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Sample records for kernel canonical correlation

  1. Kernel canonical-correlation Granger causality for multiple time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guorong; Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Gao, Qing; Chen, Huafu

    2011-04-01

    Canonical-correlation analysis as a multivariate statistical technique has been applied to multivariate Granger causality analysis to infer information flow in complex systems. It shows unique appeal and great superiority over the traditional vector autoregressive method, due to the simplified procedure that detects causal interaction between multiple time series, and the avoidance of potential model estimation problems. However, it is limited to the linear case. Here, we extend the framework of canonical correlation to include the estimation of multivariate nonlinear Granger causality for drawing inference about directed interaction. Its feasibility and effectiveness are verified on simulated data.

  2. Kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis for image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shuzhi; Ge, Hongwei; Yuan, Yun-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Existing kernel-based correlation analysis methods mainly adopt a single kernel in each view. However, only a single kernel is usually insufficient to characterize nonlinear distribution information of a view. To solve the problem, we transform each original feature vector into a 2-dimensional feature matrix by means of kernel alignment, and then propose a novel kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis (KAMCCA) method on the basis of the feature matrices. Our proposed method can simultaneously employ multiple kernels to better capture the nonlinear distribution information of each view, so that correlation features learned by KAMCCA can have well discriminating power in real-world image recognition. Extensive experiments are designed on five real-world image datasets, including NIR face images, thermal face images, visible face images, handwritten digit images, and object images. Promising experimental results on the datasets have manifested the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  3. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  4. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  5. A Stepwise Canonical Procedure and the Shrinkage of Canonical Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rim, Eui-Do

    A stepwise canonical procedure, including two selection indices for variable deletion and a rule for stopping the iterative procedure, was derived as a method of selecting core variables from predictors and criteria. The procedure was applied to simulated data varying in the degree of built in structures in population correlation matrices, number…

  6. Part and Bipartial Canonical Correlation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timm, Neil H.; Carlson, James E.

    Part and bi-partial canonical correlations were developed by extending the definitions of part and bi-partial correlation to sets of variates. These coefficients may be used to help researchers explore relationships which exist among several sets of normally distributed variates. (Author)

  7. Regularized Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; Hwang, Heungsun; Abdi, Herve

    2008-01-01

    Multiple-set canonical correlation analysis (Generalized CANO or GCANO for short) is an important technique because it subsumes a number of interesting multivariate data analysis techniques as special cases. More recently, it has also been recognized as an important technique for integrating information from multiple sources. In this paper, we…

  8. DNA pattern recognition using canonical correlation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, B K; Chakraborty, Chiranjib

    2015-10-01

    We performed canonical correlation analysis as an unsupervised statistical tool to describe related views of the same semantic object for identifying patterns. A pattern recognition technique based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was proposed for finding required genetic code in the DNA sequence. Two related but different objects were considered: one was a particular pattern, and other was test DNA sequence. CCA found correlations between two observations of the same semantic pattern and test sequence. It is concluded that the relationship possesses maximum value in the position where the pattern exists. As a case study, the potential of CCA was demonstrated on the sequence found from HIV-1 preferred integration sites. The subsequences on the left and right flanking from the integration site were considered as the two views, and statistically significant relationships were established between these two views to elucidate the viral preference as an important factor for the correlation. PMID:26564973

  9. Canonical Correlation Analysis as a General Analytical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao

    This paper focuses on three aspects related to the conceptualization and application of canonical correlation analysis as a dominant statistical model: (1) partial canonical correlation analysis and its application in statistical testing; (2) the relation between canonical correlation analysis and discriminant analysis; and (3) the relation…

  10. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  11. Face hallucination using orthogonal canonical correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huiling; Lam, Kin-Man

    2016-05-01

    A two-step face-hallucination framework is proposed to reconstruct a high-resolution (HR) version of a face from an input low-resolution (LR) face, based on learning from LR-HR example face pairs using orthogonal canonical correlation analysis (orthogonal CCA) and linear mapping. In the proposed algorithm, face images are first represented using principal component analysis (PCA). Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) with the orthogonality property is then employed, to maximize the correlation between the PCA coefficients of the LR and the HR face pairs to improve the hallucination performance. The original CCA does not own the orthogonality property, which is crucial for information reconstruction. We propose using orthogonal CCA, which is proven by experiments to achieve a better performance in terms of global face reconstruction. In addition, in the residual-compensation process, a linear-mapping method is proposed to include both the inter- and intrainformation about manifolds of different resolutions. Compared with other state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed framework can achieve a comparable, or even better, performance in terms of global face reconstruction and the visual quality of face hallucination. Experiments on images with various parameter settings and blurring distortions show that the proposed approach is robust and has great potential for real-world applications.

  12. Canonical Correlation Analysis: An Explanation with Comments on Correct Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    This paper briefly explains the logic underlying the basic calculations employed in canonical correlation analysis. A small hypothetical data set is employed to illustrate that canonical correlation analysis subsumes both univariate and multivariate parametric methods. Several real data sets are employed to illustrate other themes. Three common…

  13. Canonical Correlation Analysis as the General Linear Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Sherry

    The concept of the general linear model (GLM) is illustrated and how canonical correlation analysis is the GLM is explained, using a heuristic data set to demonstrate how canonical correlation analysis subsumes various multivariate and univariate methods. The paper shows how each of these analyses produces a synthetic variable, like the Yhat…

  14. Methods of Assessing Replicability in Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jason E.

    Theoretical hypotheses generated from data analysis of a single sample should not be advanced until the replicability issue is treated. At least one of three questions usually arises when evaluating the invariance of results obtained from a canonical correlation analysis (CCA): (1) "Will an effect occur in subsequent studies?"; (2) "Will the size…

  15. Analysing Education Production in Malaysia Using Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Noor Azina; Cheng, Ang Guat

    2005-01-01

    Data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study carried out in 1999 and canonical correlation analysis were used to investigate the effects of school inputs, environmental inputs and gender influence in the production of a joint educational production function in mathematics and science subjects for eighth grade students in…

  16. Quantum canonical ensemble and correlation femtoscopy at fixed multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkelin, S. V.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2016-07-01

    Identical particle correlations at fixed multiplicity are considered by means of quantum canonical ensemble of finite systems. We calculate one-particle momentum spectra and two-particle Bose-Einstein correlation functions in the ideal gas by using a recurrence relation for the partition function. Within such a model we investigate the validity of the thermal Wick's theorem and its applicability for decomposition of the two-particle distribution function. The dependence of the Bose-Einstein correlation parameters on the average momentum of the particle pair is also investigated. Specifically, we present the analytical formulas that allow one to estimate the effect of suppressing the correlation functions in a finite canonical system. The results can be used for the femtoscopy analysis of the A +A and p +p collisions with selected (fixed) multiplicity.

  17. A canonical correlation neural network for multicollinearity and functional data.

    PubMed

    Gou, Zhenkun; Fyfe, Colin

    2004-03-01

    We review a recent neural implementation of Canonical Correlation Analysis and show, using ideas suggested by Ridge Regression, how to make the algorithm robust. The network is shown to operate on data sets which exhibit multicollinearity. We develop a second model which not only performs as well on multicollinear data but also on general data sets. This model allows us to vary a single parameter so that the network is capable of performing Partial Least Squares regression (at one extreme) to Canonical Correlation Analysis (at the other)and every intermediate operation between the two. On multicollinear data, the parameter setting is shown to be important but on more general data no particular parameter setting is required. Finally, we develop a second penalty term which acts on such data as a smoother in that the resulting weight vectors are much smoother and more interpretable than the weights without the robustification term. We illustrate our algorithms on both artificial and real data.

  18. Computation of canonical correlation and best predictable aspect of future for time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourahmadi, Mohsen; Miamee, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    The canonical correlation between the (infinite) past and future of a stationary time series is shown to be the limit of the canonical correlation between the (infinite) past and (finite) future, and computation of the latter is reduced to a (generalized) eigenvalue problem involving (finite) matrices. This provides a convenient and essentially, finite-dimensional algorithm for computing canonical correlations and components of a time series. An upper bound is conjectured for the largest canonical correlation.

  19. High-Speed Tracking with Kernelized Correlation Filters.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João F; Caseiro, Rui; Martins, Pedro; Batista, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The core component of most modern trackers is a discriminative classifier, tasked with distinguishing between the target and the surrounding environment. To cope with natural image changes, this classifier is typically trained with translated and scaled sample patches. Such sets of samples are riddled with redundancies-any overlapping pixels are constrained to be the same. Based on this simple observation, we propose an analytic model for datasets of thousands of translated patches. By showing that the resulting data matrix is circulant, we can diagonalize it with the discrete Fourier transform, reducing both storage and computation by several orders of magnitude. Interestingly, for linear regression our formulation is equivalent to a correlation filter, used by some of the fastest competitive trackers. For kernel regression, however, we derive a new kernelized correlation filter (KCF), that unlike other kernel algorithms has the exact same complexity as its linear counterpart. Building on it, we also propose a fast multi-channel extension of linear correlation filters, via a linear kernel, which we call dual correlation filter (DCF). Both KCF and DCF outperform top-ranking trackers such as Struck or TLD on a 50 videos benchmark, despite running at hundreds of frames-per-second, and being implemented in a few lines of code (Algorithm 1). To encourage further developments, our tracking framework was made open-source. PMID:26353263

  20. High-Speed Tracking with Kernelized Correlation Filters.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João F; Caseiro, Rui; Martins, Pedro; Batista, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The core component of most modern trackers is a discriminative classifier, tasked with distinguishing between the target and the surrounding environment. To cope with natural image changes, this classifier is typically trained with translated and scaled sample patches. Such sets of samples are riddled with redundancies-any overlapping pixels are constrained to be the same. Based on this simple observation, we propose an analytic model for datasets of thousands of translated patches. By showing that the resulting data matrix is circulant, we can diagonalize it with the discrete Fourier transform, reducing both storage and computation by several orders of magnitude. Interestingly, for linear regression our formulation is equivalent to a correlation filter, used by some of the fastest competitive trackers. For kernel regression, however, we derive a new kernelized correlation filter (KCF), that unlike other kernel algorithms has the exact same complexity as its linear counterpart. Building on it, we also propose a fast multi-channel extension of linear correlation filters, via a linear kernel, which we call dual correlation filter (DCF). Both KCF and DCF outperform top-ranking trackers such as Struck or TLD on a 50 videos benchmark, despite running at hundreds of frames-per-second, and being implemented in a few lines of code (Algorithm 1). To encourage further developments, our tracking framework was made open-source.

  1. A New Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction Scheme for Seasonal Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, William K. M.; Li, Guilong; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada This paper describes the fundamental theory of the ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) algorithm for the seasonal climate forecasting. The algorithm is a statistical regression sch eme based on maximal correlation between the predictor and predictand. The prediction error is estimated by a spectral method using the basis of empirical orthogonal functions. The ECC algorithm treats the predictors and predictands as continuous fields and is an improvement from the traditional canonical correlation prediction. The improvements include the use of area-factor, estimation of prediction error, and the optimal ensemble of multiple forecasts. The ECC is applied to the seasonal forecasting over various parts of the world. The example presented here is for the North America precipitation. The predictor is the sea surface temperature (SST) from different ocean basins. The Climate Prediction Center's reconstructed SST (1951-1999) is used as the predictor's historical data. The optimally interpolated global monthly precipitation is used as the predictand?s historical data. Our forecast experiments show that the ECC algorithm renders very high skill and the optimal ensemble is very important to the high value.

  2. A Canonical Ensemble Correlation Prediction Model for Seasonal Precipitation Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Li, Guilong

    2001-01-01

    This report describes an optimal ensemble forecasting model for seasonal precipitation and its error estimation. Each individual forecast is based on the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) in the spectral spaces whose bases are empirical orthogonal functions (EOF). The optimal weights in the ensemble forecasting crucially depend on the mean square error of each individual forecast. An estimate of the mean square error of a CCA prediction is made also using the spectral method. The error is decomposed onto EOFs of the predictand and decreases linearly according to the correlation between the predictor and predictand. This new CCA model includes the following features: (1) the use of area-factor, (2) the estimation of prediction error, and (3) the optimal ensemble of multiple forecasts. The new CCA model is applied to the seasonal forecasting of the United States precipitation field. The predictor is the sea surface temperature.

  3. Theory of extreme correlations using canonical Fermions and path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, B. Sriram

    2014-04-01

    The t-J model is studied using a novel and rigorous mapping of the Gutzwiller projected electrons, in terms of canonical electrons. The mapping has considerable similarity to the Dyson-Maleev transformation relating spin operators to canonical Bosons. This representation gives rise to a non Hermitian quantum theory, characterized by minimal redundancies. A path integral representation of the canonical theory is given. Using it, the salient results of the extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory, including the previously found Schwinger equations of motion, are easily rederived. Further, a transparent physical interpretation of the previously introduced auxiliary Greens function and the ‘caparison factor’, is obtained. The low energy electron spectral function in this theory, with a strong intrinsic asymmetry, is summarized in terms of a few expansion coefficients. These include an important emergent energy scale Δ0 that shrinks to zero on approaching the insulating state, thereby making it difficult to access the underlying very low energy Fermi liquid behavior. The scaled low frequency ECFL spectral function, related simply to the Fano line shape, has a peculiar energy dependence unlike that of a Lorentzian. The resulting energy dispersion obtained by maximization is a hybrid of a massive and a massless Dirac spectrum EQ∗˜γ Q-√{Γ02+Q2}, where the vanishing of Q, a momentum type variable, locates the kink minimum. Therefore the quasiparticle velocity interpolates between (γ∓1) over a width Γ0 on the two sides of Q=0, implying a kink there that strongly resembles a prominent low energy feature seen in angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) of cuprate materials. We also propose novel ways of analyzing the ARPES data to isolate the predicted asymmetry between particle and hole excitations.

  4. Theory of extreme correlations using canonical Fermions and path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastry, B. Sriram

    2014-04-15

    The  t–J  model is studied using a novel and rigorous mapping of the Gutzwiller projected electrons, in terms of canonical electrons. The mapping has considerable similarity to the Dyson–Maleev transformation relating spin operators to canonical Bosons. This representation gives rise to a non Hermitian quantum theory, characterized by minimal redundancies. A path integral representation of the canonical theory is given. Using it, the salient results of the extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory, including the previously found Schwinger equations of motion, are easily rederived. Further, a transparent physical interpretation of the previously introduced auxiliary Greens function and the ‘caparison factor’, is obtained. The low energy electron spectral function in this theory, with a strong intrinsic asymmetry, is summarized in terms of a few expansion coefficients. These include an important emergent energy scale Δ{sub 0} that shrinks to zero on approaching the insulating state, thereby making it difficult to access the underlying very low energy Fermi liquid behavior. The scaled low frequency ECFL spectral function, related simply to the Fano line shape, has a peculiar energy dependence unlike that of a Lorentzian. The resulting energy dispersion obtained by maximization is a hybrid of a massive and a massless Dirac spectrum E{sub Q}{sup ∗}∼γQ−√(Γ{sub 0}{sup 2}+Q{sup 2}), where the vanishing of Q, a momentum type variable, locates the kink minimum. Therefore the quasiparticle velocity interpolates between (γ∓1) over a width Γ{sub 0} on the two sides of Q=0, implying a kink there that strongly resembles a prominent low energy feature seen in angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) of cuprate materials. We also propose novel ways of analyzing the ARPES data to isolate the predicted asymmetry between particle and hole excitations. -- Highlights: •Spectral function of the Extremely Correlated Fermi Liquid theory at low energy.

  5. Canonical information analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2015-03-01

    Canonical correlation analysis is an established multivariate statistical method in which correlation between linear combinations of multivariate sets of variables is maximized. In canonical information analysis introduced here, linear correlation as a measure of association between variables is replaced by the information theoretical, entropy based measure mutual information, which is a much more general measure of association. We make canonical information analysis feasible for large sample problems, including for example multispectral images, due to the use of a fast kernel density estimator for entropy estimation. Canonical information analysis is applied successfully to (1) simple simulated data to illustrate the basic idea and evaluate performance, (2) fusion of weather radar and optical geostationary satellite data in a situation with heavy precipitation, and (3) change detection in optical airborne data. The simulation study shows that canonical information analysis is as accurate as and much faster than algorithms presented in previous work, especially for large sample sizes. URL:

  6. Recovery of spectral data using weighted canonical correlation regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslahi, Niloofar; Amirshahi, Seyed Hossein; Agahian, Farnaz

    2009-05-01

    The weighted canonical correlation regression technique is employed for reconstruction of reflectance spectra of surface colors from the related XYZ tristimulus values of samples. Flexible input data based on applying certain weights to reflectance and colorimetric values of Munsell color chips has been implemented for each particular sample which belongs to Munsell or GretagMacbeth Colorchecker DC color samples. In fact, the colorimetric and spectrophotometric data of Munsell chips are selected as fundamental bases and the color difference values between the target and samples in Munsell dataset are chosen as a criterion for determination of weighting factors. The performance of the suggested method is evaluated in spectral reflectance reconstruction. The results show considerable improvements in terms of root mean square error (RMS) and goodness-of-fit coefficient (GFC) between the actual and reconstructed reflectance curves as well as CIELAB color difference values under illuminants A and TL84 for CIE1964 standard observer.

