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Sample records for kerma strength conversion

  1. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  2. New National Air-Kerma-Strength Standards for (125)I and (103)Pd Brachytherapy Seeds.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Stephen M; Lamperti, Paul J; Loevinger, Robert; Mitch, Michael G; Weaver, James T; Coursey, Bert M

    2003-01-01

    The new U.S. measurement standard for the air-kerma strength from low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy seed sources is formally described in detail. This instrument-based standard was implemented on 1 January 1999, with its salient features and the implications of differences with the previous standard given only through a series of informal communications. The Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (WAFAC) is specially designed to realize air kerma from a single-seed source emitting photons with energies up to about 40 keV, and is now used to measure the wide variety of seeds used in prostate-cancer therapy that has appeared in the last few years. For the two (125)I seed models that have been subject to both the old and new standards, the new standard reduces the air-kerma strength by 10.3 %. This change is mainly due to the removal of the influence on the measurement of the Ti K x rays produced in the source encapsulation, a component with no clinical significance.

  3. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Brian E.; Davis, Stephen D.; Schmidt, Cal R.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. Methods: The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR {sup 192}Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the {sup 192}Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at {sup 137}Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of A{sub wall} for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. Results: The average measurements when using the inverse N{sub K} interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Conclusions: Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well

  4. Air-kerma strength determination of a miniature x-ray source for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Stephen D.

    A miniature x-ray source has been developed by Xoft Inc. for high dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The source is contained in a 5.4 mm diameter water-cooling catheter. The source voltage can be adjusted from 40 kV to 50 kV and the beam current is adjustable up to 300 muA. Electrons are accelerated toward a tungsten-coated anode to produce a lightly-filtered bremsstrahlung photon spectrum. The sources were initially used for early-stage breast cancer treatment using a balloon applicator. More recently, Xoft Inc. has developed vaginal and surface applicators. The miniature x-ray sources have been characterized using a modification of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 formalism normally used for radioactive brachytherapy sources. Primary measurements of air kerma were performed using free-air ionization chambers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The measurements at UW were used to calibrate a well-type ionization chamber for clinical verification of source strength. Accurate knowledge of the emitted photon spectrum was necessary to calculate the corrections required to determine air-kerma strength, defined in vacuo. Theoretical predictions of the photon spectrum were calculated using three separate Monte Carlo codes: MCNP5, EGSnrc, and PENELOPE. Each code used different implementations of the underlying radiological physics. Benchmark studies were performed to investigate these differences in detail. The most important variation among the codes was found to be the calculation of fluorescence photon production following electron-induced vacancies in the L shell of tungsten atoms. The low-energy tungsten L-shell fluorescence photons have little clinical significance at the treatment distance, but could have a large impact on air-kerma measurements. Calculated photon spectra were compared to spectra measured with high-purity germanium spectroscopy systems at both UW and

  5. Verification of air-kerma strength of 125I seed for permanent prostate implants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Akino, Yuichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2009-12-01

    To assure the physical quality of brachytherapy, we investigated the difference between measured and manufacturer's stated source strengths in a single model SourceTech Medical (STM)1251 (125)I seed. A well-type ionization chamber with a single-seed holder was used to measure the source strength of 2412 (125)I seeds before implant in 34 patients. The air-kerma strength was 0.450 U for all cases. The mean source strength for each patient was measured and compared with the manufacturer's stated value. The deviation from the measured value was compared with the tolerance range of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-56 report's recommendation. The measured source strength was higher than the manufacturer's stated value, with a median difference of 1% (range, 2% to 5%). Sixteen of the total of 2412 seeds (0.7%) were more than 5% different from the manufacturer's stated value. The median SD from the mean value was 2.2% (range, 1.1% to 2.5%) for all patients. This is the first report of a single-seed assay performed for the model STM1251 (125)I seed. In this study the manufacturer's stated strength agreed well with the measured value. Nevertheless, the advisability of performing a single-seed assay at every institution should be considered, by referring to the appropriate regulations; for example, those used in the United States.

  6. Determination of conversion factors from air kerma to operational dose equivalent quantities for low-energy X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, Arvi; Kosunen, Antti; Pöyry, Paula; Tapiovaara, Markku

    2007-01-01

    The conversion coefficients from air kerma to ICRU operational dose equivalent quantities for STUK's realisation of the X-radiation qualities N-15 to N-60 of the ISO narrow (N) spectrum series were determined by utilising X-ray spectrum measurements. The pulse-height spectra were measured using a planar high-purity germanium spectrometer and unfolded to fluence spectra using Monte Carlo generated data of the spectrometer response. To verify the measuring and unfolding method, the first and second half-value layers and the air kerma rate were calculated from the fluence spectra and compared with the values measured using an ionisation chamber. For each radiation quality, the spectrum was characterised by the parameters given in ISO 4037-1. The conversion coefficients from the air kerma to the ICRU operational quantities Hp(10), Hp(0.07), H'(0.07) and H*(10) were calculated using monoenergetic conversion coefficients at zero angle of incidence. The results are discussed with respect to ISO 4037-4, and compared with published results for low-energy X-ray spectra.

  7. A conversion method of air kerma from the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations to effective dose for calculating x-ray shielding barriers in mammography.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation of the effective dose from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the effective dose for the mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency laboratories. The results show that, in all cases, the effective dose in mammography energy range is less than 25% of the incident air kerma for the primary and the scatter radiations and does not exceed 75% for the leakage radiation.

  8. Air-kerma strength determination of a new directional {sup 103}Pd source

    SciTech Connect

    Aima, Manik Reed, Joshua L.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Culberson, Wesley S.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: A new directional {sup 103}Pd planar source array called a CivaSheet™ has been developed by CivaTech Oncology, Inc., for potential use in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatments. The array consists of multiple individual polymer capsules called CivaDots, containing {sup 103}Pd and a gold shield that attenuates the radiation on one side, thus defining a hot and cold side. This novel source requires new methods to establish a source strength metric. The presence of gold material in such close proximity to the active {sup 103}Pd region causes the source spectrum to be significantly different than the energy spectra of seeds normally used in LDR brachytherapy treatments. In this investigation, the authors perform air-kerma strength (S{sub K}) measurements, develop new correction factors for these measurements based on an experimentally verified energy spectrum, and test the robustness of transferring S{sub K} to a well-type ionization chamber. Methods: S{sub K} measurements were performed with the variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC) at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center. Subsequent measurements were then performed in a well-type ionization chamber. To realize the quantity S{sub K} from a directional source with gold material present, new methods and correction factors were considered. Updated correction factors were calculated using the MCNP 6 Monte Carlo code in order to determine S{sub K} with the presence of gold fluorescent energy lines. In addition to S{sub K} measurements, a low-energy high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to experimentally verify the calculated spectrum, a sodium iodide (NaI) scintillating counter was used to verify the azimuthal and polar anisotropy, and a well-type ionization chamber was used to test the feasibility of disseminating S{sub K} values for a directional source within a cylindrically symmetric measurement volume. Results: The UW VAFAC was successfully used to measure the S

  9. Dosimetric characteristics, air-kerma strength calibration and verification of Monte Carlo simulation for a new ytterbium-169 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, H.; Williamson, J.F.; Li, Zuofeng; Mishra, V.; Meigooni, A.S. )

    1994-03-01

    Ytterbium-169 ([sup 169]Yb) is a promising new isotope for brachytherapy with a half life of 32 days and an average photon energy of 93 KeV. It has an Ir-192-equivalent dose distribution in water but a much smaller half-value layer in lead (0.2 mm), affording improved radiation protection and customized shielding of dose-limiting anatomic structures. The goals of this study are to: (a) experimentally validate Monte Carlo photon transport dose-rate calculations for this energy range, (b) to develop a secondary air-kerma strength standard for [sup 169]Yb, and (c) to present essential treatment planning data including the transverse-axis dose-rate distribution and dose correction factors for a number of local shielding materials. Several interstitial [sup 169]Yb sources (type 6) and an experimental high dose-rate source were made available for this study. Monte Carlo photon-transport (MCPT) simulations, based upon validated geometric models of source structure, were used to calculate dose rates in water. To verify MCPT predictions, the transverse-axis dose distribution in homogeneous water medium was measured using a silicon-diode detector. For use in designing shielded applicators, heterogeneity correction factors (HCF) arising from small cylindrical heterogeneities of lead, aluminum, titanium, steel and air were measured in a water medium. Finally, to provide a sound experimental basis for comparing experimental and theoretical dose-rate distributions, the air-kerma strength of the sources was measured using a calibrated ion chamber. To eliminate the influence of measurement artifacts on the comparison of theory and measurement, simulated detector readings were compared directly to measured diode readings. The final data are presented in the format endorsed by the Interstitial Collaborative Working Group. 33 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Determination of air-kerma strength for the {sup 192}Ir GammaMedplus iX pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A. D.; Pike, T. L.; Micka, J. A.; Fulkerson, R. K.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy was originally proposed to combine the therapeutic advantages of high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Though uncommon in the United States, several facilities employ pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in Europe and Canada. Currently, there is no air-kerma strength standard for PDR brachytherapy {sup 192}Ir sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Discrepancies in clinical measurements of the air-kerma strength of the PDR brachytherapy sources using HDR source-calibrated well chambers warrant further investigation.Methods: In this research, the air-kerma strength for an {sup 192}Ir PDR brachytherapy source was compared with the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory transfer standard well chambers, the seven-distance technique [B. E. Rasmussen et al., 'The air-kerma strength standard for 192Ir HDR sources,' Med. Phys. 38, 6721-6729 (2011)], and the manufacturer's stated value. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo techniques were also employed for comparison to the results of the measurements.Results: While the measurements using the seven-distance technique were within + 0.44% from the manufacturer's determination, there was a + 3.10% difference between the transfer standard well chamber measurements and the manufacturer's stated value. Results showed that the PDR brachytherapy source has geometric and thus radiological qualities that exhibit behaviors similar to a point source model in contrast to a conventional line source model.Conclusions: The resulting effect of the pointlike characteristics of the PDR brachytherapy source likely account for the differences observed between well chamber and in-air measurements.

  11. Calculation of conversion coefficients for air kerma to ambient dose equivalent using transmitted spectra of megavoltage X-rays through concrete.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, T P V; Silva, A X

    2012-12-01

    With the fast advancement of technology, (60)Co teletherapy units are largely being replaced with medical linear accelerators. In most cases, the linear accelerator tends to be installed in the same room in which the (60)Co teletherapy unit was previously placed. If in-depth structural remodelling is out of the question, high-density concrete is usually used to improve shielding against primary, scatter and leakage radiation originating in the new equipment. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of the transmission of some clinical photon spectra (from 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete, considering two different densities. Concrete walls with thickness ranging from 0.70 to 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm×30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to ∼65 % when barite (high-density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. In addition, conversion coefficients from air kerma to ambient dose equivalent, H*(d)/K(air), and air kerma to effective dose, E/K(air), for photon spectra from the transmitted spectra were calculated and compared. The results suggest that the 10-mm depth is not the best choice to represent the effective dose.

  12. Photon and neutron fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for ICRP-1975 reference man using improved elemental compositions for bone and marrow of the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    A twelve-element approximation of the total-body, soft-tissue and skeletal components of ICRP-1975 Reference Man is used to investigate particle fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for photons with energies between 1 keV and 20 MeV and neutrons with energies between 0.0253 eV and 20 MeV. Several recent ICRP revisions to the elemental composition of Reference Man, which have not been included in other kerma-factor calculations, are taken into account. This work suggests some additional revisions to the major-element content (i.e., H, C, N, and O) and to the mineral and trace-element content (i.e., Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe) of various total-body, soft-tissue, and skeletal components of Reference Man. The revisions to the bone and red marrow of the skeleton offer significant new refinements in red-bone-marrow dosimetry.

  13. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  14. The IPEM code of practice for determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources based on the NPL air kerma standard.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, A M; Sander, T; Locks, S M; Lee, C D; Aird, E G A; Nutbrown, R F; Flynn, A

    2010-06-07

    This paper contains the recommendations of the high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy working party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a Code of Practice (COP) for the UK for measuring the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. In 2004, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) commissioned a primary standard for the realization of RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. This has meant that it is now possible to calibrate ionization chambers directly traceable to an air kerma standard using an (192)Ir source (Sander and Nutbrown 2006 NPL Report DQL-RD 004 (Teddington: NPL) http://publications.npl.co.uk). In order to use the source specification in terms of either RAKR, Κ(R) (ICRU 1985 ICRU Report No 38 (Washington, DC: ICRU); ICRU 1997 ICRU Report No 58 (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)), or air kerma strength, S(K) (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34), it has been necessary to develop algorithms that can calculate the dose at any point around brachytherapy sources within the patient tissues. The AAPM TG-43 protocol (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34) and the 2004 update TG-43U1 (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633-74) have been developed more fully than any other protocol and are widely used in commercial treatment planning systems. Since the TG-43 formalism uses the quantity air kerma strength, whereas this COP uses RAKR, a unit conversion from RAKR to air kerma strength was included in the appendix to this COP. It is recommended that the measured RAKR determined with a calibrated well chamber traceable to the NPL (192)Ir primary standard is used in the treatment planning system. The measurement uncertainty in the source calibration based on the system described in this COP has been reduced considerably compared to other methods based on interpolation techniques.

  15. AIR KERMA TO Hp(3) CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR IEC 61267 RQR X-RAY RADIATION QUALITIES: APPLICATION TO DOSE MONITORING OF THE LENS OF THE EYE IN MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Guardiola, C; Duch, M A; Ginjaume, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies highlight the fact that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens monitoring could be required for these workers. The recommended operational quantity for monitoring of eye lens exposure is the personal dose equivalent at 3 mm depth Hp(3) (ICRU 51). However, there are no available conversion coefficients in international standards, while in the literature coefficients have only been calculated for monoenergetic beams and for ISO 4037-1 X-ray qualities. The aim of this article is to provide air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a cylindrical phantom made of ICRU-4 elements tissue-equivalent material for RQR radiation qualities (IEC-61267) from 40 to 120 kV and for angles of incidence from 0 to 180°, which are characteristic of medical workplace. Analytic calculations using interpolation techniques and Monte Carlo modelling have been compared. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  17. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  18. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M; Lavallee, Robert L; Roskopf, Marsha L; Scalzetti, Ernest M

    2011-10-01

    To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom. A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K(CT) at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R(K)) as K∕ K(CT), which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R(K) values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. At 120 kV, median R(K) values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R(K) values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R(K) values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R(K) for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 ± 0.08. Average R(K) values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R(K) values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R(K) values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R(K) values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R(K) value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R(K) value by 9%. In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would

  19. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  20. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-10-15

    isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would require the use of energy-appropriate conversion factors.

  1. Study on conversion relationships of compressive strength indexes for recycled lightweight aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-gang; Yang, Jian-hui; Kuang, Xiao-mei

    2017-01-01

    In order to study cube compressive strength and axial compressive strength of recycled lightweight aggregate concrete(RLAC), and conversion relationship between the two, with the replacement rate of recycled lightweight coarse aggregate as change parameters, 15 standard cube test specimens and 15 standard prism test specimens were produced to carry out the test. Then compressive strength of test specimens were measured, and the law of different replacement rate of recycled lightweight coarse aggregate influencing compressive strength of RLAC was analyzed, as the method of statistical regression adopted, the conversion relationships between of cube compressive strength and axial compressive strength of RLAC was obtained. It is shown that compressive strength of RLAC are lower than compressive strength of ordinary concrete; and that compressive strength of RLAC gradually decreases as replacement rate of recycled lightweight coarse aggregate increases; as well as, the conversion relationship between axial compressive strength and cube compressive strength of RLAC is different from ordinary concrete; based on the experimental data, conversion relationship formula between compressive strength indexes of RLAC was established. It is suggested that the replacement rate of recycled lightweight aggregate should be controlled within 25%.

  2. Celebrate Strengths, Nurture Affinities: A Conversation with Mel Levine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2006-01-01

    In this interview with "Educational Leadership," pediatrician Dr. Mel Levine, cofounder of "All Kinds of Minds," explains why students and educators should learn about eight neurodevelopmental functions that undergird our strengths and weaknesses. For the most part, he notes, adults who lead successful lives mobilize their strengths and compensate…

  3. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Fatemeh-Maleknejad; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% (E0), 5% (E5), 10% (E10), 15% (E15), 20% (E20) (by weight) 10-MDP monomer and Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) as a control. After 24 hours, microshear bond strength was tested. The degree of conversion was also measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interfacial ultrastructure was observed under a scanning electron microscope in all the groups. Results A higher microshear bond strength was observed with adhesives containing 10% and 15% 10-MDP in comparison to study groups (P<.05). Clearfil S3 Bond and 10% MDP had a significantly greater degree of conversion than other groups (P<.05). Conclusions The amount of functional monomer in 1-SEAs influences both the bonding performance and degree of conversion; 10% 10-MDP showed the best combination of bond strength and degree of conversion. Key words:Self-etch adhesives, 10-MDP, bond strength, degree of conversion. PMID:26155340

  4. The air-kerma rate constant: application to air-kerma measurements for homeland security.

    PubMed

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; Lucas, L; Seltzer, S M

    2008-02-01

    Air-kerma rate measurements from 57Co, 60Co, and 137Cs radioactive sources were performed. These measurements were motivated by the development of new sources at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for radiological testing of equipment for homeland security applications. The testing of radiation detection equipment relies on knowing the values of the air-kerma rate for the radioactive sources at a fixed distance from the source. The air-kerma rate can be measured or alternatively estimated by using published values of the air-kerma rate constant. Although there are a large number of published values of the air-kerma rate constant for radionuclide sources based on theoretical calculations, strong disagreement is observed throughout the literature. Furthermore, most of the published values have no uncertainties assigned, and therefore their use for testing radiological equipment is limited. In this work we report experimentally-measured values of the air-kerma rate for three radionuclides with well defined source geometries and activities. The results are compared to estimates based on published values of the air-kerma rate constant. Such values are easily found in the literature from the last three decades and are used commonly by the scientific community.

  5. Kerma factors for use in 37-group neutron spectrum calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, G. H.; Bice, W. S., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Neutron kerma factors have been regrouped from the format of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 26 (ICRU-26) to supplement those available in the 37-group format of the Oak Ridge Data Library Collection 31 (DLC-31). Lists of regrouped neutron kerma factors are presented for eight elements and for seven compounds and mixtures. For several elements, disagreements in excess of 15% were observed between those neutron kerma factors available in DLC-31 and the regrouped neutron kerma factors of ICRU-26.

  6. Kerma rate effects on thermoluminescent response of CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, F; Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Mady, F

    2006-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of chemical vapour deposition diamond is studied after X-irradiation (45 kV) at room temperature for various air kerma rates ranging from 0.7 to 100 Gy.min(-1). For a given air kerma, the TL signal as a function of air kerma rate exhibits large variations and is higher for low air kerma rates than for higher ones. In order to explain these results, the simplest energy-level scheme has been considered, that is, with only one electron trap and one recombination centre. Kinetic equations are numerically solved. Calculations are made for various electron-hole generation rates and show that the trap filling as a function of electron-hole generation rate follows, actually, the same evolution as the one of experimental TL response. The kerma rate effect on TL response is explained by the competitivity between the recombination and the trapping processes during irradiation.

  7. Heat Treatment Influences Monomer Conversion and Bond Strength of Indirect Composite Resin Restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Enciso, Reyes; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2015-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the degree of conversion (DC) of indirect composite resin restorations polymerized with light and heat. Two direct (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one indirect (Premise Indirect) composite resins were polymerized with a combination of light and heat (138°C for 20 min). For MTBS, 42 cylinders were fabricated (n = 7). After the surface treatment, cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (n = 5) were fabricated for determining degree of conversion using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS and the DC was submitted to two-way ANOVA. The interaction with existing data was explored with univariate ANOVA and two-way ANOVA. Tukey's HSD post-hoc test was used to detect pairwise differences (α = 0.05). The MTBS to light and heat polymerized Z100 was 75.7 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (58.6 MPa) and Premise Indirect (63.9 MPa). The immediate DC for Z100, Premise, and Premise Indirect were 51.0%, 68.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The DC at 24 h ranged from 53.4% (Z100) to 72.8% (Premise Indirect) and significantly increased for Premise Indirect only. Comparison with previously published data revealed that the heat treatment increased both MTBS and DC of Premise and Premise Indirect. Z100 showed better bond strength but lower DC. Heat treatment and a 24-h delay before delivery can benefit DC of Premise Indirect. The increase in DC of Premise and Premise Indirect did not affect their bond strength.

  8. Effect of coupling strength on atomic-to-molecular condensate conversion in Raman photoassociation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Moumita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2010-03-15

    We study two-photon Raman photoassociation for creating a coherent molecular Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from an atomic BEC. By exploring the dynamics of the coupled system, we show that the atom-to-molecule conversion efficiency can be controlled by changing the atom-molecule coupling strength and the effective two-photon Raman detuning. Atom-molecule coupling strength and the effective two-photon Raman detuning can be controlled by changing the laser intensity. We analyze the dynamics of the coupled atom-molecular condensate system by changing the laser intensity over a broad range, keeping the effective two-photon Raman detuning fixed. The effective two-photon Raman detuning depends on the two-photon detuning, Rabi frequencies, and the light shifting (AC Stark shift) of the levels. To keep the effective two-photon Raman detuning fixed, the two-photon detuning is varied to compensate for the light shifting of levels with laser intensity. The corresponding changes in the effective decay rates and the scattering length due to the change in the Rabi frequencies have been taken into account. Dependence of the conversion efficiency on the effective two-photon Raman detuning has also been studied by varying the laser intensity over a narrow range, keeping the two-photon detuning unchanged. The dynamics of the coupled system has been studied in Gross-Pitaevskii and modified Gross-Pitaevskii approaches to demonstrate the effect of the higher order nonlinearity (Lee-Huang-Yang term) with the increase in the laser intensity.

  9. The estimation of uniaxial compressive strength conversion factor of trona and interbeds from point load tests and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, H.; Altinpinar, M.

    2017-07-01

    The point load (PL) test is generally used for estimation of uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of rocks because of its economic advantages and simplicity in testing. If the PL index of a specimen is known, the UCS can be estimated using conversion factors. Several conversion factors have been proposed by various researchers and they are dependent upon the rock type. In the literature, conversion factors on different sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks can be found, but no study exists on trona. In this study, laboratory UCS and field PL tests were carried out on trona and interbeds of volcano-sedimentary rocks. Based on these tests, PL to UCS conversion factors of trona and interbeds are proposed. The tests were modeled numerically using a distinct element method (DEM) software, particle flow code (PFC), in an attempt to guide researchers having various types of modeling problems (excavation, cavern design, hydraulic fracturing, etc.) of the abovementioned rock types. Average PFC parallel bond contact model micro properties for the trona and interbeds were determined within this study so that future researchers can use them to avoid the rigorous PFC calibration procedure. It was observed that PFC overestimates the tensile strength of the rocks by a factor that ranges from 22 to 106.

  10. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  11. Kerma Factors for Use in 37-Group Neutron Spectrum Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    PFPPI TECHNICAL REPORT Kerma factors for use in 37-group neutron spectrum calculations en en CO G. H. Zeman W. S. Bice, Jr. DEFENSE NUCLEAR...AGENCY ARMED FORCES RADIOBIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20814 APPRCVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED REVIEWED AND...FACTORS FOR USE IN 37-GROUP NEUTRON SPECTRUM CALCULATIONS 7. AUTHORfs; G. H. Zeman and W. S. Bice, Jr. 9. PERFORMING

  12. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    PubMed Central

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  13. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Miranda, Rafael Resende de; Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  14. New evaluated kerma factor library from ENDF/B-V data

    SciTech Connect

    Farawila, Y.M.; Maynard, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    The problem addressed in this paper is the accurate evaluation of neutron fluence-to-kerma (kinetic energy released in materials) factors from microscopic nuclear data. Accurate kerma factors are necessary for calculating the local heat generation in materials subject to neutron irradiation, such as shields and fusion reactor blankets. The new algorithms developed for this purpose combine in a consistent manner the two basic methods for computing kerma factors, namely, reaction kinematics and direct energy balance. These algorithms are implemented in the code KAOS-V (kerma and other stuff), which was used as the main evaluating tool to construct the nuclear response function library KAOS/LIB-V.

  15. Strain-mediated converse magnetoelectric coupling strength manipulation by a thin titanium layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-Gang; Morley, Nicola A.; Sharp, Joanne; Tian, Ye; Rainforth, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of the strain-mediated magnetoelectric (ME) coupling strength is investigated by inserting a thin Ti layer (0-10 nm) between a 50 nm Co50Fe50 layer and a (011) oriented lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) substrate. A record high remanence ratio (Mr/Ms) tunability of 100% has been demonstrated in the 50 nm CoFe/8 nm Ti/PMN-PT heterostructure, when a total in-plane piezoelectric strain of -1821 ppm was applied at an electric field (E-field) of 16 kV/cm. The ME coupling strength is gradually optimized as the Ti layer thickness increases. Magnetic energy calculation showed that with increasing Ti layer thickness the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy energy (Euni) was reduced from 43 ± 1 kJ/m3 to 29.8 ± 1 kJ/m3. The reduction of Euni makes the strain effect dominant in the total magnetic energy, thus gives an obvious enhanced ME coupling strength.

  16. Enhanced energy conversion efficiency from high strength synthetic organic wastewater by sequential dark fermentative hydrogen production and algal lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-Yu; Liu, Bing-Feng; Kong, Fanying; Zhao, Lei; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-04-01

    A two-stage process of sequential dark fermentative hydrogen production and microalgal cultivation was applied to enhance the energy conversion efficiency from high strength synthetic organic wastewater. Ethanol fermentation bacterium Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 was used as hydrogen producer, and the energy conversion efficiency and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency reached 18.6% and 28.3% in dark fermentation. Acetate was the main soluble product in dark fermentative effluent, which was further utilized by microalga Scenedesmus sp. R-16. The final algal biomass concentration reached 1.98gL(-1), and the algal biomass was rich in lipid (40.9%) and low in protein (23.3%) and carbohydrate (11.9%). Compared with single dark fermentation stage, the energy conversion efficiency and COD removal efficiency of two-stage system remarkably increased 101% and 131%, respectively. This research provides a new approach for efficient energy production and wastewater treatment using a two-stage process combining dark fermentation and algal cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic Consequences of Acid Strength in the Conversion of Methanol to Dimethyl Ether

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Robert T.; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-02-14

    The effects of acid identity on CH{sub 3}OH dehydration are examined here using density functional theory (DFT) estimates of acid strength (as deprotonation energies, DPE) and reaction energies, combined with rate data on Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and zeolite H-BEA. Measured first-order (k{sub mono}) and zero-order (k{sub dimer}) CH3OH dehydration rate constants depend exponentially on DPE for POM clusters; the value of k{sub mono} depends more strongly on DPE than k{sub dimer} does. The chemical significance of these rate parameters and the basis for their dependences on acid strength were established by using DFT to estimate the energies of intermediates and transition states involved in elementary steps that are consistent with measured rate equations. We conclude from this treatment that CH{sub 3}OH dehydration proceeds via direct reactions of co-adsorbed CH{sub 3}OH molecules for relevant solid acids and reaction conditions. Methyl cations formed at ion-pair transition states in these direct routes are solvated by H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH more effectively than those in alternate sequential routes involving methoxide formation and subsequent reaction with CH{sub 3}OH. The stability of ion-pairs, prevalent as intermediates and transition states on solid acids, depends sensitively on DPE because of concomitant correlations between the stability of the conjugate anionic cluster and DPE. The chemical interpretation of k{sub mono} and k{sub dimer} from mechanism-based rate equations, together with thermochemical cycles of their respective transition state formations, show that similar charge distributions in the intermediate and transition state involved in k{sub dimer} cause its weaker dependence on DPE. Values of k{sub mono} involve uncharged reactants and the same ion-pair transition state as k{sub dimer}; these species sense acid strength differently and cause the larger effects of DPE on k{sub mono}. Confinement effects in H-BEA affect the value of

  18. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  19. Reference air kerma and kerma-area product as estimators of peak skin dose for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Little, Mark P.; Miller, Donald L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine more accurate regression formulas for estimating peak skin dose (PSD) from reference air kerma (RAK) or kerma-area product (KAP). Methods: After grouping of the data from 21 procedures into 13 clinically similar groups, assessments were made of optimal clustering using the Bayesian information criterion to obtain the optimal linear regressions of (log-transformed) PSD vs RAK, PSD vs KAP, and PSD vs RAK and KAP. Results: Three clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK, seven clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs KAP, and six clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK and KAP. Prediction of PSD using both RAK and KAP is significantly better than prediction of PSD with either RAK or KAP alone. The regression of PSD vs RAK provided better predictions of PSD than the regression of PSD vs KAP. The partial-pooling (clustered) method yields smaller mean squared errors compared with the complete-pooling method.Conclusion: PSD distributions for interventional radiology procedures are log-normal. Estimates of PSD derived from RAK and KAP jointly are most accurate, followed closely by estimates derived from RAK alone. Estimates of PSD derived from KAP alone are the least accurate. Using a stochastic search approach, it is possible to cluster together certain dissimilar types of procedures to minimize the total error sum of squares.

