral Sci 58, 459-464, 2016).

  3. Odontogenic Keratocysts in Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Satheesh; Marudhamuthu, Karthikeyan; Riaz, R; Balasubramaniam, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition comprising the principle triad of basal cell carcinomas, multiple jaw keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. The presence of jaw cysts are the early diagnostic feature of this syndrome, and this can be incidentally identified by routine radiographs. A patient presented with signs and symptoms of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome to us in her early stages.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Elnaz; Ferneini, Elie M.; Rengasamy, Kandasamy

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within the lining of an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a rare occurrence. Although potentially locally destructive, OKC is a benign odontogenic process that typically presents with clinical and radiographic features characteristic of a benign intraosseous neoplasm. We present the clinical and radiographic features of a maxillary mass that demonstrated SCC arising from the lining of an OKC. Although the initial clinical and radiographic presentation suggested an infection or malignant neoplasm, biopsies revealed an infiltrative well-differentiated SCC contiguous with and arising from the focus of a pre-existing OKC. The patient subsequently underwent a type II hemi-maxillectomy with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This report discusses the clinical and radiographic features associated with intraosseous malignancies, especially those arising from an otherwise benign odontogenic lesion. While the majority of OKCs are benign, the current report illustrates the potential for carcinomatous transformation within the lining of an OKC. PMID:28680851

  5. Odontogenic Keratocysts in Gorlin–Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Satheesh; Marudhamuthu, Karthikeyan; Riaz, R; Balasubramaniam, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin–Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition comprising the principle triad of basal cell carcinomas, multiple jaw keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. The presence of jaw cysts are the early diagnostic feature of this syndrome, and this can be incidentally identified by routine radiographs. A patient presented with signs and symptoms of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome to us in her early stages. PMID:26225111

  6. Expression of Ki-67 in odontogenic cysts: A comparative study between odontogenic keratocysts, radicular cysts and dentigerous cysts

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Tapan G; Chalishazar, Monali; Kumar, Malay

    2018-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Odontogenic cysts are the most common cysts of the jaws and are formed from the remnants of the odontogenic apparatus. Among these odontogenic cysts, radicular cysts (RCs) (about 60% of all diagnosed jaw cysts), dentigerous cysts (DCs) (16.6% of all jaw cysts) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) (11.2% of all developmental odontogenic cysts) are the most common. The behavior of any lesion is generally reflected by its growth potential. Growth potential is determined by measuring the cell proliferative activity. The cell proliferative activity is measured by various methods among which immunohistochemistry (IHC) is the commonly used technique. Most of the IHC studies on cell proliferation have been based on antibodies such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Materials and Method: In the present study, the total sample size comprised of 45 cases of odontogenic cysts, with 15 cases each of OKC, RC and DC. Here, an attempt is made to study immunohistochemical (streptavidin-biotin detection system HRP-DAB) method to assess the expression of Ki-67 in different layers of the epithelial lining of OKCs, RCs and DCs. Observations and Results: Ki-67 positive cells were highest in epithelium of OKC as compared to DC and RC. Conclusion: The increased Ki-67 labeling index and its expression in suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in OKC and its correlation with suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in DC and RC could contribute toward its clinically aggressive behavior. OKC is of more significance to the oral pathologist and oral surgeon because of its specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate and aggressive behavior. PMID:29731577

  7. Expression of Ki-67 in odontogenic cysts: A comparative study between odontogenic keratocysts, radicular cysts and dentigerous cysts.

    PubMed

    Modi, Tapan G; Chalishazar, Monali; Kumar, Malay

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are the most common cysts of the jaws and are formed from the remnants of the odontogenic apparatus. Among these odontogenic cysts, radicular cysts (RCs) (about 60% of all diagnosed jaw cysts), dentigerous cysts (DCs) (16.6% of all jaw cysts) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) (11.2% of all developmental odontogenic cysts) are the most common. The behavior of any lesion is generally reflected by its growth potential. Growth potential is determined by measuring the cell proliferative activity. The cell proliferative activity is measured by various methods among which immunohistochemistry (IHC) is the commonly used technique. Most of the IHC studies on cell proliferation have been based on antibodies such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In the present study, the total sample size comprised of 45 cases of odontogenic cysts, with 15 cases each of OKC, RC and DC. Here, an attempt is made to study immunohistochemical (streptavidin-biotin detection system HRP-DAB) method to assess the expression of Ki-67 in different layers of the epithelial lining of OKCs, RCs and DCs. Ki-67 positive cells were highest in epithelium of OKC as compared to DC and RC. The increased Ki-67 labeling index and its expression in suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in OKC and its correlation with suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in DC and RC could contribute toward its clinically aggressive behavior. OKC is of more significance to the oral pathologist and oral surgeon because of its specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate and aggressive behavior.

  8. Glucose Transporter 1 Expression in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst, and Ameloblastoma: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Panda, Abikshyeet; Behura, Shyam S; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Dash, Kailash C; Mishra, Pallavi

    2017-05-01

    An array of odontogenic lesions manifest in the maxillofacial region with variable presentations. The biological behavior of lesions, such as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), and ameloblastoma (AM) always invite debate. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) is proven to be an indicator of metabolic behavior of several benign and malignant neoplasms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of GLUT-1 in OKC, DC, and AM to understand their metabolic behavior. Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was evaluated in each of the 15 cases of OKC, DC, and AM. The number of labeled cells, staining intensity, and membrane or cytoplasmic expressions were the parameters assessed and analyzed using chi-square test. All cases showed positive GLUT-1 expression: 86.6% OKC showed more than 50% labeled cells followed by DC (40%) and AM (26.5%); 53.3% OKC showed strong intensity in comparison to AM, which showed weak intensity in 53.3% cases; 86.6% of OKCs showed both membrane and cytoplasmic expression followed by DC (40%) and AM (26.6%), whereas 73.3% of AM showed only membrane expression followed by DC (60%) and OKC (13.3%). Odontogenic keratocyst was found out to be more metabolically active followed by DC and AM.

  9. Study of the biologic behavior of odontogenic keratocyst and orthokeratinaized odontogenic cyst using TGF-alpha and P53 markers.

    PubMed

    Deyhimi, Parviz; Hashemzadeh, Zahra

    2014-04-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is an aggressive cyst, and its recurrence rate is higher than that of other odontogenic cysts. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is less aggressive than OKC, but bears the probability of carcinomatous changes. In this study, we evaluated the expression and intensity of P53 and TGF-alpha in order to compare the biologic behavior or probable carcinomatous changes of these two cysts. In this cross-sectional study, 15 OKC and 15 OOC were stained immunohistochemically for P53 and TGF-alpha using the Novolink polymer method. Then, all slides were examined by an optical microscope with 400× magnification, and the stained cells in the basal and parabasal layers were counted. Finally, the results were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P-value<0.05). The difference between the expression of P53 and TGF alpha in the basal layer of OKC and OOC was not statistically significant (P-value>0.05), but the expression of P53 and TGF-alpha in the parabasal layer in OKC was statistically higher compared to OOC (P<0.05). Considering the known role of P53 and TGF-alpha in malignant changes and the higher expression of P53 and TGF-alpha in OKC compared to those in OOC, the probability of carcinomatous changes was higher in OKC than in OOC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of an odontogenic keratocyst and treatment with guided tissue regeneration: case report.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Rory; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental, noninflammatory chronic cyst that may be unilocular or multilocular. Histologic features of OKC are pathognomonic. A 41-year-old male patient presented for emergency evaluation of a buccal gingival swelling in the area of teeth 34 and 35. Incision and drainage were followed 3 weeks later by surgical curettage and guided tissue regeneration using Puros allograft and resorbable membrane. Biopsy of the excised tissue revealed OKC. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was comfortable and complete resolution of the radiolucent pathology was evident. Periodic examination is required because of the high rate of recurrence of OKC.

  11. Odontogenic Cysts - An Overview.

    PubMed

    Nayyer, Namita V; Macluskey, Michaelina; Keys, William

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the clinical features, radiological assessment, histopathology and management of a variety of odontogenic cysts. It also highlights the reclassification of odontogenic keratocysts to keratocystic odontogenic tumours.

  12. c-Myc oncogene expression in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Moosvi, Zama; Rekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of c-Myc oncogene in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst were selected and primary monoclonal mouse anti-human c-Myc antibody was used in a dilution of 1: 50. Statistical Analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U test. Results: 80% positivity was observed in ameloblastoma, AOT and OKC; 50% positivity in radicular cyst and 20% positivity in dentigerous cyst. Comparison of c-Myc expression between ameloblastoma and AOT did not reveal significant results. Similarly, no statistical significance was observed when results of OKC were compared with ameloblastoma and AOT. In contrast, significant differences were seen on comparison of dentigerous cyst with ameloblastoma and AOT and radicular cyst with AOT. Conclusion: From the above data we conclude that (1) Ameloblastoma and AOT have similar proliferative potential and their biologic behavior cannot possibly be attributed to it. (2) OKC has an intrinsic growth potential which is absent in other cysts and reinforces its classification as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23798830

  13. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (p<0.05). The subepithelial zones of all cysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear.

  14. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. Methods: 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. Results: RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (p<0.05). The subepithelial zones of all cysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Conclusion: Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear. PMID:26793609

  15. Role of HIF-1α and CASPASE-3 in cystogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Natacha M M; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Ribeiro, André L R; da Silva Kataoka, Maria S; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Alves-Júnior, Sérgio M; Smith, Andrew M; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most relevant lesions that affect the gnathic bones. These lesions have in common the formation of cystic areas and this common feature may suggest involvement of similar mechanisms. The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), a responsive protein to hypoxia and caspase-3, an irreversible apoptosis marker, may contribute to cyst formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the immunoexpression of these proteins in odontogenic cysts and tumors. Twenty cases of ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) (n = 20), radicular cyst (RC) (n = 18), dentigerous cyst (DC) (n = 11), calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (n = 8), and dental follicle (DF) (n = 10) were used to investigate HIF-1α and caspase-3 expression in sequential serial cuts by immunohistochemistry. HIF-1α was overexpressed in RC, DC, and ameloblastoma when compared with DF. The basal and sometimes the lower suprabasal layer showed no or very low expression in DC, KOT, and ameloblastoma, the last also showing strong expression in solid epithelial areas and initial cystic formation regions. Caspase-3 was found to be overexpressed in all lesions, with the highest expression in odontogenic cysts compared to tumors. HIF-1α and caspase-3 were localized in similar areas of the same lesions, especially in the epithelium surrounding cystic formations. This study showed distinct immunoexpression of HIF-1α and caspase-3 in odontogenic cyst and tumors, with higher expression observed in odontogenic cysts. These findings suggest a possible correlation between hypoxia, apoptosis, and cystogenesis, leading to understand the mechanisms responsible to cystic formation in odontogenic lesions.

  16. Clinicopathologic features associated with recurrence of the odontogenic keratocyst: a cohort retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joanna Farias; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Andrade Goulart, Eugênio Marcos; de Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of clinical, radiographic, surgical and histopathologic parameters in the recurrence of disease in a series of odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). The sample comprised 24 sporadic OKC lesions from 24 patients. All patients had no previous treatment history and were treated by the same surgeon using a uniform treatment protocol (enucleation with peripheral ostectomy preceded or not preceded by decompression). Fourteen lesions (58.4%) were first submitted to decompression procedure. Eight patients (33%) developed recurrent lesions, with a mean follow-up time of 60.5 months (standard deviation [SD] = 31.3) and a mean disease-free interval for recurrent lesions of 19 months (SD = 4.9). Recurrence was significantly associated with poor clinical response to decompression (P = .027), remaining tooth with radiographic evidence of insinuation of the lesion between the dental roots (P = .009), and the presence of budding of the basal cells layer together with epithelial islands in the fibrous capsule (P = .019). Clinical, radiographic and histopathologic parameters may affect the relapse rate of OKCs and should individually guide treatment choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is podoplanin expression associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling in odontogenic cysts and tumors?

    PubMed

    Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan

    2018-03-26

    Induction of podoplanin by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been shown in a number of lesions but not in odontogenic tumors (OTs). We evaluated the association between these markers in OTs for the first time and compared their expression among the different neoplasms. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody against podoplanin and TGF-β was performed on 76 odontogenic cysts and tumors. Spearman's correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests followed by adjustment with Bonferroni were used for statistical analysis (P < .05). A significant difference in podoplanin expression was found among the lesions consisting of solid ameloblastomas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibromas, odontogenic myxomas (OMs), odontogenic keratocysts, and calcifying odontogenic cysts. Significant differences were observed only between OMs and each of the other neoplasms. Podoplanin immunostaining in the connective tissue was absent in most lesions. TGF-β was significantly different among the study sample but not between the lesions in paired comparisons. None of the studied OTs showed significant correlations between podoplanin-TGF-β, in either the epithelium or the stroma. These markers were also descriptively reported in calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors. The inductive effect of TGF-β on podoplanin seems to be limited, if any, in odontogenic lesions. Podoplanin appears to play a role in some aspects of OTs with epithelial or mixed origins. Despite the possible participation of podoplanin in tumorigenesis, it may not necessarily be involved in the aggressive behavior of OTs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Primordial odontogenic tumor: An immunohistochemical profile

    PubMed Central

    Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Mikami, Toshinari; Pereira-Prado, Vanesa; Pires, Fabio-Ramoa; Carlos-Bregni, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Background Primordial Odontogenic Tumor (POT) is a recently described odontogenic tumor characterized by a variably cellular loose fibrous tissue with areas similar to the dental papilla, covered by cuboidal to columnar epithelium that resembles the internal epithelium of the enamel organ, surrounded at least partly by a delicate fibrous capsule. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible histogenesis and biological behavior of this rare tumor by means of a wide immunohistochemical analysis of its epithelial and mesenchymal components. Material and Methods The immunoexpression of twenty-three different antibodies were evaluated in four cases of POT. Results The epithelial cells that cover the periphery of the tumor showed immunopositivity for Cytokeratins 14 and 19, while Amelogenin, Glut-1, MOC-31, Caveolin-1. Galectin-3, PITX2, p53, Bax, Bcl-2, Survivin and PTEN were variably expressed in focal areas. The mesenchymal component of the tumor was positive for Vimentin, Syndecan-1, PITX2, Endoglin (CD105), CD 34, Cyclin D1, Bax, Bcl-2, Survivin and p53. PTEN and CD 90 showed a moderate positivity. BRAF V600E and Calretinin were negative in all samples. Cell proliferation markers (Ki-67, MCM-7) were expressed in <5% of the tumor cells. Conclusions According to these immunohistochemical findings, we may conclude that POT is a benign odontogenic tumor in which there is both epithelial and mesenchymal activity during its histogenesis, as there is expression of certain components in particular zones in both tissues that suggests this tumor develops during the immature (primordial) stage of tooth development, leading to its inclusion within the group of benign mixed epithelial and mesenchymal odontogenic tumours in the current World Health Organization classification of these lesions. Key words:Immunohistochemistry, jaw tumors, odontogenic, primordial. PMID:28390134

  19. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst.

    PubMed

    Sajeevan, Thara Purath; Saraswathi, Tillai Rajasekaran; Ranganathan, Kannan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rao, Uma Devi K

    2014-07-01

    p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and periapical cyst (PA). A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%), whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1) OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60%) whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2) The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA.

  20. Morphological classification of odontogenic keratocysts using Bouligand-Minkowski fractal descriptors.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Joao B; Bruno, Odemir M; Landini, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    The Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a cystic lesion of the jaws, which has high growth and recurrence rates compared to other cysts of the jaws (for instance, radicular cyst, which is the most common jaw cyst type). For this reason OKCs are considered by some to be benign neoplasms. There exist two sub-types of OKCs (sporadic and syndromic) and the ability to discriminate between these sub-types, as well as other jaw cysts, is an important task in terms of disease diagnosis and prognosis. With the development of digital pathology, computational algorithms have become central to addressing this type of problem. Considering that only basic feature-based methods have been investigated in this problem before, we propose to use a different approach (the Bouligand-Minkowski descriptors) to assess the success rates achieved on the classification of a database of histological images of the epithelial lining of these cysts. This does not require the level of abstraction necessary to extract histologically-relevant features and therefore has the potential of being more robust than previous approaches. The descriptors were obtained by mapping pixel intensities into a three dimensional cloud of points in discrete space and applying morphological dilations with spheres of increasing radii. The descriptors were computed from the volume of the dilated set and submitted to a machine learning algorithm to classify the samples into diagnostic groups. This approach was capable of discriminating between OKCs and radicular cysts in 98% of images (100% of cases) and between the two sub-types of OKCs in 68% of images (71% of cases). These results improve over previously reported classification rates reported elsewhere and suggest that Bouligand-Minkowski descriptors are useful features to be used in histopathological images of these cysts. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computerized tomography for odontogenic cysts and cystic-appearing tumors of the jaws: is it useful?

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Naoya; Chindasombatjaroen, Jira; Tomita, Seiki; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Yuka; Hasegawa, Yoko; Kishino, Mitsunobu; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of computerized tomography (CT), particularly contrast-enhanced CT, in differentiation of jaw cysts and cystic-appearing tumors. We retrospectively analyzed contrast-enhanced CT images of 90 patients with odontogenic jaw cysts or cystic-appearing tumors. The lesion size and CT values were measured and the short axis to long axis (S/L) ratio, contrast enhancement (CE) ratio, and standard deviation ratio were calculated. The lesion size and the S/L ratio of keratocystic odontogenic tumors were significantly different from those of radicular cysts and follicular cysts. There were no significant differences in the CE ratio among the lesions. Multidetector CT provided diagnostic information about the size of odontogenic cysts and cystic-appearing tumors of the jaws that was related to the lesion type, but showed no relation between CE ratio and the type of these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Imaging of odontogenic tumors of the maxilla].

    PubMed

    Martin-Duverneuil, N; Sahli-Amor, M; Chiras, J

    2009-05-01

    Odontogenic tumors of the maxilla are frequent, mainly represented by cysts of the jaw. However, this group of tumors include a large number of potentially intricate pathologies whose evolution is dominated by frequent recurrences justifying long-term follow-up. When such a lesion is discovered, evaluation of imaging features combined with an extensive knowledge of the different patterns of other lesions (particularly their potentially evolutive patterns related to growth) can often suggest the diagnosis. While definitive diagnosis frequently relies on histology, it is not rare that the patterns are so intricate that final diagnosis is based on a correlation between clinical, imaging and histological findings.

  3. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with clear cell changes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Neeta; Routray, Samapika; Swain, Niharika; Ingale, Yashwant

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) has a limited biological profile and been an attention-grabbing tumor for a century for its origin. Though described earlier, it was widely accepted after Harbitz from Norway reported about this uncommon benign tumor in 1915. There has been a long debate as whether this tumor is a hamartoma or a neoplasm. Here, we present a case of AOT in a 20-year-old female with details of clinical, radiological and histological features along with clear cell changes, signifying AOT to be more aggressive in nature than assessed from earlier literature. Thus, we did an extensive search of PubMed literature on AOT with all its histopathological features associated until date to find the report of clear cell changes yet.

  4. Immunohistochemical Comparison of the Expression of CD34 and CD105 in Odontogenic Keratocyst and Dentigerous Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Shokoofeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Hadadi, Fatemeh; Dehghani| Nazhvani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive clinical behavior. Angiogenesis might be considered as an important factor for the growth, expansion, and distribution of this lesion. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the mean vascular densities (MVD) of OKCs and dentigerous cysts to evaluate their relationship with the biologic behavior of these lesions. Materials and Method: In this cross-sectional analytical study, angiogenesis was assessed in OKC and dentigerous cyst by measuring the MVD. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using CD34 and CD105. The results were analyzed with independent samples t-test. The data were analyzed, setting p value at 0.05. Results: The MVDs with the use of CD34 and CD105 markers were significantly higher in OKC compared to dentigerous cyst (p< 0.05). In addition, MVDs obtained by CD105 in dentigerous cysts and OKC were significantly less than those based on CD34 (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it can be suggested that angiogenesis might be one of the possible mechanisms involved in higher aggressive biologic behavior and greater recurrence rate of OKC compared to dentigerous cysts. PMID:28280759

  5. Proteoglycans as potential biomarkers in odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herrera, Zaira; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2018-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are essential for normal cellular development; however, alterations of their concentrations can promote tumor growth. To date, a limited number of studies report the presence of PGs in odontogenic tumors (OTs); therefore, the main purpose of this work is to gather the information published on the study of PGs. The search reported 26 articles referring to the presence of different PGs in distinct OTs from 1999 to May 2017. PGs seem to play an important role during OTs’ development as they are involved in several tumor processes; however, the number of reports on the study of these molecules is low. Thus, more studies are necessary in order to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of OTs. PMID:29731564

  6. Amelogenin in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Anigol, Praveen; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Anand, Nagaraja; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major enamel proteins that play a major role in the biomineralization and structural organization of enamel. Aberrations of enamel-related proteins are thought to be involved in oncogenesis of odontogenic epithelium. The expression of amelogenin is possibly an indicator of differentiation of epithelial cells in the odontogenic lesions. Aims and Objectives: The present study aimed to observe the expression of amelogenin immunohistochemically in various odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of 40 odontogenic lesions were stained immunohistochemically with amelogenin antibodies. The positivity, pattern and intensity of expression of the amelogenin antibody were assessed, graded and statistically compared between groups of odontogenic cysts and tumors. Results: Almost all the odontogenic lesions expressed amelogenin in the epithelial component with the exception of an ameloblastic carcinoma. Differing grades of intensity and pattern were seen between the cysts and tumors. Intensity of expression was uniformly prominent in all odontogenic lesions with hard tissue formation. Statistical analysis however did not indicate significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The expression of amelogenin antibody is ubiquitous in odontogenic tissues and can be used as a definitive marker for identification of odontogenic epithelium. PMID:25937729

  7. Correlation between ploidy status using flow cytometry and nucleolar organizer regions in benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Mahmoud, Sarah Ahmed; El-Rouby, Dalia Hussein; El-Ghani, Safa Fathy Abd; Badawy, Omnia Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Differentiation between the aggressive benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts is controversial and difficult. While flow cytometry (FCM) allowed DNA analysis in neoplasia, argyrophilic organizer regions (AgNORs) number and/or size in a nucleus are correlated with the ribosomal gene activity and therefore with cellular proliferation. The aim of this research was to study the diagnostic accuracy of FCM and AgNORs staining in differentiating between benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors and to correlate between these two interventions. Sixteen benign cases [8 cases of ameloblastoma (AB) and 8 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT)] and 13 malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors [8 cases of ameloblastic carcinoma (ABC) and 5 cases of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma(CCOC)] were included in the current study. For FCM analysis, a single cell suspension from Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors was prepared according to a modified method described by Hedley (1989) and AgNORs staining were performed in accordance to the Ploton protocol (1986). Analysis of AgNORs was performed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The work revealed that all the examined tumors were diploid, except for 40% of CCOC cases. The S-phase fraction (SPF) value, AgNORs count and AgNORs area/cell showed statistically significant difference on comparing benign and malignant groups. A weak positive correlation was observed between SPF and AgNORs count. The SPF value was considered to be more sensitive and specific in differentiation between aggressive benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors in comparison to AgNORs counting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Madan, Mani; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Madan, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT) is an unusual benign odontogenic neoplasm characterized by the presence of granular cells associated with apparently inactive odontogenic epithelium. These tumors tend to occur in the posterior mandible and usually present as well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesions. So far, only <40 cases of CGCOT have been described in the literature under various terminologies. Though these tumors were not considered as distinct entity in the recent WHO classification of odontogenic tumors, long-term follow-up is recommended as malignant counterpart of CGCOT has already been reported. The main aim of this article is to report an additional case of CGCOT to the literature, occurring in a 73-year-old male.

  9. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst previously treated with marsupialization: case report and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Delgado-Azañero, Wilson; Rumayor-Piña, Alicia; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2016-04-01

    A rare case of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is presented here, with the clinical and histologic features of the first biopsy showing characteristics of OKC and the second biopsy disclosing a squamous cell carcinoma. Immunoprofile of this case was compared with five cases of classical OKC by using cytokeratins CK5, CK14, and CK19, CD138, p63, Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2. Classic OKCs showed expected positivity, mainly in the basal and/or suprabasal layers with most antibodies, except for p53, which was negative, whereas the present case showed irregular positivity in all layers, indicating that this can be useful for differential diagnosis and suggesting a possible role in malignant transformation into primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, immunohistochemical differences between the first biopsy of the present case and classic OKC suggest that immunohistochemistry can be helpful in cases with areas of subtle initial malignant transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in proliferation of odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhavana; Chandra, Shaleen; Singh, Anil; Sah, Kunal; Raj, Vineet; Gupta, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is capable of initiating angiogenesis in blood vessels and may act as mitogenic agent for epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of epithelial VEGF expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastoma and its correlation with argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region counts to assess its role in their biological behavior. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 45 histologically confirmed cases, 15 cases of each of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastomas were examined for immunohistochemical expression for epithelial VEGF, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) (used as secondary marker in this study) staining was done for comparing the proliferative capacity with VEGF. KCOT shows mild expression within the basal layers and strong expression in the suprabasal layer whereas, in dentigerous cysts, a majority showed no VEGF expression whereas ameloblastomas showed strong expression in all cases by stellate reticulum-like cells at the center of the follicles and suprabasal layers of epithelium. The results of AgNOR counts were higher in KCOTs as compared to ameloblastoma and least in dentigerous cysts. VEGF expression by the epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors may play a role in epithelial proliferation via autocrine mechanism as reflected by increased AgNOR counts. The angiogenic activity via paracrine pathway may be responsible for the difference in growth rate and neoplastic behavior of the lesions.

  11. Quantitative analysis of Argyrophilic Nucleolar organizer regions in odontogenic cysts and tumor - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhavana; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Gupta, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    The nucleolar organizer region (NOR) is by definition part of a chromosome, and nucleolus is a structure containing this chromosomal part and in addition the material which accumulate around the NOR, mostly rRNAs and their precursors as well as specific ribosomal proteins. Argyrophilic Nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) are silver binding NORs often used to study cell proliferation in various types of tumors. Quantitative assessment of Argyrophilic Nucleolar organizing region count and its comparison among dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma. Forty-five histologically confirmed cases, 15 cases each of keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cysts and ameloblastomas were examined for Argyrophilic Nucleolar organizing region. The sections were obtained and Argyrophilic Nucleolar organizer regions staining was done for comparing the proliferative capacity among these lesions. Post hoc analysis for inter-group comparison and one way ANOVA were done in all three groups in this study. P  < 0.001 was considered significant. The results of AgNOR counts were higher in KCOTs as compared to ameloblastoma and least in dentigerous cysts. The mean AgNOR counts between the study groups were compared using one way ANOVA test and the differences were found to be significant ( P  < 0.001). AgNOR counts were significantly higher in KCOT and ameloblastoma as compared to dentigerous cyst suggesting that these lesions have a higher proliferative capacity than dentigerous cyst. The finding of a significantly higher AgNOR counts in KCOT as compared to ameloblastoma represent a difference in proliferative activity and greater growth potential between these two lesions.

  12. Immunohistochemical analysis of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Gaballah, Essam Taher M.A.; Tawfik, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor gene, the mutations of which are closely related to the decreased differentiation of cells. Findings of studies on immunohistochemical P53 expression in odontogenic cysts are controversial. The present study was carried-out to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts. Thirty paraffin blocks of diagnosed odontogenic cysts were processed to determine the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein. Nine of the 11 odontogenic keratocysts (81.8%) expressed P53, one of three dentigerous cyst cases expressed P53, while none of the 16 radicular cysts expressed P53 protein. The findings of the present work supported the reclassification of OKC as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23960493

  13. Caveolin-1 expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Pardis, Soheil; Asadzadeh, Maryam; Andisheh-Tadbir, Azadeh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the caveolin-1 expression in a group of odontogenic cysts and tumors. In this cross-sectional study, the expression of caveolin-1 was evaluated immunohistochemically in 75 samples including 18 cases of dentigerous cyst, 18 odontogenic keratocysts, 3 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts, 2 calcifying odontogenic cysts and 34 ameloblastomas (solid and unicystic). Positive immunohistochemical reaction was found in 100% of odontogenic cysts and this was significantly more than both unicystic (65%) and solid (55%) ameloblastomas. The present study showed the expression of caveolin-1 in all odontogenic cysts and more than ameloblastomas. The results suggested that absence of caveolin-1 might enhance aggressiveness of odontogenic lesions and could be a useful marker for distinguishing ameloblastomas from other odontogenic lesions.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Cytokeratin 18 and 19 Expressions in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst with a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vandana Sandip; Ghanchi, Mohsin Jiva; Gosavi, Sandesh Sachchidanand; Srivastava, Himanshu Mahesh; Pachore, Nivedita Javahir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic cysts viz Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC), Dentigerous Cyst (DC) and Radicular Cyst (RC) occur commonly in the oral and maxillofacial region. Cytokeratin (CK) expression studies have been done to evaluate diagnostic accuracy, role in pathogenesis, elucidate behaviour and role in treatment protocols. However, variations have been reported in the expression of CK patterns in these odontogenic cysts, which could be due to the lack of standardization of laboratory techniques. The present study has tried to shed light on CK 18 and 19 expression in odontogenic cysts and offer the brief review of previous studies on these CK. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intensity and expression patterns of CK 18 and 19 in OKCs, DCs and RCs. Materials and Methods A total of 60 cases, 20 each of OKC, DC and RC were confirmed histologically and evaluated for immunohistochemical expression pattern and intensity of CK 18 and 19. Results A focal and variable expression of CK 18 was observed in 25% of OKCs, 15% of DCs and 10% of RCs. CK 19 was expressed in 75% of OKCs and 100% in DCs as well as RCs. Conclusion The intensity and expression of Cytokeratin 19 was more in all three cysts compared to Cytokeratin 18. PMID:27630961

  15. A positive correlation between immunohistochemical expression of CD31 and mast cell tryptase in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Dibazar, Sana

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compared mast cell tryptase and CD31 expression between odontogenic tumors with the aim of predicting the clinical behavior of these lesions at the time of initial biopsy. We also evaluated the correlation between mast cell tryptase and CD31 expression to clarify the role of mast cells (MCs) in the growth of odontogenic tumors. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-MC tryptase and anti-CD31 antibodies was performed on 48 cases of odontogenic tumors including solid ameloblastoma (SAM), unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), odontogenic myxoma (OM), cystic calcifying odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). Ten high power fields were analyzed for each sample. Total MC count was significantly increased in SAM compared to other odontogenic tumors (p<0.05). Microvessel density was statistically higher in SAM and AOT compared to remaining odontogenic tumors (p<0.05). A significant correlation was observed between MCs and microvessels in odontogenic tumors (p=0.018, r=0.34). Our findings suggest a role for MCs in aggressive clinical behavior of odontogenic tumors. The significant correlation found between MC count and microvessel density in odontogenic tumors is in agreement with the theory of participation of MCs in tumor progression. Targeting MC activity may represent an important nonsurgical therapeutic approach, especially for aggressive odontogenic tumors.

  16. Multiple keratocysts of the mandible in association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Gayithri Harish; Khaji, Shahanavaj I.; Metkari, Suryakant; Kulkarni, Harish S.; Kulkarni, Reshma

    2014-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a syndrome with wide variety of manifestations ranging from oral lesions to skeletal deformities. It calls for due responsibility of maxillofacial surgeon to diagnose the syndrome because very often they are the first health professionals to see the patient for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been the topic of numerous investigators, is known for its potentially aggressive behavior, significant rate of recurrences. KCOT often occurs as a solitary lesion, in some instances multiple keratocysts may occur in association with a syndrome called Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (nevoid BCC, jaw cyst bifid rib basal cell nevus syndrome). Here, we present a case of multiple keratocysts in the mandible in association with skeletal, ocular, cutaneous anomalies in the given clinical scenario, which has profound relevance in the clinical dental practice. PMID:25191087

  17. Multiple keratocysts of the mandible in association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Gayithri Harish; Khaji, Shahanavaj I; Metkari, Suryakant; Kulkarni, Harish S; Kulkarni, Reshma

    2014-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a syndrome with wide variety of manifestations ranging from oral lesions to skeletal deformities. It calls for due responsibility of maxillofacial surgeon to diagnose the syndrome because very often they are the first health professionals to see the patient for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor has been the topic of numerous investigators, is known for its potentially aggressive behavior, significant rate of recurrences. KCOT often occurs as a solitary lesion, in some instances multiple keratocysts may occur in association with a syndrome called Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (nevoid BCC, jaw cyst bifid rib basal cell nevus syndrome). Here, we present a case of multiple keratocysts in the mandible in association with skeletal, ocular, cutaneous anomalies in the given clinical scenario, which has profound relevance in the clinical dental practice.

  18. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  19. Msx and Dlx Homeogene Expression in Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruhin-Poncet, Blandine; Ghoul-Mazgar, Sonia; Hotton, Dominique; Capron, Frédérique; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumors are rare jaw pathologies that raise clinical diagnosis and prognosis dilemmas notably between ameloblastomas and clear cell odontogenic carcinomas (CCOCs). In line with previous studies, the molecular determinants of tooth development—amelogenin, Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, Dlx3, Bmp2, and Bmp4—were analyzed by RT-PCR, ISH, and immunolabeling in 12 recurrent ameloblastomas and in one case of CCOC. Although Msx1 expression imitates normal cell differentiation in these tumors, other genes showed a distinct pattern depending on the type of tumor and the tissue involved. In benign ameloblastomas, ISH localized Dlx3 transcripts and inconstantly detected Msx2 transcripts in epithelial cells. In the CCOC, ISH established a lack of both Dlx3 and Msx2 transcripts but allowed identification of the antisense transcript of Msx1, which imitates the same scheme of distribution between mesenchyme and epithelium as in the cup stage of tooth development. Furthermore, while exploring the expression pattern of signal molecules by RT-PCR, Bmp2 was shown to be completely inactivated in the CCOC and irregularly noticeable in ameloblastomas. Bmp4 was always expressed in all the tumors. Based on the established roles of Msx and Dlx transcription factors in dental cell fates, these data suggest that their altered expression is a proposed trail to explain the genesis and/or the progression of odontogenic tumors. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:69–78, 2009) PMID:18854600

  20. Msx and dlx homeogene expression in epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ruhin-Poncet, Blandine; Ghoul-Mazgar, Sonia; Hotton, Dominique; Capron, Frédérique; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumors are rare jaw pathologies that raise clinical diagnosis and prognosis dilemmas notably between ameloblastomas and clear cell odontogenic carcinomas (CCOCs). In line with previous studies, the molecular determinants of tooth development-amelogenin, Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, Dlx3, Bmp2, and Bmp4-were analyzed by RT-PCR, ISH, and immunolabeling in 12 recurrent ameloblastomas and in one case of CCOC. Although Msx1 expression imitates normal cell differentiation in these tumors, other genes showed a distinct pattern depending on the type of tumor and the tissue involved. In benign ameloblastomas, ISH localized Dlx3 transcripts and inconstantly detected Msx2 transcripts in epithelial cells. In the CCOC, ISH established a lack of both Dlx3 and Msx2 transcripts but allowed identification of the antisense transcript of Msx1, which imitates the same scheme of distribution between mesenchyme and epithelium as in the cup stage of tooth development. Furthermore, while exploring the expression pattern of signal molecules by RT-PCR, Bmp2 was shown to be completely inactivated in the CCOC and irregularly noticeable in ameloblastomas. Bmp4 was always expressed in all the tumors. Based on the established roles of Msx and Dlx transcription factors in dental cell fates, these data suggest that their altered expression is a proposed trail to explain the genesis and/or the progression of odontogenic tumors.

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with a dentigerous cyst.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, B S; Harsh, Ashutosh; Purohit, Sharad; Naga, Mahita V

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively uncommon benign lesion of odontogenic origin mainly affecting females in second decade of life, having a predilection for the anterior region of the maxilla. Histologically, it is composed of odontogenic epithelium in a variety of histopathological patterns in a mature, fibrous connective tissue stroma and characterized by slow but progressive growth. Very few cases of AOT associated with a dentigerous cyst have been reported in the literature. PubMed and Medline data showed a total of 11 cases of AOT associated with a dentigerous cyst in the literature. We present an additional case of an AOT arising from a dentigerous cyst around the crown of an unerupted upper canine in a 20-year-old female, which was clinically diagnosed as a dentigerous cyst. Histologically, the case showed proliferation of odontogenic epithelium in the form of whorls and islands typical of AOT associated with dentigerous cyst appearing thin reduced enamel like epithelium lining the cystic cavity, described previously. However, it is unclear whether this entity has a more aggressive potential.

  2. [Odontogenic adenomatoid tumor. Apropos of 2 cases in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Cantaloube, D; Larroque, G; Ahounou, J R; Rives, J M; Seurat, P

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of large adenomatoid odontogenic tumor seen recently in Senegal are thought to be the first cases of this type reported in West Africa. One patient was a 25 year old woman and the other an 11 year old boy, the clinical history and lesions being identical in both cases. Simple enucleation appeared to be the treatment of choice in view of the constantly reported benign nature of these tumors. It is difficult, or almost impossible however, to differentiate this tumor from dentigerous cyst on radiology, justifying routine minute pathologic examination of all operated paradental cysts.

  3. Immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand and osteoprotegerin in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Felipe Rodrigues; de Moraes, Maiara; das Neves Silva, Emília Beatriz; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), solid ameloblastomas (SAs), and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). A total of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, 20 KOTs, 14 dental follicles (DFs), and 18 SAs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-RANKL and anti-OPG antibodies. The analysis was quantitative, and the number of positive cells was counted in 10 microscopic high-power fields (400×). The DFs, KOTs, and SAs showed higher expression of RANKL than did the RCs and DCs in the epithelium (P < .05). The epithelial expression of OPG was higher in the DFs, KOTs, RCs, and DCs than in the SAs (P < .05). The ratio of OPG less than RANKL was more frequent in SAs and OPG greater than RANKL in DCs (P < .05). Our results have shown differences in RANKL and OPG detection in the odontogenic cysts and tumors studied. The higher RANKL and lower OPG detection in SA could play a role in bone resorption, compatible with the tumor's biologic behavior. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S; Vaidya, Kedar

    2014-03-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm reported with various terms and is not included in the 2005 WHO classification of odontogenic tumors. It shows a predilection for middle-aged women, usually presenting as an asymptomatic swelling of the mandibular premolar-molar region. Radiographic manifestations include unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesion, but mixed density lesions can also occur. Histopathology shows sheets and lobules of round to polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic, granular cytoplasm and eccentrically placed nuclei. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features suggest the histiocytic origin of granular cells. The neoplasm does not exhibit an aggressive biological behavior and hence enucleation or curettage ensuring complete removal remains the treatment of choice. We present a systematic review on clinical, radiological, histopathological, immunohistochemical and treatment aspect of CGCOT. Published articles were identified through a literature search using online databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus) and cross-references for papers published from the year 1950 to March 2013. From a total of 37 papers, 26 (38 cases) were extracted from the database for systematic review. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Stromal differences in odontogenic cysts of a common histopathogenesis but with different biological behavior: a study with picrosirius red and polarizing microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, P; Saxena, S

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect and compare the pattern of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and also to find out if this methodology could be used to predict the aggressive nature of odontogenic cysts by comparing with the odontogenic tumors. The collagen in the wall of 11 odontogenic keratocysts, 14 dentigerous cysts and 14 radicular cysts was studied histochemically by staining sections with picrosirius red and examining under polarizing microscope. This was compared to 10 cases of odontogenic tumors using Z test of proportion at 1% and 5%. In dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors, the predominant color of collagen fibers birefringence was found to be orangish red, whereas in radicular cysts the collagen fiber was of green color. Similar birefringence pattern of collagen fibers between dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors may indicate that these lesions have a common histogenesis with a broad spectrum of biological behavior and belong to the same group, i.e., are developmental in origin. Different patterns of radicular cysts suggest different biological behavior and a positive role of inflammation on polarization color of collagen fibers.

  6. Squamous odontogenic tumor and squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations in odontogenic cysts: An updated analysis of 170 cases reported in the literature.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2018-03-01

    To integrate the available data published on squamous odontogenic tumors (SOT) and squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations in odontogenic cysts (SOT-LPOC) into a comprehensive analysis of their clinical/radiologic features. An electronic search was undertaken in January 2017. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough clinical/radiological/histological information to confirm a definite diagnosis. A total of 74 publications reporting 110 SOTs (102 central, 8 peripheral) and 60 SOT-LPOC were included. Compared to SOT-LPOC, SOT showed lower mean age, no preference regarding maxilla or mandible localization, significant association with cortical bone perforation, multilocular radiographic appearance, and mobility of the tooth/teeth associated with the lesion. While 5 recurrent SOT were reported after enucleation, no recurrent SOT-LPOC was found. SOT shows a more aggressive biologic behavior than SOT-LPOC, which supports the hypothesis that the two lesions are distinct clinicopathological conditions. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, a rare presentation in children: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Susant; Mohanty, Neeta; Routray, Samapika; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Vasudevan, Vijeev

    2014-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare and benign odontogenic neoplasm that affects the jaws. It is certainly an atypical instance to find this tumor in children. Here, we present two case reports of CEOT presenting in mandible of a 12- and 13-year-old female child, respectively. CEOT have been reported to show features of malignant transformation also.