  7. Canonical Correlation Analysis on Riemannian Manifolds and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunwoo J.; Adluru, Nagesh; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Vemuri, Baba C.; Singh, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a widely used statistical technique to capture correlations between two sets of multi-variate random variables and has found a multitude of applications in computer vision, medical imaging and machine learning. The classical formulation assumes that the data live in a pair of vector spaces which makes its use in certain important scientific domains problematic. For instance, the set of symmetric positive definite matrices (SPD), rotations and probability distributions, all belong to certain curved Riemannian manifolds where vector-space operations are in general not applicable. Analyzing the space of such data via the classical versions of inference models is rather sub-optimal. But perhaps more importantly, since the algorithms do not respect the underlying geometry of the data space, it is hard to provide statistical guarantees (if any) on the results. Using the space of SPD matrices as a concrete example, this paper gives a principled generalization of the well known CCA to the Riemannian setting. Our CCA algorithm operates on the product Riemannian manifold representing SPD matrix-valued fields to identify meaningful statistical relationships on the product Riemannian manifold. As a proof of principle, we present results on an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) study where the analysis task involves identifying correlations across diffusion tensor images (DTI) and Cauchy deformation tensor fields derived from T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. PMID:25317426

  8. Target detection from dual disparate sonar platforms using canonical correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Sadjdadi, Mahmood R.; Tucker, J. Derek

    2008-04-01

    In this paper a new coherence-based feature extraction method for sonar imagery generated from two disparate sonar systems is developed. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is employed to identify coherent information from co-registered regions of interest (ROI's) that contain target activities, while at the same time extract useful coherent features from both images. The extracted features can be used for simultaneous detection and classification of target and non-target objects in the sonar images. In this study, a side-scan sonar that provides high resolution images with good target definition and a broadband sonar that generates low resolution images, but with reduced background clutter. The optimum Neyman-Pearson detector will be presented and then extended to the dual sensor platform scenarios. Test results of the proposed methods on a dual sonar imagery data set provided by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Panama City, FL will be presented. This database contains co-registered pair of images over the same target field with varying degree of detection difficulty and bottom clutter. The effectiveness of CCA as the optimum detection tool is demonstrated in terms of probability of detection and false alarm rate.

  9. Correlation and classification of single kernel fluorescence hyperspectral data with aflatoxin concentration in corn kernels inoculated with Aspergillus flavus spores.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Hruska, Z; Kincaid, R; Brown, R; Cleveland, T; Bhatnagar, D

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between fluorescence emissions of corn kernels inoculated with Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin contamination levels within the kernels. Aflatoxin contamination in corn has been a long-standing problem plaguing the grain industry with potentially devastating consequences to corn growers. In this study, aflatoxin-contaminated corn kernels were produced through artificial inoculation of corn ears in the field with toxigenic A. flavus spores. The kernel fluorescence emission data were taken with a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system when corn kernels were excited with ultraviolet light. Raw fluorescence image data were preprocessed and regions of interest in each image were created for all kernels. The regions of interest were used to extract spectral signatures and statistical information. The aflatoxin contamination level of single corn kernels was then chemically measured using affinity column chromatography. A fluorescence peak shift phenomenon was noted among different groups of kernels with different aflatoxin contamination levels. The fluorescence peak shift was found to move more toward the longer wavelength in the blue region for the highly contaminated kernels and toward the shorter wavelengths for the clean kernels. Highly contaminated kernels were also found to have a lower fluorescence peak magnitude compared with the less contaminated kernels. It was also noted that a general negative correlation exists between measured aflatoxin and the fluorescence image bands in the blue and green regions. The correlation coefficients of determination, r(2), was 0.72 for the multiple linear regression model. The multivariate analysis of variance found that the fluorescence means of four aflatoxin groups, <1, 1-20, 20-100, and >or=100 ng g(-1) (parts per billion), were significantly different from each other at the 0.01 level of alpha. Classification accuracy under a two-class schema ranged from 0.84 to

  10. The Basic Concepts of the General Linear Model (GLM): Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) as a GLM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbell, Anne-Marie

    This paper illustrates how canonical correlation analysis can be used to implement all the parametric tests that canonical methods subsume as special cases. The point is heuristic: all analyses are correlational, apply weights to measured variables to create synthetic variables, and require the interpretation of both weights and structure…

  11. Association Study between Lead and Zinc Accumulation at Different Physiological Systems of Cattle by Canonical Correlation and Canonical Correspondence Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Partha; Das, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Seema Sarkar; Karmakar, Sougata; Mazumdar, Debasis

    2010-10-26

    Pb pollution from automobile exhausts around highways is a persistent problem in India. Pb intoxication in mammalian body is a complex phenomenon which is influence by agonistic and antagonistic interactions of several other heavy metals and micronutrients. An attempt has been made to study the association between Pb and Zn accumulation in different physiological systems of cattles (n = 200) by application of both canonical correlation and canonical correspondence analyses. Pb was estimated from plasma, liver, bone, muscle, kidney, blood and milk where as Zn was measured from all these systems except bone, blood and milk. Both statistical techniques demonstrated that there was a strong association among blood-Pb, liver-Zn, kidney-Zn and muscle-Zn. From observations, it can be assumed that Zn accumulation in cattles' muscle, liver and kidney directs Pb mobilization from those organs which in turn increases Pb pool in blood. It indicates antagonistic activity of Zn to the accumulation of Pb. Although there were some contradictions between the observations obtained from the two different statistical methods, the overall pattern of Pb accumulation in various organs as influenced by Zn were same. It is mainly due to the fact that canonical correlation is actually a special type of canonical correspondence analyses where linear relationship is followed between two groups of variables instead of Gaussian relationship.

  12. Association Study between Lead and Zinc Accumulation at Different Physiological Systems of Cattle by Canonical Correlation and Canonical Correspondence Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Partha; Das, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Seema Sarkar; Karmakar, Sougata; Mazumdar, Debasis

    2010-10-01

    Pb pollution from automobile exhausts around highways is a persistent problem in India. Pb intoxication in mammalian body is a complex phenomenon which is influence by agonistic and antagonistic interactions of several other heavy metals and micronutrients. An attempt has been made to study the association between Pb and Zn accumulation in different physiological systems of cattles (n = 200) by application of both canonical correlation and canonical correspondence analyses. Pb was estimated from plasma, liver, bone, muscle, kidney, blood and milk where as Zn was measured from all these systems except bone, blood and milk. Both statistical techniques demonstrated that there was a strong association among blood-Pb, liver-Zn, kidney-Zn and muscle-Zn. From observations, it can be assumed that Zn accumulation in cattles' muscle, liver and kidney directs Pb mobilization from those organs which in turn increases Pb pool in blood. It indicates antagonistic activity of Zn to the accumulation of Pb. Although there were some contradictions between the observations obtained from the two different statistical methods, the overall pattern of Pb accumulation in various organs as influenced by Zn were same. It is mainly due to the fact that canonical correlation is actually a special type of canonical correspondence analyses where linear relationship is followed between two groups of variables instead of Gaussian relationship.

  13. KERNEL-SMOOTHED CONDITIONAL QUANTILES OF CORRELATED BIVARIATE DISCRETE DATA

    PubMed Central

    De Gooijer, Jan G.; Yuan, Ao

    2012-01-01

    Socio-economic variables are often measured on a discrete scale or rounded to protect confidentiality. Nevertheless, when exploring the effect of a relevant covariate on the outcome distribution of a discrete response variable, virtually all common quantile regression methods require the distribution of the covariate to be continuous. This paper departs from this basic requirement by presenting an algorithm for nonparametric estimation of conditional quantiles when both the response variable and the covariate are discrete. Moreover, we allow the variables of interest to be pairwise correlated. For computational efficiency, we aggregate the data into smaller subsets by a binning operation, and make inference on the resulting prebinned data. Specifically, we propose two kernel-based binned conditional quantile estimators, one for untransformed discrete response data and one for rank-transformed response data. We establish asymptotic properties of both estimators. A practical procedure for jointly selecting band- and binwidth parameters is also presented. Simulation results show excellent estimation accuracy in terms of bias, mean squared error, and confidence interval coverage. Typically prebinning the data leads to considerable computational savings when large datasets are under study, as compared to direct (un)conditional quantile kernel estimation of multivariate data. With this in mind, we illustrate the proposed methodology with an application to a large dataset concerning US hospital patients with congestive heart failure. PMID:23667297

  14. A depression network of functionally connected regions discovered via multi-attribute canonical correlation graphs.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Bowman, F DuBois; Mayberg, Helen; Liu, Han

    2016-11-01

    To establish brain network properties associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI) data, we develop a multi-attribute graph model to construct a region-level functional connectivity network that uses all voxel level information. For each region pair, we define the strength of the connectivity as the kernel canonical correlation coefficient between voxels in the two regions; and we develop a permutation test to assess the statistical significance. We also construct a network based classifier for making predictions on the risk of MDD. We apply our method to Rs-fMRI data from 20 MDD patients and 20 healthy control subjects in the Predictors of Remission in Depression to Individual and Combined Treatments (PReDICT) study. Using this method, MDD patients can be distinguished from healthy control subjects based on significant differences in the strength of regional connectivity. We also demonstrate the performance of the proposed method using simulationstudies. PMID:27474522

  15. Creativity and Brain-Functioning in Product Development Engineers: A Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Frederick; Lagrosen, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This study used canonical correlation analysis to explore the relation among scores on the Torrance test of figural and verbal creativity and demographic, psychological and physiological measures in Swedish product-development engineers. The first canonical variate included figural and verbal flexibility and originality as dependent measures and…

  16. Characterizing nonlinear relationships in functional imaging data using eigenspace maximal information canonical correlation analysis (emiCCA).

    PubMed

    Dong, Li; Zhang, Yangsong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xingxing; Gong, Diankun; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A; Xu, Peng; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-04-01

    Many important problems in the analysis of neuroimages can be formulated as discovering the relationship between two sets of variables, a task for which linear techniques such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) have been commonly used. However, to further explore potential nonlinear processes that might co-exist with linear ones in brain function, a more flexible method is required. Here, we propose a new unsupervised and data-driven method, termed the eigenspace maximal information canonical correlation analysis (emiCCA), which is capable of automatically capturing the linear and/or nonlinear relationships between various data sets. A simulation confirmed the superior performance of emiCCA in comparison with linear CCA and kernel CCA (a nonlinear version of CCA). An emiCCA framework for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data processing was designed and applied to data from a real motor execution fMRI experiment. This analysis uncovered one linear (in primary motor cortex) and a few nonlinear networks (e.g., in the supplementary motor area, bilateral insula, and cerebellum). This suggests that these various task-related brain areas are part of networks that also contribute to the execution of movements of the hand. These results suggest that emiCCA is a promising technique for exploring various data.

  17. Registration of prone and supine CT colonography scans using correlation optimized warping and canonical correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shijun; Yao Jianhua; Liu Jiamin; Petrick, Nicholas; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), a patient will be scanned twice--Once supine and once prone--to improve the sensitivity for polyp detection. To assist radiologists in CTC reading, in this paper we propose an automated method for colon registration from supine and prone CTC scans. Methods: We propose a new colon centerline registration method for prone and supine CTC scans using correlation optimized warping (COW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based on the anatomical structure of the colon. Four anatomical salient points on the colon are first automatically distinguished. Then correlation optimized warping is applied to the segments defined by the anatomical landmarks to improve the global registration based on local correlation of segments. The COW method was modified by embedding canonical correlation analysis to allow multiple features along the colon centerline to be used in our implementation. Results: We tested the COW algorithm on a CTC data set of 39 patients with 39 polyps (19 training and 20 test cases) to verify the effectiveness of the proposed COW registration method. Experimental results on the test set show that the COW method significantly reduces the average estimation error in a polyp location between supine and prone scans by 67.6%, from 46.27{+-}52.97 to 14.98 mm{+-}11.41 mm, compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline algorithm (p<0.01). Conclusions: The proposed COW algorithm is more accurate for the colon centerline registration compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline method and the dynamic time warping method. Comparison results showed that the feature combination of z-coordinate and curvature achieved lowest registration error compared to the other feature combinations used by COW. The proposed method is tolerant to centerline errors because anatomical landmarks help prevent the propagation of errors across the entire colon centerline.

  18. Discriminative learning and recognition of image set classes using canonical correlations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyun; Kittler, Josef; Cipolla, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    We address the problem of comparing sets of images for object recognition, where the sets may represent variations in an object's appearance due to changing camera pose and lighting conditions. Canonical Correlations (also known as principal or canonical angles), which can be thought of as the angles between two d-dimensional subspaces, have recently attracted attention for image set matching. Canonical correlations offer many benefits in accuracy, efficiency, and robustness compared to the two main classical methods: parametric distribution-based and nonparametric sample-based matching of sets. Here, this is first demonstrated experimentally for reasonably sized data sets using existing methods exploiting canonical correlations. Motivated by their proven effectiveness, a novel discriminative learning method over sets is proposed for set classification. Specifically, inspired by classical Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), we develop a linear discriminant function that maximizes the canonical correlations of within-class sets and minimizes the canonical correlations of between-class sets. Image sets transformed by the discriminant function are then compared by the canonical correlations. Classical orthogonal subspace method (OSM) is also investigated for the similar purpose and compared with the proposed method. The proposed method is evaluated on various object recognition problems using face image sets with arbitrary motion captured under different illuminations and image sets of 500 general objects taken at different views. The method is also applied to object category recognition using ETH-80 database. The proposed method is shown to outperform the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy and efficiency. PMID:17431299

  19. Nonlinear Canonical Correlation Analysis with k Sets of Variables. Research Report 87-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Burg, Eeke; de Leeuw, Jan

    The multivariate technique OVERALS is introduced as a non-linear generalization of canonical correlation analysis (CCA). First, two sets CCA is introduced. Two sets CCA is a technique that computes linear combinations of sets of variables that correlate in an optimal way. Two sets CCA is then expanded to generalized (or k sets) CCA. The…

  20. Quantum Correlations of Ideal Bose and Fermi Gases in the Canonical Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Kazumasa; Kita, Takafumi

    2016-11-01

    We derive an expression for the reduced density matrices of ideal Bose and Fermi gases in the canonical ensemble, which corresponds to the Bloch-De Dominicis (or Wick's) theorem in the grand canonical ensemble for normal-ordered products of operators. Using this expression, we study one- and two-body correlations of homogeneous ideal gases with N particles. The pair distribution function g(2)(r) of fermions clearly exhibits antibunching with g(2)(0) = 0 due to the Pauli exclusion principle at all temperatures, whereas that of normal bosons shows bunching with g(2)(0) ≈ 2, corresponding to the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect. For bosons below the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature T0, an off-diagonal long-range order develops in the one-particle density matrix to reach g(1)(r) = 1 at T = 0, and the pair correlation starts to decrease towards g(2)(r) ≈ 1 at T = 0. The results for N → ∞ are seen to converge to those of the grand canonical ensemble obtained by assuming the average < hat{ψ}(r)> of the field operator hat{ψ}(r) below T0. This fact justifies the introduction of the "anomalous" average < hat{ψ}(r)> ≠ 0 below T0 in the grand canonical ensemble as a mathematical means of removing unphysical particle-number fluctuations to reproduce the canonical results in the thermodynamic limit.

  1. Generalized Approaches to the Maxbet Problem and the Maxdiff Problem, with Applications to Canonical Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    1988-01-01

    A summary and a unified treatment of fully general computational solutions for two criteria for transforming two or more matrices to maximal agreement are provided. The two criteria--Maxdiff and Maxbet--have applications in the rotation of factor loading or configuration matrices to maximal agreement and the canonical correlation problem. (SLD)

  2. Canonical Correlation Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling: What Do They Have in Common?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between structural equation modeling (SEM) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is illustrated. The representation of CCA in SEM may provide interpretive information not available from conventional CCA. Hierarchically, the relationship suggests that SEM is a more general analytic approach. (SLD)

  3. Canonical Correlational Models of Students' Perceptions of Assessment Tasks, Motivational Orientations, and Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkharusi, Hussain

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at deriving correlational models of students' perceptions of assessment tasks, motivational orientations, and learning strategies using canonical analyses. Data were collected from 198 Omani tenth grade students. Results showed that high degrees of authenticity and transparency in assessment were associated with positive…

  4. Anthropometric and demographic correlates of dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signal characteristics: a canonical correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Fady; Molfenter, Sonja M; Cliffe, Rebecca E; Chau, Tom; Steele, Catriona M

    2010-06-01

    Swallowing accelerometry has been proposed as a potential minimally invasive tool for collecting assessment information about swallowing. The first step toward using sounds and signals for dysphagia detection involves characterizing the healthy swallow. The purpose of this article is to explore systematic variations in swallowing accelerometry signals that can be attributed to demographic factors (such as participant gender and age) and anthropometric factors (such as weight and height). Data from 50 healthy participants (25 women and 25 men), ranging in age from 18 to 80 years and with approximately equal distribution across four age groups (18-35, 36-50, 51-65, 66 and older) were analyzed. Anthropometric and demographic variables of interest included participant age, gender, weight, height, body fat percent, neck circumference, and mandibular length. Dual-axis (superior-inferior and anterior-posterior) swallowing accelerometry signals were obtained for five saliva and five water swallows per participant. Several swallowing signal characteristics were derived for each swallowing task, including variance, amplitude distribution skewness, amplitude distribution kurtosis, signal memory, total signal energy, peak energy scale, and peak amplitude. Canonical correlation analysis was performed between the anthropometric/demographic variables and swallowing signal characteristics. No significant linear relationships were identified for saliva swallows or for superior-inferior axis accelerometry signals on water swallows. In the anterior-posterior axis, signal amplitude distribution kurtosis and signal memory were significantly correlated with age (r = 0.52, P = 0.047). These findings suggest that swallowing accelerometry signals may have task-specific associations with demographic (but not anthropometric) factors. Given the limited sample size, our results should be interpreted with caution and replication studies with larger sample sizes are warranted.