  20. Air kerma based dosimetry calibration for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2009-02-15

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma Knife registered (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 individual {sup 60}Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This article proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using either an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the absorbed dose rate of fields of the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume air ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The absorbed dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with {sup 60}Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined absorbed dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) absorbed dose rate. The TPS used with the GK unit is Leksell GammaPlan. The TPS absorbed dose rate at the time of treatment is the absorbed dose rate determined by the physicist at the time of machine commissioning decay corrected to the treatment date. The TPS absorbed dose rate is defined as absorbed dose rate to water at the isocenter of a water phantom with a radius of 8 cm. Measurements were performed on model B and C Gamma Knife units. The absorbed dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using air-kerma based calculations is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the absorbed dose rate provided by the TPS. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were also made with the same ionization chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow further development of calibration methods appropriate for the

  1. Seasonal variation of air kerma rate in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Basile, S; Brai, M; Marrale, M; Rizzo, S

    2008-07-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry has been used to measure air kerma in 29 sites in Sicily. Four three month measurement campaigns have been carried out in order to assess seasonal variations. Average annual values between 20 and 90 nGy h(-1), after cosmic background subtraction, are reported. Average annual values are strongly dependent on site lithology, and we find that winter data are generally the highest, while spring and autumn rates are generally the lowest with very similar trends in any site. Summer values generally lay in between. Largest seasonal variations are found in sites along the southern coast of the island, probably because of stronger action of winds affecting radon, along with its progeny, concentrations at ground level.

  2. Comparison of the NIST and ENEA air kerma standards

    SciTech Connect

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.; Lamperti, P.J.

    1998-07-01

    A comparison was made between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Ente per le Nuov Tecnologie l`Energia e l`Ambiente (ENEA) air kerma standards for medium energy x rays and {sup 60}Co gamma rays. The comparison took place at ENEA in June 1994. Two different transfer chambers from NIST were used for the comparison. The measurements were made at radiation qualities similar to those used at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) (generating voltages of 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV, respectively) and with {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. The transfer chamber calibration factors obtained at the NIST and at the ENEA agreed with one another to 0.03% for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation and between 0.1% to 0.8% for the medium energy x-ray beam codes.

  3. Comparison of the NIST and ENEA Air Kerma Standards

    PubMed Central

    Laitano, R. F.; Lamperti, P. J.; Toni, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie l’Energia e l’Ambiente (ENEA) air kerma standards for medium energy x rays and 60Co gamma rays. The comparison took place at ENEA in June 1994. Two different transfer chambers from NIST were used for the comparison. The measurements were made at radiation qualities similar to those used at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) (generating voltages of 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV, respectively) and with 60Co gamma radiation. The transfer chamber calibration factors obtained at the NIST and at the ENEA agreed with one another to 0.03 % for 60Co gamma radiation and between 0.1 % to 0.8 % for the medium energy x-ray beam codes. PMID:28009356

  4. Correlation between degree of conversion, resin-dentin bond strength and nanoleakage of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hass, Viviane; Dobrovolski, Max; Zander-Grande, Christiana; Martins, Gislaine Cristine; Gordillo, Luís Alfonso Arana; Rodrigues Accorinte, Maria de Lourdes; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of conversion measured inside the hybrid layer (DC) with the microtensile resin-dentin bond strength (μTBS) and silver nitrate uptake or nanoleakage (SNU) for five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Fifty-five caries free extracted molars were used in this study. Thirty teeth were used for μTBS/SNU [n=6] and 25 teeth for DC [n=5]. The dentin surfaces were bonded with the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Ambar (AB), XP Bond (XP), Tetric N-Bond (TE) and Stae (ST) followed by composite resin build-ups. For μTBS and SNU test, bonded teeth were sectioned in order to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8mm(2)), which were tested under tensile stress (0.5mm/min). Three bonded sticks, from each tooth, were not tested in tensile stress and they were immersed in 50% silver nitrate, photo-developed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Longitudinal 1-mm thick sections were prepared for the teeth assigned for DC measurement and evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ST showed lowest DC, μTBS, and higher SNU (p<0.05). All other adhesives showed similar DC, μTBS, and SNU (p>0.05), except for TE which showed an intermediate SNU level. The DC was positively correlated with μTBS and negatively correlated with SNU (p<0.05). SNU was also negatively correlated with μTBS (p<0.05). The measurement of DC inside the hybrid layer can provide some information about bonding performance of adhesive systems since this property showed a good correlation with resin-dentin bond strength and SNU values. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-02-07

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of 'secondary bremsstrahlung' along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV 'clinical' radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the 'area under the kerma, K, curve' exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the 'double counting' of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma 'liberated' in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this 'violation' amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a 'clinical' 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm−2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut-offs reveals the considerable

  6. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-02-01

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of ‘secondary bremsstrahlung’ along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV ‘clinical’ radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the ‘area under the kerma, K, curve’ exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the ‘double counting’ of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma ‘liberated’ in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this ‘violation’ amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a ‘clinical’ 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm-2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut

  7. Effect of increased dwell times for solvent evaporation on the bond strength and degree of conversion of an ethanol-based adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Argolo, Saryta; Oliveira, Denise C; Fontes, Céres M; Lima, Adriano F; de Freitas, Anderson P; Cavalcanti, Andrea N

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the prolonged setting time of an ethanol-based adhesive system on the dentin bond strength and degree of conversion. Labial and lingual surfaces of fifteen human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 10), according to the dwell time between the application of two consecutive layers of the adhesive system (Adper Single Bond Plus, 3M ESPE) and light activation: G1--control (no extra dwell time); G2 and G3--dwell time of 30 seconds and 60 seconds, respectively. After light curing, two cylinders (1.4 x 1 mm) of composite resin (Filtek Flow, 3M ESPE) were bonded to each surface and submitted to micro-shear testing, 24 hours after light curing. A similar adhesive procedure was used for the degree of conversion evaluation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Significant differences between bond strength values (p = 0.0003) and degrees of conversion (p = 0.0004) were detected. The bond strength of G3 (60-second dwell time) was statistically higher than that of other groups. G1 (control) and G2 (30-second dwell time) presented similar results. Values of degree of conversion indicated that both the 30-second and 60-second dwell times resulted in similar and greater percentages of conversion. The use of a longer dwell time (60 seconds) might provide better solvent volatilization and monomer infiltration; bringing benefits to dentin bonding using simplified etch & rinse adhesive systems.

  8. Influence of two different methods of delivering fluoride on bond strength and degree of conversion of an adhesive after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Dominguez, John Alexis; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of fluoride delivery and restoration time point on the microshear bond strength (mSBS) and degree of conversion (DC) values of an adhesive applied on bleached enamel. Fifty-four enamel specimens were submitted to bleaching and divided into 3 groups of n = 18: group HP: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); group HPF: HP + 1.23% sodium fluoride application (F); group PF: 38% HP with F. A control group of n = 6 was neither bleached nor fluoridated. Subsequently, each group except the control was subdivided into 3 subgroups (n = 6) to be restored immediately, or at 7 or 14 days. Tygon tubes were filled with composite resin and placed on enamel surfaces, then the mSBS test was performed. The DC of the interface was observed with Raman spectroscopy. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's and Dunnet's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). The mSBS results showed higher values for groups HP and HPF at 14 days compared with immediate and 7 days (p < 0.05). Lower DC values were obtained in the immediately restored groups HP and HPF, which were significantly different from 7 and 14 days (p < 0.05). mSBS and DC for group PF was similar at all restoration time points and to the control group (p > 0.05). Only the use of a fluoridated in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence Boost PF) proved to be effective for immediately reversing the side effects of low mSBS and DC values when in-office bleaching is used.

  9. Absorbed dose to water based dosimetry versus air kerma based dosimetry for high-energy photon beams: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; De, Jans Jo; Gillis, Sofie; Hoornaert, Marie-Thérèse; Martens, Chantal; Piessens, Marleen; Thierens, Hubert; Van der Plaetsen, Ann; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2002-02-07

    In recent years, a change has been proposed from air kerma based reference dosimetry to absorbed dose based reference dosimetry for all radiotherapy beams of ionizing radiation. In this paper, a dosimetry study is presented in which absorbed dose based dosimetry using recently developed formalisms was compared with air kerma based dosimetry using older formalisms. Three ionization chambers of each of three different types were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water and air kerma and sent to five hospitals. There, reference dosimetry with all the chambers was performed in a total of eight high-energy clinical photon beams. The selected chamber types were the NE2571, the PTW-30004 and the Wellhöfer-FC65G (previously Wellhöfer-IC70). Having a graphite wall, they exhibit a stable volume and the presence of an aluminium electrode ensures the robustness of these chambers. The data were analysed with the most important recommendations for clinical dosimetry: IAEA TRS-398, AAPM TG-51, IAEA TRS-277, NCS report-2 (presently recommended in Belgium) and AAPM TG-21. The necessary conversion factors were taken from those protocols, or calculated using the data in the different protocols if data for a chamber type are lacking. Polarity corrections were within 0.1% for all chambers in all beams. Recombination corrections were consistent with theoretical predictions, did not vary within a chamber type and only slightly between different chamber types. The maximum chamber-to-chamber variations of the dose obtained with the different formalisms within the same chamber type were between 0.2% and 0.6% for the NE2571, between 0.2% and 0.6% for the PTW-30004 and 0.1% and 0.3% for the Wellhöfer-FC65G for the different beams. The absorbed dose results for the NE2571 and Wellhöfer-FC65G chambers were in good agreement for all beams and all formalisms. The PTW-30004 chambers gave a small but systematically higher result compared to the result for the NE2571 chambers (on the

  10. Calibration and features of air-kerma length product meters.

    PubMed

    Merimaa, K; Tapiovaara, M; Kosunen, A; Toroi, P

    2012-12-01

    Pencil-type air-kerma length product meters are generally used for quality control and radiation exposure measurements in computed tomography. To ensure reliable results, these meters should be calibrated so that measurements are traceable to international standards. Suitable calibration procedures, together with the properties of these meters, were examined and compared with the international standards and recommendations. The calibration procedure and setup used in this study were slightly modified compared with international recommendations. The special collimator system was found to cause less scatter than similar setups in earlier studies. The energy dependence of the meter response was investigated for several types of meters with standard radiation qualities. With most tested meter types, the total variation due to energy dependence was <4 %, but some had strong energy dependence and the variation was up to 15 % or higher. This highlights the importance of a proper calibration. The response of one semiconductor meter type varied up to 8 % when rotating the meter around its axis; this should be taken into account when making calibrations with a static setup.

  11. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  12. Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to radiation in plasmas with various magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2013-12-15

    Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z waves to electromagnetic radiation near the plasma and upper hybrid frequency in the presence of density gradients is potentially relevant to type II and III solar radio bursts, ionospheric radar experiments, pulsars, and continuum radiation for planetary magnetospheres. Here, we study mode conversion in warm, magnetized plasmas using a numerical electron fluid simulation code when the density gradient has a wide range of angle, δ, to the ambient magnetic field, B{sub 0}, for a range of incident Langmuir/z wavevectors. Our results include: (1) Left-handed polarized ordinary (oL) and right-handed polarized extraordinary (xR) mode waves are produced in various ranges of δ for Ω{sub 0} = (ωL/c){sup 1/3}(ω{sub ce}/ω) < 1.5, where ω{sub ce} is the (angular) electron cyclotron frequency, ω is the angular wave frequency, L is the length scale of the (linear) density gradient, and c is the speed of light; (2) the xR mode is produced most strongly in the range, 40° < δ < 60°, for intermediately magnetized plasmas with Ω{sub 0} = 1.0 and 1.5, while it is produced over a wider range, 0° ≤ δ ≤ 90°, for weakly magnetized plasmas with Ω{sub 0} = 0.1 and 0.7; (3) the maximum total conversion efficiencies for wave power from the Langmuir/z mode to radiation are of order 50%–99% and the corresponding energy conversion efficiencies are 5%–14% (depending on the adiabatic index γ and β = T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}, where T{sub e} is the electron temperature and m{sub e} is the electron) for various Ω{sub 0}; (4) the mode conversion window becomes wider as Ω{sub 0} and δ increase. Hence, the results in this paper confirm that linear mode conversion under these conditions can explain the weak total circular polarization of interplanetary type II and III solar radio bursts because a strong xR mode can be generated via linear mode conversion near δ ∼ 45°.

  13. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  14. Elucidating inequality in Nubia: an examination of entheseal changes at Kerma (Sudan).

    PubMed

    Schrader, Sarah A

    2015-02-01

    Located 10 km south of the Third Cataract of the Nile River, the ancient city of Kerma was once capital to the second largest state in Africa. The Eastern Cemetery at Kerma (∼4 km east of city center) encompasses 80+ hectares and was used over a period of 1,500 years (3,200-1,500 BC). Excavated in the early 20th century by George Reisner, the cemetery contained an estimated 20,000-40,000 individuals. Reisner classified these burials into multiple categories, including chiefs and human sacrifices, based on burial position and grave goods. This study investigates the skeletal embodiment of social inequality by examining variation in entheseal severity between the Kerma burial classifications. Seventeen entheses were examined using the Hawkey and Merbs (1995) scoring method (n = 205 individuals); age, sex, and body size variables were considered by employing Mann-Whitney U tests and partial Spearman's correlations. This analysis suggests that significant differences in entheseal changes existed between select burial types. Specifically, "corridor sacrifices" had significantly higher rates of entheseal changes while "chiefs" and "subsidiary burials" had similar entheseal changes; furthermore, within these burial categories, males had higher entheseal scores despite body size controls. The elevated entheseal changes in the sacrificial burials may be due to an intensive agro-pastoral lifestyle or other demanding forms of manual labor. In conclusion, the disparity of entheseal markers between burial subgroups at Kerma might reflect a degree of social inequality within this state level society. This bioarchaeological research informs our understanding of socially-defined categories of persons as well as everyday life in Ancient Kerma.

  15. Effects of aluminum-copper alloy filtration on photon spectra, air kerma rate and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréa; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, without the original aluminum filter, for dental radiography in terms of x-ray energy spectrum, air kerma rate and image quality. Comparisons of various thicknesses of aluminum-copper alloy in three different percentages were made with aluminum filtration. Tests were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray machine and were made on mandible phantom and on step-wedge. Depending on the thickness of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, the beam could be hardened and filtrated. The use of the aluminum-copper alloy filter resulted in reductions in air kerma rate from 8.40% to 47.33%, and indicated the same image contrast when compared to aluminum filtration. Aluminum-copper alloy filtration may be considered a good alternative to aluminum filtration.

  16. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O'Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm.

  17. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O’Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm. PMID:26601044

  18. Air kerma calculation in Monte Carlo simulations for deriving normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulations requires the calculation of the incident air kerma evaluated on the breast surface. In such a calculation, caution should be applied in considering explicitly the presence of the top compression paddle, since Compton scattering in this slab may produce a large spread of the incidence angles of x-ray photons on the scoring surface. Then, the calculation of the incident air kerma should contain the ‘effective’ area of the scoring surface, which takes into account the angle of incidence of photons on such a surface. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations with a code previously validated according to the Task Group 195 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, we show that for typical x-ray spectra and energy range adopted in mammography, the resulting discrepancy in the calculation of the incident air kerma may lead to an overestimation from a minimum of 10% up to 12% of normalized dose coefficients and, hence, of the corresponding mean glandular dose if this contribution is not considered.

  19. SU-D-209-01: Can Fluoroscopic Air-Kerma Rates Be Reliably Measured with Solid-State Meters?

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, C; Thai, L; Wagner, L; Ozus, B

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ionization chambers remain the standard for calibration of air-kerma rate measuring devices. Despite their strong energy-dependent response, solid state radiation detectors are increasingly used, primarily due to their efficiency in making standardized measurements. To test the reliability of these devices in measuring air-kerma rates, we compared ion chambers measurements with solid-state measurements for various mobile fluoroscopes operated at different beam qualities and air-kerma rates. Methods: Six mobile fluoroscopes (GE OEC models 9800 and 9900) were used to generate test beams. Using various field sizes and dose rate controls, copper attenuators and a lead attenuator were placed at the image receptor in varying combinations to generate a range of air-kerma rates. Air-kerma rates at 30 centimeters from the image receptors were measured using two 6-cm{sup 3} ion chambers with electrometers (Radcal, models 1015 and 9015) and two with solid state detectors (Unfors Xi and Raysafe X2). No error messages occurred during measurements. However, about two months later, one solid-state device stopped working and was replaced by the manufacturer. Two out of six mobile fluoroscopic units were retested with the replacement unit. Results: Generally, solid state and ionization chambers agreed favorably well, with two exceptions. Before replacement of the detector, the Xi meter when set in the “RF High” mode deviated from ion chamber readings by factors of 2 and 10 with no message indicating error in measurement. When set in the “RF Low” mode, readings were within −4% to +3%. The replacement Xi detector displayed messages alerting the user when settings were not compatible with air-kerma rates. Conclusion: Air-kerma rates can be measured favorably well using solid-state devices, but users must be aware of the possibility that readings can be grossly in error with no discernible indication for the deviation.

  20. Effect of sodium ascorbate on degree of conversion and bond strength of RealSeal SE to sodium hypochlorite treated root dentin.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Deepti; Wu, Wan-Cui; He, Qing-Yin; Wei, Xi; Ling, Jun-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium ascorbate (Sa) on degree of conversion (DC) and bond strength (BS) of RealSeal SE to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) treated root dentin. Two hundreds simulated canals were prepared and irrigated with Distilled water(DW), 1.3% NaOCl (1.3% N), 5.2% NaOCl (5.2% N), MTAD, 17% EDTA (EDTA), 10% Sa, 1.3% NaOCl/MTAD (N-M), 1.3% NaOCl/Sa/MTAD(N-Sa-M), 5.2% NaOCl/EDTA(N-E), and 5.2% NaOCl/Sa/EDTA (N-Sa-E) respectively. They were subsequently bulk filled with RealSeal SE and analyzed with micro-Raman spectroscopy and universal testing machine for DC and BS respectively. One-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test showed DC of 1.3% N, 5.2% N, N-M and N-E were significantly lower (p<0.01) than other six groups. BS of DW, Sa, N-M were significantly lower than 1.3% N, 5.2% N, MTAD, EDTA, N-Sa-M and N-E (p<0.01), and group N-Sa-E achieved the highest BS among all groups (p<0.01). NaOCl negatively affected DC and BS of RealSeal SE, which could be reversed with 10% Sa.

  1. Absorbed Dose and Collision Kerma Relationship for High-Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    Historically, exposure has been used as an important quantity to specify X- or (gamma)- ray beams. For any photon beam the energy fluence is proportional to the exposure. Exposure can be calculated and/or measured if the spectrum of the beam is known and charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists. For low energy photons (up to approximately 1 MeV), due to the existence of CPE, absorbed dose (D) is equal to the collision kerma (K(,c)). For megavoltage photons this equality is lost due to CPE failure, which also restricts the measurement of exposure. It is possible, though, to find a relationship between the absorbed dose and collision kerma when transient charged particle equilibrium (TCPE) exists. This basic idea was originally proposed by Roesch in 1958 and its refinement has been discussed by Attix in 1979 and 1983. The modified Roesch's formula which enables us to measure exposure even for high-energy photons is given by D = (beta) K(,c) (TURNEQ) K(,c) (1 + (mu)' ) where (mu)' is the effective linear attenuation coefficient and is the mean distance the secondary electrons carry kinetic energy in the direction of the photon beam while depositing it as absorbed dose. The symbol (beta) is the quotient of the absorbed dose and the collision kerma. The importance of Roesch's formula has been recognized and used implicitly in the recent dosimetry protocol of the AAPM (Task Group 21). However, the value used in the protocol is based on theoretical calculations which do not include photon scattering. As a result of the present effort the parameters (mu)' and have been determined experimentally, for the first time. The dependence of (beta) on several factors has been studied and (beta) has been obtained including the effects of scattering. Calculations were also performed for several photon energies and materials, using the Roesch method, which does not include photon scattering effects. Comparisons of measured and calculated values of show

  2. Comparison of measurements on tissue kerma and photon radiation dose made with emergency dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, V.V.; Lashuk, A.I.; Shalin, V.A.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the tissue equivalence and tissue kerma for dosimetric tissue-equivalent detectors with allowance for the neutron spectra. Results are given for the calculated dose sensitivities for the DINA and GNEIS dosemeters for a portion of the neutron spectra recommended by IAEA for comparative tests. The measurements were made with five nuclear systems - BR-10, RF-GS, BR-1-21, BR-1-21, and IBR-30 - as well as with accelerators. Doses from photon radiation were also measured using thermoluminescent and photoluminescent dosemeters sensitive to neutrons.

  3. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  4. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Air-over-ground calculations of the neutron, prompt, and secondary-gamma free-in-air tissue kerma from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V. III; Knight, J.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of the two-dimensional discrete-ordinate, calculations for the air-over-ground transport of radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki weapon devices. It was found that the gamma-ray kerma dominated the total kerma for both environments.

  6. SU-E-I-27: Estimating KERMA Area Product for CT Localizer Images

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, K; Greene-Donnelly, K; Bennett, R; Thorpe, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the free-in-air KERMA-Area Product (KAP) incident on patients due to CT localizer scans for common CT exams. Methods: In-plane beam intensity profiles were measured in localizer acquisition mode using OSLs for a 64 slice MDCT scanner (Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI). The z-axis beam width was measured as a function of distance from isocenter. The beam profile and width were used to calculate a weighted average air KERMA per unit mAs as a function of intercepted x-axis beam width for objects symmetric about the localizer centerline.Patient areas were measured using manually drawn regions and divided by localizer length to determine average width. Data were collected for 50 head exams (lateral localizer only), 15 head/neck exams, 50 chest exams, and 50 abdomen/pelvis exams. Mean patient widths and acquisition techniques were used to calculate the weighted average free-in-air KERMA, which was multiplied by the patient area to estimate KAP. Results: Scan technique was 120 kV tube voltage, 10 mA current, and table speed of 10 cm/s. The mean ± standard deviation values of KAP were 120 ± 11.6, 469 ± 62.6, 518 ± 45, and 763 ± 93 mGycm{sup 2} for head, head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. For studies with AP and lateral localizers, the AP/lateral area ratio was 1.20, 1.33, and 1.24 for the head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. However, the AP/lateral KAP ratios were 1.12, 1.08, and 1.07, respectively. Conclusion: Calculation of KAP in CT localizers is complicated by the non-uniform intensity profile and z-axis beam width. KAP values are similar to those for simple radiographic exams such as a chest radiograph and represent a small fraction of the x-ray exposure at CT. However, as CT doses are reduced the localizer contribution will be a more significant fraction of the total exposure.

  7. [Air kerma transmission factors of Scattered X-rays in the maze of a Linac room for lead shield].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2005-01-20

    Spectra of scattered X-rays in the maze of a Linac (X-ray energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV) room were estimated by means of the Monte Carlo simulation, and air kerma transmission factors of the X-rays scattered through a lead shield were evaluated based on those spectra. Spectra of scattered X-rays showed a maximum in the energy area below 200 keV. The higher the accelerated electron energy, also, the smaller the scattering angle that tended to spread to the higher energy area of the distribution of spectra. The air kerma transmission factor of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 4 MV X-rays obtained in this study was larger than the transmission factors of 124 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays through a lead shield given in ICRP. The air kerma transmission factors of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 6 MV X-rays were smaller than the transmission factors of 90 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays. The air kerma transmission factors of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 10 MV X-rays was slightly larger than transmission factors of 90 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays. Therefore, in the case of a 4 MV X-ray Linac room, the calculation method given in the "Manual of Practical Shield Calculation of Radiation Facilities (2000)" causes underestimation of leakage doses.

  8. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships for initial nuclear radiation from the atomic devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III; Scott, W.H. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    Initial nuclear radiation is comprised of prompt neutrons and prompt primary gammas from an exploding nuclear device, prompt secondary gammas produced by neutron interactions in the environment, and delayed neutrons and delayed fission-product gammas from the fireball formed after the nuclear device explodes. These various components must all be considered in establishing tissue kerma vs distance relationships which describe the decrease of initial nuclear radiation with distance in Hiroshima and in Nagasaki. The tissue kerma at ground evel from delayed fission-product gammas and delayed neutrons was investigated using the NUIDEA code developed by Science Applications, Inc. This code incorporates very detailed models which can take into account such features as the rise of the fireball, the rapid radioactive decay of fission products in it, and the perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosion. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships obtained by summing results of these current state-of-the-art calculations will be discussed. Our results clearly show that the prompt secondary gammas and delayed fission-product gammas are the dominant components of total tissue kerma from initial nuclear radiation in the cases of the atomic (or pure-fission) devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  9. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  10. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.; Cerra, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow “pencil” beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source, or b) during the traversal of a point source, is a unifying concept. The “universal source strength” of air kerma rate at a meter from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose.

  11. Modelling the contribution of individual radionuclides to the total gamma air kerma rate for the sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; McDonald, P; Williams, M; Parker, A; Rae, J E

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the performance of a published dose-rate model, investigate the contribution of individual radionuclides to the total gamma air kerma rate (GAKR) and derive external doses to man in the Ribble Estuary, NW England. GAKRs were measured and sediment cores were collected in order to determine radionuclide specific activities with depth. The latter values were used as input data for the external dose-rate model. The model has a slight tendency to over-predict the GAKR, but, on average, the model predictions fall within +/-26% of the measured value. Improvements, in the present case, might be made by accounting for core shortening and variations in soil density in the input data. The model predicted that, for exposed intertidal mud sites, a range of GAKRs between 0.011 and 0.022 microGy h(-1) was attributable to Springfields discharges alone. The contribution due to 234mPa and 234Th ranged between 20 and 60%. An excess GAKR (GAKR arising from anthropogenic emissions alone) of 0.139-0.150 microGy h(-1), used in conjunction with relevant habit-survey data (for a potential critical group) and conversion factors, yielded a dose to man of 0.029-0.031 mSv year(-1).

  12. Simulation evaluation of NIST air-kerma rate calibration standard for electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, Jessica R; Rivard, Mark J; Hughes, H Grady

    2016-03-01

    Dosimetry for the model S700 50 kV electronic brachytherapy (eBT) source (Xoft, Inc., a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) was simulated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods by Rivard et al. ["Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent x-ray source: An electronic brachytherapy source," Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)] and recently by Hiatt et al. ["A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model," Med. Phys. 42, 2764-2776 (2015)] with improved geometric characterization. While these studies examined the dose distribution in water, there have not previously been reports of the eBT source calibration methods beyond that recently reported by Seltzer et al. ["New national air-kerma standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 119, 554-574 (2014)]. Therefore, the motivation for the current study was to provide an independent determination of air-kerma rate at 50 cm in air K̇air(d=50 cm) using MC methods for the model S700 eBT source. Using CAD information provided by the vendor and disassembled sources, an MC model was created for the S700 eBT source. Simulations were run using the mcnp6 radiation transport code for the NIST Lamperti air ionization chamber according to specifications by Boutillon et al. ["Comparison of exposure standards in the 10-50 kV x-ray region," Metrologia 5, 1-11 (1969)], in air without the Lamperti chamber, and in vacuum without the Lamperti chamber. K̇air(d=50 cm) was determined using the *F4 tally with NIST values for the mass energy-absorption coefficients for air. Photon spectra were evaluated over 2 π azimuthal sampling for polar angles of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 180° every 1°. Volume averaging was averted through tight radial binning. Photon energy spectra were determined over all polar angles in both air and vacuum using

  13. SU-E-I-49: Influence of Scanner Output Measurement Technique on KERMA Ratios in CT.

    PubMed

    Ogden, K; Roskopf, M; Scalzetti, E

    2012-06-01

    KERMA ratios (RK) are defined as the ratio of KERMA measured at a specific phantom location (K) to in-air isocenter CT scanner output (KCT). In this work we investigate the impact of measurement methodology on KCT values. OSL dosimeter chips were used to measure KCT for a GE VCT scanner (GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), using the 40 mm nominal beam width. Methods included a single point measurement at the center of the beam (1 tube rotation), and extended z-axis measurements using multiple adjacent OSL's (7.5 cm extent), with single tube rotation, multiple contiguous axial scans, and helical scans (pitch of 1.375). Measurements were made in air and on the scan table at 80 and 120 kV. Averaged single point measurements were consistent, with a mean coefficient of variation of 2.5%. For extended measurements with a single tube rotation, the mean value was equivalent to the single point measurements. For multiple contiguous axial scans, the in-air KCT values were higher than the single rotation mean value and single point measurements by 13% and 10.3% at 120 and 80 kV, respectively, and for the on-table measurements the values were 14.9% and 8.1% higher at 120 and 80 kV, respectively. The increase is due to beam overlap caused by z- axis over-beaming. Extended measurements using helical scanning were equivalent to the multiple rotation axial measurements when corrected for the helical pitch. For all methodologies, the in-air values exceeded the on- table measurements by an average of 23% and 19.4% at 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Scanner KCT values must be measured to allow organ dose estimation using published RK values. It is imperative that the KCT measurement methodology is the same as for the published values, or large errors may be introduced into the resulting organ dose estimates. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Comparison of the NIST and BIPM Standards for Air Kerma in Medium-Energy X-Rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; O'Brien, M

    2006-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for medium-energy x-rays of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the BIPM and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and three NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Reference beam qualities in the range from 100 kV to 250 kV were used. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the combined standard uncertainty of the comparison of 0.37 %, although a significant trend with radiation quality is observed and the possible sources discussed.

  15. NOTE: Monte Carlo evaluation of kerma in an HDR brachytherapy bunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Crispin, V.; Puchades, V.; León, A.; Verdú, G.