  8. Melan-A/Mart-1- or HMB-45-positive melanocytes are not present in calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (calcifying odontogenic cysts): a study in 13 Caucasian patients.

    PubMed

    Tosios, Konstantinos I; Prountzos, Nikolaos; Katsoulas, Nikolaos; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Sklavounou-Andrikopoulou, Alexandra

    2012-03-01

    Melanin pigment and melanocytes may be found in odontogenic cysts and tumors, particularly calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). In the present study we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of the Melan-A/Mart-1 and HMB-45 antigens in 13 Caucasians patients with CCOT. Melan-A/Mart-1- and HMB-45-positive melanocytes were not seen in any of the cases. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that pigmentation in odontogenic lesions may be a racial phenomenon.

  9. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: immunohistochemistry and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Meer, Shabnum; Altini, Mario; Coleman, Hedley; Daya, Nilesh

    2004-01-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumors are rare, with only 30 cases having been reported. The tumors usually occur in the mandibular molar area and are seen as localized painless swellings in patients older than 40 years. We report an additional case that occurred in the posterior mandible of an elderly black woman. All reported cases of this tumor are benign, and cure is effected by localized surgical excision. Ultrastructurally, the cells contain numerous lysosomes and phagocytic vacuoles. Immunohistochemically, the granular cells were positive for vimentin, CD68, muramidase, carcinogenic embryonic antigen, and bcl-2. These features support a mesenchymal origin with a possible histiocytic lineage for the granular cells. Awareness of the occurrence of this neoplasm is important to promote detection and differentiation from other intraoral granular cell lesions.

  10. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  11. Stromal characterization and comparison of odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumors using picrosirius red stain and polarizing microscopy: A retrospective and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jahagirdar, P B; Kale, A D; Hallikerimath, S

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions represent a range of conditions, the features of which probably depend on the stage of induction towards tooth formation reached prior to neoplastic or hamartomatous proliferation. It has been also suggested that inductive changes may allow progression from one type of odontogenic tumor to another. The epithelium also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these lesions; even stroma is likely to play an equally important role in the pathogenesis and biological behavior. So, this study was performed to investigate, compare, and correlate different types of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumors. Thirty each pre-diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors were histochemically analyzed using a special stain (Picrosirius red stain) and polarizing microscopy. Seven cases (99%) of inflammatory cysts exhibited predominantly greenish-yellow birefringence indicating procollagen, intermediate, or pathologic collagen fibers suggestive of loosely packed collagen fibers. Predominant yellowish-orange birefringence exhibited by 21 cases (99%) of developmental cysts was comparable to the yellowish-orange and orangish-red to red birefringence exhibited by odontogenic tumors suggesting tightly packed fibers. The Picrosirius red stain in conjunction with polarizing microscopy serves as a specific and sensitive tool in characterizing collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and odontogenic tumor.

  12. Cyclin d1 expression in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Nasim; Modabbernia, Shirin; Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    In the present study expression of cyclin D1 in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and glandular odontogenic cyst was investigated to compare proliferative activity in these lesions. Immunohistochemical staining of cyclin D1 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of odontogenic keratocysts (n=23), dentigerous cysts (n=20), radicular cysts (n=20) and glandular odontogenic cysts (n=5) was performed by standard EnVision method. Then, slides were studied to evaluate the following parameters in epithelial lining of cysts: expression, expression pattern, staining intensity and localization of expression. The data analysis showed statistically significant difference in cyclin D1 expression in studied groups (p < 0.001). Assessment of staining intensity and staining pattern showed more strong intensity and focally pattern in odontogenic keratocysts, but difference was not statistically significant among groups respectively (p=0.204, 0.469). Considering expression localization, cyclin D1 positive cells in odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts were frequently confined in parabasal layer, different from radicular cysts and glandular odontogenic cysts. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Findings showed higher expression of cyclin D1 in parabasal layer of odontogenic keratocyst and the entire cystic epithelium of glandular odontogenic cysts comparing to dentigerous cysts and radicular cysts, implying the possible role of G1-S cell cycle phase disturbances in the aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst and glandular odontogenic cyst.

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblasts in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Syamala, Deepa; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya; Anand, Prem P; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Myofibroblasts are fibroblasts with smooth muscle-like features characterized by the presence of a contractile apparatus and found in the connective tissue stroma of normal tissues such as blood vessels and lymph nodes. They are now thought to play a role in the synthesis and reorganization of extracellular matrix, which could contribute to the aggressive biologic behavior of the lesions. Aims: To compare the mean number of stromal myofibroblasts in dentigerous cysts (DCs), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and ameloblastoma; and to derive a correlation between the stromal myofibroblasts and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional immunohistochemical analysis of cases of DC, KCOT and ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks each of DC, KCOT and multicystic ameloblastoma were selected for the study and diagnosis confirmed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. Tissue sections were analyzed for the number of myofibroblasts using alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining. Statistical Analysis: Differences in the mean number of α-SMA positive cells in each group were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Intergroup comparisons of mean values of α-SMA positive cells were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Ameloblastoma showed the highest number of myofibroblasts, whereas DC showed the lowest. Among the groups, there were significant differences between the myofibroblast counts among DC and KCOT and between DC and ameloblastoma, whereas the difference in counts was not statistically significant between KCOT and ameloblastoma. A positive correlation was observed between the myofibroblast count and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Conclusion: Myofibroblasts may act in close association with the epithelial cells to bring about changes in stromal microenvironment, favorable to the growth and progression of the lesion. They may be of great value in

  14. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblasts in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Syamala, Deepa; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya; Anand, Prem P; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are fibroblasts with smooth muscle-like features characterized by the presence of a contractile apparatus and found in the connective tissue stroma of normal tissues such as blood vessels and lymph nodes. They are now thought to play a role in the synthesis and reorganization of extracellular matrix, which could contribute to the aggressive biologic behavior of the lesions. To compare the mean number of stromal myofibroblasts in dentigerous cysts (DCs), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and ameloblastoma; and to derive a correlation between the stromal myofibroblasts and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. A cross-sectional immunohistochemical analysis of cases of DC, KCOT and ameloblastoma. Twenty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks each of DC, KCOT and multicystic ameloblastoma were selected for the study and diagnosis confirmed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. Tissue sections were analyzed for the number of myofibroblasts using alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining. Differences in the mean number of α-SMA positive cells in each group were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Intergroup comparisons of mean values of α-SMA positive cells were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Ameloblastoma showed the highest number of myofibroblasts, whereas DC showed the lowest. Among the groups, there were significant differences between the myofibroblast counts among DC and KCOT and between DC and ameloblastoma, whereas the difference in counts was not statistically significant between KCOT and ameloblastoma. A positive correlation was observed between the myofibroblast count and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Myofibroblasts may act in close association with the epithelial cells to bring about changes in stromal microenvironment, favorable to the growth and progression of the lesion. They may be of great value in predicting the biologic behavior and growth potential of such lesions.

  15. Spatial distribution of osteopontin, CD44v6 and podoplanin in the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst, and their biological relevance.

    PubMed

    Kechik, Khamisah Awang; Siar, Chong Huat

    2018-02-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) remains the most challenging jaw cyst to treat because of its locally-aggressive behaviour and high recurrence potential. Emerging evidence suggests that osteopontin, its receptors CD44v6 and integrin α v , and podoplanin, have a role in the local invasiveness of this cyst. However the spatial distribution characteristics of these pro-invasive markers in the lining epithelium of OKC, and their association with the clinicopathologic parameters of OKC are largely unexplored. This study sought to address these issues in comparison with dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs) and to evaluate their biological relevance. A sample consisting of 20 OKC cases, 10 DCs and 10 RCs was subjected to immunohistochemical staining for osteopontin, CD44v6 and integrin α v , and podoplanin, and semiquantitative analysis was performed. All factors (except integrin α v ) were detected heterogeneously in the constitutive layers of the lining epithelium in all three cyst types. Key observations were significant upregulation of CD44v6 and podoplanin in OKC compared to DCs and RCs, suggesting that these protein molecules may play crucial roles in promoting local invasiveness in OKC (P<0.05). Osteopontin underexpression and distribution patterns were indistinctive among all three cysts indicating its limited role as pro-invasive factor. Clinical parameters showed no significant correlations with all protein factors investigated. Present findings suggest that an osteopontin low CD44v6 high and podoplanin high immunoprofile most probably represent epithelial signatures of OKC and are markers of local invasiveness in this cyst. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant odontogenic tumors. A retrospective and collaborative study of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda Taylor, Adalberto; Meneses García, Abelardo; Ruíz Godoy Rivera, Luz María; Suárez Roa, María de Lourdes; Luna Ortiz, Kuauhyama

    2003-01-01

    The frequency, clinico-pathologic features and outcome of malignant odontogenic tumors diagnosed according to the current WHO classification in three pathology services in Mexico City are presented. There were seven cases (5 male and 2 female patients), which represent less than 4% of all odontogenic tumors diagnosed in these services. There were six odontogenic carcinomas (two malignant ameloblastomas, two clear cell odontogenic carcinomas, one primary intraosseous carcinoma and one carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst) and one ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. Age ranged from 25 to 72 years (mean: 43.8). Clear cell odontogenic carcinomas occurred in the canine-premolar region, one in the maxilla and one in the mandible (one ia a man and one in a woman), while the remaining lesions affected the posterior region of the mandible, with a male predominance (4:1), which agrees with previously reported cases. Surgical resection was the treatment employed in all carcinomas, while the ameloblastic fibrosarcoma was treated with chemotherapy due to its large extension, but without favorable response. The patient with primary intraosseous carcinoma had submaxillary and cervical metastases and the neoplasm was the cause of death. In spite of their extremely low frequency, malignant odontogenic tumors are an important cause of extensive surgical procedures in the oral and maxillofacial region.

  17. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  18. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Atarbashi Moghadam, Fazele; Eini, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (P = 0.86). Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells. PMID:24350278

  20. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  1. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  2. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias. PMID:26464605

  3. Ghost cells in pilomatrixoma, craniopharyngioma, and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor: histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Rumayor, Alicia; Carlos, Román; Kirsch, Hernán Molina; de Andrade, Bruno A Benevenuto; Romañach, Mario J; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2015-04-01

    Pilomatrixoma, craniopharyngioma, and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor are the main entities presenting ghost cells as an important histological feature, in spite their quite different clinical presentation; it seems that they share a common pathway in the formation of these cells. The aim of this study is to examine and compare the characteristics of ghost and other cells that form these lesions. Forty-three cases including 21 pilomatrixomas, 14 craniopharyngiomas, and eight calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, CD138, β-catenin, D2-40, Glut-1, FAS, CD10 and also by scanning electron microscopy. The CKs, CD138, β-catenin, Glut-1, FAS, and CD10 were more often expressed by transitional cells of craniopharyngioma and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, compared with pilomatrixoma. Basaloid cells of pilomatrixoma showed strong positivity for CD138 and CD10. Differences on expression pattern were identified in transitional and basal cells, as ghost cells were negative for most antibodies used, except by low expression for cytokeratins. By scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of ghost cells were similar in their fibrillar cytoplasm, but their pattern varied from sheets in pilomatrixoma to small clusters in craniopharyngioma and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. Mechanisms involved in formation of ghost cells are unknown, but probably they follow different pathways as protein expression in the basal/transitional cells was not uniform in the three tumors studied. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Odontogenic keratocysts in the Basal Cell Nevus (Gorlin-Goltz) Syndrome associated with paresthesia of the lower jaw: Case report, retrospective analysis of a representative Czech cohort and recommendations for the early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, Milan; Kripnerova, Tereza; Nemcikova, Michaela; Krepelová, Anna; Puchmajerova, Alena; Malikova, Marcela; Havlovicová, Markéta; Cadova, Jana; Kodet, Roman; Macek, Milan; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    Identification of early presenting signs of the Basal Cell Nevus (BCNS; synonyme Gorlin-Goltz) syndrome, which is associated with a principal triad of multiple basal cell nevi, jaw odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies, in stomatological and neurological practices. Proposal of multidisciplinary diagnostic algorithm comprising other medical specialists, including pathology, imaging, laboratory and molecular analyses based on the study outcomes. Case report of a male patient reporting paresthesia of their lower jaw, with right facial asymmetry (maxilla and mandible) and radiological detection of large osteolytic lesions in both jaws, including a retrospective analysis of a representative Czech cohort with BCNS from within the last decade. Clinical, imaging and laboratory analyses were carried out at a national tertiary centre. A multidisciplinary clinical approach followed by surgical management lead to the identification of odontogenic cysts, which were substantiated by histological examination. DNA sequencing of the PTCH1 gene detected a c.2929dupT resulting in p. Tyr977Leufs*16 pathogenic variant. This finding confirmed the clinical and laboraoty diagnosis of BCNS. Parental DNA analysis showed that this causal genetic defect arose de novo. Surgical management and orthodontic therapy were successful. Analysis of the reported case and retrospective data analysis provided evidence that paresthesia of the lower jaw should be considered as one of the early presenting signs of this rare disorder in stomatological and neurological practice. Obtained results allowed us to formulate recommendations for diagnostic practice in stomatology and neurology.

  5. Two-stage treatment protocol of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in young patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: marsupialization and later enucleation with peripheral ostectomy. A 5-year-follow-up experience.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Di Lascia, Stefano; Grossi, Giovanni; Maiorana, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is a benign uni- or multicystic intraosseous odontogenic tumour with potential for local destruction and tendency for multiplicity, especially when associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We suggest a conservative surgical treatment based on marsupialization and later enucleation with peripheral ostectomy in order to preserve jaw's integrity in young patients. Three young patients affected of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome) presented large and multiple KCOTs, which have been treated following a two-stage surgical strategy. Initially marsupialization was performed and after a mean period of 10 months, contextually to evident reduction in radiological size image, enucleation with peripheral ostectomy was carried out. All the patients showed high collaboration in daily self-irrigation of the stomia with chlorhexidine 0.2% during the period of marsupialization. Definitive surgical intervention led to complete healing and no signs of recurrence have been observed during a 5-year-follow-up. The main advantage of this modality is the preservation of important anatomical structures involved in the lesion and jaw's continuity. Therefore in a selected group of cooperative patients, especially those affected of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, the surgical protocol exposed allows for a less invasive approach with excellent results avoiding extensive disfiguring procedures. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Application of diffusion kurtosis imaging to odontogenic lesions: Analysis of the cystic component.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Junichiro; Kuribayashi, Ami; Kotaki, Shinya; Fujikura, Mamiko; Nakamura, Shin; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2016-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of applying diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) to common odontogenic lesions and to compare its diagnostic ability versus that of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for differentiating keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) from odontogenic cysts. Altogether, 35 odontogenic lesions were studied: 24 odontogenic cysts, six KCOTs, and five ameloblastomas. The diffusion coefficient (D) and excessive kurtosis (K) were obtained from diffusion-weighted images at b-values of 0, 500, 1000, and 1500 s/mm 2 on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The combination of D and K values showing the maximum density of the probable density function was estimated. The ADC was obtained (0 and 1000 s/mm 2 ). Values for odontogenic cysts, KCOTs, and ameloblastomas were compared. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to assess the combination of D and K model versus ADC for differentiating KCOTs from odontogenic cysts. The mean D and ADC were significantly higher for ameloblastomas than for odontogenic cysts or KCOTs (P < 0.05). The mean K was significantly lower for ameloblastomas than for odontogenic cysts or KCOTs (P < 0.05). The mean values of all parameters for odontogenic cysts and KCOTs showed no significant differences (P = 0.369 for ADC, 0.133 for D, and 0.874 for K). The accuracy of the combination of D and K model (76.7%) was superior to that of ADC (66.7%). Use of DKI may be feasible for common odontogenic lesions. A combination of DKI parameters can be expected to increase the accuracy of its diagnostic ability compared with ADC. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1565-1571. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. [Study of 103 cases of odontogenic cysts].

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Bravo, Gustavo Sergio; Magallanes-González, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    To describe characteristics of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican population. A retrospective study of 103 odontogenic cysts in 86 patients was done. The data were obtained from files of the Pathology Department of a General Hospital. We observed a frequency of the 8.13 % of odontogenic cysts (103) in 1266 pathological studies. The dentigerous cyst 56 % and odontogenic keratocyst 33 % were the most common odontogenic cysts. Sixty one percent of the cysts appeared in the second and third decades of life. In 71 cysts, 42 % appeared in the posterior region jaw, 29 % in the anterior region of the maxilla and 21 % in the posterior region of the maxilla. A 6.7 % developed a recurrence after treatment and a case of keratocyst of posterior region of the maxilla was associated with epidermoid carcinoma. The study included three women with the syndrome of carcinoma of the basal cell nevus, who presented multiple keratocysts. The dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts were the most frequent odontogenic cysts. They appeared mainly in the second and third decades of life.

  8. Primordial odontogenic tumor: Subepithelial expression of Syndecan-1 and Ki-67 suggests origin during early odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bologna-Molina, R; Mikami, T; Pereira-Prado, V; Tapia-Repetto, G; Pires, F R; Carlos, R; Mosqueda-Taylor, A

    2018-03-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) is composed of variably cellular myxoid connective tissue, surrounded by cuboidal to columnar odontogenic epithelium resembling the inner epithelium of the enamel organ, which often invaginates into the underlying connective tissue. The tumor is delimited at least partially by a thin fibrous capsule. It derives from the early stages of tooth development. Syndecan-1 is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that has a physiological role in several cellular functions, including maintenance of the epithelial architecture, cell-to-cell adhesion and interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, and with diverse growth factors, stimulating cell proliferation. Ki-67 is considered the gold standard as a cell proliferation marker. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of Syndecan-1 and Ki-67 proliferation index in POT and normal tooth germs to better understand the biological behavior of this tumor. Results showed that Syndecan-1 was more intensely expressed in subepithelial mesenchymal areas of POT, in a pattern that resembles the early stages of tooth development. The cell proliferation index (4.1%) suggests that POT is a slow growing tumor. Syndecan-1 expression in tooth germs in late cap and early bell stages was similar to POT, showing immunopositivity in subepithelial mesenchymal condensed areas. The immunohistochemical findings showed a pattern in which the population of subepithelial mesenchymal cells exhibited greater proliferative activity than the central portion of the dental papilla. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [In vitro study on bone resorption of odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas].

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Li, Tie-jun

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the effect of bone resorption by odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas in vitro. Fragments of odontogenic cysts (14 odontogenic keratocysts, 6 inflamed odontogenic keratocysts, 5 dentigerous cysts) and ameloblastomas (n = 7) were incubated in vitro for 24 h. The supernatant was then removed into the culture system of SD rat calvaria. After incubation (48 h), the calcium contents of the media were measured by atom spectrophotometer. The supernatant of odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas was measured for the bone resorption related factors such as IL-6, TNF-alpha, PGE(2), bone Gla-containing protein (BGP) and calcitonin (CT) by a radioimmunoassay system. The calcium released in the calvaria culture media by all the odontogenic lesions was significantly higher than that in the blank controls (P < 0.01). The inflamed odontogenic keratocyst group had a significantly higher calcium concentration than odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of IL-6, TNF-alpha, PGE(2) and CT in the culture media of all odontogenic lesions were significantly higher than that of the blank controls (P < 0.05). IL-6 concentration in the inflamed and non-inflamed odontogenic keratocyst groups were significantly higher than that of ameloblastoma group (P < 0.05). CT concentration in the inflamed odontogenic keratocyst was significantly higher than those of odontogenic keratocyst and dentigerous cyst groups (P < 0.05). Correlation and regression analysis showed that IL-6 was significantly correlated with the calcium content (P < 0.01). The odontogenic lesions could promote bone resorption in vitro and it is likely to be related to some of the cytokines secreted by the lesions.

  10. Management of odontogenic cysts by endonasal endoscopic techniques: A systematic review and case series.

    PubMed

    Marino, Michael J; Luong, Amber; Yao, William C; Citardi, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors of the maxilla may be amendable to management by endonasal endoscopic techniques, which may reduce the morbidity associated with open procedures and avoid difficult reconstruction. To perform a systematic review that evaluates the feasibility and outcomes of endoscopic techniques in the management of different odontogenic cysts. A case series of our experience with these minimally invasive techniques was assembled for insight into the technical aspects of these procedures. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses was used to identify English-language studies that reported the use of endoscopic techniques in the management of odontogenic cysts. Several medical literature data bases were searched for all occurrences in the title or abstract of the terms "odontogenic" and "endoscopic" between January 1, 1950, and October 1, 2016. Publications were evaluated for the technique used, histopathology, complications, recurrences, and the follow-up period. A case series of patients who presented to a tertiary rhinology clinic and who underwent treatment of odontogenic cysts by an endoscopic technique was included. A systematic review identified 16 case reports or series that described the use of endoscopic techniques for the treatment of odontogenic cysts, including 45 total patients. Histopathologies encountered were radicular (n = 16) and dentigerous cysts (n = 10), and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (n = 12). There were no reported recurrences or major complications for a mean follow-up of 29 months. A case series of patients in our institution identified seven patients without recurrence for a mean follow-up of 10 months. Endonasal endoscopic treatment of various odontogenic cysts are described in the literature and are associated with effective treatment of these lesions for an average follow-up period of >2 years. These techniques have the potential to reduce morbidity associated with the resection of these

  11. A squamous odontogenic tumor following an orthodontic micro-screw: A rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jingqiu; Yin, Ping; Yuan, Yunyi; Chen, Jie; Yuan, Yongxiang; Lei, Yonghua

    2018-02-01

    We reported a very rare case of squamous odontogenic tumor(SOT) in a 23-year-old female. The tumor arose after an implanting operation of an orthodontic micro-screw, and was definitely diagnosed by the histopathological examination. Based on the case report and a review of the literature, we discussed about the general features, differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of SOT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extensive Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxilla: A Case Report of Conservative Surgical Excision and Orthodontic Alignment of Impacted Canine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jee-Won

    2014-07-01

    The present report describe the surgical therapy, clinical course, orthodontic treatment and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the maxilla of an 11-year-old patient. The cystic tumor filled the maxillary sinus and involved a tooth. Marsupialization was accompanied by partial enucleation and applied traction to the affected tooth by a fixed orthodontic appliance. Healing was uneventful and no local recurrence was observed during a 1-year period of follow-up control.

  13. Large mandibular central odontogenic fibroma documented over 20 years: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Patrick; Sutter, Walter; Meier, Marius; Berger, Sebastian; Turhani, Dritan

    2017-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare, benign, slow-growing intraosseous odontogenic tumor, and accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is often confused with other entities, such as keratocysts, ameloblastomas, and odontogenic myxomas. Complete enucleation followed by curettage is the treatment of choice for COF to ensure the lowest possible chance of recurrence. We report the case of a young Caucasian woman with COF that went undiagnosed for several years despite repeated radiologic examinations. Finally, a massive tumor was surgically removed and the wound was curetted. The specimen was histologically confirmed to be a COF. The patient remains under regular follow-up, and thus far there have been no clinical or radiologic signs of recurrence. This rare case of COF, which was documented over a period of 20 years, has helped us to describe the features of this tumor. It also confirms that adequate surgical treatment can lead to impressive bone regeneration in healthy individuals, as evident from the radiologic findings acquired before, during, and after enucleation of the COF in our patient. Our findings also confirm the view that COF has a favorable prognosis regardless of its final size. Early diagnosis is key to successful treatment of COF. The slow but steady increase in the size of a COF with no accompanying symptoms has not been reported previously. To our knowledge, this is the only documented case of a COF that has been under continuous radiologic observation for over 20 years.

  14. Differential expression of cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology.

  15. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The HER3 expression had positive results in 52.4% of OKC, 50% of DC and only 20% of RC samples. There was a significant difference between HER3 expression in OKCs and RCs. Conclusions: The HER3 expression in developmental odontogenic cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor. PMID:26734469

  16. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The HER3 expression had positive results in 52.4% of OKC, 50% of DC and only 20% of RC samples. There was a significant difference between HER3 expression in OKCs and RCs. The HER3 expression in developmental odontogenic cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor.

  17. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Odontogenic and Maxillofacial Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Vered, Marilena

    2017-03-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization's Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published in January of 2017. This article provides a summary of the changes to Chapter 4 Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue and Chapter 8 Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours. Odontogenic cysts which were eliminated from the 3rd 2005 edition were included in the 4th edition as well as other unique allied conditons of the jaws. Many new tumors published since 2005 have been included in the 2017 classification.

  18. NCAM (CD56) expression in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts: aberrant expression in KCOT.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-02-12

    To investigate immunohistochemically the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which has been identified as a signaling receptor with frequent reactivity in ameloblastomas (AB), in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts (KPOCs). Immunohistochemical expression of NCAM, using a monoclonal antibody, was determined in a series of 58 KPOCs comprising 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs) and 46 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), corresponding to 40 non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOTs) and 6 syndromic KCOT (S-KCOTs), associated with nevic basocellular syndrome (NBCS). NCAM expression was negative in all OOCs, but 36.45% of KCOTs exhibited focal and heterogeneous expression at the basal cell level, as well as in basal budding areas and the basal cells of daughter cysts. The latter two locations were especially applicable to S-KCOTs, with focal NCAM reactivity occurring in 66.66% of cases. Aberrant NCAM expression, in KCOTs but especially in S-KCOTs, together with its immunomorphological location, suggests that this adhesion molecule and signaling receptor plays a role in the pathogenesis of KCOTs, with a probable impact on lesional recurrence.

  19. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy for odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tsugihama; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Asaka, Daiya; Okushi, Tetsushi; Haruna, Shin-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic maxillary cysts and tumours originate from the tooth root and have traditionally been treated through an intraoral approach. Here, we report the efficacy and utility of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for the treatment of odontogenic maxillary cysts and a tumour. We undertook EMMM under general anaesthesia in six patients: four had radicular cysts, one had a dentigerous cyst, and one had a keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The cysts and tumours were completely excised and the inferior turbinate and nasolacrimal duct were preserved in all patients. There were no peri- or postoperative complications, and no incidences of recurrence. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating odontogenic cysts and tumours.

  20. Does decompression of odontogenic cysts and cystlike lesions change the histologic diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Schlieve, Thomas; Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the histopathologic findings after postdecompression definitive treatment of odontogenic cystlike lesions and determine whether the diagnosis was consistent with the pretreatment diagnosis, thereby answering the clinical question: does decompression change the histologic diagnosis? The authors implemented a retrospective cohort study from a sample of patients diagnosed with a benign odontogenic cystlike lesion and who underwent decompression followed by definitive surgery as part of their treatment. The predictor variable was treatment by decompression and the dependent variable was change in histologic diagnosis. Age, gender, and lesion location were included as variables. The χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis of the categorical data and P values less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Twenty-five cysts and cystlike lesions in 25 patients were treated with decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The mean age was 34 years (range, 13 to 80 yr) and 56% (14) were male patients. Lesions were located in the mandible in 76% (19 of 25) of patients. Postdecompression histologic examination at the time of definitive surgical treatment was consistent with the preoperative biopsy diagnosis in 91% (10 of 11) of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 67% (2 of 3) of glandular odontogenic cysts, 75% (3 of 4) of dentigerous cysts, and 100% (7 of 7) of cystic ameloblastomas. The histologic diagnosis at time of definitive treatment by enucleation and curettage is consistent with the predecompression diagnosis. Therefore, all lesions should be definitively treated after decompression based on the initial lesion diagnosis, with all patients placed on appropriate follow-up protocols. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts: A qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Akshatha, B K; Karuppiah, Karpagaselvi; Manjunath, G S; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Rao, Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    The three common odontogenic cysts include radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Among these 3 cysts, OKC is recently been classified as benign keratocystic odontogenic tumor attributing to its aggressive behavior, recurrence rate, and malignant potential. The present study involved qualitative and quantitative analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in epithelial lining of RCs, DCs, and OKCs, compare iNOS expression in epithelial linings of all the 3 cysts and determined overexpression of iNOS in OKCs which might contribute to its aggressive behavior and malignant potential. The present study is to investigate the role of iNOS in the pathogenesis of OKCs, DCs, and RCs by evaluating the iNOS expression in the epithelial lining of these cysts. Analysis of iNOS expression in epithelial lining cells of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, and 20 OKCs using immunohistochemistry done. The percentage of positive cells and intensity of stain was assessed and compared among all the 3 cysts using contingency coefficient. Kappa statistics for the two observers were computed for finding interobserver agreement. The percentage of iNOS-positive cells was found to be remarkably high in OKCs (12/20) -57.1% as compared to RCs (6/20) - 28.6% and DCs (3/20) - 14.3%. The interobserver agreement for iNOS-positive percentage cells was arrived with kappa values with OKCs → Statistically significant ( P > 0.000), RCs → statistically significant ( P > 0.001) with no significant values for DCs. No statistical difference exists among 3 study samples in regard to the intensity of staining with iNOS. Increased iNOS expression in OKCs may contribute to bone resorption and accumulation of wild-type p53, hence, making OKCs more aggressive.

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts: A qualitative and quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Akshatha, B K; Karuppiah, Karpagaselvi; Manjunath, G S; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Rao, Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The three common odontogenic cysts include radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Among these 3 cysts, OKC is recently been classified as benign keratocystic odontogenic tumor attributing to its aggressive behavior, recurrence rate, and malignant potential. The present study involved qualitative and quantitative analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in epithelial lining of RCs, DCs, and OKCs, compare iNOS expression in epithelial linings of all the 3 cysts and determined overexpression of iNOS in OKCs which might contribute to its aggressive behavior and malignant potential. Aims: The present study is to investigate the role of iNOS in the pathogenesis of OKCs, DCs, and RCs by evaluating the iNOS expression in the epithelial lining of these cysts. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of iNOS expression in epithelial lining cells of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, and 20 OKCs using immunohistochemistry done. Statistical Analysis Used: The percentage of positive cells and intensity of stain was assessed and compared among all the 3 cysts using contingency coefficient. Kappa statistics for the two observers were computed for finding interobserver agreement. Results: The percentage of iNOS-positive cells was found to be remarkably high in OKCs (12/20) –57.1% as compared to RCs (6/20) – 28.6% and DCs (3/20) – 14.3%. The interobserver agreement for iNOS-positive percentage cells was arrived with kappa values with OKCs → Statistically significant (P > 0.000), RCs → statistically significant (P > 0.001) with no significant values for DCs. No statistical difference exists among 3 study samples in regard to the intensity of staining with iNOS. Conclusions: Increased iNOS expression in OKCs may contribute to bone resorption and accumulation of wild-type p53, hence, making OKCs more aggressive. PMID:29391711

  3. Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Ana Paula; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Almeida, Janete Dias; Brandão, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2012-08-23

    Odontogenic tumors are lesions that are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or calcifying odontogenic cyst is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor may be centrally or peripherally located, and its ghost cells may exhibit calcification, as first described by Gorlin in 1962. Most peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected. All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated.

  4. Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors are lesions that are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or calcifying odontogenic cyst is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor may be centrally or peripherally located, and its ghost cells may exhibit calcification, as first described by Gorlin in 1962. Most peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. Case presentation Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected. Conclusions All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated. PMID:22917449

  5. Odontogenic cysts: demographic profile in a Brazilian population over a 38-year period.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lélia-Batista; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel-Antonio; Nonaka, Cassiano-Francisco-Weege; de Medeiros, Marcell-Costa; Torres, Tabita-Fernandes; Emiliano, Gustavo-Barbalho-Guedes

    2010-07-01

    To determine the distribution of odontogenic cysts diagnosed histologically over a period of 38 years in a Brazilian population according to age, gender and site affected and to compare these data with previously reported studies from other countries. A total of 1019 cases of odontogenic cysts diagnosed between 1970 and 2007 were studied. Clinical features obtained from the patient records and microscope slides were reviewed according to the 1992 World Health Organization classification. The mean age was 31.0 years, and there was a predominance of females. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (61.4%), followed by dentigerous cysts (20.1%) and odontogenic keratocysts (6.4%). Radicular cysts were more frequent in females (62.0%), and the maxillary teeth were the site most commonly involved (63.05%). The peak incidence of dentigerous cysts occurred in the second decade of life, with the posterior region of the mandible being the site most affected (46.3%), followed by the anterior region of the maxilla (27.8%). Odontogenic keratocysts showed a peak incidence between the third and fourth decades of life and predominance among females. The posterior region of the mandible was the site most frequently affected (65.6%). The present results showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts in this Brazilian population and other populations around the world, with inflammatory cysts being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and odontogenic keratocysts are the most common cystic lesions, accounting for 87.9% of all odontogenic cysts.

  6. Expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Abdulhadi Abbas

    2008-08-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is known to induce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. The expression of EMMPRIN in odontogenic cysts has not been previously studied. This study was done to determine the presence and the variability of EMMPRIN expression in various types of odontogenic cysts. An immunohistochemical study using a polyclonal anti-EMMPRIN antibody was done using 48 odontogenic cyst cases: 13 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), 18 dentigerous cysts (DCs), and 17 periapical cysts (PAs). Twelve cases of normal dental follicles (DFs) were also included in this study for comparison. EMMPRIN immunoreactivity was detected in all of the cysts and DFs studied. In odontogenic cysts, EMMPRIN immunoreactivity was generally higher in basal cells than in suprabasal cells. The overall EMMPRIN expression in the epithelial lining of the 3 different types of odontogenic cyst was significantly higher than in the DFs. Overall EMMPRIN expression was also found to be significantly higher in the epithelial lining of OKCs than in the other types of cysts. This study confirmed that EMMPRIN is present in odontogenic cysts and DFs. The higher EMMPRIN expression in OKCs suggests that it may be involved in the aggressive behavior of this type of cyst.

  7. Multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Liang, Hui; Wright, John; Teenier, Tom

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the clinical, radiographic, pathological and molecular findings of the first case of multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs). Multiple odontogenic keratocysts are one of the major features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and loss of heterozygosity in the PTCH gene, the culprit gene for NBCCS, has recently been found in sporadic OOC cases. Therefore, in this presenting case, we also investigated the possibility that this patient might also have NBCCS, by comparing the available clinical information and the molecular findings of this case to the diagnostic criteria for NBCCS (as proposed by the First International Colloquium on NBCCS in 2011). However, this patient with multiple OOCs showed no evidence of having NBCCS. This conclusion supports the findings from previous case series based on sporadic cases that OOC does not appear to be associated with NBCCS.

  8. Expression of cytokeratins in odontogenic jaw cysts: monoclonal antibodies reveal distinct variation between different cyst types.

    PubMed

    Hormia, M; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Nagle, R B; Virtanen, I

    1987-08-01

    Immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies was used to study and compare the cytokeratin content of odontogenic cysts and normal gingival epithelium. Two monoclonal antibodies, PKK2 and KA1, stained the whole epithelium in all cyst samples. In gingiva, PKK2 gave a suprabasal staining and KA1 reacted with all epithelial cell layers. Antibodies PKK1, KM 4.62 and KS 8.12 gave a heterogeneous staining in follicular and radicular cysts. In keratocysts and in gingiva PKK1 and KM 4.62 reacted mainly with basal cells and KS 8.12 gave a suprabasal staining. Antibodies reacting with the simple epithelial cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18 (PKK3, KS 18.18) recognized in gingiva only solitary cells compatible with Merkel cells. In a case of follicular ameloblastoma a distinct staining of tumor epithelium was revealed with these antibodies. In 2 follicular cysts, but not in other cyst types, a layer of cytokeratin 18-positive cells was revealed. KA5 and KK 8.60 antibodies, reacting exclusively with keratinizing epithelia, including normal gingiva, gave no reaction in radicular cysts, keratocysts and ameloblastoma. Two of the follicular cysts, were negative for PKK3 and KS 18.18, but reacted strongly with KA5 and KK 8.60. The present results show that odontogenic jaw cysts have distinct differences in their cytokeratin content. With the exception of some follicular cysts, they lack signs of keratinizing epithelial differentiation. Only follicular cysts appear to share with some types of ameloblastoma the expression of cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18.

  9. Developmental odontogenic cysts of jaws: a clinical study of 245 cases.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Javad; Kahnamouii, Shiva Solahaye

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative frequency of developmental odontogenic cysts in an Iranian population. In this study 245 cysts from both jaws, treated in the Faculty of Dentistry at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during a 10-year period from 1998 to 2008, were analyzed in order to evaluate the incidence of such cysts. We had permission from all the patients. Case histories of 65% of male and 35% of female patients were analyzed. The age of the patients varied from 14 to 64 years, with an average of 33.21 ± 10.89. In this 10-year study of odontogenic cysts, 97 cases were developmental odontogenic cysts with the following inci-dence: dentigerous cyst, 44%; odontogenic keratocyst, 36%; primordial cyst, 9%; Gorlin cyst, 2%; lateral periodontal cyst, 3%; eruption cyst, 3%; and gingival cyst, 3% (adults 2%, infants 1%). A total of 60% of the cysts were found in the mandible and 40% in the maxilla. Regarding the mandible, the molar region was involved in 47% of the cases, premolar region in 33% and anterior region in 20% (total = 100%). Regarding the maxilla, the canine-to-canine region was involved in 52% of the cases, premolar region in 20% and molar region in 28% (total = 100%). An important finding in this study was the fact that 39% of the jaw cysts were developmental odontogenic cysts and the most common developmental odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cyst and OKC (odontogenic keratocyst).

  10. Clinical signs and histologic findings in dogs with odontogenic cysts: 41 cases (1995-2010).

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Frank J M; Zin, Bliss P; Kass, Philip H; Cox, Darren P; Jordan, Richard C

    2011-12-01

    To characterize clinical signs and histologic findings in dogs with odontogenic cysts and determine whether histologic findings were associated with clinical features. Retrospective case series. 41 dogs. Medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data, including breed, age, sex, and lesion location. Microscopic sections and results of diagnostic imaging were reviewed. Odontogenic cysts were identified in 41 dogs between 1995 and 2010. There were 29 dogs with dentigerous cysts, 1 with a radicular cyst, 1 with a lateral periodontal cyst, and 1 with a gingival inclusion cyst. In addition, 9 dogs with odontogenic cysts that had clinical and histologic features suggestive of, but not diagnostic for, odontogenic keratocysts seen in people were identified. In all 9 dogs, these cysts were located in the maxilla and surrounded the roots of normally erupted teeth. Of the 29 dogs with dentigerous cysts, 23 had a single cyst, 5 had 2 cysts, and 1 had 3 cysts. Six cysts were associated with an unerupted canine tooth, and 30 were associated with an unerupted first premolar tooth (1 cyst was associated both with an unerupted canine tooth and with an unerupted first premolar tooth). Dentigerous cysts were identified in a variety of breeds, but several brachycephalic breeds were overrepresented, compared with the hospital population during the study period. Results suggested that a variety of odontogenic cysts can occur in dogs. In addition, cysts that resembled odontogenic keratocysts reported in people were identified. We propose the term canine odontogenic parakeratinized cyst for this condition.

  11. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts presenting as a periapical lesion: report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Silva Servato, João Paulo; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; Parreira da Silva, Marcelo Caetano; Cordeiro, Mirna Scalon; Rogério de Faria, Paulo; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory cysts, granulomas, abscesses, and fibrous scars represent most periapical radiolucencies. However, other less common lesions, such as orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs), can be found at this region, and they deserve to be discussed because the prognosis for an OOC is different from that expected for the ordinary inflammatory periapical diseases. An interesting case of OOC associated with a nonvital tooth in a 40-year-old woman is described. After a previous clinical diagnosis of a radicular cyst, the tooth was extracted, and the lesion was enucleated and submitted to microscopy examination. Because of the detection of an orthokeratinized epithelium lining, a diagnosis of OOC was concluded. After 2 years of periodic follow-up, no signs of recurrence were detected. The presence of keratin in radicular lesions must be carefully evaluated to eliminate the diagnosis of lesions with more aggressive behavior, such as an OOC or even a keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Hence, histopathologic examination is mandatory to confirm the type of lesion and to differentiate other pathologic conditions, therefore establishing patients' prognoses precisely. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinico-pathologic study of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample population.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Hernández-Guerrero, J C; Garcés-Ortíz, M

    2000-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are uncommon lesions that frequently behave agressively and attain a large size. Unfortunately, information on the relative incidence of these cysts from different populations is not abundant. In Mexico, for example, only a few examples have been reported. The aim of this study was to ascertain the frequency of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample and to compare these data with previously reported studies from other countries. The files of the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Diagnosis Service at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) were reviewed and all accessions of odontogenic cysts were listed. Clinical and radiographic data were recorded and microscopic slides evaluated according to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) classification (1992). Three hundred and four cases of odontogenic cysts (55.9% male predominance) were found. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were the following: periapical cyst (38. 8%); dentigerous cyst (35.5%), and odontogenic keratocyst (18.8%). Periapical cyst was more frequent in females, and maxillary anterior teeth were most commonly involved. Dentigerous cysts appeared in males at a rate of 64.8%, this cyst found more frequently between the 1st and 2nd decades of life and in the molar zone. Odontogenic keratocyst was more frequent in males (59.6%), between the 2nd and 4th decades of life and more common in the molar zone. More than 50% of the sample were aggressive cysts (dentigerous and keratocyst). Our results suggest that Mexican patients develop aggressive odontogenic cysts more commonly than other populations. Our figures point to the need for a precise diagnosis in order to institute the correct surgical procedure, prevent recurrence, and forestall more extensive tissue destruction.