  5. Multiscale causal connectivity analysis by canonical correlation: theory and application to epileptic brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo Rong; Chen, Fuyong; Kang, Dezhi; Zhang, Xiangyang; Marinazzo, Daniele; Chen, Huafu

    2011-11-01

    Multivariate Granger causality is a well-established approach for inferring information flow in complex systems, and it is being increasingly applied to map brain connectivity. Traditional Granger causality is based on vector autoregressive (AR) or mixed autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model, which are potentially affected by errors in parameter estimation and may be contaminated by zero-lag correlation, notably when modeling neuroimaging data. To overcome this issue, we present here an extended canonical correlation approach to measure multivariate Granger causal interactions among time series. The procedure includes a reduced rank step for calculating canonical correlation analysis (CCA), and extends the definition of causality including instantaneous effects, thus avoiding the potential estimation problems of AR (or ARMA) models. We tested this approach on simulated data and confirmed its practical utility by exploring local network connectivity at different scales in the epileptic brain analyzing scalp and depth-EEG data during an interictal period. PMID:21788178

  6. A canonical correlation analysis based method for contamination event detection in water sources.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruonan; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Che, Han

    2016-06-15

    In this study, a general framework integrating a data-driven estimation model is employed for contamination event detection in water sources. Sequential canonical correlation coefficients are updated in the model using multivariate water quality time series. The proposed method utilizes canonical correlation analysis for studying the interplay between two sets of water quality parameters. The model is assessed by precision, recall and F-measure. The proposed method is tested using data from a laboratory contaminant injection experiment. The proposed method could detect a contamination event 1 minute after the introduction of 1.600 mg l(-1) acrylamide solution. With optimized parameter values, the proposed method can correctly detect 97.50% of all contamination events with no false alarms. The robustness of the proposed method can be explained using the Bauer-Fike theorem. PMID:27264637

  7. Getting full control of canonical correlation analysis with the AutoBiplot.CCA function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. Rui

    2016-06-01

    Function AutoBiplot.CCA was built in R language. Given two multivariate data sets, this function carries out a conventional canonical correlation analysis, followed by the automatic production of predictive biplots based on the accuracy of readings as assessed by a mean standard predictive error and a user defined tolerance value. As the user's intervention is mainly restricted to the choice of the magnitude of the t.axis value, common misinterpretations, overestimations and adjustments between outputs and personal beliefs are avoided.

  8. Relationship between organisational commitment and burnout syndrome: a canonical correlation approach.

    PubMed

    Enginyurt, Ozgur; Cankaya, Soner; Aksay, Kadir; Tunc, Taner; Koc, Bozkurt; Bas, Orhan; Ozer, Erdal

    2016-04-01

    Objective Burnout syndrome can significantly reduce the performance of health workers. Although many factors have been identified as antecedents of burnout, few studies have investigated the role of organisational commitment in its development. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships between subdimensions of burnout syndrome (emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment) and subdimensions of organisational commitment (affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment). Methods The present study was a cross-sectional survey of physicians and other healthcare employees working in the Ministry of Health Ordu University Education and Research Hospital. The sample consisted of 486 healthcare workers. Data were collected using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Organisation Commitment Scale, and were analysed using the canonical correlation approach. Results The first of three canonical correlation coefficients between pairs of canonical variables (Ui , burnout syndrome and Vi, organisational commitment) was found to be statistically significant. Emotional exhaustion was found to contribute most towards the explanatory capacity of canonical variables estimated from the subdimensions of burnout syndrome, whereas affective commitment provided the largest contribution towards the explanatory capacity of canonical variables estimated from the subdimensions of organisational commitment. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that affective commitment is the primary determinant of burnout syndrome in healthcare professionals. What is known about the topic? Organisational commitment and burnout syndrome are the most important criteria in predicting health workforce performance. An increasing number of studies in recent years have clearly indicated the field's continued relevance and importance. Conversely, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a technique for describing the relationship

  9. Optimization of Correlation Kernel Size for Accurate Estimation of Myocardial Contraction and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    For noninvasive and quantitative measurements of global two-dimensional (2D) heart wall motion, speckle tracking methods have been developed and applied. In these conventional methods, the frame rate is limited to about 200 Hz, corresponding to the sampling period of 5 ms. However, myocardial function during short periods, as obtained by these conventional speckle tracking methods, remains unclear owing to low temporal and spatial resolutions of these methods. Moreover, an important parameter, the optimal kernel size, has not been thoroughly investigated. In our previous study, the optimal kernel size was determined in a phantom experiment under a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the determined optimal kernel size was applied to the in vivo measurement of 2D displacements of the heart wall by block matching using normalized cross-correlation between RF echoes at a high frame rate of 860 Hz, corresponding to a temporal resolution of 1.1 ms. However, estimations under low SNRs and the effects of the difference in echo characteristics, i.e., specular reflection and speckle-like echoes, have not been considered, and the evaluation of accuracy in the estimation of the strain rate is still insufficient. In this study, the optimal kernel sizes were determined in a phantom experiment under several SNRs and, then, the myocardial strain rate was estimated such that the myocardial function can be measured at a high frame rate. In a basic experiment, the optimal kernel sizes at depths of 20, 40, 60, and 80 mm yielded similar results: in particular, SNR was more than 15 dB. Moreover, it was found that the kernel size at the boundary must be set larger than that at the inside. The optimal sizes of the correlation kernel were seven times and four times the size of the point spread function around the boundary and inside the silicone rubber, respectively. To compare the optimal kernel sizes, which was determined in a phantom experiment, with other sizes, the radial strain

  10. Canonical correlation analysis of synchronous neural interactions and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Lewis, Scott M.; Riley McCarten, J.; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Hemmy, Laura S.; McPherson, Susan E.; Rottunda, Susan J.; Rubins, David M.; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2012-10-01

    In previous work (Georgopoulos et al 2007 J. Neural Eng. 4 349-55) we reported on the use of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) synchronous neural interactions (SNI) as a functional biomarker in Alzheimer's dementia (AD) diagnosis. Here we report on the application of canonical correlation analysis to investigate the relations between SNI and cognitive neuropsychological (NP) domains in AD patients. First, we performed individual correlations between each SNI and each NP, which provided an initial link between SNI and specific cognitive tests. Next, we performed factor analysis on each set, followed by a canonical correlation analysis between the derived SNI and NP factors. This last analysis optimally associated the entire MEG signal with cognitive function. The results revealed that SNI as a whole were mostly associated with memory and language, and, slightly less, executive function, processing speed and visuospatial abilities, thus differentiating functions subserved by the frontoparietal and the temporal cortices. These findings provide a direct interpretation of the information carried by the SNI and set the basis for identifying specific neural disease phenotypes according to cognitive deficits.

  11. DISCOVERY OF A TIGHT CORRELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH 'CANONICAL' LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michal; Willingale, Richard; Capozziello, Salvatore; Cardone, Vincenzo Fabrizio E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.p E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.i

    2010-10-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts z>8 are fascinating objects to study due to their still unexplained relativistic outburst mechanisms and their possible use to test cosmological models. Our analysis of 77 GRB afterglows with known redshifts revealed a physical subsample of long GRBs with the canonical plateau breaking to power-law light curves with a significant luminosity L*{sub X}-break time T*{sub a} correlation in the GRB rest frame. This subsample forms approximately the upper envelope of the studied distribution. We have also found a similar relation for a small sample of GRB afterglows that belong to the intermediate class between the short and the long ones. It proves that within the full sample of afterglows there exist physical subclasses revealed here by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. The afterglows with regular ('canonical') light curves obey not only the mentioned tight physical scaling, but-for a given T*{sub a}-the more regular progenitor explosions lead to preferentially brighter afterglows.

  12. Comparison of JADE and canonical correlation analysis for ECG de-noising.

    PubMed

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Kremen, Vaclav; Lhotska, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores differences between two methods for blind source separation within frame of ECG de-noising. First method is joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices, which is based on estimation of fourth order cross-cummulant tensor and its diagonalization. Second one is the statistical method known as canonical correlation analysis, which is based on estimation of correlation matrices between two multidimensional variables. Both methods were used within method, which combines the blind source separation algorithm with decision tree. The evaluation was made on large database of 382 long-term ECG signals and the results were examined. Biggest difference was found in results of 50 Hz power line interference where the CCA algorithm completely failed. Thus main power of CCA lies in estimation of unstructured noise within ECG. JADE algorithm has larger computational complexity thus the CCA perfomed faster when estimating the components.

  13. Comparison of JADE and canonical correlation analysis for ECG de-noising.

    PubMed

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Kremen, Vaclav; Lhotska, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores differences between two methods for blind source separation within frame of ECG de-noising. First method is joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices, which is based on estimation of fourth order cross-cummulant tensor and its diagonalization. Second one is the statistical method known as canonical correlation analysis, which is based on estimation of correlation matrices between two multidimensional variables. Both methods were used within method, which combines the blind source separation algorithm with decision tree. The evaluation was made on large database of 382 long-term ECG signals and the results were examined. Biggest difference was found in results of 50 Hz power line interference where the CCA algorithm completely failed. Thus main power of CCA lies in estimation of unstructured noise within ECG. JADE algorithm has larger computational complexity thus the CCA perfomed faster when estimating the components. PMID:25570833

  14. CANONICAL CORRELATION ANALYSIS BETWEEN TIME SERIES AND STATIC OUTCOMES, WITH APPLICATION TO THE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY.

    PubMed

    Krafty, Robert T; Hall, Martica

    2013-03-01

    Although many studies collect biomedical time series signals from multiple subjects, there is a dearth of models and methods for assessing the association between frequency domain properties of time series and other study outcomes. This article introduces the random Cramér representation as a joint model for collections of time series and static outcomes where power spectra are random functions that are correlated with the outcomes. A canonical correlation analysis between cepstral coefficients and static outcomes is developed to provide a flexible yet interpretable measure of association. Estimates of the canonical correlations and weight functions are obtained from a canonical correlation analysis between the static outcomes and maximum Whittle likelihood estimates of truncated cepstral coefficients. The proposed methodology is used to analyze the association between the spectrum of heart rate variability and measures of sleep duration and fragmentation in a study of older adults who serve as the primary caregiver for their ill spouse.

  15. CANONICAL CORRELATION ANALYSIS BETWEEN TIME SERIES AND STATIC OUTCOMES, WITH APPLICATION TO THE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY.

    PubMed

    Krafty, Robert T; Hall, Martica

    2013-03-01

    Although many studies collect biomedical time series signals from multiple subjects, there is a dearth of models and methods for assessing the association between frequency domain properties of time series and other study outcomes. This article introduces the random Cramér representation as a joint model for collections of time series and static outcomes where power spectra are random functions that are correlated with the outcomes. A canonical correlation analysis between cepstral coefficients and static outcomes is developed to provide a flexible yet interpretable measure of association. Estimates of the canonical correlations and weight functions are obtained from a canonical correlation analysis between the static outcomes and maximum Whittle likelihood estimates of truncated cepstral coefficients. The proposed methodology is used to analyze the association between the spectrum of heart rate variability and measures of sleep duration and fragmentation in a study of older adults who serve as the primary caregiver for their ill spouse. PMID:24851143

  16. Personal incentives for exercise and body esteem: a canonical correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Finkenberg, M E; Dinucci, J M; McCune, S L; McCune, E D

    1994-12-01

    Two hundred twelve women and 93 men enrolled in physical education courses were administered the Personal Incentives for Exercise Questionnaire and the Body Esteem Scale. Canonical correlation was conducted. For women, it was determined that personal incentives for exercise have modest predictive power for the weight concern and physical conditioning dimensions of body esteem and very little predictive power for the sexual attractiveness dimension; the body esteem variates have slight predictive power for the competition and weight management dimensions of investment in exercise. For men, it was determined that personal incentives for exercise have modest predictive power for the physical conditioning dimension of body esteem, slight predictive power for physical attractiveness, and none for upper body strength; the body esteem variate has modest predictive power for the weight management dimension of incentives for exercise and slight predictive power for appearance and affiliation. PMID:7643586

  17. GN-SCCA: GraphNet based Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis for Brain Imaging Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Yan, Jingwen; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Huang, Heng; Inlow, Mark; Moore, Jason H.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Identifying associations between genetic variants and neuroimaging quantitative traits (QTs) is a popular research topic in brain imaging genetics. Sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) has been widely used to reveal complex multi-SNP-multi-QT associations. Several SCCA methods explicitly incorporate prior knowledge into the model and intend to uncover the hidden structure informed by the prior knowledge. We propose a novel structured SCCA method using Graph constrained Elastic-Net (GraphNet) regularizer to not only discover important associations, but also induce smoothness between coefficients that are adjacent in the graph. In addition, the proposed method incorporates the covariance structure information usually ignored by most SCCA methods. Experiments on simulated and real imaging genetic data show that, the proposed method not only outperforms a widely used SCCA method but also yields an easy-to-interpret biological findings. PMID:26636135

  18. Fatty acids in serum and diet--a canonical correlation analysis among toddlers.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Liisa; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Salminen, Irma; Ovaskainen, Marja-Leena; Kronberg-Kippilä, Carina; Ahonen, Suvi; Niinistö, Sari; Alfthan, Georg; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2013-07-01

    Fatty acid concentrations in blood are potential biomarkers of dietary fat intake, but methodological studies among children are scarce. The large number of fatty acids and their complex interrelationships pose a special challenge in research on fatty acids. Our target was to assess the interrelationships between the total fatty acid profiles in diet and serum of young children. The study subjects were healthy control children from the birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. A 3-day food record and a frozen serum sample were available from 135 children at the age of 1 year, from 133 at 2 years, and from 92 at 3 years. The relationship between dietary and serum fatty acid profiles was analysed using canonical correlation analysis. The consumption of fatty milk correlated positively with serum fatty acids, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) at all ages. Correlations between dietary and serum eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acid were observed at 2 and 3 years of age. Serum linoleic acid was positively associated with the consumption of infant formula at the age of 1 year, and with the consumption of vegetable margarine at 2 and 3 years. The results indicate a high quality of the 3-day food records kept by parents and other caretakers of the children, and suitability of non-fasting, un-fractioned serum samples for total fatty acid analyses. The correlation between intake of milk fat and serum proportion of CLA is a novel finding. PMID:22066932

  19. Non-adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel for the non-equilibrium response of three-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shree Ram; Baral, Nisha; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Rahman, Talat S.

    2015-03-01

    We apply Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT) to calculate the non-adiabatic (frequency-dependent) exchange-correlation kernel for the three-dimensional Hubbard model. We analyze the dependence of the kernel on the electron doping, local Coulomb repulsion and frequency by using three different impurity solvers: Hubbard-I, Iterative Perturbation Theory (IPT) and Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC). From the calculated data, we obtain approximate analytical expressions for the kernel. We apply the exact numerical and analytical kernels to study the non-equilibrium response of the system for applied ultrafast laser pulse. We demonstrate that the non-adiabaticity of the kernel plays an important role in the system response; in particular, leading to new excited-states involved in the system dynamics. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  20. Canonical correlation analysis for assessing the performance of adaptive spectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Paskalova, Biliana; Tyo, J. Scott; Hayat, M. M.

    2005-06-01

    A new class of spectrally adaptive infrared detectors has been reported recently that has a spectral response function that can be altered electronically by controlling the bias voltage of the photodetector. Unlike conventional sensors, these new sensors have ``bands'' that have highly correlated spectral responses. The potential benefit of these sensors is that the number of bands (and their spectral features) used can be adapted to a specific task. The drawback is that there might not be enough spectral diversity to perform detection and classification operations. In this paper we present a new theory that describes the suitability of an arbitrary spectral sensor to perform a specific spectral detection/classification task. This theory is based on the geometric relationships between the sensor space that describes the spectral characteristics of the detector and a scene space that contains the spectra to be observed. We adapt the theory of canonical correlation analysis to provide a rigorous framework for assessing the utility of spectral detectors. We also show that this general theory encompasses traditional band selection methods, but provides much greater flexibility and a more transparent and intuitive explanation of the phenomenology.