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, the use of high dose rate (HDR) after-loader machines has greatly increased due to the shift from traditional Cs-137/Ir-192 low dose rate (LDR) to HDR brachytherapy. The method used to calculate the required concrete and, where appropriate, lead shielding in the door is based on analytical methods provided by documents published by the ICRP, the IAEA and the NCRP. The purpose of this study is to perform a more realistic kerma evaluation at the entrance maze door of an HDR bunker using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The Monte Carlo results were validated experimentally. The spectrum at the maze entrance door, obtained with Monte Carlo, has an average energy of about 110 keV, maintaining a similar value along the length of the maze. The comparison of results from the aforementioned values with the Monte Carlo ones shows that results obtained using the albedo coefficient from the ICRP document more closely match those given by the Monte Carlo method, although the maximum value given by MC calculations is 30% greater.

  16. Entrance surface air kerma in X-ray systems for paediatric interventional cardiology: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, C; Vano, E; Miranda, P; Valenzuela, E; Vergara, F; Guarda, E

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this work were to report the results of a national survey on entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values for different phantom thicknesses and operation modes in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) systems and to compare them with previous values. The national survey also offers suggested investigation levels (ILs) for ESAK in paediatric cardiac procedures. ESAK was measured on phantoms of 4-16 cm thickness of polymethyl methacrylate slabs. For low fluoroscopy mode (FM), ESAK rates ranged from 0.11 to 33.1 mGy min(-1) and for high FM from 0.34 to 61.0 mGy min(-1). For cine mode, values of ESAK per frame were from 1.9 to 78.2 µGy fr(-1). The ILs were suggested as the third quartile of the values measured. This research showed lower ESAK values than in previous research, particularly for ESAK values in cine modes. This work represents a first step towards launching a national programme in paediatric dosimetry for IC procedures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Diaphragm correction factors for free-air chamber standards for air kerma in x-rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C

    2009-05-07

    At present, only a correction factor for photon transmission, k(l), is systematically applied for the entrance diaphragm of free-air chamber standards for air kerma. In the present work, the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE is used to re-evaluate k(l) for the BIPM standards and new correction factors are calculated for photon scatter and for fluorescence production in the diaphragm. An additional effect arising from electrons emitted from the diaphragm is shown to be significant at the highest photon energies. The results for the radiation qualities used for international comparisons give a combined diaphragm correction factor k(dia) = 0.9980(3) for the BIPM medium-energy standard at 250 kV. This is significantly different from the factor k(l) = 0.9996(1) in use at present and it might be concluded that differences are likely to exist for all free-air chamber standards. The effect of using a conical taper at the downstream edge of the diaphragm is shown to be negligible for these radiation qualities.

  18. A radiation quality correction factor k for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Andreas; Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for (192)Ir HDR sources. The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of (60)Co and (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor kQ was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for (60)Co and (192)Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor kQ is 1.05. Both kQ values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of kQ is UkQ = 2.1% for both chamber types. The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for (192)Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ. However, the uncertainty of a (60)Co calibration coefficient calculated via kQ is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a (60)Co source.

  19. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W. F.

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  20. SU-E-T-552: Monte Carlo Calculation of Correction Factors for a Free-Air Ionization Chamber in Support of a National Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Bergstrom, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo radiation transport methods to calculate correction factors for a free-air ionization chamber in support of a national air-kerma standard for low-energy, miniature x-ray sources used for electronic brachytherapy (eBx). Methods: The NIST is establishing a calibration service for well-type ionization chambers used to characterize the strength of eBx sources prior to clinical use. The calibration approach involves establishing the well-chamber’s response to an eBx source whose air-kerma rate at a 50 cm distance is determined through a primary measurement performed using the Lamperti free-air ionization chamber. However, the free-air chamber measurements of charge or current can only be related to the reference air-kerma standard after applying several corrections, some of which are best determined via Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a detailed geometric model of the Lamperti chamber was developed in the EGSnrc code based on the engineering drawings of the instrument. The egs-fac user code in EGSnrc was then used to calculate energy-dependent correction factors which account for missing or undesired ionization arising from effects such as: (1) attenuation and scatter of the x-rays in air; (2) primary electrons escaping the charge collection region; (3) lack of charged particle equilibrium; (4) atomic fluorescence and bremsstrahlung radiation. Results: Energy-dependent correction factors were calculated assuming a monoenergetic point source with the photon energy ranging from 2 keV to 60 keV in 2 keV increments. Sufficient photon histories were simulated so that the Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty of the correction factors was less than 0.01%. The correction factors for a specific eBx source will be determined by integrating these tabulated results over its measured x-ray spectrum. Conclusion: The correction factors calculated in this work are important for establishing a national standard for eBx which will help ensure that dose

  1. APMP key comparison for the measurement of air kerma for 60Co (APMP.RI(I)-K1.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. V.; Lee, J.-H.; Budiantari, C. T.; Laban, J.; Saito, N.; Srimanoroth, S.; Khaled, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported for an APMP.R(I)-K1.1 comparison that extends the regional comparison of standards for air kerma APMP.R(I)-K1 to several laboratories unable to participate earlier. The comparison was conducted with the goal of supporting the relevant calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs) planned for publication by the participant laboratories. The comparison was conducted by the pilot laboratory, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANSA), Australia, supported by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Taiwan, in a modified ring-shaped arrangement from September 2009 to November 2010, in parallel with an APMP.R(I)-K4 comparison being piloted by the INER. The laboratories that took part in the comparison were the ARPANSA, the Centre of Technology of Radiation Safety and Metrology (PTKMR-BATAN), Indonesia, the Division of Radiation and Medical Devices (DMSC), Thailand, the INER, the National Centre for Radiation Science (NCRS), New Zealand, the National Institute for Standards (NIS), Egypt and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST), Japan. The two primary laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ, were chosen as the linking laboratories. Three ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments to be calibrated in terms of air kerma in 60Co radiotherapy beams. The comparison result is based on the ratio between the air kerma calibration coefficients (NK) determined by the participants and the mean of the results of the linking laboratories. The mean comparison ratio was found to be within 0.5 % of the key comparison reference value KCRV. The largest deviation between any two comparison ratios for the three chambers in terms of air kerma was 2.0 %. An analysis of the participant uncertainty budgets enabled the calculation of degrees of equivalence (DoE) in terms of the deviations of the results and their associated uncertainties. As a result of this APMP comparison, the BIPM key comparison database (KCDB) should

  2. Strengths-oriented therapeutic conversations for families of children with chronic illnesses: findings from the Landspitali university hospital family nursing implementation project.

    PubMed

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Sigurdardottir, Anna Olafia; Tryggvadottir, Gudny Bergthora

    2014-02-01

    Psychosocial services have been recommended for families of children with chronic illnesses to assist them in adjusting to the illness experience. However, little is known about the benefit of psychosocial interventions in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the benefits of a two-session family therapeutic conversation intervention (FAM-TCIs) for families of children diagnosed with asthma, cancer, or diabetes. A secondary data analysis was conducted on intervention data from 37 families of children with chronic illnesses. Mothers of the children/teenagers perceived significantly higher family support after the FAM-TCI compared with before; mothers reported significantly higher collaboration and problem-solving abilities on the expressive family functioning scale after the FAM-TCI. However, no significant differences were found on the fathers' perceived family support nor on their expressive family functioning after the FAM-TCI compared with that before the intervention. It is promising that mothers of children with chronic illness perceived the two-session FAM-TCI to be beneficial to them. More attention should be paid to psychosocial interventions for families of children with chronic illnesses.

  3. MO-D-BRD-04: NIST Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitch, M.

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  4. Conversational Dominance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  5. Comparison of the NIST and PTB Air-Kerma Standards for Low-Energy X-Rays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle; Bueermann, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the PTB and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and two NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Results are presented for the reference radiation beam qualities in the range from 25 kV to 50 kV for low energy x rays, including the techniques used for mammography dose traceability. The tungsten generated reference radiation qualities, between 25 kV and 50 kV used for this comparison, are new to NIST; therefore this comparison will serve as the preliminary comparison for NIST and a verification of the primary standard correction factors. The mammography comparison will repeat two previously unpublished comparisons between PTB and NIST. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.4 %.

  6. Buildup factors and kerma for Al2O3 and SiO2 in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Alım, Bünyamin; Akkuş, Tuba; Güzeldir, Betül

    2017-04-01

    The energy absorption buildup factors (EABF) have been calculated for some thermoluminescent dosimetric materials (Al2O3 and SiO2) in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free paths (mfp). Also, kerma relative to air has been determined for these materials. It is observed that the energy absorption buildup factors and kerma relative to air depend on the photon energy and chemical content. Also, the energy absorption build up factors are found the highest in intermediate energy whereas the lowest in low- as well as high energies.

  7. Comparison of the NIST and NPL Air Kerma Standards Used for X-Ray Measurements Between 10 kV and 80 kV.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M; Lamperti, P; Williams, T; Sander, T

    2000-01-01

    A direct comparison was made between the air kerma primary standards used for the measurements of low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The comparison was conducted at the NPL using NPL reference radiation qualities between 10 kV and 80 kV. The results show the primary air-kerma standards to agree within 0.6 % of their values for beam qualities up to 80 kV.

  8. Evaluation of conversion coefficients from measurable to risk quantities for external exposure over contaminated soil by use of physical human phantoms.

    PubMed

    Golikov, V; Wallström, E; Wöhni, T; Tanaka, K; Endo, S; Hoshi, M

    2007-11-01

    Conversion coefficients from measurable quantities such as air kerma free-in-air or personal dose equivalent to effective dose were determined by phantom experiments. Heterogenic anthropomorphic phantoms representing children of one and five years age, and a Rando phantom representing an adult were exposed in the open field contaminated by different levels of radiocesium in the upper soil layer, in a forest site and inside a wooden house. LiF thermoluminescent (TL) detectors were used inside the phantoms for the estimation of organ doses and effective dose. Personal dosimeters similar to those used in radiation protection for individual dose measurements were placed onto the phantom surface (chest area). The ratios of dose values in separate organs to air kerma free-in-air varied from 0.69 to 1.15 for the children phantoms, and from 0.55 to 0.94 for the adult phantom, respectively, when irradiated in the open field. Body size (weight) was found to be the most important factor influencing the values of the conversion coefficients. The differences observed can reach approximately 40% when comparing conversion factors from air kerma free-in-air to effective dose for adults and newborns. For conversion coefficients from personal dose to effective dose, these differences can reach approximately 15%. The dependences of the various conversion coefficients on body mass were quantified by regression analysis. The results were compared with those calculated for a plane mono-energetic photon source having an energy of 700 keV and being located in the ground at a depth of 0.5 g cm(-2). Calculated and measured conversion coefficients from air kerma free-in-air to effective dose agreed within 12%.

  9. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends.

  11. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  12. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R E

    1998-01-01

    The Power Conservation Technologies thrust area supports initiatives that enhance the core competencies of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Directorate in the area of solid-state power electronics. Through partnerships with LLNL programs, projects focus on the development of enabling technologies for existing and emerging programs that have unique power conversion requirements. This year, a multi-disciplinary effort was supported which demonstrated solid-state, high voltage generation by using a dense, monolithic photovoltaic array. This effort builds upon Engineering's strengths in the core technology areas of power conversion, photonics, and microtechnologies.

  13. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  14. Contentious Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  15. Contentious Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  16. Cross sections and partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at En = 21.6 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Ramström, E; Trostell, B

    1990-09-01

    The Studsvik high-resolution, low-background time-of-flight facility has been used to measure differential neutron scattering cross sections for nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at a neutron energy of 21.6 MeV. Angular distributions in the range 10 degrees-160 degrees have been measured for both elastic and inelastic scattering from some low-lying levels in the three nuclei. Angle-integrated cross sections have been determined by fitting Legendre polynomial expansions to the differential data. Partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic scattering have been deduced from these fits. Analyses in terms of the spherical optical model and the distorted-wave Born approximation have provided information on potential parameters and deformations, which have been used to calculate cross sections and partial kerma factors. Comparisons have been made with other recent data sets and model predictions, as well as with the evaluated neutron data file ENDF/B-V.

  17. Evaluated cross section libraries and kerma factors for neutrons up to 100 MeV on {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1995-07-01

    We present evaluations of the interaction of 20 to 100 MeV neutrons with oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, which follows on from our previous work on carbon. Our aim is to accurately represent integrated cross sections, inclusive emission spectra, and kerma factors, in a data library which can be used in radiation transport calculations. We apply the FKK-GNASH nuclear model code, which includes Hauser-Feshbach, preequilibrium, and direct reaction mechanisms, and use experimental measurements to optimize the calculations. We determine total, elastic, and nonelastic cross sections, angle-energy correlated emission spectra, for light ejectiles with A{<=}4 and gamma-rays, and average energy depositions. Our results for charged-particle emission spectra agree well with the measurements of Subramanian et al.. We compare kerma factors derived from our evaluated cross sections with experimental data, providing an integral benchmarking of our work. The evaluated data libraries are available as electronic files.

  18. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the NIM, China and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Wang, K.; Fan, Y.; Jin, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for air kerma of the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in November 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the NIM and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9997 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.7 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NMIJ and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Kurosawa, T.; Mikamoto, T.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources of the National Metrology Institute of Japan (AIST-NMIJ), Japan, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) in April 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NMIJ and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 1.0036 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0054. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NPL and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. T.; Sander, T.; de Pooter, J. A.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Kessler, C.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), United Kingdom, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the NPL in June 2010. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NPL and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 0.9989 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0057. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; De la Cruz Hernández, D.; Cabrera Vertti, M. R.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in February 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0048 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.0 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2013-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in 2012. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0035 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.1 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and 137Cs Gamma-Ray Beams

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients. PMID:27134777

  4. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and (137)Cs Gamma-Ray Beams.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients.

  5. Dose conversion coefficients for photon exposure of the human eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Dietze, G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published, because epidemiological studies implied that the induction of cataracts occurs even at eye lens doses of less than 500 mGy. Different questions were addressed: Which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens? Is a new definition of the dose quantity Hp(3) based on a cylinder phantom to represent the human head necessary? Are current conversion coefficients from fluence to equivalent dose to the lens sufficiently accurate? To investigate the latter question, a realistic model of the eye including the inner structure of the lens was developed. Using this eye model, conversion coefficients for electrons have already been presented. In this paper, the same eye model—with the addition of the whole body—was used to calculate conversion coefficients from fluence (and air kerma) to equivalent dose to the lens for photon radiation from 5 keV to 10 MeV. Compared to the values adopted in 1996 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the new values are similar between 40 keV and 1 MeV and lower by up to a factor of 5 and 7 for photon energies at about 10 keV and 10 MeV, respectively. Above 1 MeV, the new values (calculated without kerma approximation) should be applied in pure photon radiation fields, while the values adopted by the ICRP in 1996 (calculated with kerma approximation) should be applied in case a significant contribution from secondary electrons originating outside the body is present.

  6. Metric Conversion

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-12

    ... 1,000,000 1,000,000 micrometers nano- 1,000,000,000 1,000,000,000 nanometers ... conversions, see the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publications: NIST Guide to SI Units: ...

  7. Conversation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  8. Accuracy of Spencer-Attix cavity theory and calculations of fluence correction factors for the air kerma formalism.

    PubMed

    La Russa, D J; Rogers, D W O

    2009-09-01

    EGSnrc calculations of ion chamber response and Spencer-Attix (SA) restricted stopping-power ratios are used to test the assumptions of the SA cavity theory and to assess the accuracy of this theory as it applies to the air kerma formalism for 60Co beams. Consistent with previous reports, the EGSnrc calculations show that the SA cavity theory, as it is normally applied, requires a correction for the perturbation of the charged particle fluence (K(fl)) by the presence of the cavity. The need for K(fl) corrections arises from the fact that the standard prescription for choosing the low-energy threshold delta in the SA restricted stopping-power ratio consistently underestimates the values of delta needed if no perturbation to the fluence is assumed. The use of fluence corrections can be avoided by appropriately choosing delta, but it is not clear how delta can be calculated from first principles. Values of delta required to avoid K(fl) corrections were found to be consistently higher than delta values obtained using the conventional approach and are also observed to be dependent on the composition of the wall in addition to the cavity size. Values of K(fl) have been calculated for many of the graphite-walled ion chambers used by the national metrology institutes around the world and found to be within 0.04% of unity in all cases, with an uncertainty of about 0.02%.

  9. Summary of the BIPM.RI(I)-K5 comparison for air kerma in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    International comparisons of air kerma in 137Cs gamma radiation beams have been made at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) since 1994. Twelve national metrology institutes have taken part, seven of which have repeated the comparison over the intervening years. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) is taken as the BIPM evaluation, each comparison result being the ratio of the national metrology institute (NMI) evaluation to that of the BIPM standard under the same reference conditions. The degrees of equivalence between each NMI and the KCRV and a graphical presentation are given using the most recent published result for eleven NMIs. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. COOMET regional comparison of national measurement standards of air kerma for 137Cs γ radiation at protection level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, L.; Oborin, A. V.; Milevsky, V. S.; Walwyn Salas, G.; Sukhishvili, S.; Ginga, I.; Ivanov, R.; Gudelis, A.; Gomola, I.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented of the COOMET supplementary comparison of the national measurement standards for air kerma in 137Cs γ radiation at protection level (~10 mGy/h). Ten National Metrology Institutes from the COOMET organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency participated in this COOMET project no. 445. The PTB acted as pilot laboratory. Two of the participants, the SMU (Slovakia) and the NSC-'IM' (Ukraine) participated in the measurements but did not submit a valid report of results. The comparison reference value (CRV) was obtained as the mean result of the PTB and the VNIIM, both of which had previously taken part in the key comparison BIPM-RI(I)-K5. The degree of equivalence with the CRV was evaluated. The results were consistent within the relative standard uncertainties of the comparison ranging from 0.28% to 1.3% and deviated from the CRV by less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Monomer-to-polymer conversion and micro-tensile bond strength to dentine of experimental and commercial adhesives containing diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide or a camphorquinone/amine photo-initiator system.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Vesna; Pongprueksa, Pong; De Munck, Jan; Brooks, Neil R; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    To compare the degree of conversion (DC) of adhesives initiated by diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide (TPO) or a camphorquinone/tertiary amine system (CQ/Amine) as well as their 'immediate' micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) to bur-cut dentine. DC of Scotchbond Universal ('SBU'; 3M ESPE), its experimental counterpart containing TPO as photo-initiator system, an experimental G-aenial Bond ('Ga-B'; GC) adhesive formulation, and an experimental LUB-102 adhesive formulation ('LUB', Kuraray Noritake), containing as photo-initiatior system either 2wt% CQ along with 2wt% tertiary amine ('SBU_CQ/Amine'; 'Ga-B_CQ/Amine'; 'LUB_CQ/Amine'), or 2wt% TPO ('SBU_TPO'; 'Ga-B_TPO'; 'LUB_TPO'), was determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), after being cured with a dual-wavelength light-curing unit (bluephase 20i, Ivoclar Vivadent). The same adhesive formulations were applied to bur-cut mid-coronal dentine of intact human molars, and subjected to a μTBS test after 1-week water storage. Besides being applied following a self-etch (SE) application mode, the adhesive formulations SBU_CQ/Amine and SBU_TPO were also applied following an etch-and-rinse (E&R) mode, this both for DS and μTBS measurement. No significant difference in DC was found for any of the adhesive formulations, except for SBU_CQ/Amine_SE and SBU_TPO_SE. For both SBU formulations, a significantly higher DC was reached for the E&R than the SE approach. Regarding μTBS, no significant differences were recorded, except for the significantly higher μTBS measured for SBU_CQ/Amine_E&R and SBU_TPO_E&R. In self-etch adhesives, the photo-initiator TPO may be used instead of CQ/Amine. The curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency depended on the application protocol (E&R versus SE), but not on the photo-initiator system. The photo-initiator TPO may be used in self-etch adhesives instead of CQ/Amine with similar curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  13. Collision-kerma conversion between dose-to-tissue and dose-to-water by photon energy-fluence corrections in low-energy brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Antunes, Paula C. G.; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, introduced in 1995, has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations, except in the vicinity of the source capsule. Subsequent dosimetry developments, based on Monte Carlo calculations or analytical solutions of transport equations, do not rely on the CPE assumption and determine directly the dose to different tissues. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seeds is proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences. State-of-the art Monte Carlo calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone), which in all cases include a realistic modelling of low-energy brachytherapy sources in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases (e.g. bone tissue).

  14. Conversational Telugu.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop elementary conversational skills in Telugu. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The first, and most predominant, is the unit microwave cycle. These cycles divide the learning process into two basic phases, the first of which involves mimicry, memorization, and…

  15. Conversational Tamil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop conversational skills in Tamil. It is to be used as a review of what has been learned in class and not as a teaching device. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The unit microwave cycle divides the learning process into two basic phases. The first phase involves…

  16. Pin-photodiode array for the measurement of fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of X-ray CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao; Kameyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Patient dose estimation in X-ray computed tomography (CT) is generally performed by Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions within anthropomorphic or cylindrical phantoms. An accurate Monte Carlo simulation requires an understanding of the effects of the bow-tie filter equipped in a CT scanner, i.e. the change of X-ray energy and air kerma along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. To measure the effective energy and air kerma distributions, we devised a pin-photodiode array utilizing eight channels of X-ray sensors arranged at regular intervals along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. Each X-ray sensor consisted of two plate type of pin silicon photodiodes in tandem - front and rear photodiodes - and of a lead collimator, which only allowed X-rays to impinge vertically to the silicon surface of the photodiodes. The effective energy of the X-rays was calculated from the ratio of the output voltages of the photodiodes and the dose was calculated from the output voltage of the front photodiode using the energy and dose calibration curves respectively. The pin-photodiode array allowed the calculation of X-ray effective energies and relative doses, at eight points simultaneously along the fan-beam arc of a CT scanner during a single rotation of the scanner. The fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of CT scanners can be effectively measured using this pin-photodiode array. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  18. Conversational sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  19. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  20. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W; Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Christopher J; Lye, Jessica E; Nordström, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M; Lewis, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 ± 0.015 and 0.412 ± 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 ± 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation curve on the IMBL using a simple experimental

  1. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C; O'Brien, M; Minniti, R

    2012-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.8 parts in 10(3), except at 250 kV where the difference is 1.5 times the standard uncertainty. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database.

  2. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  3. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  4. Evaluation of wall correction factor of INER's air-kerma primary standard chamber and dose variation by source displacement for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Wang, J N; Huang, T T; Su, S H; Chang, B J; Su, C H; Hsu, S M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the ¹⁹²Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR ¹⁹²Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  5. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the SCK.CEN, Belgium and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Chiriotti, S.

    2017-01-01

    A first key comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) from the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie—Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK.CEN), Belgium and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in September 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the SCK.CEN and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0021 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.6 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 7 parts in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Human occupations and environmental changes in the Nile valley during the Holocene: The case of Kerma in Upper Nubia (northern Sudan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honegger, Matthieu; Williams, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Our article presents a detailed Holocene archaeological sequence from the Nile Valley at Kerma in Upper Nubia, northern Sudan. This sequence retraces the evolution of human populations thanks to the study of several sites, supported by 90 14C dates. Reconstruction of the environmental changes was supported by a study of dated stratigraphic sections located near the archaeological sites studied, and illustrates the effects on human occupation of changes in river flow and floods, which are in turn forced by climatic changes. The results shed new light on the evolutionary dynamics of the Holocene populations in Nile Valley, little known due to the numerous hiatuses in occupation. When compared with the situation in the Sahara and the rest of the Nile Valley, they confirm that the initial occupation took place ca. 10.5 kyr BP after the start of the African Humid Period, followed by a migration towards the banks of the Nile commencing 7.3 kyr BP. They also confirm the appearance of the Neolithic by ca. 8.0 kyr BP. The Kerma stratigraphic sequences show two prosperous periods (10-8 and 7-6 kyr BP) and two hiatuses in the occupation of the sites (7.5-7.1 and 6.0-5.4 kyr BP), resulting from increased aridity.

  7. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the VSL and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Jansen, B. J.; de Pooter, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the VSL, Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in April 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the VSL and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9952 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 1 part in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Energy absorption buildup factors, exposure buildup factors and Kerma for optically stimulated luminescence materials and their tissue equivalence for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials are sensitive dosimetric materials used for precise and accurate dose measurement for low-energy ionizing radiation. Low dose measurement capability with improved sensitivity makes these dosimeters very useful for diagnostic imaging, personnel monitoring and environmental radiation dosimetry. Gamma ray energy absorption buildup factors and exposure build factors were computed for OSL materials using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path. The computed energy absorption buildup factor and exposure buildup factor values were studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Effective atomic numbers and Kerma relative to air of the selected OSL materials and tissue equivalence were computed and compared with that of water, PMMA and ICRU standard tissues. The buildup factors and kerma relative to air were found dependent upon effective atomic numbers. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, medical diagnostics and therapy, space dosimetry, accident dosimetry and personnel monitoring.

  9. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, J. N.; Huang, T. T.; Su, S. H.; Chang, B. J.; Su, C. H.; Hsu, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity. PMID:24222907

  10. Air kerma standard for calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and its traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prinzio, Renato; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2009-03-15

    In Brazil there are over 100 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy facilities using well-type chambers for the determination of the air kerma rate of {sup 192}Ir sources. This paper presents the methodology developed and extensively tested by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR) and presently in use to calibrate those types of chambers. The system was initially used to calibrate six well-type chambers of brachytherapy services, and the maximum deviation of only 1.0% was observed between the calibration coefficients obtained and the ones in the calibration certificate provided by the UWADCL. In addition to its traceability to the Brazilian National Standards, the whole system was taken to University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) for a direct comparison and the same formalism to calculate the air kerma was used. The comparison results between the two laboratories show an agreement of 0.9% for the calibration coefficients. Three Brazilian well-type chambers were calibrated at the UWADCL, and by LCR, in Brazil, using the developed system and a clinical HDR machine. The results of the calibration of three well chambers have shown an agreement better than 1.0%. Uncertainty analyses involving the measurements made both at the UWADCL and LCR laboratories are discussed.

  11. Strength Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... strengthens your heart and lungs. When you strength train with weights, you're using your muscles to ... see there are lots of different ways to train with weights. Try a few good basic routines ...

  12. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schüller, Andreas Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for {sup 192}Ir HDR sources. Methods: The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. Results: For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.05. Both k{sub Q} values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of k{sub Q} is U{sub k{sub Q}} = 2.1% for both chamber types. Conclusions: The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for {sup 192}Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q}. However, the uncertainty of a {sup 60}Co calibration coefficient calculated via k{sub Q} is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a {sup 60}Co source.

  13. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  14. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.; Kessler, C.; O'Brien, M.; Minniti, R.

    2017-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.8 parts in 103, except at 250 kV where the difference is 1.5 times the standard uncertainty. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Assessment of protocols in cone-beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beams usingeffective dose and air kerma-area product.

    PubMed

    Batista, Wilson Otto; Soares, Maria Rosangela; de Oliveira, Marcus V L; Maia, Ana F; Caldas, Linda V E

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and the air kerma-area product (PKA) as the kerma index. The measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain an image of the maxilla-mandible using the equipment GENDEX GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14cm×8.5cm-maxilla/mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5cm×8.5cm-maxillary/mandible). LiF dosimeters inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom were used. For both protocols, the value of PKA was evaluated using a PTW Diamentor E2 meter and the multimeter Radcal Rapidose system. The results obtained for the effective dose/PKA were separated by protocol image. [GX1]: 44.5µSv/478mGycm(2); [GX2]: 54.8µSv/507mGycm(2). Although the ratio of the diameters (14cm/8.5cm)=1.65, the ratio of effective dose values (44.5µSv/54.8µSv)=0.81, that is, the effective dose of the protocol with extended diameter is 19% smaller. The PKA values reveal very similar results between the two protocols. For the cases where the scanner uses an asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face, there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients when compared to the use of symmetrical beam and/or to FOV images with a smaller diameter.

  16. SU-E-I-36: A Study to Compare Operator Dosimeter Exposure versus Fluoroscopic Time and Air Kerma in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures.

    PubMed

    McKetty, M

    2012-06-01

    The total effective dose equivalent limit for occupationally radiation exposed persons has remained at 50 millisieverts per year since the 1960s. There is ongoing discussion whether this limit should be lowered. Whether or not it is lowered, all facilities have to adhere to the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). In a hospital environment, the workers who typically have exposures which Result in ALARA investigations having to be performed include interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and mobile C-arm operators. At our institution there are a limited number of interventional radiologists with one person being responsible for performing the majority of the procedures and sometimes exceeding the ALARA investigational levels. A limited study was performed to compare the number, type of studies, cumulative air kerma, and fluoroscopic time versus the exposure measured by the personnel dosimeters worn by the radiologists. This was also related to the type of angiographic equipment in use. The length of fluoroscopic time and cumulative air kerma and cumulative DAP appeared to be related to the higher exposures received by the operator. The number of procedures performed did not correlate with the personnel dosimeter exposure; rather it was the type and complexity of a study and the length of fluoroscopic time that was related. The number of ALARA investigations required has decreased gradually. This could be attributed to several factors. These include increased use of available safety items. With an increase in the number of interventionalists the work load is distributed more equitably. The purchase of new angiographic equipment has resulted in better image quality and more shielding options for the operators. The operators are periodically reminded to keep fluoroscopic time to a minimum and use appropriate settings on the equipment. The equipment is calibrated to provide adequate image quality at mid-dose settings. © 2012 American Association of

  17. Attitude Strength.

    PubMed

    Howe, Lauren C; Krosnick, Jon A

    2017-01-03

    Attitude strength has been the focus of a huge volume of research in psychology and related sciences for decades. The insights offered by this literature have tremendous value for understanding attitude functioning and structure and for the effective application of the attitude concept in applied settings. This is the first Annual Review of Psychology article on the topic, and it offers a review of theory and evidence regarding one of the most researched strength-related attitude features: attitude importance. Personal importance is attached to an attitude when the attitude is perceived to be relevant to self-interest, social identification with reference groups or reference individuals, and values. Attaching personal importance to an attitude causes crystallizing of attitudes (via enhanced resistance to change), effortful gathering and processing of relevant information, accumulation of a large store of well-organized relevant information in long-term memory, enhanced attitude extremity and accessibility, enhanced attitude impact on the regulation of interpersonal attraction, energizing of emotional reactions, and enhanced impact of attitudes on behavioral intentions and action. Thus, important attitudes are real and consequential psychological forces, and their study offers opportunities for addressing behavioral change.