  13. Oncogenic signalling pathways in benign odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Xavier, Guilherme Machado; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2017-09-01

    The first step towards the prevention of cancer is to develop an in-depth understanding of tumourigenesis and the molecular basis of malignant transformation. What drives tumour initiation? Why do most benign tumours fail to metastasize? Oncogenic mutations, previously considered to be the hallmark drivers of cancers, are reported in benign cysts and tumours, including those that have an odontogenic origin. Despite the presence of such alterations, the vast majority of odontogenic lesions are benign and never progress to the stage of malignant transformation. As these lesions are likely to develop due to developmental defects, it is possible that they harbour quiet genomes. Now the question arises - do they result from DNA replication errors? Specific candidate genes have been sequenced in odontogenic lesions, revealing recurrent BRAF mutation in the case of ameloblastoma, KRAS mutation in adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, PTCH1 mutation in odontogenic keratocysts, and CTNNB1 (Beta-catenin) mutation in calcifying odontogenic cysts. Studies on these benign and rare entities might reveal important information about the tumorigenic process and the mechanisms that hinder/halt neoplastic progression. This is because the role of relatively common oncogenic mutations seems to be context dependent. In this review, each mutation signature of the odontogenic lesion and the affected signalling pathways are discussed in the context of tooth development and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, behavioural differences between different types of odontogenic lesions are explored and discussed based on the molecular alteration described. This review also includes the employment of molecular results for guiding therapeutic approaches towards odontogenic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Odontogenic carcinoma with dentinoid: a new odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Neville, Brad W; Tatemoto, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Dentinoid is an integral part of some odontogenic tumors. This article describes the clinico-pathological features of three cases of odontogenic carcinomas with dentinoid (OCD). A comparison of these with previously reported cases of dentinoid-producing epithelial odontogenic tumors allowed us to identify another six cases that may be considered as examples of OCD. Six cases occurred in the mandible and three in the maxilla, all developing behind the canines. There was no sex predilection (five men and four women; age range 14-61 years, mean 38.1). Pain or discomfort was mentioned in five cases, four of which showed tooth resorption. All cases appeared initially as well-defined radiolucencies, five of which showed variable amounts of calcified material. Recurrences were recorded in three instances, but no evidence of metastasis has been found. Seven cases were composed predominantly or entirely of clear cells, usually with minimal cellular atypia and variable mitotic activity; however, in all cases there was evidence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissues, including the presence of perineural invasion in two tumors. Those cases in which no reference was made to the presence of clear cells exhibited evident mitotic activity and cellular pleomorphism. The epithelium in OCD does not produce buds or enamel organ-like structures such as those found in ameloblastic fibro-dentinoma and this tumor does not contain a mesenchyme-like connective tissue resembling dental papilla as observed in several mixed odontogenic tumors. Based on the existing data and the present series of cases, OCD appears to represent a distinct entity.

  15. Comparison of Mast Cells Count in Odontogenic Cysts Using Histochemical Staining.

    PubMed

    Rajabi-Moghaddam, Mahdieh; Abbaszadeh-Bidokhty, Hamid; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are among the most frequent destructive lesions of jaws which their pathogenesis and growth mechanism are not cleared. With respect to different roles of mast cells, they may play a role in the pathogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. The aim of present study was to evaluate mast cells in the most common odontogenic cyst. Thirty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks including 10 radicular cysts, 10 dentigerous cysts and 10 odontogenic keratocysts were used and 5 micron sections stained with toluidine blue and observed by light microscope under ×400 magnification to evaluate mast cells within these cysts. For each case, 5 high-power field areas, selected from hot-spot areas, were considered and each area divided into 3 zones: intra-epithelial zone, sub-epithelial zone and deep zone. Most of the studied cyst showed presence of mast cells. There was not any significant difference in mast cell count between studied cysts ( P -values > 0.05).With respect to intra-epithelial, sub-epithelial and deep zones, there was not any significant difference between three studied cysts. There was not any significant difference between sub-epithelial zone and deep zone within each of these cysts. There was only significant difference between intra-epithelial zone and sub-epithelial zone within dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts ( P -value < 0.05). Prevalence of mast cells in fibrous wall of odontogenic cysts suggests their activity in these cysts. Mast cells may not be directly involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic keratocysts.

  16. Comparison of Mast Cells Count in Odontogenic Cysts Using Histochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi-Moghaddam, Mahdieh; Abbaszadeh-Bidokhty, Hamid; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Odontogenic cysts are among the most frequent destructive lesions of jaws which their pathogenesis and growth mechanism are not cleared. With respect to different roles of mast cells, they may play a role in the pathogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. The aim of present study was to evaluate mast cells in the most common odontogenic cyst. Methods: Thirty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks including 10 radicular cysts, 10 dentigerous cysts and 10 odontogenic keratocysts were used and 5 micron sections stained with toluidine blue and observed by light microscope under ×400 magnification to evaluate mast cells within these cysts. For each case, 5 high-power field areas, selected from hot-spot areas, were considered and each area divided into 3 zones: intra-epithelial zone, sub-epithelial zone and deep zone. Results: Most of the studied cyst showed presence of mast cells. There was not any significant difference in mast cell count between studied cysts ( P -values > 0.05).With respect to intra-epithelial, sub-epithelial and deep zones, there was not any significant difference between three studied cysts. There was not any significant difference between sub-epithelial zone and deep zone within each of these cysts. There was only significant difference between intra-epithelial zone and sub-epithelial zone within dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts ( P -value < 0.05). Conclusions: Prevalence of mast cells in fibrous wall of odontogenic cysts suggests their activity in these cysts. Mast cells may not be directly involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic keratocysts. PMID:26351470

  17. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Prashanth; Maligi, Prathima; Raghuveer, HP

    2011-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Materials and Methods: Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) (2005) were included in the study and the following variables were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic location, and histological type. Results: In a total of 252 cyst specimens diagnosed, 79.76% were odontogenic cysts and 20.24% were nonodontogenic cysts. Among the odontogenic cysts most frequent lesions were radicular cysts (50.25%), followed by keratocysts (27.36%) and dentigerous cysts (22.39%). Conclusions: Our study provides a cumulative data of odontogenic cysts in the population of Bangalore city. The results of our study showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts as compared to other populations of the world, with radicular cyst being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Keratocyst was the second most common cyst followed by dentigerous cyst. PMID:21731270

  18. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Prashanth; Maligi, Prathima; Raghuveer, Hp

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) (2005) were included in the study and the following variables were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic location, and histological type. In a total of 252 cyst specimens diagnosed, 79.76% were odontogenic cysts and 20.24% were nonodontogenic cysts. Among the odontogenic cysts most frequent lesions were radicular cysts (50.25%), followed by keratocysts (27.36%) and dentigerous cysts (22.39%). Our study provides a cumulative data of odontogenic cysts in the population of Bangalore city. The results of our study showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts as compared to other populations of the world, with radicular cyst being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Keratocyst was the second most common cyst followed by dentigerous cyst.

  19. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words: Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer.

  20. Odontogenic cysts: a clinicopathological study of 507 cases.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael L; Antunes, Antonio A; Carvalho, Ricardo W F; Bezerra, Paulo G C F; Oliveira Neto, Patrício J; Andrade, Emanuel S S

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts at the Pernambuco School of Dentistry - Universidade de Pernambuco (Brazil) and compare this prevalence with other international studies. Data for the study were obtained from reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 1992 and 2007. Case records of patients who fit the Histological Classification of the World Health Organization (2005) were included. The following variables were analyzed: gender, age group, anatomical location, histological type and ethnic background. Odontogenic cysts accounted for 9.94% of all lesions biopsied throughout the study period. Mean patient age was 28.9 years and 57.6% of the patients were males (P > 0.05). Radicular cyst was the most prevalent histological type (52.2%), followed by dentigerous cyst (30.7%). Regarding ethnic background, 41.8 % of the patients were of African descent, followed by Caucasians and other ethnic groups (P > 0.05). The mandible was the most prevalent site of the lesions (56%). Odontogenic cysts appear to have a distinct predilection for the male gender, the second and third decades of life (P < 0.05) and are more frequent in the mandible. The removal of odontogenic keratocysts from the new WHO classification has not altered the order of the most prevalent cysts in the maxillofacial complex.

  1. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  2. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Baiju, C. S.; Rohatgi, Sumidha

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors mainly occur as intraosseous growths but sometimes may present in a peripheral location on the gingiva where they are referred to as peripheral odontogenic tumors (POTs) which are a rare entity, the most common of them being the peripheral odontogenic fibroma that is an otherwise uncommon, slowly growing, benign odontogenic neoplasm of the periodontal soft tissues. In fact, peripheral odontogenic fibroma is the only POT that is more frequent than its central counterpart. Although considered to be with a potential to recur after excision, the actual recurrence rate is not known due to paucity of literature. This paper presents a case report along with review of the available literature and reinforces the importance of patient follow-up in addition to radiographic and histological examination of seemingly innocuous gingival exophytic lesions. PMID:22028517

  3. Diagnostic Factors of Odontogenic Cysts in Iranian Population: A Retrospective Study Over the Past Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Hassan; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Sabour, Siamak; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of odontogenic cysts due to their silent progression is always a challenging problem for clinicians. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the frequency of odontogenic cysts and related factors in a selected Iranian population. Patients and Methods: The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 312 patients’ recorded data in Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April 1993 to December 2013. All related data were extracted from the records and categorized in tables. The correlation between the variables was analyzed by either chi-square or multinominal logistic regression tests. The P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Evaluation of 312 patients’ records (185 males and 127 females) with the mean age of 27.6 showed that Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) was the most common odontogenic cyst of all followed by the dentigerous cyst as the second most common lesion. Most of the patients were in the second or third decades of their lives, although there was no statistically significant age distribution. The finding of the current study showed that calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurrence was significantly related to the history of trauma. Enucleation and curettage of the odontogenic cysts were the most common treatment plans of all. Conclusions: The current study showed that clinicians should consider the many factors associated with the occurrence of odontogenic cysts. PMID:26357548

  4. Diagnostic Factors of Odontogenic Cysts in Iranian Population: A Retrospective Study Over the Past Two Decades.

    PubMed

    Mohajerani, Hassan; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Sabour, Siamak; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of odontogenic cysts due to their silent progression is always a challenging problem for clinicians. The current study aimed to evaluate the frequency of odontogenic cysts and related factors in a selected Iranian population. The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 312 patients' recorded data in Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April 1993 to December 2013. All related data were extracted from the records and categorized in tables. The correlation between the variables was analyzed by either chi-square or multinominal logistic regression tests. The P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Evaluation of 312 patients' records (185 males and 127 females) with the mean age of 27.6 showed that Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) was the most common odontogenic cyst of all followed by the dentigerous cyst as the second most common lesion. Most of the patients were in the second or third decades of their lives, although there was no statistically significant age distribution. The finding of the current study showed that calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurrence was significantly related to the history of trauma. Enucleation and curettage of the odontogenic cysts were the most common treatment plans of all. The current study showed that clinicians should consider the many factors associated with the occurrence of odontogenic cysts.

  5. New tumour entities in the 4th edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours: odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, Paul M; Takata, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    The latest (4th) edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours has recently been published with a number of significant changes across all tumour sites. In particular, there has been a major attempt to simplify classifications and to use defining criteria which can be used globally in all situations, avoiding wherever possible the use of complex molecular techniques which may not be affordable or widely available. This review summarises the changes in Chapter 8: Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone lesions. The most significant change is the re-introduction of the classification of the odontogenic cysts, restoring this books status as the only text which classifies and defines the full range of lesions of the odontogenic tissues. The consensus group considered carefully the terminology of lesions and were concerned to ensure that the names used properly reflected the best evidence regarding the true nature of specific entities. For this reason, this new edition restores the odontogenic keratocyst and calcifying odontogenic cyst to the classification of odontogenic cysts and rejects the previous terminology (keratocystic odontogenic tumour and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour) which were intended to suggest that they are true neoplasms. New entities which have been introduced include the sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma and primordial odontogenic tumour. In addition, some previously poorly defined lesions have been removed, including the ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, which are probably developing odontomas, and the odontoameloblastoma, which is not regarded as an entity. Finally, the terminology "cemento" has been restored to cemento-ossifying fibroma and cemento-osseous dysplasias, to properly reflect that they are of odontogenic origin and are found in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws.

  6. Developmental Odontogenic Cysts of Jaws: A Clinical Study of 245 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Javad; Kahnamouii, Shiva Solahaye

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the relative frequency of developmental odontogenic cysts in an Iranian population. Materials and methods In this study 245 cysts from both jaws, treated in the Faculty of Dentistry at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during a 10-year period from 1998 to 2008, were analyzed in order to evaluate the incidence of such cysts. We had permission from all the patients. Case histories of 65% of male and 35% of female patients were analyzed. The age of the patients varied from 14 to 64 years, with an average of 33.21 ± 10.89. Results In this 10-year study of odontogenic cysts, 97 cases were developmental odontogenic cysts with the following inci-dence: dentigerous cyst, 44%; odontogenic keratocyst, 36%; primordial cyst, 9%; Gorlin cyst, 2%; lateral periodontal cyst, 3%; eruption cyst, 3%; and gingival cyst, 3% (adults 2%, infants 1%). A total of 60% of the cysts were found in the mandible and 40% in the maxilla. Regarding the mandible, the molar region was involved in 47% of the cases, premolar region in 33% and anterior region in 20% (total = 100%). Regarding the maxilla, the canine-to-canine region was involved in 52% of the cases, premolar region in 20% and molar region in 28% (total = 100%). Conclusion An important finding in this study was the fact that 39% of the jaw cysts were developmental odontogenic cysts and the most common developmental odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cyst and OKC (odontogenic keratocyst). PMID:23230485

  7. Morphometric evaluation of AgNORs in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Sreeshyla, Huchanahalli S; Shashidara, Raju; Sudheendra, Udyavara Sridhara

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the morphometry of AgNORs in odontogenic cysts and to compare their biologic behavior to determine whether AgNOR morphometry is helpful in predicting the behavior. Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC) and radicular cyst (RC) were stained with silver nitrate. Morphometric analysis of 100 selected epithelial and connective tissue cells was done to record their nuclear volume, nuclear perimeter, contour index of the nucleus, AgNOR count, AgNOR proportion and single AgNOR volume. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. AgNOR count, nuclear volume and nuclear perimeter were greatest in the OKC followed by DC and RC, suggesting that these parameters differentiate between the aggressive and less aggressive odontogenic cysts. Single AgNOR volume and AgNOR proportion were greatest in the RC followed by OKC and DC, respectively. Results of our study taken in isolation point to AgNOR count as the most reliable factor in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive odontogenic cysts.

  8. Odontogenic cysts: a retrospective study of 1227 cases in an Iranian population from 1987 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Mohammad J; Khalili, Maryam

    2011-09-01

    Odontogenic cysts constitute a major part of oral pathological lesions, but little is known about their distribution patterns in various populations. In this retrospective study, patient records from the archive of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology at the Faculty of Dentistry affiliated to the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were reviewed. Cases diagnosed as odontogenic cyst from 1987 to 2007 were selected and histopathologically re-evaluated to confirm the diagnosis. Patients' demographic information (age and sex) and location of the lesion were recorded and analyzed using descriptive statistics. From a total of 8529 files reviewed, the diagnosis of odontogenic cyst was confirmed in 1227 cases (14.4%). The overall male to female ratio was 1.33:1. The patients' age ranged from 3 to 84 years with a mean of 28 years. 49% of cysts were found in maxilla and 50.4% in mandible. Radicular cyst was the most common type followed by dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, residual cyst and paradental cyst. Lateral periodontal cyst, eruption cyst, glandular odontogenic cyst and gingival cyst of adults were also reported. The distribution pattern of odontogenic cysts in Iran is relatively similar to that in other parts of the world. The importance of complete clinical reports for final diagnosis of these lesions and routine follow-up examinations is emphasized.

  9. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts - An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Shaloom; Sumathi, M K; Balaji, N; Shetty, Nisha K N; Pramod, K M; Cheeramelil, Jacob

    2013-12-01

    Calretinin a 29-kDa calcium binding protein is expressed widely in normal human tissue and tumours including amelobastoma. The objective of this study was to determine calretinin expression in heamatoxylin and eosin diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma and non-neoplastic odontogenic cysts. The lining epithelium in 3 cases of radicular cysts, 5 cases of odontogenic keratocysts, 5 cases of dentigerous cysts and 11 cases of ameloblastomas were examined for expression of calretinin. No positive epithelial staining was observed in radicular and dentigerous cysts. In comparison, however 100% of cases of ameloblastomas and 40% of cases of odontogenic karatocysts showed positive calretinin expression. Calretinin may be a specific immunohistochemical marker for ameloblastoma. If there is any possible relation between calretinin expression and neural origin of the odontogenic epithelium and its neoplastic transformation and if calretinin could be used as an early marker to predict the tendency of neoplastic change of odontogenic epithelium could be answered through further researches. How to cite this article: D'Silva S, Sumathi MK, Balaji N, Shetty NK, Pramod KM, Cheeramelil J. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts - An immunohistochemical study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):42-8 .

  10. Evaluation of collagen in connective tissue walls of odontogenic cysts--a histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Vij, Ruchieka; Vij, Hitesh; Rao, Nirmala N

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nature of collagen in the connective tissue walls of odontogenic cysts, like the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst using picrosirius red stained sections. Furthermore, it was intended to assess if the capsular connective tissue can affect the nature of overlying epithelium, thus emphasizing the role of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in biological behaviour of the cysts. The material for the study included 51 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks (15 odontogenic keratocyst, 15 dentigerous cysts, 15 radicular cysts and four normal mucosa and two dental follicular tissue as controls), retrieved from the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, MCODS, Manipal. Tissue blocks were sectioned at 5-μm thickness, stained with picrosirius red stain and observed with polarization and light microscopy. Few sections of OKC and dentigerous cyst exhibited greenish-yellow birefringence in sub-epithelial region, whereas others showed a yellowish-orange birefringence under polarization microscopy. Most radicular cysts had yellowish-orange to orange birefringence. Shift in colour in case OKC and dentigerous cyst was attributed to the presence of inflammation in those sections. These regions also exhibited either a change in phenotype or thickness of overlying epithelium. This technique can be used to study the nature of collagen fibres in odontogenic cyst walls. Further studies with an increased sample size and using various epithelial and mesenchymal markers and ssDNA antibodies should be carried out to confirm the effect of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions on the nature of epithelium of odontogenic cysts. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Actual Proliferating Index and p53 protein expression as prognostic marker in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Gadbail, A R; Chaudhary, M; Patil, S; Gawande, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst/keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT), radicular cyst (RC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) by observing the actual proliferative activity of epithelium, and p53 protein expression. The actual proliferative activity was measured by Ki-67 Labelling Index and argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNOR) count per nucleus. The p53 protein expression was also evaluated. Ki-67 positive cells were observed higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT with uniform distribution, a few of them were predominantly observed in basal cell layer in RC and DC. The AgNOR count was significantly higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The actual proliferative activity was noted to be higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The p53 immunolabelling was dense and scattered in basal and suprabasal cell layers in KCOT. The weakly stained p53 positive cells were observed diffusely distributed in KCOT, whereas they were mainly seen in basal cell layer of RC and DC. The quantitative and qualitative differences of the proliferative activity and the p53 protein expression in sporadic KCOT may be associated with intrinsic growth potential that could play a role in its development and explain locally aggressive biological behaviour. AgNOR count and p53 protein detection in odontogenic lesions can be of great consequence to predict the biological behaviour and prognosis.

  12. Demographic distribution of odontogenic cysts in Isfahan (Iran) over a 23-year period (1988-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Negin; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Navabi, Amir Arsalan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic cysts are relatively common lesions which can cause different complications. As demographic information is lacking in Iran and specially in Isfahan, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts according to age, gender and affected area among patients referring to the Oral Pathology Department of the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran) over a 23-year period. Materials and Methods: A total of 7412 diagnosed lesions recorded in the Oral Pathology Department archives of Isfahan Dental School between 1988 and 2010 were reevaluated, then odontogenic cysts were separated through reviewing microscopic slides according to the 2005 World Health Organization classification and variables such as age, gender, the infected jaw, and its specific region were obtained by SPSS Version 16.0 from the recorded database. Results: 21.62% of the lesions were odontogenic cysts, of which 48.72% were inflammatory and 51.28% were developmental cysts. These cysts were more common in the mandible. The mean age of patients was 29.53 ± 16.1. Male to female ratio was 1.31:1. The four most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (35.12%), dentigerous cysts (25.77%), odontogenic keratocysts (22.58%) and residual cysts (12.98%). Conclusion: Odontogenic cysts are fairly frequent jaw lesions (21.62%), of which radicular cyst was the most common cyst. The four most common lesions constituted a sum of 96.45% of the total. In general, the prevalence rates in our study are similar to the studies from other geographic parts of the world but with a lower incidence of inflammatory cysts, higher prevalence of dentigerous cysts and residual cysts and also mandibular predominance for residual cysts. PMID:23946730

  13. Demographic distribution of odontogenic cysts in Isfahan (Iran) over a 23-year period (1988-2010).

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Negin; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Navabi, Amir Arsalan

    2013-03-01

    Odontogenic cysts are relatively common lesions which can cause different complications. As demographic information is lacking in Iran and specially in Isfahan, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts according to age, gender and affected area among patients referring to the Oral Pathology Department of the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran) over a 23-year period. A total of 7412 diagnosed lesions recorded in the Oral Pathology Department archives of Isfahan Dental School between 1988 and 2010 were reevaluated, then odontogenic cysts were separated through reviewing microscopic slides according to the 2005 World Health Organization classification and variables such as age, gender, the infected jaw, and its specific region were obtained by SPSS Version 16.0 from the recorded database. 21.62% of the lesions were odontogenic cysts, of which 48.72% were inflammatory and 51.28% were developmental cysts. These cysts were more common in the mandible. The mean age of patients was 29.53 ± 16.1. Male to female ratio was 1.31:1. The four most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (35.12%), dentigerous cysts (25.77%), odontogenic keratocysts (22.58%) and residual cysts (12.98%). Odontogenic cysts are fairly frequent jaw lesions (21.62%), of which radicular cyst was the most common cyst. The four most common lesions constituted a sum of 96.45% of the total. In general, the prevalence rates in our study are similar to the studies from other geographic parts of the world but with a lower incidence of inflammatory cysts, higher prevalence of dentigerous cysts and residual cysts and also mandibular predominance for residual cysts.

  14. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Uzun-Bulut, Emel; Özden, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. Study Design A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayıs University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we analyzed age, gender, type and number of cysts, and cyst location. Imaging patterns and pathologies associated with cystic lesions were also determined. Results: The prevalence of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts was 3.51%; males were affected more frequently than females. There were 452 odontogenic cysts (98.5%) and seven nonodontogenic cysts (1.5%). The most frequent odontogenic cyst was radicular (54.7%), followed by dentigerous (26.6%), residual (13.7%), odontogenic keratocyst (3.3%), and lateral periodontal cyst (0.2%). Nasopalatine duct cyst (1.5%) was the only nonodontogenic cyst. By age, cysts peaked in the third decade (24.2%). Concerning location, no statistically significant difference was found between the maxilla and mandible (p>0.05). The most frequent radiological feature of these lesions was unilocular cyst (93.7%). Pathologies associated with cystic lesions occurred in 14.7%. Conclusion: The prevalence of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts were lower than that reported in many other studies. In our study population, cysts were mainly inflammatory in origin. Key words: Prevalence, odontogenic, nonodontogenic, cysts. PMID:21743428

  15. Laparoscopic Treatment of Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of the Ovary in a Woman With Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Grechi, Gianluca; Clemente, Nicolò; Tozzi, Alessandra; Ciavattini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare hereditary multisystemic disease. Multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal abnormalities are the main clinical manifestations of the syndrome, but several organs can be involved. Moreover, this condition is associated with the development of various benign and malignant tumors, even in the genital tract. This report describes a rare association between Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and the sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary. Because the ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging patterns of this tumor can be similar to those of a malignant neoplasm, prompt surgical intervention and histological confirmation of diagnosis is mandatory; however, this is a benign lesion and thus can be approached with a laparoscopic fertility-sparing surgery. Gynecologists should be aware of this possible association to provide appropriate counseling for these women, and to take a fertility-sparing laparoscopic approach whenever possible. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Odontogenic and nonodontogenic jaw cysts: experience in 25 cases].

    PubMed

    Ağir, Hakan; Sen, Cenk; Işil, Eda; Unal, Ciğdem; Ustündağ, Emre; Keskin, Gürkan

    2008-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the patients with jaw cysts treated at our center. The study included 25 patients (14 males, 11 females; mean age 33+/-19 years; range 7 to 69 years) who underwent surgery for odontogenic or nonodontogenic jaw cysts. The most common presentation was a swelling in the jaw with or without dental problems. Involvement was in the mandible in 18 patients, and in the maxilla in seven patients. The lesions consisted of eight radicular, six dentigerous, two nasoalveolar, two globulomaxillary cysts, and three keratocysts. Four patients had gingival, nasopalatine, residual, and median mandibular cysts, respectively. Marsupialization, curettage, extensive burring, enucleation, or marginal resection were performed depending on pre- and intraoperative findings. The defects were repaired with a corticocancellous iliac bone block graft in three patients and cancellous iliac bone chips in five patients. During a mean follow-up of 14 months (range 12 to 46 months), recurrence was seen in only one patient with a keratocyst. A good preoperative assessment, complete removal of the cystic lesion, and close radiographic follow-up are essential for a successful outcome in jaw cysts. In selected cases, reconstruction of the defects with autogenous corticocancellous iliac bone graft yields highly satisfactory results.

  17. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  18. Quantitative assessment of silver-stained nucleolar organizer region in odontogenic cysts to correlate the growth and malignant potentiality.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sailendra Nath; Paul, R R; Ray, Jay Gopal; Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya

    2017-01-01

    The most common and important odontogenic cyst involving jaws is the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) or primordial cyst, the dentigerous cyst and the radicular cyst. These cysts all though do not show similar behavior, they all have the potentiality to recur. Silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) of the benign and malignant lesions is becoming very useful as a diagnostic indicator. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic potential of AgNORs in the cystic epithelium of common odontogenic cysts. Archived specimens of odontogenic cysts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and AgNOR stain. The comparative evaluation of the AgNOR counts was done among the three varieties of odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and OKC and were observed that the mean for OKC was significantly higher than that of radicular cyst. Therefore, AgNor could be used as an efficient tool for comparative evaluation of microscopic features such as epithelial thickness, surface keratinization and mural proliferation in dentigerous cyst to that of the AgNOR count.

  19. Quantitative assessment of silver-stained nucleolar organizer region in odontogenic cysts to correlate the growth and malignant potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sailendra Nath; Paul, R R; Ray, Jay Gopal; Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Context: The most common and important odontogenic cyst involving jaws is the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) or primordial cyst, the dentigerous cyst and the radicular cyst. These cysts all though do not show similar behavior, they all have the potentiality to recur. Silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) of the benign and malignant lesions is becoming very useful as a diagnostic indicator. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic potential of AgNORs in the cystic epithelium of common odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods: Archived specimens of odontogenic cysts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and AgNOR stain. Results: The comparative evaluation of the AgNOR counts was done among the three varieties of odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and OKC and were observed that the mean for OKC was significantly higher than that of radicular cyst. Conclusion: Therefore, AgNor could be used as an efficient tool for comparative evaluation of microscopic features such as epithelial thickness, surface keratinization and mural proliferation in dentigerous cyst to that of the AgNOR count. PMID:29391734

  20. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Martos-Fernández, Míriam; Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Hueto-Madrid, Juan Antonio; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2014-12-01

    Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare condition characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinitation in the form of Ghost cell with varying amounts of dysplastic dentina. We report a case of a 70 year-old woman with a rapid onset of painful swelling right maxillary tumor. Magnetic resonance showed a huge tumor dependent on the right half of the right hard palate with invasion of the pterygoid process and focally to the second branch of the trigeminal. Radiological stage was T4N0. The patient underwent a right subtotal maxillectomy with clear margins. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given. The patient was free of residual or recurrent disease 12 months after surgery. The tumor was 3,9cm in diameter. It was spongy and whitish gray. Microscopically the tumor was arranged in nets and trabeculae, occasionally forming palisade. Tumoral cells had clear cytoplasm with vesicular nuclei. There was atipia and mitosi with vascular and perineural invasion. The excised tumor was diagnosed as a GCOC. Ghost cell carcinoma is a rare odontogenic carcinoma. Its course is unpredictable, ranging from locally invasive tumors of slow growth to highly aggressive and infiltrative ones. Wide surgical excision with clean margins is the treatment of choice although its combination with postoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, remains controversial. Key words:Ameloblastic carcinoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, Ghost cell carcinoma, keratinizing epithelial odontogenic cyst, maxillary tumor, odontogenic carcinoma.

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the evaluation of odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, K; Seith Bhalla, A; Sharma, R; Kumar, A; Roychoudhury, A; Bhutia, O

    2012-10-01

    The differentiation between keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) and other cystic/predominantly cystic odontogenic tumours is difficult on conventional CT and MR sequences as there is overlap in the imaging characteristics of these lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to assess the performance of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in the differential diagnosis of odontogenic cysts and tumours. 20 patients with odontogenic cysts and tumours of the maxillomandibular region were examined with DWI. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained with a single-shot echoplanar technique with b-values of 0, 500 and 1000 s mm(-2). An ADC map was obtained at each slice position. The cystic areas of ameloblastoma (n=10) showed free diffusion with a mean ADC value of 2.192±0.33×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1), whereas the solid areas showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.041±0.41×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1). KCOT (n=5) showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.019±0.07×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1). There was a significant difference between the ADC values of KCOT and cystic ameloblastoma (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). The cut-off with which KCOT and predominantly cystic ameloblastomas were optimally differentiated was 2.013×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1), which yielded 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. DWI can be used to differentiate KCOT from cystic (or predominantly cystic) odontogenic tumours.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of glucose transporter 1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2016-03-10

    Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts (KPOCs) are a group of cystic lesions that are often aggressive, with high rates of recurrence and multifocality. KPOCs included orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) and parakeratotic odontogenic cysts, which are now considered true tumours denominated keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). GLUT1 is a protein transporter that is involved in the active uptake of glucose across cell membranes and that is overexpressed in tumours in close correlation with the proliferation rate and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging results. A series of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically in terms of GLUT1 expression. Different data were correlated using the beta regression model in relation to histological type and immunohistochemical expression of GLUT1, which was quantified using two different morphological methods. KPOC cases comprised 12 OOCs and 46 KCOTs, the latter corresponding to 6 syndromic and 40 sporadic KCOTs. GLUT1 expression was very low in OOC cases compared with KCOT cases, with statistical significant differences when quantification was considered. Different GLUT1 localisation patterns were revealed by immunostaining, with the parabasal cells showing higher reactivity in KCOTs. However, among KCOTs cases, GLUT1 expression was unable to establish differences between syndromic and sporadic cases. GLUT1 expression differentiated between OOC and KCOT cases, with significantly higher expression in KCOTs, but did not differentiate between syndromic and sporadic KCOT cases. However, given the structural characteristics of KCOTs, we hypothesised that PET imaging methodology is probably not a useful diagnostic tool for KCOTs. Further studies of GLUT1 expression and PET examination in KCOT series are needed to confirm this last hypothesis.

  3. Immunohistochemical evaluation of podoplanin in odontogenic tumours & cysts using anti-human podoplanin antibody.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Namrata; Khanduri, Nitin; Kurup, Deepak; Gupta, Brijesh; Mitra, Pranjan; Chawla, Roshani

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic Cysts & tumors originate through some aberration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most frequent intraosseous odontogenic tumors. However it is no longer appropriate to use the diagnosis of ameloblastoma without specifying the type. Varied-clinical entities of ameloblastoma differ in their biologic behaviour. Odontogenic cysts like dentigerous and radicular cysts are less aggressive in nature than odontogenic tumors. Recently, podoplanin commonly used as a lymphatic endothelial marker in cancers has recently been found to play a possible role in odontogenic tumorigenesis also. Therefore the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically analyse the expression of podoplanin in ameloblastomas, KCOTs, dentigerous cysts, radicular cysts & dental follicles. Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 15 Ameloblastomas (7 follicular, 6 unicystic, 2 desmoplastic),10KCOTs, 5 dentigerous cysts, 5 radicular cysts & 5 dental follicles were immunohistochemically examined using antibody against podoplanin. All ameloblastomas displayed podoplanin expression in ameloblast-like cells of the epithelial islands while the stellate-reticulum like cells exhibited no or weak immunostaining. Expression of podoplanin in KCOTs was strongly positive in the cells of the basal and suprabasal layers & odontogenic epithelial nests. Positive immunoreaction for podoplanin was observed in the inflammatory radicular cysts and inflamed dentigerous cyst only and negative or weak expression in the lining epithelium of uninflamed dentigerous cysts and dental follicles. Our results suggest that podoplanin can be used as a potential proliferative marker to observe the aggressive behaviour of ameloblastomas and KCOTs.

  4. p53 expression and mutation analysis of odontogenic cysts with and without dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Darren P

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein is well described in odontogenic cystic lesions (OCLs), including those with epithelial dysplasia; however, most p53 antibodies stain both wild-type and mutated p53 protein and may not reflect genotype. Direct sequencing of the p53 gene has not identified mutations in OCLs with dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular basis of p53 expression in several types of OCLs with and without dysplasia. The study material comprised 13 OCLs: odontogenic keratocyst (n = 5), orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (n = 5), dentigerous cyst (n = 2), lateral periodontal cyst (n = 1), and unspecified developmental odontogenic cyst (UDOC) (n = 1). Five of these had features of mild or moderate epithelial dysplasia. One intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that was believed to have arisen from an antecedent dysplastic orthokeratinized OC was also included. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the DO7 monoclonal antibody that recognizes wild-type and mutated p53. DNA was extracted from microdissected tissue for all samples and exons 4 to 8 of the p53 gene direct sequenced. In 4 of 5 OCLs with dysplasia there was strong nuclear staining of basal and suprabasal cells. In all cases without dysplasia, nuclear expression in basal cells was either negative or weak and was absent in suprabasal cell nuclei. A mutation in exon 6 of the p53 gene (E224D) was identified in both the dysplastic orthokeratinized OC and the subsequent intraosseous SCC. OCLs with features of dysplasia show increased expression of p53 protein that does not reflect p53 mutational status. One dysplastic OC shared the same p53 mutation with a subsequent intraosseous SCC, indicating that p53 mutation may be associated with malignant transformation in this case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Prevalence of Inflammatory and Developmental Odontogenic Cysts in a Libyan Population

    PubMed Central

    El Gehani, R; Krishnan, B; Orafi, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Libyan population and to compare the data with previously published reports from other countries. Materials and methods We retrieved and analyzed 2190 case notes and biopsy records of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Al Arab Medical Sciences University, Benghazi, Libya, dating from January 1990 to December 2005. There were 326 cases (14.8%) of diagnosed odontogenic cysts among the 2190 biopsies performed during this period. The cases were analyzed for age and sex distribution, site of presentation, association with impacted teeth, and the method of treatment. Results The male to female ratio of patients was 1.3:1 Radicular cysts accounted for 222 cases (68.1%), followed by dentigerous cysts (n=49, 15%) and odontogenic keratocysts (n=43, 14.1%). Mean ages of the patients were, respectively, 31.7, 22.7 and 36.1 years. The maxilla was more commonly involved than the mandible (1.3:1). The anterior maxilla was the commonest site (n=132, 37.4%) followed by the posterior mandible (n=96, 29.4%). Fifty three cases were associated with impacted teeth, and the highest frequency was for dentigerous cysts (n=37). Enucleation and curettage was performed on 300 patients, marsupialization on 14, and marginal/segmental resection on 12. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first such study on a Libyan population. Our results are comparable to studies from other countries. Knowledge of the relative frequencies and sites of presentation of odontogenic cysts in different ethno-geographic backgrounds is essential for the early diagnosis and management of these benign yet potentially destructive lesions. PMID:21499462

  6. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Odontogenic Cysts: Is There Any Impression on Clinical Outcome?

    PubMed

    Sadri, Donia; Farhadi, Sareh; Shahabi, Zahra; Sarshar, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    The recent scientific reports have shown that angiogenesis can affect biological behavior of pathologic lesions. Regarding unique clinical outcome of Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), the present study was aimed to compare angiogenesis in Odontogenic keratocyst and Dentigerous cyst (DC). In this experimental study, tissue sections of 46 samples of OKC and DC were stained through immunohistochemical method using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) antibody. VEGF expression was evaluated in epithelial cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. The average percentage of stained cells in any samples was categorized to 3 groups as follows: SCORE 0: 10% of cells or less are positive. SCORE 1: 10 to 50% of cells are positive. SCORE 2: more than 50% of cells are positive. Mann-U-Whitney, T-test and chi-square was used for statistical analysis. The average of VEGF expression in 24 samples of DC was 20.2% and in 22 samples of OKC was 52.6%, respectively. The average of VEGF expression in these two cysts had statistical significant differences. (PV= 0.045). There was significant statistical differences between two cysts in the terms of VEGF SCORE (PV= 0.000). OKC samples had significantly higher SCORE for the purpose of VEGF incidence than DC. Also, there were no differences between VEGF expression in epithelial cells of two cysts (PV= 0.268) there were significant statistical differences between two cysts in terms of endothelial cell staining. The endothelial cell staining was significantly higher in OKC than DC (PV= 0.037%). Regarding higher expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth factor in OKC than DC, it seems that angiogenesis may have great impression on clinical outcome of OKC.

  7. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effect of weather on odontogenic abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nissen, G; Schmidseder, R

    1978-11-01

    An increased frequency of odontogenous abcesses was observed on certain days in the course of routine clinical practice. We therefore investigated the possibility of a statistically significant weather-related odontogenous soft-tissue purulence originating from chronic apical periodontitis. Medical reports of patients treated between 1970 and 1977 were used. Our study indicated that the frequency of odontogenous abcesses was significantly higher with cyclonic weather conditions, i.e., weather with low barometric pressure.

  9. Clinicopathologic analysis of 14 cases of odontogenic myxoma and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Ana-Lucia-Noronha; Chulam, Thiago-Celestino; Silva, Fábio-Oliveira; Ribeiro, Diogo-Gonçalves; Pinto, Clóvis-Antônio-Lopes; Gondak, Rogério-Oliveira; Kowalski, Luiz-Paulo; Gonçalves-Filho, João

    2017-04-01

    Odontogenic myxoma is a rare benign neoplasm that originates from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. There is no standard of care and recurrences are frequent after conservative surgical procedures. A retrospective study conducted at a single cancer center, with analysis of medical records of all patients diagnosed with odontogenic myxoma from 1980 to 2010, along with a literature review. There were 14 patients with diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma (OM). Most patients were female (78.6%) and Caucasian (100%), with ages ranging from 7 to 51 years (21.6 ± 11.6 years). The time period between the first symptom and first consultation ranged from 0 to 60 months (19.4 ± 19.97 months). The most frequent complaints were increased local volume or failure to tooth eruption. The most common tumor site was the mandible (11 cases, 78.5%). About radiological findings, most lesions were multilocular (9 cases, 64.3%) and with imprecise limits (12 cases, 85.7%). Surgery was performed in all cases and curettage was the most applied technique (10 cases, 71.4%). Three patients underwent mandibulectomy and complex reconstructions including iliac crest microvascular flap. Three patients had postoperative complications and 4 had local recurrences of the tumor. The follow up time ranged from 12 to 216 months (112 ± 70.8 months). All patients are without clinical and radiographic evidence of disease. OM is a locally aggressive and rare tumor. There is no gold standard surgical management and the therapeutic decision should be individualized taking into account the characteristics and extension of the tumor. Key words: Mandible, myxoma, odontogenic, odontogenic tumor.

  10. Desmosomes: A light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of desmosomes in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Raju, Pratima; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal S

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes together with adherens junctions represent the major adhesive cell-cell junctions of epithelial cells. Any damage to these junctions leads to loss of structural balance. The present study was designed to analyze the desmosomal junctions in different odontogenic cysts and compare them with their corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)   stained sections. Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cysts (DCs), radicular cysts (RCs) and normal mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sections was then carried out of all the sections. The area of interest on H and E stained section was marked and this marking was later superimposed onto the corresponding unstained sections and were subjected to SEM analysis. OKC at ×1000 magnification showed many prominent desmosomes. However, an increase in the intercellular space was also noted. SEM analysis demonstrated similar findings with the presence of many desmosomes, though they were seen to be damaged and fragile. H and E stained DC under oil immersion did not show any prominent desmosomes. SEM analysis of the same confirmed the observation and very minimal number were seen with a very condense arrangement of the epithelial cells. RC at ×1000 magnification revealed plenty of desmosomes, which were again confirmed by SEM. The number and quality of desmosomal junctions in all the cysts has a role in the clinical behavior of the cyst.