  1. A Study on the Oral Disfluencies Developmental Traits of EFL Students--A Report Based on Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Ying; Du, Wanyi

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces 9 non-English major EFL students and collects their oral productions in 4 successive oral exams in 2 years. The canonical correlation analysis approach of SPSS is adopted to study the disfluencies developmental traits under the influence of language acquisition development. We find that as language acquisition develops, the total…

  2. Use of the Multinomial Jackknife and Bootstrap in Generalized Nonlinear Canonical Correlation Analysis. Research Report 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Burg, Eeke; de Leeuw, Jan

    The estimation of mean and standard errors of the eigenvalues and category quantifications in generalized non-linear canonical correlation analysis (OVERALS) is discussed. Starting points are the delta method equations. The jackknife and bootstrap methods are compared for providing finite difference approximations to the derivatives. Examining the…

  3. Discriminative Learning for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis via Canonical Correlation Analysis and Multimodal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Baiying; Chen, Siping; Ni, Dong; Wang, Tianfu

    2016-01-01

    To address the challenging task of diagnosing neurodegenerative brain disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), we propose a novel method using discriminative feature learning and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) in this paper. Specifically, multimodal features and their CCA projections are concatenated together to represent each subject, and hence both individual and shared information of AD disease are captured. A discriminative learning with multilayer feature hierarchy is designed to further improve performance. Also, hybrid representation is proposed to maximally explore data from multiple modalities. A novel normalization method is devised to tackle the intra- and inter-subject variations from the multimodal data. Based on our extensive experiments, our method achieves an accuracy of 96.93% [AD vs. normal control (NC)], 86.57 % (MCI vs. NC), and 82.75% [MCI converter (MCI-C) vs. MCI non-converter (MCI-NC)], respectively, which outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in the literature. PMID:27242506

  4. Estimating multivariate similarity between neuroimaging datasets with sparse canonical correlation analysis: an application to perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Maria J.; Mehta, Mitul A.; Pich, Emilio M.; Risterucci, Celine; Zelaya, Fernando; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Williams, Steve C. R.; Dazzan, Paola; Doyle, Orla M.; Marquand, Andre F.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of neuroimaging studies are based on either combining more than one data modality (inter-modal) or combining more than one measurement from the same modality (intra-modal). To date, most intra-modal studies using multivariate statistics have focused on differences between datasets, for instance relying on classifiers to differentiate between effects in the data. However, to fully characterize these effects, multivariate methods able to measure similarities between datasets are needed. One classical technique for estimating the relationship between two datasets is canonical correlation analysis (CCA). However, in the context of high-dimensional data the application of CCA is extremely challenging. A recent extension of CCA, sparse CCA (SCCA), overcomes this limitation, by regularizing the model parameters while yielding a sparse solution. In this work, we modify SCCA with the aim of facilitating its application to high-dimensional neuroimaging data and finding meaningful multivariate image-to-image correspondences in intra-modal studies. In particular, we show how the optimal subset of variables can be estimated independently and we look at the information encoded in more than one set of SCCA transformations. We illustrate our framework using Arterial Spin Labeling data to investigate multivariate similarities between the effects of two antipsychotic drugs on cerebral blood flow. PMID:26528117

  5. Estimating multivariate similarity between neuroimaging datasets with sparse canonical correlation analysis: an application to perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria J; Mehta, Mitul A; Pich, Emilio M; Risterucci, Celine; Zelaya, Fernando; Reinders, Antje A T S; Williams, Steve C R; Dazzan, Paola; Doyle, Orla M; Marquand, Andre F

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of neuroimaging studies are based on either combining more than one data modality (inter-modal) or combining more than one measurement from the same modality (intra-modal). To date, most intra-modal studies using multivariate statistics have focused on differences between datasets, for instance relying on classifiers to differentiate between effects in the data. However, to fully characterize these effects, multivariate methods able to measure similarities between datasets are needed. One classical technique for estimating the relationship between two datasets is canonical correlation analysis (CCA). However, in the context of high-dimensional data the application of CCA is extremely challenging. A recent extension of CCA, sparse CCA (SCCA), overcomes this limitation, by regularizing the model parameters while yielding a sparse solution. In this work, we modify SCCA with the aim of facilitating its application to high-dimensional neuroimaging data and finding meaningful multivariate image-to-image correspondences in intra-modal studies. In particular, we show how the optimal subset of variables can be estimated independently and we look at the information encoded in more than one set of SCCA transformations. We illustrate our framework using Arterial Spin Labeling data to investigate multivariate similarities between the effects of two antipsychotic drugs on cerebral blood flow. PMID:26528117

  6. Removal of the ballistocardiographic artifact from EEG-fMRI data: a canonical correlation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assecondi, Sara; Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Bianchi, Anna M; Huiskamp, Geertjan M; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-03-01

    The simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can give new insights into how the brain functions. However, the strong electromagnetic field of the MR scanner generates artifacts that obscure the EEG and diminish its readability. Among them, the ballistocardiographic artifact (BCGa) that appears on the EEG is believed to be related to blood flow in scalp arteries leading to electrode movements. Average artifact subtraction (AAS) techniques, used to remove the BCGa, assume a deterministic nature of the artifact. This assumption may be too strong, considering the blood flow related nature of the phenomenon. In this work we propose a new method, based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and blind source separation (BSS) techniques, to reduce the BCGa from simultaneously recorded EEG-fMRI. We optimized the method to reduce the user's interaction to a minimum. When tested on six subjects, recorded in 1.5 T or 3 T, the average artifact extracted with BSS-CCA and AAS did not show significant differences, proving the absence of systematic errors. On the other hand, when compared on the basis of intra-subject variability, we found significant differences and better performance of the proposed method with respect to AAS. We demonstrated that our method deals with the intrinsic subject variability specific to the artifact that may cause averaging techniques to fail.

  7. Empirical sensitivity kernels of noise correlations with respect to virtual sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, P.; Stehly, L.; Nakata, N.; Beroza, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-correlation of time-series, or interferometry, applied to the ambient seismic field is an established method to observe the propagation of waves between pairs of sensors without involving transient sources. These reconstructed waves are routinely used to develop high-resolution images of the crust and upper mantle, or in mapping the time-dependent velocity changes associated with tectonic events. Using similar methods, recent work have highlighted more challenging observations, such as higher mode surface wave propagation and body wave reconstruction at various scales of the Earth: from the industrial surveys at the reservoir scale to the global scale. Furthermore, the reconstruction of the correct amplitude information can be used to image the anelastic attenuation of the medium and has led to a new type of ground motion prediction using virtual earthquakes method. The dependability of such amplitude retrieval had been debated and represents a difficult challenge due to uneven source distribution. In this study, we discuss the possibility to use the correlation of ambient noise correlation (similar to C3 method) to map the contribution of different source locations for Rayleigh wave reconstruction between receiver pairs. These maps constructed in terms of traveltime or amplitude perturbations of the Green's function, can be considered as empirical sensitivity kernels with respect to the contribution of each virtual source. We propose for the first time to map these kernels using a dataset of continuous records from a dense array of about 2600 sensors deployed at the local-scale in Long Beach (CA, USA). Finally, these maps are used to analyze the impact of the original ambient noise directivity on the recovered Green's functions and discuss the effects of the velocity lateral heterogeneity within the array. We aim at understanding, and thereby reducing, the bias in ambient field measurements.

  8. A Canonical Correlation Analysis of AIDS Restriction Genes and Metabolic Pathways Identifies Purine Metabolism as a Key Cooperator

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanhui; Yuan, Jinjin; Wang, Zhengwu; Huang, Aiqiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Han, Xiao; Chen, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus causes a severe disease in humans, referred to as immune deficiency syndrome. Studies on the interaction between host genetic factors and the virus have revealed dozens of genes that impact diverse processes in the AIDS disease. To resolve more genetic factors related to AIDS, a canonical correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between AIDS restriction and metabolic pathway gene expression. The results show that HIV-1 postentry cellular viral cofactors from AIDS restriction genes are coexpressed in human transcriptome microarray datasets. Further, the purine metabolism pathway comprises novel host factors that are coexpressed with AIDS restriction genes. Using a canonical correlation analysis for expression is a reliable approach to exploring the mechanism underlying AIDS. PMID:27462363

  9. Robust low dimensional kernel correlation feature spaces that generalize to unseen datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiantun, Ramzi; Savvides, Marios; Vijayakumar, B. V. K.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the subspace generalization power of the kernel correlation feature analysis (KCFA) method for extracting a low dimensional subspace that has the ability to represent new unseen datasets. Examining the portability of this algorithm across different datasets is an important practical aspect of real-world face recognition applications where the technology cannot be dataset-dependant. In most face recognition literature, algorithms are demonstrated on datasets by training on one portion of the dataset and testing on the remainder. Generally, the testing subjects' dataset partially or totally overlap the training subjects' dataset however with disjoint images captured from different sessions. Thus, some of the expected facial variations and the people's faces are modeled in the training set. In this paper we describe how we efficiently build a compact feature subspace using kernel correlation filter analysis on the generic training set of the FRGC dataset and use that basis for recognition on a different dataset. The KCFA feature subspace has a total dimension that corresponds to the number of training subjects; we chose to vary this number to include up to all of 222 available in the FRGC generic dataset. We test the built subspace produced by KCFA by projecting other well-known face datasets upon it. We show that this feature subspace has good representation and discrimination to unseen datasets and produces good verification and identification rates compared to other subspace and dimensionality reduction methods such as PCA (when trained on the same FRGC generic dataset). Its efficiency, lower dimensionality and discriminative power make it more practical and powerful than PCA as a robust lower dimensionality reduction method for modeling faces and facial variations.

  10. Insights into the spurious long-range nature of local r-dependent non-local exchange-correlation kernels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Deyu

    2016-08-01

    A systematic route to go beyond the exact exchange plus random phase approximation (RPA) is to include a physical exchange-correlation kernel in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In the previous study [D. Lu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A520 (2014)], we found that non-local kernels with a screening length depending on the local Wigner-Seitz radius, rs(r), suffer an error associated with a spurious long-range repulsion in van der Waals bounded systems, which deteriorates the binding energy curve as compared to RPA. We analyze the source of the error and propose to replace rs(r) by a global, average rs in the kernel. Exemplary studies with the Corradini, del Sole, Onida, and Palummo kernel show that while this change does not affect the already outstanding performance in crystalline solids, using an average rs significantly reduces the spurious long-range tail in the exchange-correlation kernel in van der Waals bounded systems. When this method is combined with further corrections using local dielectric response theory, the binding energy of the Kr dimer is improved three times as compared to RPA. PMID:27497553

  11. Insights into the spurious long-range nature of local rs-dependent non-local exchange-correlation kernels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Deyu

    2016-08-05

    A systematic route to go beyond the exact exchange plus random phase approximation (RPA) is to include a physical exchange-correlation kernel in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Previously, [D. Lu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A520 (2014)], we found that non-local kernels with a screening length depending on the local Wigner-Seitz radius, rs(r), suffer an error associated with a spurious long-range repulsion in van der Waals bounded systems, which deteriorates the binding energy curve as compared to RPA. Here, we analyze the source of the error and propose to replace rs(r) by a global, average rs in the kernel. Exemplary studies withmore » the Corradini, del Sole, Onida, and Palummo kernel show that while this change does not affect the already outstanding performance in crystalline solids, using an average rs significantly reduces the spurious long-range tail in the exchange-correlation kernel in van der Waals bounded systems. Finally, when this method is combined with further corrections using local dielectric response theory, the binding energy of the Kr dimer is improved three times as compared to RPA.« less

  12. Insights into the spurious long-range nature of local rs-dependent non-local exchange-correlation kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu

    2016-08-01

    A systematic route to go beyond the exact exchange plus random phase approximation (RPA) is to include a physical exchange-correlation kernel in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In the previous study [D. Lu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A520 (2014)], we found that non-local kernels with a screening length depending on the local Wigner-Seitz radius, rs(r), suffer an error associated with a spurious long-range repulsion in van der Waals bounded systems, which deteriorates the binding energy curve as compared to RPA. We analyze the source of the error and propose to replace rs(r) by a global, average rs in the kernel. Exemplary studies with the Corradini, del Sole, Onida, and Palummo kernel show that while this change does not affect the already outstanding performance in crystalline solids, using an average rs significantly reduces the spurious long-range tail in the exchange-correlation kernel in van der Waals bounded systems. When this method is combined with further corrections using local dielectric response theory, the binding energy of the Kr dimer is improved three times as compared to RPA.

  13. Kernel Feature Cross-Correlation for Unsupervised Quantification of Damage from Windthrow in Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirotti, F.; Travaglini, D.; Giannetti, F.; Kutchartt, E.; Bottalico, F.; Chirici, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this study estimation of tree damage from a windthrow event using feature detection on RGB high resolution imagery is assessed. An accurate quantitative assessment of the damage in terms of volume is important and can be done by ground sampling, which is notably expensive and time-consuming, or by manual interpretation and analyses of aerial images. This latter manual method also requires an expert operator investing time to manually detect damaged trees and apply relation functions between measures and volume which are also error-prone. In the proposed method RGB images with 0.2 m ground sample distance are analysed using an adaptive template matching method. Ten images corresponding to ten separate study areas are tested. A 13x13 pixels kernel with a simplified linear-feature representation of a cylinder is applied at different rotation angles (from 0° to 170° at 10° steps). The higher values of the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) of all angles are recorded for each pixel for each image. Several features are tested: percentiles (75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, max) and sum and number of pixels with NCC above 0.55. Three regression methods are tested, multiple regression (mr), support vector machines (svm) with linear kernel and random forests. The first two methods gave the best results. The ground-truth was acquired by ground sampling, and total volumes of damaged trees are estimated for each of the 10 areas. Damaged volumes in the ten areas range from ~1.8 x102 m3 to ~1.2x104 m3. Regression results show that smv regression method over the sum gives an R-squared of 0.92, a mean of absolute errors (MAE) of 255 m3 and a relative absolute error (RAE) of 34% using leave-one-out cross validation from the 10 observations. These initial results are encouraging and support further investigations on more finely tuned kernel template metrics to define an unsupervised image analysis process to automatically assess forest damage from windthrow.

  14. Bill colour and correlates of male quality in blackbirds: an analysis using canonical ordination.

    PubMed

    Bright, A; Waas, J R; King, C M; Cuming, P D

    2004-02-27

    Carotenoid-dependent plumage displays are widely assumed to be honest indicators of individual health or quality, which are used as cues during mate choice and/or agonistic signalling. Despite the fact that red, yellow and orange pigmentation of bills is common, and also variable between individuals, comparatively little is known about bill colouration as a condition-dependent trait. Furthermore, many studies of avian colouration are confounded by the lack of objective colour quantification and the use of overly simplistic univariate techniques for analysis of the relationship between the condition-dependent trait and individual quality variables. In this study, we correlated male blackbird bill colour (a likely carotenoid-dependent sexually selected trait) with body/condition variables that reflect male quality. We measured bill colour using photometric techniques, thus ensuring objectivity. The data were analysed using the multivariate statistical techniques of canonical ordination. Analyses based on reflectance spectra of male blackbird bill samples and colour components (i.e. hue, chroma and brightness) derived from the reflectance spectra were very similar. Analysing the entire reflectance spectra of blackbird bill samples with Redundancy Analysis (RDA) allowed examination of individual wavelengths and their specific associations with the body/condition variables. However, hue, chroma and brightness values also provided useful information to explain colour variation, and the two approaches may be complimentary. We did not find any significant associations between male blackbird bill colour and percent incidence of ectoparasites or cloaca size. However, both the colour component and full spectral analyses showed that culmen length explained a significant amount of variation in male blackbird bill colour. Culmen length was positively associated with greater reflectance from the bill samples at longer wavelengths and a higher hue value (i.e. more orange

  15. Supervised multi-view canonical correlation analysis: fused multimodal prediction of disease diagnosis and prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singanamalli, Asha; Wang, Haibo; Lee, George; Shih, Natalie; Rosen, Mark; Master, Stephen; Tomaszewski, John; Feldman, Michael; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    While the plethora of information from multiple imaging and non-imaging data streams presents an opportunity for discovery of fused multimodal, multiscale biomarkers, they also introduce multiple independent sources of noise that hinder their collective utility. The goal of this work is to create fused predictors of disease diagnosis and prognosis by combining multiple data streams, which we hypothesize will provide improved performance as compared to predictors from individual data streams. To achieve this goal, we introduce supervised multiview canonical correlation analysis (sMVCCA), a novel data fusion method that attempts to find a common representation for multiscale, multimodal data where class separation is maximized while noise is minimized. In doing so, sMVCCA assumes that the different sources of information are complementary and thereby act synergistically when combined. Although this method can be applied to any number of modalities and to any disease domain, we demonstrate its utility using three datasets. We fuse (i) 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features with cerbrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic measurements for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (n = 30), (ii) 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI and T2w MRI for in vivo prediction of prostate cancer grade on a per slice basis (n = 33) and (iii) quantitative histomorphometric features of glands and proteomic measurements from mass spectrometry for prediction of 5 year biochemical recurrence postradical prostatectomy (n = 40). Random Forest classifier applied to the sMVCCA fused subspace, as compared to that of MVCCA, PCA and LDA, yielded the highest classification AUC of 0.82 +/- 0.05, 0.76 +/- 0.01, 0.70 +/- 0.07, respectively for the aforementioned datasets. In addition, sMVCCA fused subspace provided 13.6%, 7.6% and 15.3% increase in AUC as compared with that of the best performing individual view in each of the three datasets, respectively. For the biochemical recurrence

  16. The Relationship Between Procrastination, Learning Strategies and Statistics Anxiety Among Iranian College Students: A Canonical Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Shahrum; Farrokhi, Farahman; Gahramani, Farahnaz; Issazadegan, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Approximately 66-80%of graduate students experience statistics anxiety and some researchers propose that many students identify statistics courses as the most anxiety-inducing courses in their academic curriculums. As such, it is likely that statistics anxiety is, in part, responsible for many students delaying enrollment in these courses for as long as possible. This paper proposes a canonical model by treating academic procrastination (AP), learning strategies (LS) as predictor variables and statistics anxiety (SA) as explained variables. Methods: A questionnaire survey was used for data collection and 246-college female student participated in this study. To examine the mutually independent relations between procrastination, learning strategies and statistics anxiety variables, a canonical correlation analysis was computed. Results: Findings show that two canonical functions were statistically significant. The set of variables (metacognitive self-regulation, source management, preparing homework, preparing for test and preparing term papers) helped predict changes of statistics anxiety with respect to fearful behavior, Attitude towards math and class, Performance, but not Anxiety. Conclusion: These findings could be used in educational and psychological interventions in the context of statistics anxiety reduction. PMID:24644468

  17. Life skills and subjective well-being of people with disabilities: a canonical correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cardoso, Elizabeth; Blalock, Kacie; Allen, Chase A; Chan, Fong; Rubin, Stanford E

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the canonical relationships between a set of life skill variables and a set of subjective well-being variables among a national sample of vocational rehabilitation clients in the USA. Self-direction, work tolerance, general employability, and self-care were related to physical, family and social, and financial well-being. This analysis also found that communication skill is related to family and social well-being, while psychological well-being is not related to any life skills in the set. The results showed that vocational rehabilitation services aimed to improve life functioning will lead to an improvement in subjective quality of life.