  18. Comparison of high-dose-rate (192)Ir source strength measurements using equipment with traceability to different standards.

    PubMed

    Carlsson Tedgren, Asa; Bjerke, Hans; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Hetland, Per-Otto; Kosunen, Antti; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Persson, Linda; Sipila, Petri

    2014-01-01

    According to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism used for dose calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems, the absolute level of absorbed dose is determined through coupling with the measurable quantity air-kerma strength or the numerically equal reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Traceability to established standards is important for accurate dosimetry in laying the ground for reliable comparisons of results and safety in adoption of new treatment protocols. The purpose of this work was to compare the source strength for a high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source as measured using equipment traceable to different standard laboratories in Europe and the United States. Source strength was determined for one HDR (192)Ir source using four independent systems, all with traceability to different primary or interim standards in the United States and Europe. The measured HDR (192)Ir source strengths varied by 0.8% and differed on average from the vendor value by 0.3%. Measurements with the well chambers were 0.5% ± 0.1% higher than the vendor-provided source strength. Measurements with the Farmer chamber were 0.7% lower than the average well chamber results and 0.2% lower than the vendor-provided source strength. All of these results were less than the reported source calibration uncertainties (k=2) of each measurement system. In view of the uncertainties in ion chamber calibration factors, the maximum difference in source strength found in this study is small and confirms the consistency between calibration standards in use for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  20. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site, part II: man-made γ-ray emitting radionuclides in the ground and the resultant kerma rate in air.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2012-07-01

    Samples of soil and epigeic lichens were collected from the "Taiga" peaceful nuclear explosion site (61.30°N 56.60°E, the Perm region, Russia) in 2009 and analyzed using high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. For soil samples obtained at six different plots, two products of fission ((137)Cs and (155)Eu), five products of neutron activation ((60)Co, (94)Nb, (152)Eu, (154)Eu, (207)Bi) and (241)Am have been identified and quantified. The maximal activity concentrations of (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am for the soils samples were measured as 1650, 7100, and 6800 Bq kg(-1) (d.w.), respectively. The deposit of (137)Cs for the top 20 cm of soil on the tested plots at the "Taiga" site ranged from 30 to 1020 kBq m(-2); the maximal value greatly (by almost 3 orders of magnitude) exceeded the regional background (from global fallout) level of 1.4 kBq m(-2). (137)Cs contributes approximately 57% of the total ground inventory of the man-made γ-ray emitters for the six plots tested at the "Taiga" site. The other major radionuclides -(241)Am and (60)Co, constitute around 40%. Such radionuclides as (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am, and (207)Bi have also been determined for the epigeic lichens (genera Cladonia) that colonized certain areas at the ground lip produced by the "Taiga" explosion. Maximal activity concentrations (up to 80 Bq kg(-1) for (60)Co, 580 Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs, 200 Bq kg(-1) for (241)Am, and 5 Bq kg(-1) for (207)Bi; all are given in terms of d.w.) have been detected for the lower dead section of the organisms. The air kerma rates associated with the anthropogenic sources of gamma radiation have been calculated using the data obtained from the laboratory analysis. For the six plots tested, the kerma rates ranged from 50 to 1200 nGy h(-1); on average, 51% of the dose can be attributed to (137)Cs and 45% to (60)Co. These estimates agree reasonably well with the results of the in situ measurements made during our field survey of the "Taiga" site in August

  1. Important comments on KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data in ACE files of JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.2 and ENDF/B-VII.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Chikara; Tada, Kenichi; Kwon, Saerom; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We have studied reasons of differences of KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data among nuclear data libraries. Here the KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data included in the official ACE files of JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 are examined in more detail. As a result, it is newly found out that the KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data of a lot of nuclei are different among JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 and reasons of the differences are the followings: 1) large secondary particle production yield, 2) no secondary gamma data, 3) secondary gamma data in files12-15 mt = 3, 4) mt = 103-107 data without mt = 600 s-800 s data in file6. The issue 1) is considered to be due to nuclear data, while the issues 2)-4) seem to be due to NJOY. The ACE files of JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 with these problems should be revised after correcting wrong nuclear data and NJOY problems.

  2. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Perichon, N; Rapp, B; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  3. Pashto Conversation Manual and Pashto Conversation Tapescript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegey, Habibullah; Robson, Barbara

    This conversation manual and tapescript are part of a set of materials that have been developed to teach oral and written Afghan Pashto to English speakers. In addition to the conversation manual and tapescript, the set consists of a beginning textbook, an intermediate textbook, a reader, and a set of taped lessons that correlate with the…

  4. Comparison of air kerma measurements for tungsten anode based mammography x-ray beam qualities (EURAMET.RI(I)-S4.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, I.; Büermann, L.; Gomola, I.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in mammography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two reference-class ionization chamber types Radcal RC6M and Magna A650 of the IAEA and tungsten anode based beam qualities with Mo and Al external filtrations (W+Mo, W+Al) established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients, NK_air, were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in May 2015 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show good agreement, to be well within the 0.55 % standard uncertainty of the comparison. Correction factors to determine NK_air for these beam qualities based on calibration in RQR-M mammography beam qualities, established according to the IEC 61267 standard, were also calculated for the Radcal RC6M, 10X5-6M, and Magna A650 types of chambers. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. KEY COMPARISON: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (APMP.RI(I)-K3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, W. S.; Kotler, L. H.; Webb, D. V.; Büermann, L.; Burns, D. T.; Takeyeddin, M.; Shaha, V. V.; Srimanoroth, S.; Meghzifene, A.; Hah, S. H.; Chun, K. J.; Kadni, T. B.; Takata, N.; Msimang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group performed the APMP.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (100 kV to 250 kV) between 2000 and 2003. In total, 11 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 8 were APMP member laboratories. Two commercial cavity ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. All the participants established the 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV x-ray beam qualities equivalent to those of the BIPM. The results showed that the maximum difference between the participants and the BIPM in the medium-energy x ray range, evaluated using the comparison data of the linking laboratories ARPANSA and PTB, is less than 1.4%. The degrees of equivalence between the participants are presented and this comparison confirms the calibration capabilities of the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  6. Comparison of air kerma standards of LNE-LNHB and NPL for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources: EUROMET project no 814.

    PubMed

    Douysset, Guilhem; Sander, Thorsten; Gouriou, Jean; Nutbrown, Rebecca

    2008-03-21

    An indirect comparison has been made in the air kerma standards for high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The measurements were carried out at both laboratories between November and December 2004. The comparison was based on measurements using well-type transfer ionization chambers and two different source types, Nucletron microSelectron HDR Classic and version 2. The results show the reported calibration coefficients to agree within 0.47% to 0.63%, which is within the overall standard uncertainty of 0.65% reported by both laboratories at the time of this comparison. Following this comparison, some of the NPL primary standard correction factors were re-evaluated resulting in a change of +0.17% in the overall correction factor. The new factor was implemented in May 2006. Applying the revised chamber factor to the measurements reported in this comparison report will reduce the difference between the two standards by 0.17%.

  7. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  8. Learning through Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patricia R.; Klein, Adria F.; Pinnell, Gay Su

    1996-01-01

    Through teacher-child conversation, experts use oral language to help novices take on more complex tasks; and Reading Recovery children, who are obviously having difficulty with school-based learning, are especially in need of significant conversations with adults. Reading and writing processes are supported through conversation with Reading…

  9. SU-E-T-155: Calibration of Variable Longitudinal Strength 103Pd Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J; Radtke, J; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) allow for a customized intensity along the length of the source. These have applications in focal brachytherapy treatments of prostate cancer where dose boosting can be achieved through modulation of intra-source strengths. This work focused on development of a calibration methodology for VLS sources based on measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of five 1 cm {sup 10} {sup 3}Pd sources each containing four regions of variable {sup 103}Pd strength. Methods: The air-kerma strengths of the sources were measured with a variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC). Source strengths were also measured using a well chamber. The in-air azimuthal and polar anisotropy of the sources were measured by rotating them in front of a NaI scintillation detector and were calculated with MC simulations. Azimuthal anisotropy results were normalized to their mean intensity values. Polar anisotropy results were normalized to their average transverse axis intensity values. The relative longitudinal strengths of the sources were measured via on-contact irradiations with radiochromic film, and were calculated with MC simulations. Results: The variable {sup 103}Pd loading of the sources was validated by VAFAC and well chamber measurements. Ratios of VAFAC air-kerma strengths and well chamber responses were within ±1.3% for all sources. Azimuthal anisotropy results indicated that ≥95% of the normalized values for all sources were within ±1.7% of the mean values. Polar anisotropy results indicated variations within ±0.3% for a ±7.6° angular region with respect to the source transverse axis. Locations and intensities of the {sup 103}Pd regions were validated by radiochromic film measurements and MC simulations. Conclusion: The calibration methodology developed in this work confirms that the VLS sources investigated have a high level of polar uniformity, and that the strength and longitudinal intensity can be

  10. Relationship among fatigue strength, mean grain size and compressive strength of a rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.

    1988-10-01

    Fatigue tests carried on three sets of samples having different mean grain sizes revealed that fatigue strength is a function of mean grain size of the rock. Samples having smaller grain size show higher value of fatigue strength. Graywacke samples from Flagstaff formation having mean grain sizes of 1.79 mm, 1.35 mm and 0.93 mm showed fatigue strengths of 87%, 88.25% and 89.1% respectively. Since the mean uniaxial compressive strength also varied with varying grain size, i. e. higher mean strength value for samples having finer grain size; the fatigue strength of a rock also shows a converse relation with mean uniaxial compressive strength.

  11. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-23

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  12. NGL data conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Nobuyasu

    2005-06-01

    We are developing a NGL data conversion system for EPL, for LEEPL, and for EBDW, which is based on our established photomask data conversion system, PATACON PC-cluster. For EPL data conversion, it has SF division, Complementary division, Stitching, Proximity effect correction, Alignment mark insertion, EB stepper control data creation, and Mask inspection data creation. For LEEPL data conversion, it has Pattern checking, Complementary division, Stitching, Stress distortion correction, Alignment mark insertion, and Mask inspection data creation. For EB direct-writing data conversion, it has Proximity effect correction and Extraction of aperture pattern for cell projection exposure.

  13. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose.

  14. Direct reference air-kerma rate calibration of 192Ir for a thimble-type ionization chamber in a cylindrical solid phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulich, Theodor W.; Quast, Ulrich; Bamberg, Michael; Selbach, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    International and national reports strongly recommend experimental verification of the calibration of new HDR 192Ir sources prior to their clinical application for afterloading brachytherapy. To guarantee traceability, calibrated transfer standards are used, e.g. the recommended well-type ionization chambers (WIC) or certain detector-phantom arrangements (DPA) consisting of a thimble-type ionization chamber with a solid phantom. In Germany, direct calibrations for 192Ir were only provided for WICs. In June 2010, the PTB directly calibrated a DPA-transfer standard in the quantity reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) for 192Ir photons for the University Hospital Tübingen. This direct calibration provides the advantage that the comprehensive RAKR 192Ir calibration coefficient already takes all influence quantities into account—their correction factors are thus unified—except for the air-density correction kρ. The DPA-transfer standard described above and a WIC used as a reference were compared for acceptance tests of three GammaMedplus HDR 192Ir afterloading sources. The measurement uncertainty of the WIC and of the DPA-transfer standard were ±2.6%(k = 2) and ±2.8%(k = 2) respectively. A strong correlation was found between these measurement results with a coefficient of determination of r2 = 0.9998. Determining the RAKR of an HDR 192Ir afterloading source is as simple with the DPA as it is with WIC. The direct 192Ir calibrated DPA-transfer standard can therefore be used alternatively in future with the same measurement uncertainty if no WIC is available.

  15. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  16. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  17. Conversing with Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    I/NET, Inc., is making the dream of natural human-computer conversation a practical reality. Through a combination of advanced artificial intelligence research and practical software design, I/NET has taken the complexity out of developing advanced, natural language interfaces. Conversational capabilities like pronoun resolution, anaphora and ellipsis processing, and dialog management that were once available only in the laboratory can now be brought to any application with any speech recognition system using I/NET s conversational engine middleware.

  18. Poster — Thur Eve — 24: Commissioning and preliminary measurements using an Attix-style free air ionization chamber for air kerma measurements on the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D; McEwen, M; Shen, H; Siegbahn, EA; Fallone, BG; Warkentin, B

    2014-08-15

    Synchrotron facilities, including the Canadian Light Source (CLS), provide opportunities for the development of novel imaging and therapy applications. A vital step progressing these applications toward clinical trials is the availability of accurate dosimetry. In this study, a refurbished Attix-style (cylindrical) free air chamber (FAC) is tested and used for preliminary air kerma measurements on the two BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamlines at the CLS. The FAC consists of a telescoping chamber that relies on a difference measurement of collected charge in expanded and collapsed configurations. At the National Research Council's X-ray facility, a Victoreen Model 480 FAC was benchmarked against two primary standard FACs. The results indicated an absolute accuracy at the 0.5% level for energies between 60 and 150 kVp. A series of measurements were conducted on the small, non-uniform X-ray beams of the 05B1-1 (∼8 – 100 keV) and 05ID-2 (∼20 – 200 keV) beamlines for a variety of energies, filtrations and beam sizes. For the 05B1-1 beam with 1.1 mm of Cu filtration, recombination corrections of less than 5 % could only be achieved for field sizes no greater than 0.5 mm × 0.6 mm (corresponding to an air kerma rate of ∼ 57 Gy/min). Ionic recombination thus presents a significant challenge to obtaining accurate air kerma rate measurements using this FAC in these high intensity beams. Future work includes measurements using a smaller aperture to sample a smaller and thus more uniform beam area, as well as experimental and Monte Carlo-based investigation of correction factors.

  19. Conversation et Television (Conversation and Television)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadde, Jean-Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Czechosovakian television has just presented a series of French Conversation Classes using audiovisual techniques and starring Czech actors and actresses. The setting of each dialog is in Czechoslovakia, and the situations are those in which a Czech would use French in his or her native land. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  20. Conversations in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardige, Betty; Segal, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Bardige and Segal discuss how teachers can help a toddler's language and literacy development through conversation. They suggest an array of tactics, from asking young children open-ended, intellectually challenging questions to going beyond the here and now when carrying on a conversation. Research has shown that the practice of…

  1. Energy conversion alternatives study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  2. The Art of Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin-Tripp, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Criticizes Dorval and Eckerman (included in this issue) for their findings' lack of generality due to the artificial nature of the conversational groups studied. Also both age changes in the ability to plan large conversational units and the functions of particular kinds of turns within these larger units are left unexplored. (CB)

  3. Recording Conversations in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluckman, Ivan B.; Koerner, Thomas J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In general, because of varying federal and state legislation and a paucity of court decisions, the law governing the recording of conversations is in considerable flux. School personnel desiring to record conversations in school without the consent or knowledge of all parties involved must proceed with considerable caution. (Author)

  4. Content for Conversation Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  5. The Conversation Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  6. NUCLEAR CONVERSION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-09-13

    A nuclear conversion apparatus is described which comprises a body of neutron moderator, tubes extending therethrough, uranium in the tubes, a fluid- circulating system associated with the tubes, a thorium-containing fluid coolant in the system and tubes, and means for withdrawing the fluid from the system and replacing it in the system whereby thorium conversion products may be recovered.

  7. Final report on APMP.RI(I)-K1: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, K. J.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Lee, J. H.; Hah, S. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Zhang, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Msimang, Z. L. M.; Caseria, E. S.

    2013-01-01

    The APMP.RI(I)-K1 key comparison of the measurement standards of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays was undertaken by the APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group between 2004 and 2006, coordinated by the Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). In total, 10 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 7 were APMP member laboratories. Three Farmer-type commercial cavity chambers were used as transfer chambers and circulated among the participants. All the participants carried out their measurements according to the guidelines for the comparison established by the KRISS with the cooperation of the ARPANSA. For each transfer chamber, an NMI calibration coefficient was obtained and a ratio derived by dividing by the average result from the linking laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ. The APMP comparison reference value for each chamber was calculated as the mean of the NMI-determined calibration coefficients divided by the average result from the linking laboratories. The results showed that the maximum difference between the APMP linked ratio of a participating NMI and the APMP reference value was 1.76%. The measured ratios of the calibration coefficient RNMI, BIPM between the participating NMI and the BIPM via the link laboratories for the transfer chambers were obtained. The maximum expanded uncertainty of RNMI, BIPM for any participating laboratory was 2.0%. The degree of equivalence of each participating laboratory with respect to the key comparison reference value was also evaluated. The expanded uncertainty of the difference between the results ranged from 0.5% to 1.2%. The pair-wise degree of equivalence between each pair of laboratories was also obtained and the largest difference of the expanded uncertainty of the difference for any pair-wise degree of equivalence was within the expanded uncertainty of the measurement for the pair of laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that

  8. Conversation Simulation and Sensible Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Jason L.

    I have entered the Loebner Prize five times, winning the "most humanlike program" category in 1996 with a surly ELIZA-clone named HeX, but failed to repeat the performance in subsequent years with more sophisticated techniques. Whether this is indicative of an unanticipated improvement in "conversation simulation" technology, or whether it highlights the strengths of ELIZA-style trickery, is as an exercise for the reader. In 2000, I was invited to assume the role of Chief Scientist at Artificial Intelligence Ltd. (Ai) on a project inspired by the advice given by Alan Turing in the final section of his classic paper - our quest was to build a "child machine" that could learn and use language from scratch. In this chapter, I will discuss both of these experiences, presenting my thoughts regarding the Chinese Room argument and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in between.

  9. Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Cheng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Yuan, Yong; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2012-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ absorbed dose for external photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV are presented based on a newly developed voxel mouse model, for the purpose of radiation effect evaluation. The voxel mouse model was developed from colour images of successive cryosections of a normal nude male mouse, in which 14 organs or tissues were segmented manually and filled with different colours, while each colour was tagged by a specific ID number for implementation of mouse model in Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP was carried out to obtain organ dose conversion coefficients for 22 external monoenergetic photon beams between 10 keV and 10 MeV under five different irradiation geometries conditions (left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic). Organ dose conversion coefficients were presented in tables and compared with the published data based on a rat model to investigate the effect of body size and weight on the organ dose. The calculated and comparison results show that the organ dose conversion coefficients varying the photon energy exhibits similar trend for most organs except for the bone and skin, and the organ dose is sensitive to body size and weight at a photon energy approximately <0.1 MeV.

  10. The secret of good conversation--investing in success.

    PubMed

    Ryder-Smith, J

    1998-01-01

    Organisations are created by conversations. They are key in all decisions. Negative conversations are familiar and a big investment in failure. We can learn to have positive and creative conversations and to make them even more effective by understanding differences and "talking each other's language". There are two models for successful conversations which the author uses in organisation and team development: The Mobius Model (Stockton, 1996) and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The Mobius maps the six stages of effective conversations and enables teams to identify strengths and gaps in how they work. The MBTI provides a logical framework of personality difference which increases mutual understanding, supports the different stages of Mobius conversations, and enables people to identify and respond positively to others who are unlike themselves. The impact of learning these models can be--and frequently is--dramatically improved outcomes.

  11. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  13. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  14. Photochemical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batschelet, William H.; George, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Describes procedures for two demonstrations: (1) photochemical energy conversion using ferric oxalate actinometry and (2) liquification of gases using Freon 114. Safety precautions are given for both demonstrations, as are procedures and material specifications. (JM)

  15. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  16. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  17. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    PubMed

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay). Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition) increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  18. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  19. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  20. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  1. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  2. Corticospinal adaptations and strength maintenance in the immobilized arm following 3 weeks unilateral strength training.

    PubMed

    Pearce, A J; Hendy, A; Bowen, W A; Kidgell, D J

    2013-12-01

    Cross-education strength training has being shown to retain strength and muscle thickness in the immobilized contralateral limb. Corticospinal mechanisms have been proposed to underpin this phenomenon; however, no transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) data has yet been presented. This study used TMS to measure corticospinal responses following 3 weeks of unilateral arm training on the contralateral, immobilize arm. Participants (n = 28) were randomly divided into either immobilized strength training (Immob + train) immobilized no training (Immob) or control. Participants in the immobilized groups had their nondominant arm rested in a sling, 15 h/day for 3 weeks. The Immob + train group completed unilateral arm curl strength training, while the Immob and control groups did not undertake training. All participants were tested for corticospinal excitability, strength, and muscle thickness of both arms. Immobilization resulted in a group x time significant reduction in strength, muscle thickness and corticospinal excitability for the untrained limb of the Immob group. Conversely, no significant change in strength, muscle thickness, or corticospinal excitability occurred in the untrained limb of the Immob + train group. These results provide the first evidence of corticospinal mechanisms, assessed by TMS, underpinning the use of unilateral strength training to retain strength and muscle thickness following immobilization of the contralateral limb.

  3. Clients as conversational agents.

    PubMed

    Massfeller, Helen F; Strong, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Conversational agency is our invented term that orients us to ways in which clients participate in therapeutic dialogues. In this study we examined how clients' conversational correctives and initiatives influenced collaborative therapeutic consultations. Thirty-five single-session lifestyle consultations were videotaped in which adult clients volunteered to discuss concerns of non-clinical severity with a counselor. We discursively microanalyzed excerpts where clients initiated topic shifts or corrected counselor misunderstandings and how counselors responded to them. Clients were actively involved in co-managing conversational developments during the consultations. They influenced the content and course of the conversations with the counselors by correcting, interrupting, or speaking from positions contrary or unrelated to those of the counselors. Clients observably influenced the conversational agenda through their correctives and initiatives if counselors were responsive during face-to-face consultations. Clinicians should demonstrate increased sensitivity and relational responsivity by intentionally engaging with clients' agentive contributions to consultative dialogues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isomolybdate conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating solution and process forms a stable and corrosion-resistant layer on metal substrates or layers or, more preferably, on a boehmite layer or other base conversion coating. The conversion coating process involves contacting the substrate, layer or coating with an aqueous alkali metal isomolybdate solution in order to convert the surface of the substrate, layer or coating to a stable conversion coating. The aqueous alkali metal molybdates are selected from sodium molybdate (Na.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), lithium molybdate (Li.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), potassium molybdate (K.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), or combinations thereof, with the most preferred alkali metal molybdate being sodium molybdate. The concentration of alkali metal molybdates in the solution is preferably less than 5% by weight. In addition to the alkali metal molybdates, the conversion coating solution may include alkaline metal passivators selected from lithium nitrate (LiNO.sub.3), sodium nitrate (NaNO.sub.3), ammonia nitrate (NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3), and combinations thereof; lithium chloride, potassium hexafluorozirconate (K.sub.2 ZrF.sub.6) or potassium hexafluorotitanate (K.sub.2 TiF.sub.6).

  5. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  6. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-07-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  7. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  8. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  9. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  10. Overview of coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.R.

    1981-03-27

    The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

  11. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  12. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  13. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  14. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  15. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  16. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  17. Procedures for establishing and maintaining consistent air-kerma strength standards for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources: recommendations of the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

    PubMed

    DeWerd, Larry A; Huq, M Saiful; Das, Indra J; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hanson, William F; Slowey, Thomas W; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Coursey, Bert M

    2004-03-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is being used extensively for the treatment of prostate cancer. As of September 2003, there are a total of thirteen 125I and seven 103Pd sources that have calibrations from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories (ADCLs) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The dosimetry standards for these sources are traceable to the NIST wide-angle free-air chamber. Procedures have been developed by the AAPM Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee to standardize quality assurance and calibration, and to maintain the dosimetric traceability of these sources to ensure accurate clinical dosimetry. A description of these procedures is provided to the clinical users for traceability purposes as well as to provide guidance to the manufacturers of brachytherapy sources and ADCLs with regard to these procedures.

  18. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the VSL, The Netherlands and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.; Kessler, C.; de Pooter, J. A.; Jansen, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the VSL, The Netherlands and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.2 parts in 103. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  20. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  1. Stories in Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Roberta Senner

    Although conversational stories within one individual's corpus share the same structure, they have features that set them apart from one another. Based on the stories' general characteristics and the way they function in ongoing talk, they can be identified as: (1) durable personal experience narratives (PENs), which are often repeated during the…

  2. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  3. A Conversation about Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Mao, Minnie Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of the Lindau Meeting, we present a dialogue between a Nobel laureate and a young researcher. This interchange started online, where it continues to unfold. Here is a digest of this conversation, which has developed across time and space.

  4. Conversations and Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpan, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at how a series of conversations contributed to the development of a newly formed role at the University of Victoria--Teaching Assistant Consultants (TACs). TACs act as departmental mentors for teaching assistants (TAs) in their respective departments, charged with providing support in the form of discipline-specific workshops…

  5. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  6. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  7. Electromechanical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text on electromechanical energy conversion (motors and generators) was developed under contract with the U.S. Office of Education as Number 12 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series. (DH)

  8. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  9. Conversational English Program, 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This second book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  10. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  11. Conversational English Program, 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This first book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  12. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  13. Leadership is a conversation.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate.

  14. Conversations on ecology IV

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1963-01-01

    The conversations on ecology have mentioned the pesticide problem, and in such discussion it is easy to lose sight of the basic philosophic view which is an undercurrent in Miss Carson's book. I should like to expand on that philosophic premise and examine some of its implications for planning vegetation management measures as well as other measures for resource development.

  15. Conversion or New Building?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Phil

    1970-01-01

    Examined first is "the overall problem of housing a TV studio complex to see what particular sorts of buildings are required and how they must be related," and then considered are "the relative merits and particular problems of new studio building or a conversion." (LS)

  16. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  17. Solar energy conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S.

    2008-03-01

    If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces

  18. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  19. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using ...

  20. Energy conversion in polyelectrolyte hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Erbas, Aykut; Olvera de la Cruz Team

    Energy conversion and storage have been an active field of research in nanotechnology parallel to recent interests towards renewable energy. Polyelectrolyte (PE) hydrogels have attracted considerable attention in this field due to their mechanical flexibility and stimuli-responsive properties. Ideally, when a hydrogel is deformed, applied mechanical work can be converted into electrostatic, elastic and steric-interaction energies. In this talk, we discuss the results of our extensive molecular dynamics simulations of PE hydrogels. We demonstrate that, on deformation, hydrogels adjust their deformed state predominantly by altering electrostatic interactions between their charged groups rather than excluded-volume and bond energies. This is due to the hydrogel's inherent tendency to preserve electro-neutrality in its interior, in combination with correlations imposed by backbone charges. Our findings are valid for a wide range of compression ratios and ionic strengths. The electrostatic-energy alterations that we observe in our MD simulations may induce pH or redox-potential changes inside the hydrogels. The resulting energetic difference can be harvested, for instance, analogously to a Carnot engine, or facilitated for sensor applications. Center for Bio-inspired Energy Science (CBES).

  1. Wind energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Longrigg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  2. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  3. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    PubMed

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  4. Advanced Thermal Conversion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    BAA09-31 3  Figure 1. (a) Energy diagram of the PETE process. Photo -excitation leads to enhanced...photovoltaic cells at 3000x concentration (~38%). As shown in Fig. 2(b), the highest conversion efficiencies are obtained by using photo -cathodes...p-type 4H-SiC (left) and polycrystalline n-type 3C-SiC (right). The fabrication process for p-type devices used bulk p- doped 4H-SiC wafers from

  5. Session: Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

  6. Persuasion Detection in Conversation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    is the first step in developing machine learning systems that can automatically detect persuasion in conversations. This corpus was developed from...requires some form of persuasion. Based on this research, it may be possible to construct a machine learning system that can automatically detect...specific markers, can these markers be learned and identified by annotators? Our research attempted to answer all of these questions by annotating a

  7. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  8. Natural gas conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

  9. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  10. Pyroelectric conversion in space: A conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Pyroelectric conversion is potentially a very lightweight means of providing electrical power generation in space. Two conceptualized systems approaches for the direct conversion of heat (from sunlight) into electrical energy using the pyroelectric effect of a new class of polar polymers were evaluated. Both of the approaches involved large area thin sheets of plastic which are thermally cycled by radiative input and output of thermal energy. The systems studied are expected to eventually achieve efficiencies of the order of 8% and may deliver as much as one half kilowatt per kilogram. In addition to potentially very high specific power, the pyroelectric conversion approaches outlined appear to offer low cost per watt in the form of an easily deployed, flexible, strong, electrically ""self-healing'', and high voltage sheet. This study assessed several potential problems such as plasma interactions and radiation degradation and suggests approaches to overcome them. The fundamental technological issues for space pyroelectric conversion are: (1) demonstration of the conversion cycle with the proposed class of polymers, (2) achievement of improved dielectric strength of the material, (3) demonstration of acceptable plasma power losses for low altitude, and (4) establishment of reasonable lifetime for the pyroelectric material in the space environment. Recommendations include an experimental demonstration of the pyroelectric conversion cycle followed by studies to improve the dielectric strength of the polymer and basic studies to discover additional pyroelectric materials.