  11. Diagnostic dilemma of unicystic ameloblastoma: novel parameters to differentiate unicystic ameloblastoma from common odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Gunawardhana, Kuda Singappulige Niluka Darshani; Jayasooriya, Primali Rukmal; Tilakaratne, Wanninayake Mudiyanselage

    2014-08-01

    Diagnostic criteria that have been specified for unicystic ameloblastomas (UAs) are not always helpful to differentiate these cystic tumors from common odontogenic cysts. The aim of this study therefore was to identify additional histopathological features (other than the features considered for the diagnosis of UA at present) that would be helpful to differentiate UA from odontogenic cysts. One hundred histopathologically confirmed unicystic ameloblastomas and 20 cases each of radicular, inflamed dentigerous and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts were selected. Histopathological features of the UAs that are not used as diagnostic criteria at present were identified. Hyperplastic arcading epithelial proliferations with stellate-reticulum-like and vacuolated cells were always seen associated with inflammation in odontogenic cysts, while in UA plexiform-like areas were also seen without inflammation (P < 0.001). In addition, a spiky rete pattern was observed in non-inflamed UA while this pattern was observed only in inflamed odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, spiky retes together with subepithelial hyalinization were usually observed in UAs while only subepithelial hyalinization was observed in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts. Combinations of histopathological features were identified to differentiate non-inflamed UA from common odontogenic cysts. However, presence of inflammatory changes in UA precludes the use of features identified in the present study for diagnostic purposes. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Pediatric Odontogenic Cysts of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Arce, Kevin; Streff, Christopher S; Ettinger, Kyle S

    2016-02-01

    Odontogenic cysts represent a common form of pathology of the jaws, and the natural history, clinicopathologic findings, and appropriate management strategies are important to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Odontogenic cysts in the pediatric populations are important pathologic entities given their potential impact on the growth and development of the maxillofacial complex. Inappropriate management strategies can severely affect the form and function of the growing child. Categorizing pediatric odontogenic cysts into inflammatory or developmental causes provides a convenient way of conceptualizing these various entities and helps facilitate the appropriate diagnosis and the subsequent management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical resection of peripheral odontogenic fibromas in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): a case study.

    PubMed

    Wozniak-Biel, Anna; Janeczek, Maciej; Janus, Izabela; Nowak, Marcin

    2015-07-04

    Neoplastic lesions of the mammary gland, lymph nodes, or oral cavity in African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are common in captive animals. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols have not yet been established for the African pygmy hedgehog. Thus, surgical resection is the current treatment of choice in this species. A 5-year-old male African pygmy hedgehog showed multiple erythematous, round small tumors located in the oral cavity, on both sides of maxilla. The treatment of choice was surgical resection of tumors using a surgical knife under general anesthesia. Excised neoplastic lesions were diagnosed as peripheral odontogenic fibroma by histopathology. Six months after surgery relapse of tumors in the oral cavity was not observed. The treatment adopted in this case report is safe for the patient and provides the best solution for mild proliferative lesions of the oral cavity. To our knowledge this is the first report of surgical resection of oral tumors (peripheral odontogenic fibroma) in the African pygmy hedgehog.

  14. Retrospective clinicopathological study of 418 odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Urrutia, Sergio; Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2010-09-01

    To determine the relative incidence of odontogenic cysts and to identify the main clinicopathological features among patients treated in the Oral Surgery Department of the Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona (Spain). A retrospective observational study was made of 418 odontogenic cysts diagnosed in 380 patients included in the database of 1235 histopathological diagnoses. The subjects were treated in the Master degree program of Oral Surgery and Implantology of the University of Barcelona in the period 1997-2006. The following variables were recorded: gender, age, clinical characteristics of the lesions (size and location), radiological features, duration, treatment, complications and relapses. A descriptive analysis was made of the study variables, using the SPSS version 15.0. The incidence of odontogenic cysts was 33.8%. The mean patient age at appearance of the lesion was 42 years (range 7-83). The cysts were slightly more prevalent in males (58.4%). The lesion size ranged from 2-60 mm, with a mean size of 18.4 mm. The most frequent diagnosis was radicular cyst (50.2%). The most common location of the odontogenic cysts was in the mandible (61.5%), particularly the lower third molar region (36.8%). The most frequently diagnosed lesion was the radicular cyst. Odontogenic cysts were seen to be slightly more prevalent in males, and showed a high mandibular incidence. Knowledge of the biological and histological behavior of odontogenic cysts and their frequency are key aspects for ensuring early detection and adequate treatment.

  15. Odontogenic tumours: A review of 266 cases.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Ahmed O; Adisa, Akinyele O; Olusanya, Adeola A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumours at a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, as well as to study the various histologic types based on WHO 2005 classification and to compare results from this study with those of previous studies. The records of the Oral Pathology Department of University College Hospital were reviewed. Lesions diagnosed as odontogenic tumours were categorized into four groups based on WHO 2005 classification and were analyzed for age, sex and site using SPSS for Window (version 18.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL) and frequency tables were generated. Two hundred and sixty six (41.7%) cases of odontogenic tumours were seen. The mean age of occurrence was 32.6 (±15.815) years (range3-82 years) and peak age was in the third decade of life. Eleven (4.1%) malignant odontogenic tumours were seen. Ameloblastoma with 65.4% of cases was the most common odontogenic tumour followed by fibromyxoma (14.7%), no case of odontoma was seen in this series. The findings were mostly similar to those of African and Asian series and showed variations from reports from the Americas. The reason for the disparity in African and American series needs further investigations. Key words:Odontogenic tumour, classification, Nigeria.

  16. Immunoexpression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α and interleukin-10 on odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    PubMed

    Sá, M C; de Matos, F R; Conceição, T S; Leitão, A C G H; Freitas, R A

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the immunoreactivity of IL-1α, TNF-α and IL-10 in odontogenic cysts and tumours and to investigate possible associations with established biological behaviours of these different lesions. Immunohistochemical expression of anti-IL-1α, anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-10 antibodies was assessed on epithelium and mesenchyme of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 residual cysts (RECs), 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs), 18 solid ameloblastomas (SAs), 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs) and 15 dental follicles (DFs). Comparative analysis of data was performed using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Kruskal-Wallis's test. Significantly greater expression of IL-1α in the epithelium was noted in RC, KCOT and SA (P = 0.01), whilst IL-10 and TNF-α was in the epithelium of RC, DC and KCOT (P < 0.01). In the mesenchyme, significantly greater immunopositivity was observed for IL-1α, IL-10 and TNF-α in KCOT, DC and RC (P < 0.01). In epithelial and mesenchymal tissues, there were a significant number of cases of RC and DC with IL-1α < IL-10 ratio (P < 0.01), whilst SA and KCOT showed IL-1α > IL-10 (P < 0.01). There was a significantly greater percentage of DF, DC and KCOT with TNF-α > IL10 ratio (P < 0.01). These results suggest involvement of the proteins in the pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumours, with emphasis on the highest immunoreactivity of osteolysis stimulating factors in tumours with aggressive biological behaviour, such as SA and KCOT. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed.

  18. Odontogenic infections. Complications. Systemic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Bagán, José Vicente; Murillo, Judith; Poveda, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The term, odontogenic infection refers to an infection that originates in the tooth proper or in the tissues that closely surround it; said infection then progresses along the periodontia down to the apex, involving periapical bone and from this area, it then spreads through the bone and periosteum towards near-by or more distant structures. The relevance of this type of infection lies in that it can cause infections that compromise more distant structures (via direct spread and distant spread), for example, intracraneal, retropharyngeal and pulmonary pleural infections. Dissemination by means of the bloodstream can lead to rheumatic problems and deposits on the valves of the heart (endocarditis), etc. The conditions or factors that influence the spread of infection are dependent on the balance between patient-related conditions and microorganism-related conditions. The virulence of the affecting germs is dependent upon their quality and quantity and is one of the microbiological conditions that influences the infection. It is this virulence that promotes infectious invasion and the deleterious effects the microbe will have on the host. Patient-related conditions include certain systemic factors that determine host resistance, which may be impaired in situations such as immunodeficiency syndrome or in brittle diabetes, as well as local factors that will also exert their impact on the spread of the infection.

  19. Evaluation of the osteoclastogenic process associated with RANK / RANK-L / OPG in odontogenic myxomas

    PubMed Central

    González-Galván, María del Carmen; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Setien-Olarra, Amaia; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Aguirre-Urizar, José-Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign intraosseous neoplasm that exhibits local aggressiveness and high recurrence rates. Osteoclastogenesis is an important phenomenon in the tumor growth of maxillary neoplasms. RANK (Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κappa B) is the signaling receptor of RANK-L (Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-Β ligand) that activates the osteoclasts. OPG (osteoprotegerin) is a decoy receptor for RANK-L that inhibits pro-osteoclastogenesis. The RANK / RANKL / OPG system participates in the regulation of osteolytic activity under normal conditions, and its alteration has been associated with greater bone destruction, and also with tumor growth. Objectives To analyze the immunohistochemical expression of OPG, RANK and RANK-L proteins in odontogenic myxomas (OMs) and their relationship with the tumor size. Material and Methods Eighteen OMs, 4 small (<3 cm) and 14 large (> 3cm) and 18 dental follicles (DF) that were included as control were studied by means of standard immunohistochemical procedure with RANK, RANKL and OPG antibodies. For the evaluation, 5 fields (40x) of representative areas of OM and DF were selected where the expression of each antibody was determined. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were performed with the obtained data. Results There are significant differences in the expression of RANK in OM samples as compared to DF (p = 0.022) and among the OMSs and OMLs (p = 0.032). Also a strong association is recognized in the expression of RANK-L and OPG in OM samples. Conclusions Activation of the RANK / RANK-L / OPG triad seems to be involved in the mechanisms of bone balance and destruction, as well as associated with tumor growth in odontogenic myxomas. Key words:Odontogenic myxoma, dental follicle, RANK, RANK-L, OPG, osteoclastogenesis. PMID:29680857

  20. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: report of 7 new cases and systematic review of the current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Adriano Mota; Cardoso, Sergio Vitorino; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Barbosa de Paulo, Luiz Fernando; Eisenberg, Ana Lúcia Amaral; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study is to describe 7 cases of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma among a Brazilian population and compare these data with a systematic review of the English-language literature. Descriptive statististics were used to compare the clinicopathologic data gathered retrospectively with those compiled from a review. Tumor sections were immunostained for Ki-67, p16, p53, and cytokeratins (CKs) 7, 8, 14, 18, and 19. Log-rank tests were performed for survival analysis. Most cases occurred in the posterior mandible (5/7, 71.4%), and recurrence was diagnosed in all treated patients. Metastatic disease occurred in 2 patients (28.6%). Tumors were focally positive for CKs 7, 8, 14, and 18 and diffusely positive for CK19, p53, and p16. The mean number of Ki-67-positive cells was 35.2 cells/high-power field. Our systematic review provided evidence that tumor size (P = .046), histologic pattern (P = .034), regional metastasis (P = .001), distant metastasis (P = .001), and local recurrence (P = .05) were of significant prognostic value. This study has contributed to improved characterization of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, which is an aggressive odontogenic malignant neoplasm diagnosed mainly in the posterior mandible of middle-aged women and typically at an advanced stage. Radical surgical procedures remain the gold standard treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Juncar, M; Bran, S; Juncar, R I; Baciut, M F; Baciut, G; Onisor-Gligor, F

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft-tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential. In this study, we selected 55 patients with confirmed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin, treated in the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Cluj-Napoca during January 1996-December 2012. In the majority of cases, the disease evolved without the presence of associated systemic disorders (60% [45.49-72.69]), the rest of the patients having 1-4 types of systemic disorders; type 2 diabetes mellitus was the most frequent type of underlying systemic disorder. From the appearance of the first symptoms until the presentation for treatment, a time interval of 2-30 days elapsed. During this time period, 78.18% (95% confidence interval [CI] [65.49-89.06]) of the patients received antibiotic treatment, but without results. Mandibular molars were the most frequent starting point of the disease, and the submandibular space was the first affected by the disease, 47.27% (95% CI [32.76-61.79]). Bacteriological exams showed that facultatively aerobic/anaerobic G + bacteria were the most frequently identified (72.22% [58.21-83.60]). The odontogenic lesions of the lower molars, complicated by submandibular space infections, are the most frequent starting point of odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. Delayed surgical treatment and strict antibiotic therapy play an important role in favoring the development of odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis.

  2. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  3. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  4. Ki-67 and MCM-2 in Dental Follicle and Odontogenic Cysts: The Effects of Inflammation on Proliferative Markers

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Nurhan; Çomunoğlu, Nil; Cabbar, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any association between inflammation and the expression of markers of cell cycle entry (Ki-67 and MCM-2) in dental follicle (DF) of asymptomatic impacted teeth and odontogenic cysts. The study consisted of 70 DFs and 20 odontogenic cysts (radicular cyst (RC), dentigerous cyst (DC) and keratocytic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) located at posterior mandibular region. Histological findings of inflammation for all specimen and mucous cell prosoplasia, squamous metaplasia, glandular epithelium for all DFs were stained with hematoxyline and eosin, periodic acid schiff, alcian blue, and mucin. Epithelial cell proliferation was determined by using immunohistochemical labeling for Ki-67 and MCM-2. The histologic examinations showed 16% mucous cell prosoplasia, 54% squamous metaplasia, 20% glandular epithelium, 37% inflammation. Inflammation was detected in all RCs and %62 in DF, %43 in DC and KCOT. Positive correlation was found between the inflammation of DF and odontogenic cysts (P < 0.01). The mean Ki-67 and MCM-2 expressions were found 9, 64 ± 5, 99 and 6, 34 ± 3, 81 in DF, 11, 85 ± 9, 01 and 13, 6 ± 9, 94 in odontogenic cysts, respectively. While the mean Ki-67 expressions were statistically significant in DF and KCOT (P < 0.01), MCM-2 were significant in RC and KCOT (P < 0.01). MCM-2 expresion in RCs were statistically significant than KCOT (P < 0.01). The results of this study indicated that the higher MCM-2 expressions in RC than the KCOT might be related to the inflammation and this protein might be more sensitive to inflammation. PMID:22778705

  5. Ki-67 and MCM-2 in dental follicle and odontogenic cysts: the effects of inflammation on proliferative markers.

    PubMed

    Güler, Nurhan; Comunoğlu, Nil; Cabbar, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any association between inflammation and the expression of markers of cell cycle entry (Ki-67 and MCM-2) in dental follicle (DF) of asymptomatic impacted teeth and odontogenic cysts. The study consisted of 70 DFs and 20 odontogenic cysts (radicular cyst (RC), dentigerous cyst (DC) and keratocytic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) located at posterior mandibular region. Histological findings of inflammation for all specimen and mucous cell prosoplasia, squamous metaplasia, glandular epithelium for all DFs were stained with hematoxyline and eosin, periodic acid schiff, alcian blue, and mucin. Epithelial cell proliferation was determined by using immunohistochemical labeling for Ki-67 and MCM-2. The histologic examinations showed 16% mucous cell prosoplasia, 54% squamous metaplasia, 20% glandular epithelium, 37% inflammation. Inflammation was detected in all RCs and %62 in DF, %43 in DC and KCOT. Positive correlation was found between the inflammation of DF and odontogenic cysts (P < 0.01). The mean Ki-67 and MCM-2 expressions were found 9, 64 ± 5, 99 and 6, 34 ± 3, 81 in DF, 11, 85 ± 9, 01 and 13, 6 ± 9, 94 in odontogenic cysts, respectively. While the mean Ki-67 expressions were statistically significant in DF and KCOT (P < 0.01), MCM-2 were significant in RC and KCOT (P < 0.01). MCM-2 expresion in RCs were statistically significant than KCOT (P < 0.01). The results of this study indicated that the higher MCM-2 expressions in RC than the KCOT might be related to the inflammation and this protein might be more sensitive to inflammation.

  6. Oncologic profile of maxillary odontogenic myxoma: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Reena Radhikaprasad

    2013-07-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an ectomesenchyme derived neoplasm, almost exclusively found in jaws. This article presents a maxillary OM with a brief review of the molecular and proteomic antecedents of OMs, capturing its histopathogenesis.

  7. Exophthalmos due to odontogenic intraorbital abscess in Cebus apella.

    PubMed

    Oriá, Arianne P; Pinna, Melissa H; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Junior, Deusdete G; Libório, Fernanda A; de Assis Dórea Neto, Francisco; Oliveira, Alberto V D; Nogueira, Marcos; Requião, Katia

    2013-04-01

    The accumulation of pus in the orbit originating from an infected dental root is classified as odontogenic intraorbital abscess. Clinical, laboratory, and image evaluation of a non-human primate was performed. The patient was cured after surgical therapy. This represents the first report of an odontogenic periodontal abscess in Cebus apella. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. [The odontogenic abscess. Aetiology, treatment and involvement in the orofacial region].

    PubMed

    Spijkervet, F K; Vissink, A; Raghoebar, G M

    2004-04-01

    Odontogenic infections are a common problem in daily practice. Occasionally, an odontogenic infection evolves an abscess. This article discusses the aetiology, the treatment and the involvement of odontogenic abscesses in the oro-facial region. Their occurrence, course and treatment are depending on the patient's immune response, and on microbial and environmental factors.

  9. A mixed odontogenic sarcoma: A challenging histopathologic case and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Atarbashi-Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma (AFOS) is an extremely rare malignant mixed odontogenic tumor. The ectomesenchymal part of the neoplasm shows malignancy, whereas the epithelial component is rather benign. In addition, small areas with deposition of enamel matrix and dentine material are seen. The rarity of this neoplasm and microscopic similarities with other malignant and benign tumors can lead to diagnostic problems. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of a new case of AFOS of the mandible in a 34-year-old female patient. It is essential for oral pathologists to be familiar with the microscopic features of this rare neoplasm to have a proper diagnosis. This is also the first reported case of AFOS that closely resembles osteosarcoma in some areas. PMID:29491601

  10. A mixed odontogenic sarcoma: A challenging histopathologic case and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Atarbashi-Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma (AFOS) is an extremely rare malignant mixed odontogenic tumor. The ectomesenchymal part of the neoplasm shows malignancy, whereas the epithelial component is rather benign. In addition, small areas with deposition of enamel matrix and dentine material are seen. The rarity of this neoplasm and microscopic similarities with other malignant and benign tumors can lead to diagnostic problems. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of a new case of AFOS of the mandible in a 34-year-old female patient. It is essential for oral pathologists to be familiar with the microscopic features of this rare neoplasm to have a proper diagnosis. This is also the first reported case of AFOS that closely resembles osteosarcoma in some areas.

  11. Odontogenic cysts: analysis of 680 cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prockt, Anderson P; Schebela, Clarissa R; Maito, Fábio D M; Sant'Ana-Filho, Manoel; Rados, Pantelis V

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of 680 odontogenic cysts diagnosed in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, and to compare results with findings in the literature. Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed from 1985 to 2005 were collected from the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory of Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, and entered in a standardized form for later comparisons. The most prevalent odontogenic cysts were radicular (72.50%), dentigerous (22.20%) and residual (4.26%) cysts. The mandible of white patients was the anatomic site and ethnic group most frequently affected by this disease. Four of the six types of cysts were more frequent in the second and fourth decades of life, and no significant differences were found between sexes in the diagnosis of odontogenic cysts. In conclusion, the prevalence of odontogenic cysts was similar to that reported in the literature, which shows that inflammatory cysts are the most frequent.

  12. Molecular methods for diagnosis of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Thomas R; Paster, Bruce J; Stokes, Lauren N; Susarla, Srinivas M; Shanti, Rabie M

    2012-08-01

    Historically, the identification of microorganisms has been limited to species that could be cultured in the microbiology laboratory. The purpose of the present study was to apply molecular techniques to identify microorganisms in orofacial odontogenic infections (OIs). Specimens were obtained from subjects with clinical evidence of OI. To identify the microorganisms involved, 16S rRNA sequencing methods were used on clinical specimens. The name and number of the clones of each species identified and the combinations of species present were recorded for each subject. Descriptive statistics were computed for the study variables. Specimens of pus or wound fluid were obtained from 9 subjects. A mean of 7.4 ± 3.7 (standard deviation) species per case were identified. The predominant species detected in the present study that have previously been associated with OIs were Fusobacterium spp, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Prevotella oris. The predominant species detected in our study that have not been previously associated with OIs were Dialister pneumosintes and Eubacterium brachy. Unculturable phylotypes accounted for 24% of the species identified in our study. All species detected were obligate or facultative anaerobes. Streptococci were not detected. Molecular methods have enabled us to detect previously cultivated and not-yet-cultivated species in OIs; these methods could change our understanding of the pathogenic flora of orofacial OIs. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Central odontogenic fibroma: new findings and report of a multicentric collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Martínez-Mata, Guillermo; Carlos-Bregni, Roman; Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Toral-Rizo, Victor; Cano-Valdéz, Ana María; Palma-Guzmán, José Mario; Carrasco-Daza, Daniel; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Ledesma-Montes, Constantino; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of 14 cases of central odontogenic fibroma (COF), and the ultrastructural features of 2 of them. Collaborative retrospective study based on the records of 4 oral pathology diagnostic services in Latin America based on the current World Health Organization classification. There were 7 male and 7 female patients (mean age 31.8 years). Eight tumors occurred in the maxilla and 6 in the mandible. Thirteen cases were epithelium-rich and 1 epithelium-poor COF. Three were classified as hybrid COF with giant cell lesion. Mean size of the hybrid lesions were larger than pure COF (3.8 vs. 2.4 cm). Odontogenic epithelial islands were immunoreactive for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/AE3, CK5, CK14, CK19, and 34BE12 and negative for CK1 and CK18. Langerhans cells positive for S-100 and CD1a were found within the epithelial islands in 6/6 tested cases. CD68 was expressed in the giant cells of the hybrid lesions and in a few mononuclear cells of 2 cases of COF. Ki-67 index was <1% in all cases. In 6 tumors (42.8%), there were small globular eosinophilic droplets within the epithelial islands, which were positive for collagen type IV, and 9/13 cases (69.2%) were focally positive for smooth muscle actin. In addition to fibroblasts, myofibroblastic differentiation was found in the 2 cases studied ultrastructurally. Immunohistochemistry was useful to confirm the presence of epithelium and to exclude other central fibrous tumors. COF also contains a variable number of mast cells, Langerhans cells, and myofibroblasts, and further studies are needed to better understand the participation of these cells in COF histogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automated classification of four types of developmental odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Frydenlund, A; Eramian, M; Daley, T

    2014-04-01

    Odontogenic cysts originate from remnants of the tooth forming epithelium in the jaws and gingiva. There are various kinds of such cysts with different biological behaviours that carry different patient risks and require different treatment plans. Types of odontogenic cysts can be distinguished by the properties of their epithelial layers in H&E stained samples. Herein we detail a set of image features for automatically distinguishing between four types of odontogenic cyst in digital micrographs and evaluate their effectiveness using two statistical classifiers - a support vector machine (SVM) and bagging with logistic regression as the base learner (BLR). Cyst type was correctly predicted from among four classes of odontogenic cysts between 83.8% and 92.3% of the time with an SVM and between 90 ± 0.92% and 95.4 ± 1.94% with a BLR. One particular cyst type was associated with the majority of misclassifications. Omission of this cyst type from the data set improved the classification rate for the remaining three cyst types to 96.2% for both SVM and BLR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduction rate by decompression as a treatment of odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Lopez, L; Fernandez-Olavarria, A; Torres-Lagares, D; Serrera-Figallo, M-A; Castillo-Oyagüe, R; Segura-Egea, J-J; Gutierrez-Perez, J-L

    2017-09-01

    Odontogenic cysts are defined as those cysts that arise from odontogenic epithelium and occur in the tooth-bearing regions of the jaws. Cystectomy, marsupialization or decompression of odontogenic cyst are treatment approach to this pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the decompression as the primary treatment of the cystic lesions of the jaws and them reduction rates involving different factors. 23 patients with odontogenic cysts of the jaws, previously diagnosed by anatomical histopathology (follicular cysts (7) and radicular cysts (16)) underwent decompression as an initial treatment. Clinical examination and pre and post panoramic radiograph were measured and analyzed. In addition, data as gender, age, time reduction and location of the lesion were collected. Significant results were obtained in relation to the location of lesions and the reduction rate (p<0.01). In a higher initial lesion, a greater reduction rate was observed (p<0.05). Decompression as an initial treatment of cystic lesions of the jaws was effective; it reduces the size of the lesions avoiding a possible damage to adjacent structures. Cystic lesions in the mandible, regardless of the area where they occur will have a higher reduction rate if it is compared with the maxilla. Similar behavior was identified in large lesions compared to smaller.

  16. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  17. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail. PMID:22474649

  18. Basal cell carcinoma arising in association with a maxillary keratocyst in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lazaridou, Maria Nikolaou; Dimitrakopoulos, Ioannis; Tilaveridis, Ioannis; Iliopoulos, Christos; Heva, Antigoni

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder which is characterized by the presence of multiple basal cell carcinomas, maxillary keratocysts, and musculoskeletal anomalies. We present a case of a patient suffering from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome who developed an intraosseous basal cell carcinoma associated with a recurrent maxillary keratocyst. To our knowledge, this is the first case of malignant transformation of a keratocyst into a basal cell carcinoma described in the literature. This case highlights the importance of careful histologic examination of keratocysts excised in patients suffering from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  19. Epidemiologic study of odontogenic and non-odontogenic cysts in children and adolescents of a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    da Silva, L-P; Gonzaga, A-K-G; Severo, M-L-B; Barros, C-C-S; de Medeiros, A-M-C; de Souza, L-B; da Silveira, É-J-D

    2018-01-01

    the objective of this study was to describe the frequency of cystic lesions in a Brazilian population of patients histopathologically diagnosed in the first and second decade of life. Retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. Biopsy records were obtained from the archives of a Brazilian referral center between 1980 and 2016. A total of 2.114 biopsy records of pediatric patients were analyzed with oral and maxillofacial lesions. Data such as gender, age, anatomical location, and histopathological diagnosis were collected and categorized. Among all oral and maxillofacial lesions (n=2.114), were diagnosed 294 cases of odontogenic cysts (13.9%) and 16 cases of non-odontogenic cysts (0.8%). The most frequent lesions in each group were, respectively: radicular cyst (n=145) and epidermoid cyst (n=4). These lesions were most common in female (n=158), with a mean age of 14 years. For intraosseous lesions, the mandible (n=148) was the most affected anatomic site; moreover, the floor of the mouth (n=6) was most affected by cysts in soft tissues. Odontogenic cysts were relatively common in population studied, but non-odontogenic cysts were rare in these patients.

  20. [Endoscopic surgery in the treatment of patients with extensive odontogenic cysts].

    PubMed

    Sysolyatin, P G; Sysolyatin, S P; Baydik, O D

    The aim of the study was the assessment of effectiveness of endoscopic techniques in the treatment of extensive odontogenic cysts. Endosurgery for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes was used in 67 patients with odontogenic cysts of the jaws: 23 follicular cysts, 19 radicular cysts, 6 residual cysts, and 19 keratokists. The results prove that the developed methods of endovideosurgery of odontogenic cysts have low invasiveness, provide an optimal healing of bone tissue and reduce postoperative complications.

  1. Persistent apical periodontitis associated with a calcifying odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Estrela, C; Decurcio, D A; Silva, J A; Mendonça, E F; Estrela, C R A

    2009-06-01

    To report a case of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) that was suggestive of apical periodontitis adjacent to the roots of the maxillary incisor teeth. Tooth 21 presented with clinical and radiographic signs of secondary infection, a post within the root canal and substantial internal tooth destruction; it was scheduled for endodontic surgery. Teeth 12 and 22 were root filled following the placement of a calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing for 21 days. Three attempts at root canal disinfection in tooth 11 were unsuccessful, and a persistent purulent drainage precluded completion of root canal treatment. Surgical enucleation of the periapical lesion was undertaken and the tissues submitted for histopathological examination. A diagnosis of COC was established based on the microscopic analysis. COC is an unusual benign lesion that represents 2% of all odontogenic lesions. Depending on the stage of development, it can mimic a large lesion associated with apical periodontitis and should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the case of COC, the definitive diagnosis can only be made with histopathological analysis. Persistent apical periodontitis may be of nonendodontic origin. * Histological examination is essential to establish the cause of persistent apical periodontitis. * Calcifying odontogenic cyst can mimic apical periodontitis.

  2. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals.

  3. Empiric systemic antibiotics for hospitalized patients with severe odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Zirk, Matthias; Buller, Johannes; Goeddertz, Peter; Rothamel, Daniel; Dreiseidler, Timo; Zöller, Joachim E; Kreppel, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Odontogenic infections may lead to severe head and neck infections with potentially great health risk. Age, location of purulent affected sites and beta-lactam allergy are some mentionable factors regarding patients' in-hospital stay and course of disease. Are there new challenges regarding bacteria' antibiotic resistance for empiric treatment and what influences do they have on patients' clinical course? We analyzed in a 4-year retrospective study the medical records of 294 in-hospital patients with severe odontogenic infections. On a routine base bacteria were identified and susceptibility testing was performed. Length of stay in-hospital was evaluated regarding patients' age, beta-lactam allergy profile, affected sites and bacteria susceptibility to empiric antibiotics. Length of stay in-hospital was detected to be associated with affected space and penicillin allergy as well (p < 0.05). Isolates presented large amounts of aerobic gram-positive bacteria (64.2%), followed by facultative anaerobic bacteria (gram+/15.8%, gram-/12.7%). Tested ampicillin in combination with sulbactam (or without) and cephalosporins displayed high susceptibility rates, revealing distinguished results regarding clindamycin (p < 0.05). Co-trimoxazol and moxifloxacin showed high overall susceptibility rates (MOX: 94.7%, COTRIM: 92.6%). This study demonstrates ampicillin/sulbactam in addition to surgical intervention is a good standard in treatment of severe odontogenic neck infections. Cephalosporins seem to be a considerable option as well. If beta-lactam allergy is diagnosed co-trimoxazol and moxifloxacin represent relevant alternatives. Age, allergic profile and bacteria' resistance patterns for empiric antibiotics have an influence on patients in-hospital stay. Ampicillin/sulbactam proves itself to be good for empiric antibiosis in severe odontogenic infections. Furthermore cephalosporins could be considered as another option in treatment. However moxifloxacin and co

  4. Clinico-radiographic study of odontogenic cysts at a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kamran; Munir, Faisal; Rehman, Abdur; Abbas, Iram; Ahmad, Nofil; Akhtar, Muhammad Usman

    2014-01-01

    Cysts of the jaws constitute an important pathology in the oral and maxillofacial region and are broadly classified as odontogenic and non-odontogenic. Objective of this study was to document the clinical and radiographic presentation of odontogenic cysts at a tertiary care centre. In this descriptive case-series, patients presenting with features of suspected cystic lesions of the jaws were investigated using radiographs and incisional biopsy. Subjects showing clinico- radiographic features of odontogenic cyst(s) with subsequent confirmation on histopathological examination were included. A total of 112 subjects were investigated for suspected jaw cysts and cystic diagnosis of odontogenic cysts was confirmed in 100 patients with 53 males (53%) and 47 females (47%). The age range of patients was from 12-55 years. Radicular cyst was the most commonly diagnosed odontogenic cyst (63%) followed by dentigerous cyst (22%) and odontogenickeratocyst (14%). Anterior maxilla was the most affected site (44%) followed by posterior mandible (30%). Odontogenic cysts constitute an established pathology affecting the jaws with varying frequency. This study augments the data cited from Western countries and re-emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and prompt management. It also highlights the differences in the presentation of odontogenic cysts as observed in the current series.

  5. Assessment of CD-105 as an Angiogenic Modulator in Odontogenic Myxomas and Dental Follicles.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen González-Galván, María; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Farfán-Morales, J Eduardo; Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria Luisa; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-06-01

    Aim Odontogenic myxoma is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaws, with a locally aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. CD-105 is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and is a component of the TGF-β1 growth factor receptor complex that modulates angiogenesis by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration. The aim of this study is to quantify the microvascular density of the odontogenic myxoma based on the expression of CD-105. Materials and Methods The analysis included 18 odontogenic myxoma and 18 dental follicles as controls. A standard immunohistochemical procedure was performed with the CD-105 antibody. Five representative fields (40×) of the odontogenic myxoma and the dental follicles were selected to determine the microvascular density, which was then followed by a descriptive and comparative statistical analysis. Results Dental follicles presented a significantly higher microvascular density compared with odontogenic myxoma (P = .001). The odontogenic myxoma smaller than 3 cm showed a greater microvascular density than those larger than 3 cm in size (P > .05), and the microvascular density was lower in large odontogenic myxomas as compared with the dental follicles (P = .003). Conclusion A weaker expression of CD-105 in odontogenic myxoma might indicate a lower angiogenic activity, suggesting that vascular proliferation has a limited role in the growth mechanisms and in the aggressive behavior of this neoplasm. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Maya; Krishnan, Ramesh; Chalakkal, Paul; Paul, George

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an infrequent multisystemic disease with an autosomal dominant trait, with complete penetrance and variable expressivity, though sporadic cases have been described. This article includes a case report and an extensive review of the GGS with regard to its history, incidence, etiology, features, investigations, diagnostic criteria, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and treatment modalities. PMID:26604511

  7. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Maya; Krishnan, Ramesh; Chalakkal, Paul; Paul, George

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an infrequent multisystemic disease with an autosomal dominant trait, with complete penetrance and variable expressivity, though sporadic cases have been described. This article includes a case report and an extensive review of the GGS with regard to its history, incidence, etiology, features, investigations, diagnostic criteria, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and treatment modalities.

  8. [THE ROLE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN ODONTOGENIC CYSTS].

    PubMed

    Lytvynets-Holutyak, Y E

    2015-01-01

    The study involved 67 patients with odontogenic cysts (OC) aged 18 to 45 years, who were divided into groups: Group 1 (n = 67) patients with OC aged 18 to 45 years, group 2--control group, consisted of 20 healthy persons of similar age. We studied the characteristics of immune status and immunoreactivity in patients with odontogenic cysts. Condition of cellular and humoral immunity was assessed by using the methods of direct rosette developing with erythrocytes coated with monoclonal antibodies to CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD22+, CD4/CD8 indicators of immunoregulatory index and phagocytic immunity. State of nonspecific resistance was studied by determining the phagocytic activity of neutrophils and their oxygen dependent metabolism in NBT test. The concentration of cytokines (IL-6 and IL-4) in serum was determined by ELISA. During the study we found that in patients with (OC) developed significant changes in the structure of the immune response at the cellular as well as at the humoral level that makes it necessary to develop new individualized preventive measures along with existing therapies OC.

  9. Treatment of odontogenic infections: An analysis of two antibiotic regimens.

    PubMed

    Bhagania, Manish; Youseff, Wael; Mehra, Pushkar; Figueroa, Ruben

    2018-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the efficacy for two commonly used antibiotic regimens in the management of severe odontogenic infections. Evaluation of records of patients admitted to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery service at Boston University Medical Center from 2009 to 2014 with severe infections of odontogenic origin (SOI). Patients were divided into two groups based on the administered intravenous antibiotic: 1) Group I: Clindamycin only and 2) Group II: Penicillin and Metronidazole. Variables evaluated included demographic characteristics, ASA status, and anatomic site of infection risk, length of hospital stay, antibiotic failure, and pharmaceutical treatment cost. 78 patients (46 males and 32 females) were included in the study. There were 57 patients in group I (average age 32.6 years) and 21 in Group II (average age 32.8 years). The average white cell count at time of admission count was higher in Group I (19.3) versus Group II (17.4). Antibiotic failure rate was 3.5% in Group I and 4.7% for group 2 patients. Clindamycin alone and combination of Penicillin with Metronidazole are both effective pharmaceutical regimens for SOI. Clindamycin therapy resulted in shorter hospital stay and lower net treatment costs with a slightly higher success rate.

  10. [Management of odontogenic infections in Primary Care: Antibiotic?

    PubMed

    Robles Raya, Purificación; Javierre Miranda, Ana Pilar; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Mas Casals, Ariadna; de Frutos Echániz, Elena; Morató Agustí, M Luisa

    2017-12-01

    Our aim is to contribute to the rational use of antibiotics prescribed by family doctors when a patient consults for a dental problem. Nowadays we should not ask which antibiotic to give. The question has to be if we need to prescribe antibiotics in front of the most common odontogenic infections seen in our practice. We review the main dental infections, which should be their appropriate management and the role of prevention. We need to know the complexity of the oral microbiome because it?ll depend on the appropriateness of the antibiotherapy, the evolution towards cure or progression of some odontogenic infections. The bacterial plaque, formed by the biofilm, behaves as a barrier to the action of antimicrobials. It?s in the prevention of its development as well as in it mechanical elimination once shaped, in what the family doctor should insist. We must transmit antibiotics don?t heal dental pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  12. [Odontogenic cyst of the left maxilla and oro-antral fistula].

    PubMed

    Gil Tutor, E

    1999-01-01

    We considered these cases of odontogenic cysts of the maxillary sinus. One of them complicated with an oroantral fistula. The aim of our paper is to consider the origine, the radiology and the surgery of those items.

  13. Antibiotic resistance in severe odontogenic infections of the South Australian population: a 9-year retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Liau, I; Han, J; Bayetto, K; May, B; Goss, A; Sambrook, P; Cheng, A

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological trends in severe odontogenic infections requiring hospital admission in the South Australian Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit. Rates of antibiotic resistance to empirical antibiotic regimens were determined to quantify the clinical implications of antibiotic-resistant odontogenic infections. A retrospective case audit was performed on all odontogenic infections admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital over a 9-year period. Data was collected regarding demographics, microbiological culture and sensitivity results, and clinical outcome variables. Of a total of 672 patients, microbiology data was available for 447 cases. Penicillin-resistant organisms were identified in 10.8% of patients, who required a significantly longer length of hospital admission (mean, 9.93 days) and higher rates of non-response to initial surgical therapy (40%). There were moderate rates of antibiotic-resistant odontogenic infections within the South Australian population. Patients within this subgroup demonstrate markedly poorer clinical outcomes. Effective treatment of odontogenic infections involves early operative intervention, with adjunctive use of appropriate antibiotic therapy that involves close monitoring of response to removal of the cause and use of first-line antibiotic agents. Cases that fail to respond require urgent specialist review in order to reduce morbidity and mortality outcomes. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  14. An amelogenin mutation leads to disruption of the odontogenic apparatus and aberrant expression of Notch I

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Li, Yong; Alawi, Faizan; Bouchard, Jessica R.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amelogenins are highly conserved proteins secreted by ameloblasts in the dental organ of developing teeth. These proteins regulate dental enamel thickness and structure in humans and mice. Mice that express an amelogenin transgene with a P70T mutation (TgP70T) develop abnormal epithelial proliferation in an amelogenin null (KO) background. Some of these cellular masses have the appearance of proliferating stratum intermedium, which is the layer adjacent to the ameloblasts in unerupted teeth. As Notch proteins are thought to constitute the developmental switch that separates ameloblasts from stratum intermedium, these signaling proteins were evaluated in normal and proliferating tissues. METHODS Mandibles were dissected for histology and immunohistochemistry using Notch I antibodies. Molar teeth were dissected for western blotting and RT-PCR for evaluation of Notch levels through imaging and statistical analyses. RESULTS Notch I was immunolocalized to ameloblasts of TgP70TKO mice, KO ameloblasts stained, but less strongly, and wild-type teeth had minimal staining. Cells within the proliferating epithelial cell masses were positive for Notch I and had an appearance reminiscent of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor with amyloid-like deposits. Notch I protein and mRNA were elevated in molar teeth from TgP70TKO mice. CONCLUSION Expression of TgP70T leads to abnormal structures in mandibles and maxillae of mice with the KO genetic background and these mice have elevated levels of Notch I in developing molars. As cells within the masses also express transgenic amelogenins, development of the abnormal proliferations suggests communication between amelogenin producing cells and the proliferating cells, dependent on the presence of the mutated amelogenin protein. PMID:20923441

  15. Optimization of FNAC findings as a preoperative diagnostic aid for odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Jain, Garima; Shetty, Pushparaja

    2015-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is not a definitive preoperative diagnostic procedure done for all cases of odontogenic cysts. This is because of the inconsistent results obtained with it. This study was done to optimize FNAC findings and help in preoperative characterization of odontogenic cysts. Cystic fluid was collected and centrifuged from 50 odontogenic cysts that were planned for excision. Three smears were prepared from the cell sediment obtained after centrifugation and stained. The stained sections were examined for presence and type of epithelial cells, to formulate a preopererative diagnosis. Epithelial cells were detected in 46% cases in smear 1, 48% cases in smear 2, and 52% cases in smear 3. When all three smears from one case were studied, 86% cases showed epithelial cells for evaluation. Cystic aspirate should be centrifuged and the entire cell sediment should be examined by making multiple smears for evaluation of cystic epithelial lining cells.