  18. [Effect of processing on the chemical contents and hepatic and renal toxicity of rhubarb studied by canonical correlation analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Bo; Ma, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ping; Jin, Cheng; Sun, Yu-Qi; Xiao, Xiao-He; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Zhou, Can-Ping

    2009-08-01

    In this article, canonical correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the toxicity-attenuating effect and the variation of chemical contents in rhubarb caused by processing. With quasi-acute toxicity test, the difference of hepatic and renal toxicity to mice with the processed materials of rhubarb was researched. The chemical contents of anthraquinones and tannins in rhubarb were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that there were toxic effects to liver and kidney in mice after repeated intragastric administration of rhubarb and its processed materials for 14 days at a dosage of 76 g x kg(-1). The toxic effect of processed materials was much lower than crude drug. With canonical correlation analysis, the sequence of the hepatic and renal toxicity of chemical contents in rhubarb were found as follows: total anthraquinone glycosides (AQGs) > tannins (Tns) > total anthraquinones (AQs); aloe-emodin (AE) > physcione (Ph) > rhein (Rn) > emodin (Ed) > chrysophanol (Ch) and AEG > PhG > ChG > EdG > RnG of glycosyl-anthraquinone. It could be concluded that processing would attenuate the toxicity of crude drug of rhubarb. The toxicity-attenuating effect might be correlated to the decline of the contents of both anthraquinone glycosides and tannins, especially the aloe-emodin glycoside and physcione glycoside. The results also suggested that the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine (CREA) would be useful to monitor the hepatic and renal toxicity of rhubarb.

  19. Fast nosological imaging using canonical correlation analysis of brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Laudadio, Teresa; Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Celda, Bernardo; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    A new fast and accurate tissue typing technique has recently been successfully applied to prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data. This technique is based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA), a statistical method able to simultaneously exploit the spectral and spatial information characterizing the MRSI data. Here, the performance of CCA is further investigated by using brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging (2DTSI) from patients affected by glioblastoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of CCA when typing tissues of heterogeneous tumors. The performance of CCA is also compared with that of ordinary correlation analysis on simulated as well as in vivo data. The results show that CCA outperforms ordinary correlation analysis in terms of robustness and accuracy.

  20. A canonical correlation analysis of the association between carcass and ham traits in pigs used to produce dry-cured ham

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Henrique T.; Lopes, Paulo S.; Peloso, José V.; Guimarães, Simone E.F.; Carneiro, Antonio Policarpo S.; Carneiro, Paulo L.S.

    2011-01-01

    The association between carcass and ham traits in a pig population used to produce dry-cured ham was studied using canonical correlation analysis. The carcass traits examined were hot carcass weight (HCW), backfat thickness (BT) and loin depth (LD), and the ham traits studied were gross ham weight (GHW), trimmed ham weight (THW), ham inner layer fat thickness (HIFT), ham outer layer fat thickness (HOFT), pH (pH) and the Göfo value. Carcass and ham traits are not independent. The canonical correlations (r) between the carcass and ham traits at 130 kg were 0.77, 0.24 and 0.20 for the first, second and third canonical pair, respectively, and were all significant (p < 0.01) by the Wilks test. The corresponding canonical correlations between the three canonical variate pairs for the carcass and ham traits at 160 kg were 0.88, 0.42 and 0.14, respectively (p < 0.05 for all, except the third). The correlations between the traits and their canonical variate showed an association among HCW, GHW and THW, and between BT and HOFT. These results indicate that carcass traits should be used to cull pigs that are not suitable for dry-cured ham production. PMID:21931518

  1. Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the United States: Raising the Bar for Dynamical Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into non-overlapping sectors. The canonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all the regions of the US in every season compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible to the enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduces the spring predictability barrier over all the regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and additional local observations. The enhanced ECC forecast skill provides a new benchmark for evaluating dynamical model forecasts.

  2. Quantitative increases in temporal lobe symptoms in human males are proportional to postnatal geomagnetic activity: verification by canonical correlation.

    PubMed

    Hodge, K A; Persinger, M A

    1991-04-29

    Enhanced geomagnetic activity during episodes of biochemical stress has been correlated with inferences of increased liability within deep temporal lobe structures. Because adult limbic epilepsy is frequently associated with perinatal hypoxia or metabolic disruption within this region, a weak positive correlation was expected between possible signs of mesiobasal temporal lobe lability in normal adults and perinatal geomagnetic activity. Canonical correlation demonstrated that young adult males (n = 243) displayed a positive (r = 0.31) relationship between the intensity of geomagnetic disturbance the day after birth only and a history of subjective depersonalization, anomalous visual and olfactory experiences. The effects was very clear when aa values exceeded 30 nT (gamma). Temporal lobe signs for these males were similar to those reported by normal young adult females (n = 313) who did not display any consistent correlation between these measures and perinatal geomagnetic disturbance. The results suggest that interactions between perinatal neurochemistry and the correlates of geomagnetic activity might permanently alter portions of the male limbic system. PMID:1881599

  3. Using canonical correlation analysis to identify environmental attitude groups: considerations for national forest planning in the southwestern U.S.

    PubMed

    Prera, Alejandro J; Grimsrud, Kristine M; Thacher, Jennifer A; McCollum, Dan W; Berrens, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    As public land management agencies pursue region-specific resource management plans, with meaningful consideration of public attitudes and values, there is a need to characterize the complex mix of environmental attitudes in a diverse population. The contribution of this investigation is to make use of a unique household, mail/internet survey data set collected in 2007 in the Southwestern United States (Region 3 of the U.S. Forest Service). With over 5,800 survey responses to a set of 25 Public Land Value statements, canonical correlation analysis is able to identify 7 statistically distinct environmental attitudinal groups. We also examine the effect of expected changes in regional demographics on overall environmental attitudes, which may help guide in the development of socially acceptable long-term forest management policies. Results show significant support for conservationist management policies and passive environmental values, as well as a greater role for stakeholder groups in generating consensus for current and future forest management policies.

  4. Using Canonical Correlation Analysis to Identify Environmental Attitude Groups: Considerations for National Forest Planning in the Southwestern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prera, Alejandro J.; Grimsrud, Kristine M.; Thacher, Jennifer A.; McCollum, Dan W.; Berrens, Robert P.

    2014-10-01

    As public land management agencies pursue region-specific resource management plans, with meaningful consideration of public attitudes and values, there is a need to characterize the complex mix of environmental attitudes in a diverse population. The contribution of this investigation is to make use of a unique household, mail/internet survey data set collected in 2007 in the Southwestern United States (Region 3 of the U.S. Forest Service). With over 5,800 survey responses to a set of 25 Public Land Value statements, canonical correlation analysis is able to identify 7 statistically distinct environmental attitudinal groups. We also examine the effect of expected changes in regional demographics on overall environmental attitudes, which may help guide in the development of socially acceptable long-term forest management policies. Results show significant support for conservationist management policies and passive environmental values, as well as a greater role for stakeholder groups in generating consensus for current and future forest management policies.

  5. Spatial filtering based on canonical correlation analysis for classification of evoked or event-related potentials in EEG data.

    PubMed

    Spüler, Martin; Walter, Armin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Classification of evoked or event-related potentials is an important prerequisite for many types of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). To increase classification accuracy, spatial filters are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the brain signals and thereby facilitate the detection and classification of evoked or event-related potentials. While canonical correlation analysis (CCA) has previously been used to construct spatial filters that increase classification accuracy for BCIs based on visual evoked potentials, we show in this paper, how CCA can also be used for spatial filtering of event-related potentials like P300. We also evaluate the use of CCA for spatial filtering on other data with evoked and event-related potentials and show that CCA performs consistently better than other standard spatial filtering methods.

  6. Filter bank canonical correlation analysis for implementing a high-speed SSVEP-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaogang; Wang, Yijun; Gao, Shangkai; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gao, Xiaorong

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Recently, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) has been widely used in steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) due to its high efficiency, robustness, and simple implementation. However, a method with which to make use of harmonic SSVEP components to enhance the CCA-based frequency detection has not been well established. Approach. This study proposed a filter bank canonical correlation analysis (FBCCA) method to incorporate fundamental and harmonic frequency components to improve the detection of SSVEPs. A 40-target BCI speller based on frequency coding (frequency range: 8-15.8 Hz, frequency interval: 0.2 Hz) was used for performance evaluation. To optimize the filter bank design, three methods (M1: sub-bands with equally spaced bandwidths; M2: sub-bands corresponding to individual harmonic frequency bands; M3: sub-bands covering multiple harmonic frequency bands) were proposed for comparison. Classification accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR) of the three FBCCA methods and the standard CCA method were estimated using an offline dataset from 12 subjects. Furthermore, an online BCI speller adopting the optimal FBCCA method was tested with a group of 10 subjects. Main results. The FBCCA methods significantly outperformed the standard CCA method. The method M3 achieved the highest classification performance. At a spelling rate of ˜33.3 characters/min, the online BCI speller obtained an average ITR of 151.18 ± 20.34 bits min-1. Significance. By incorporating the fundamental and harmonic SSVEP components in target identification, the proposed FBCCA method significantly improves the performance of the SSVEP-based BCI, and thereby facilitates its practical applications such as high-speed spelling.

  7. Power Series Approximation for the Correlation Kernel Leading to Kohn-Sham Methods Combining Accuracy, Computational Efficiency, and General Applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Jannis; Bleiziffer, Patrick; Görling, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    A power series approximation for the correlation kernel of time-dependent density-functional theory is presented. Using this approximation in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem leads to a new family of Kohn-Sham methods. The new methods yield reaction energies and barriers of unprecedented accuracy and enable a treatment of static (strong) correlation with an accuracy of high-level multireference configuration interaction methods but are single-reference methods allowing for a black-box-like handling of static correlation. The new methods exhibit a better scaling of the computational effort with the system size than rivaling wave-function-based electronic structure methods. Moreover, the new methods do not suffer from the problem of singularities in response functions plaguing previous ACFD methods and therefore are applicable to any type of electronic system.

  8. An Investigation of the Relationship between the Fear of Receiving Negative Criticism and of Taking Academic Risk through Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Bayram; Ilhan, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ferat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the fear of receiving negative criticism and taking academic risk through canonical correlation analysis-in which a relational model was used. The participants of the study consisted of 215 university students enrolled in various programs at Dicle University's Ziya Gökalp Faculty of…

  9. An online multi-channel SSVEP-based brain-computer interface using a canonical correlation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Guangyu; Gao, Xiaorong; Yan, Zheng; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai

    2009-08-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in using steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) in brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. However, several aspects of current SSVEP-based BCI systems need improvement, specifically in relation to speed, user variation and ease of use. With these improvements in mind, this paper presents an online multi-channel SSVEP-based BCI system using a canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP. The key parameters, channel location, window length and the number of harmonics, are investigated using offline data, and the result used to guide the design of the online system. An SSVEP-based BCI system with six targets, which use nine channel locations in the occipital and parietal lobes, a window length of 2 s and the first harmonic, is used for online testing on 12 subjects. The results show that the proposed BCI system has a high performance, achieving an average accuracy of 95.3% and an information transfer rate of 58 ± 9.6 bit min-1. The positive characteristics of the proposed system are that channel selection and parameter optimization are not required, the possible use of harmonic frequencies, low user variation and easy setup.

  10. A Comparison Study of Canonical Correlation Analysis Based Methods for Detecting Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yijun; Wang, Yu-Te; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) has been widely used in the detection of the steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). The standard CCA method, which uses sinusoidal signals as reference signals, was first proposed for SSVEP detection without calibration. However, the detection performance can be deteriorated by the interference from the spontaneous EEG activities. Recently, various extended methods have been developed to incorporate individual EEG calibration data in CCA to improve the detection performance. Although advantages of the extended CCA methods have been demonstrated in separate studies, a comprehensive comparison between these methods is still missing. This study performed a comparison of the existing CCA-based SSVEP detection methods using a 12-class SSVEP dataset recorded from 10 subjects in a simulated online BCI experiment. Classification accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR) were used for performance evaluation. The results suggest that individual calibration data can significantly improve the detection performance. Furthermore, the results showed that the combination method based on the standard CCA and the individual template based CCA (IT-CCA) achieved the highest performance. PMID:26479067

  11. Classification of MALDI-MS imaging data of tissue microarrays using canonical correlation analysis-based variable selection.

    PubMed

    Winderbaum, Lyron; Koch, Inge; Mittal, Parul; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Applying MALDI-MS imaging to tissue microarrays (TMAs) provides access to proteomics data from large cohorts of patients in a cost- and time-efficient way, and opens the potential for applying this technology in clinical diagnosis. The complexity of these TMA data-high-dimensional low sample size-provides challenges for the statistical analysis, as classical methods typically require a nonsingular covariance matrix that cannot be satisfied if the dimension is greater than the sample size. We use TMAs to collect data from endometrial primary carcinomas from 43 patients. Each patient has a lymph node metastasis (LNM) status of positive or negative, which we predict on the basis of the MALDI-MS imaging TMA data. We propose a variable selection approach based on canonical correlation analysis that explicitly uses the LNM information. We apply LDA to the selected variables only. Our method misclassifies 2.3-20.9% of patients by leave-one-out cross-validation and strongly outperforms LDA after reduction of the original data with principle component analysis. PMID:27028088

  12. Utilization of an Enhanced Canonical Correlation Analysis (ECCA) to Predict Daily Precipitation and Temperature in a Semi-Arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S. R.; Hogue, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) are primarily used to generate historical and future large-scale circulation patterns at a coarse resolution (typical order of 50,000 km2) and fail to capture climate variability at the ground level due to localized surface influences (i.e topography, marine, layer, land cover, etc). Their inability to accurately resolve these processes has led to the development of numerous 'downscaling' techniques. The goal of this study is to enhance statistical downscaling of daily precipitation and temperature for regions with heterogeneous land cover and topography. Our analysis was divided into two periods, historical (1961-2000) and contemporary (1980-2000), and tested using sixteen predictand combinations from four GCMs (GFDL CM2.0, GFDL CM2.1, CNRM-CM3 and MRI-CGCM2 3.2a. The Southern California area was separated into five county regions: Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego. Principle component analysis (PCA) was performed on ground-based observations in order to (1) reduce the number of redundant gauges and minimize dimensionality and (2) cluster gauges that behave statistically similarly for post-analysis. Post-PCA analysis included extensive testing of predictor-predictand relationships using an enhanced canonical correlation analysis (ECCA). The ECCA includes obtaining the optimal predictand sets for all models within each spatial domain (county) as governed by daily and monthly overall statistics. Results show all models maintain mean annual and monthly behavior within each county and daily statistics are improved. The level of improvement highly depends on the vegetation extent within each county and the land-to-ocean ratio within the GCM spatial grid. The utilization of the entire historical period also leads to better statistical representation of observed daily precipitation. The validated ECCA technique is being applied to future climate scenarios distributed by the IPCC in order to provide forcing data for

  13. Multi-set canonical correlation analysis for the fusion of concurrent single trial ERP and functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Nicolle M.; Eichele, Tom; Adalı, Tülay; Li, Yi-Ou; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and electroencephalography (EEG) data provide complementary spatio-temporal information about brain function. Methods to couple the relative strengths of these modalities usually involve two stages: first forming a feature set from each dataset based on one criterion followed by exploration of connections among the features using a second criterion. We propose a data fusion method for simultaneously acquired fMRI and EEG data that combines these steps using a single criterion for finding the cross-modality associations and performing source separation. Using multi-set canonical correlation analysis (M-CCA), we obtain a decomposition of the two modalities, into spatial maps for fMRI data and a corresponding temporal evolution for EEG data, based on trial-to-trial covariation across the two modalities. Additionally, the analysis is performed on data from a group of subjects in order to make group inferences about the covariation across modalities. Being multivariate, the proposed method facilitates the study of brain connectivity along with localization of brain function. M-CCA can be easily extended to incorporate different data types and additional modalities. We demonstrate the promise of the proposed method in finding covarying trial-to-trial amplitude modulations (AMs) in an auditory task involving implicit pattern learning. The results show approximately linear decreasing trends in AMs for both modalities and the corresponding spatial activations occur mainly in motor, frontal, temporal, inferior parietal, and orbito-frontal areas that are linked both to sensory function as well as learning and expectation—all of which match activations related to the presented paradigm. PMID:20100584

  14. Ab initio-driven nuclear energy density functional method. A proposal for safe/correlated/improvable parametrizations of the off-diagonal EDF kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguet, T.; Bender, M.; Ebran, J.-P.; Lesinski, T.; Somà, V.