  11. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  12. Tables and conversions for microclimatology.

    Treesearch

    James M. Brown

    1973-01-01

    A series of tables, charts, and conversion factors have been prepared for use in microclimatic and ecological studies. Included are: the solution to various equations of radiant energy exchange; solar radiation diagrams; psychometric and precipitation data; and unit conversion factors.

  13. Microbial Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Merry; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  14. Crucial Conversations about America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John C.; Protheroe, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    It's up to school leaders to shift the momentum away from conversations based on misperceptions and toward those that study critical issues about school improvement. "Crucial Conversations About America's Schools" talks about how to do this and provides examples of how to reframe conversations on the hot-button but important topics of…

  15. The Personal Enjoyment of Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Paul W.

    Conversation reminds us that we are not alone, that shared language is the opportunity to try on our many masks to see how many of them we can do without. The variety of pleasures accrued from conversation--"layers of pleasure"--deepen only as they move away from the individual orbits into the circle of mutual experience. When conversation is…

  16. Crucial Conversations about America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John C.; Protheroe, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    It's up to school leaders to shift the momentum away from conversations based on misperceptions and toward those that study critical issues about school improvement. "Crucial Conversations About America's Schools" talks about how to do this and provides examples of how to reframe conversations on the hot-button but important topics of…

  17. Special Features in Children's Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjalainen, Merja

    In a study of features that seem to be typical of children's conversations, 10 Finnish preschool children's conversations were videotaped and audiotaped over a period of 10 hours. The children were taped in conversation, play, fairy tale, and eating situations. Among the findings are that all children enjoy playing with language, but some initiate…

  18. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  19. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  20. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  1. Strength and Balance Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Strength and Balance Exercises Updated:Sep 8,2016 If you have medical ... if you have been inactive and want to exercise vigorously, check with your doctor before beginning a ...

  2. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  3. Conversing Cooperatively: Using "Mini-Conversations" to Develop Conversational Knowledge and Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth B.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Interpersonal communication, relational communication, language and social interaction, professional communication, interviewing practices. Objectives: This single class activity enables students to understand the theoretical foundations of conversation and to develop their conversational skills by talking in dyads with classmates. Upon…

  4. Hand-Strength Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Elliot, Joe

    1987-01-01

    Special grip-strength meter designed for accurate, reproducible measurement of hand rehabilitation. Four strain gauges connected in Wheatstone bridge to measure deflection caused by gripping hand. Compressive force exerted by hand transmitted to measuring beams. Beams therefore deflected or strained, and mechanical strain sensed by strain gauges and converted into electrical signal. After amplification and conditioning, signal displayed on LED as measure of gripping strength of hand.

  5. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  6. Direct somatic lineage conversion

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  7. Conversion program in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  8. Energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1987-01-01

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

  9. Natural gas conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to design and operate a laboratory apparatus for the catalytic reforming of natural gas in order to provide data for a large-scale process. To accelerate the assembly and calibration of this equipment, a request has been made to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for assistance, under the DOE's Industrial Visitor Exchange Program. Pr. Heinz Heinemann (Catalysis), Dr. John Apps (Geochemistry) and Dr. Robert Fulton (Mechanical Engineering) have expressed interest in supporting our request. Pr. Heinemann's recent results on the conversion of Petroleum Coke residues into CO2 and H2 mixtures using highly basic metal oxides catalysts, similar to ours, are very encouraging regarding the possibility of converting the Coke residue on our catalyst into Syngas in the Regenerator/riser, as proposed. To minimize Coke formation in the vapor phase, by the Plasmapyrolytic Methane Conversion reactions, the experimental data of H. Drost et al. (Ref. 12) have been reviewed. Work is underway to design equipment for the safe and non-polluting disposal of the two gaseous product streams of the flow loop. 2 refs.

  10. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  11. Energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1985-09-16

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

  12. Spatial language and converseness.

    PubMed

    Burigo, Michele; Coventry, Kenny R; Cangelosi, Angelo; Lynott, Dermot

    2016-12-01

    Typical spatial language sentences consist of describing the location of an object (the located object) in relation to another object (the reference object) as in "The book is above the vase". While it has been suggested that the properties of the located object (the book) are not translated into language because they are irrelevant when exchanging location information, it has been shown that the orientation of the located object affects the production and comprehension of spatial descriptions. In line with the claim that spatial language apprehension involves inferences about relations that hold between objects it has been suggested that during spatial language apprehension people use the orientation of the located object to evaluate whether the logical property of converseness (e.g., if "the book is above the vase" is true, then also "the vase is below the book" must be true) holds across the objects' spatial relation. In three experiments using sentence acceptability rating tasks we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that when converseness is violated people's acceptability ratings of a scene's description are reduced indicating that people do take into account geometric properties of the located object and use it to infer logical spatial relations.

  13. Light alkane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a process for the aromatization of an aliphatic feedstream. It comprises fluidizing finely divided solid particles in a combustion zone; charging oxygen-containing combustion gas and fuel to the combustion zone under combustion conditions; withdrawing a stream of finely divided particles from the combustion zone; flowing the withdrawn stream of finely divided particles above to a cracking/dehydrogenation zone; fluidizing the finely divided particles above in an aliphatic feedstream under conditions within the cracking/dehydrogenation zone controlled to at least partially crack and at least partially dehydrogenate the aliphatic feedstream to form an intermediate product stream containing a quantity of C{sub 4}-olefins such that the exothermic catalytic conversion of the C{sub 4}-olefins is sufficient to supply a portion of the endothermic heat of reaction for the endothermic catalytic conversion of paraffins contained in the intermediate feedstream to aromatics; contacting the intermediate product stream with an aromatization catalyst under aromatization conditions sufficient to evolve an aromatics-rich products stream.

  14. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  15. Women's Speech, Women's Strength?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Jennifer

    A discussion of women's oral discourse patterns focuses on the uses made of minimal responses, hedges, and tag questions. The analysis draws on transcriptions of conversations among a group of women friends over a period of months. It is proposed that the conventional treatment of these forms as "weak" is inappropriate in all-female…

  16. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  17. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Developments towards space and terrestrial applications of thermionic energy conversion are presented. Significant accomplishments for the three month period include: (1) devised a blade-type distributed lead design with many advantages compared to the stud-type distributed lead; (2) completed design of Marchuk tube test apparatus; (3) concluded, based on current understanding, that residual hydrogen should not contribute to a negative space charge barrier at the collector; (4) modified THX design program to include series-coupled designs as well as inductively-coupled designs; (5) initiated work on the heat transfer technology, THX test module, output power transfer system, heat transfer system, and conceptual plant design tasks; and (6) reached 2200 hours of operation in JPL-5 cylindrical converter envelope test.

  18. Automated FORTRAN conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    The most pratical solution to the conversion of FORTRAN to other programming languages which STO and a few others have adopted, uses an intermediate language that is easy to translate FORTRAN into, and allows for source codes in other languages to be generated automatically. The intermediate language is the union of all other programming languages (and the trick is to create a useful union) with some extensions that reflect the nature of the algorithms. The benefits of this approach are many. First the original FORTRAN program has to be rewritten only once, and then only parts of the program: most FORTRAN code passes through without and change (i.e., assignment and simple IF statements). Software tools are provided to ease this initial translation. Once in the intermediate language, the algorithm can then be obtained in any other language automatically. An example of a subroutine from the Rispack library in ten different languages is given.

  19. Laser plasmadynamic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of electrons ions by interacting an intense laser beam with cesium vapor is considered. Theoretical calculation shows that the conversion efficiency is as high as 40 percent if the entire photon energy is utilized in ionizing the cesium vapor that is generated initially by the incoming laser beam. An output voltage is expected to be generated across two electrodes, one of which is the liquid cesium, by keeping the other electrode at a different work function. Evaluation of the laser plasmadynamic (LPD) converter was performed using pulsed ruby and Nd-glass lasers. Although the results obtained to date indicate an efficiency smaller than that of theoretical predictions, an unoptimized LPD converter did demonstrate the capability of converting laser energy at large power levels. The limitations in the performance may by due to converter geometry, the types of lasers used, and other limitations inherent to the cesium plasma.

  20. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  1. The Role of Conversation Policy in Carrying Out Agent Conversations

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Phillips, Laurence R.

    1999-05-20

    Structured conversation diagrams, or conversation specifications, allow agents to have predictable interactions and achieve predefined information-based goals, but they lack the flexibility needed to function robustly in an unpredictable environment. We propose a mechanism that combines a typical conversation structure with a separately established policy to generate an actual conversation. The word "policy" connotes a high-level direction external to a specific planned interaction with the environment. Policies, which describe acceptable procedures and influence decisions, can be applied to broad sets of activity. Based on their observation of issues related to a policy, agents may dynamically adjust their communication patterns. The policy object describes limitations, constraints, and requirements that may affect the conversation in certain circumstances. Using this new mechanism of interaction simplifies the description of individual conversations and allows domain-specific issues to be brought to bear more easily during agent communication. By following the behavior of the conversation specification when possible and deferring to the policy to derive behavior in exceptional circumstances, an agent is able to function predictably under normal situations and still act rationally in abnormal situations. Different conversation policies applied to a given conversation specification can change the nature of the interaction without changing the specification.

  2. Key Comparison APMP.RI(I)-K2 of air kerma standards for the CCRI reference radiation qualities for low-energy x-rays, including a supplementary comparison for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Bero, M.; Butler, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Chu, C. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Jinjie, WU; Soodprasert, T.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison was performed between nine national standards for air kerma for the CCRI radiation qualities from 10 kV to 50 kV (APMP.RI(I)-K2) and for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series (15 kV and 40 kV). Among the nine institutes that participated in the comparison, seven institutes were APMP member laboratories. Three commercially available thin window parallel plate ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. The pilot laboratory, the NMIJ/AIST, served also as the link to the corresponding BIPM.RI(I)-K2 comparison. The results show general agreement within the combined uncertainties, although certain results for Nuclear Malaysia, the BARC and the OAP show larger differences. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Comparison of air kerma-length product measurements between the PTB and the IAEA for x-radiation qualities used in computed tomography (EURAMET.RI(I)-S12, EURAMET project #1327)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, István; Büermann, Ludwig; Alikhani, Babak; Gomola, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of air kerma-length product determinations for standard radiation qualities defined for use in computed tomography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA as EURAMET project #1327, registered in the KCDB as the EURAMET.RI(I)-S12 comparison. A pencil type reference-class ionization chamber of the IAEA and the three RQT beam qualities established according to the IEC standard 61627:2005 were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients for the transfer chamber in terms of Gycm/C at the PTB and the IAEA using the partial irradiation method recommended in the IAEA TRS 457 were determined. The results show the calibration coefficients of both laboratories were in a very good agreement of about 0.2 % well within the estimated relative standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.8 %. Residual correction due to the additional aperture required for partial irradiation of pencil chambers and feasibility of the full irradiation method were also studied. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Strength of inorganic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkjian, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: a look at the history of glass strength; atomistic theory of fracture; surface chemistry in relation to the strength and fracture of silicate glasses; high-speed photographic investigations of the dynamic localized loading of some oxide glasses; a correction for measurements of contact area using Newton's rings; envionmentally enhanced crack growth; fatigue in glass; behavior of flaws in fused silica fibers; fracture toughness of chalcogenide glasses and glass-ceramics; fracture analysis of glass surfaces; and fracture mechanics parameters for glasses - a compilation and correlation.

  5. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  6. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  7. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  8. Respiratory markers of conversational interaction.

    PubMed

    McFarland, D H

    2001-02-01

    Respiratory movements were recorded from 10 dyads (20 subjects) during quiet breathing, reading aloud, spontaneous monologue, scripted dialog, and spontaneous conversation. Timing measures of inspiratory, expiratory, and total cycle duration were used to compare respiratory function during quiet breathing, listening, and speech. Cross-correlation analyses of the respiratory movements of conversational partners provided an index of conversational synchrony. Inspiratory duration was found to be the most consistent and sensitive measure for discriminating quiet breathing from speech breathing. In the scripted dialog and spontaneous conversation conditions, respiratory kinematics changed during listening to more closely resemble speech, and systematic changes were observed in anticipation of turn-taking speech onset. For the breathing cycles immediately surrounding turn changes and simultaneously produced vocal events, the kinematic signals of conversational partners were strongly correlated. Results are discussed in the context of similar findings concerning conversational interactions and motor preparation for speech.

  9. Conversion of coals with various degree of metamorphism in supercritical water with formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Pukhovoy, M. V.; Smal, A. N.; Uuemaa, A. O.

    2007-09-01

    Conversion of coals with various degrees of metamorphism in supercritical water (SCW) was studied under the isochoric conditions at the temperatures of 380 800 °C. At conversion, formic acid, increasing the hydrogenating properties of the medium, was added into SCW. The results of conversion are comparable with the results of pyrolysis under the same temperatures. It was found that the degree of conversion in SCW is 10 15 % higher than that at pyrolysis. An addition of formic acid increases the conversion degree. After processing, there are almost no liquid organic substances escaped into SCW. However, some agglomerates, whose strength is comparable with the strength of lump coal, are formed because of dissolution of the organic matter in the mixture of SCW and formic acid.

  10. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  11. Gender Differences in Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  12. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  13. Correction factors for source strength determination in HDR brachytherapy using the in-phantom method.

    PubMed

    Ubrich, Frank; Wulff, Jörg; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of clinical source strength determination for HDR brachytherapy sources, the German society for Medical Physics (DGMP) recommends in their report 13 the usage of a solid state phantom (Krieger-phantom) with a thimble ionization chamber. In this work, the calibration chain for the determination of the reference air-kerma rate Ka,100 and reference dose rate to waterDw,1 by ionization chamber measurement in the Krieger-phantom was modeled via Monte Carlo simulations. These calculations were used to determine global correction factors k(tot), which allows a user to directly convert the reading of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, into the desired quantity Ka,100 or Dw,1. The factor k(tot) was determined for four available (192)Ir sources and one (60)Co source with three different thimble ionization chambers. Finally, ionization chamber measurements on three μSelectron V2 HDR sources within the Krieger-phantom were performed and Ka,100 was determined according to three different methods: 1) using a calibration factor in terms of absorbed dose to water with the global correction factor [Formula: see text] according DGMP 13 2) using a global correction factor calculated via Monte Carlo 3) using a direct reference air-kerma rate calibration factor determined by the national metrology institute PTB. The comparison of Monte Carlo based [Formula: see text] with those from DGMP 13 showed that the DGMP data were systematically smaller by about 2-2.5%. The experimentally determined [Formula: see text] , based on the direct Ka,100 calibration were also systematically smaller by about 1.5%. Despite of these systematical deviations, the agreement of the different methods was in almost all cases within the 1σ level of confidence of the interval of their respective uncertainties in a Gaussian distribution. The application of Monte Carlo based [Formula: see text] for the determination of Ka,100 for three μSelectron V2 sources

  14. Strength Training: For Overall Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Strength training is an important part of an overall fitness program. Here's what strength training can do for you — and how to ... lean muscle mass and burn calories more efficiently? Strength training to the rescue! Strength training is a ...

  15. Solar energy conversion apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, S.G.

    1983-10-18

    Solar energy conversion apparatus is disclosed including a housing portion, an energy absorbing portion, a fluid directing portion and a cover portion; the housing portion including a molded plastic pan member including a base section with upwardly extending spaced spacer sections, the pan member including outwardly inclined sidewall sections having spaced inner and outer wall sections with a top section including an outwardly extending flange section and an inwardly extending slotted frame section; the energy absorbing portion including a conductive metal liner member positioned within the housing portion and resting on the upper surfaces of the spacer sections, a conductive metal separator section extending between the liner sidewall sections adjacent the upper ends thereof and enclosing the liner member; the fluid directing portion including a plurality of parallel spaced longitudinal baffle members arranged in a staggered relationship to provide a tortuous fluid path through the apparatus, an inlet opening and an outlet opening to the tortuous path, the baffle members extending upwardly from the liner bottom to the separator section; the cover portion including transparent impact resistant flat and dome members, the edges of the flat member being secured to the top section, the dome member being disposed over the flat member with its edges engaged with the flange section slots, the dome member including flat sections extending upwardly at an angle of 20/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/ and a convex central section joining the flat sections.

  16. Reactor for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, R.A.; Axelrod, M.G.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes a reactor adapted for the conversion of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. It comprises a central support column and an outer shell which together define an annular reaction zone, inlet means for introducing a mixture of methane containing gas and fluidized solid catalyst particles into the reaction zone, and outlet means for withdrawing a mixture of gas and fluidized solid catalyst particles from the zone, and a plurality of vertically spaced ceramic baffle assemblies comprised of wedged-shaped segments positioned in the reaction zone each perpendicular to the central support column and the outer shell. The baffle assemblies filling the annular cross-section between the support column and the outer shell and being supported at the outer wall of the central support column and at the inner wall of the outer shell, adjacent baffle assembly segments also being supported by radial ceramic support beams. The baffle assemblies each having a plurality of openings 0.25 to 3 inches in diameter adapted to permit passage of the mixture of gas and fluidized solid catalyst particles through the baffle assemblies only toward the outlet means, the area of the openings being 10-70% of the baffle area of each baffle assembly.

  17. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  18. Microbial conversion of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to describe in detail the degradation of coals by fungi and microbes, to expand the range of applicability of the process to include new microbes and other coal types, to identify the means by which biosolubilization of coal is accomplished, and to explore means to enhance the rates and extent of coal bioconversion. The project was initiated in a response to the discovery by Dr. Martin Cohen at the University of Hartford, of a fungal strain of Coriolus versicolor that would render a solid coal substance, leonardite, into a liquid product. The project has identified the principal agent of leonardite solubilization as a powerful metal chelator, most likely a fungal-produced siderophore. Another nonlaccase enzyme has also been identified as a unique biosolubilizing agent produced by C. versicolor. Assays were developed for the quantitative determination of biological coal conversion, and for the determination of potency of biosolubilizing agent. Screening studies uncovered several microbial organisms capable of coal biodegradation, and led to the discovery that prolonged heating in air at the moderate temperature of 150{degree}C allowed the biodegradation of Illinois {number sign}6 coal to material soluble in dilute base. Chemical studies showed that leonardite biosolubilization was accompanied by relatively small change in composition, while solubilization of Illinois {number sign}6 coal involves considerable oxidation of the coal. 24 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Energy conversion apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.R.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes an energy conversion apparatus comprising: an engine, the engine comprising a cylinder and a piston reciprocally mounted therein, the cylinder defining a combustion chamber on one side of the piston for receiving a fuel mixture and a fluid drive chamber on the other side of the piston for receiving hydraulic fluid, a turbine, the turbine comprising a housing and a vaned turbine wheel rotatably mounted on a drive shaft journalled in the housing, hydraulic means for coupling fluid in the fluid drive chamber of the cylinder with the housing for rotatably driving the turbine wheel and the drive shaft upon a given movement of the piston, means for providing the combustion chamber of the engine with a fuel mixture comprising hydrogen and oxygen, an ignition means for selectively igniting the mixture in the combustion chamber, and purging means for selectively rotating the turbine prior to ignition of the fuel mixture in the engine to remove air therefrom, the purging means comprising a pump means for moving fluid from the reservoir into the fluid drive chambers, the conduit means and the turbine housing, whereby the piston driven by the ignited fuel mixture forces fluid in the fluid drive chamber against the vanes of the turbine wheel to rotate the drive shaft.

  20. GPU color space conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Patrick; Vondran, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahedral interpolation is commonly used to implement continuous color space conversions from sparse 3D and 4D lookup tables. We investigate the implementation and optimization of tetrahedral interpolation algorithms for GPUs, and compare to the best known CPU implementations as well as to a well known GPU-based trilinear implementation. We show that a 500 NVIDIA GTX-580 GPU is 3x faster than a 1000 Intel Core i7 980X CPU for 3D interpolation, and 9x faster for 4D interpolation. Performance-relevant GPU attributes are explored including thread scheduling, local memory characteristics, global memory hierarchy, and cache behaviors. We consider existing tetrahedral interpolation algorithms and tune based on the structure and branching capabilities of current GPUs. Global memory performance is improved by reordering and expanding the lookup table to ensure optimal access behaviors. Per multiprocessor local memory is exploited to implement optimally coalesced global memory accesses, and local memory addressing is optimized to minimize bank conflicts. We explore the impacts of lookup table density upon computation and memory access costs. Also presented are CPU-based 3D and 4D interpolators, using SSE vector operations that are faster than any previously published solution.

  1. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors for cylindrical chambers in high energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Seuntjens, J P; Ross, C K; Shortt, K R; Rogers, D W

    2000-12-01

    available, using %dd(10)x, all published data show a spread of 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively, over the entire measurement range, compared to spreads of up to 1.1% for both chambers when the kQ values are expressed as a function of TPR10(20). For the PR06-C chamber no clear preference of beam quality specifier could be identified. When comparing the differences of our kQ measurements and calculations with an analysis in terms of air-kerma protocols with the same underlying calculations but expressed in terms of a compound conversion factor CQ, we observe that a system making use of absorbed-dose calibrations and calculated kQ values, is more accurate than a system based on air-kerma calibrations in combination with calculated CQ (rms deviation of 0.48% versus 0.67%, respectively).

  2. Record Conversion at Oregon State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Deane

    1985-01-01

    Describes the conversion of card catalog records at William Jasper Kerr Library, Oregon State University, to an online system. Discussion covers the use of OCLC and student assistants, procedures and specifications, and problems associated with massive retrospective conversion needs and uncertain budget allocations. Eight sources are recommended.…

  3. [Neuropsychological assessment in conversion disorder].

    PubMed

    Demır, Süleyman; Çelıkel, Feryal Çam; Taycan, Serap Erdoğan; Etıkan, İlker

    2013-01-01

    Conversion disorder is characterized by functional impairment in motor, sensory, or neurovegetative systems that cannot be explained by a general medical condition. Diagnostic systems emphasize the absence of an organic basis for the dysfunction observed in conversion disorder. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of data on the specific functional brain correlates of conversion symptoms, particularly those obtained via neuroimaging and neurophysiological assessment. The present study aimed to determine if there are differences in measures of cognitive functioning between patients with conversion disorder and healthy controls. The hypothesis of the study was that the patients with conversion disorder would have poorer neurocognitive performance than the controls. The patient group included 43 patients diagnosed as conversion disorder and other psychiatric comorbidities according to DSM-IV-TR. Control group 1 included 44 patients diagnosed with similar psychiatric comorbidities, but not conversion diosorder, and control group 2 included 43 healthy individuals. All participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and were administered the SCID-I and a neuropsychological test battery of 6 tests, including the Serial Digit Learning Test (SDLT), Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT), Wechsler Memory Scale, Stroop Color Word Interference Test, Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test (BJLOT), and Cancellation Test. The patient group had significantly poorer performance on the SDLT, AVLT, Stroop Color Word Interference Test, and BJLOT than both control groups. The present findings highlight the differences between the groups in learning and memory, executive and visuospatial functions, and attention, which seemed to be specific to conversion disorder.

  4. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  5. In Conversation with Jim Blair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Jim Blair is the only consultant nurse working with people with learning disabilities in the country. His job helps make people better and saves money. This article shares a conversation with Jim Blair. In the conversation, Blair says he is unhappy Valuing People programme did not do as much as it could have done. Jim is worried all the changes,…

  6. Older Siblings as Conversational Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff-Ginsberg, Erika; Krueger, Wendy M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a study of conversational dyadic interaction between children aged 1.5 to 3 years; their 4-, 5-, 7-, or 8-year-old siblings; and their mothers. Mothers were more supportive conversational partners and adapted their level of speech more than siblings. (GH)

  7. Language Teacher Educators Collaborative Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Francis; Hawkins, Maggie; Irujo, Suzanne; Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Rintell, Ellen; Willett, Jerri

    1998-01-01

    Conveys the power and value of collaborative conversation among a small group of language teacher educators who meet regularly to discuss practice. Excerpts from a discussion are presented to show a sample of real issues the teachers face and illustrate how the conversations allow ongoing feedback about real dilemmas from a supportive community of…

  8. Tree value conversion standards revisited

    Treesearch

    Paul S. DeBald; Martin E. Dale; Martin E. Dale

    1991-01-01

    Updated tree value conversion standards (TVCS) are presented for 12 important hardwood species of the oak-hickory forest. These updated standards-developed for each species by butt-log grade, merchantable height, and diameter at breast height-reflect the changes in lumber prices and in conversion costs which have occurred since 1976 when the original TVCS were...

  9. Selecting a Retrospective Conversion Vendor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisowski, Andrew; Sessions, Judith

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of using vendors for retrospective conversion of library catalogs rather than in-house projects highlights reasons to consider vendors, four conversion methodologies, and vendor selection criteria (database, non-matches, local data, accuracy, charging, schedule, product delivery time, local system compatibility, MARC format, impact on…

  10. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  11. Record Conversion at Oregon State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Deane

    1985-01-01

    Describes the conversion of card catalog records at William Jasper Kerr Library, Oregon State University, to an online system. Discussion covers the use of OCLC and student assistants, procedures and specifications, and problems associated with massive retrospective conversion needs and uncertain budget allocations. Eight sources are recommended.…

  12. Selecting a Retrospective Conversion Vendor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisowski, Andrew; Sessions, Judith

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of using vendors for retrospective conversion of library catalogs rather than in-house projects highlights reasons to consider vendors, four conversion methodologies, and vendor selection criteria (database, non-matches, local data, accuracy, charging, schedule, product delivery time, local system compatibility, MARC format, impact on…

  13. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  14. Conversational Expansion in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boynton, Kathleen Reardon; Henke, Lucy L.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of contextual influences to conversational competence development is emphasized. Included are one or more significant adults whose systematic patterns of feedback teach children rules of conversation while providing guided practice in the use of these rules. The role of expansion is examined as one of the common patterns of feedback…

  15. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  16. In Conversation with Jim Blair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Jim Blair is the only consultant nurse working with people with learning disabilities in the country. His job helps make people better and saves money. This article shares a conversation with Jim Blair. In the conversation, Blair says he is unhappy Valuing People programme did not do as much as it could have done. Jim is worried all the changes,…

  17. Medicinal relationships: caring conversation.

    PubMed

    Mikesell, Lisa

    2013-05-01

    Good social relationships are crucial to well-being and to health in particular. The perception of having supportive social relationships has effects on reducing morbidity and mortality comparable with those of a good diet, regular exercise and cessation of moderate smoking. This suggests that supportive, trusting relationships with doctors could have a substantial direct biomedical effect on patients' health. A critical review of the patient-doctor relationship (PDR) literature is presented, along with a review of relevant interactional studies that examine doctor-patient interactions from the perspective of conversation analysis (CA). This literature shows how patients respond to doctors' verbal and non-verbal behaviours in systematic ways that affect how they disclose and how they relate to doctors. Findings from the CA literature suggest that clinicians might consider several important interactional features to improve the PDR and perhaps also patient health outcomes: (i) the use of open-ended questions (e.g. 'What brought you in today?') and positive polarity items (e.g. 'Is there something else you wanted to talk about today?') elicits patient concerns and addresses unmet concerns more effectively than the use of closed questions and negative polarity items, respectively; (ii) eye gaze suggests availability and an attending recipient, and patients indicate that doctor attentiveness at crucial parts of their problem presentation is important, and (iii) verbal dysfluencies are one practice speakers employ to gain the attention of a non-attending recipient. Doctors may want to pay attention to patients' dysfluencies to better understand when their attention is valued. Constructing supportive relationships with patients often does not require a great investment of time, but it does require commitment to 'being there for patients'. This review suggests that when doctors attune to language and social practices during medical consultations, the relationships they

  18. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  19. Constraining resonant photon-axion conversions in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Günter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-08-01

    The presence of a primordial magnetic field would have induced resonant conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs) during the thermal history of the Universe. These conversions would have distorted the blackbody spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this context, we derive bounds on the photon-ALP resonant conversions using the high precision CMB spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. We obtain upper limits on the product of the photon-ALP coupling constant g times the magnetic field strength B down to gB ∼< 10{sup −13} GeV{sup −1} nG for ALP masses below the eV scale.

  20. Petite fabrique de conversation francaise (Little Factory of French Conversation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubroca, Danielle

    1987-01-01

    A technique using dialogues and realistic prose passages from the works of Georges Simenon and Simone de Beauvoir to teach French conversational skills at the college level is explained and illustrated. (MSE)

  1. Petite fabrique de conversation francaise (Little Factory of French Conversation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubroca, Danielle

    1987-01-01

    A technique using dialogues and realistic prose passages from the works of Georges Simenon and Simone de Beauvoir to teach French conversational skills at the college level is explained and illustrated. (MSE)

  2. Dynamical strength of social ties in information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Moro, Esteban; Lara, Rubén

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the temporal patterns of human communication and its influence on the spreading of information in social networks. The analysis of mobile phone calls of 20 million people in one country shows that human communication is bursty and happens in group conversations. These features have the opposite effects on the reach of the information: while bursts hinder propagation at large scales, conversations favor local rapid cascades. To explain these phenomena we define the dynamical strength of social ties, a quantity that encompasses both the topological and the temporal patterns of human communication.