  16. Microbiology of intracranial abscesses associated with sinusitis of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2006-12-01

    The unique microbiology of sinusitis of dental origin that is associated with intracranial abscesses (IAs) and the correlation between the organisms at the two sites has not been reported before. This report describes the author's experience during a 30-year period in studying the microbiology of 8 IAs and their corresponding sinusitis of dental origin. Aspirates of pus from 8 infected sinuses associated with odontogenic infections and their corresponding IAs were studied for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Polymicrobial flora was found in all 8 sinuses and 7 IAs, and the number of isolates varied from 1 to 5. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from all sinuses and IAs. A total of 28 isolates (3.5 isolates per site; 25 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 2 microaerophilic) were recovered from the sinuses, and 20 isolates (2.5 isolates per site; 16 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 3 microaerophilic) were found in the IAs. The bacterial isolates were Fusobacterium spp (14), Prevotella spp (11), Peptostreptococcus spp (13), microaerophilic streptococci (5), Veillonella parvula (3), and beta-hemolytic streptococci group F(2). Concordance in the microbiological findings between the sinus and the IA was found in all instances; however, certain organisms were only present at one site. These data illustrate the concordance in the organisms recovered from sinusitis of dental origin and their associated IAs and confirm the importance of anaerobic bacteria in sinusitis and IAs of dental origin.

  17. Cancer genes mutation profiling in calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; França, Josiane Alves; Fontes Pereira, Thaís Dos Santos; Moreira, Rennan Garcias; Santos, Jean Nunes Dos; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri

    2018-03-01

    To identify calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. A panel of 50 genes commonly mutated in cancer was sequenced in CEOT by next-generation sequencing. Sanger sequencing was used to cover the region of the frameshift deletion identified in one sample. Missense single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) <1% were detected in PTEN , MET and JAK3 . A frameshift deletion in CDKN2A occurred in association with a missense mutation in the same gene region, suggesting a second hit in the inactivation of this gene. APC, KDR, KIT, PIK3CA and TP53 missense SNVs were identified; however, these are common SNVs, showing MAF >1%. CEOT harbours mutations in the tumour suppressor PTEN and CDKN2A and in the oncogenes JAK3 and MET . As these mutations occurred in only one case each, they are probably not driver mutations for these tumours. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Syndrome in question: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Pauline Lyrio; Souza, João Basílio de; Abreu, Karina Demoner de; Brezinscki, Marisa Simon; Pignaton, Christine Chambo

    2016-01-01

    The Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by a mutation in Patched, tumor suppressor gene. It is mainly characterized by numerous early onset basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic cysts of jaw and skeletal abnormalities. Due to the wide clinical spectrum, treatment and management of its modalities are not standardized and should be individualized and monitored by a multidisciplinary team. We report a typical case in a 30-year-old man with multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratotic pits of palmar creases and bifid ribs, with a history of several corrective surgeries for keratocystic odontogenic tumors, among other lesions characteristic of the syndrome.

  19. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  20. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Radiography-based score indicative for the pathogenicity of bacteria in odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Cachovan, Georg; Blessmann, Marco; Schön, Gerhard; Rother, Uwe; Heiland, Max; Stürenburg, Enno; Platzer, Ursula; Sobottka, Ingo

    2014-10-01

    To develop a new radiography-based score to assess the potential of bacteria to cause odontogenic infections derived from the occurrence of bacteria at small or large radiographical lesions. The patients analyzed were a sub-population from a large randomized clinical trial comparing moxifloxacin and clindamycin in the treatment of inflammatory infiltrates and odontogenic abscesses. Routine radiographs were used to analyze the area of the periapical radiolucent lesions. Lesions were stratified by their radiographically measured area as large (>9 mm(2)) or small (≤9 mm(2)). A risk ratio was calculated for each species from the frequency of their occurrence in large vs in small lesions. Fifty-one patients, 19 with abscesses and 32 with infiltrates, were evaluated. Overall, the radiographical lesion areas ranged from 0.4-46.2 mm(2) (median = 9 mm(2)). An increased risk (risk ratio >1) to occur at large abscess lesions was observed for Prevotella (P.) oralis, P. buccae, P. oris, P. intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus (Strep.) anginosus group. An increased risk to occur at large infiltrate lesions was found for Strep. salivarius, Strep. parasanguis, Strep. anginosus group, Capnocytophaga spp., Neisseria (N.) sicca, Neisseria spp., Staphylococcus (Staph.) aureus, P. intermedia, P. buccae, Prevotella spp. and P. melaninogenica. The radiography-based score suggests that certain Prevotella spp., F. nucleatum and Strep. anginosus groups play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of odontogenic abscesses, and that various streptococci, Neisseria spp., Capnocytophaga spp., Staph. aureus and Prevotella spp. are involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic infiltrates.

  2. Mural odontogenic epithelial proliferations within the wall of a dentigerous cyst: their significance.

    PubMed

    Generson, R M; Porter, J M; Stratigos, G T

    1976-12-01

    A case of a dentigerous cyst with proliferating odontogenic epithelium in a 5-year-old black boy is presented. A controversy exists in the histologic diagnosis and surgical treatment of this lesion. The accuracy of the pathologic diagnosis is imperative, as it will determine to a great extent the surgical modality of treatment.

  3. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ODONTOGENIC BACTERAEMIA IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Umeh, O D; Sanu, O O; Utomi, I L; Nwaokorie, F O

    2016-01-01

    Various researches have investigated factors associated with the prevalence and intensity of bacteraemia following oral procedures including orthodontic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, gender, plaque and gingival indices on the occurrence of odontogenic bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures. Orthodontic Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos , Nigeria. Using the consecutive, convenience sampling method, a total of 100 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study and peripheral blood was collected before and again within 2 minutes of completion of orthodontic procedures for microbiologic analysis using the BACTEC automated blood culture system and the lysis filtration methods of blood culturing. The subjects were randomly placed in one of four orthodontic procedures investigated: alginate impression making (Group I), separator placement (Group II), band cementation (Group III) and arch wire change (Group IV). Plaque and gingival indices were assessed using the plaque component of the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) (Greene & Vermillion) and Modified gingival index (Lobene) respectively before blood collection. Spearman Point bi-serial correlations and logistic regression statistics were used for statistical evaluations at p < 0.05 level. An overall baseline prevalence of bacteraemia of 3% and 17% were observed using the BACCTEC and lysis filtration methods respectively. Similarly, overall prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures of 16% and 28% were observed respectively using the BACTEC and lysis filtration methods. A statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bateraemia was observed following separator placement (p=0.016). An increase in age, plaque index scores and modified gingival index scores of the subjects were found to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment

  4. Analysis of 153 cases of odontogenic cysts in a South Indian sample population: a retrospective study over a decade.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, Manickam; Donoghue, Mandana; Basandi, Praveen Shivappa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and to identify their clinico-pathological features among patients by studying biopsy specimens obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India, during the past 10 years. Data for the study were retrieved from the case records of patients fitting the histological classification of the World Health Organization (1992). Analyzed clinical variables included age, gender, anatomical location, and histological diagnosis. Of the 2275 biopsy reports analyzed, 194 cases (8.5%) were jaw cysts, including odontogenic (6.7%) and nonodontogenic cysts (0.25%). Odontogenic cysts included 69.3% radicular, 20.3% dentigerous, 5.2% keratinizing odontogenic, 3.3% residual, and 1.9% other cysts, such as lateral periodontal, botryoid odontogenic, and gingival cysts. The most frequent clinical manifestation was swelling, followed by a combination of pain and swelling. Age, gender, and location were related to the etiopathologic characteristics of the cyst type. A definitive diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological findings, which makes a good interdepartmental relationship between the clinicians and pathologists essential. Knowledge of the biological and histological behavior of the odontogenic cysts is required for their early detection and treatment.

  5. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:25610614

  6. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos; Nezami, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

  7. Odontogenic myxoma: A 63-year retrospective multicenter study of 85 cases in a Brazil population and a review of 999 cases from literature.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Carolina Uchoa; Silveira, Felipe Martins; Gomes, Ana Paula Neutzling; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras; de Arruda, José Alcides Almeida; da Silva, Leorik Pereira; da Silveira, Marcia Maria Fonseca; Barbosa, Larissa Ferreira; Kato, Camila de Nazaré Alves de Oliveira; Jaeger, Filipe; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon neoplasm of the jaws. Considering the importance of defining the relative incidence and demographic profile of these lesions in South America, the aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and imagiological features of OM from three South American oral pathology services and to discuss these findings in light of the literature. Data regarding age, gender, anatomic site, and imagiological features from 85 cases of OM were collected. Additionally, we did a review of OM studies published in three electronic databases. Among 63 450 oral biopsies, 1178 (1.85%) were odontogenic tumors (World Health Organization - 2017), of which 85 (7.21%) met the criteria of OM. The mean age was 30.7 years (range: 10-61 years; SD: 12.22). Forty-five (52.9%) cases occurred in females and 40 (47.1%) in males (ratio: 1:1.12). Maxilla was affected in 44 cases (53%) and mandible in 39 (47%). Of the 41 informed cases (48.2%), all of them were radiolucent lesions. The literature review indicated a majority of mean ages in third decade and a predilection for females, mandible, and multilocular radiolucent lesions. The features of OM samples have strong similarity to that reported in studies from other continents. It is possible to infer that geographic variation does not help to explain some differences observed in the clinical features of OM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSTICS OF ODONTOGENIC MAXILLARY SINUSITIS (CASE REPORTS)].

    PubMed

    Demidova, E; Khurdzidze, G

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic studies performed by cone beam computed tomography Morita 3D made possible to obtain high resolution images of hard tissues of upper jawbone and maxillary sinus, to detect bony tissue defects, such as odontogenic cysts, cystogranulomas and granulomas. High-resolution and three dimensional tomographic image reconstructions allowed for optimal and prompt determination of the scope of surgical treatment and planning of effective conservative treatment regimen. Interactive diagnostics helped to estimate cosmetic and functional results of surgical treatment, to prevent the occurrence of surgical complications, and to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment. The obtained data contributed to determination of particular applications of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, detection of specific defects with cone beam tomography as the most informative method of diagnosis; as well as to determination of weak and strong sides, and helped to offer mechanisms of x-ray diagnostics to dental surgeons and ENT specialists.

  9. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  10. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  11. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample. A 753 cases study

    PubMed Central

    Villasis-Sarmiento, Luis; Melendez-Ocampo, Arcelia; Gaitan-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Leyva-Huerta, Elba-Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cysts (OC) are the most frequent lesions of the jaws and their constant epidemiological update is necessary and indispensable. Therefore the principal objective of this report was To determine prevalence and clinical-demographical characteristics of OC in a Mexican sample. Material and Methods 753 cases of OC coming from the archive of a head and neck histopathological teaching service, from January 2000 to December 2013, were included. OC cases were re-assessed according 2005 WHO classification. Chi square test was used to establish possible associations (p<0.05IC95%). Results From 753 OC, 369 were female and 384 male; 52.9% of them were in their 2nd- 4th decade of life. The most common location (41%) was the mandibular posterior area. Radicular cysts were more frequent in maxillary anterior zone of females (p 0.0002) at their fourth decade of life. Dentigerous cysts were more frequent in the mandibular posterior zone of males (p 0.0000) in their second decade of life. Six cases of periodontal lateral cyst; 4 cases of paradental cysts; 4 eruption cysts and 4 cases of adult gingival cyst, as well were identified. Conclusions Radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst are the most prevalent odontogenic cyst in this Mexican sample. Due to their etiology, dental pulpar necrosis and impacted teeth, radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst could be prevenible. Therefore, it is necessary to establish preventive strategies to diminish dental decay and programs of prophylactic extractions of impacted teeth, to in consequence decrease the prevalence of odontogenic cysts. Key words:Cyst, dentigerous cyst, mexican, odontogenic cyst, radicular cyst. PMID:28469818

  12. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample. A 753 cases study.

    PubMed

    Villasis-Sarmiento, Luis; Portilla-Robertson, Javier; Melendez-Ocampo, Arcelia; Gaitan-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Leyva-Huerta, Elba-Rosa

    2017-04-01

    Odontogenic cysts (OC) are the most frequent lesions of the jaws and their constant epidemiological update is necessary and indispensable. Therefore the principal objective of this report was To determine prevalence and clinical-demographical characteristics of OC in a Mexican sample. 753 cases of OC coming from the archive of a head and neck histopathological teaching service, from January 2000 to December 2013, were included. OC cases were re-assessed according 2005 WHO classification. Chi square test was used to establish possible associations ( p <0.05IC95%). From 753 OC, 369 were female and 384 male; 52.9% of them were in their 2nd- 4th decade of life. The most common location (41%) was the mandibular posterior area. Radicular cysts were more frequent in maxillary anterior zone of females ( p 0.0002) at their fourth decade of life. Dentigerous cysts were more frequent in the mandibular posterior zone of males ( p 0.0000) in their second decade of life. Six cases of periodontal lateral cyst; 4 cases of paradental cysts; 4 eruption cysts and 4 cases of adult gingival cyst, as well were identified. Radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst are the most prevalent odontogenic cyst in this Mexican sample. Due to their etiology, dental pulpar necrosis and impacted teeth, radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst could be prevenible. Therefore, it is necessary to establish preventive strategies to diminish dental decay and programs of prophylactic extractions of impacted teeth, to in consequence decrease the prevalence of odontogenic cysts. Key words: Cyst, dentigerous cyst, mexican, odontogenic cyst, radicular cyst.

  13. Analysis of the frequency and nature of hyaline ring granulomas in inflammatory odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Henriques, A C G; Pereira, J S; Nonaka, C F W; Freitas, R A; Pinto, L P; Miguel, M C C

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of hyaline ring granulomas (HRGs) in a large case series of inflammatory odontogenic cysts, and to investigate the nature of these structures. All records from the patients diagnosed with inflammatory odontogenic cysts between January 1970 and April 2009 were reviewed. Histologic sections were evaluated by light microscopy and cases with HRGs for which sufficient biological material was available were submitted to histochemical analysis (Masson's trichrome) and immunohistochemistry (CD34, CD68 and collagen IV). Twenty-two (3.3%) of the 661 cases of inflammatory odontogenic cysts diagnosed during the study period presented HRGs. The relative frequency of HRGs was higher amongst residual radicular cysts (6.1%), followed by paradental cysts (5.6%) and radicular cysts (3.0%). HRGs appeared as roughly circular homogeneous/fibrillar masses in 14 (63.6%) cases and as round structures enclosing amorphous material in 3 (13.6%) cases. Most (77.8%) roughly circular homogeneous/fibrillar masses were positive for collagen, whereas all (100.0%) round structures enclosing amorphous material were negative for this protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that most mononucleated cells and all multinucleated giant cells were positive for CD68, but negative for CD34, in all cases. In addition, collagen IV immunostaining was negative in amorphous structures and weakly positive in homogeneous/fibrillar masses. The present results suggest a very low frequency of HRGs in inflammatory odontogenic cysts and support the hypothesis that these structures arise from the implantation of foreign material, most likely food particles of plant or vegetable origin. The diverse microscopic features of HRG possibly represent different developmental stages of this structure. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  14. Antibiotic prescription in the treatment of odontogenic infection by health professionals: A factor to consensus

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro; Herráez-Vilas, José M.; Arnau-de Bolós, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the attitude of dentists and family doctors in prescribing antibiotics for the treatment of dental infections. Study Design: A poll was performed to determine the differences in the prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of odontogenic infection by dentists and family doctors of the primary care department of the Catalan Health Care Service. Results: A hundred polls were distributed among family doctors, and another 100 ones among primary care dentists assigned to the Catalan Health Care Service of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Of the total of questionnaires distributed, 63 were retuned and answered from dentists and 71 from family doctors. Eighty-one percent of dentists included in the opinion poll considered amoxicillin as the first antibiotic choice for the treatment of odontogenic infections, while 73.2% of family doctors preferred the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. With regard to antibiotics of choice in patients allergic to penicillin, 67.7% of family doctors preferred macrolides (25.4% opted for clarithromycin, 25.4% for erythromycin and 16.9% for spiramycin). However, clindamycin was the antibiotic most frequently prescribed by dentists (66.7%), followed by erythromycin (28.6%). Conclusions: The results of this study show a large discrepancy in the criteria for the treatment of odontogenic infections on the part of leading professionals involved in the management of this condition. Although the most common prescription involved beta-lactam antibiotics in both groups, several significant differences have been detected with regard to the second antibiotic choice. Key words:Odontogenic infections, antibiotics, antimicrobials. PMID:22143715

  15. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  16. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of odontogenic infection: a review of management and case series.

    PubMed

    Bayetto, K; Cheng, A; Sambrook, P

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish the incidence of head and neck necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in the Adelaide Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit; review the current literature regarding the management of head and neck NF; and determine the evidence for the role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of NF. A retrospective audit of all patients admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit 2006-2015 with severe odontogenic infections was carried out. Patient demographics were recorded and treatment details were collected and analysed. A total of 672 patients were admitted for management of severe odontogenic infections. Of these, three were identified as NF. One case was treated using hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct to conventional surgical and medical management. Two cases were managed using aggressive surgical management alone. Two patients survived. The incidence of head and neck NF in South Australia is 48/100 000 infections per year. The first-line treatment of severe odontogenic infections remains conventional surgical and medical management; however, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may have an additional role in the management of NF and other rare severe infections in medically complex patients. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Examining the Sensitivity and Specificity of 2 Screening Instruments: Odontogenic or Temporomandibular Disorder Pain?

    PubMed

    Fonseca Alonso, Barbara; Nixdorf, Donald R; Shueb, Sarah S; John, Mike T; Law, Alan S; Durham, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Two groups of patients with orofacial pains that are clinically important to distinguish from each other are patients with odontogenic pain and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of 2 screening instruments in distinguishing between patients with these types of pain. A convenience sample of patients seeking care at an endodontic clinic and an orofacial pain clinic were recruited. The 14-item dental pain questionnaire (DePaQ) was used to screen for odontogenic pain and the 6-item TMD screener was used to screen for TMD pain. Sensitivity and specificity calculations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were performed for both instruments, and thresholds/acceptability/performance was assessed using published guidelines. Thirty-four patients with odontogenic pain and 37 patients with TMD pain were included in this study. The sensitivity of the DePaQ was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.69-0.95), and specificity was 0.11 (95% CI, 0.03-0.25). The sensitivity of the TMD screener was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.78-0.98), and specificity was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.41-0.75). The point estimates, a single value used to estimate the population parameter, for both the DePaQ and TMD screener were "acceptable" in identifying patients who had the pain condition in question (ie, sensitivity), whereas the point estimate for appropriately identifying patients who did not have the pain condition when they did not have it (ie, specificity) was "nonacceptable" for both. The DePaQ and the TMD screener lack diagnostic accuracy for differentiating TMD from odontogenic tooth pain without adjunctive (clinical) investigation(s) or examination. However, the TMD screener has high sensitivity for identifying true positives (ie, TMD pain) and would therefore be useful as a screening instrument when one can definitively exclude odontogenic etiology for pain on clinical and radiographic grounds, for instance in endodontic practices. In this study, the negative

  19. Boron enhances odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2013-06-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the treatment of many common problems such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, cancer, and tissue regeneration. Therefore, the main challenge in hard tissue engineering is to make a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors in the concept of stem cell differentiation into odontogenic and osteogenic cell types. Although some boron derivatives have been reported to promote bone and teeth growth in vivo, the molecular mechanism of bone formation has not been elucidated yet. Different concentrations of sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (NaB) were prepared for the analysis of cell toxicity and differentiation evaluations. The odontogenic, osteogenic differentiation and biomineralization of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) were evaluated by analyzing the mRNA expression levels, odontogenic and osteogenic protein expressions, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and calcium deposits. The NaB-treated group displayed the highest ALP activity and expression of osteo- and odontogenic-related genes and proteins compared to the other groups and baseline. In the current study, increased in vitro odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity of hTGSCs by NaB application has been shown for the first time. The study offers considerable promise for the development of new scaffold systems combined with NaB in both functional bone and tooth tissue engineering.

  20. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities

    PubMed Central

    Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth. PMID:22232727

  1. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities.

    PubMed

    Bronoosh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-12-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  2. [Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: review of the neuroradiological and maxillofacial features illustrated with two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Arantes, Mavilde; Lima, Iva; Domingues, Sara; Almeida, Marta; Moniz, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a rare hereditary autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas in young patients, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri and skeletal malformations. This syndrome is due to mutations in PTCH1 (patched homolog 1 da Drosophila), a tumor suppressor gene. Diagnostic criteria were defined by Evans, revised by Kimonis and include major and minor criteria. The authors review in particular the neuroradiological and maxillofacial characteristics of the syndrome. The authors describe the clinical presentation of two children with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome without affected first degree relatives. In both the clinical suspicion of the syndrome is raised by the presence of multiple odontogenic cysts surgically removed. Histopathological exam revealed keratocysts. None of the patients has basal cell carcinomas but both present with skeletal anomalies, namely marked pectus deformity. The absence of major diagnostic criteria like basal cell carcinomas or palmar or plantar pits in young patients delay the early diagnosis and the correct screening for medulloblastoma, basal cell carcinomas and cardiac fibromas. Odontogenic keratocysts are the most consistent clinical finding in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in the first one or two decades of life. These patients are very sensitive to ionizing radiation, being able to develop basal cell carcinomas and meningiomas. Treatment should accomplish the complete resection of the tumors.

  3. Use of FDG-PET to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as a possible source of the brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Wada, Mayumi; Satoh, Akira; Watanabe, Shiro; Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as the possible origin of a brain abscess (BA). A 74-year-old man with esophageal carcinoma was referred to our department to determine the origin of a BA in his oral cavity. He had no acute odontogenic infections. The BA was drained, and bacteria of the Staphylococcus milleri group were detected. Whole body FDG-PET revealed that the only sites of definite uptake of FDG were the esophageal carcinoma and the left upper maxillary region (SUVmax: 4.5). These findings suggested that the BA may have originated from a chronic periodontal infection. Six teeth with progressive chronic periodontal disease were extracted to remove the possible source of BA. These findings excluded the possibility of direct spread of bacteria from the odontogenic infectious lesion to the intracranial cavity. After extraction, there was no relapse of BA.

  4. Osteosarcoma of the mandible mimicking an odontogenic abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bhadage, Chetan J; Vaishampayan, Sagar; Kolhe, Swapnil; Umarji, Hemant

    2013-04-01

    Inflammatory lesions, like periapical/odontogenic abscesses, are by far the most common pathologic condition of the jaws. Radiographically, these lesions commonly manifest as widening of periodontal ligament space, discontinuity of lamina dura and ill-defined periapical radiolucency. There are some rare disorders which could cause similar radiographic changes in the jaw bone. With careful scrutiny of periapical radiolucency, regular periodic follow-up radiographs and histo-pathologic examination, the periapical abscess or infection can be differentiated from rare fatal disorders. This paper highlights the need for vigilant examination of even the commonest, innocuous-appearing periapical changes which sometimes are produced by some rare fatal disorders.

  5. [A case of intracranial abscess caused by peri-odontogenic infection].

    PubMed

    Homma, Hiroomi; Takemura, Hideki; Yui, Takefumi; Ono, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Aya; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The authors report a case in which a 42-year-old woman developed an intracranial abscess in the temporal lobe as a result of a peri-odontogenic infection. A subdural abscess also developed in the middle cranial fossa, expanding directly from the base of the skull through the foramen ovale and the foramen spinosum. An operation involving a left-front temporal incision extending to the tragus was performed. Debridement and brain aspiration with drainage were carried out after the craniotomy via the same skin incision without operative complications. The patient left hospital 36 days after the operation without sequelae.

  6. Adult-onset Still's disease initially thought to be an odontogenic infection: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Satoshi; Kaneko, Takahiro; Horie, Norio; Shimoyama, Tetsuo

    2018-06-01

    To present a case of Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) initially suspected to be odontogenic inflammation. Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare, complex autoinflammatory disease and a known cause of fever of unknown origin. The patient had both a fever and dental pain. Following meticulous examination, the patient was diagnosed with AOSD. Clinicians should keep in mind that a patient such as AOSD may visit their clinics. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. CK13 in craniopharyngioma versus related odontogenic neoplasms and human enamel organ.

    PubMed

    el-Sissy, N A; Rashad, N A

    1999-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody NCL-CK13 was studied in specimens of craniopharyngioma, ameloblastoma and calcifying odontogenic cyst neoplasms and the mandible and maxillae of normal human fetuses. There was a decrease in NCL-CK13 as the dental lamina developed, with a complete loss in the enamel organ. The neoplastic epithelia of the neoplasms revealed a clear phenotypic and immunohistochemical reactive relationship to the stratified embroyonic mucosa, away from the enamel organ. This suggests that these neoplasms might have their histogenesis from early stage epithelium, the oral part of the dental lamina or its remnants.

  8. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  9. Ventral rhinotomy in a pet rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with an odontogenic abscess and sub-obstructive rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tamara; Beaufrère, Hugues; Brisson, Brigitte; Laniesse, Delphine; zur Linden, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A rabbit was presented for severe dyspnea and was diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess obstructing the rostral nasopharynx using CT scan and oral endoscopy. The offending tooth was extracted intraorally, but due to persistent dyspnea, an endoscopic-guided ventral rhinotomy was performed. The dyspnea subsequently resolved, but the rabbit died 5 weeks later from a seemingly unrelated cause. PMID:27493289

  10. Rapid treatment reduces hospitalization for pediatric patients with odontogenic-based cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Thikkurissy, Sarat; Rawlins, Joseph T; Kumar, Ashok; Evans, Erik; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2010-07-01

    The study aimed to assess characteristics of facial cellulitis admissions and their relationship to cost of hospitalization (COH) and length of stay (LOS) in children ages 0 to 20 years at an urban hospital and to compare outcomes of rapid management to published and national statistics for LOS and COH. A retrospective review of 376 charts of facial cellulitis admissions between 2000 and 2006 revealed 63 of confirmed odontogenic cases from which cellulitis characteristics, COH, and LOS were gleaned. Variables were correlated to LOS and COH. Data on LOS and cost of admission were compared to published studies and 506 entries from the 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Of 63 charts included, children included were 8.3 years (SD, +/-3.8 years) and equal in sex distribution. Treatment rendered and site of infection had no significant relationship to COH. Overall mean hospital LOS was 2.08 days and significantly less as compared to 3.97 days for published studies and 3.4 days for KID (P < .0001). The mean overall hospital COH was $4166 and significantly less compared to $3223 in the literature and $8998.43 for KID. In the management of pediatric facial cellulitis of odontogenic origin, rapid treatment had a significant positive impact on length of stay and total cost of treatment compared to published studies and nationally reflective data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 20-year Follow-up of Recurrent Glandular Odontogenic Cyst Mimicking a Periapical Lesion.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; Silva Sant'Ana, Simone Sousa; Mariano-Júnior, Wilson José; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Periapical lesions usually are caused by root canal infection; nevertheless, other pathologies may eventually involve the tooth apex, making the correct diagnosis more difficult. Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are uncommon and, despite their cystic nature, may present an aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. This report describes a recurrent GOC mimicking a periapical lesion that was followed up for 20 years. A 45-year-old woman described tooth discomfort for several years in the anterior region of the mandible that was not exacerbated during eating or occlusion. Clinical examination revealed no signs of swelling, redness, or inflammation in the gingival or surrounding soft tissue. Nevertheless, periapical radiography showed a well-defined large radiolucent lesion in the periapical region of teeth #22, #23, #24, and #25. The pulp test confirmed that all these teeth were vital. An incisional biopsy was performed, and with the histopathological diagnosis of an odontogenic cyst, the lesion was enucleated surgically. After recurrence, the extensive periapical multilocular lesions were again surgically removed. Based on the microscopic findings, the final diagnosis was GOC. One year later, there were no signs of recurrence. GOCs associated with the root apex may mimic periapical inflammatory diseases. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings are essential for the diagnosis of inconclusive radiolucent findings in the periapical region. Biopsy specimens should be sent to a specialized oral pathology laboratory. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Isolation of Pseudomonas stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst: Diagnostic relevance].

    PubMed

    Molgatini, Susana; Rey, Eduardo; Basilaki, Jorge; Mosca, Christian; Galante, Rafael; Gliosca, Laura

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is distributed widely in the environment, and occupies different ecological niches. However, it is found in clinically relevant infections as an opportunistic pathogen. Isolation of P. stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst is an uncommon microbiological finding that has not been reported to date. In the case presented here, the bacterium was isolated from surgical material obtained from excision of an inflammatory odontogenic cyst located in the tooth 1.2, and presenting with concomitant pulp necrosis. Complementary techniques such as radiographs, CAT scans, and histopathological and microbiological studies were used to establish definitive diagnosis. The obtained results allowed classifying the process as an inflammatory cyst infected by P. stutzeri. Biotyping and characterization of the susceptibility profile of the isolated strain allowed adjusting the antibiotic therapy more specifically. The microbiological studies allowed establishing the etiology of the infectious process, adjusting the treatment plan, and re-establishing tissue integrity. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient. In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved. Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  14. Follicular cyst of the jaw developing into a keratocyst in a patient with unrecognized Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, Gianluigi; Diana, Giovanni; Poddi, Valentina; Pagano, Immacolata

    2010-05-01

    Gorlin-Goltz (GG) syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant condition. Its diagnosis may be clinically confirmed by checking either major or minor signs that define the diagnostic criteria. It may occur that, although GG syndrome is a well-known condition, only the specific symptom could be observed by different specialists. Therefore, the patient cannot be placed into an always complex clinical panel. We introduce an example in this report. Throughout a 20-year clinical history characterized by the lack of proper diagnosis and missed follow-up operations, a patient with GG syndrome underwent partial amputation of the jaw after severe complications. A 52-year-old man required an implant-prosthetic rehabilitation since becoming edentulous after a partial resection of the jaw due to a keratocyst, which was later reconstructed through a free fibula flap. The observation of a typical phenotype and various symptoms that succeeded for longer than 20 years, with anamnestic evaluation and clinical examination, led us to suspect a complex pathologic condition such as GG syndrome, which was not previously considered, although the patient had undergone several polyspecialistic evaluations. Diagnosis has been eventually confirmed by a genetic study, which was always mandatory. The simultaneous presence of muscular and skeletal malformations, basocellular nevi, and multiple cysts of the jaw can represent signs linking to a condition such as GG syndrome. There are many syndromes involving the head and neck region, and specialists are supposed to be alerted when faced with similar typical expressions associated with a characteristic soma so as to avoid delays in diagnosing the syndrome.

  15. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  16. Odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells and elicits PTEN elevation and inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) is expressed in a wide range of normal epithelial, and neoplastic tissues, and we have posited that ODAM serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and melanoma. Transfection of ODAM into breast cancer cells yields suppression of cellular growth, motility, and in vivo tumorigenicity. Herein we have extended these studies to the effects of ODAM on cultured melanoma cell lines. Methods The A375 and C8161 melanoma cell lines were stably transfected with ODAM and assayed for properties associated with tumorigenicity including cell growth, motility, and extracellular matrix adhesion. In addition, ODAM–transfected cells were assayed for signal transduction via AKT which promotes cell proliferation and survival in many neoplasms. Results ODAM expression in A375 and C8161 cells strongly inhibited cell growth and motility in vitro, increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix, and yielded significant cytoskeletal/morphologic rearrangement. Furthermore, AKT activity was downregulated by ODAM expression while an increase was noted in expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) tumor suppressor gene, an antagonist of AKT activation. Increased PTEN in ODAM-expressing cells was associated with increases in PTEN mRNA levels and de novo protein synthesis. Silencing of PTEN expression yielded recovery of AKT activity in ODAM-expressing melanoma cells. Similar PTEN elevation and inhibition of AKT by ODAM was observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells while ODAM expression had no effect in PTEN-deficient BT-549 breast cancer cells. Conclusions The apparent anti-neoplastic effects of ODAM in cultured melanoma and breast cancer cells are associated with increased PTEN expression, and suppression of AKT activity. This association should serve to clarify the clinical import of ODAM expression and any role it may serve as an indicator of tumor behavior. PMID:23648148

  17. Bacteroides endodontalis and other black-pigmented Bacteroides species in odontogenic abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    van Winkelhoff, A J; Carlee, A W; de Graaff, J

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-eight odontogenic abscesses were examined for the presence of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. Of the 28 samples, 26 were found to contain one or more species of black-pigmented Bacteroides. Abscesses were divided into three categories according to the tissue of origin: endodontal, periodontal, and pericoronal. Four abscesses which developed after extraction were also examined. It was found that Bacteroides endodontalis, a newly described species of asaccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides, was isolated almost exclusively from periapical abscesses of endodontal origin. B. intermedius proved to be the most frequently isolated species in all of the samples. B. gingivalis was present in all of the periodontal abscesses studied, as well as in two endodontal abscesses. B. melaninogenicus was recovered once from a pericoronal abscess. Precautions for the isolation of B. endodontalis are discussed. PMID:4030089

  18. [Use of a new cobetalactamine in the therapy of acute and chronic odontogenic processes].

    PubMed

    De Siate, A

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of 70 patients with acute and chronic odontogenic processes for 5-35 days (mean 10.9 days) with a new cobetalactamine is reported. Rapid resolution was noted in nosological groups marked by the presence of acute infection. Particular interest is attached to the effect of the drug on chronicisting infections, such as apical granuloma, maxillary osteitis, and radicular cysts, since these forms displayed a high degree of vascular isolation, were often sustained by a mixed flora, and had been previously treated with other antibiotics. Follow-up four weeks after the conclusion of treatment showed a low incidence of recurrences that was in all events lower than in earlier experiments with chemical antibiotics. There were no instances of intolerance or allergy.

  19. Aerobic microbiology and culture sensitivity of head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amit; Ramola, Vikas; Nautiyal, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Context: Head and neck space infections source, age, gender, tooth involved, fascial spaces involved, microbiological study of aerobic flora, and antibiotic susceptibilities. Aims: The aim of the present study is to identify causative aerobic microorganisms responsible for deep fascial spaces of head and neck infections and evaluate the resistance of antibiotics used in the treatment of such. Settings and Design: Prospective study in 100 patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who reported in the outpatient department and fulfilled the inclusion criteria to study aerobic microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity in head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin. Pus sample was obtained either by aspiration or by swab stick from the involved spaces, and culture and sensitivity tests were performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test and level of significance. Results: Result showed aerobic Gram-positive isolates were 73% and aerobic Gram-negative isolates were 18%. Nine percent cases showed no growth. Streptococcus viridans was the highest isolate in 47% cases among Gram-positive bacteria, and in Gram-negative, Klebsiella pneumoniae was the highest isolate of total cases 11%. Amoxicillin showed resistance (48.4%) as compared to other antibiotics such as ceftriaxone, carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem had significantly higher sensitivity. Conclusions: Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid showed (64.8%) efficacy for all organisms isolated, whereas ceftriaxone showed (82.4%) efficacy and could be used in odontogenic infections for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Substitution of third generation cephalosporin for amoxicillin in the empirical management of deep fascial space infections can also be used. Carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem showed (93.4%) sensitivity against all microorganisms and should be reserved for more severe infection. Newer and broad-spectrum antibiotics are more

  20. Hypercementosis and odontogenic epithelial hyperplasia associated with a tooth root remnant mimicking a neoplasm. A case report.

    PubMed

    Zustin, J; Friedrich, R E

    2010-01-01

    Hypercementosis presents as painless, single or multiple non-neoplastic cementum formation beyond the physiological limits of the tooth. It often occurs in the apical area of the involved tooth following infection, chemical or mechanical trauma. We report on radiographic and histopathological findings in a single case of late intraosseous hypercementosis and odontogenic epithelial hyperplasia associated with a minute apical tooth root remnant years after its extraction, mimicking a tumour.

  1. Microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity of head and neck space infections of odontogenic origin. Differences in inpatient and outpatient management.

    PubMed

    Heim, Nils; Faron, Anton; Wiedemeyer, Valentin; Reich, Rudolf; Martini, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The microbial flora of infections of the orofacial region of odontogenic origin is typically polymicrobial. Shortly after mass production of the first antibiotics, antibiotic resistant microorganisms were observed. A 28-months retrospective study evaluated hospital records of 107 patients that were treated for head and neck infections of odontogenic origin. All patients underwent surgical incision and drainage. There were 65 male (61%) and 42 female (39%) patients ranging in age from 5 to 91 years, with a mean age of 48 years (SD = 21). 52 patients underwent outpatient management and 55 patients inpatient management. A total of 92 bacterial strains were isolated from 107 patients, accounting for 0.86 isolates per patient. Overall 46 bacterial strains were isolated from patients that underwent outpatient and 34 bacterial strains that underwent inpatient treatment. 32.6% of the strains, isolated from outpatient treated individuals showed resistances against one or more of the tested antibiotics. Isolated strains of inpatient treated individuals showed resistances in 52.9%. According to this study's data, penicillin continues to be a highly effective antibiotic to be used against viridans streptococci, group C Streptococci and prevotella, whereas clindamycin was not shown to be effective as an empirical drug of choice for most odontogenic infections. Microorganisms that show low susceptibility to one or more of the standard antibiotic therapy regimes have a significantly higher chance of causing serious health problems, a tendency of spreading and are more likely to require an inpatient management with admission of IV antibiotics. Penicillin continues to be a highly effective antibiotic to be used against viridans streptococci, group C Streptococci and prevotella, whereas clindamycin could not be shown to be effective as an empirical drug of choice for a high number of odontogenic infections. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery

  2. Stem cell regulatory gene expression in human adult dental pulp and periodontal ligament cells undergoing odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Wu, Liping; Xiao, Yin

    2009-10-01

    During development and regeneration, odontogenesis and osteogenesis are initiated by a cascade of signals driven by several master regulatory genes. In this study, we investigated the differential expression of 84 stem cell-related genes in dental pulp cells (DPCs) and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) undergoing odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation. Our results showed that, although there was considerable overlap, certain genes had more differential expression in PDLCs than in DPCs. CCND2, DLL1, and MME were the major upregulated genes in both PDLCs and DPCs, whereas KRT15 was the only gene significantly downregulated in PDLCs and DPCs in both odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, a large number of regulatory genes in odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation interact or crosstalk via Notch, Wnt, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/bone morphogenic protein (BMP), and cadherin signaling pathways, such as the regulation of APC, DLL1, CCND2, BMP2, and CDH1. Using a rat dental pulp and periodontal defect model, the expression and distribution of both BMP2 and CDH1 have been verified for their spatial localization in dental pulp and periodontal tissue regeneration. This study has generated an overview of stem cell-related gene expression in DPCs and PDLCs during odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation and revealed that these genes may interact through the Notch, Wnt, TGF-beta/BMP, and cadherin signaling pathways to play a crucial role in determining the fate of dental derived cell and dental tissue regeneration. These findings provided a new insight into the molecular mechanisms of the dental tissue mineralization and regeneration.

  3. Root Cause Analysis: An Examination of Odontogenic Origins of Acute Maxillary Sinusitis in Both Immunocompetent & Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Jennifer L; David, Ryan M; Lensing, Shelly Y; Samant, Rohan S; Kumar, Manoj; Van Hemert, Rudy L; Angtuaco, Edgardo J C; Fitzgerald, Ryan T

    Dental and periodontal diseases represent important but often overlooked causes of acute sinusitis. Our goal was to examine the prevalence of potential odontogenic sources of acute maxillary sinusitis according to immune status and their associations with sinusitis. A retrospective review of maxillofacial computed tomography studies from 2013 to 2014 was performed. Each maxillary sinus and its ipsilateral dentition were evaluated for findings of acute sinusitis and dental/periodontal disease. Eighty-four patients (24 immunocompetent, 60 immunocompromised) had 171 maxillary sinuses that met inclusion criteria for acute maxillary sinusitis. Inspection of dentition revealed oroantral fistula in 1%, periapical lucencies in 16%, and projecting tooth root(s) in 71% of cases. Immunocompromised patients were more likely to have bilateral sinusitis than immunocompetent patients (67% vs 33%, P = 0.005). A paired case-control analysis in a subset of patients with unilateral maxillary sinusitis (n = 39) showed a higher prevalence of periapical lucency in association with sinuses that had an air fluid level-29% of sinuses with a fluid level had periapical lucency compared with 12% without sinus fluid (P = 0.033). Potential odontogenic sources of acute maxillary sinusitis are highly prevalent in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, although the 2 patient populations demonstrate no difference in the prevalence of these potential odontogenic sources. Periapical lucencies were found to be associated with an ipsilateral sinus fluid level. Increased awareness of the importance of dental and periodontal diseases as key components of maxillofacial computed tomography interpretation would facilitate a more appropriate and timely treatment.

  4. Dental health and odontogenic infections among 6- to 16-year-old German students with special health care needs (SHCN).