    2015-12-01

    This programmatic paper lays down the possibility to reconcile the necessity to resum many-body correlations into the energy kernel with the fact that safe multi-reference energy density functional (EDF) calculations cannot be achieved whenever the Pauli principle is not enforced, as is for example the case when many-body correlations are parametrized under the form of empirical density dependencies. Our proposal is to exploit a newly developed ab initio many-body formalism to guide the construction of safe, explicitly correlated and systematically improvable parametrizations of the off-diagonal energy and norm kernels that lie at the heart of the nuclear EDF method. The many-body formalism of interest relies on the concepts of symmetry breaking and restoration that have made the fortune of the nuclear EDF method and is, as such, amenable to this guidance. After elaborating on our proposal, we briefly outline the project we plan to execute in the years to come.

  15. Relativistic four-component calculations of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings with efficient evaluation of the exchange-correlation response kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Křístková, Anežka; Malkin, Vladimir G.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkina, Olga L.

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we report on the development and implementation of a new scheme for efficient calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings in the framework of four-component matrix Dirac-Kohn-Sham approach termed matrix Dirac-Kohn-Sham restricted magnetic balance resolution of identity for J and K, which takes advantage of the previous restricted magnetic balance formalism and the density fitting approach for the rapid evaluation of density functional theory exchange-correlation response kernels. The new approach is aimed to speedup the bottleneck in the solution of the coupled perturbed equations: evaluation of the matrix elements of the kernel of the exchange-correlation potential. The performance of the new scheme has been tested on a representative set of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings. The obtained results have been compared with the corresponding results of the reference method with traditional evaluation of the exchange-correlation kernel, i.e., without employing the fitted electron densities. Overall good agreement between both methods was observed, though the new approach tends to give values by about 4%-5% higher than the reference method. On the average, the solution of the coupled perturbed equations with the new scheme is about 8.5 times faster compared to the reference method.

  16. The ecology of early childhood risk: a canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample.

    PubMed

    Vilsaint, Corrie L; Aiyer, Sophie M; Wilson, Melvin N; Shaw, Daniel S; Dishion, Thomas J

    2013-08-01

    The ecology of the emergence of psychopathology in early childhood is often approached by the analysis of a limited number of contextual risk factors. In the present study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of ecological risk by conducting a canonical correlation analysis of 13 risk factors at child age 2 and seven narrow-band scales of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at child age 4, using a sample of 364 geographically and ethnically diverse, disadvantaged primary caregivers, alternative caregivers, and preschool-age children. Participants were recruited from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites and were screened for family risk. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that (1) a first latent combination of family and individual risks of caregivers predicted combinations of child emotional and behavioral problems, and that (2) a second latent combination of contextual and structural risks predicted child somatic complaints. Specifically, (1) the combination of chaotic home, conflict with child, parental depression, and parenting hassles predicted a co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and (2) the combination of father absence, perceived discrimination, neighborhood danger, and fewer children living in the home predicted child somatic complaints. The research findings are discussed in terms of the development of psychopathology, as well as the potential prevention needs of families in high-risk contexts.

  17. Kernel PLS-SVC for Linear and Nonlinear Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.; Matthews, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    A new methodology for discrimination is proposed. This is based on kernel orthonormalized partial least squares (PLS) dimensionality reduction of the original data space followed by support vector machines for classification. Close connection of orthonormalized PLS and Fisher's approach to linear discrimination or equivalently with canonical correlation analysis is described. This gives preference to use orthonormalized PLS over principal component analysis. Good behavior of the proposed method is demonstrated on 13 different benchmark data sets and on the real world problem of the classification finger movement periods versus non-movement periods based on electroencephalogram.

  18. Kernel MAD Algorithm for Relative Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Tang, Ping; Hu, Changmiao

    2016-06-01

    The multivariate alteration detection (MAD) algorithm is commonly used in relative radiometric normalization. This algorithm is based on linear canonical correlation analysis (CCA) which can analyze only linear relationships among bands. Therefore, we first introduce a new version of MAD in this study based on the established method known as kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA). The proposed method effectively extracts the non-linear and complex relationships among variables. We then conduct relative radiometric normalization experiments on both the linear CCA and KCCA version of the MAD algorithm with the use of Landsat-8 data of Beijing, China, and Gaofen-1(GF-1) data derived from South China. Finally, we analyze the difference between the two methods. Results show that the KCCA-based MAD can be satisfactorily applied to relative radiometric normalization, this algorithm can well describe the nonlinear relationship between multi-temporal images. This work is the first attempt to apply a KCCA-based MAD algorithm to relative radiometric normalization.

  19. Improving the accuracy of ground-state correlation energies within a plane-wave basis set: The electron-hole exchange kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Anant; Ángyán, János G.; Rocca, Dario

    2016-09-01

    A new formalism was recently proposed to improve random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energies by including approximate exchange effects [B. Mussard et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 12, 2191 (2016)]. Within this framework, by keeping only the electron-hole contributions to the exchange kernel, two approximations can be obtained: An adiabatic connection analog of the second order screened exchange (AC-SOSEX) and an approximate electron-hole time-dependent Hartree-Fock (eh-TDHF). Here we show how this formalism is suitable for an efficient implementation within the plane-wave basis set. The response functions involved in the AC-SOSEX and eh-TDHF equations can indeed be compactly represented by an auxiliary basis set obtained from the diagonalization of an approximate dielectric matrix. Additionally, the explicit calculation of unoccupied states can be avoided by using density functional perturbation theory techniques and the matrix elements of dynamical response functions can be efficiently computed by applying the Lanczos algorithm. As shown by several applications to reaction energies and weakly bound dimers, the inclusion of the electron-hole kernel significantly improves the accuracy of ground-state correlation energies with respect to RPA and semi-local functionals.

  20. Improving the accuracy of ground-state correlation energies within a plane-wave basis set: The electron-hole exchange kernel.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Anant; Ángyán, János G; Rocca, Dario

    2016-09-14

    A new formalism was recently proposed to improve random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energies by including approximate exchange effects [B. Mussard et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 12, 2191 (2016)]. Within this framework, by keeping only the electron-hole contributions to the exchange kernel, two approximations can be obtained: An adiabatic connection analog of the second order screened exchange (AC-SOSEX) and an approximate electron-hole time-dependent Hartree-Fock (eh-TDHF). Here we show how this formalism is suitable for an efficient implementation within the plane-wave basis set. The response functions involved in the AC-SOSEX and eh-TDHF equations can indeed be compactly represented by an auxiliary basis set obtained from the diagonalization of an approximate dielectric matrix. Additionally, the explicit calculation of unoccupied states can be avoided by using density functional perturbation theory techniques and the matrix elements of dynamical response functions can be efficiently computed by applying the Lanczos algorithm. As shown by several applications to reaction energies and weakly bound dimers, the inclusion of the electron-hole kernel significantly improves the accuracy of ground-state correlation energies with respect to RPA and semi-local functionals. PMID:27634249

  1. The Bargmann transform and canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Blas, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    This paper concerns a relationship between the kernel of the Bargmann transform and the corresponding canonical transformation. We study this fact for a Bargmann transform introduced by Thomas and Wassell [J. Math. Phys. 36, 5480-5505 (1995)]—when the configuration space is the two-sphere S2 and for a Bargmann transform that we introduce for the three-sphere S3. It is shown that the kernel of the Bargmann transform is a power series in a function which is a generating function of the corresponding canonical transformation (a classical analog of the Bargmann transform). We show in each case that our canonical transformation is a composition of two other canonical transformations involving the complex null quadric in C3 or C4. We also describe quantizations of those two other canonical transformations by dealing with spaces of holomorphic functions on the aforementioned null quadrics. Some of these quantizations have been studied by Bargmann and Todorov [J. Math. Phys. 18, 1141-1148 (1977)] and the other quantizations are related to the work of Guillemin [Integ. Eq. Operator Theory 7, 145-205 (1984)]. Since suitable infinite linear combinations of powers of the generating functions are coherent states for L2(S2) or L2(S3), we show finally that the studied Bargmann transforms are actually coherent states transforms.

  2. A Technology Integration Education (TIE) Model for Millennial Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Canonical Correlation Relationships among Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioral Controls, Motivation, and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual goods can follow the same pattern as physical goods with the product life cycle of birth, growth, maturity, and decline. For the intellectual good of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), its birth began with Shulman (1986, 1987). Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to test the relationships among five…

  3. metaCCA: summary statistics-based multivariate meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies using canonical correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cichonska, Anna; Rousu, Juho; Marttinen, Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Ripatti, Samuli; Pirinen, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A dominant approach to genetic association studies is to perform univariate tests between genotype-phenotype pairs. However, analyzing related traits together increases statistical power, and certain complex associations become detectable only when several variants are tested jointly. Currently, modest sample sizes of individual cohorts, and restricted availability of individual-level genotype-phenotype data across the cohorts limit conducting multivariate tests. Results: We introduce metaCCA, a computational framework for summary statistics-based analysis of a single or multiple studies that allows multivariate representation of both genotype and phenotype. It extends the statistical technique of canonical correlation analysis to the setting where original individual-level records are not available, and employs a covariance shrinkage algorithm to achieve robustness. Multivariate meta-analysis of two Finnish studies of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics by metaCCA, using standard univariate output from the program SNPTEST, shows an excellent agreement with the pooled individual-level analysis of original data. Motivated by strong multivariate signals in the lipid genes tested, we envision that multivariate association testing using metaCCA has a great potential to provide novel insights from already published summary statistics from high-throughput phenotyping technologies. Availability and implementation: Code is available at https://github.com/aalto-ics-kepaco Contacts: anna.cichonska@helsinki.fi or matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153689

  4. Exploring metabolic syndrome serum free fatty acid profiles based on GC-SIM-MS combined with random forests and canonical correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Gonçalves, Carlos M Vicente; Lin, Zhang; Huang, Jianhua; Lu, Hongmei; Yi, Lunzhao; Liang, Yizeng; Wang, Dongsheng; An, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases or type II diabetes. Till now, the etiology of MetS is complex and still unknown. Metabolic profiling is a powerful tool for exploring metabolic perturbations and potential biomarkers, thus may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanism of diseases. In this study, fatty acid profiling was employed to exploit the metabolic disturbances and discover potential biomarkers of MetS. Fatty acid profiles of serum samples from metabolic syndrome patients and healthy controls were first analyzed by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS), a robust method for quantitation of fatty acids. Then, the supervised multivariate statistical method of random forests (RF) was used to establish a classification and prediction model for MetS, which could assist the diagnosis of MetS. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was employed to investigate the relationships between free fatty acids (FFAs) and clinical parameters. As a result, several FFAs, including C16:1n-9c, C20:1n-9c and C22:4n-6c, were identified as potential biomarkers of MetS. The results also indicated that high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) were the most important parameters which were closely correlated with FFAs disturbances of MetS, thus they should be paid more attention in clinical practice for monitoring FFAs disturbances of MetS than waist circumference (WC) and systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP). The results have demonstrated that metabolic profiling by GC-SIM-MS combined with RF and CCA may be a useful tool for discovering the perturbations of serum FFAs and possible biomarkers for MetS.

  5. Features of Published Analyses of Canonical Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries-Wadsworth, Terresa M.

    D. Wood and J. Erskine (1976) and B. Thompson (1989) provided bibliographies of roughly 130 applications of canonical correlation analysis, but the features of such reports have not been widely studied. This report examines the features of recent canonical reports, including substantive inquiries, but also measurement applications examining…

  6. Canonical and non-canonical Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    D’SOUZA, BRENDAN; MELOTY-KAPELLA, LAURENCE; WEINMASTER, GERRY

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling induced by canonical Notch ligands is critical for normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis through the regulation of a variety of cell fate decisions and cellular processes. Activation of Notch signaling is normally tightly controlled by direct interactions with ligand-expressing cells and dysregulated Notch signaling is associated with developmental abnormalities and cancer. While canonical Notch ligands are responsible for the majority of Notch signaling, a diverse group of structurally unrelated non-canonical ligands has also been identified that activate Notch and likely contribute to the pleiotropic effects of Notch signaling. Soluble forms of both canonical and non-canonical ligands have been isolated, some of which block Notch signaling and could serve as natural inhibitors of this pathway. Ligand activity can also be indirectly regulated by other signaling pathways at the level of ligand expression, serving to spatio-temporally compartmentalize Notch signaling activity and integrate Notch signaling into a molecular network that orchestrates developmental events. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the dual role of Notch ligands as activators and inhibitors of Notch signaling. Additionally, evidence that Notch ligands function independent of Notch are presented. We also discuss how ligand post-translational modification, endocytosis, proteolysis and spatio-temporal expression regulate their signaling activity. PMID:20816393

  7. Analysis of heat kernel highlights the strongly modular and heat-preserving structure of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Maiorino, Enrico; Pinna, Andrea; Sadeghian, Alireza; Rizzi, Antonello; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the structure and dynamical properties of protein contact networks with respect to other biological networks, together with simulated archetypal models acting as probes. We consider both classical topological descriptors, such as modularity and statistics of the shortest paths, and different interpretations in terms of diffusion provided by the discrete heat kernel, which is elaborated from the normalized graph Laplacians. A principal component analysis shows high discrimination among the network types, by considering both the topological and heat kernel based vector characterizations. Furthermore, a canonical correlation analysis demonstrates the strong agreement among those two characterizations, providing thus an important justification in terms of interpretability for the heat kernel. Finally, and most importantly, the focused analysis of the heat kernel provides a way to yield insights on the fact that proteins have to satisfy specific structural design constraints that the other considered networks do not need to obey. Notably, the heat trace decay of an ensemble of varying-size proteins denotes subdiffusion, a peculiar property of proteins.

  8. Analysis of maize (Zea mays) kernel density and volume using micro-computed tomography and single-kernel near infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize kernel density impacts milling quality of the grain due to kernel hardness. Harder kernels are correlated with higher test weight and are more resistant to breakage during harvest and transport. Softer kernels, in addition to being susceptible to mechanical damage, are also prone to pathogen ...

  9. Predicting Protein Function Using Multiple Kernels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoxian; Rangwala, Huzefa; Domeniconi, Carlotta; Zhang, Guoji; Zhang, Zili

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput experimental techniques provide a wide variety of heterogeneous proteomic data sources. To exploit the information spread across multiple sources for protein function prediction, these data sources are transformed into kernels and then integrated into a composite kernel. Several methods first optimize the weights on these kernels to produce a composite kernel, and then train a classifier on the composite kernel. As such, these approaches result in an optimal composite kernel, but not necessarily in an optimal classifier. On the other hand, some approaches optimize the loss of binary classifiers and learn weights for the different kernels iteratively. For multi-class or multi-label data, these methods have to solve the problem of optimizing weights on these kernels for each of the labels, which are computationally expensive and ignore the correlation among labels. In this paper, we propose a method called Predicting Protein Function using Multiple Kernels (ProMK). ProMK iteratively optimizes the phases of learning optimal weights and reduces the empirical loss of multi-label classifier for each of the labels simultaneously. ProMK can integrate kernels selectively and downgrade the weights on noisy kernels. We investigate the performance of ProMK on several publicly available protein function prediction benchmarks and synthetic datasets. We show that the proposed approach performs better than previously proposed protein function prediction approaches that integrate multiple data sources and multi-label multiple kernel learning methods. The codes of our proposed method are available at https://sites.google.com/site/guoxian85/promk.

  10. Relations between canonical and non-canonical inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Rummel, Markus; Westphal, Alexander E-mail: markus.rummel@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2013-12-01

    We look for potential observational degeneracies between canonical and non-canonical models of inflation of a single field φ. Non-canonical inflationary models are characterized by higher than linear powers of the standard kinetic term X in the effective Lagrangian p(X,φ) and arise for instance in the context of the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action in string theory. An on-shell transformation is introduced that transforms non-canonical inflationary theories to theories with a canonical kinetic term. The 2-point function observables of the original non-canonical theory and its canonical transform are found to match in the case of DBI inflation.