  3. Strengths only or strengths and relative weaknesses? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rust, Teri; Diessner, Rhett; Reade, Lindsay

    2009-10-01

    Does working on developing character strengths and relative character weaknesses cause lower life satisfaction than working on developing character strengths only? The present study provides a preliminary answer. After 76 college students completed the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (C. Peterson & M. E. P. Seligman, 2004), the authors randomly assigned them to work on 2 character strengths or on 1 character strength and 1 relative weakness. Combined, these groups showed significant gains on the Satisfaction With Life Scale (E. Diener, R. A. Emmons, R. J. Larsen, & S. Griffin, 1985), compared with a 32-student no-treatment group. However, there was no significant difference in gain scores between the 2-strengths group and the 1-character-strength-and-1-relative-character-weakness group. The authors discuss how focusing on relative character weaknesses (along with strengths) does not diminish-and may assist in increasing-life satisfaction.

  4. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean -Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-24

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. As a result, it is our hope that

  5. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-01

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. It is our hope that the roadmap

  6. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-24

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. It is our hope that the roadmap

  7. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; ...

    2016-06-24

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in themore » optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. As a result, it is our

  8. Practical method for determination of air kerma by use of an ionization chamber toward construction of a secondary X-ray field to be used in clinical examination rooms.

    PubMed

    Maehata, Itsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Takegami, Kazuki; Okino, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Yuki; Tominaga, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new practical method for the construction of an accurate secondary X-ray field using medical diagnostic X-ray equipment. For accurate measurement of the air kerma of an X-ray field, it is important to reduce and evaluate the contamination rate of scattered X-rays. To determine the rate quantitatively, we performed the following studies. First, we developed a shield box in which an ionization chamber could be set at an inner of the box to prevent detection of the X-rays scattered from the air. In addition, we made collimator plates which were placed near the X-ray source for estimation of the contamination rate by scattered X-rays from the movable diaphragm which is a component of the X-ray equipment. Then, we measured the exposure dose while changing the collimator plates, which had diameters of 25-90 mm(ϕ). The ideal value of the exposure dose was derived mathematically by extrapolation to 0 mm(ϕ). Tube voltages ranged from 40 to 130 kV. Under these irradiation conditions, we analyzed the contamination rate by the scattered X-rays. We found that the contamination rates were less than 1.7 and 2.3 %, caused by air and the movable diaphragm, respectively. The extrapolated value of the exposure dose has been determined to have an uncertainty of 0.7 %. The ionization chamber used in this study was calibrated with an accuracy of 5 %. Using this kind of ionization chamber, we can construct a secondary X-ray field with an uncertainty of 5 %.

  9. Studies of the mortality of A-bomb survivors. 9. Mortality, 1950-1985: Part 1. Comparison of risk coefficients for site-specific cancer mortality based on the DS86 and T65DR shielded kerma and organ doses

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H.; Schull, W.J.; Preston, D.L.; Fujita, S.; Pierce, D.A. )

    1989-06-01

    As a result of the reassessment of the A-bomb dosimetry, new (DS86) doses were calculated in 1986. In this paper, site-specific estimates of cancer mortality in the years 1950-1985, based on these new doses, are compared with those using the T65DR doses. The subjects of the study are 75,991 members of the Life Span Study sample for whom DS86 doses have been calculated. This reevaluation of the exposures does not change the list of radiation-related cancers. Most differences in dose response between Hiroshima and Nagasaki are no longer significant with the DS86 doses. The dose-response curve is closer to linear with the DS86 than the T65DR doses even for leukemia in the entire dose range, though, statistically, many other models cannot be excluded. However, in the low-dose range, the risk of leukemia remains nonlinear. Assuming a linear model at an RBE of 1, and using organ-absorbed doses, the risk coefficients derived from the two dosimetries are very similar, whereas those based on shielded kerma are about 40% higher with the new dosimetry. If RBE values larger than 1 are assumed, the disparity between the two dosimetries increases because the neutron dose is much greater in the T65DR. At an RBE of 10, for the five specific cancers, i.e., female breast, colon, leukemia, lung, and stomach, the increase in excess number of deaths per 10(4) PYSv under the DS86 varies from 12% (colon) to 133% (female breast). The magnitude of the effects of such modifiers of radiation-induced cancer as age at time of bomb and sex do not differ between the two dose systems.

  10. Comparison of pediatric radiation dose and vessel visibility on angiographic systems using piglets as a surrogate: anti-scatter grid removal vs lower detector air kerma settings with a grid - a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Keith J; Racadio, John M; Abruzzo, Todd A; Johnson, Neil D; Patel, Manish N; Kukreja, Kamlesh U; den Hartog, Mark J H; Hoonaert, Bart P A; Nachabe, Rami A

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to reduce pediatric doses while maintaining or improv-ing image quality scores without removing the grid from X-ray beam. This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Three piglets (5, 14, and 20 kg) were imaged using six different selectable detector air kerma (Kair) per frame values (100%, 70%, 50%, 35%, 25%, 17.5%) with and without the grid. Number of distal branches visualized with diagnostic confidence relative to the injected vessel defined image quality score. Five pediatric interventional radiologists evaluated all images. Image quality score and piglet Kair were statistically compared using analysis of variance and receiver operating curve analysis to define the preferred dose setting and use of grid for a visibility of 2nd and 3rd order vessel branches. Grid removal reduced both dose to subject and imaging quality by 26%. Third order branches could only be visualized with the grid present; 100% detector Kair was required for smallest pig, while 70% detector Kair was adequate for the two larger pigs. Second order branches could be visualized with grid at 17.5% detector Kair for all three pig sizes. Without the grid, 50%, 35%, and 35% detector Kair were required for smallest to largest pig, respectively. Grid removal reduces both dose and image quality score. Image quality scores can be maintained with less dose to subject with the grid in the beam as opposed to removed. Smaller anatomy requires more dose to the detector to achieve the same image quality score.

  11. Energy conversion and storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemical and chemical engineering principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels; (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy storage; (4) characterization of complex chemical processes; and (5) the application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, and advanced methods of analysis. The following five areas are discussed: electrochemical energy storage and conversion; microstructured materials; biotechnology; fossil fuels; and high temperature superconducting processing. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. Selected organ dose conversion coefficients for external photons calculated using ICRP adult voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo code FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Patni, H K; Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Bhati, S; Sarkar, P K

    2011-11-01

    The adult reference male and female computational voxel phantoms recommended by ICRP are adapted into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The FLUKA code is then utilised for computation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free-in-air for colon, lungs, stomach wall, breast, gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid due to a broad parallel beam of mono-energetic photons impinging in anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior directions in the energy range of 15 keV-10 MeV. The computed DCCs of colon, lungs, stomach wall and breast are found to be in good agreement with the results published in ICRP publication 110. The present work thus validates the use of FLUKA code in computation of organ DCCs for photons using ICRP adult voxel phantoms. Further, the DCCs for gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid are evaluated and compared with results published in ICRP 74 in the above-mentioned energy range and geometries. Significant differences in DCCs are observed for breast, testis and thyroid above 1 MeV, and for most of the organs at energies below 60 keV in comparison with the results published in ICRP 74. The DCCs of female voxel phantom were found to be higher in comparison with male phantom for almost all organs in both the geometries.

  13. Prepubescent Strength Training. Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Joe W.; Holshouser, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Under the careful supervision of a trained fitness professional, the benefits of prepubescent strength training (improved strength, power, muscular endurance, bone density) outweigh the risks (acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries). (CB)

  14. NASA thermionic-conversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Technological processes in out-of-core thermionic energy conversion are described. The emphasis was on high temperature electrode materials and system engineering of converter geometries to produce practical power densities.

  15. A Conversation Well Worth Remembering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolven-Allen, John

    2009-01-01

    To mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, a special event was held at Oxford, which included a "Conversation" between Professor Richard Dawkins and Bishop Richard Harries. Here we present a personal reminiscence of the event.

  16. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    DOEpatents

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  17. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    PubMed

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  18. Energy conversion at dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Divin, A.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Markidis, S.

    2017-02-01

    We use multispacecraft observations by Cluster in the Earth's magnetotail and 3-D particle-in-cell simulations to investigate conversion of electromagnetic energy at the front of a fast plasma jet. We find that the major energy conversion is happening in the Earth (laboratory) frame, where the electromagnetic energy is being transferred from the electromagnetic field to particles. This process operates in a region with size of the order several ion inertial lengths across the jet front, and the primary contribution to E·j is coming from the motional electric field and the ion current. In the frame of the front we find fluctuating energy conversion with localized loads and generators at sub-ion scales which are primarily related to the lower hybrid drift instability excited at the front; however, these provide relatively small net energy conversion.

  19. Dynamic Conversion Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffee, N.; Sovie, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of dynamic conversion devices for use in solar and nuclear dynamic space power systems was addressed. Conversion systems considered were based on the use of Brayton, Stirling and Rankine cycles. Both organic and liquid metal Rankine cycles were included. The basic system considerations were: mission requirements, system attributes, system options, technology issues and constraints, and priorities of needed technology development. Mission requirements, where dynamic conversion was considered enabling technology, were identified along with the associated power levels and potential energy sources. When considering the system options special attention was given to recommend operating temperatures and other significant discriminators. A list of prioritized tasks considered important for the successful development of dynamic conversion systems for 1995 and beyond was compiled.

  20. Conversational topics in transsexual persons.

    PubMed

    Van Borsel, John; Cayzeele, Miet; Heirman, Eva; T'sjoen, Guy

    2014-06-01

    Abstract In general, speech language therapy for transsexual persons focuses on pitch and pitch variation and more recently also on resonance. Other communicative aspects are dealt with far less often, especially language. This study investigated to what extent conversational topics might need attention in therapy for transsexual persons. A total of 111 males, 116 females, 28 male-to-female and 18 female-to-male transsexuals were asked to indicate on a list with 34 topics how often they speak about each topic (never, sometimes, often) in conversations with males, with females and in a gender mixed group. Results showed that transsexual persons behave in accordance with the desired gender. However, they also tend to adopt a position depending on the gender of their conversational partner. It can be concluded that in general it is not necessary to pay attention to conversational topics in therapy for transsexual persons.

  1. Virginia Hamilton: Continuing the Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkelsen, Nina

    1995-01-01

    Relates the latest installment of a continuing conversation between the author and Virginia Hamilton. Discusses ethnicity and identity, environmental issues, the creative process, and the way heritage, history, and family storytelling affect a writer's work. (RS)

  2. A Conversation Well Worth Remembering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolven-Allen, John

    2009-01-01

    To mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, a special event was held at Oxford, which included a "Conversation" between Professor Richard Dawkins and Bishop Richard Harries. Here we present a personal reminiscence of the event.

  3. Development of Geodetic Conversion Routines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    horizontal and vertical datums in the United States. It provides examples to invoke the Dynamic Link Library and use conversion functions in various programming languages, such as Visual Basic , C, and C++.

  4. Direct Energy Conversion Literature Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-12-01

    HOMOPOLAR Apparatus needed to fabricate and test MOTOR , by G. J. Bukow. 46p., Jan. 1961. candidate junction materials and modules (ASD TR-61-101...small homopolar motor as a 3085 component of a thermoelectric energy- NEW TYPE OF THERMOELECTRIC GENER- conversion system, utilizing the low- ATOR...CONVERSION AND HEAT-TRANSFER are silent outboard motors and power FLUIDS FCR SPACE APPLICATIONS, by lawnmiowers. W. D. Weatherford, J.C. Tyler and P. M

  5. Frequency conversion of structured light

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging. PMID:26875448

  6. Frequency conversion of structured light.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P

    2016-02-15

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging.

  7. Frequency conversion of structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging.

  8. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  9. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  10. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  11. Strength of Rewelded Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcllwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Inconel 718, nickel-based alloy used extensively for high-temperature structural service, welded repeatedly without detriment to its strength. According to NASA report, tests show 12 repairs on same weld joint do not adversely affect ultimate tensile strenth, yield strength, fatigue strength, metallurgical grain structures, or ability of weld joint to respond to post weld heat treatments.

  12. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  13. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  14. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators.

    PubMed

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main 'symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted 'electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted 'nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and 'continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  15. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  16. Failure strength of icy lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    Lithospheric strengths derived from friction on pre-existing fractures and ductile flow laws show that the tensile strength of intact ice under applicable conditions is actually an order of magnitude stronger than widely assumed. It is demonstrated that this strength is everywhere greater than that required to initiate frictional sliding on pre-existing fractures and faults. Because the tensile strength of intact ice increases markedly with confining pressure, it actually exceeds the frictional strength at all depths. Thus, icy lithospheres will fail by frictional slip along pre-existing fractures at yeild stresses greater than previously assumed rather than opening tensile cracks in intact ice.

  17. Plastic Work to Heat Conversion During High-Strain Rate Deformation of Mg and Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Kingstedt, Owen T.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium and magnesium alloy were investigated for plastic work to heat conversion ( β). Thermomechanical response was measured employing the shear-compression specimen geometry, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, and an infra-red detector. β of both materials measured to be less than the common assumption of 0.9; however, heat conversion was observed to be greater for magnesium alloy. Thus, results suggest that alloying and grain size refinement not only improved yield strength but also affected the thermomechanical response.

  18. Serious Illness Conversations in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Ernest I; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Block, Susan D

    2016-12-28

    Dialysis-dependent ESRD is a serious illness with high disease burden, morbidity, and mortality. Mortality in the first year on dialysis for individuals over age 75 years old approaches 40%, and even those with better prognoses face multiple hospitalizations and declining functional status. In the last month of life, patients on dialysis over age 65 years old experience higher rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, procedures, and death in hospital than patients with cancer or heart failure, while using hospice services less. This high intensity of care is often inconsistent with the wishes of patients on dialysis but persists due to failure to explore or discuss patient goals, values, and preferences in the context of their serious illness. Fewer than 10% of patients on dialysis report having had a conversation about goals, values, and preferences with their nephrologist, although nearly 90% report wanting this conversation. Many nephrologists shy away from these conversations, because they do not wish to upset their patients, feel that there is too much uncertainty in their ability to predict prognosis, are insecure in their skills at broaching the topic, or have difficulty incorporating the conversations into their clinical workflow. In multiple studies, timely discussions about serious illness care goals, however, have been associated with enhanced goal-consistent care, improved quality of life, and positive family outcomes without an increase in patient distress or anxiety. In this special feature article, we will (1) identify the barriers to serious illness conversations in the dialysis population, (2) review best practices in and specific approaches to conducting serious illness conversations, and (3) offer solutions to overcome barriers as well as practical advice, including specific language and tools, to implement serious illness conversations in the dialysis population.

  19. Strength in numbers.

    PubMed

    Lakkis, S

    1999-03-01

    A case study showing the attitudes and actions reinforcing discrimination against women's rights in Lebanon is presented. The study illustrates the way in which the public¿s views and the interests of families and local dignitaries can manipulate opinions. Organizations aimed at protecting women's rights have found strength in working together. The Lebanese League, an organization comprised of 17 women's and human rights associations, has established a center and a telephone hotline to encourage abused women to disclose and discuss their situation. The center provides support in the form of legal, psychological and medical assistance. Another organization working with the Lebanese League towards the same vision is the Lebanese Physically Handicapped Union. Efforts to lobby around a Lebanese legislation discriminating against women so far had no success, but all organizations involved are aware of the need to work through a range of interventions, and to take a long-term view, before they can count on any success.

  20. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  1. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, E. J.

    1993-06-01

    This report is the 1992 annual progress report for the Energy Conversion and Storage Program, a part of the Energy and Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Work described falls into three broad areas: electrochemistry; chemical applications; and materials applications. The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies principles of chemistry and materials science to solve problems in several areas: (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species, and (5) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Chemical applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing product and waste streams from synfuel plants, coal gasifiers, and biomass conversion processes. Materials applications research includes evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as development of novel preparation techniques. For example, techniques such as sputtering, laser ablation, and poised laser deposition are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  2. Stephen Schwandt: "Master of Conversation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the life and work of Stephen Schwandt, a mystery writer who incorporates elements of the mystery genre into his nonmystery novels. Suggests that the major strength of his novels is the characters. (RS)

  3. Stephen Schwandt: "Master of Conversation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the life and work of Stephen Schwandt, a mystery writer who incorporates elements of the mystery genre into his nonmystery novels. Suggests that the major strength of his novels is the characters. (RS)

  4. Impact strength and indentation hardness of high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1993-08-01

    Hugoniot elastic limit and indentation hardness data are provided for selected high-strength ceramics AlN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 4}C, SiC, TiB, Zr{sub 2}. Degree of correlation of the strength data by the two test methods is examined. Influence of reformation mechanism on strength measurement, including rate sensitivity, size scale and confining pressure, is discussed.

  5. The ethics of conversion therapy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    1991-04-01

    ... Both the past and present have seen a number of methods being used to extinguish homoerotic desire and behavior and to inaugurate heteroeroticism in their place, methods I will here call conversion therapies... The typical defense of such therapy holds that even if homoeroticism is not necessarily a disease or evil, neither is it a universal good... Conversion therapy is morally defensible, on such a view, because some people suffer from the perceived consequences of homoerotic orientations despite the freedom and toleration extended to gay men and lesbians in certain areas... Against the view that conversion therapy is morally defensible as a matter of personal preference, I here argue that such therapy is morally suspect and should be resisted for a number of reasons....

  6. Asymptotic cost in document conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blostein, Dorothea; Nagy, George

    2012-01-01

    In spite of a hundredfold decrease in the cost of relevant technologies, the role of document image processing systems is gradually declining due to the transition to an on-line world. Nevertheless, in some high-volume applications, document image processing software still saves millions of dollars by accelerating workflow, and similarly large savings could be realized by more effective automation of the multitude of low-volume personal document conversions. While potential cost savings, based on estimates of costs and values, are a driving force for new developments, quantifying such savings is difficult. The most important trend is that the cost of computing resources for DIA is becoming insignificant compared to the associated labor costs. An econometric treatment of document processing complements traditional performance evaluation, which focuses on assessing the correctness of the results produced by document conversion software. Researchers should look beyond the error rate for advancing both production and personal document conversion.

  7. Mode conversion experiments in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeski, R.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Batha, S.; Darrow, D.; Fisch, N. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Ignat, D.; Levinton, F.; Mazzucato, E.; Murakami, M.; Nazikian, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Valeo, E. J.

    1996-02-01

    In the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the mode converted ion Bernstein wave (IBW) has been shown to heat electrons, drive current (both on and off axis), and to interact with fusion products. D-3He and D-T-3He plasmas have been used as mode conversion targets. On-axis mode conversion heating increased Te(0) from 3 keV to 10 keV with 4 MW of ICRF. On-axis currents of 125 kA with 2 MW of ICRF, and off axis currents of 100 kA with 4 MW of ICRF, have been driven. A strong interaction of the IBW with fusion products has been observed. Mode conversion current drive (MCCD) for TPX is briefly discussed.

  8. Conversations with Environmental Educators: A Conversation with Four Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Trudi L.

    2003-01-01

    This article includes a conversation with four environmental education classroom teachers. The author introduces the four classroom teachers, Marie Marrs, Barb Pietrucha, Vicki Newberry, and Dara Lukonen. In the interview, the four environmental education classroom teachers describe the environmental education in their classrooms. Three of these…

  9. Des documents authentiques pour la conversation (Authentic Documents for Conversation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariet, Jacqueline

    1978-01-01

    A description of two conversation courses (elementary and advanced) given during a summer session at Middlebury College. The materials used were tapes and slides made in France by the instructors to realize the course objectives--use of authentic spoken French and cultural education. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  10. Conversations with Environmental Educators: A Conversation with Four Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Trudi L.

    2003-01-01

    This article includes a conversation with four environmental education classroom teachers. The author introduces the four classroom teachers, Marie Marrs, Barb Pietrucha, Vicki Newberry, and Dara Lukonen. In the interview, the four environmental education classroom teachers describe the environmental education in their classrooms. Three of these…

  11. La Conversation par le theatre (Conversation through Theater).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoff, Marie-Jose

    1986-01-01

    A successful advanced college-level French conversation course using French theater as a basis for students to learn oral skills has six phases: an overview of the history of French theater, reading, adaptation of the text, rehearsal-readings, final rehearsals, and performance. (MSE)

  12. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  13. Wheelchair armrest strength testing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Rentschler, A J; O'Connor, T J; Ster, J F

    2000-01-01

    There are about 1.4 million manual wheelchair users, 100,000 electric-powered wheelchair users, and 60,000 electric-powered scooter users. The current study was undertaken to determine if the fasteners of a clamp-type armrest receiver were prone to failure. The first test was used to examine the potential misalignment of the armrest receiver components that attach it to the frame. The second test was to evaluate the entire armrest using the American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America armrest static strength standard. Finally, we conducted three fatigue tests. The first fatigue test was performed by repeating the static stability tests multiple times. The last two tests were a modified version of the double-drum wheelchair fatigue test used to apply repeated loading and vibration simultaneously. A paired t-test showed that there is no statistically significant difference (p = 0.08), with a confidence of 95%, between critical alignment measurements. The armrest including the receiver passed the standard requirement of a force of 760 N being applied outward at 15 degrees. During fatigue testing, we found that armrests did not exhibit any visible or functional damage. Upon completion of the tests, the armrests and receivers functioned properly. At about 100,289 cycles on a double-drum test machine, three bolts failed on each armrest receiver when the screws were loosened to have only five threads engaged prior to commencing the test. The design of the armrest tested was in compliance with existing national and international standards. Currently, both International Standards Organization and American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society committees are developing standards for seating systems that will include static, impact, and fatigue strength testing of devices like lateral torso supports, lateral hip support, etc. Methods similar to those

  14. Pronunciation models for conversational speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Keith

    2005-09-01

    Using a pronunciation dictionary of clear speech citation forms a segment deletion rate of nearly 12% is found in a corpus of conversational speech. The number of apparent segment deletions can be reduced by constructing a pronunciation dictionary that records one or more of the actual pronunciations found in conversational speech; however, the resulting empirical pronunciation dictionary often fails to include the citation pronunciation form. Issues involved in selecting pronunciations for a dictionary for linguistic, psycholinguistic, and ASR research will be discussed. One conclusion is that Ladefoged may have been the wiser for avoiding the business of producing pronunciation dictionaries. [Supported by NIDCD Grant No. R01 DC04330-03.

  15. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

    2008-07-30

    A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

  16. Power conversion in electrical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of dc to dc conversion were studied in terms of a class of switching voltage regulators from a stability viewpoint. Background concepts of nonlinear system theory were considered, including the problem of obtaining suitable realizations for a class of positive operators. It is shown that the state evolution equations for a power conversion network are in general of bilinear form, and that the theory of lie groups and lie algebras is useful in analyzing such systems. The feedback stabilization of a class of bilinear systems whose state space is a manifold is also discussed.

  17. [Hydroxylamine conversion by anammox enrichment].

    PubMed

    Hu, Anhui; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Huifeng; Ding, Shuang; Wang, Caihua

    2010-04-01

    Hydroxylamine is an important intermediate product of anammox. This study was focused on the characteristics of hydroxylamine and nitrite conversions by anammox enrichment. The changes of nitrogenous substrates and related products with time were measured using batch tests with anammox enrichment as inoculum. Since hydroxylamine didn't react with nitrite in uninoculated control culture, these two compounds were chemically stable. Both of them decreased with time in anammox enrichment inoculated cultures, in which ammonia as intermediate product would be produced and converted with the maximum concentration being 0.338 mg/L. The total nitrogen concentration decreased from 4.694 mmol/L to 0.812 mmol/L with conversion rate 82.7% in the end. When hydroxylamine and nitrite concentrations were about 2.5 mmol/L respectively, the maximum specific sludge conversion rates of hydroxylamine was 0.535 mmol/(gVSS.h), which was 1.81 times bigger than that of ammonia in ammonia reaction system; the maximum specific sludge rate of total nitrogen was slightly higher than that in ammonia reaction system. When hydroxylamine concentration increased to 5.0 mmol/L, the hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates promoted by 26.7% and 120.7% respectively; and the maximum ammonia accumulated was 1.810 mmol/L. When nitrite concentration increased to 5.0 mmol/L, the hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates promoted by 6.9% and 9.0% respectively; and the maximum ammonia accumulated was 0.795 mmol/L. Anammox enrichment was capable of converting hydroxylamine and nitrite simultaneously and had the higher conversion rate of hydroxylamine than ammonia conversion rate. Hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates were less affected by increase in nitrite concentration, but more significantly influenced by increase in hydroxylamine. The maximum ammonia concentration accumulated would rise as the result of increasing both hydroxylamine and nitrite. The result of experiment was consistent with pathway

  18. Review of betavoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1993-01-01

    Betavoltaic energy conversion refers to the generation of power by coupling a beta source to a semiconductor junction device. The theory of betavoltaic energy conversion and some past studies of the subject are briefly reviewed. Calculations of limiting efficiencies for semiconductor cells versus bandgap are presented along with specific studies for Pm-147 and Ni-63 fueled devices. The approach used for fabricating Pm-147 fueled batteries by the author in the early 1970's is reviewed. Finally, the potential performance of advanced betavoltaic power sources is considered.

  19. 16 CFR 1012.7 - Telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Telephone conversations. 1012.7 Section 1012... AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.7 Telephone conversations. (a) Telephone conversations... meet with Agency employees. However, because telephone conversations, by their very nature, are...

  20. 16 CFR 1012.7 - Telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Telephone conversations. 1012.7 Section 1012... AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.7 Telephone conversations. (a) Telephone conversations... meet with Agency employees. However, because telephone conversations, by their very nature, are...

  1. 16 CFR 1012.7 - Telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Telephone conversations. 1012.7 Section 1012... AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.7 Telephone conversations. (a) Telephone conversations... meet with Agency employees. However, because telephone conversations, by their very nature, are...

  2. 16 CFR 1012.7 - Telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Telephone conversations. 1012.7 Section 1012... AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.7 Telephone conversations. (a) Telephone conversations... meet with Agency employees. However, because telephone conversations, by their very nature, are...

  3. 16 CFR 1012.7 - Telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Telephone conversations. 1012.7 Section 1012... AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.7 Telephone conversations. (a) Telephone conversations... meet with Agency employees. However, because telephone conversations, by their very nature, are...

  4. Calculation Methods and Conversions for Pesticide Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Herbert, Jr.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University consists of conversion tables and formulas for determining concentration and rate of application of pesticides. Contents include: (1) Area and volume conversions; (2) Important conversion formulae; (3) Conversions for rates of application; (4) Quantities of pesticide…

  5. Calculation Methods and Conversions for Pesticide Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Herbert, Jr.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University consists of conversion tables and formulas for determining concentration and rate of application of pesticides. Contents include: (1) Area and volume conversions; (2) Important conversion formulae; (3) Conversions for rates of application; (4) Quantities of pesticide…

  6. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in Stable Nickel Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evitts, Lee; Garnsworthy, Adam; Kibedi, Tibor; Super-e Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Electric monopole (E 0) transition strengths are a sensitive probe for investigating nuclear structure and shape coexistence. There is a need for E 0 transition strengths in closed shell nuclei in order to develop our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of electric monopole strength. Simultaneous detections of γ rays and internal conversion electrons must be measured in order to determine an E 0 transition strength. A series of measurements in the stable nickel isotopes were performed at the Australian National University. Excited states in 58 , 60 , 62Ni were populated via inelastic proton scattering. The CAESAR array of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used to measure the (E 2 / M 1) mixing ratio of transitions from angular distributions of γ rays. The Super-e spectrometer was used to measure electron-gamma branching ratios in order to extract E 0 transition strengths for a number of Jπ ->Jπ transitions. An overview of the experiments will be presented, along with preliminary results for E 0 transition strengths between Jπ ≠ 0 states in the semi-magic nuclei, 58 , 60 , 62Ni. A comparison with the matrix elements obtained from a new microscopic model for E 0 transitions will be made. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  7. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  8. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  9. Improving Interlaminar Shear Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Justin

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of complex propulsion elements.1 Use of fiber-reinforced, polymeric composite tanks are known to reduce weight while increasing performance of propulsion vehicles. Maximizing the performance of these materials is needed to reduce the hardware weight to result in increased performance in support of NASA's missions. NASA has partnered with the Mississippi State University (MSU) to utilize a unique scalable approach of locally improving the critical properties needed for composite structures. MSU is responsible for the primary development of the concept with material and engineering support provided by NASA. The all-composite tank shown in figure 1 is fabricated using a prepreg system of IM7 carbon fiber/CYCOM 5320-1 epoxy resin. This is a resin system developed for out-of-autoclave applications. This new technology is needed to support the fabrication of large, all composite structures and is currently being evaluated on a joint project with Boeing for the Space Launch System (SLS) program. In initial efforts to form an all composite pressure vessel using this prepreg system, a 60% decrease in properties was observed in scarf joint regions. Inspection of these areas identified interlaminar failure in the adjacent laminated structure as the main failure mechanism. This project seeks to improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) within the prepreg layup by locally modifying the interply region shown in figure 2.2

  10. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength 1902-1906

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Cliver, E. W.