    PubMed

    Dziwak, Marco; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Limberger, Kathrin; Ifland, Susanne; Gottstein, Ilka; Lehmann, Thomas; Schüler, Ina M

    2017-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to assess dental health and odontogenic infections in students with special health care needs (SHCN) in the Free State of Thuringia, Germany. From 1283 students with SHCN aged 6-16 years, 66.0 % (n = 848 of whom are 35.7 % females and 64.3 % males) with intellectual/learning disabilities (ID/LD), physical disabilities (PD), and sensory disorders (SD) participated after informed consent in oral examinations according to WHO standards. Dental caries was assessed by dmft/DMFT, odontogenic infections by pufa/PUFA. Fissure sealants (FS) were scored in permanent molars. Data were compared to regional and national reference data and analysed by t test and age-adjusted logistic regression models. Students with SHCN revealed 41.2 % caries prevalence in permanent and 31.7 % in primary teeth. Highest prevalence/experience of caries and odontogenic infections in primary teeth was recorded in 6-11-year-olds with PD (65.1 %/2.3 dmft; 14.0 %/0.3 pufa). Most affected permanent teeth were observed in students with ID/LD (12-16-year-olds 59.6 %/2.4 DMFT; 6-11-year-olds 2.8 %/0.03 PUFA). All odontogenic infections in 12-16-year-olds occurred in males; n = 9 students revealed n = 9 teeth with pufa/PUFA. Students with ID/LD aged 6-11 years exhibited lowest prevalence of FS (29.0 %) and mean of 0.8 FS. Students with SHCN suffered more than twice as frequent from untreated dental caries and benefited up to 29.0 % less from FS than peers without disabilities. This first study investigating odontogenic infections of German students with SHCN revealed highest prevalence in primary teeth and in males. Oral health among students with SHCN is reduced, and FS are underutilized compared to German students without disabilities. Reinforcing the application of FS in students with SHCN might contribute to reducing disparities in oral health.

  5. Dual odontogenic origins develop at the early stage of rat maxillary incisor development.

    PubMed

    Kriangkrai, Rungarun; Iseki, Sachiko; Eto, Kazuhiro; Chareonvit, Suconta

    2006-03-01

    Developmental process of rat maxillary incisor has been studied through histological analysis and investigation of tooth-related gene expression patterns at initial tooth development. The tooth-related genes studied here are fibroblast growth factor-8 (Fgf-8), pituitary homeobox gene-2 (Pitx-2), sonic hedgehog (Shh), muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1), paired box-9 (Pax-9) and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp-4). The genes are expressed in oral epithelium and/or ectomesenchyme at the stage of epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development. Both the histological observation and tooth-related gene expression patterns during early stage of maxillary incisor development demonstrate that dual odontogenic origins aligned medio-laterally in the medial nasal process develop, subsequently only single functional maxillary incisor dental placode forms. The cascade of tooth-related gene expression patterns in rat maxillary incisor studied here is quite similar to those of the previous studies in mouse mandibular molar, even though the origins of oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme involved in development of maxillary incisor and mandibular molar are different. Thus, we conclude that maxillary incisor and mandibular molar share a similar signaling control of Fgf-8, Pitx-2, Shh, Msx-1, Pax-9 and Bmp-4 genes at the stage of oral epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development.

  6. Tooth replacement and putative odontogenic stem cell niches in pharyngeal dentition of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Abduweli, Dawud; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Higuchi, Kazunori; Mitani, Hiroshi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    The small-sized teleost fish medaka, Oryzias latipes, has as many as 1000 pharyngeal teeth undergoing continuous replacement. In this study, we sought to identify the tooth-forming units and determine its replacement cycles, and further localize odontogenic stem cell niches in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka to gain insights into the mechanisms whereby continuous tooth replacement is maintained. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pharyngeal epithelium and sequential fluorochrome labeling of pharyngeal bones and teeth indicated that the individual functional teeth and their successional teeth were organized in families, each comprising up to five generations of teeth and successional tooth germs, and that the replacement cycle of functional teeth was approximately 4 weeks. BrdU label/chase experiments confirmed the existence of clusters of label-retaining epithelial cells at the posterior end of each tooth family where the expression of pluripotency marker Sox2 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Label-retaining cells were also identified in the mesoderm immediately adjacent to the posterior end of each tooth family. These data suggest the importance of existence of slow-cycling dental epithelial cells and Sox2 expressions at the posterior end of each tooth family to maintain continuous tooth formation and replacement in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka.

  7. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I.

    PubMed

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  8. Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour: immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors (TIMPs and RECK) and inducer (EMMPRIN).

    PubMed

    Prosdócimi, Fábio C; Rodini, Camila O; Sogayar, Mari C; Sousa, Suzana C O M; Xavier, Flávia C A; Paiva, Katiúcia B S

    2014-08-01

    Calcifying cyst odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a rare benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin. MMPs are responsible for extracellular matrix remodelling and, together their inhibitors and inducer, determinate the level of its turnover in pathological processes, leading to an auspicious microenvironment for tumour development. Thus, our goal was to evaluate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs-2, -7, -9 and -14), their inhibitors (TIMPs-2, -3, -4 and RECK) and its inductor (EMMPRIN) expression in CCOT. We used 18 cases of CCOT submitted to immunolocalization of the target proteins and analysed in both neoplastic odontogenic epithelial and stromal compartments. All molecules evaluated were expressed in both compartments in CCOT. In epithelial layer, immunostaining for MMPs, TIMPs, RECK and EMMPRIN was found in basal, suprabasal spindle and stellate cells surrounding ghost cells and ghost cells themselves, except for MMP-9 and TIMP-2 which were only expressed by ghost cells. In stromal compartment, extracellular matrix, mesenchymal (MC) and endothelial cells (EC) were positive for MMP-2, -7, TIMP-3 and -4, while MMP-9, TIMP-2 and RECK were positive only in MC and MMP-14 only in EC. Statistical significance difference was found between both compartments for MMP-9 (P < 0.001), RECK (P = 0.004) and EMMPRIN (P < 0.001), being more expressed in epithelium than in stroma. Positive correlation between both stromal EMMPRIN and RECK expression was found (R = 0.661, P = 0.003). We concluded that these proteins/enzymes are differentially expressed in both epithelium and stroma of CCOT, suggesting an imbalance between MMPs and their inducer/inhibitors may contribute on the tumour behaviour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Epigenetic Marks Define the Lineage and Differentiation Potential of Two Distinct Neural Crest-Derived Intermediate Odontogenic Progenitor Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, play an active role in the differentiation and lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, epigenetic states and differentiation profiles of two odontogenic neural crest-derived intermediate progenitor populations were compared: dental pulp (DP) and dental follicle (DF). ChIP on chip assays revealed substantial H3K27me3-mediated repression of odontoblast lineage genes DSPP and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in DF cells, but not in DP cells. Mineralization inductive conditions caused steep increases of mineralization and patterning gene expression levels in DP cells when compared to DF cells. In contrast, mineralization induction resulted in a highly dynamic histone modification response in DF cells, while there was only a subdued effect in DP cells. Both DF and DP progenitors featured H3K4me3-active marks on the promoters of early mineralization genes RUNX2, MSX2, and DLX5, while OSX, IBSP, and BGLAP promoters were enriched for H3K9me3 or H3K27me3. Compared to DF cells, DP cells expressed higher levels of three pluripotency-associated genes, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2. Finally, gene ontology comparison of bivalent marks unique for DP and DF cells highlighted cell–cell attachment genes in DP cells and neurogenesis genes in DF cells. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the DF intermediate odontogenic neural crest lineage is distinguished from its DP counterpart by epigenetic repression of DSPP and DMP1 genes and through dynamic histone enrichment responses to mineralization induction. Findings presented here highlight the crucial role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the terminal differentiation of odontogenic neural crest lineages. PMID:23379639

  10. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  11. [Structure of maxillary sinus mucous membrane under normal conditions and in odontogenic perforative sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Baĭdik, O D; Logvinov, S V; Zubarev, S G; Sysoliatin, P G; Gurin, A A

    2011-01-01

    Methods of light, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to study the samples of maxillary sinus (MS) mucous membrane (MM) under normal conditions and in odontogenic sinusitis. To study the normal structure, the samples were obtained at autopsy from 26 human corpses 12-24 hours after death. Electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study was performed on biopsies of grossly morphologically unchanged MS MM, obtained during the operations for retention cysts in 6 patients. MS MM in perforative sinusitis was studied using the biopsies obtained from 43 patients. The material is broken into 4 groups depending on perforative sinusitis duration. Under normal conditions, MS MM is lined with a pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium. Degenerative changes of ciliated epithelial cells were already detected at short time intervals after MS perforations and become apparent due to reduction of specific volume of mitochondria and, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and increase of nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. In the globlet cells, the reduction of nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio was associated with the disturbance of the secretory product release. At time intervals exceeding 3 months, epithelium underwent metaplasia into simple cuboidal and stratified squamous keratinized, while in MS MM lamina propria, cellular infiltration was increased. CD4+ cell content in sinus MM gradually increased, while at late periods after perforation occurrence it decreased. Low CD4+ cell count within the epithelium and the absence of muromidase on the surface of MS MM was detected. With the increase of the time interval since MS perforation, the number of CD8+ and CD20+ cells in MS MM was found to increase.

  12. Controversies in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Zachary S

    2017-11-01

    Several benign pathologic entities that are commonly encountered by the oral and maxillofacial surgeon remain controversial. From etiology to treatment, no consensus exists in the literature regarding the best treatment of benign lesions, such as the keratocystic odontogenic tumor, giant cell lesion, or ameloblastoma. Given the need for often-morbid treatment to prevent recurrence of these lesions, multiple less-invasive treatments exist in the literature for each entity with little agreement. As the molecular and genomic pathogenesis of these lesions are better understood, directed treatments will hopefully lessen the contention in management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Amod P; Kshirsagar, Rajesh A; Dugal, Arun; Mishra, Akshay; Ram, Hari

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is characterized by multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormities. The syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist during the routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This article reports the series of 3 cases, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestations of GGS.

  14. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A series of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amod P.; Kshirsagar, Rajesh A.; Dugal, Arun; Mishra, Akshay; Ram, Hari

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is characterized by multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormities. The syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist during the routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This article reports the series of 3 cases, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestations of GGS. PMID:25937738

  15. Delayed diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome: Learning from mistakes!

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome (GS) is a rare inherited multisystem disorder with predisposition to basal cell carcinomas and various other neoplasms. Characteristic features include falx calcification, multiple odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), early onset medulloblastoma, craniofacial and skeletal malformations, cardiac and ovarian fibroma. We present a case of GS in a 9-year-old girl with recurrent dental infections which was overlooked for 8 years. Diagnosis was finally suggested by the incidental detection of multiple OKCs and ovarian fibromas on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging performed for surveillance of previous operated brain tumor.

  16. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones in your body. This can cause endocrine diseases such as Cushing's syndrome and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms of pituitary tumors include Headaches Vision problems Nausea and vomiting Problems caused ... the tumor. Other options include medicines, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  17. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  18. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  20. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-27

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bartholin Gland Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis; Endometrial Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Minimally Invasive Lung Adenocarcinoma; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma

  1. Comparison of antioxidant enzymes activity and the concentration of uric acid in the saliva of patients with oral cavity cancer, odontogenic cysts and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Wroczyński, Piotr; Samolczyk-Wanyura, Danuta

    2011-10-01

    Chronic inflammation is related to oxidative stress and is still believed to be the cause of carcinogenesis. Patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC) exhibited lower total antioxidant capacity, uric acid (UA) concentration, salivary peroxidise (SPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in their saliva than did healthy subjects. This could be a risk factor for tumour induction. Odontogenic cysts also arise in response to locally acting proinflammatory factors, for example, a gangrenous tooth. Furthermore, cyst development is accompanied by chronic inflammation. There are some reports in the literature concerning primary tumours such as squamous cell carcinomas arising from odontogenic cysts. The reason for this transformation is still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the status of the antioxidant defence system in the saliva of the group with odontogenic cysts and OCC with that of the healthy control. Saliva samples were collected in the morning. SOD, SPO activity and UA concentration were determined using standard methods. Patients with odontogenic cysts and OCC exhibited lower activity of major antioxidants in their saliva (SPO, UA) than did healthy people. SOD activity and age are the main factors that distinguish these diseases. Discriminant function analysis showed that once data such as antioxidant status of saliva, age and smoking status are known 80% cases can be correctly classified as healthy, 80% as having odontogenic cysts and 40% as cancerous. To conclude, the decrease in concentrations of major antioxidants in the saliva of patients with cysts may increase the risk of neoplastic transformation especially in advanced age. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Skeletal and cranio-facial signs in Gorlin syndrome from ancient Egypt to the modern age: sphenoid asymmetry in a patient with a novel PTCH1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Ruini, Cristel; Pastorino, Lorenza; Loschi, Pietro; Pecchi, Annarita; Malagoli, Marcella; Mandel, Victor Desmond; Boano, Rosa; Conti, Andrea; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder linked to PTCH1 mutation, identified by a collection of clinical and radiologic signs. We describe the case of a family in which father and son fulfilled clear cut diagnostic criteria for Gorlin syndrome including multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, atypical skeletal anomalies and a novel PTCH1 germline mutation (c.1041delAA). Craniofacial and other skeletal anomalies displayed at 3D and helical CT scan were: macrocephaly, positional plagiocephaly, skull base and sphenoid asymmetry, bifidity of multiple ribs and giant multilocular odontogenic jaw cysts. Extensive multilamellar calcifications were found in falx cerebri, tentorium, falx cerebelli and in the atlanto-occipital ligament. The inclusion of bifid ribs as a novel major criteri may be useful for the recognition and characterization of misdiagnosed cases.

  3. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells synergize osteo/odontogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells in 3D cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Pandula, P K C Prgeeth; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L J; Zhang, C F

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the expression of osteo/odontogenic differentiation markers and vascular network formation in a 3D cell sheet with varying cell ratios of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Human PDLSCs were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry, and co-cultured with HUVECs for the construction of cell sheets. Both types of cells were seeded on temperature-responsive culture dishes with PDLSCs alone, HUVECs alone and various ratios of the latter cells (1 : 1, 2 : 1, 5 : 1 and 1 : 5) to obtain confluent cell sheets. The expressions of osteo/odontogenic pathway markers, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), were analyzed at 3 and 7 d using RT-PCR. Further ALP protein quantification was performed at 7 and 14 d using ALP assay. The calcium nodule formation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by alizarin red assay. Histological evaluations of three cell sheet constructs treated with different combinations (PDLSC-PDLSC-PDLSC/PDLSC-HUVEC-PDLSC/co-culture-co-culture-co-culture) were performed with hematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescence staining. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test (p < 0.05). Significantly higher ALP gene expression was observed at 3 d in 1 : 1 (PDLSC-HUVEC) (2.52 ± 0.67) and 5 : 1 (4.05 ± 1.07) co-culture groups compared with other groups (p < 0.05); this was consistent with ALP protein quantification. However, the expression of BSP and RUNX2 genes was higher at 7 d compared to 3 d. Significant calcium mineralization was detected as quantified by alizarin red assay at 14 d in 1 : 1 (1323.55 ± 6.54 μm) and 5 : 1 (994.67 ± 4.15 μm) co-cultures as compared with monoculture cell sheets (p < 0.05). Hematoxylin and eosin and CD31 immunostaining clearly exemplified the development of a layered cell sheet structure with endothelial cell islands within the constructed PDLSC-HUVEC-PDLSC and co

  4. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  5. The root of the problem: Occurrence of typical and atypical periapical pathoses.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Megan; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki

    2016-08-01

    A preponderance of periapical radiolucencies are of inflammatory etiology (radicular cysts or periapical granulomas) secondary to pulpal disease. In some instances, however, a suspected periapical inflammatory lesion is not a consequence of pulpal disease but instead represents a lesion of noninflammatory origin. The differential diagnosis for such lesions is broad, ranging from odontogenic cysts and tumors to metastatic disease. As the biological behavior of such lesions is varied, the distinction between inflammatory odontogenic periapical lesions and lesions of noninflammatory origin in a periapical location is critical. A retrospective study of 5,993 archival periapical biopsies over a span of 15 years from the database of the Oral Pathology Biopsy Service in the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine at Boston University recorded the incidence of various lesions in a periapical location. Of the cases studied, 97.2% represented lesions of inflammatory origin with histopathologic diagnoses as follows: periapical granuloma (60.0%), radicular cyst (36.7%), periapical fibrous scar (0.27 %), and periapical abscess (0.23 %). The remaining 2.8% cases were lesions of noninflammatory origin with histopathologic diagnoses of odontogenic keratocyst (also known as keratocystic odontogenic tumor), benign fibro-osseous lesions, and ameloblastoma. One patient had Langerhans cell disease, and 1 had central giant cell granuloma. Although most periapical specimens biopsied represented expected inflammatory periapical lesions, the biological behavior of underdiagnosed lesions may have considerable consequences for both the patient and the clinician. This article serves to inform clinicians regarding the diversity of lesions arising in the periapical region of the jaws, to assist in the formulation of differential diagnoses, and to highlight the importance of submission of lesional tissue for histopathologic evaluation and definitive diagnosis when biopsy is clinically

  6. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor Dictionary Upcoming Webinars Anytime Learning Brain Tumor Educational Presentations ... Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor Dictionary Upcoming Webinars Anytime Learning Brain Tumor Educational Presentations ...

  7. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fang; Gao, Lifen; Lu, Yating; Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan; Ma, Chunhong

    2016-01-15

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R C

    1985-05-01

    Soft-tissue tumors are similar in their behavior. Benign tumors can be easily resected in most cases, whereas malignant tumors are relentless in their locally invasive characteristics. A clear understanding of the constraints of the pathologist in reaching a confirmed diagnosis and a logical plan utilizing surgery as the major modality of therapy are necessary for successful management of these tumors. It appears that radiation combined with hyperthermia is beginning to play a significant role in the local control of soft-tissue sarcomas and that single or multi-agent chemotherapy may be of benefit in treatment of nonresectable or metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas. For the immediate future, surgery remains the only nonexperimental modality of therapy, but the rapid advances in the other therapy methods are encouraging.

  9. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... feeling of warmth in your face and neck (skin flushing), chronic diarrhea, and difficulty breathing, among other signs and symptoms. Carcinoid heart disease. Carcinoid tumors may secrete hormones that can cause ...

  10. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... dizziness, dry skin, irregular periods in women, and sexual dysfunction in men. Other symptoms depend on the hormone ... not pregnant. In men, these tumors can cause sexual dysfunction and breast enlargement. These conditions can have serious ...

  11. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ... 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer; 2010. Related Resources Understanding Cancer ... Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute ...

  12. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Fang; VIP Center, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012; Gao, Lifen

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression ofmore » osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. - Highlights: • Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. • we found another new biological function of ZHX2 for the first time. • ZHX2 inhibit SCAPs proliferation. • ZHX2 promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs.« less

  13. Tumor immunology.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Simone; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Advances in tumor immunology are supporting the clinical implementation of several immunological approaches to cancer in the clinical setting. However, the alternate success of current immunotherapeutic regimens underscores the fact that the molecular mechanisms underlying immune-mediated tumor rejection are still poorly understood. Given the complexity of the immune system network and the multidimensionality of tumor/host interactions, the comprehension of tumor immunology might greatly benefit from high-throughput microarray analysis, which can portrait the molecular kinetics of immune response on a genome-wide scale, thus accelerating the discovery pace and ultimately catalyzing the development of new hypotheses in cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of microarray technology in tumor immunology studies has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to an effective immune response against cancer. Although the general principles of microarray-based gene profiling have rapidly spread in the scientific community, the need for mastering this technique to produce meaningful data and correctly interpret the enormous output of information generated by this technology is critical and represents a tremendous challenge for investigators, as outlined in the first section of this book. In the present Chapter, we report on some of the most significant results obtained with the application of DNA microarray in this oncology field.

  14. Retrorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors that arise in the retrorectal (presacral) space are uncommon lesions that present with nonspecific signs and symptoms, which lead to difficult diagnoses. For complete evaluation of the lesion, cross-sectional imaging is required to determine the extent of resection and the appropriate surgical approach. Surgical removal leads to favorable outcomes for patients with benign purely cystic retrorectal tumors. Preoperative tissue diagnosis with transperineal and transsacral biopsies of solid or heterogeneous cystic lesions, are essential to determine the necessity of neoadjuvant therapy, which may decrease local recurrence after surgery and avoid an unnecessary delay in systemic therapy. PMID:22942797

  15. Keratinizing odontogenic cysts with a spectrum of verrucoid morphology: investigation of a potential role of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Kalpesh; Mahomed, Farzana; Meer, Shabnum

    2016-11-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in keratinizing odontogenic cysts (OC) has only rarely been studied. We describe the clinicopathologic findings in a series of OCs that had unusual keratinization patterns and were investigated for a possible HPV etiology. Tissue samples from 29 patients with keratinizing OCs were studied for light microscopic features suggestive of HPV infection and by an HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction assay. The mean age at presentation was 31.1 years; 79.3% of the OCs occurred in the mandible and 46.4% were associated with an impacted tooth. The phenotypic characteristics koilocytes, hypergranulosis, and a verrucous pattern of the cyst-lining epithelium were observed in 69%, 62.1%, and 17.2% of cases, respectively. These histomorphologic features did not, however, correlate with HPV infection. HPV does not appear to play a role in keratinizing OCs and is not responsible for the wart-like histomorphologic features that may be seen in these lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 10-year follow-up of calcifying odontogenic cyst in the periapical region of vital maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Radiographic images may lead to misinterpretations of lesions of endodontic and nonendodontic origin. This report describes a case of a 10-year follow-up of a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) in the periapical region of a vital maxillary central incisor in a 9-year-old boy. The patient revealed a history of a swelling in the periapical area of tooth #9. The patient denied any dental trauma or history of pain. Clinical examination revealed no mobility, but there was discrete discomfort when horizontal pressure was applied. Pulp vitality was present in all maxillary anterior teeth. Radiographs revealed an oval radiolucent lesion in the periapical region of maxillary central incisor. The therapeutic option was enucleation of the periapical lesion and histologic examination of the specimen. Microscopic findings suggested the diagnosis of a COC. At a follow-up visit 10 years after surgery, panoramic and periapical radiographs showed new bone formation; the patient did not have any pain, and pulp vitality was maintained in all teeth in this area. A COC should be part of the differential diagnosis of other jaw lesions, such as apical periodontitis. The definitive diagnosis of a COC can only be made after microscopic evaluation of the specimen. The follow-up is a helpful reference because it confirms the survival of pulp tissue and no recurrence of the COC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perforating internal root resorption repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate caused complete resolution of odontogenic sinus mucositis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bendyk-Szeffer, Maja; Łagocka, Ryta; Trusewicz, Matylda; Lipski, Mariusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-02-01

    An extensive perforating internal root resorption accompanied by apical periodontitis and odontogenic sinus mucositis was detected on preoperative cone-beam computed tomographic scans in a first maxillary molar. After the chemomechanical debridement of the root canals, calcium hydroxide was placed as a temporary dressing for 7 days. Mineral trioxide aggregate was used to fill the perforation site with the aid of a surgical microscope. At the next visit, the root with the resorption defect was filled with warm vertical compaction of gutta-percha. A control cone-beam computed tomographic scan acquired 6 months after the endodontic treatment revealed complete resolution of the sinus retention cyst. Moreover, the patient's frequent otolaryngologic disturbances ceased. The tooth was functional with satisfactory clinical and radiographic results after 12 months. Based on the results of this case, successful repair of an extensive, perforating internal resorption with mineral trioxide aggregate may lead to complete resolution of apical periodontitis and maxillary sinus retention cyst. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  19. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... updates Please leave this field empty Brain Tumor Diagnosis SHARE Home > Brain Tumor Information > Diagnosis Listen In cases where a brain tumor is ... to help the doctor reach a brain tumor diagnosis. These tests may also be able help the ...

  20. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  1. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  2. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  3. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  4. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain ...

  5. Renal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Merino, Maria J.; Netto, George; Reuter, Victor E.; Shen, Steven S.; Grignon, David J.; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R.; Delahunt, Brett; Moch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology convened a consensus conference on renal cancer, preceded by an online survey, to address issues relating to the diagnosis and reporting of renal neoplasia. In this report, the role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors is addressed. In particular we focused upon the use of immunohistochemical markers and the approach to specific differential diagnostic scenarios. We enquired whether cytogenetic and molecular tools were applied in practice and asked for views on the perceived prognostic role of biomarkers. Both the survey and conference voting results demonstrated a high degree of consensus in participants’ responses regarding prognostic/predictive markers and molecular techniques, whereas it was apparent that biomarkers for these purposes remained outside the diagnostic realm pending clinical validation. Although no individual antibody or panel of antibodies reached consensus for classifying renal tumors, or for confirming renal metastatic disease, it was noted from the online survey that 87% of respondents used immunohistochemistry to subtype renal tumors sometimes or occasionally, and a majority (87%) used immunohistochemical markers (Pax 2 or Pax 8, renal cell carcinoma [RCC] marker, panel of pan-CK, CK7, vimentin, and CD10) in confirming the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. There was consensus that immunohistochemistry should be used for histologic subtyping and applied before reaching a diagnosis of unclassified RCC. At the conference, there was consensus that TFE3 and TFEB analysis ought to be requested when RCC was diagnosed in a young patient or when histologic appearances were suggestive of the translocation subtype; whereas Pax 2 and/or Pax 8 were considered to be the most useful markers in the diagnosis of a renal primary. PMID:24025522

  6. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of induced mesenchymal stem cells generated through epithelial-mesenchyme transition of cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jin-Kyu; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun; Bhalla, Anu; Oo, Jenessa; Chen, Wei; Lee, Min; Kim, Reuben H; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K

    2014-11-01

    Revascularization of necrotic pulp has been successful in the resolution of periradicular inflammation; yet, several case studies suggest the need for cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative for de novo pulp regeneration. Because the availability of MSCs may be limited, especially in an aged population, the current study reports an alternative approach in generating MSCs from epidermal keratinocytes through a process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We induced EMT in primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) by transient transfection of small interfering RNA targeting the p63 gene. The resulting cells were assayed for their mesenchymal marker expression, proliferation capacities as a monolayer and in a 3-dimensional collagen scaffold, and differentiation capacities. Transient transfection of p63 small-interfering RNA successfully abolished the expression of endogenous p63 in NHEKs and induced the expression of mesenchymal markers (eg, vimentin and fibronectin), whereas epithelial markers (eg, E-cadherin and involucrin) were lost. The NHEKs exhibiting the EMT phenotype acquired extended replicative potential and an increased telomere length compared with the control cells. Similar to the established MSCs, the NHEKs with p63 knockdown showed attachment onto the 3-dimensional collagen scaffold and underwent progressive proliferation and differentiation. Upon differentiation, these EMT cells expressed alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin, and osteonectin and readily formed mineralized nodules detected by alizarin S red staining, showing osteo-/odontogenic differentiation. The induction of EMT in primary NHEKs by means of transient p63 knockdown allows the generation of induced MSCs from autologous sources. These cells may be used for tissues engineering purposes, including that of dental pulp. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Necrotizing odontogenic fasciitis of head and neck extending to anterior mediastinum in elderly patients: innovative treatment with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Antonio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Borri, Antonio; Amato, Massimo; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of odontogenic origin affecting the head and neck region is a rare but serious clinical condition, which, if diagnosed late, can lead to a fatal outcome. The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis can be difficult. Delay in diagnosis leads to increase in the area of necrosis with a resulting increase in cosmetic deformity and life-threatening complication. In this study, we present two cases of elderly patients with aggressive NF affecting the neck and anterior mediastinum, which were of odontogenic origin. In the two patients selected necrotic skin and soft tissue were removed and wide exposure was achieved with debridement of the neck at the level of the affected layer of superficial cervical fascia. Saline solution was used as irrigation to treat the patients with acute necrotizing fasciitis. Difficulties in managing this condition with NF extent to deep anterior mediastinum is related to clavicle osteotomy or thoracotomy need with high surgical risks. In our technique, by gentle suction in anterior mediastinum, necrotic tissue resection was possible without any osteotomy need. Suctioning resection technique associated with hyperbaric, metabolic rebalance, and amino acid support in association with three types antibiotic therapy are fundamental points for correct therapy strategy, leading to full recovery and healing of NF patients even if in very unfavorable conditions. Multidisciplinary approach is paramount for proper treatment of this disease.

  8. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  9. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Cancer.gov

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  10. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  11. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  12. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  13. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 01/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  14. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACTH . A clinical trial of stereotactic radiation surgery . Growth Hormone–Producing Pituitary Tumors Treatment may include the ... Drug therapy to stop the tumor from making growth hormone . Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone–Producing Tumors Treatment may ...

  15. Generation of tooth-periodontium complex structures using high-odontogenic potential dental epithelium derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yancong; Li, Yongliang; Shi, Ruirui; Zhang, Siqi; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2017-06-08

    A number of studies have shown that tooth-like structures can be regenerated using induced pluripotent stem cells and mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. However, few studies have reported the regeneration of tooth-periodontium complex structures, which are more suitable for clinical tooth transplantation. We established an optimized approach to induce high-odontogenic potential dental epithelium derived from mES cells by temporally controlling bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) function and regenerated tooth-periodontium complex structures in vivo. First, immunofluorescence and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to identify the watershed of skin and the oral ectoderm. LDN193189 was then used to inhibit the BMP4 receptor around the watershed, followed by the addition of exogenous BMP4 to promote BMP4 function. The generated dental epithelium was confirmed by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. The generated epithelium was ultimately combined with embryonic day 14.5 mouse mesenchyme and transplanted into the renal capsules of nude mice. After 4 weeks, the tooth-periodontium complex structure was examined by micro-computed tomography (CT) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Our study found that the turning point of oral ectoderm differentiation occurred around day 3 after the embryoid body was transferred to a common culture plate. Ameloblastin-positive dental epithelial cells were detected following the temporal regulation of BMP4. Tooth-periodontium complex structures, which included teeth, a periodontal membrane, and alveolar bone, were formed when this epithelium was combined with mouse dental mesenchyme and transplanted into the renal capsules of nude mice. Micro-CT and H&E staining revealed that the generated tooth-periodontium complex structures shared a similar histological structure with normal mouse teeth. An optimized induction method was established to promote the differentiation of mES cells into dental

  16. Conservative Management of Ovarian Fibroma in A Case of Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome Comorbid with Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Nazari, Leila; Mehdizadeh-Kashi, Abolfazl; Vahdat, Mansoureh; Rokhgireh, Samaneh; Farbod, Ali; Tajbakhsh, Banafsheh

    2018-04-01

    Ovarian fibromas are the most common benign solid ovarian tumors, which are often difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Ovarian fibromas, especially in bilateral cases, may be cases of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS), a rare autosomal dominant disorder with predisposition to basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and other various benign and malignant tumors. This case report describes a 25 year-old female with GGS, bilateral ovarian fibroma, endometriosis and septated uterus, which was referred to the Gynecology Clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in October 2016. This patient had facial asymmetry due to recurrent odontogenic keratocysts. In young cases of ovarian fibromas as reported here, conservative surgical management can preserve ovarian function and fertility. These patients must be followed up by a multidisciplinary team and submitted to periodic tests. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  17. Conservative Management of Ovarian Fibroma in A Case of Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome Comorbid with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Nazari, Leila; Mehdizadeh-Kashi, Abolfazl; Vahdat, Mansoureh; Rokhgireh, Samaneh; Farbod, Ali; Tajbakhsh, Banafsheh

    2018-01-01

    Ovarian fibromas are the most common benign solid ovarian tumors, which are often difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Ovarian fibromas, especially in bilateral cases, may be cases of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS), a rare autosomal dominant disorder with predisposition to basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and other various benign and malignant tumors. This case report describes a 25 year-old female with GGS, bilateral ovarian fibroma, endometriosis and septated uterus, which was referred to the Gynecology Clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in October 2016. This patient had facial asymmetry due to recurrent odontogenic keratocysts. In young cases of ovarian fibromas as reported here, conservative surgical management can preserve ovarian function and fertility. These patients must be followed up by a multidisciplinary team and submitted to periodic tests. PMID:29334213

  18. Assessing the level of matrix metal proteinases 1,8,9, their tissue inhibitor, type I, in cases of odontogenic phlegmons.

    PubMed

    Markelova, E V; Romanchuk, A L; Prosekova, E V; Krasnikov, V E; Beniova, S N

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the measured values of the level of MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-9, and of their tissue inhibitor Type I (TIMP-1) in the blood serum and mixed saliva samples of 78 patients (31 women - 36.2 %, 47 men - 63.8 %) suffering from odontogenic phlegmons in the oral and maxillofacial region. The study indicators were assessed through the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using diagnostic sets RandD Diagnostics Inc. (USA). An uncontrolled hyperactivation of metal proteinases as one of the components of the systemic inflammatory response in case of phlegmon-related complications in the oral and maxillofacial region, as well as development of the sepsis syndrome were studied and it was determined that it results in distortion of the processes of reparative hystogeny and compel us to employ new approaches to the treatment of this type of patients (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 13).

  19. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23more » cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.« less

  20. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%–20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient’s outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. PMID:24787299

  1. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  3. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: An often missed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ninan; Vinod, Sankar V; George, Arun; Varghese, Aabu

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome due to its high variability in expression are often not diagnosed as the syndrome and often managed same as that of odontogenic keratocyst. But a more careful approach for the syndrome is needed as there is high chance of malignant changes owing to improper management of the syndrome. In this manuscript a case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with the diagnostic features of the same in Indian population along with the difference in treatment protocol from treating an odontogenic keratocyst is described with review of literature.

  4. Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: An often missed diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ninan; Vinod, Sankar V.; George, Arun; Varghese, Aabu

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome due to its high variability in expression are often not diagnosed as the syndrome and often managed same as that of odontogenic keratocyst. But a more careful approach for the syndrome is needed as there is high chance of malignant changes owing to improper management of the syndrome. In this manuscript a case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with the diagnostic features of the same in Indian population along with the difference in treatment protocol from treating an odontogenic keratocyst is described with review of literature PMID:27563620

  5. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome in a black child.

    PubMed

    Hall, J; Johnston, K A; McPhillips, J P; Barnes, S D; Elston, D M

    1998-02-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is rare in black persons. We describe an 11-year-old black boy with NBCCS who presented with exotropia and a painful, expanding, cystic mass in the left posterior alveolar ridge. Further examination revealed odontogenic keratocysts with palmar and plantar pitting. Less than 5% of reported patients with NBCCS are black. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a black patient with NBCCS presenting with exotropia and an impacted molar displaced into the orbit by an odontogenic keratocyst.

  6. Brain Tumor Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific Advisory Council & Reviewers The International Low Grade Glioma Registry Get Involved Advocacy Breakthrough for Brain Tumors ... an estimated 29,320 new cases in 2018. Gliomas , a broad term which includes all tumors arising ...

  7. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... are linked to known inherited syndromes, such as neurofibromatosis 2 and von Hippel-Lindau disease. Risk factors ... tumors are more common in people who have: Neurofibromatosis 2. In this hereditary disorder, benign tumors develop ...

  8. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Tumor Association Names Leslie M. Stokes Interim Chief Executive Officer and Begins Search for Permanent CEO September 7, ... American Brain Tumor Association Names Kelly Sitkin as Chief Advancement Officer Read More ABTA Live ABTA Facebook Follow @theabta ...

  9. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - Leydig cell; Testicular tumor - Leydig; Testicular neoplasm ... your provider if you have symptoms of testicular cancer. ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. National Cancer ... cancer treatment (PDQ) - health professional version. www.cancer. ...

  10. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  11. Early diagnosis of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Casaroto, Ana R; Loures, Daniela C N Rocha; Moreschi, Eduardo; Veltrini, Vanessa C; Trento, Cleverson L; Gottardo, Vilmar D; Lara, Vanessa S

    2011-01-25

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This article paper reports the case of a patient, a 10-year-old boy with NBCCS, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestations. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of NBCCS and in a preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  12. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    PubMed

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  13. Malignant tumors of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Cancer Research Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Renin-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Roswell, R H

    1990-02-01

    Hypertension resulting from a renin-secreting tumor was first reported in 1967 by Robertson et al. Kihara and coworkers subsequently coined the term juxtaglomerular cell tumor for a similar tumor in a young woman with hyperreninemic hypertension. Since the description of these first two cases, it has become clear that renin-secreting tumors of both renal and nonrenal origin can cause surgically curable hypertension. Primary reninism has been suggested as a more appropriate term for the clinical syndrome associated with renin-secreting tumors, both renal and extrarenal, whether benign or malignant.

  16. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  17. Immunology of intraocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y; Wang, Shixuan

    2005-02-01

    The immune surveillance hypothesis was introduced over 30 years ago and proposed that neoplasms express novel antigens that subjected them to immune detection and elimination. In order for immune surveillance to be effective in controlling neoplasms, two requirements must be satisfied: 1) the tumor must arise in a body site that permits the induction the full array of immune responses and 2) the immune elements generated must have unfettered access to the tumor and be able to express their entire range of effector functions at the tumor site. The unique immunologic and anatomic features of the eye prevent the induction and expression of conventional immunity--a phenomenon known as 'immune privilege'. Although ocular immune privilege represents a theoretical obstacle to immune surveillance, some highly immunogenic intraocular tumors can circumvent immune privilege and undergo immune rejection. Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in adults, yet it occurs with a frequency that is no higher than neoplasms arising in conventional bodies. The presence of either tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TIM) is associated with poor prognosis in uveal melanoma patients and suggests that some immune responses to intraocular tumors might exacerbate, rather than mitigate, tumor progression. Although counterintuitive, this proposition is consistent with the 'immune stimulation' hypothesis of tumor progression offered by Richmond Prehn over thirty years ago. It remains to be ascertained if immune stimulation affects the malignancy of ocular tumors, but it represents an intriguing explanation for the paradoxes of uveal melanoma.

  18. Miscellaneous rare paratesticular tumors.

    PubMed

    Henley, J D; Ferry, J; Ulbright, T M

    2000-11-01

    A few uncommon but distinctive tumors may preferentially involve the paratestis. The 3 unusual tumors that represent the focus of this discussion are the ovarian-type epithelial tumors (OTET), the desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT), and the melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI). The OTETs are testicular homologues of their more common namesake counterparts that arise in the ovary. Most frequent of these are serous tumors of borderline malignancy, with fewer cases of serous carcinomas or other forms of mullerian differentiation. DSRCT is an increasingly recognized, aggressive, "small blue cell" neoplasm with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. These polyphenotypic tumors characteristically, but not invariably, arise in intimate association with the serosal membrane of the peritoneal cavity and harbor a signature translocation-t(11;22)(p13,q12). In the paratestis they often involve the surface of the epididymis. The MNTI is an enigmatic, histologically distinctive, low-grade neoplasm occasionally encountered in the epididymis. Recognition of its features is essential to avoid misdiagnosis as a more aggressive "small blue cell" neoplasm and consequent therapeutic mismanagement. Primary hematopoietic tumors of the paratesticular structures are rare. There appears to be a tendency for young men to have low-grade lymphomas with an indolent course and older patients to develop higher-grade tumors. Plasmacytoma and granulocytic sarcoma of the paratestis are even more rare and are often susceptible to misinterpretation. Finally, metastatic tumors and a variety of other very rare neoplasms are discussed.

  19. Biomineralization, life-time of odontogenic cells and differential expression of the two homeobox genes MSX-1 and DLX-2 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lézot, F; Thomas, B; Hotton, D; Forest, N; Orestes-Cardoso, S; Robert, B; Sharpe, P; Berdal, A

    2000-03-01

    Msx and Dlx homeobox genes encode for transcription factors that control early morphogenesis. More specifically, Msx-1, Msx-2, and Dlx-2 homeobox genes contribute to the initial patterning of the dentition. The present study is devoted to the potential role of those homeobox genes during the late formation of mineralized tissues, using the rodent incisor as an experimental system. The continuously erupting mandibular incisor allows (1) the coinvestigation of the whole sequences of amelogenesis and dentinogenesis, aligned along the main dental axis in a single sample in situ and (2) the differential characterization of transcripts generated by epithelial and ectomesenchymal odontogenic cells. Northern blot experiments on microdissected cells showed the continuing expression of Msx-2 and Dlx-2 in the later stages of dental biomineralization, differentially in epithelial and ectomesenchymal compartments. Transgenic mice produced with LacZ reporter constructs for Dlx-2 and Msx-1 were used to detect different components of the gene expression patterns with the sensitive beta-galactosidase histoenzymology. The results show a prominent epithelial involvement of Dlx-2, with stage-specific variations in the cells involved in enamel formation. Quantitative analyses identified specific modulations of Dlx-2 expression in ameloblasts depending on the anatomical sites of the incisor, showing more specifically an inverse linear relationship between the Dlx-2 promoter activity level and enamel thickness. This investigation extends the role of homeoproteins to postmitotic stages, which would control secretory cell activity, in a site-specific manner as shown here for Dlx-2.

  20. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization identifies Mastermind-like 2 (MAML2) rearrangement in odontogenic cysts with mucous prosoplasia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wehrs, Rebecca N; García, Joaquín J; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of intraosseous mucoepidermoid carcinoma (IMEC) remains unknown. Coexistence with odontogenic cysts (ODC) has been reported in 32-48% of IMEC. Furthermore, prosoplastic mucous cells are often seen in the epithelial lining of ODCs. MECT1-MAML2 fusion transcripts have been identified in >66% of salivary gland MEC cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of MAML2 rearrangement in ODCs featuring mucous prosoplasia. Ten cases of ODC with a mucous cell component and three cases of IMEC were evaluated using fluorescence in-situ hybridization. All cases occurred in the mandible. The ODCs exhibited a M:F ratio of 4:1 (mean age 49.2 years), while all IMECs occurred in women (mean age 68.3 years). All three IMECs demonstrated MAML2 rearrangement, in 26-61% of tumour cells. Successful hybridization was observed in nine of 10 cases of ODC. In two of these nine, there was MAML2 rearrangement in 12% and 24% of the lining epithelial cells, while three of the nine showed rearrangement in 7-8% of cells; the remaining four cases were negative. We identified MAML2 rearrangements in five of nine ODCs lined by mucus-secreting cells. This suggests that at least a subset of ODCs with mucous prosoplasia are characterized by molecular events considered diagnostic for intraosseous and extraosseous MEC. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comparison of osteo/odontogenic differentiation of human adult dental pulp stem cells and stem cells from apical papilla in the presence of platelet lysate.