  11. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  12. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches. PMID:25528318

  13. [Canon Busting and Cultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum: Phi Kappa Phi Journal, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Articles on literary canon include: "Educational Anomie" (Stephen W. White); "Why Western Civilization?" (William J. Bennett); "Peace Plan for Canon Wars" (Gerald Graff, William E. Cain); "Canons, Cultural Literacy, and Core Curriculum" (Lynne V. Cheney); "Canon Busting: Basic Issues" (Stanley Fish); "A Truce in Curricular Wars" (Chester E. Finn,…

  14. Canonical and Non-canonical Reelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bock, Hans H; May, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a large secreted glycoprotein that is essential for correct neuronal positioning during neurodevelopment and is important for synaptic plasticity in the mature brain. Moreover, Reelin is expressed in many extraneuronal tissues; yet the roles of peripheral Reelin are largely unknown. In the brain, many of Reelin's functions are mediated by a molecular signaling cascade that involves two lipoprotein receptors, apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (Apoer2) and very low density-lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), the neuronal phosphoprotein Disabled-1 (Dab1), and members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases as crucial elements. This core signaling pathway in turn modulates the activity of adaptor proteins and downstream protein kinase cascades, many of which target the neuronal cytoskeleton. However, additional Reelin-binding receptors have been postulated or described, either as coreceptors that are essential for the activation of the "canonical" Reelin signaling cascade involving Apoer2/Vldlr and Dab1, or as receptors that activate alternative or additional signaling pathways. Here we will give an overview of canonical and alternative Reelin signaling pathways, molecular mechanisms involved, and their potential physiological roles in the context of different biological settings. PMID:27445693

  15. Canonical field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine

    2015-11-01

    A new canonical field theory has been developed to help interpret the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields. The theory augments the Lagrangian of general dynamical systems to rigourously demonstrate that canonical helicity transport is valid across single particle, kinetic and fluid regimes, on scales ranging from classical to general relativistic. The Lagrangian is augmented with two extra terms that represent the interaction between the motion of matter and electromagnetic fields. The dynamical equations can then be re-formulated as a canonical form of Maxwell's equations or a canonical form of Ohm's law valid across all non-quantum regimes. The field theory rigourously shows that helicity can be preserved in kinetic regimes and not only fluid regimes, that helicity transfer between species governs the formation of flows or magnetic fields, and that helicity changes little compared to total energy only if density gradients are shallow. The theory suggests a possible interpretation of particle energization partitioning during magnetic reconnection as canonical wave interactions. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  16. Iterative software kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, I.

    1994-12-31

    This workshop focuses on kernels for iterative software packages. Specifically, the three speakers discuss various aspects of sparse BLAS kernels. Their topics are: `Current status of user lever sparse BLAS`; Current status of the sparse BLAS toolkit`; and `Adding matrix-matrix and matrix-matrix-matrix multiply to the sparse BLAS toolkit`.

  17. Canonical and Non-canonical Reelin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a large secreted glycoprotein that is essential for correct neuronal positioning during neurodevelopment and is important for synaptic plasticity in the mature brain. Moreover, Reelin is expressed in many extraneuronal tissues; yet the roles of peripheral Reelin are largely unknown. In the brain, many of Reelin’s functions are mediated by a molecular signaling cascade that involves two lipoprotein receptors, apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (Apoer2) and very low density-lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), the neuronal phosphoprotein Disabled-1 (Dab1), and members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases as crucial elements. This core signaling pathway in turn modulates the activity of adaptor proteins and downstream protein kinase cascades, many of which target the neuronal cytoskeleton. However, additional Reelin-binding receptors have been postulated or described, either as coreceptors that are essential for the activation of the “canonical” Reelin signaling cascade involving Apoer2/Vldlr and Dab1, or as receptors that activate alternative or additional signaling pathways. Here we will give an overview of canonical and alternative Reelin signaling pathways, molecular mechanisms involved, and their potential physiological roles in the context of different biological settings. PMID:27445693

  18. Canonical fluid thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The space-time integral of the thermodynamic pressure plays the role of the thermodynamic potential for compressible, adiabatic flow in the sense that the pressure integral for stable flow is less than for all slightly different flows. This stability criterion can be converted into a variational minimum principle by requiring the molar free-enthalpy and the temperature, which are the arguments of the pressure function, to be generalized velocities, that is, the proper-time derivatives of scalar spare-time functions which are generalized coordinates in the canonical formalism. In a fluid context, proper-time differentiation must be expressed in terms of three independent quantities that specify the fluid velocity. This can be done in several ways, all of which lead to different variants (canonical transformations) of the same constraint-free action integral whose Euler-Lagrange equations are just the well-known equations of motion for adiabatic compressible flow.

  19. Canonical Transformations of Kepler Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, canonical transformations generated by constants of motion in the case of the Kepler problem are discussed. It is shown that canonical transformations generated by angular momentum are rotations of the trajectory. Particular attention is paid to canonical transformations generated by the Runge-Lenz vector. It is shown that these…

  20. A Spectrum Tree Kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboyama, Tetsuji; Hirata, Kouichi; Kashima, Hisashi; F. Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Yasuda, Hiroshi

    Learning from tree-structured data has received increasing interest with the rapid growth of tree-encodable data in the World Wide Web, in biology, and in other areas. Our kernel function measures the similarity between two trees by counting the number of shared sub-patterns called tree q-grams, and runs, in effect, in linear time with respect to the number of tree nodes. We apply our kernel function with a support vector machine (SVM) to classify biological data, the glycans of several blood components. The experimental results show that our kernel function performs as well as one exclusively tailored to glycan properties.

  1. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Mike C.

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel-Comms is the communication server that transmits information between one or more robots using the RIK and one or more user interfaces. It supports event handling and multiple hardware communication protocols.

  2. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Driver

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel-Driver is built on top of the RIK-A and implements a dynamic autonomy structure. The RIK-D is used to orchestrate hardware for sensing and action as well as software components for perception, communication, behavior and world modeling into a single cognitive behavior kernel that provides intrinsic intelligence for a wide variety of unmanned ground vehicle systems.

  3. Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golts, Alona; Elad, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a new approach of incorporating kernels into dictionary learning. The kernel K-SVD algorithm (KKSVD), which has been introduced recently, shows an improvement in classification performance, with relation to its linear counterpart K-SVD. However, this algorithm requires the storage and handling of a very large kernel matrix, which leads to high computational cost, while also limiting its use to setups with small number of training examples. We address these problems by combining two ideas: first we approximate the kernel matrix using a cleverly sampled subset of its columns using the Nystr\\"{o}m method; secondly, as we wish to avoid using this matrix altogether, we decompose it by SVD to form new "virtual samples," on which any linear dictionary learning can be employed. Our method, termed "Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning" (LKDL) can be seamlessly applied as a pre-processing stage on top of any efficient off-the-shelf dictionary learning scheme, effectively "kernelizing" it. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on several tasks of both supervised and unsupervised classification and show the efficiency of the proposed scheme, its easy integration and performance boosting properties.

  4. [Epilepsy and Canon Law].

    PubMed

    Bonduelle, M

    1987-01-01

    The Canon Law (Codex Iuris Canonici), promulgated in 1917, was a classification of laws and jurisprudence which ruled the early Church, governed the ecclesiastical condition of Roman Church until its reorganisation in 1983. It forbade to be ordained or to exercise orders already received to "those who are or were epileptics either not quite in their right mind or possessed by the Evil One". All the context and in particular the paragraph which treated of bodily lacks, indicated that between these three conditions, there was juxtaposition and no confusion. The texts specified the foundations of these dispositions, not in a malefic view of epilepsy inherited from Morbus Sacer of Antiquity, but in decency and on account of risk incured by Eucharist in case of fit. Some derogations could attenuate the severity of these dispositions--as jurisprudence had taken progresses of Epileptology and therapeutics into consideration. In the new Code of Canon Law (1983) physical disabilities were removed from the text and also possessed evil and epilepsy, the only impediment being "insanity or other psychic defect" appreciation of which is done by experts. Concerning poorly controlled epilepsies, we believe that experts will be allowed to express their opinion and a new jurisprudence will make up for the silence of the law.

  5. Matrix product purifications for canonical ensembles and quantum number distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Matrix product purifications (MPPs) are a very efficient tool for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at finite temperatures. When a system features symmetries, these can be used to reduce computation costs substantially. It is straightforward to compute an MPP of a grand-canonical ensemble, also when symmetries are exploited. This paper provides and demonstrates methods for the efficient computation of MPPs of canonical ensembles under utilization of symmetries. Furthermore, we present a scheme for the evaluation of global quantum number distributions using matrix product density operators (MPDOs). We provide exact matrix product representations for canonical infinite-temperature states, and discuss how they can be constructed alternatively by applying matrix product operators to vacuum-type states or by using entangler Hamiltonians. A demonstration of the techniques for Heisenberg spin-1 /2 chains explains why the difference in the energy densities of canonical and grand-canonical ensembles decays as 1 /L .

  6. Kernel mucking in top

    SciTech Connect

    LeFebvre, W.

    1994-08-01

    For many years, the popular program top has aided system administrations in examination of process resource usage on their machines. Yet few are familiar with the techniques involved in obtaining this information. Most of what is displayed by top is available only in the dark recesses of kernel memory. Extracting this information requires familiarity not only with how bytes are read from the kernel, but also what data needs to be read. The wide variety of systems and variants of the Unix operating system in today`s marketplace makes writing such a program very challenging. This paper explores the tremendous diversity in kernel information across the many platforms and the solutions employed by top to achieve and maintain ease of portability in the presence of such divergent systems.

  7. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors' knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  8. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors’ knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  9. Canonical Granger causality between regions of interest.

    PubMed

    Ashrafulla, Syed; Haldar, Justin P; Joshi, Anand A; Leahy, Richard M

    2013-12-01

    Estimating and modeling functional connectivity in the brain is a challenging problem with potential applications in the understanding of brain organization and various neurological and neuropsychological conditions. An important objective in connectivity analysis is to determine the connections between regions of interest in the brain. However, traditional functional connectivity analyses have frequently focused on modeling interactions between time series recordings at individual sensors, voxels, or vertices despite the fact that a single region of interest will often include multiple such recordings. In this paper, we present a novel measure of interaction between regions of interest rather than individual signals. The proposed measure, termed canonical Granger causality, combines ideas from canonical correlation and Granger causality analysis to yield a measure that reflects directed causality between two regions of interest. In particular, canonical Granger causality uses optimized linear combinations of signals from each region of interest to enable accurate causality measurements from substantially less data compared to alternative multivariate methods that have previously been proposed for this scenario. The optimized linear combinations are obtained using a variation of a technique developed for optimization on the Stiefel manifold. We demonstrate the advantages of canonical Granger causality in comparison to alternative causality measures for a range of different simulated datasets. We also apply the proposed measure to local field potential data recorded in a macaque brain during a visuomotor task. Results demonstrate that canonical Granger causality can be used to identify causal relationships between striate and prestriate cortexes in cases where standard Granger causality is unable to identify statistically significant interactions.

  10. Calculates Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel.

    1989-11-10

    Version 00 THRUSH computes the thermal neutron scattering kernel by the phonon expansion method for both coherent and incoherent scattering processes. The calculation of the coherent part is suitable only for calculating the scattering kernel for heavy water.

  11. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel-Visualization is the software that supports the user interface. It uses the RIK-C software to communicate information to and from the robot. The RIK-V illustrates the data in a 3D display and provides an operating picture wherein the user can task the robot.

  12. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel Architecture (RIK-A) is a multi-level architecture that supports a dynamic autonomy structure. The RIK-A is used to coalesce hardware for sensing and action as well as software components for perception, communication, behavior and world modeling into a framework that can be used to create behaviors for humans to interact with the robot.

  13. MC Kernel: Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, Simon C.; van Driel, Martin; Auer, Ludwig; Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    2016-04-01

    We present MC Kernel, a software implementation to calculate seismic sensitivity kernels on arbitrary tetrahedral or hexahedral grids across the whole observable seismic frequency band. Seismic sensitivity kernels are the basis for seismic tomography, since they map measurements to model perturbations. Their calculation over the whole frequency range was so far only possible with approximative methods (Dahlen et al. 2000). Fully numerical methods were restricted to the lower frequency range (usually below 0.05 Hz, Tromp et al. 2005). With our implementation, it's possible to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. The advantage is that frequencies up to 0.2 Hz and higher can be accessed. Since the usage of irregular, adapted grids is an integral part of regularisation in seismic tomography, MC Kernel works in a inversion-grid-centred fashion: A Monte-Carlo integration method is used to project the kernel onto each basis function, which allows to control the desired precision of the kernel estimation. Also, it means that the code concentrates calculation effort on regions of interest without prior assumptions on the kernel shape. The code makes extensive use of redundancies in calculating kernels for different receivers or frequency-pass-bands for one earthquake, to facilitate its usage in large-scale global seismic tomography.

  14. Twin kernel embedding.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Gao, Junbin; Kwan, Paul W

    2008-08-01

    In most existing dimensionality reduction algorithms, the main objective is to preserve relational structure among objects of the input space in a low dimensional embedding space. This is achieved by minimizing the inconsistency between two similarity/dissimilarity measures, one for the input data and the other for the embedded data, via a separate matching objective function. Based on this idea, a new dimensionality reduction method called Twin Kernel Embedding (TKE) is proposed. TKE addresses the problem of visualizing non-vectorial data that is difficult for conventional methods in practice due to the lack of efficient vectorial representation. TKE solves this problem by minimizing the inconsistency between the similarity measures captured respectively by their kernel Gram matrices in the two spaces. In the implementation, by optimizing a nonlinear objective function using the gradient descent algorithm, a local minimum can be reached. The results obtained include both the optimal similarity preserving embedding and the appropriate values for the hyperparameters of the kernel. Experimental evaluation on real non-vectorial datasets confirmed the effectiveness of TKE. TKE can be applied to other types of data beyond those mentioned in this paper whenever suitable measures of similarity/dissimilarity can be defined on the input data. PMID:18566501

  15. Uncertainty relations, zero point energy and the linear canonical group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The close relationship between the zero point energy, the uncertainty relations, coherent states, squeezed states, and correlated states for one mode is investigated. This group-theoretic perspective enables the parametrization and identification of their multimode generalization. In particular the generalized Schroedinger-Robertson uncertainty relations are analyzed. An elementary method of determining the canonical structure of the generalized correlated states is presented.

  16. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  17. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures.

  18. Kernel Phase and Kernel Amplitude in Fizeau Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin J. S.

    2016-09-01

    Kernel phase interferometry is an approach to high angular resolution imaging which enhances the performance of speckle imaging with adaptive optics. Kernel phases are self-calibrating observables that generalize the idea of closure phases from non-redundant arrays to telescopes with arbitrarily shaped pupils, by considering a matrix-based approximation to the diffraction problem. In this paper I discuss the recent fhistory of kernel phase, in particular in the matrix-based study of sparse arrays, and propose an analogous generalization of the closure amplitude to kernel amplitudes. This new approach can self-calibrate throughput and scintillation errors in optical imaging, which extends the power of kernel phase-like methods to symmetric targets where amplitude and not phase calibration can be a significant limitation, and will enable further developments in high angular resolution astronomy.

  19. Canonical considerations in corporate restructuring.

    PubMed

    Holland, S

    1985-03-01

    Religious institutes sponsoring Catholic health facilities face competitive economic pressures that impel them to seek corporate restructuring and joint ventures to fulfill their mission to the poor. They especially must look to the Church's Code of Canon Law to protect ecclesiastical goods and maintain their Catholic identity when entering such ventures. The U.S. bishops directives also assist in guaranteeing patient expectations that the health facility will observe the Church's ethical principles. Institutes first must ensure that subsidiaries will operate according to Catholic mission and philosophy. The canons delineate proper protection of assets and identify ends toward which the religious must apply temporal goods, such as supporting clergy and performing charitable works. Alienation, or conveyance of goods, is a critical consideration in such financial transactions; canons specify the institute's administrative limits and require superiors' written permission along with their councils' consent. All involved must be "thoroughly informed concerning the economic situation," show "just cause" for the transaction, and obtain expert estimates of property values. Religious administrators retain certain faith and executive obligations, such as amending the charter, appointing the board, and merging or dissolving the corporation. With the canons they help to ensure that collaborative efforts preserve the institute's corporate mission and allow religious to carry out their responsibility for ecclesiastical goods. Though alternatives to corporate ventures may be limited, options regarding how to structure and with whom to affiliate do exist. Sponsoring bodies dedicated to providing high-quality care must explore these options

  20. Romanticism, Sexuality, and the Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Kathleen K.

    1990-01-01

    Traces the Romanticism in the work and persona of film director Jean-Luc Godard. Examines the contradictions posed by Godard's politics and representations of sexuality. Asserts, that by bringing an ironic distance to the works of such canonized directors, viewers can take pleasure in those works despite their contradictions. (MM)

  1. Robotic intelligence kernel

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J.

    2009-11-17

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes a robot intelligence kernel (RIK) that includes a multi-level architecture and a dynamic autonomy structure. The multi-level architecture includes a robot behavior level for defining robot behaviors, that incorporate robot attributes and a cognitive level for defining conduct modules that blend an adaptive interaction between predefined decision functions and the robot behaviors. The dynamic autonomy structure is configured for modifying a transaction capacity between an operator intervention and a robot initiative and may include multiple levels with at least a teleoperation mode configured to maximize the operator intervention and minimize the robot initiative and an autonomous mode configured to minimize the operator intervention and maximize the robot initiative. Within the RIK at least the cognitive level includes the dynamic autonomy structure.

  2. Flexible kernel memory.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Dimitri; Siegelmann, Hava

    2010-06-11

    This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  3. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  4. Canonical Thermal Pure Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2013-07-01

    A thermal equilibrium state of a quantum many-body system can be represented by a typical pure state, which we call a thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state. We construct the canonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the canonical ensemble of the conventional statistical mechanics. It is related to the microcanonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the microcanonical ensemble, by simple analytic transformations. Both TPQ states give identical thermodynamic results, if both ensembles do, in the thermodynamic limit. The TPQ states corresponding to other ensembles can also be constructed. We have thus established the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, according to which all quantities of statistical-mechanical interest are obtained from a single realization of any TPQ state. We also show that it has great advantages in practical applications. As an illustration, we study the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  5. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  6. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  7. Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Koji; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice; Thouroude, Tatiana; Loustau, Sébastien

    2014-02-01

    The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping of plant architecture is a critical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous studies adopted simple measurements, such as plant-height, stem-diameter and branching-intensity for QTL mapping of plant architecture. Many of these quantitative traits were generally correlated to each other, which give rise to statistical problem in the detection of QTL. We aim to test the applicability of kernel methods to phenotyping inflorescence architecture and its QTL mapping. We first test Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) over an artificial dataset of simulated inflorescences with different types of flower distribution, which is coded as a sequence of flower-number per node along a shoot. The ability of discriminating the different inflorescence types by SVM and KPCA is illustrated. We then apply the KPCA representation to the real dataset of rose inflorescence shoots (n=1460) obtained from a 98 F1 hybrid mapping population. We find kernel principal components with high heritability (>0.7), and the QTL analysis identifies a new QTL, which was not detected by a trait-by-trait analysis of simple architectural measurements. The main tools developed in this paper could be use to tackle the general problem of QTL mapping of complex (sequences, 3D structure, graphs) phenotypic traits.