    2006-05-01

    Using geomagnetic measurements made by Robert F. Scott at Discovery Hut in the Antarctic polar cap 1902- 1903 and by Roald Amundsen at Gjøahavn in the Arctic polar cap 1903-1906 we determine the strength of the cross polar cap equivalent current. This quantity is controlled by the interplanetary electric field, E, (essentially the product VB of solar wind speed V and IMF strength B). Comparison with modern data from contemporary polar cap stations at similar latitudes and locations and from spacecraft yields the conversion factor from the variation measured on the ground to the electric field E. Our geomagnetic activity indices IDV and IHV measure B and BV22, respectively, thus allowing both B and V to be determined since at least 1882. Their product VB agrees well with VB determined from the early polar cap data, providing an important independent confirmation of the validity of all three methods. We find that B during 1902-1906 was ~6 nT, comparable to present day values ~100 years later.

  11. On the strength of glasses

    PubMed Central

    Wisitsorasak, Apiwat; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable strength of glasses is examined using the random first order transition theory of the glass transition. The theory predicts that strength depends on elastic modulus but also on the configurational energy frozen in when the glass is prepared. The stress catalysis of cooperative rearrangements of the type responsible for the supercooled liquid’s high viscosity account quantitatively for the measured strength of a range of metallic glasses, silica, and a polymer glass. PMID:22988070

  12. Norms for hand grip strength.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, D G; Pearn, J; Barnes, A; Young, C M; Kehoe, M; Newman, J

    1984-01-01

    Norms for hand grip strength of healthy children are presented. Sex and age specific centiles for age 5 to 18 years have been determined using a portable strain gauge dynamometer with an accuracy of 0.5 N. The test group comprised 1417 healthy, urban school children from a middle class suburb of Brisbane. Mean maximum grip strength (of four tests, two with each hand) and mean peak grip strength (best of four tests) were recorded. Mean values of peak grip strength were 10 to 15% higher than the average maximum grip in all age groups. At all ages girls had a reduced grip strength compared with boys and although boys manifested a continual, approximately linear increase in grip strength through all age groups, girls manifested an approximately linear increase up to 13 years after which mean hand grip usually remained constant. By the age of 18 years boys had a mean grip strength some 60% higher than girls. Correlations with height and weight are also presented. "Handedness' influenced grip strength and was most noticeable in children aged over 10 years. The clinical use of hand grip strength centiles for the early indication of neurological and muscular disorders and for following the natural history of neuromuscular disease is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6732276

  13. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  14. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  15. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  16. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  17. Technology for satellite power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. P.; Gouker, M. A.; Summers, C.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for satellite electromagnetic energy transfer and power conversion at millimeter and infrared wavelengths are discussed. The design requirements for rectenna receiving elements are reviewed for both coherent radiation sources and Earth thermal infrared emission. Potential power transmitters including gyrotrons, free electron lasers, and CO2 lasers are assessed along with the rectification properties of metal-oxide metal diode power converters.

  18. Conversion events in gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene clusters containing multiple similar genomic regions in close proximity are of great interest for biomedical studies because of their associations with inherited diseases. However, such regions are difficult to analyze due to their structural complexity and their complicated evolutionary histories, reflecting a variety of large-scale mutational events. In particular, conversion events can mislead inferences about the relationships among these regions, as traced by traditional methods such as construction of phylogenetic trees or multi-species alignments. Results To correct the distorted information generated by such methods, we have developed an automated pipeline called CHAP (Cluster History Analysis Package) for detecting conversion events. We used this pipeline to analyze the conversion events that affected two well-studied gene clusters (α-globin and β-globin) and three gene clusters for which comparative sequence data were generated from seven primate species: CCL (chemokine ligand), IFN (interferon), and CYP2abf (part of cytochrome P450 family 2). CHAP is freely available at http://www.bx.psu.edu/miller_lab. Conclusions These studies reveal the value of characterizing conversion events in the context of studying gene clusters in complex genomes. PMID:21798034

  19. Conversation at the Intermediate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Ian

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the use of free conversation, especially with regard to vocabulary. Recommends group discussion in the FL, using, at the intermediate level, limited, familiar vocabulary. At a higher level, words from a special technical vocabulary may be introduced, aurally and visually. A teaching example ("Traffic") is given with thorough…

  20. Semester Conversion. 1983 Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    This update is designed to provide information on the conversion in the Atlanta public school system from a quarter to a semester plan. The major tasks, the semester schedule, and the recommended grading system are all outlined. A section on kindergarten provides material on proposed curriculum and support materials, the suggested weekly block of…

  1. Ten Commandments of System Conversions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabotar, Kent John

    1998-01-01

    Administrators at Bowdoin College (Maine) have translated lessons learned from the process of administrative software conversion into ten commandments for other small colleges undertaking such changes. Three approaches to management information systems are outlined, with advantages and limitations highlighted, as well as the ten recommendations,…

  2. Spin conversion on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Yoshichika; Shiraishi, Masashi; Oiwa, Akira; Saitoh, Eiji; Murakami, Shuichi

    2017-09-01

    Spins can act as mediators to interconvert electricity, light, sound, vibration and heat. Here, we give an overview of the recent advances in different sub-disciplines of spintronics that can be associated with the developing field of spin conversion, and discuss future prospects.

  3. INDOOR EMISSIONS FROM CONVERSION VARNISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion varnishes are two-component, acid-catalyzed varnishes that are commonly used to finish cabinets. They are valued for their water- and stain-resistance, as well as their appearance. They have been found, however, to contribute to indoor emissions of organic compounds. F...

  4. Turbulence and energy conversion research

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report examines the role of fluid mechanics research (particularly turbulence research) in improving energy conversion systems. In this report two of the listed application areas are selected as examples: fluidization and cavitation. Research needs in general, and research possibilities for ECUT in particular, are examined.

  5. Conversations to Transform Geometry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szydlik, Jennifer Earles; Parrott, Amy; Belnap, Jason Knight

    2016-01-01

    Classroom culture is negotiated and established through both conversations and practices. Traditionally, teachers and researchers have focused primarily on the individual and social construction of mathematical content--that is, students' conceptual understanding and procedural skills--through mathematical actions and practices. This article…

  6. Direct digital conversion detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.; Fedors, Richard

    1995-06-01

    Future imaging sensors for the aerospace and commercial video markets will depend on low cost, high speed analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion to efficiently process optical detector signals. Current A/D methods place a heavy burden on system resources, increase noise, and limit the throughput. This paper describes a unique method for incorporating A/D conversion right on the focal plane array. This concept is based on Sigma-Delta sampling, and makes optimum use of the active detector real estate. Combined with modern digital signal processors, such devices will significantly increase data rates off the focal plane. Early conversion to digital format will also decrease the signal susceptibility to noise, lowering the communications bit error rate. Computer modeling of this concept is described, along with results from several simulation runs. A potential application for direct digital conversion is also reviewed. Future uses for this technology could range from scientific instruments to remote sensors, telecommunications gear, medical diagnostic tools, and consumer products.

  7. Taking the Grading Conversation Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    To manage effective grading reform, education leaders must engage teachers, parents, communities, and policymakers in a rational discussion about grading. Doug Reeves suggests that leaders start the conversation with a discussion of the principles on which all stakeholders can agree; make clear what will not change under the new grading policy; be…

  8. A Conversation with Edwin Shneidman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestian, John

    2010-01-01

    This article is a transcript of a conversation that took place with Edwin Shneidman, PhD, on August 19, 2008. Recent advances in machine learning, particularly neurocognitive computing, have provided a fresh approach to the idea of using computers to analyze the language of the suicidal person. Here this notion and many others are discussed.

  9. A conversation with Edwin Shneidman.

    PubMed

    Pestian, John

    2010-10-01

    This article is a transcript of a conversation that took place with Edwin Shneidman, PhD, on August 19, 2008. Recent advances in machine learning, particularly neurocognitive computing, have provided a fresh approach to the idea of using computers to analyze the language of the suicidal person. Here this notion and many others are discussed.

  10. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is reviewed briefly. The two types of OTEC system (open and closed) are described and limitations are pointed out. A bibliography of 148 references on OTEC is given for the time period 1975 to 1980. Entries are arranged alphabetically according to the author's name. (MJJ)

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavi, A.

    1977-01-01

    Energy Research and Development Administration research progress in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is outlined. The development program is being focused on cost effective heat exchangers; ammonia is generally used as the heat exchange fluid. Projected costs for energy production by OTEC vary between $1000 to $1700 per kW.

  12. INDOOR EMISSIONS FROM CONVERSION VARNISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion varnishes are two-component, acid-catalyzed varnishes that are commonly used to finish cabinets. They are valued for their water- and stain-resistance, as well as their appearance. They have been found, however, to contribute to indoor emissions of organic compounds. F...

  13. Pronominal Chains in English Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavenius, Cecilia

    A study of the functions and structure of referential third- person pronominal chains in spontaneous English conversation as compared to those in written English is discussed. The study found the frequencies of these pronouns and of their chains to be generally much higher in the spoken corpus than in the written corpus. In the spoken corpus,…

  14. Batteries: Beyond intercalation and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Conventional positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, such as intercalation and conversion compounds, feature a host structure to reversibly insert and conduct lithium ions. Now, electrochemically activated transition metal oxide-lithium fluoride composite materials are shown to be a promising class of positive electrodes.

  15. Photovoltaic conversion of laser energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The Schottky barrier photovoltaic converter is suggested as an alternative to the p/n junction photovoltaic devices for the conversion of laser energy to electrical energy. The structure, current, output, and voltage output of the Schottky device are summarized. The more advanced concepts of the multilayer Schottky barrier cell and the AMOS solar cell are briefly considered.

  16. A Conversation with Edwin Shneidman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestian, John

    2010-01-01

    This article is a transcript of a conversation that took place with Edwin Shneidman, PhD, on August 19, 2008. Recent advances in machine learning, particularly neurocognitive computing, have provided a fresh approach to the idea of using computers to analyze the language of the suicidal person. Here this notion and many others are discussed.

  17. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  18. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  19. Aluminum alloys with improved strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical strength and stress corrosion of new BAR and 7050 alloys that include Zn instead of Cr have been studied and compared with those of 7075 aluminum alloy. Added mechanical strength of new alloys is attributed to finer grain size of 5 to 8 micrometers, however, susceptibility to stress corrosion attack is increased.

  20. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  1. The Relationship Between Maximal Strength and Reactive Strength.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Kris; Carson, Brian P; Lyons, Mark; Kenny, Ian C

    2017-04-01

    Maximum- and reactive-strength qualities both have important roles in athletic movements and sporting performance. Very little research has investigated the relationship between maximum strength and reactive strength. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between maximum-strength (isometric midthigh-pull peak force [IMTP PF]) and reactive-strength (drop-jump reactive-strength index [DJ-RSI]) variables at 0.3-m, 0.4-m, 0.5-m, and 0.6-m box heights. A secondary aim was to investigate the between- and within-group differences in reactive-strength characteristics between relatively stronger athletes (n = 11) and weaker athletes (n = 11). Forty-five college athletes across various sports were recruited to participate in the study (age, 23.7 ± 4.0 y; mass, 87.5 ± 16.1 kg; height, 1.80 ± 0.08 m). Pearson correlation results showed that there was a moderate association (r = .302-.431) between maximum-strength variables (absolute, relative, and allometric scaled PF) and RSI at 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 m (P ≤ .05). In addition, 2-tailed independent-samples t tests showed that the RSIs for relatively stronger athletes (49.59 ± 2.57 N/kg) were significantly larger than those of weaker athletes (33.06 ± 2.76 N/kg) at 0.4 m (Cohen d = 1.02), 0.5 m (d = 1.21), and 0.6 m (d = 1.39) (P ≤ .05). Weaker athletes also demonstrated significant decrements in RSI as eccentric stretch loads increased at 0.3-m through 0.6-m box heights, whereas stronger athletes were able to maintain their reactive-strength ability. This research highlights that in specific sporting scenarios, when there are high eccentric stretch loads and fast stretch-shortening-cycle demands, athletes' reactive-strength ability may be dictated by their relative maximal strength, specifically eccentric strength.

  2. Progress in understanding conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Matthew; Streeruwitz, Anna; Curtis, Vivienne

    2005-01-01

    Conversion disorder has a history that may reach back into antiquity, and it continues to present a clinical challenge to both psychiatrists and neurologists. This article reviews the current state of knowledge surrounding the prevalence, etiology, and neurobiology of conversion disorder. There have been improvements in the accuracy of diagnosis that are possibly related to improved technologies such as neuroimaging. Once the diagnosis is made, it is important to develop a therapeutic alliance between the patient and the medical team, and where comorbid psychiatric diagnoses have been made, these need to be adequately treated. While there have been no formal trials of medication or psychoanalytic treatments in this disorder, case reports suggest that a combination of antidepressants, psychotherapy, and a multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation may be beneficial. PMID:18568070

  3. Complexity matching in dyadic conversation.

    PubMed

    Abney, Drew H; Paxton, Alexandra; Dale, Rick; Kello, Christopher T

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies of dyadic interaction have examined phenomena of synchronization, entrainment, alignment, and convergence. All these forms of behavioral matching have been hypothesized to play a supportive role in establishing coordination and common ground between interlocutors. In the present study, evidence is found for a new kind of coordination termed complexity matching. Temporal dynamics in conversational speech signals were analyzed through time series of acoustic onset events. Timing in periods of acoustic energy was found to exhibit behavioral matching that reflects complementary timing in turn-taking. In addition, acoustic onset times were found to exhibit power law clustering across a range of timescales, and these power law functions were found to exhibit complexity matching that is distinct from behavioral matching. Complexity matching is discussed in terms of interactive alignment and other theoretical principles that lead to new hypotheses about information exchange in dyadic conversation and interaction in general.

  4. Coal conversion products Industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, D.; Dunkin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The synfuels economic evaluation model was utilized to analyze cost and product economics of the TVA coal conversion facilities. It is concluded that; (1) moderate yearly future escalations ( 6%) in current natural gas prices will result in medium-Btu gas becoming competitive with natural gas at the plant boundary; (2) utilizing DRI price projections, the alternate synfuel products, except for electricity, will be competitive with their counterparts; (3) central site fuel cell generation of electricity, utilizing MBG, is economically less attractive than the other synthetic fuels, given projected price rises in electricity produced by other means; and (4) because of estimated northern Alabama synfuels market demands, existing conventional fuels, infrastructure and industrial synfuels retrofit problems, a diversity of transportable synfuels products should be produced by the conversion facility.

  5. Conversation, speech acts, and memory.

    PubMed

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Speakers frequently have specific intentions that they want others to recognize (Grice, 1957). These specific intentions can be viewed as speech acts (Searle, 1969), and I argue that they play a role in long-term memory for conversation utterances. Five experiments were conducted to examine this idea. Participants in all experiments read scenarios ending with either a target utterance that performed a specific speech act (brag, beg, etc.) or a carefully matched control. Participants were more likely to falsely recall and recognize speech act verbs after having read the speech act version than after having read the control version, and the speech act verbs served as better recall cues for the speech act utterances than for the controls. Experiment 5 documented individual differences in the encoding of speech act verbs. The results suggest that people recognize and retain the actions that people perform with their utterances and that this is one of the organizing principles of conversation memory.

  6. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  7. Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-04-21

    Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion include at least one catalytically active element with a particle size above 0.6 nm. The electrocatalysts can also include a Helper Catalyst. The catalysts can be used to increase the rate, modify the selectivity or lower the overpotential of electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts also include processes to produce CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  8. Conversion of heavy petroleum oils

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.

    1982-03-02

    Heavy petroleum oils, such as vacuum resids, and heavy fractions of tar sands and shale oil, are partially converted to more volatile hydrocarbons by mixing with light aromatic hydrocarbons and treatment of the mixture with a friedel-crafts catalyst such as aluminum chloride. It is believed that the conversion found is essentially a transalkylation, I.E. The resid undergoes dealkylation with concurrent alkylation of the light aromatic hydrocarbon.

  9. Observation of Thermoacoustic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Yusuke; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    In order to understand thermoacoustic phenomena from a point of view of thermodynamics, oscillating pressure, velocity and temperature were measured in the tube having a temperature gradient. By converting the measured Eulerian quantities to the Lagrangian quantities associated with a given gas parcel, we determined the local energy conversion rate per unit volume and time. The obtained data demonstrate the validity of the thermodynamic approach to thermoacoustic phenomena.

  10. Materials for thermoelectric energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1988-01-01

    The field of thermoelectric energy conversion is reviewed from both a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The basic theory is introduced and the thermodynamic and solid state views are compared. An overview of the development of thermoelectric materials is presented with particular emphasis being placed on the most recent developments in high-temperature semiconductors. A number of possible device applications are discussed and the successful use and suitability of these devices for space power is manifest.

  11. Explicit Polymorphism and CPS Conversion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    programming language design , the concepts of polymorphism [14, 28, 39] and continuation-passing [38, 41, 43] are of particular interest. The use of...Principles of Programming Languages, January 1991. [9] Matthias Felleisen . The Calculi of X.-CS Conversion: A Syntactic Theory of Control and State in...Imperative Higher-Order Programming Languages. PhD thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 1987. 18 [10] Matthias Felleisen and Daniel Friedman

  12. Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F. S.; Hull, A.

    2010-10-15

    Magnetic field reconnection is often invoked to explain electromagnetic energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres, stellar coronae, and other astrophysical objects. Because of the huge dynamic range of magnetic fields in these bodies, it is important to understand energy conversion as a function of magnetic field strength and related parameters. It is conjectured theoretically and shown experimentally that the energy conversion rate per unit area in reconnection scales as the cube of an appropriately weighted magnetic field strength divided by the square root of an appropriately weighted density. With this functional dependence, the energy release in flares on the Sun, the large and rapid variation of the magnetic flux in the tail of Mercury, and the apparent absence of reconnection on Jupiter and Saturn, may be understood. Electric fields at the perihelion of the Solar Probe Plus mission may be tens of V/m.

  13. Allocation of speech in conversation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carsta; Baum, William M

    2017-03-01

    In a replication and extension of Conger and Killeen's (1974) widely cited demonstration of matching in conversations, we evaluated nine participants' allocation of speech and gaze to two conversational partners. German speakers participated in two 90-min sessions in which confederates uttered approval on independent variable-interval schedules. In one of the sessions, confederates uttered approval contingent upon and contiguous with eye contact whereas in the other session approval was uttered independent of the participant's gaze. Several measures of participants' verbal behavior were taken, including relative duration and rate of speech and gaze. These were compared to confederates' relative rate of approval and relative duration and rate of talk. The generalized matching equation was fitted to the various relations between participants' behavior and confederates' behavior. Conger and Killeen's results were not replicated; participants' response allocation did not show a systematic relation to the confederates' relative rate of approval. The strongest relations were to overall talk, rather than approval. In both conditions, the participant talked more to the confederate who talked less-inverse or antimatching. Participants' gaze showed the same inverse relation to the confederates' talk. Requiring gaze to be directed toward a confederate for delivery of approval made no difference in the results. The absence of a difference combined with prior research suggests that matching or antimatching in conversations is more likely due to induction than to reinforcement.

  14. Hemicellulose conversion by anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Christopher, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The digestibility of an aquatic biomass (water hyacinth), a land-based biomass (Coastal Bermuda grass), and a biomass-waste blend (a mixture of hyacinth, grass, MSW, and sludge) under various digestion conditions was studied. Anaerobic digestion of hemicellulose consists of the steps of enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose to glucans, mannans, galactans, xylans, and arabans, and then to simple hexose and pentose sugars; production of C/sub 2/ and higher fatty acids from the simple sugars; conversion of higher fatty acids to acetate; and finally, production of methane and CO/sub 2/ from acetate, and CO/sub 2/ and hydrogen. The conversion of hemicellulose was higher under mesophilic conditions than those of cellulose or protein for all biomass test feeds, probably because the hemicellulose structure was more vulnerable to enzymatic attack than that of the lignocellulosic component. Cellulose conversion efficiencies at the mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures were about the same. However, hemicellulose was converted at a much lower efficiency than cellulose during thermophilic digestion - a situation that was the reverse of that observed at the mesophilic temperature. Cellulose was utilized in preference to hemicellulose during mesophilic digestion of nitrogen-supplemented Bermuda grass. It was speculated that Bermuda grass cellulose was converted at a higher efficiency than hemicellulose in the presence of external nitrogen because the metabolism of the breakdown product (glucose) of cellulose requires the least investment of enzymes and energy.

  15. Irradiation enhancement of biomass conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. S.; Kiesling, H. E.; Galyean, M. L.; Bader, J. R.

    The vast supply of cellulosic agricultural residues and industrial by-products that is produced each year is a prospective resource of biomass suitable for conversion to useful products such as feedstock for the chemicals industry and feedstuffs for the livestock industry. Conversions of such biomass is poor at present, and utilization is inefficient, because of physio-chemical barriers to biological degradation and (or) anti-quality components such as toxicants that restrict biological usages. Improvements in biodegradability of ligno-cellulosic materials have been accomplished by gamma-ray and electron-beam irradiation at intermediate dosage (˜ 50 Mrad; .5 MGy); but applications of the technology have been hampered by questionable interpretations of results. Recent research with organic wastes such as sewage sludge and straw suggests opportunity for important applications of irradiation technology in enhancement of biomass conversion. Data from experiments using irradiated straw as feed for ruminants are presented and discussed in relation to research on prospective usage of sewage products as feed for ruminants. Findings are discussed in regard to prospective applications in industrial fermentation processes. Possible usage of irradiation technology for destruction of toxicants in exotic plants is considered in regard to prospective new feedstuffs.

  16. Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

  17. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S v

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyngaarden, W. L.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the optical extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager space mission revealed bright emission lines of some sulfur ions. The spectra of the torus at the orbit of Io are likely to contain S V lines. The described investigation provides oscillator strengths and collision strengths for the first four UV lines. The collision strengths from the ground state to four other excited states are also obtained. Use is made of a two-state calculation which is checked for convergence for some transitions by employing a three-state or a four-state approximation. Target wave functions for S V are calculated so that the oscillator strengths calculated in dipole length and dipole velocity approximations agree within 5%.

  18. Strength deterioration of high strength concrete in sulfate environment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.S.; Suh, J.K.; Lee, J.H.; Shin, Y.S.

    1999-09-01

    Sulfate in soil and groundwater may cause damage to the concrete in underground structures. In this paper, laboratory tests were performed to assess the damage of chemical attack by magnesium sulfate and sodium sulfate on normal and high strength concretes. The selected solutions were pure water and 10% sulfate solutions (sodium and magnesium), which were determined by consideration of the soil environment in Korea. The parameters in experimental programs were water-binder ratio, silica fume content, and the compressive strength of concrete. Observed differences in the characteristics between normal and high strength concretes are discussed, and a scheme for maximizing the resistance of high strength concrete against various kinds of sulfates is suggested.

  19. The Pavlovian "principle of strength".

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1995-01-01

    The Pavlovian principle of strength assumed that the magnitude of the conditional response is a linear function of the intensity of the external conditional stimulus. But experiments failed to provide evidence for the universality of the principle. The Pavlovians tried to identify conditions that distorted the linearity of this relationship. Some of the disturbing conditions were external and some were internal intervening variables. It is possible that the relation between the strength of the conditional stimulus and the magnitude of the conditional response is not linear but logarithmic. Pavlov acknowledged the lack of experimental evidence to support the principle of strength in its original form.

  20. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main ‘symmetry-breaking’ interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin–orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule–solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted ‘electronic’ conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted ‘nuclear’, the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and ‘continui’ of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule–solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures. PMID:27703681

  1. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requests conversion to career appointment. Failure to respond shall be deemed a declination. (b) Employees... declination. (5) Effective date. A conversion under this section for an employee who elects to join the SES...

  2. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requests conversion to career appointment. Failure to respond shall be deemed a declination. (b) Employees... declination. (5) Effective date. A conversion under this section for an employee who elects to join the SES...

  3. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requests conversion to career appointment. Failure to respond shall be deemed a declination. (b) Employees... declination. (5) Effective date. A conversion under this section for an employee who elects to join the SES...

  4. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requests conversion to career appointment. Failure to respond shall be deemed a declination. (b) Employees... declination. (5) Effective date. A conversion under this section for an employee who elects to join the SES...

  5. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requests conversion to career appointment. Failure to respond shall be deemed a declination. (b) Employees... declination. (5) Effective date. A conversion under this section for an employee who elects to join the SES...

  6. Molten Slag Would Boost Coal Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrall, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor increases residence time of uncovered char. Near-100percent carbon conversion achievable in reactor incorporating moltenslag bath. Slag maintains unconverted carbon impinging on surface at high temperatures for longer period of time, enhancing conversion.

  7. Calculation of dose conversion factors for posterior-anterior chest radiography of adults with a relatively high-energy X-ray spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schultz, F W; Geleijns, J; Zoetelief, J

    1994-08-01

    In a survey of X-ray units as applied for thorax examinations considerable variations were observed in entrance dose among different hospitals in the Leyden region. For the median exposure conditions, i.e. 125 kVp, heavy filtering and large focus-to-skin distance (177.5 cm), absorbed dose distributions have been derived using mathematical phantoms of a standard male or female adult. For relatively high-energy X-rays, back scatter factors were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, conversion factors were obtained, relating organ doses to air kerma, free in air. Effective dose equivalent and effective dose were calculated according to ICRP-26 and ICRP-60 recommendations, respectively. The computational procedures were compared with results reported in the literature for a similar exposure configuration but using lower-energy X-rays. Causes of relative differences ranging from -56% to +34% were analysed. In addition to the photon energy spectrum and filtering, the exposure geometry appears to be a very important parameter which can be optimized for the purpose of dose reduction.

  8. Interrogative suggestibility in patients with conversion disorders.

    PubMed

    Foong, J; Lucas, P A; Ron, M A

    1997-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased interrogative suggestibility may contribute to the shaping and maintaining of conversions symptoms. Interrogative suggestibility was measured in 12 patients with conversion disorder and 10 control patients with confirmed neurological disease matched for age, premorbid intelligence, and as closely as possible in terms of their neurological symptoms to the patients with conversion disorder. Our observations do not support the contention that individual differences in interrogative suggestibility are of importance in the etiology of conversion disorders.

  9. Elbow isokinetic strength characteristics among collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Laudner, Kevin G; Wilson, James T; Meister, Keith

    2012-05-01

    To compare the bilateral strength characteristics of the wrist flexors, extensors, pronators, and supinators among baseball players. Cross-sectional. Laboratory. 30 collegiate baseball players with no recent history of upper extremity injury. Bilateral pronation, supination, wrist flexion, and wrist extension peak torque (PT) and peak torque to body weight (PT/BW) strength were measured at speeds of 90 and 180°/second. Paired t-tests showed that the throwing arm of baseball players produced significantly less PT/BW strength for supination at 90°/second compared to the non-throwing arm (P = .001). The throwing arm produced significantly more PT/BW strength for pronation (P = .001) at 180°/second compared to the non-throwing arm. Furthermore, the throwing arm had more PT and PT/BW strength for wrist extension (P < .005) at 180°/second. Conversely, the throwing arm had less PT and PT/BW strength for supination (P < .004) and wrist flexion (P < .004) at 180°/second compared to the non-throwing arm. Significant bilateral strength differences exist in pronation, supination, wrist flexion, and wrist extension among collegiate baseball players. With the steady increase in ulnar collateral ligament injuries of the elbow among baseball players and the proven resistance to valgus force provided by the flexor-pronator mass of the elbow, the results of this study may prove beneficial in the prevention, evaluation, and rehabilitation of such dysfunctions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... considering strength-training programs: An instructor-to-child ratio of no more than 1 to 10. The ... major muscle groups of the upper and lower body and core. Kids should start with no load ( ...

  11. Machine Gun Liner Bond Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    investigation does not constitute a complete analysis of liner failures in the M2 machine gun. The fact that two different liner-failure modes were...An order-of-magnitude estimate can be made of the bond strength in this case using a standard elastic analysis and some reasonable assumptions... analysis of the forces on the machine gun bullet, it was found that the measured bond strength was adequate to resist the reaction forces produced when

  12. The Teacher and the Conversational Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Cites a typical classroom "pseudo-conversation," showing how German students of English sound stiff and clumsy when conversing with English-speaking partners. This is blamed partly on the teacher's behavior. The example is then expanded into a "communicative exchange." In teaching conversation, manner is seen as more important…

  13. Adaptive Feedback Improving Learningful Conversations at Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaeta, Matteo; Mangione, Giuseppina Rita; Miranda, Sergio; Orciuoli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes the definition of an Adaptive Conversation-based Learning System (ACLS) able to foster computer-mediated tutorial dialogues at the workplace in order to increase the probability to generate meaningful learning during conversations. ACLS provides a virtual assistant selecting the best partner to involve in the conversation and…

  14. Alkaline Hydrolysis Conversion of Nitrocellulose Fines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    The conversion of 1,125,000 pounds of bone-dry nitrocellulose fines into a liquid fertilizer was documented. Alkaline hydrolysis was the conversion... fertilizer . Fertilizer nutrient value was 1.3% nitrogen (N), 8.0% potassium (K2O) and 0.9% phosphorus (P2O5). Conversion met all applicable federal and state safety and environmental regulations.

  15. Teaching Conversation Using a Television Soap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lynn E.

    1996-01-01

    Examines an approach to teaching conversation in New Zealand to adult migrants studying English as a Second Language, using language data from a television soap opera. Compares teacher-made samples of conversation and the scripted conversation of television soaps and points to advantages of using videoed television samples. (15 references)…

  16. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  17. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  18. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  19. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  20. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to the other of the indicated types of units...