    PubMed

    Abuarqoub, Duaa; Awidi, Abdalla; Abuharfeil, Nizar

    2015-10-01

    Human dental pulp cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from apical papilla have been used for the repair of damaged tooth tissues. Human platelet lysate (PL) has been suggested as a substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for large scale expansion of dental stem cells. However, biological effects and optimal concentrations of PL for proliferation and differentiation of human dental stem cells remain to be elucidated. DPSCs and SCAP cells were isolated from impacted third molars of young healthy donors, at the stage of root development and identified by markers using flow cytometry. For comparison the cells were cultured in media containing PL (1%, 5% and 10%) and FBS, with subsequent induction for osteogenic/odontogenic differentiation. The cultures were analyzed for; morphology, growth characteristics, mineralization potential (Alizarin Red method) and differentiation markers using ELISA and real time -polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The proliferation rates of DPSCs and SCAP significantly increased when cells were treated with 5% PL (7X doubling time) as compared to FBS. 5% PL also enhanced mineralized differentiation of DPSCs and SCAP, as indicated by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin and osteopontin, calcium deposition and q-PCR. Our findings suggest that using 5% platelet lysate, proliferation and osteo/odontogenesis of DPSCs and SCAP for a short period of time (15 days), was significantly improved. This may imply its use as an optimum concentration for expansion of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tumor microenvironment is multifaceted.

    PubMed

    Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Damotte, Diane; Fisson, Sylvain; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Cremer, Isabelle; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline

    2011-03-01

    Cancer initiation, progression, and invasion occur in a complex and dynamic microenvironment which depends on the hosts and sites where tumors develop. Tumors arising in mucosal tissues may progress in an inflammatory context linked to local viral and/or bacterial infections. At the opposite, tumors developing in immunoprivileged sites are protected from microorganisms and grow in an immunosuppressive environment. In the present review, we summarize and present our recent data on the influence of infectious context and immune cell infiltration organization in human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers (NSCLC) progression. We show that stimulation of tumor cells by TLR for viral ssRNA, such as TLR7/8, or bacteria, such as TLR4, promotes cell survival and induces chemoresistance. On the opposite, stimulation by TLR3, receptor for double-stranded viral RNA, decreases tumor cell viability and induces chemosensitivity in some lung tumor cell lines. Since fresh lung tumor cells exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of TLR-stimulated lung tumor cell lines, we suspect that viral and bacterial influence may not only act on the host immune system but also directly on tumor growth and sensitivity to chemotherapy. The stroma of NSCLC contains tertiary lymphoid structures (or Tumor-induced Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissues (Ti-BALT)) with mature DC, follicular DC, and T and B cells. Two subsets of immature DC, Langerhans cells (LC) and interstitial DC (intDC), were detected in the tumor nests and the stroma, respectively. Here, we show that the densities of the three DC subsets, mature DC, LC, and intDC, are highly predictive of disease-specific survival in a series of 74 early-stage NSCLC patients. We hypothesize that the mature DC may derive from local activation and migration of the immature DC--and especially LC which contact the tumor cells--to the tertiary lymphoid structures, after sampling and processing of the tumor antigens. In view of the prominent role of DC in

  3. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Immunomodulation of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Prehn, Richmond T.

    1974-01-01

    Most and perhaps all neoplasms arouse an immune response in their hosts. Unfortunately, this response is seldom effective in limiting tumor growth. Immunologic surveillance, as originally conceived, probably does not exist. The early weak response to nascent tumors stimulates rather than inhibits their growth. A truly tumor-limiting reaction occurs only in exceptional tumor systems, and then it is relatively late and ineffectual. Immunity may be of great importance in limiting the activity of oncogenic viruses, but is probably seldom the determiner of whether or not an already transformed cell gives rise to a lethal cancer. PMID:4548632

  5. [Pituitary gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Jesser, J; Schlamp, K; Bendszus, M

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65% of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50% secrete prolactin, 10% secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6% secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10% of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland.

  6. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  7. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  8. Pathophysiology of Tumor Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Mitsuko; Nishiyama, Mariko; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi; Kimura, Sadao; Ishikura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Neovascularization is essential to the process of development and differentiation of tissues in the vertebrate embryo, and is also involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions in adults, including wound repair, metabolic diseases, inflammation, cardiovascular disorders, and tumor progression. Thanks to cumulative studies on vasculature, new therapeutic approaches have been opened for us to some life-threatening diseases by controlling angiogenesis in the affected organs. In cancer therapy, for example, modulation of factors responsible for tumor angiogenesis may be beneficial in inhibiting of tumor progression. Several antiangiogenic approaches are currently under preclinical trial. However, the mechanisms of neovascularization in tumors are complicated and each tumor shows unique features in its vasculature, depending on tissue specificity, angiogenic micromilieu, grades and stages, host immunity, and so on. For better understanding and effective therapeutic approaches, it is important to clarify both the general mechanism of angiogenic events and the disease-specific mechanism of neovascularization. This review discusses the general features of angiogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions, mainly in tumor progression. In addition, recent topics such as contribution of the endothelial progenitor cells, tumor vasculogenic mimicry, markers for tumor-derived endothelial cells and pericytes, and angiogenic/angiostatic chemokines are summarized. PMID:17315600

  9. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies for neuronal differentiation in glial tumors revealed subsets of tumors having both characteristics of glial and neuronal lineages. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation can be observed with diverse phenotypes and histologic grades. The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and papillary glioneuronal tumor have been newly classified as distinct disease entities. There are other candidates for classification, such as the glioneuronal tumor without pseudopapillary architecture, glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands, and the malignant glioneuronal tumor. The clinical significance of these previously unclassified tumors should be confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Metz, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) have long fascinated clinicians and investigators despite their relative rarity. Their clinical presentation varies depending upon whether the tumor is functional or not and also according to the specific hormonal syndrome produced. Tumors may be sporadic or inherited but little is known about their molecular pathology, especially the sporadic forms. Chromogranin A appears to be the most useful serum marker for diagnosis, staging and monitoring. Initially, therapy should be directed at the hormonal syndrome as this has the major initial impact on the patient's health. Most PETs are relatively indolent but ultimately malignant, except for insulinomas which are predominantly benign. Surgery is the only modality that offers the possibility of cure although it is generally noncurative in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or nonfunctional PETs with MEN1. Preoperative staging of disease extent is necessary to determine the likelihood of complete resection though debulking surgery is often felt to be useful in unresectable patients. Once metastatic, biotherapy is usually the first modality employed because it is generally well tolerated. Systemic or regional therapies are generally reserved until symptoms occur or tumor growth is rapid. Recently a number of newer agents, as well as receptor-directed radiotherapy, are being evalulated for patients with advanced disease. This review addresses a number of recent advances regarding the molecular pathology, diagnosis, localization and management of PETs including discussion of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and other novel antitumor approaches. We conclude with a discussion of future directions and unsettled problems in the field. PMID:18703061

  11. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  12. Tumor microenvironment indoctrination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nastiness of cancer does not only reside in the corruption of cancer cells by genetic aberrations that drive their sustained proliferative power—the roots of malignancy—but also in its aptitude to reciprocally sculpt its surrounding environment and cellular stromal ecosystem, in such a way that the corrupted tumor microenvironment becomes a full pro-tumorigenic entity. Such a contribution had been appreciated three decades ago already, with the discovery of tumor angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling. Nevertheless, the recent emergence of the tumor microenvironment as the critical determinant in cancer biology is paralleled by the promising therapeutic potential it carries, opening alternate routes to fight cancer. The study of the tumor microenvironment recruited numerous lead-scientists over the years, with distinct perspectives, and some of them have kindly accepted to contribute to the elaboration of this special issue entitled Tumor microenvironment indoctrination: An emerging hallmark of cancer. PMID:22863738

  13. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. General Information about Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Kidney Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. The Tumor Macroenvironment: Cancer-Promoting Networks Beyond Tumor Beds.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  17. Treatment Options for Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACTH . A clinical trial of stereotactic radiation surgery . Growth Hormone–Producing Pituitary Tumors Treatment may include the ... Drug therapy to stop the tumor from making growth hormone . Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone–Producing Tumors Treatment may ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACTH . A clinical trial of stereotactic radiation surgery . Growth Hormone–Producing Pituitary Tumors Treatment may include the ... Drug therapy to stop the tumor from making growth hormone . Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone–Producing Tumors Treatment may ...

  19. Subconjunctival epidermoid cysts in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Craene, S; Batteauw, A; Van Lint, M; Claerhout, I; Decock, C

    2014-08-01

    Epidermoid cysts are common benign cysts which occur particularly on the skin of the face, neck and upper trunk. Subconjunctival location of these cysts is very rare and, until today, only seen in patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Histopathological examination of these cysts show similarities with odontogenic keratocysts, a typical clinical manifestation of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  20. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali Akhtar; Perveen, Saima; Raza, Naeem; Ali Bukhari, Syed Gulzar

    2014-11-01

    A 12 years old girl was presented with bilateral swellings on angle and body of mandible. On general physical examination, there were polydactyly and papular lesions on arm. Histopathology of mandibular lesions revealed odontogenic keratocysts. Marsupialization of the cysts followed by enucleation was done. The patient was reviewed every six months and there was no recurrence at the end of two years.

  1. Basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome): genetic insights, diagnostic challenges, and unmet milestones.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Maryam; Chen, Harold; Guo, Grace; Legan, Zachary; Ghali, Ghali

    2018-01-31

    In this article, we present three clinical case reports on Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome). Gorlin syndrome is an inherited medical condition with challenges that manifest in multiple body systems and complicate early diagnosis. We examine the epidemiology of the disease and benefits of genetic testing, molecular pathophysiology, and advancement in the molecular-based therapy of Basal Cell Nevus syndrome. The goal of this paper is to shed light on both unmet challenges and advancements in the management of Gorlin syndrome and to provide a new clinical perspective and guidance for future research. Furthermore, the FDA approved Hedgehog pathway inhibitors Vismodegib and Sonidegib designed for advanced basal cell carcinoma have opened a new door for treatment that may ultimately decrease the number of surgeries for a patient with Gorlin syndrome. The role of these agents in syndromic odontogenic keratocyst has not been studied extensively, but one study found that hedgehog pathway inhibitors decrease the size of syndromic odontogenic keratocyst. Ideal surgical treatment that balances low recurrence rates with low impact on one's quality of life for syndromic odontogenic keratocyst is another unanswered question for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Per survey studies, treatment options practiced for syndromic odontogenic keratocyst range from marsupialization to segmental osteotomy. Future studies performed should take a comprehensive long-term approach with at least three years of follow-up in order to determine the most appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  3. PTCH1 Germline Mutations and the Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma Values in the Tumor Spectrum of Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS).

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Marco; Pastorino, Lorenza; Maccaferri, Monia; Tomasi, Aldo; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCC), odontogenic tumors and various skeletal anomalies. Basaloid follicular hamartomas (BFHs) constitute rare neoplasms that can be detected in sporadic and familial settings as in the Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma Syndrome (BFHS). Although BFHS shares clinical, histopathological and genetic overlapping with the NBCCS, they are still considered two distinctive entities. The aim of our single-institution study was the analysis of a cohort of PTCH1-mutated patients in order to define clinical and biomolecular relationship between NBCCS and BFHs. In our study we evaluated PTCH1 gene-carrier probands affected by NBCCS to detect the incidence of BFHs and their correlation with this rare syndrome. Among probands we recognized 4 patients with BFHs. We found 15 germline PTCH1 mutations, uniformly distributed across the PTCH1 gene. Six of them had familial history of NBCCS, two of them were novel and have not been described previously. NBCCS and BFHS may be the same genetic entity and not two distinctive syndromes. The inclusion of BFH in the NBCCS cutaneous tumor spectrum might be useful for the recognition of misdiagnosed NBCCS cases that could benefit from tailored surveillance strategies. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Retrospective analysis of nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as endodontic apical periodontitis lesions in a population of Taiwanese patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsun-Yu; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Ko, Edward Cheng-Chuan; Chuang, Fu-Hsiung; Chen, Ping-Ho; Chen, Ching-Yi; Wang, Wen-Chen

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate nonendodontic periapical lesions clinically misdiagnosed as endodontic periapical pathoses in a population of Taiwanese patients. Cases (2000-2014) of histopathological diagnoses of nonendodontic periapical lesions were retrieved from all cases with a clinical diagnosis of radicular cyst, apical granuloma, or apical periodontitis in the institution. These cases were regarded as misdiagnosed nonendodontic periapical lesions, of which the types and frequencies, in addition to the demographic data, were determined. Four thousand and four specimens were clinically diagnosed as endodontically associated pathoses, of which 118 cases (2.95%) received a histopathological diagnosis of a nonendodontic pathologic entity, the most frequent lesion being keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, n = 38, 32.20%), followed by fibro-osseous lesion (n = 18, 15.25%), and dentigerous cyst (n = 13, 11.02%). Nine malignant lesions in the periapical area [squamous cell carcinoma (n = 7, 5.93%), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 1, 0.85%), and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (n = 1, 0.85%)] were also noted. A wide variety of histopathological diagnoses, including benign odontogenic and non-odontogenic cystic and tumorous lesions and infectious diseases, as well as malignant lesions, was noted in these 118 cases of nonendodontic periapical lesions. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most predominant malignancy of nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as apical periodontitis lesions from imaging examination overlooking the clinical findings. The current data form a useful basis for clinicopathological investigation and educational teaching regarding nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as endodontic apical periodontitis lesions.

  5. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain, the type of tissue involved, the original location of the tumor, and other factors. In rare cases, doctors do not know the original location. This is called cancer of unknown primary ( ...

  6. Allogeneic tumor cell vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina M; Bozeman, Erica N; Imasuen, Imade E; He, Sara; Daniels, Danielle; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cancer and its resistance to conventional treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy has led to the investigation of a variety of anti-cancer immunotherapies. The development of novel immunotherapies has been bolstered by the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), through gene sequencing and proteomics. One such immunotherapy employs established allogeneic human cancer cell lines to induce antitumor immunity in patients through TAA presentation. Allogeneic cancer immunotherapies are desirable in a clinical setting due to their ease of production and availability. This review aims to summarize clinical trials of allogeneic tumor immunotherapies in various cancer types. To date, clinical trials have shown limited success due potentially to extensive degrees of inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity found among cancer patients. However, these clinical results provide guidance for the rational design and creation of more effective allogeneic tumor immunotherapies for use as monotherapies or in combination with other therapies. PMID:24064957

  7. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ...

  8. Brain Tumor Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their Management Support and Resources Caregiver Resource Center Pediatric Caregiver ...

  9. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Director of Heart Failure, and Director of Cardiac MRI, Providence VA Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Institute ... stroke . Diagnosis Imaging with echocardiography, CT, and/or MRI Primary heart tumors are difficult to diagnose because ...

  10. [Choroid plexus tumors].

    PubMed

    Pianetti, G; Fonseca, L F

    1998-06-01

    This analysis comprises 15 children under 16 years of age, with choroid plexus tumors, seen in the Service of Paediatric Neurosurgery, Hospital das Clínicas and Hospital São Francisco de Assis in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, between 1981 and 1996. The patients were aged between 4 months and 16 years (average of 3 years and a half); 10 were less than 2 years, 9 were female; 14 children had clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension. All the children underwent CT scan and the choroid plexus tumors were clearly demonstrated in 14 of then. In 8 children the tumors were located in one lateral ventricle, 5 in the fourth ventricle and 2 had the tumors in more than one ventricle, 11 children required ventriculo-peritoneal shunt; 14 cases were operated on, 13 with total excision; 2 children died, respectively 7 days and one year after the surgery. Pathological examination revealed papillomas in 12 cases and carcinoma in two cases.

  11. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  12. Tracheal and bronchial tumors.

    PubMed

    Varela, Patricio; Pio, Luca; Brandigi, Elisa; Paraboschi, Irene; Khen-Dunlop, Nazhia; Hervieux, Erik; Muller, Cecile; Mattioli, Girolamo; Sarnacki, Sabine; Torre, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Although primary tracheobronchial tumors are extremely rare in children, recurrent respiratory symptoms resistant to conventional therapy require further investigations to exclude possible malignant obstructive causes. As the matter of fact, early diagnosis may allow minimally invasive surgeries, improving the standard of living and the globally survival rate. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of diagnosis and management of tracheobronchial tumors in the early age, since only few reports are reported in the worldwide literature.

  13. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-01

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  14. Tumoral and Choroidal Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Maud; Maillard, Catherine; Lecomte, Julie; Lambert, Vincent; Tjwa, Marc; Blaise, Pierre; Alvarez Gonzalez, Maria-Luz; Bajou, Khalid; Blacher, Silvia; Motte, Patrick; Humblet, Chantal; Defresne, Marie Paule; Thiry, Marc; Frankenne, Francis; Gothot, André; Carmeliet, Peter; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès

    2007-01-01

    An adequate balance between serine proteases and their plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is critical for pathological angiogenesis. PAI-1 deficiency in mice is associated with impaired choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and tumoral angiogenesis. In the present work, we demonstrate unexpected differences in the contribution of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in these two processes regulated by PAI-1. PAI-1−/− mice grafted with BM-derived from wild-type mice were able to support laser-induced CNV formation but not skin carcinoma vascularization. Engraftment of irradiated wild-type mice with PAI-1−/− BM prevented CNV formation, demonstrating the crucial role of PAI-1 delivered by BM-derived cells. In contrast, the transient infiltration of tumor transplants by local PAI-1-producing host cells rather than by BM cells was sufficient to rescue tumor growth and angiogenesis in PAI-1-deficient mice. These data identify PAI-1 as a molecular determinant of a local permissive soil for tumor angiogenesis. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that different cellular mechanisms contribute to PAI-1-regulated tumoral and CNV. PAI-1 contributes to BM-dependent choroidal vascularization and to BM-independent tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:17717143

  15. [A rare parotid tumor].

    PubMed

    Doh, Kwame; Thiam, Ibou; Takin, Romulus Carmen Adechina; Sonhaye, Khaled; Woto-Gaye, Gisèle

    2018-06-04

    Sebaceous lymphadenoma of the parotid (SLP) is a rare, benign tumor with similar epidemiological and macroscopic characteristics with other sebaceous differentiated tumors of the parotid (SDTP). The authors report a case of SLP in an 80-year-old woman. They then recall the distinctive histological and immunohistochemical criteria of SDTP. Mrs P. D. was received during a surgical consultation for the management of a painless right parotid swelling that has evolved for 10years, increasing slightly in volume. At admission, the mass was movable, firm with a healthy skin without facial paralysis or satellite lymphadenopathy. The surgical intervention performed removed a nodular mass measuring 7cm, encapsulated, yellowish. It was made of regular epithelial cells without atypia or mitoses organized in nests, trabeculae and massifs. This tumor also included small canalicular cystic dilatations associated with several islands of sebaceous glands. The stroma was dense lymphoid with follicles and germinal centers. The tumor cells were CK7+, P63+, MSA+ and had a Ki67<5%. The diagnosis of an SLP was retained. No additional therapy was performed. One year after surgery, the patient had no local recurrence or metastatic foci. SLP is a rare tumor with a particular histological and immunohistochemical profile. It is an epithelial tumor with sebaceous islands, a dense reactional lymphoid stroma, expression of luminal and basal epithelial markers and a low proliferation index. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Pancreatic cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Salvia, R; Festa, L; Butturini, G; Tonsi, A; Sartori, N; Biasutti, C; Capelli, P; Pederzoli, P

    2004-04-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than other tumors in neoplastic pancreatic pathology, but in recent years the literature has reported an increasing number. After the first report by Becourt in 1830, cystic tumors were classified into 2 different types by Compagno and Oertel in 1978: benign tumors with glycogen-rich cells and mucinous cystic neoplasms with overt and latent malignancy. The WHO classification of exocrine tumors of the pancreas, published in 1996, is based on the histopathological features of the epithelial wall, which are the main factor in differential diagnosis with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Thanks to the knowledge acquired up to now, a surgical procedure is not always required because the therapeutic choice is conditioned by the correct classification of this heterogeneous group of tumors. Clinical signs are not really useful in the clinical work up, most patients have no symptoms and when clinical signs are present, they may help us to pinpoint the organ of origin but never to identify the type of pathology. In the last few years, the great improvement in imaging has enabled us not only to discriminate cystic from solid lesions, but also to identify the features of the lesions and label them preoperatively. More invasive diagnostic procedures such as fine needle aspiration and intracystic fluid tumor marker level are not really useful because they are not sensitive and the cystic wall can show different degrees of dysplasia and de-epithelialization. These are the reasons for sending the entire specimen to pathology. Good cooperation between surgeons, pathologists, radiologists and gastroenterologists is mandatory to increase the chances of making a proper diagnosis. Therefore, we must analyze all the information we have, such as age, sex, clinical history, location of the tumor and radiological features, in order to avoid the mistake of treating a cystic neoplasm as a benign lesion or as a pseudocyst, as described in the

  17. Gorlin syndrome with an ovarian leiomyoma associated with a PTCH1 second hit.

    PubMed

    Akizawa, Yoshika; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Ryo; Nagata, Reiko; Aoki, Ryoko; Ishitani, Ken; Nagashima, Yoji; Matsui, Hideo; Saito, Kayoko

    2016-04-01

    We describe a Gorlin syndrome (GS) case with two different second hit mutations of PTCH1, one in a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and the other in an ovarian leiomyoma. GS is a rare genetic condition manifesting as multiple basal cell nevi associated with other features such as medulloblastomas, skeletal abnormalities, and ovarian fibromas. A 21-year-old Japanese woman with a history of two KCOTs was diagnosed with GS according to clinical criteria. A PTCH1 mutation, c.1427del T, was detected in peripheral blood. A novel PTCH1 mutation, c.264_265insAATA, had been found in the maxillary KCOT as a second hit mutation. More recently, the ovarian tumor was detected during a gynecological examination. Laparoscopic adnexectomy was performed, and the pathological diagnosis of the ovarian tumor was leiomyoma. Interestingly, another novel mutation, loss of heterozygosity spanning from 9q22.32 to 9q31.2, including PTCH1 and 89 other genes, was detected in this ovarian tumor, providing evidence of a second hit mutation. This is the first report describing a GS-associated ovarian tumor carrying a second hit in the PTCH1 region. We anticipate that accumulation of more cases will clarify the importance of second hit mutations in ovarian tumor formation in GS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Optical imaging of tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yihan; Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Jinbo; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays important roles in tumor development and metastasis. Features of the tumor microenvironment that are significantly different from normal tissues include acidity, hypoxia, overexpressed proteases and so on. Therefore, these features can serve as not only biomarkers for tumor diagnosis but also theraputic targets for tumor treatment. Imaging modalities such as optical, positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been intensively applied to investigate tumor microenvironment. Various imaging probes targeting pH, hypoxia and proteases in tumor microenvironment were thus well developed. In this review, we will focus on recent examples on fluorescent probes for optical imaging of tumor microenvironment. Construction of these fluorescent probes were based on characteristic feature of pH, hypoxia and proteases in tumor microenvironment. Strategies for development of these fluorescent probes and applications of these probes in optical imaging of tumor cells or tissues will be discussed in this review paper. PMID:23342297

  19. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manjima, S; Naik, Zameera; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana

    2015-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome.

  20. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manjima, S.; Naik, Zameera; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome. PMID:25821359

  1. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  2. Ovarian tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, M; Barlow, J J

    1978-09-01

    Evidence has been reported for at least two common tumor-associated antigens, or antigenic determinants, in human cystadenocarcinomas of the ovary that are apparently absent in tissues of normal reproductive organs. These antigenic determinants are immunologically distinct from carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha-fetoprotein, ferritins and histocompatibility antigens. One of these two ovarian cystadenocarcinoma-associated antigens (OCAA) is not detectable in any ovarian carcinomas except serous or mucinous types, other gynecologic or nongynecologic malignancies thus far tested, while the second antigen is present in about 90% of all gynecologic tumors and occasionally in breast and colon tumors. OCAA has been purified and partially characterized. It is a high molecular weight glycoprotein which carries the unique ovarian tumor-specific antigenic determinant along with some normal cross-reacting determinants. High levels of this glycoprotein antigen have been detected in the sera of ovarian cancer patients with advanced disease by the radioimmunoassay inhibition technique. The serial determination of circulating OCAA appeared to correlate with tumor volume as well as the clinical status of the patients.

  3. Testis tumor associated to microlithiasis.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Lisieux Eyer de; Maciel, Felipe; Monnerat, Andrea Lima C; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Dekermache, Samuel

    2013-12-01

    To discuss the relationship between testicular microlithiasis and testis tumors in children and to consider the chances of testis preserving surgery in specific cases. Pre-adolescent presenting testicular microlithiasis and a larger left testis, corresponding to a cystic testicular tumor. The tumor was excised, with ipsilateral testis preservation. Histology diagnosed a testis dermoid tumor. The relationship between testis tumors and testicular microlithiasis is ill defined in children. Pediatric urologists need to develop specific follow-up protocols for pre-pubertal children.

  4. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and reviewmore » the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.« less

  6. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border and the surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stochastic partial differential equations are reported in this paper in order to correctly model the physical properties of tumoral growth in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions. The advantage of these models is that they reproduce the correct geometry of the tumor and are defined in terms of polar variables. An analysis of these models allows us to quantitatively estimate the response of the tumor to an unfavorable perturbation during growth.

  7. Lacrimal gland tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abeloff's Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 67. Yanoff M, Cameron JD. Diseases of the visual system. In: ... Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 423. Review ... Benign Tumors Read more Eye Cancer ...

  8. Types of Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... already registered, you will receive periodic updates and communications from American Brain Tumor Association. Keep me logged in. What's this? Remembers your login information for your convenience. Use only on trusted, private computers. Privacy Policy Spam Control Text: Please leave this ...

  9. Recurrence of Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... already registered, you will receive periodic updates and communications from American Brain Tumor Association. Keep me logged in. What's this? Remembers your login information for your convenience. Use only on trusted, private computers. Privacy Policy Spam Control Text: Please leave this ...

  10. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  11. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most tumors of the posterior fossa are primary brain cancers. They start in the brain, rather than spreading from somewhere else in the ... nausea, vomiting, or vision changes. Alternative Names ... JF, Hollander AB, Alonso-Basanta M, et al. Cancer of the central nervous system. In: Niederhuber JE, ...

  12. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  13. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  14. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  15. Find a Brain Tumor Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to Give Charitable Shopping Close Find a Brain Tumor Center Below is a listing of brain ... center is in your insurance plan’s covered network Brain Tumor Treatment Centers: Filter: Mayo Clinic Arizona Mayo ...

  16. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  17. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... The Sertoli cells are normally located in the male reproductive glands (the testes). They feed sperm cells. The Leydig cells, also ...

  18. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tube, & Primary Peritoneal Cancer Screening Research Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment Option Overview ... types of treatment for patients with ovarian germ cell tumors. Different types of treatment are available for ...

  19. Escape From Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    addressed using a novel organotypic bioreactor in which tumor cells can be followed for weeks to months, the process of seeding, dormancy and...and Kupffer cells (months 7-24) 3. seed bioreactors with cells (months 1-24) 4. label tumor cells for fluorescence (months 1-6) 5. label tumor... cells for mass reporting (months 3-9) Objective 2: 1. generate liver organ bioreactors for tumor cell seeding (months 3-24) 2. seed organotypic

  20. Radiological review of pleural tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Thukral, Brij Bhushan; Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Mittal, Aliza; Sinha, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the pleura are not uncommon and diagnosis is clinched by combined imaging and clinical correlation. Malignant tumors are more common than benign tumors. Initial imaging modalities are chest radiography and Computed Tomography (CT). Further characterization may be required using Ultrasoundgraphy (USG), Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) and PET-CT. Biopsy remains gold standard. This article highlights various common and uncommon tumors of pleura and characteristic imaging findings. PMID:24604935

  1. [Benign bone tumors. General principles].

    PubMed

    Hillmann, A; Gösling, T

    2014-10-01

    Benign bone tumors and tumor-like lesions are much more frequent than malignant bone tumors among the total number of tumors of the skeleton. This article gives a presentation of the characteristics and treatment modalities of benign bone tumors. In this article in-house treatment principles are compared with those in the currently available literature. Benign bone tumors are frequently found incidentally; however, the term benign does not always signify that a purely observational role is needed. Benign bone tumors differ in their biological behavior and can be latent, active or aggressive which determines the treatment approach. Some benign bone tumors are just as aggressive locally as malignant tumors. The most important diagnostic feature is still conventional radiography and a thorough systematic analysis is necessary. Therapy options range from ignore, wait and see up to wide resection. In contrast to malignant tumors the radicalism of resection can be weighed against the accompanying local control and loss of function. The treatment of benign bone tumors depends on the histological type and the biological activity. Most benign bone tumors are diagnosed incidentally and do not necessitate any treatment.

  2. Obesity: an endocrine tumor?

    PubMed

    Dizdar, Omer; Alyamaç, Evrim

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most common disorders in clinical practice. The prevalance of obesity has increased by more than 60% since 1990. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ secreting many factors into the blood, known as adipokines, including leptin, adipsin, acylation-stimulating protein, adiponectin, etc. This article examines the hypothesis that obesity may be evaluated as an endocrine tumor, regarding its genetic basis, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes, neovascularisation within the adipose tissue associated with growth, and beneficisal metabolic effects of surgical removal of excess adipose tissue by liposuction. Assuming obesity as an endocrine tumor may bring out new treatment modalities. Liposuction as "cytoreductive surgery", antiangiogenic teraphy or anti-neoplastic drugs may be important components of obesity treatment in future.

  3. Differential tumor microenvironment in human ovarian cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tavares Murta, Beatriz Martins; Cunha, Fernando de Queiróz; Miranda, Rodrigo; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2004-01-01

    Cells and soluble mediators obtained from tumor effusions are useful in evaluating the tumor microenvironment. Our aim was to examine cytologically and to quantify the leukocyte infiltrate, nitric oxide, cytokines and tumor markers in the intracystic fluid from patients with a cystic adnexal mass, for a possible differentiation between benign and malignant findings. Sixty-six women who had their cystic fluids collected were prospectively divided into benign tumor (22, 33.3%), malignant tumor (10, 15.2%) or other gynecological alterations (34, 51.5%). Cytology, total and differential leukocyte counts were determined by light microscopy. Tumor markers, cytokines and nitric oxide were assayed in the supernatants using the Immulite system, ELISA and Griess reaction, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the cytological analysis was 66.7% and 97.7%, respectively. The levels of CA 19.9, CA 15.3, alpha-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, progesterone and beta-HCG were significantly higher in the benign and/or malignant group than in the other gynecological alterations. Also, the local concentrations of CA 15.3 and beta-HCG were significantly higher in malignant than in benign tumors. In malignant tumors, increased leukocyte counts and higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-10 and nitric oxide were detected than in benign tumors or other gynecological alterations. In malignant tumors, the microenvironment could be differentiated from benign tumors or other gynecological alterations by cystic fluid analysis.

  4. [Epidemiology of lung tumors].

    PubMed

    Ott, S; Geiser, T

    2012-07-01

    Approximately one out of 500 chest radiographs shows the incidental finding of a solitary pulmonary nodule and almost one half of these pulmonary lesions are caused by a tumor. Unfortunately, only 2% to 5% of all lung tumors are of benign origin, e. g. lipoma, fibroma, hamartoma, and chondroma, and the majority are malignant neoplasms, most commonly primary lung cancer followed by metastases of extrapulmonary primary carcinomas. Thus, a careful diagnostic work up of solitary pulmonary nodules, including histological diagnosis, is mandatory for an adequate management and treatment of patients with pulmonary lesions. Despite all recent improvements of treatment modalities, lung cancer continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among malignant diseases worldwide. The prognosis of affected patients is still very poor and a 5-years survival rate of only 14% makes lung cancer the number one cause of death due to cancer in Switzerland. Active and passive tobacco smoking are by far the best known risk factor for the development of lung cancer, but there are severe other probably less known factors that may increase the individual risk for malignant neoplasms of the lung. These risk factors include e. g. exposure to natural ionic radiation, consisting of terrestrial radiation and indoor radiation caused by radon gas, exposure to respirable dust and Diesel engine emissions, asbestos, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the majority of cases, the latency between exposure and development of cancer is years to decades and the person concerned was occupationally exposed. Therefore, a detailed evaluation of a patient's medical and occupational history is needed. Due to its poor prognosis, prevention and early diagnosis of lung cancer is crucial to improve our patients' outcome. Good knowledge of epidemiology and aetiology of pulmonary tumors is the key to preventive measures and identification of individuals at increased risk for lung cancer. An overview will

  5. Characterization of the Tumor Secretome from Tumor Interstitial Fluid (TIF).

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) surrounds and perfuses bodily tumorigenic tissues and cells, and can accumulate by-products of tumors and stromal cells in a relatively local space. Interstitial fluid offers several important advantages for biomarker and therapeutic target discovery, especially for cancer. Here, we describe the most currently accepted method for recovering TIF from tumor and nonmalignant tissues that was initially performed using breast cancer tissue. TIF recovery is achieved by passive extraction of fluid from small, surgically dissected tissue specimens in phosphate-buffered saline. We also present protocols for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of snap-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor sections and for proteomic profiling of TIF and matched tumor samples by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) to enable comparative analysis of tumor secretome and paired tumor tissue.

  6. Testis tumor associated to microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Maciel, Felipe; Monnerat, Andrea Lima C.; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Dekermache, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the relationship between testicular microlithiasis and testis tumors in children and to consider the chances of testis preserving surgery in specific cases. CASE DESCRIPTION: Pre-adolescent presenting testicular microlithiasis and a larger left testis, corresponding to a cystic testicular tumor. The tumor was excised, with ipsilateral testis preservation. Histology diagnosed a testis dermoid tumor. COMMENTS: The relationship between testis tumors and testicular microlithiasis is ill defined in children. Pediatric urologists need to develop specific follow-up protocols for pre-pubertal children. PMID:24473964

  7. Collecting Tumor Samples From Patients With Gynecological Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Borderline Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Borderline Ovarian Serous Tumor; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Childhood Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Malignant Mesothelioma; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Melanoma; Neoplasm of Uncertain Malignant Potential; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Vulva; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vaginal Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell

  8. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  9. Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and redirects tumor phenotype in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

    PubMed

    Easter, Stephanie L; Mitchell, Elizabeth H; Baxley, Sarah E; Desmond, Renee; Frost, Andra R; Serra, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt that has been implicated in tumor suppression. We previously showed that loss of Wnt5a in MMTV-PyVmT tumors resulted in a switch in tumor phenotype resulting in tumors with increased basal phenotype and high Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that Wnt5a can act to inhibit tumors formed by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To this end, we characterized tumor and non-tumor mammary tissue from MMTV-Wnt1 and double transgenic MMTV-Wnt1;MMTV-Wnt5a mice. Wnt5a containing mice demonstrated fewer tumors with increased latency when compared to MMTV-Wnt1 controls. Expression of markers for basal-like tumors was down-regulated in the tumors that formed in the presence of Wnt5a indicating a phenotypic switch. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling was detected in double transgenic tumors as a decrease in active β-catenin protein and a decrease in Axin2 mRNA transcript levels. In non-tumor tissues, over-expression of Wnt5a in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary glands resulted in attenuation of phenotypes normally observed in MMTV-Wnt1 glands including hyperbranching and increased progenitor and basal cell populations. Even though Wnt5a could antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary mammary epithelial cells in culture, reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling was not detected in non-tumor MMTV-Wnt1;Wnt5a tissue in vivo. The data demonstrate that Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and promotes a phenotypic shift in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

  10. Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-27

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  11. Management of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-11-01

    Current strategies for managing neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in adult patients are reviewed, with a focus on medication safety concerns. NETs usually originate in the gastrointestinal or bronchopulmonary tract. Symptoms due to hormonal hypersecretion often occur in patients with foregut or midgut NETs or liver metastases. Surgical resection is recommended for most localized NETs, while systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy is typically used for high-grade and pancreatic tumors. The standard of care for metastatic NETs is somatostatin analog therapy with octreotide (available in both short- and long-acting formulations) or a depot formulation of lanreotide. Everolimus and sunitinib are targeted therapies with approved indications for use in treating advanced pancreatic NETs. Some patients with liver-predominant disease or liver metastases may undergo regional chemoembolization procedures. Pharmacists should be cognizant of differences between newer and older chemoembolization agents and procedures, as well as differences between somatostatin analog products used as medications and the radiolabelled forms used in diagnostic scintigraphy. Other medication safety issues in NET management arise during perioperative supportive care, patient education, compliance counseling, and management of adverse effects of targeted therapies and chemotherapy, including stomatitis, hyperthyroidism, and hand-foot skin reaction. Somatostatin analog therapy is the mainstay for management of locally advanced or metastatic NETs. Liver-directed therapy is an option for localized unresectable disease; platinum-based chemotherapy is the first-line treatment for poorly differentiated tumors. Optimal sequencing of these treatments and targeted therapies such as everolimus and tyrosine kinase inhibitors remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Theranostics of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sze Ting; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2017-10-01

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography using 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs is the mainstay for the evaluation of receptor status in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This translates towards better therapy options, with increasing evidence of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) as the treatment of choice for advanced or progressive NETs. There are benefits in progression-free and overall survival as well as a significant improvement in clinical condition. In patients with progressive NETs, fractionated, personalized PRRT results in good therapeutic responses with no significant severe hematological and/or renal toxicity, thus improving quality of life.

  13. Regional Control of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chen, Catherine; Grillo, Jenny; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Holmgren, Lars; Yoon, Sam S.; Folkman, Judah; Ryeom, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Tumors implanted near the scapulae have been shown to grow four-times faster than the same tumors implanted at the iliac crest. While there were marked differences in the vascularization of tumors from these two different sites, the mechanism controlling regional angiogenesis was not identified. Here we demonstrate site-specific growth of intraperitoneal tumor implants in the mouse abdomen. Our data indicate that the angiogenic response of the host differs significantly between the upper and lower sites in the mouse abdomen and reveals that the expansion of tumor mass is restricted at sites with low angiogenic responses such as the bowel mesentery in the lower abdomen. We show that in this model, this suppression of angiogenesis is due to an expression gradient of thrombospondin-1, a potent endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. Mice with a targeted deletion of thrombospondin-1 no longer demonstrate regional restriction of tumor growth. The physiological relevance of these findings may be seen in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis, whereby tumors spread within the peritoneal cavity and show differential growth in the upper and lower abdomen. We hypothesize that the difference in tumor growth in these patients may be due to a gradient of thrombospondin-1 expression in stroma. Finally, our studies suggest that upregulation of thrombospondin-1 in tumor cells is one method to suppress the growth of tumors in the upper abdomen. PMID:20736295

  14. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol

    PubMed Central

    Aghighi, Maryam; Golovko, Daniel; Ansari, Celina; Marina, Neyssa M.; Pisani, Laura; Kurlander, Lonnie; Klenk, Christopher; Bhaumik, Srabani; Wendland, Michael; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment. Materials and Methods Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations. Results 4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001). Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3) compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3). Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients

  15. The sensitivity and specificity of frozen-section histopathology in the management of benign oral and maxillofacial lesions.

    PubMed

    Aronovich, Sharon; Kim, Roderick Y

    2014-05-01

    The management of odontogenic cysts and tumors typically requires a biopsy, which may present significant challenges and prompt an additional visit to the operating room before definitive treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of frozen-section diagnosis in the management of benign oral and maxillofacial lesions, allowing intraoperative diagnosis followed by definitive treatment under the same general anesthetic. A retrospective chart review of patients treated at the University of Michigan Health System was performed. Patients of all ages who had a diagnosis of a benign maxillofacial lesion by frozen-section and permanent histopathology reports were included for analysis. Patients were identified using the Current Procedural Terminology code for enucleation and curettage and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for benign cysts or tumors of skull, face, or lower jaw. Of 450 patients reviewed, 214 had intraoperative frozen-section examination available for comparison with permanent histopathology. There were 121 men (56.5%) and 93 women (43.5%), with a mean age of 41 years. Compared with final permanent histopathology, the overall sensitivity of frozen sections was 92.1%. Frozen-section histopathology had a sensitivity greater than 90% and a specificity greater than 95% for the diagnosis of dentigerous cyst and keratocyst odontogenic tumor. In this study of 214 patients with benign maxillofacial lesions, frozen-section histopathology was found to be a valid diagnostic modality with high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. These results and analysis support the use of frozen-section histopathology for the treatment of benign maxillofacial lesions and underscore its value in the management of these lesions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics of Primary Intraocular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti-Gude, Nisha; Wang, Yujuan; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Honavar, Santosh G.; Jager, Martine J.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Primary intraocular neoplasms are tumors that originate within the eye. The most common malignant primary intraocular tumor in adults is uveal melanoma and the second is primary intraocular lymphoma or vitreoretinal (intraocular) lymphoma. The most common malignant intraocular tumor in children is retinoblastoma. Genetics plays a vital role in the diagnosis and detection of ocular tumors. In uveal melanoma, monosomy 3 is the most common genetic alteration and somatic mutations of BAP1, a tumor suppressor gene, have been reported in nearly 50% of primary uveal melanomas. The retinoblastoma gene RB1 is the prototype tumor suppressor gene—mutations in RB1 alleles lead to inactivated RB protein and the development of retinoblastoma. Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) or T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement is observed in B-cell or T-cell primary vitreoretinal lymphoma, respectively. Other factors related to the genetics of these three common malignancies in the eye are discussed and reviewed. PMID:22834783

  17. Tumor cell-derived microparticles polarize M2 tumor-associated macrophages for tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Degao; Dong, Wenqian; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Ma, Jingwei; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Guanxin; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Despite identification of macrophages in tumors (tumor-associated macrophages, TAM) as potential targets for cancer therapy, the origin and function of TAM in the context of malignancy remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that microparticles (MPs), as a by-product, released by tumor cells act as a general mechanism to mediate M2 polarization of TAM. Taking up tumor MPs by macrophages is a very efficient process, which in turn results in the polarization of macrophages into M2 type, not only leading to promoting tumor growth and metastasis but also facilitating cancer stem cell development. Moreover, we demonstrate that the underlying mechanism involves the activation of the cGAS/STING/TBK1/STAT6 pathway by tumor MPs. Finally, in addition to murine tumor MPs, we show that human counterparts also possess consistent effect on human M2 polarization. These findings provide new insights into a critical role of tumor MPs in remodeling of tumor microenvironment and better understanding of the communications between tumors and macrophages.

  18. Escape from Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bioreactor has been developed (oxygen sensing) to improve monitoring of the physiological status of the cultures ; as cells are stimulated by inflammation...therapeutics but of prevention and possibly lifestyle avoidance. Herein, these issues are addressed using a novel organotypic bioreactor in which tumor cells ...months 7-24) 3. seed bioreactors with cells (months 1-24) 4. label tumor cells for fluorescence (months 1-6) 5. label tumor cells for mass

  19. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  20. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  1. [Diagnostic aspects of pharyngeal tumors].

    PubMed

    Savin, A A; Kradinov, A I; Vasil'ev, A Iu; Rogozhin, V A; Ivankov, A P

    1999-01-01

    In the work there are summarized the results of the examination of the 28 patients suffering with the pharynx tumors (angiophybroma of the pharynx, tumor of rhinopharynx with spreading to the cells of ethmoidal labyrinth and maxillary sinus, tumor of the pharynx spreading upon the rhinopharynx and intracranially) aged from 14 till 62. There are described the methods of roentgenologic investigation, computed and magnetic resonance tomography. There are shown the possibilities of different diagnostic methods in pharynx tumors, in estimation of the localization specification, prevalence, structure, degree of invasion into the neoplasms gathering round the cells, as well as the definition of the bony destruction.

  2. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: clinical considerations].

    PubMed

    Castronovo, G; Ciulla, A; Tomasello, G; Urso, G; Damiani, S

    2003-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (61ST) are an heterogeneous group of non epithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are peculiar to extreme cellular variability and uncertain malignancy. Gist are rare tumors that arise from primitive mesenchymal cells located in all gastrointestinal tract. Till now they are object of discussion about their origin, diagnostic standards, prognostic factors, histopathological classification. They are more frequently in over 40 years old people without difference in two sex, but they can appear in the child too and in the young man suffering from HIV. The authors relate two cases of recent observation, and discuss on the biological behaviour of these rare tumors.

  3. Tumor stem cells: A new approach for tumor therapy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MENG, MIN; ZHAO, XIN-HAN; NING, QIAN; HOU, LEI; XIN, GUO-HONG; LIU, LI-FENG

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a minority of tumor cells possessing the stem cell properties of self-renewal and differentiation in leukemia and several solid tumors. However, these cells do not possess the normal regulatory mechanisms of stem cells. Following transplantation, they are capable of initiating tumorigenesis and are therefore known as ‘tumor stem cells’. Cellular origin analysis of tumor stem cells has resulted in three hypotheses: Embryonal rest hypothesis, anaplasia and maturation arrest. Several signaling pathways which are involved in carcinogenesis, including Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Oct-4 signaling pathways are crucial in normal stem cell self-renewal decisions, suggesting that breakdown in the regulation of self-renewal may be a key event in the development of tumors. Thus, tumors can be regarded as an abnormal organ in which stem cells have escaped from the normal constraints on self-renewal, thus, leading to abnormally differentiated tumor cells that lose the ability to form tumors. This new model for maligancies has significance for clinical research and treatment. PMID:22844351

  4. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-18

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  5. [Immunotherapy in brain tumors].

    PubMed

    De Carli, Emilie; Delion, Matthieu; Rousseau, Audrey

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse gliomas represent the most common primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors in adults and children alike. Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant form of diffuse glioma with a median overall survival of 15 months despite aggressive treatments. New therapeutic approaches are needed to prolong survival in this always fatal disease. The CNS has been considered for a long time as an immune privileged organ, in part because of the existence of the blood-brain barrier. Nonetheless, immunotherapy is a novel approach in the therapeutic management of glioma patients, which has shown promising results in several clinical trials, especially in the adult population. Vaccination, with or without dendritic cells, blockade of the immune checkpoints, and adoptive T cell transfer are the most studied modalities of diffuse glioma immunotherapy. The future most likely resides in combinatorial approaches, with administration of conventional treatments (surgery, radiochemotherapy) and immunotherapy following yet to determine schedules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  7. WHO is in and WHO is out of the mouth, salivary glands, and jaws sections of the 4th edition of the WHO classification of head and neck tumours.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R A

    2018-02-01

    This review of changes to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of head and neck tumours focuses on their impact on the surgical care of diseases that affect the salivary glands, jaws, and oral cavity. Updates to the chapter on the salivary glands include the addition of secretory carcinoma and sclerosing polycystic adenosis. The odontogenic cysts are back, and the odontogenic keratocyst is listed among them, as it has now lost its brief and confusing designation as a neoplasm. The newly-defined sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma and primordial odontogenic tumour have been added. Oropharyngeal tumours have been separated from those of the oral cavity, which reflects the importance of HPV in carcinoma of the tonsils. The problems of grading oral epithelial dysplasia persist. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ponticulus posticus is a frequent radiographic finding on lateral cephalograms in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E

    2014-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a predisposition to a rare tumor type with a variable phenotype. Besides tumors, skeletal alterations, such as bifid ribs or frontal bossing constitute the phenotype. Recently, a variant of the first cervical vertebra, the ponticulus posticus, was reported to occur in 50% of patients with NBCCS as revealed by analysis of lateral cephalograms. Lateral cephalograms of eight patients with NBCCS were studied for the presence of ponticulus posticus. The ponticulus posticus was present in all patients. In one case, a series of cephalograms performed during a period of 20 years allowed the slow and continuous recording of a ponticulus posticus formation. Besides the predisposition to developing neoplasms, NBCCS also affects bone development. Some diagnostic criteria for NBCCS rely on certain osseous transformations either in hard tissues, e.g. keratocystic odontogenic tumor in jaws, or in soft tissues, e.g. calcification of the falx cerebri. Furthermore, the physiognomy can be affected by skeletal alterations, e.g. frontal bossing or hypertelorism. Given this wide spectrum of osseous involvement in NBCCS, the high prevalence rate of ponticulus posticus should be added to the relevant diagnostic findings of the skull and vertebral column. However, the onset of ponticulus posticus formation in the life of such patients is unclear and thus the relevance of this finding in early diagnosis of NBCCS remains to be elucidated. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Circulating tumor cells in patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Nastały, Paulina; Ruf, Christian; Becker, Pascal; Bednarz-Knoll, Natalia; Stoupiec, Małgorzata; Kavsur, Refik; Isbarn, Hendrik; Matthies, Cord; Wagner, Walter; Höppner, Dirk; Fisch, Margit; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ahyai, Sascha; Honecker, Friedemann; Riethdorf, Sabine; Pantel, Klaus

    2014-07-15

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent the most frequent malignancies among young men, but little is known about circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in these tumors. Considering their heterogeneity, CTCs were investigated using two independent assays targeting germ cell tumor and epithelial cell-specific markers, and results were correlated with disease stage, histology, and serum tumor markers. CTCs were enriched from peripheral blood (n = 143 patients) and testicular vein blood (TVB, n = 19 patients) using Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. For CTC detection, a combination of germ cell tumor (anti-SALL4, anti-OCT3/4) and epithelial cell-specific (anti-keratin, anti-EpCAM) antibodies was used. In parallel, 122 corresponding peripheral blood samples were analyzed using the CellSearch system. In total, CTCs were detected in 25 of 143 (17.5%) peripheral blood samples, whereas only 11.5% of patients were CTC-positive when considering exclusively the CellSearch assay. The presence of CTCs in peripheral blood correlated with clinical stage (P < 0.001) with 41% of CTC positivity in patients with metastasized tumors and 100% in patients with relapsed and chemotherapy-refractory disease. Histologically, CTC-positive patients suffered more frequently from nonseminomatous primary tumors (P < 0.001), with higher percentage of yolk sac (P < 0.001) and teratoma (P = 0.004) components. Furthermore, CTC detection was associated with elevated serum levels of α-fetoprotein (AFP; P = 0.025), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (βHCG; P = 0.002), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; P = 0.002). Incidence and numbers of CTCs in TVB were much higher than in peripheral blood. The inclusion of germ cell tumor-specific markers improves CTC detection in GCTs. CTCs occur frequently in patients with more aggressive disease, and there is a gradient of CTCs with decreasing numbers from the tumor-draining vein to the periphery. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Origins of Brain Tumor Macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Michele

    2016-12-12

    The ontogeny of brain-tumor-associated macrophages is poorly understood. New findings indicate that both resident microglia and blood-derived monocytes generate the pool of macrophages that infiltrate brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  12. [Desmoid tumors in three patients].

    PubMed

    Mohos, E; Kovács, T; Brittig, F; Nagy, A

    2001-12-01

    Desmoids are rare tumors of the connective tissue. It develops about 1:1000 times more in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, Gardner syndrome) compared to normal population. It has been shown in molecular genetic examinations, that different mutations of the APC gene are responsible for desmoid tumors in FAP. It means, that this disease is one of the extraintestinal manifestations of Gardner syndrome. This tumor has high recurrence rate and is growing rapidly, and as a result it is the second most common cause of death in FAP patients. That is why genetic examination for FAP patients is advised to decide if the patient has higher risk for desmoid formation. If the result of the genetic test is positive, it is advisable to try to slow the progression of polyposis with medical treatment, and so to delay the date of the colectomy because the surgical intervention--and connective tissue damage--can induce desmoid formation in these patients. At the same time it is reasonable to examine and regularly control patients with sporadic desmoid tumors searching for other manifestations of Gardner syndrome (colon, stomach and duodenum polyposis, tumor of papilla Vateri, retinopathy, etc.). Palliative surgery is not indicated in patients with inoperable intraabdominal desmoid tumors, because partial resections (R1, R2, debulking) result in further tumor progression. In these patients medical treatment (sulindac, tamoxifen), chemotherapy (doxorubicin, dacarbazin) and radiotherapy or combination of them can result tumor remission. We describe our three patients (an abdominal wall desmoid four years following Cesarean section; a desmoid tumor in the retroperitoneum and in the pelvis diagnosed three years after total colectomy; and a retroperitoneal and abdominal wall desmoid one year after total colectomy) and etiology, diagnosis and therapy of desmoid tumors are discussed.

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Sekac, J; Labas, P; Skultety, J; Prochotsky, A; Durdik, J; Hrbaty, B

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 years 9 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) underwent surgery at our department. All cases were with very atypical process. From these patients 3 interesting cases are described in more details. A 75-years-old woman with gastroscopically verified endoluminal tumour in the proximal third of stomach, 6x7 cm, 76-years-old man with a large endoluminal tumour in D2-D3 part of the duodenum, 4x4 cm, and 62-years-old man with verified extraluminal tumour by CT examination in the middle part of stomach. In all cases, gastrointestinal stromal tumour was histologically confirmed. Work is well photo-documented pre-surgically with endoscopic and CT-findings and during surgery: individual steps during the removal of these tumours. In assessment of the size and number of mitoses, tumours belonged to a group with highly malignant potential. Patients are regularly checked in 3-months intervals and also examination by positron emission tomography was performed--it seems to have the best demonstrability of possible relapse. All three patients live and are subjectively and objectively without significant problems (Tab. 5, Fig. 5, Ref. 7). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Exosomes Function in Tumor Immune Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Keli; Li, Qing; Yao, Yikun; Wang, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Immune cells and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells are the major cellular components in tumor microenvironment that actively migrate to tumor sites by sensing "signals" released from tumor cells. Together with other stromal cells, they form the soil for malignant cell progression. In the crosstalk between tumor cells and its surrounded microenvironment, exosomes exert multiple functions in shaping tumor immune responses. In tumor cells, their exosomes can lead to pro-tumor immune responses, whereas in immune cells, their derived exosomes can operate on tumor cells and regulate their ability to growth, metastasis, even reaction to chemotherapy. Employing exosomes as vehicles for the delivery products to initiate anti-tumor immune responses has striking therapeutic effects on tumor progression. Thus, exosomes are potential therapeutic targets in tumor-related clinical conditions. Here we discuss the role of exosomes in regulating tumor immune microenvironment and future indications for the clinical application of exosomes.

  16. ABT-751 in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-14

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Vasculogenic Mimicry and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Folberg, Robert; Hendrix, Mary J. C.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Tumors require a blood supply for growth and hematogenous dissemination. Much attention has been focused on the role of angiogenesis—the recruitment of new vessels into a tumor from pre-existing vessels. However, angiogenesis may not be the only mechanism by which tumors acquire a microcirculation. Highly aggressive and metastatic melanoma cells are capable of forming highly patterned vascular channels in vitro that are composed of a basement membrane that stains positive with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent in the absence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. These channels formed in vitro are identical morphologically to PAS-positive channels in histological preparations from highly aggressive primary uveal melanomas, in the vertical growth phase of cutaneous melanomas, and in metastatic uveal and cutaneous melanoma. The generation of microvascular channels by genetically deregulated, aggressive tumor cells was termed “vasculogenic mimicry” to emphasize their de novo generation without participation by endothelial cells and independent of angiogenesis. Techniques designed to identify the tumor microcirculation by the staining of endothelial cells may not be applicable to tumors that express vasculogenic mimicry. Although it is not known if therapeutic strategies targeting endothelial cells will be effective in tumors whose blood supply is formed by tumor cells in the absence of angiogenesis, the biomechanical and molecular events that regulate vasculogenic mimicry provide opportunities for the development of novel forms of tumor-targeted treatments. The unique patterning characteristic of vasculogenic mimicry provides an opportunity to design noninvasive imaging techniques to detect highly aggressive neoplasms and their metastases. PMID:10666364

  18. Concepts in solid tumor evolution.

    PubMed

    Sidow, Arend; Spies, Noah

    2015-04-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms in cancer progression give tumors their individuality. Cancer evolution is different from organismal evolution, however, and we discuss where concepts from evolutionary genetics are useful or limited in facilitating an understanding of cancer. Based on these concepts we construct and apply the simplest plausible model of tumor growth and progression. Simulations using this simple model illustrate the importance of stochastic events early in tumorigenesis, highlight the dominance of exponential growth over linear growth and differentiation, and explain the clonal substructure of tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary bone tumors of adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Harvey E L; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2004-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of primary bone tumors in adults. Initial radiographic evaluation is indicated in all cases with suspected primary bone tumors. Radiographs are useful for providing the diagnosis, a short list of differential diagnosis or at least indicating the degree of aggressiveness of the lesion. More detailed information about the lesion, such as cortical destruction or local spread, can be obtained using cross-sectional imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This article discusses the characteristic features of the more common primary bone tumors of adulthood, and also the pre-treatment evaluation and staging of these lesions using imaging techniques. PMID:18250012

  20. Microglia function in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jyoti J; Schartner, Jill M; Badie, Behnam

    2005-08-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). These cells have also been identified in brain neoplasms; however, as of yet their function largely remains unclear. More recent studies designed to characterize further tumor-associated microglia suggest that the immune effector function of these cells may be suppressed in CNS tumors. Furthermore, microglia and macrophages can secrete various cytokines and growth factors that may contribute to the successful immune evasion, growth, and invasion of brain neoplasms. A better understanding of microglia and macrophage function is essential for the development of immune-based treatment strategies against malignant brain tumors. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Anaesthetic management in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Kundan S; Mundada, Surbhi D

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal-dominant syndrome related to mutation in “Patched” tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 9. Basocellular carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri are its major features, along with more than 100 minor features. Odontogenic cysts, notorious for recurrence, can make endotracheal intubation difficult, requiring modification of the standard intubation technique. We report such a case managed successfully by awake fibreoptic intubation. Direct laryngoscopy under anaesthesia later confirmed that it was a good decision. PMID:23087465

  2. Anaesthetic management in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Kundan S; Mundada, Surbhi D

    2012-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal-dominant syndrome related to mutation in "Patched" tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 9. Basocellular carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri are its major features, along with more than 100 minor features. Odontogenic cysts, notorious for recurrence, can make endotracheal intubation difficult, requiring modification of the standard intubation technique. We report such a case managed successfully by awake fibreoptic intubation. Direct laryngoscopy under anaesthesia later confirmed that it was a good decision.

  3. [Surgical management of minor salivary gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Chen, Xiaoling; Huang, Weiting; Li, Kelan; Zhang, Xiaotong; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    To study the clinical features of minor salivary gland tumors and to discuss the treatment modalities for these tumors. Retrospective analysis of 54 cases with minor salivary gland tumor operated in our hospital from 1997 to 2004. Among 54 cases with minor salivary gland tumors in this series, 16 patients lost of follow up. Among the remaining 38 patients, 2 patients with nasal cavity adenoid cystic carcinoma died of tumor recurrence 2 and 3 years after the surgery respectively, one patient with laryngeal myoepithelial carcinoma died of tumor recurrence 3 years after the surgery and one patient with paranasal sinus mucoepidermoid carcinoma died of recurrence 17 months after the surgery. Two patients with paranasal sinus adenoid cystic carcinoma recurred after the primary surgery and were survived without tumor after salvage surgery. The other patients survived with no tumor recurrence. While different histopathology of minor salivary gland tumors were found in this group, malignant tumors were predominant, accounting for 81.4%. The choice of treatment for minor salivary gland tumors depends upon the location and the histopathology of the tumors. The treatment policy for benign tumors is simple tumor excision, while that for malignant tumors is surgery combined with pre- or post-operative radiation therapy. Complete surgical resection of tumor masses and tumor free margin is essential for successful treatment of malignant minor salivary gland tumors.

  4. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.

  5. [Benign tumors of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Rubay, J; Barreau, J

    1975-01-01

    The authors report their surgical experience of benign gastric tumors between 1947 and 1972: 19 cases (18 patients) were operated, which represent 3, 5% of the operated malignant tumors. Distribution was as follows: 6 polyps, 4 schwannomas, 4 accessory pancreases, 4 leiomyomas, 1 lipoma plus one leiomyoma of the ampula of Vater. The authors recall the symptomatology and roentgenological aspect of these tumors. They point out the growing importance of fibroscopy. They insist on the connexion between these tumors and carcinomas: this is clear for schwannomas and polyps where volume is a determining feature. Resection can be limited where there is no danger of malignant change. Though unquestionalbe, the malignancy of polyps is less than that of classical carcinomas.

  6. Geometrical approach to tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells and particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former paper [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (2006)], and in the present work we extend our analysis and try to shed light on the possible geometrical principles that drive tumor growth. We present two-dimensional models that reproduce the experimental observations, and analyze the unexplored three-dimensional case, for which interesting conclusions on tumor growth are derived.

  7. Hypercalcemia in tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binay Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is characterized by hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. This report describes a case of hypercalcemia in TLS in a patient with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: desmoid tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition aggressive fibromatosis deep fibromatosis desmoid fibromatosis familial infiltrative fibromatosis ... catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors). Am J Pathol. 1997 Aug; ...

  9. Wilms' tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Vinita M; Meisel, Jane; O'Brien, Shannon; Khanna, Namita

    2017-02-01

    Extrarenal Wilms' tumor of the ovary is a very rare tumor likely derived from embryonic mesonephros. We present the first reported case of a teratoid extrarenal Wilms' tumor of the ovary with a short review of the existing literature. In the case, a 26-year-old woman presented with back pain and was found to have a dermoid cyst; three years later, she presented again, now pregnant, with severe abdominal pain. She was diagnosed with an immature teratoma consisting of a Wilms' tumor (immature component) arising within a mature teratoma and treated exclusively with surgery and surveillance. The recovery from surgery was uneventful and the patient remains without evidence of disease with eleven months of follow-up.

  10. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and other childhood kidney cancers. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Assisted Care Options (Brain Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Care & Hospice National Agency Locator Assisted Living Facilities and Nursing Homes For brain tumor patients who ... activities of daily living (ADLs), an assisted living facility can be a viable option. Your family member ...

  12. Primary tracheobronchial tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Varela, Patricio; Pio, Luca; Torre, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Primary tracheobronchial tumors are rare lesions that can be benign or malignant, with different location along the airway tree. Symptoms may include wheezing, chronic pneumonia, asthma, chest pain, recurrent cough, atelectasis, haemoptysis, and weight loss. Due to the heterogeneity of symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult and the airway involvement can lead progressively to a bronchial or tracheal obstruction. Due to the rarity of primary tracheobronchial tumors in children, there are not any oncological guidelines on pre-operative work-up, treatment, and follow-up. Only few reports and multicentric studies are reported. In most cases, surgical resection seems to be the treatment of choice. Brachytherapy, endoscopic treatment, and chemotherapy are rarely described. In this article we present an overview on these rare tumors, including pathological aspects, clinical presentation, imaging assessment, and endoscopic or open surgical treatments. We discuss different surgical approaches, according with tumor location. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Bronchopulmonary ACTH-producing tumors].

    PubMed

    Pikunov, M Iu; Kuznetsov, N S; Latkina, N V; Dobreva, E A; Remizov, O V

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have the ability to produce the hormones and vasoactive peptides. Excess of these hormones leads to different symptoms and syndromes because of organs' injuries. Detection of ACTH origin by using of modern diagnostic methods is not always possible. Lungs and bronchi are one of the most frequent localization of ACTH-producing tumors. It is considered that carcinoids with bronchopulmonary localization like a benign tumors in the clinical course. But at the same time carcinoid tends to metastasize, so timely diagnostics and treatment improve quality of life significant and increase the life expectancy of patients. The modern state of diagnostics and surgical treatment problem of ACTH-producing tumors with bronchopulmonary localization is presented in the article. It was described the brief historical background, clinical symptoms, instrumental and biochemical methods of diagnosis. The principles of surgical treatment are presented in the article.

  14. Patellar metastasis from primary tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shan, Changxing; Sun, Ran; Liu, Song; Chen, Song; Song, Mingzhi; Lu, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Although bone tumors are frequently located in the knee area, primary tumors of the patella are rare and patellar metastases are even rarer. Knee pain is the most common complaint of patients with patellar metastases. Owing to the low incidence of patellar metastases, misdiagnosis is not unusual. The present review analyzes ~44 cases of patellar metastases originating from distinct primary sites. Reports of malignant tumors of the lung and kidney metastasizing to the patella were more common than those of other patellar metastases. Relative incidence, symptomatology, imaging features, histopathology and treatment options for these patellar metastatic lesions are described respectively along with a review of the literature. Despite numerous experiments demonstrating the reasons for implantation of tumor in patella, the answer to this question has not yet been revealed. In the light of the increasing attention on the diagnosis and the treatment of these lesions, the availability of the integrated information regarding metastases in the patella becomes more relevant. PMID:29434829

  15. Cutaneous metastases of internal tumors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Antón Martínez, M C; Parra-Blanco, V; Avilés Izquierdo, J A; Suárez Fernández, R M

    2013-12-01

    Cutaneous metastases are relatively rare in clinical practice and their diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion because clinical findings can be subtle. These metastases reveal the presence of disseminated malignant disease and can lead to the diagnosis of unsuspected internal tumors or the spread or recurrence of an already diagnosed tumor. Early recognition of cutaneous metastases can facilitate prompt and accurate diagnosis resulting in early treatment; however, they are generally indicative of a poor prognosis. Some tumors have a predilection to metastasize to specific areas. Recognition of these patterns provides essential information that can guide the search for the underlying tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. Escape from Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    feature of the bioreactor has been developed (oxygen sensing) to improve monitoring of the physiological status of the cultures ; as cells are stimulated...Herein, these issues are addressed using a novel organotypic bioreactor in which tumor cells can be followed for weeks to months, the process of seeding... cells (months 1-6) 3. isolate human stellate and Kupffer cells (months 7-24) 3. seed bioreactors with cells (months 1-24) 4. label tumor cells for

  17. Molecular Testing of Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hye; Won, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong-Ik; Lee, Yujin; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Seung-Ki; Choi, Seung-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system (CNS) tumors was revised in 2016 with a basis on the integrated diagnosis of molecular genetics. We herein provide the guidelines for using molecular genetic tests in routine pathological practice for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. While astrocytomas and IDH-mutant (secondary) glioblastomas are characterized by the mutational status of IDH, TP53, and ATRX, oligodendrogliomas have a 1p/19q codeletion and mutations in IDH, CIC, FUBP1, and the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERTp). IDH-wildtype (primary) glioblastomas typically lack mutations in IDH, but are characterized by copy number variations of EGFR, PTEN, CDKN2A/B, PDGFRA, and NF1 as well as mutations of TERTp. High-grade pediatric gliomas differ from those of adult gliomas, consisting of mutations in H3F3A, ATRX, and DAXX, but not in IDH genes. In contrast, well-circumscribed low-grade neuroepithelial tumors in children, such as pilocytic astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and ganglioglioma, often have mutations or activating rearrangements in the BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB genes. Other CNS tumors, such as ependymomas, neuronal and glioneuronal tumors, embryonal tumors, meningothelial, and other mesenchymal tumors have important genetic alterations, many of which are diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers and therapeutic targets. Therefore, the neuropathological evaluation of brain tumors is increasingly dependent on molecular genetic tests for proper classification, prediction of biological behavior and patient management. Identifying these gene abnormalities requires cost-effective and high-throughput testing, such as next-generation sequencing. Overall, this paper reviews the global guidelines and diagnostic algorithms for molecular genetic testing of brain tumors. PMID:28535583

  18. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy

    PubMed Central

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T. U. Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature. PMID:23119199

  19. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy.

    PubMed

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T U Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature.

  20. Translational progress on tumor biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Zhou, Xiaolin; Lu, Yi; Xie, Liye; Chen, Qian; Keller, Evan T; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to apply basic research achievements to the clinic. In particular, mechanistic studies should be developed by bench researchers, depending upon clinical demands, in order to improve the survival and quality of life of cancer patients. To date, translational medicine has been addressed in cancer biology, particularly in the identification and characterization of novel tumor biomarkers. This review focuses on the recent achievements and clinical application prospects in tumor biomarkers based on translational medicine. PMID:26557902

  1. Muscle Contraction Arrests Tumor Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0464 TITLE: Muscle Contraction Arrests Tumor Growth...DATE 01-09-2006 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2005 – 31 Aug 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Muscle ... Contraction Arrests Tumor Growth 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0464 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kim Westerlind, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  2. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Porkka K, Laakko- nen P, Ruoslahti E. Nucleolin expressed at the cell surface is a marker of endothelial cells in angiogenic blood vessels. J Cell...anti-angiogenic therapy. Markers of such vessels will be useful in developing strategies for complete destruction of breast cancer vasculature, and in...express specific markers , and that these lymphatic markers are tumor type specific and distinct from blood vessel markers in the same tumors. The

  3. An uncommon disorder with multiple skeletal anomalies: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keçeli, Onur; Coskun-Benlidayı, İlke; Benlidayı, M Emre; Erdoğan, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon disorder transmitted through autosomal dominant inheritance. This syndrome is characterized by multiple odontogenic keratocysts, along with congenital skeletal anomalies and basal cell carcinomas. A 16-year-old girl was admitted with a complaint of swelling on the lower jaw. She had multiple basal cell nevi on both hands. Multiple lytic bone lesions on radiographs were defined as odontogenic keratocysts following the biopsy. The patient was referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation for detailed musculoskeletal evaluation. Adam's forward bend test revealed a hump on the right side representing right thoracic scoliosis. Cervical kyphosis, thoracic lordosis and scoliosis, bifid rib and sacral and lumbar spina bifida on plain radiographs led to the diagnosis of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Since early diagnosis may provide optimum surveillance for related neoplasms, it is of paramount importance for pediatricians as well as physicians dealing with the musculoskeletal system to be aware of this rare condition.

  4. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, N. K.; Tilak Raj, T. N.; Mukunda, K. S.; Rajashekar Reddy, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:23633824

  5. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome).

    PubMed

    Kiran, N K; Tilak Raj, T N; Mukunda, K S; Rajashekar Reddy, V

    2012-10-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  6. Gorlin's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, R T; Barrett, A

    1975-06-01

    The uncommon familial syndrome of multiple odontogenic keratocysts, basal cell naevi and skeletal anomalies is reviewed, and seven cases are described, including one patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma in a previous odontogenic keratocyst of the maxilla. We wish to thank Consultants from the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, The Middlesex Hospital and the Eastman Dental Hospital, who allowed us access to their patients; Mr. D. Garfield Davies, Dr. M. F. Spittle, Mr. D. Winstock, Mr. H. P. Cook, Professor H. C. Killey and Mr. L. W. Kay. We are grateful to Professor L. Michaels and Mr. D. J. Connolly for preparation of the illustrations and to Mrs. A. Matthews for the typescript.

  7. Diagnosing and treating pancoast tumors.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kelly; Eleftheriadou, Ellada; Ioannidou, Despoina; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2016-12-01

    According to the American College of Chest Physician definition, a Pancoast tumor is a tumor which invades any of the structures of the apex of the chest including the first thoracic ribs or periosteum, the lower nerve roots of the bronchial plexus, the sympathetic chain and stellate gaglion near the apex of the chest or the subclavian vessels. Pancoast tumors account for less than 3-5 % of lung tumors. Areas covered: We searched the libraries scopus and pub med and found 124 related manuscripts. From those we chose 18 to include in our short commentary based on the most up-date information included. Expert commentary: The present status of the recommended treatment of Pancoast tumors for patients medically fit for surgical resection is trimodality (chemoradiation followed by radical surgery excersion) as state of the art. Patients with unresectable Pancoast tumors and poor PS 4 or distant metastasis are candidate for radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms and best supportive care. In this mini review we will present up to date information regarding diagnosis and treatment management.

  8. Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy for Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chuan-yu, Sun; Yat-faat, Ho; Wei-hong, Ding; Yuan-cheng, Gou; Qing-feng, Hu; Ke, Xu; Bin, Gu; Guo-wei, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the indication and the clinical value of laparoscopic adrenalectomy of different types of adrenal tumor. Methods. From 2009 to 2014, a total of 110 patients were diagnosed with adrenal benign tumor by CT scan and we performed laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The laparoscopic approach has been the procedure of choice for surgery of benign adrenal tumors, and the upper limit of tumor size was thought to be 6 cm. Results. 109 of 110 cases were successful; only one was converted to open surgery due to bleeding. The average operating time and intraoperative blood loss of pheochromocytoma were significantly more than the benign tumors (P < 0.05). After 3 months of follow-up, the preoperative symptoms were relieved and there was no recurrence. Conclusions. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has the advantages of minimal invasion, less blood loss, fewer complications, quicker recovery, and shorter hospital stay. The full preparation before operation can decrease the average operating time and intraoperative blood loss of pheochromocytomas. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy should be considered as the first choice treatment for the resection of adrenal benign tumor. PMID:25132851

  9. Captopril improves tumor nanomedicine delivery by increasing tumor blood perfusion and enlarging endothelial gaps in tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; Tuo, Yanyan; Jin, Kai; Luo, Zimiao; Shi, Wei; Mei, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2017-12-01

    Poor tumor perfusion and unfavorable vessel permeability compromise nanomedicine drug delivery to tumors. Captopril dilates blood vessels, reducing blood pressure clinically and bradykinin, as the downstream signaling moiety of captopril, is capable of dilating blood vessels and effectively increasing vessel permeability. The hypothesis behind this study was that captopril can dilate tumor blood vessels, improving tumor perfusion and simultaneously enlarge the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels, therefore enhancing nanomedicine drug delivery for tumor therapy. Using the U87 tumor xenograft with abundant blood vessels as the tumor model, tumor perfusion experiments were carried out using laser Doppler imaging and lectin-labeling experiments. A single treatment of captopril at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly increased the percentage of functional vessels in tumor tissues and improved tumor blood perfusion. Scanning electron microscopy of tumor vessels also indicated that the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels were enlarged after captopril treatment. Immunofluorescence-staining of tumor slices demonstrated that captopril significantly increased bradykinin expression, possibly explaining tumor perfusion improvements and endothelial gap enlargement. Additionally, imaging in vivo, imaging ex vivo and nanoparticle distribution in tumor slices indicated that after a single treatment with captopril, the accumulation of 115-nm nanoparticles in tumors had increased 2.81-fold with a more homogeneous distribution pattern in comparison to non-captopril treated controls. Finally, pharmacodynamics experiments demonstrated that captopril combined with paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles resulted in the greatest tumor shrinkage and the most extensive necrosis in tumor tissues among all treatment groups. Taken together, the data from the present study suggest a novel strategy for improving tumor perfusion and enlarging blood vessel permeability simultaneously in order to improve

  10. Pre-operative planning for mandibular reconstruction - A full digital planning workflow resulting in a patient specific reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reconstruction of large mandiblular defects following ablative oncologic surgery could be done by using vascularized bone transfer or, more often, primarily with simultaneous or delayed bone grafting, using load bearing reconstruction plates. Bending of these reconstruction plates is typically directed along the outer contour of the original mandible. Simultaneously or in a second operation vascularized or non-vascularized bone is fixed to the reconstruction plate. However, the prosthodontic-driven backward planning to ease bony reconstruction of the mandible in terms of dental rehabilitation using implant-retained overdentures might be an eligible solution. The purpose of this work was to develop, establish and clinically evaluate a novel 3D planning procedure for mandibular reconstruction. Materials and methods Three patients with tumors involving the mandible, which included squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of the mouth and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, were treated surgically by hemimandibulectomy. Results In primary alloplastic mandible reconstruction, shape and size of the reconstruction plate could be predefined and prebent prior to surgery. Clinical relevance This study provides modern treatment strategies for mandibular reconstruction. PMID:21968330

  11. Skeletal stigmata as keys to access to the composite and ancient Gorlin-Goltz syndrome history: The Egypt, Pompeii and Herculaneum lessons.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Sammaria, Giuliano; Manfredini, Marco

    2016-09-10

    There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant systemic disease with almost complete penetrance and high intra-familial phenotypic variability, caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The syndrome is characterized by unusual skeletal changes and high predisposition to the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts tumors and other visceral tumors. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined as distinct syndrome in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a costellation of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to 3000years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. These paleogenetic and historical evidences, together with the clinical and biomolecular modern evidences, confirm the quite benign behavior of the syndrome and the critical value of the multiple and synchronous skeletal anomalies in the recognition of these rare and complex genetic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic and pathogenetic role of café-au-lait macules in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Café au lait spots (CALS) are common dermatologic findings that can at the same time arise in a variety of pathologic conditions such as Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), together with numerous hereditary syndromes for which they represent either diagnostic criteria or associated elements (McCune Albright, Silver-Russell, LEOPARD, Ataxia-Telangiectasia). A review of the literature also revealed two cases of association with NBCCS. We report here the case of a female proband with CALS associated to Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) with known PTCH1 germline mutation (C.1348-2A>G) who had been misdiagnosed with NF1 in her childhood because of 5 CALS and cutaneous nodules. The patient presented a giant cell tumor of the skin, palmar and calcaneal epidermoidal cystic nodules, odontogenic keratocystic tumors and deformity of the jaw profile. Her family history brought both her brother and father to our attention because of the presence of KCOTs diagnosed at early age: after genetic testing, the same PTCH1 germline mutation was identified in the three family members. Clinical criteria are used for discerning NF1 diagnosis (size, number and onset age), while there are no definite guidelines concerning CALS except for their presence. In our experience, we have noted an association of CALS with NBCCS; this seems interesting because we already know clinical criteria are a dynamic entity and can be modified by epidemiologic evidences. PMID:23107377

  13. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  14. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management. PMID:24339558

  15. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jawa, Deepti Singh; Sircar, Keya; Somani, Rani; Grover, Neeraj; Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Sanjeet

    2009-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

  16. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  17. [Malignant tumors of thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Uhliarová, B; Bugová, G; Hajtman, A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing. The aim of this work was to determine risk factors, diagnostic methods and extent of surgical treatment of malignant goiter. The authors retrospectively analyzed patients who were surgically treated for thyroid disease at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comenius University, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Teaching Hospital in Martin, Slovakia, from the January 1st, 2006 to December 31st, 2013, for thyroid disease. The incidence, risk factors of malignant thyroid tumors, indication for surgery and its complications were evaluated. A total of 1,620 adult patients were surgically treated for thyroid disease at the Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, CU JMF, UH in Martin, Slovakia, between 2006- 2013. Malignant tumors were identified in 238 patients (15%). Microcarcinoma (incidentally detected malignant tumor 1 cm) occurred in 78 cases (5%). Malignant thyroid tumor was more common in younger patients (p = 0.002). Newly created and larger nodules positively correlated with the occurrence of malignancy (p = 0.003, p = 0.041, resp.). Gender, family history of thyroid disorder, previous radiation therapy, and previous malignancy did not affect the incidence of malignant tumor of thyroid gland. High sensitivity and specificity in the dia-gnosis of malignant thyroid nodule was observed using aspiration cytology (75%, 97%, resp.) and intraoperative histopathological examination (88%, 100%, resp.). Malignant tumor of thyroid gland is more common in younger patients with newly developed nodule. The risk factors of malignancy increase with the size of the thyroid nodule. Aspiration cytology and peroperative histopathology have high sensitivity and specificity in the dia-gnosis of malignant thyroid tumor; therefore, they should be a standard method in the dia-gnosis of nodular goiter. The method of choice in the treatment of thyroid malignancy is total thyroidectomy.

  18. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Belkacemi, Yazid; University of Lille II, Lille; Bousquet, Guilhem

    Purpose: To better identify prognostic factors for local control and survival, as well as the role of different therapeutic options, for phyllodes tumors, a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm of the breast. Methods and Materials: Data from 443 women treated between 1971 and 2003 were collected from the Rare Cancer Network. The median age was 40 years (range, 12-87 years). Tumors were benign in 284 cases (64%), borderline in 80 cases (18%), and malignant in 79 cases (18%). Surgery consisted of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 377 cases (85%) and total mastectomy (TM) in 66 cases (15%). Thirty-nine patients (9%) received adjuvant radiotherapymore » (RT). Results: After a median follow-up of 106 months, local recurrence (LR) and distant metastases rates were 19% and 3.4%, respectively. In the malignant and borderline group (n = 159), RT significantly decreased LR (p = 0.02), and TM had better results than BCS (p = 0.0019). Multivariate analysis revealed benign histology, negative margins, and no residual disease (no RD) after initial treatment and RT delivery as independent favorable prognostic factors for local control; benign histology and low number of mitosis for disease-free survival; and pathologic tumor size tumor necrosis for overall survival. In the malignant and borderline subgroup multivariate analysis TM was the only favorable independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusions: This study showed that phyllodes tumor patients with no RD after treatment have better local control. Benign tumors have a good prognosis after surgery alone. In borderline and malignant tumors, TM had better results than BCS. Thus, in these forms adjuvant RT should be considered according to histologic criteria.« less

  19. Rare Primary Central Nervous System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Sahgal, Arjun; Chang, Eric L.; Lo, Simon S.

    2014-01-01

    There are close to 70,000 new cases of primary central nervous system tumors diagnosed annually in the United States. Meningiomas, gliomas, nerve sheath tumors and pituitary tumors account for 85% of them. There is abundant literature on these commonly occurring tumors but data from the literature on infrequently encountered tumors such as atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, choroid plexus carcinoma, ganglioglioma, hemangiopericytoma, and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma are limited. This review provides an overview of the clinicopathologic and therapeutic aspects of these rare primary central nervous system tumors. PMID:25276324

  20. Round Cell Tumors: Classification and Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shweta; Kamala, R; Nair, Divya; Ragavendra, T Raju; Mhatre, Swapnil; Sabharwal, Robin; Choudhury, Basanta Kumar; Rana, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Round cell tumors as the name suggest are comprised round cells with increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. This group of tumor includes entities such as peripheral neuroectodermal tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and desmoplastic small round cell tumor. These round cells tumors are characterized by typical histological pattern, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic features that can help in differential diagnosis. The present article describes the classification and explains the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of some important round cell tumors.