  1. 5 CFR 536.303 - Geographic conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... after geographic conversion is the employee's existing payable rate of basic pay in effect immediately before the action. (b) Geographic conversion when a retained rate employee's official worksite is changed... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Geographic conversion. 536.303...

  2. 5 CFR 536.303 - Geographic conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... after geographic conversion is the employee's existing payable rate of basic pay in effect immediately before the action. (b) Geographic conversion when a retained rate employee's official worksite is changed... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Geographic conversion. 536.303...

  3. Retrospective Conversion of Three Library Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carolyn A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports on the retrospective conversion via OCLC of cataloging for three library collections at the University of South Carolina--the main, rare book, and historical collections. Backgrounds of the collections, conversion procedures, determinants of conversion rates, and cost factors are discussed. (Author/JL)

  4. 5 CFR 317.301 - Conversion coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.301 Conversion coverage... implementation of the Senior Executive Service effective on July 13, 1979, and the initial conversions thereto. (2) The implementation of the Senior Executive Service in an agency following the revocation of that...

  5. Conversational Knowledge Process for Social Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Toyoaki

    The conversational knowledge process is a collective activity for knowledge creation, management, and application where conversational communications are used as a primary means of interaction among participating actors. In this article, I survey a suite of communication tools that augment the conversational knowledge process in order to accelerate social problem solving.

  6. Nonverbal Behavior Generator for Embodied Conversational Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    position for alternatives or items in a list. Ekman [10] describes eyebrow movements for emotional expressions and conversational signals. Some...2005) 10. Ekman , P.: About brows: emotional and conversational signals. In von Cranach, M., Foppa, K., Lepenies, W., Ploog, D., eds.: Human Ethology...behavior can in turn influence the beliefs, emotions , and behavior of observers. Embodied conversational agents (ECA) with appropriate nonverbal

  7. Teaching Casual Conversation: The Issue of Simplification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Diana; Gardner, Rod

    This paper focuses on the issue of whether pedagogical mediation will facilitate the acquisition of conversational skills. It argues that it is possible to describe casual conversation, that it has a grammatical structure, and that it is of benefit to English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learners for the structure of conversation to be explicitly…

  8. 31 CFR 800.205 - Conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conversion. 800.205 Section 800.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.205 Conversion. The term conversion means the exercise of a right...

  9. 31 CFR 800.205 - Conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conversion. 800.205 Section 800.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.205 Conversion. The term conversion means the exercise of a right...

  10. 31 CFR 800.205 - Conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conversion. 800.205 Section 800.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.205 Conversion. The term conversion means the exercise of a right...

  11. Effects of copper and selenium on beta-carotene conversion and bone strength in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborn, C.D.; Kiangura, R.K.; Brusewitz, G.H.; Stoecker, B.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-four weanling male rats were depleted of vitamin A and selenium for 5 wk, randomly assigned to groups in a 2 {times} 2 factorial design, and fed a torula yeast diet without vitamin A for 4 wks. The diets contained either 20 ppb Se ({minus}Se) or 510 ppb Se as sodium selenate (+Se) and 1 ppm Cu ({minus}Cu) or 6 ppm Cu (+Cu). Rats were fed 100 ug of beta-carotene daily. Force to break tibias was measured with a three point bending fixture in an Instron universal testing machine. Bone weights and kg force to break bones were increased by +Cu diets. Animals fed the {minus}Cu diets had depressed body and organ weights. An interaction between Cu and Se affected hepatic and kidney vitamin A after feeding carotene. Total hepatic vitamin A was 26.8, 44.2, 45.1 and 32.5 ug for the {minus}Cu{minus}Se, {minus}Cu+Se, +Cu{minus}Se, and +Cu+Se groups, respectively. Total kidney vitamin A was 8.7, 3.9, 7.1 and 13.5 ug for the same groups. Beta-carotene dioxygenase activity was not significantly affected by treatment. The findings indicate that dietary Cu and Se affect the metabolism of vitamin A.

  12. Definition of medical event is to be based on the total source strength for evaluation of permanent prostate brachytherapy: A report from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subir; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Hagan, Michael; Rivard, Mark J; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Welsh, James S; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission deems it to be a medical event (ME) if the total dose delivered differs from the prescribed dose by 20% or more. A dose-based definition of ME is not appropriate for permanent prostate brachytherapy as it generates too many spurious MEs and thereby creates unnecessary apprehension in patients, and ties up regulatory bodies and the licensees in unnecessary and burdensome investigations. A more suitable definition of ME is required for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) formed a working group of experienced clinicians to review the literature, assess the validity of current regulations, and make specific recommendations about the definition of an ME in permanent prostate brachytherapy. The working group found that the current definition of ME in §35.3045 as "the total dose delivered differs from the prescribed dose by 20 percent or more" was not suitable for permanent prostate brachytherapy since the prostate volume (and hence the resultant calculated prostate dose) is dependent on the timing of the imaging, the imaging modality used, the observer variability in prostate contouring, the planning margins used, inadequacies of brachytherapy treatment planning systems to calculate tissue doses, and seed migration within and outside the prostate. If a dose-based definition for permanent implants is applied strictly, many properly executed implants would be improperly classified as an ME leading to a detrimental effect on brachytherapy. The working group found that a source strength-based criterion, of >20% of source strength prescribed in the post-procedure written directive being implanted outside the planning target volume is more appropriate for defining ME in permanent prostate brachytherapy. ASTRO recommends that the definition of ME for permanent prostate brachytherapy should not be dose based but should be based upon the source strength (air-kerma strength) administered.

  13. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  14. Comparison of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suited and unsuited isolated joint strength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Demel, Kenneth J.; Morgan, David A.; Wilmington, Robert P.; Pandya, Abhilash K.

    1996-01-01

    In this study the strength of subjects suited in extravehicular mobility units (EMU's) - or Space Shuttle suits - was compared to the strength of unsuited subjects. The authors devised a systematic and complete data set that characterizes isolated joint torques for all major joints of EMU-suited subjects. Six joint motions were included in the data set. The joint conditions of six subjects were compared to increase our understanding of the strength capabilities of suited subjects. Data were gathered on suited and unsuited subjects. Suited subjects wore Class 3 or Class 1 suits, with and without thermal micrometeoroid garments (TMG's). Suited and unsuited conditions for each joint motion were compared. From this the authors found, for example, that shoulder abduction suited conditions differ from each other and from the unsuited condition. A second-order polynomial regression model was also provided. This model, which allows the prediction of suited strength when given unsuited strength information, relates the torques of unsuited conditions to the torques of all suited conditions. Data obtained will enable computer modeling of EMU strength, conversion from unsuited to suited data, and isolated joint strength comparisons between suited and unsuited conditions at any measured angle. From these data mission planners and human factors engineers may gain a better understanding of crew posture, and mobility and strength capabilities. This study also may help suit designers optimize suit strength, and provide a foundation for EMU strength modeling systems.

  15. The Spectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons at TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallcombe, James; Evitts, Lee; Garnsworthy, Adam; Moukaddam, Mohamad; Spice Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    SPICE (SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons) is a powerful tool to measure conversion coefficients and E 0 transitions in nuclei. E 0 transition strengths, which are not accessible by gamma-ray spectroscopy, are a sparsely measured observable. Such transition strengths are particularly sensitive to nuclear shape and state mixing effects and as such are a key item of data in studying the evolution of shape coexistence. SPICE is an ancillary detector that has been commissioned for use with Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) at the ISAC-II facility of TRIUMF. The main feature of SPICE is high efficiency over a range of electron energies from 100 to 3500 keV, crucial for work with RIBs, and an effective reduction of beam-induced backgrounds. This is achieved with an upstream magnetic lens, a high- Z photon shield and a large-area lithium-drifted silicon detector. A major theme of the physics program will be the investigation of shape coexistence and state mixing in exotic nuclei. An overview of the main features of SPICE will be presented alongside details of the commissioning and preliminary data from the first experiment studying excited structures in 110Pd. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation (MRI).

  16. Conversion disorder: a problematic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Timothy R J; Stone, Jon; Kanaan, Richard A A

    2011-11-01

    The diagnosis of conversion disorder is problematic. Since doctors have conceptually and practically differentiated the symptoms from neurological ('organic') disease it has been presumed to be a psychological disorder, but the psychological mechanism, and how this differs from feigning (conscious simulation), has remained elusive. Although misdiagnosis of neurological disease as conversion disorder is uncommon, it remains a concern for clinicians, particularly for psychiatrists who may be unaware of the positive ways in which neurologists can exclude organic disease. The diagnosis is anomalous in psychiatry in that current diagnostic systems require that feigning is excluded and that the symptoms can be explained psychologically. In practice, feigning is very difficult to either disprove or prove, and a psychological explanation cannot always be found. Studies of childhood and adult psychological precipitants have tended to support the relevance of stressful life events prior to symptom onset at the group level but they are not found in a substantial proportion of cases. These problems highlight serious theoretical and practical issues not just for the current diagnostic systems but for the concept of the disorder itself. Psychology, physiology and functional imaging techniques have been used in attempts to elucidate the neurobiology of conversion disorder and to differentiate it from feigning, but while intriguing results are emerging they can only be considered preliminary. Such work looks to a future that could refine our understanding of the disorder. However, until that time, the formal diagnostic requirement for associated psychological stressors and the exclusion of feigning are of limited clinical value. Simplified criteria are suggested which will also encourage cooperation between neurology and psychiatry in the management of these patients.

  17. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  18. Energy conversion and storage process

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, O.N.

    1982-01-26

    An energy conversion process is described for converting thermal energy into stored electrochemical energy and then into electrical energy comprising heating a first FeCl2-containing electrolyte melt to produce gaseous FeCl3 and a reductant product in a first chemical reaction, these reaction products being separated, cooled, optionally stored, and combined in a second FeCl2-containing electrolyte melt to cause a reaction to take place which is the reverse of said first reaction, thereby regenerating said first melt and producing heat and electrical energy.

  19. Formation of alcohol conversion catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2001-01-01

    The method of the present invention involves a composition containing an intimate mixture of (a) metal oxide support particles and (b) a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, its method of manufacture, and its method of use for converting alcohols to aldehydes. During the conversion process, catalytically active metal oxide from the discrete catalytic metal oxide particles migrates to the oxide support particles and forms a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on the oxide support particle to form a catalyst composition having a higher specific activity than the admixed particle composition.

  20. Power enhanced frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system includes at least one source providing a first near-IR wavelength output including a gain medium for providing high power amplification, such as double clad fiber amplifier, a double clad fiber laser or a semiconductor tapered amplifier to enhance the power output level of the near-IR wavelength output. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Ra-man/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device.

  1. Conversion of raw carbonaceous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-07

    Three configurations for an electrochemical cell are utilized to generate electric power from the reaction of oxygen or air with porous plates or particulates of carbon, arranged such that waste heat from the electrochemical cells is allowed to flow upwards through a storage chamber or port containing raw carbonaceous fuel. These configurations allow combining the separate processes of devolatilization, pyrolysis and electrochemical conversion of carbon to electric power into a single unit process, fed with raw fuel and exhausting high BTU gases, electric power, and substantially pure CO.sub.2 during operation.

  2. Raster to Lineal Conversion Software.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Acceso B-i APPENDIX C NTIS GAIC-i r-l TAB U1nunno~Ced 1 just if icai DistribUtionI _Availabilit oe --- Avail and/or _it Spe ci I pca LIST OF FIGURES...shortcomings of the existing Raster to Lineal Conversion Software, and, secondly, to design and implement output modules to provide multiple output formats...the RAPS scanner and to provide flexibility. This would result in a more useful system, one that could provide multiple types of output from multiple

  3. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  4. A brief review of calcium phosphate conversion coating on magnesium and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaludin, Mohd Amin Farhan; Jamal, Zul Azhar Zahid; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Derman, Mohd Nazree

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments have shown that magnesium is a promising candidate to be used as a biomaterial. Owing to its light weight, biocompatibility and compressive strength comparable with natural bones makes magnesium as an excellent choice for biomaterial. However, high reactivity and low corrosion resistance properties have restricted the application of magnesium as biomaterials. At the moment, several strategies have been developed to solve this problem. Surface modification of magnesium is one of the popular solutions to solve the problem. Among many techniques developed in the surface modification, conversion coating method is one of the simple and effective techniques. From various types of conversion coating, calcium phosphate-based conversion coating is the most suitable for biomedical fields. This paper reviews some studies on calcium phosphate coating on Mg and its alloys via chemical conversion method and discusses some factors determining the coating performance.

  5. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Methods: Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was

  6. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Static conversion systems. [for space power reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  8. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  9. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  10. Static conversion systems. [for space power reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  11. 12 CFR 192.365 - May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? 192.365 Section 192.365 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY... Stock § 192.365 May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? (a) You must give...

  12. 12 CFR 192.365 - May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? 192.365 Section 192.365 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY... Stock § 192.365 May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? (a) You must give...

  13. 12 CFR 192.365 - May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? 192.365 Section 192.365 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY... Stock § 192.365 May other voting members purchase conversion shares in the conversion? (a) You must give...

  14. High resolution A/D conversion based on piecewise conversion at lower resolution

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Steve [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    Piecewise conversion of an analog input signal is performed utilizing a plurality of relatively lower bit resolution A/D conversions. The results of this piecewise conversion are interpreted to achieve a relatively higher bit resolution A/D conversion without sampling frequency penalty.

  15. Muscular strength and physical function.

    PubMed

    Brill, P A; Macera, C A; Davis, D R; Blair, S N; Gordon, N

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential association of muscular strength and endurance at baseline with the prevalence of functional limitations at follow-up. Study participants were 3,069 men and 589 women (30-82 yr) who received a clinical examination including a strength evaluation at the Cooper Clinic between 1980 and 1989 and responded to a 1990 mail-back survey. Participants also had to achieve at least 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate on a maximal exercise treadmill test and have no history of heart attack, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, or arthritis at their first visit. A strength index composite score (0-6) was calculated using age- and sex-specific tertiles from bench press, leg press, and sit-up tests. Those scoring 5 or 6 were categorized in the high strength group. Functional health status was assessed by responses to questions about the participant's ability to perform light, moderate, and strenuous recreational, household, daily living, and personal care tasks. After an average follow-up of 5 yr, 7% of men and 12% of women reported at least one functional limitation. A logistic regression model including age, aerobic fitness, body mass index, and new health problems at follow-up found that, relative to those with lower levels of strength, the odds of reporting functional limitations at follow-up in men and women categorized as having higher levels of strength were 0.56 (95%CI = 0.34, 0.93) and 0.54 (95%CI = 0.21, 1.39), respectively. These findings, if replicated in other populations, suggest that maintenance of strength throughout the lifespan may reduce the prevalence of functional limitations.

  16. Electromagnetic wave energy conversion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L.; Callahan, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    Known electromagnetic wave absorbing structures found in nature were first studied for clues of how one might later design large area man-made radiant-electric converters. This led to the study of the electro-optics of insect dielectric antennae. Insights were achieved into how these antennae probably operate in the infrared 7-14um range. EWEC theoretical models and relevant cases were concisely formulated and justified for metal and dielectric absorber materials. Finding the electromagnetic field solutions to these models is a problem not yet solved. A rough estimate of losses in metal, solid dielectric, and hollow dielectric waveguides indicates future radiant-electric EWEC research should aim toward dielectric materials for maximum conversion efficiency. It was also found that the absorber bandwidth is a theoretical limitation on radiant-electric conversion efficiency. Ideally, the absorbers' wavelength would be centered on the irradiating spectrum and have the same bandwith as the irradiating wave. The EWEC concept appears to have a valid scientific basis, but considerable more research is needed before it is thoroughly understood, especially for the complex randomly polarized, wide band, phase incoherent spectrum of the sun. Specific recommended research areas are identified.

  17. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  18. Astrophysicists’ Conversational Connections on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Kim; Bowman, Timothy D.; Haustein, Stefanie; Peters, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists’ activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency) and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions) on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators) and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets). The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions. PMID:25153196

  19. Radiation energy conversion in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed at the third NASA conference on radiant energy conversion are reviewed. The unconcentrated-photovoltaic-generation version of a solar power satellite is described, noting that it will consist of a 21.3 x 5.3-sq-km silicon-solar-cell array expected to provide 17 Gw of electrical power, with 1 km in diam transmitters oriented to beam 2.45 GHz microwave power to two receiving/rectifying 'rectennas' on earth. The Solares space-energy-system concept, designed for providing a large fraction of the world's energy needs at costs comparable to those of future coal/nuclear alternative, is considered, as are subsystems for improving the economics of the solar power satellite. A concept proposing the use of relativistic-electron-storage rings for electron-beam energy transmission and storage, and a report on the production of a high temperature plasma with concentrated solar radiation are taken into account. Laser-conversion systems, including the direct-solar-pumped space laser, and the telec-powered spacecraft, are discussed.

  20. Radiation energy conversion in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed at the third NASA conference on radiant energy conversion are reviewed. The unconcentrated-photovoltaic-generation version of a solar power satellite is described, noting that it will consist of a 21.3 x 5.3-sq-km silicon-solar-cell array expected to provide 17 Gw of electrical power, with 1 km in diam transmitters oriented to beam 2.45 GHz microwave power to two receiving/rectifying 'rectennas' on earth. The Solares space-energy-system concept, designed for providing a large fraction of the world's energy needs at costs comparable to those of future coal/nuclear alternative, is considered, as are subsystems for improving the economics of the solar power satellite. A concept proposing the use of relativistic-electron-storage rings for electron-beam energy transmission and storage, and a report on the production of a high temperature plasma with concentrated solar radiation are taken into account. Laser-conversion systems, including the direct-solar-pumped space laser, and the telec-powered spacecraft, are discussed.

  1. Photochemical conversion of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Credi, Alberto; Venturi, Margherita

    2008-01-01

    Energy is the most important issue of the 21st century. About 85% of our energy comes from fossil fuels, a finite resource unevenly distributed beneath the Earth's surface. Reserves of fossil fuels are progressively decreasing, and their continued use produces harmful effects such as pollution that threatens human health and greenhouse gases associated with global warming. Prompt global action to solve the energy crisis is therefore needed. To pursue such an action, we are urged to save energy and to use energy in more efficient ways, but we are also forced to find alternative energy sources, the most convenient of which is solar energy for several reasons. The sun continuously provides the Earth with a huge amount of energy, fairly distributed all over the world. Its enormous potential as a clean, abundant, and economical energy source, however, cannot be exploited unless it is converted into useful forms of energy. This Review starts with a brief description of the mechanism at the basis of the natural photosynthesis and, then, reports the results obtained so far in the field of photochemical conversion of solar energy. The "grand challenge" for chemists is to find a convenient means for artificial conversion of solar energy into fuels. If chemists succeed to create an artificial photosynthetic process, "... life and civilization will continue as long as the sun shines!", as the Italian scientist Giacomo Ciamician forecast almost one hundred years ago.

  2. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H[sub 2]0 [yields] CO[sub 2] + H[sub 2]. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H[sub 2]S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25[degree] and 30[degree]C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30[degree], 32[degree] or 34[degree]C. The rate of conversion of COs and H[sub 2]O to CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30[degree]C was found to be 0.243 h[sup [minus]1]. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: [mu] = [sub 351] + I[sub o]/[sup 0.152]I[sub o]. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  3. Bilingualism Accentuates Children's Conversational Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Michael; Surian, Luca; Matsuo, Ayumi; Geraci, Alessandra; Iozzi, Laura; Okumura, Yuko; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Background Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3–6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite). Principal Findings In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1) significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1) significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. Conclusions As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1) and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2), these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses. PMID:20140246

  4. Workplace conversations: building and maintaining collaborative capital.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Glenda; Vickers, Margaret H; Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Heavy, pressured workloads are a feature of health workplaces internationally, presenting challenges to communication and contributing to tension and negative emotions. This paper explores supportive and unsupportive workplace conversations between nurses and midwives and their colleagues. The findings focus on qualitative interviews of ten nurses and midwives that were audio-taped and analysed for perceptions about the role of workplace conversations. Conversations between colleagues were significant for building and maintaining collaborative capital, but unsupportive conversations also threatened it. Findings suggest the need for considering the impact of co-worker conversations on workplace culture. Nurse managers and management may play a pivotal role in establishing and maintaining supportive conversations. Recognising the role and potential of workplace conversations for building capacities for support, conflict resolution, job satisfaction and the personal resilience of nurses and midwives can raise the collaborative capital of the workplace.

  5. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Gene Conversion in Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Gene conversion is a specific type of homologous recombination that involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a ‘donor’ sequence to a highly homologous ‘acceptor’. We have recently reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying gene conversion, explored the key part that this process has played in fashioning extant human genes, and performed a meta-analysis of gene-conversion events known to have caused human genetic disease. Here we shall briefly summarize some of the latest developments in the study of pathogenic gene conversion events, including (i) the emerging idea of minimal efficient sequence homology (MESH) for homologous recombination, (ii) the local DNA sequence features that appear to predispose to gene conversion, (iii) a mechanistic comparison of gene conversion and transient hypermutability, and (iv) recently reported examples of pathogenic gene conversion events. PMID:24710102

  7. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  8. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested.

  9. Crystal strength by direct computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, Vasily

    2007-03-01

    The art of making materials stronger goes back to medieval and even ancient times. Swords forged from Damascus steels more than 10 centuries ago possessed a unique combination of hardness and flexibility, two qualities that are difficult to attain simultaneously. The skills of metalworking were based on empirical knowledge and were passed from the master smith to his pupils. The science of physical metallurgy came about only in the XX century bringing with it new methods for finding out why some materials are strong while others are not. Soon it was realized that, when it comes to metal strength, it is all about crystal defects -- impurities, dislocations, grain boundaries, etc. - and how they are organized into crystal microstructure. This understanding has since resulted in new effective methods of material processing aiming to modify crystal microstructure in order to affect material's properties, e.g. strength and/or hardness. Remarkably and disappointingly, general understanding that microstructure defines material's response to external loads has not yet resulted in a workable physical theory of metal strength accounting for the realistic complexity of material microstructure. In this presentation I would like to discuss a few tidbits from computational and experimental research in our group at LLNL on crystal defects and their contributions to material strength. My selection of the examples aims to illustrate the major premise of our work that the mechanisms by which the microstructure affects crystal strength are multiple and complex but that there is hope to bring some order to this complexity.

  10. Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-07-21

    In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to

  11. Thermodynamics fundamentals of energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Nicolae

    The work reported in the chapters 1-5 focuses on the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and electrical phenomena related to the conversion of one form of energy to another. Chapter 6 is a re-examination of the fundamental heat transfer problem of how to connect a finite-size heat generating volume to a concentrated sink. Chapter 1 extends to electrical machines the combined thermodynamics and heat transfer optimization approach that has been developed for heat engines. The conversion efficiency at maximum power is 1/2. When, as in specific applications, the operating temperature of windings must not exceed a specified level, the power output is lower and efficiency higher. Chapter 2 addresses the fundamental problem of determining the optimal history (regime of operation) of a battery so that the work output is maximum. Chapters 3 and 4 report the energy conversion aspects of an expanding mixture of hot particles, steam and liquid water. At the elemental level, steam annuli develop around the spherical drops as time increases. At the mixture level, the density decreases while the pressure and velocity increases. Chapter 4 describes numerically, based on the finite element method, the time evolution of the expanding mixture of hot spherical particles, steam and water. The fluid particles are moved in time in a Lagrangian manner to simulate the change of the domain configuration. Chapter 5 describes the process of thermal interaction between the molten material and water. In the second part of the chapter the model accounts for the irreversibility due to the flow of the mixture through the cracks of the mixing vessel. The approach presented in this chapter is based on exergy analysis and represents a departure from the line of inquiry that was followed in chapters 3-4. Chapter 6 shows that the geometry of the heat flow path between a volume and one point can be optimized in two fundamentally different ways. In the "growth" method the

  12. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Systematic Review of Muscle Strength Assessment and Muscle Strength Impairment.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-02-01

    To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion isokinetic dynamometry. A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles were reviewed. Twenty studies covering 316 PPSH were included. High intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) inter- and intrasession reliability was reported for isokinetic dynamometry, which was independent of the tested muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Slightly higher ICC values were found for the nonparetic extremity. Standard error of the mean (SEM) values showed that a change of 7% to 20% was required for a real group change to take place for most muscle groups, with the knee extensors showing the smallest SEM% values. The muscle strength of paretic muscles showed deficits when compared with both healthy and nonparetic muscles, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Nonparetic muscles only showed minor strength impairments when compared with healthy muscles. Criterion isokinetic dynamometry is a reliable test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Copyright

  13. Infrared band strengths: Laboratory techniques and applications to astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, P. A.

    2002-09-01

    Whenever an abundance measurement is derived by way of infrared spectroscopy, it will typically make use of a laboratory-obtained conversion factor between the size of an IR absorption feature and the (column) density of the molecule under study. This factor is usually called the "absolute absorption intensity" by a chemist or the "band strength" by a typical IR astronomer. Band strengths have been studied in chemistry since the 1950s, and the commonly quoted "accuracy to with a factor of ten" historically required of astronomical calculations has not required much new input into this area. Today, however, astronomical measurements require much higher precision, and it is time for IR astronomers to ask more of laboratory measurements and to understand when and why to use IR band strengths in a more appropriate manner. The history, interpretation, measurement, and common astrophysical applications of infrared band strengths will be discussed. The "secrets" of the laboratory techniques involved in their measurement are described, and a compilation of results from the literature is given along with some new results. Typical astrophysical applications and appropriate uses will also be discussed. Common misconceptions are confronted and two challenges are presented: (i) to the laboratory astrophysics community to produce and advertise accurate values with caveats when necessary, and (ii) to the observational community to use the most appropriate results for the environment under study.

  14. Withdrawal Strength and Bending Yield Strength of Stainless Steel Nails

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that stainless steel nails have superior corrosion performance compared to carbon steel or galvanized nails in treated wood; however, their mechanical fastening behavior is unknown. In this paper, the performance of stainless steel nails is examined with respect to two important properties used in wood connection design: withdrawal strength...

  15. Power conversion apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A power conversion apparatus includes an interfacing circuit that enables a current source inverter to operate from a voltage energy storage device (voltage source), such as a battery, ultracapacitor or fuel cell. The interfacing circuit, also referred to as a voltage-to-current converter, transforms the voltage source into a current source that feeds a DC current to a current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also provides means for controlling and maintaining a constant DC bus current that supplies the current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also enables the current source inverter to charge the voltage energy storage device, such as during dynamic braking of a hybrid electric vehicle, without the need of reversing the direction of the DC bus current.

  16. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K. T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E. C.; Gaddy, J. L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H2 from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in the first task are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  17. Ocean thermal-energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, G.; Niblett, C.; Walker, L.

    1983-03-01

    The principles underlying ocean thermal-energy conversion (OTEC) are reviewed, and a schematic layout of a system is included. The two systems currently under study, the open system and the closed system, are described. The prospect now, it is noted, is that OTEC plants will not be commercially viable on a widespread basis, even in the tropics. This is especially true of the large-scale plants that have been envisioned. A strong possibility is seen, however, that smaller plants, generating about 40 megawatts of electrical power, can survive commercially. The following conditions would favor their success: placement on land rather than at sea; placement in areas (such as islands) where alternative energy supplies are at a premium; and designing the plant to operate in conjunction with either an aquaculture or a desalination plant.

  18. Compliance, Conversion, and Category Induction

    PubMed Central

    Jaswal, Vikram K.; Lima, Olivia K.; Small, Jenna E.

    2008-01-01

    When children hear an object referred to with a label that is moderately discrepant from its appearance, they frequently make inferences about that object consistent with the label rather than its appearance. We asked whether 3-year-olds actually believe these unexpected labels (“conversion”), or whether their inferences simply reflect a desire to comply with the considerable experimental demands of the induction task (“compliance”). Specifically, we asked how likely children would be to pass an unexpected label on to another person who had not been present during the labeling event. Results showed that children who used an unexpected label as the basis for inference passed that label on to another person about as often as they could remember it. This suggests that children’s label-based inferences do reflect conversion rather than mere compliance. PMID:18556016

  19. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kocha, S.; Arent, D.; Peterson, M.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a stable, cost effective, photoelectrochemical based system that will split water upon illumination, producing hydrogen and oxygen directly, using sunlight as the only energy input. This type of direct conversion system combines a photovoltaic material and an electrolyzer into a single monolithic device. We report on our studies of two multifunction multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices, one based on the ternary semiconductor gallium indium phosphide, (GaInP{sub 2}), and the other one based on amorphous silicon carbide. We also report on our studies of the solid state surface treatment of GaInP{sub 2} as well as our continuing effort to develop synthetic techniques for the attachment of transition metal complexes to the surface of semiconductor electrodes. All our surface studies are directed at controlling the interface energetics and forming stable catalytic surfaces.

  20. Topological strength of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Ramos, J. G. G. S.; Rodrigues, E. I. B.

    2017-02-01

    This work deals with magnetic structures that attain integer and half-integer skyrmion numbers. We model and solve the problem analytically, and show how the solutions appear in materials that engender distinct, very specific physical properties, and use them to describe their topological features. In particular, we found a way to model skyrmion with a large transition region correlated with the presence of a two-peak skyrmion number density. Moreover, we run into the issue concerning the topological strength of a vortex-like structure and suggest an experimental realization, important to decide how to modify and measure the topological strength of the magnetic structure.