  8. Kernel Methods on Riemannian Manifolds with Gaussian RBF Kernels.

    PubMed

    Jayasumana, Sadeep; Hartley, Richard; Salzmann, Mathieu; Li, Hongdong; Harandi, Mehrtash

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to exploiting kernel methods with manifold-valued data. In many computer vision problems, the data can be naturally represented as points on a Riemannian manifold. Due to the non-Euclidean geometry of Riemannian manifolds, usual Euclidean computer vision and machine learning algorithms yield inferior results on such data. In this paper, we define Gaussian radial basis function (RBF)-based positive definite kernels on manifolds that permit us to embed a given manifold with a corresponding metric in a high dimensional reproducing kernel Hilbert space. These kernels make it possible to utilize algorithms developed for linear spaces on nonlinear manifold-valued data. Since the Gaussian RBF defined with any given metric is not always positive definite, we present a unified framework for analyzing the positive definiteness of the Gaussian RBF on a generic metric space. We then use the proposed framework to identify positive definite kernels on two specific manifolds commonly encountered in computer vision: the Riemannian manifold of symmetric positive definite matrices and the Grassmann manifold, i.e., the Riemannian manifold of linear subspaces of a Euclidean space. We show that many popular algorithms designed for Euclidean spaces, such as support vector machines, discriminant analysis and principal component analysis can be generalized to Riemannian manifolds with the help of such positive definite Gaussian kernels. PMID:26539851

  9. Enzymatic treatment of peanut kernels to reduce allergen levels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianmei; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Goktepe, Ipek; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Maleki, Soheila

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the use of enzymatic treatment to reduce peanut allergens in peanut kernels as affected by processing conditions. Two major peanut allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, were used as indicators of process effectiveness. Enzymatic treatment effectively reduced Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 in roasted peanut kernels by up to 100% under optimal conditions. For instance, treatment of roasted peanut kernels with α-chymotrypsin and trypsin for 1-3h significantly increased the solubility of peanut protein while reducing Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 in peanut kernel extracts by 100% and 98%, respectively, based on ELISA readings. Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 levels in peanut protein extracts were inversely correlated with protein solubility in roasted peanut. Blanching of kernels enhanced the effectiveness of enzyme treatment in roasted peanuts but not in raw peanuts. The optimal concentration of enzyme was determined by response surface to be in the range of 0.1-0.2%. No consistent results were obtained for raw peanut kernels since Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 increased in peanut protein extracts under some treatment conditions and decreased in others. PMID:25214091

  10. Derivation of Mayer Series from Canonical Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Zhi

    2016-02-01

    Mayer derived the Mayer series from both the canonical ensemble and the grand canonical ensemble by use of the cluster expansion method. In 2002, we conjectured a recursion formula of the canonical partition function of a fluid (X.Z. Wang, Phys. Rev. E 66 (2002) 056102). In this paper we give a proof for this formula by developing an appropriate expansion of the integrand of the canonical partition function. We further derive the Mayer series solely from the canonical ensemble by use of this recursion formula.

  11. Stroke in Canon of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alorizi, Seyed Morteza Emami; Nimruzi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke has a huge negative impact on the society and more adversely affect women. There is scarce evidence about any neuroprotective effects of commonly used drug in acute stroke. Bushnell et al. provided a guideline focusing on the risk factors of stroke unique to women, including reproductive factors, metabolic syndrome, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and migraine with aura. The ten variables cited by Avicenna in Canon of Medicine would compensate for the gaps mentioned in this guideline. The prescribed drugs should be selected qualitatively opposite to Mizaj (warm-cold and wet-dry qualities induced by disease state) of the disease and according to ten variables, including the nature of the affected organ, intensity of disease, sex, age, habit, season, place of living, occupation, stamina and physical status. Methods: Information related to stroke was searched in Canon of Medicine, which is an outstanding book in traditional Persian medicine written by Avicenna. Results: A hemorrhagic stroke is the result of increasing sanguine humor in the body. Sanguine has warm-wet quality, and should be treated with food and drugs that quench the abundance of blood in the body. An acute episode of ischemic stroke is due to the abundance of phlegm that causes a blockage in the cerebral vessels. Phlegm has cold-wet quality and treatment should be started with compound medicines that either solve the phlegm or eject it from the body. Conclusion: Avicenna has cited in Canon of Medicine that women have cold and wet temperament compared to men. For this reason, they are more prone to accumulation of phlegm in their body organs including the liver, joints and vessels, and consequently in the risk of fatty liver, degenerative joint disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke especially the ischemic one. This is in accordance with epidemiological studies that showed higher rate of ischemic stroke in women rather than hemorrhagic one. PMID:26722147

  12. Canonical and alternative MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Genaro; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-11-01

    The archetype of MAPK cascade activation is somewhat challenged by the most recent discovery of unexpected phosphorylation patterns, alternative activation mechanisms and sub-cellular localization, in various members of this protein kinase family. In particular, activation by autophosphorylation pathways has now been described for the three best understood MAPK subgroups: ERK1/2; JNK1/2 and p38 alpha/beta. Also, a form of dosage compensation between homologs has been shown to occur in the case of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. In this paper we summarize the MAPK activation pathway, with an emphasis on non-canonical examples. We use this information to propose a model for MAPK signal transduction that considers a cross-talk between MAPKs with different activation loop sequence motifs and unique C-terminal extensions. We highlight the occurrence of non-canonical substrate specificity during MAPK auto-activation, in strong connection with MAPK homo- and hetero-dimerization events.

  13. Learning With Jensen-Tsallis Kernels.

    PubMed

    Ghoshdastidar, Debarghya; Adsul, Ajay P; Dukkipati, Ambedkar

    2016-10-01

    Jensen-type [Jensen-Shannon (JS) and Jensen-Tsallis] kernels were first proposed by Martins et al. (2009). These kernels are based on JS divergences that originated in the information theory. In this paper, we extend the Jensen-type kernels on probability measures to define positive-definite kernels on Euclidean space. We show that the special cases of these kernels include dot-product kernels. Since Jensen-type divergences are multidistribution divergences, we propose their multipoint variants, and study spectral clustering and kernel methods based on these. We also provide experimental studies on benchmark image database and gene expression database that show the benefits of the proposed kernels compared with the existing kernels. The experiments on clustering also demonstrate the use of constructing multipoint similarities.

  14. A canonical approach to forces in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Jay R.; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Lucchese, Robert R.; Bevan, John W.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we introduced a generalized formulation for canonical transformations and spectra to investigate the concept of canonical potentials strictly within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Data for the most accurate available ground electronic state pairwise intramolecular potentials in H2+, H2, HeH+, and LiH were used to rigorously establish such conclusions. Now, a canonical transformation is derived for the molecular force, F(R), with H2+ as molecular reference. These transformations are demonstrated to be inherently canonical to high accuracy but distinctly different from those corresponding to the respective potentials of H2, HeH+, and LiH. In this paper, we establish the canonical nature of the molecular force which is key to fundamental generalization of canonical approaches to molecular bonding. As further examples Mg2, benzene dimer and to water dimer are also considered within the radial limit as applications of the current methodology.

  15. Particle number fluctuations in a canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Begun, V.V.; Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M.I.; Zozulya, O.S.

    2004-09-01

    Fluctuations of charged particle number are studied in the canonical ensemble. In the infinite volume limit the fluctuations in the canonical ensemble are different from the fluctuations in the grand canonical one. Thus, the well-known equivalence of both ensembles for the average quantities does not extend for the fluctuations. In view of the possible relevance of the results for the analysis of fluctuations in nuclear collisions at high energies, a role of the limited kinematical acceptance is studied.

  16. RTOS kernel in portable electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, C. A.; Voos, J. A.; Riva, G. G.; Zerbini, C.; Gonzalez, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the use of a Real Time Operating System (RTOS) on a portable electrocardiograph based on a microcontroller platform. All medical device digital functions are performed by the microcontroller. The electrocardiograph CPU is based on the 18F4550 microcontroller, in which an uCOS-II RTOS can be embedded. The decision associated with the kernel use is based on its benefits, the license for educational use and its intrinsic time control and peripherals management. The feasibility of its use on the electrocardiograph is evaluated based on the minimum memory requirements due to the kernel structure. The kernel's own tools were used for time estimation and evaluation of resources used by each process. After this feasibility analysis, the migration from cyclic code to a structure based on separate processes or tasks able to synchronize events is used; resulting in an electrocardiograph running on one Central Processing Unit (CPU) based on RTOS.

  17. A canonical form for nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, R.; Hunt, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The concepts of transformation and canonical form have been used in analyzing linear systems. These ideas are extended to nonlinear systems. A coordinate system and a corresponding canonical form are developed for general nonlinear control systems. Their usefulness is demonstrated by showing that every feedback linearizable system becomes a system with only feedback paths in the canonical form. For control design involving a nonlinear system, one approach is to put the system in its canonical form and approximate by that part having only feedback paths.

  18. Density Estimation with Mercer Kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macready, William G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for density estimation based on Mercer kernels. The density estimate can be understood as the density induced on a data manifold by a mixture of Gaussians fit in a feature space. As is usual, the feature space and data manifold are defined with any suitable positive-definite kernel function. We modify the standard EM algorithm for mixtures of Gaussians to infer the parameters of the density. One benefit of the approach is it's conceptual simplicity, and uniform applicability over many different types of data. Preliminary results are presented for a number of simple problems.

  19. The canonical and other mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, Jesús; Aoiz, F Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, Vicente; Kendrick, Brian K; de Miranda, Marcelo P

    2007-11-21

    This article introduces a definition of the concept of elementary reaction mechanism that, while conforming to the traditional view of reaction mechanisms as dynamical processes whereby reagents are transformed into products, sharpens it by requiring reagent and product states to be completely specified and fully correlated. This leads to well-defined mathematical requirements for classification of a dynamical process as a reaction mechanism and also to a straightforward mathematical procedure for the determination of a special class of independent collision mechanisms that are dubbed "canonical". Canonical mechanisms result from an exact decomposition of the differential cross section of the reaction and form a complete orthogonal basis in terms of which all reaction mechanisms can be described. Examples involving the benchmark F + H2 and D + H2 reactions at energies ranging from ultralow to hyperthermal illustrate how canonical and other reaction mechanisms can be visualised and also how analysis of a reaction in terms of its canonical mechanisms can provide insight into its dynamics.

  20. Equivalence of kernel machine regression and kernel distance covariance for multidimensional phenotype association studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wen-Yu; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-09-01

    Associating genetic markers with a multidimensional phenotype is an important yet challenging problem. In this work, we establish the equivalence between two popular methods: kernel-machine regression (KMR), and kernel distance covariance (KDC). KMR is a semiparametric regression framework that models covariate effects parametrically and genetic markers non-parametrically, while KDC represents a class of methods that include distance covariance (DC) and Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC), which are nonparametric tests of independence. We show that the equivalence between the score test of KMR and the KDC statistic under certain conditions can lead to a novel generalization of the KDC test that incorporates covariates. Our contributions are 3-fold: (1) establishing the equivalence between KMR and KDC; (2) showing that the principles of KMR can be applied to the interpretation of KDC; (3) the development of a broader class of KDC statistics, where the class members are statistics corresponding to different kernel combinations. Finally, we perform simulation studies and an analysis of real data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. The ADNI study suggest that SNPs of FLJ16124 exhibit pairwise interaction effects that are strongly correlated to the changes of brain region volumes. PMID:25939365

  1. Equivalence of kernel machine regression and kernel distance covariance for multidimensional phenotype association studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wen-Yu; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-09-01

    Associating genetic markers with a multidimensional phenotype is an important yet challenging problem. In this work, we establish the equivalence between two popular methods: kernel-machine regression (KMR), and kernel distance covariance (KDC). KMR is a semiparametric regression framework that models covariate effects parametrically and genetic markers non-parametrically, while KDC represents a class of methods that include distance covariance (DC) and Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC), which are nonparametric tests of independence. We show that the equivalence between the score test of KMR and the KDC statistic under certain conditions can lead to a novel generalization of the KDC test that incorporates covariates. Our contributions are 3-fold: (1) establishing the equivalence between KMR and KDC; (2) showing that the principles of KMR can be applied to the interpretation of KDC; (3) the development of a broader class of KDC statistics, where the class members are statistics corresponding to different kernel combinations. Finally, we perform simulation studies and an analysis of real data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. The ADNI study suggest that SNPs of FLJ16124 exhibit pairwise interaction effects that are strongly correlated to the changes of brain region volumes.

  2. The Current Canon in British Romantics Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linkin, Harriet Kramer

    1991-01-01

    Describes and reports on a survey of 164 U.S. universities to ascertain what is taught as the current canon of British Romantic literature. Asserts that the canon may now include Mary Shelley with the former standard six major male Romantic poets, indicating a significant emergence of a feminist perspective on British Romanticism in the classroom.…

  3. The NAS kernel benchmark program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A collection of benchmark test kernels that measure supercomputer performance has been developed for the use of the NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation) program at the NASA Ames Research Center. This benchmark program is described in detail and the specific ground rules are given for running the program as a performance test.

  4. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  5. Local Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    Three local observed-score kernel equating methods that integrate methods from the local equating and kernel equating frameworks are proposed. The new methods were compared with their earlier counterparts with respect to such measures as bias--as defined by Lord's criterion of equity--and percent relative error. The local kernel item response…

  6. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as... Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded dirt or other foreign material not easily removed...

  7. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as... Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded dirt or other foreign material not easily removed...

  8. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as... Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded dirt or other foreign material not easily removed...

  9. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as... Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded dirt or other foreign material not easily removed...

  10. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as... Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded dirt or other foreign material not easily removed...

  11. Wigner functions defined with Laplace transform kernels.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Baek; Petruccelli, Jonathan C; Tian, Lei; Barbastathis, George

    2011-10-24

    We propose a new Wigner-type phase-space function using Laplace transform kernels--Laplace kernel Wigner function. Whereas momentum variables are real in the traditional Wigner function, the Laplace kernel Wigner function may have complex momentum variables. Due to the property of the Laplace transform, a broader range of signals can be represented in complex phase-space. We show that the Laplace kernel Wigner function exhibits similar properties in the marginals as the traditional Wigner function. As an example, we use the Laplace kernel Wigner function to analyze evanescent waves supported by surface plasmon polariton.

  12. 17 CFR 200.52 - Copies of the Canons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.52 Copies of the Canons. The Canons have been distributed to employees of the Commission. In addition, executive and professional...

  13. Kernel Near Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, SHAWN B.

    2002-07-01

    We propose a novel algorithm based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). First, we present an interesting approximation of PCA using Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization. Next, we combine our approximation with the kernel functions from Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to provide a nonlinear generalization of PCA. After benchmarking our algorithm in the linear case, we explore its use in both the linear and nonlinear cases. We include applications to face data analysis, handwritten digit recognition, and fluid flow.

  14. Antioxidant capacity and phenolics content of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) kernel as a function of genotype.

    PubMed

    Korekar, Girish; Stobdan, Tsering; Arora, Richa; Yadav, Ashish; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2011-11-01

    Fourteen apricot genotypes grown under similar cultural practices in Trans-Himalayan Ladakh region were studied to find out the influence of genotype on antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content (TPC) of apricot kernel. The kernels were found to be rich in TPC ranging from 92.2 to 162.1 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g. The free radical-scavenging activity in terms of inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) ranged from 43.8 to 123.4 mg/ml and ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) from 154.1 to 243.6 FeSO(4).7H(2)O μg/ml. A variation of 1-1.7 fold in total phenolic content, 1-2.8 fold in IC(50) by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and 1-1.6 fold in ferric reducing antioxidant potential among the examined kernels underlines the important role played by genetic background for determining the phenolic content and antioxidant potential of apricot kernel. A positive significant correlation between TPC and FRAP (r=0.671) was found. No significant correlation was found between TPC and IC(50); FRAP and IC(50); TPC and physical properties of kernel. Principal component analysis demonstrated that genotypic effect is more pronounced towards TPC and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) content in apricot kernel while the contribution of seed and kernel physical properties are not highly significant.

  15. Absorption cross section of canonical acoustic holes

    SciTech Connect

    Crispino, Luis C. B.; Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Matsas, George E. A.

    2007-11-15

    We compute numerically the absorption cross section of a canonical acoustic hole for sound waves with arbitrary frequencies. Our outputs are in full agreement with the expected low- and high-frequency limits.

  16. Canonical Force Distributions in Pairwise Interatomic Interactions from the Perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman Theorem.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2016-05-26

    Force-based canonical approaches have recently given a unified but different viewpoint on the nature of bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. Differing molecular categories (covalent, ionic, van der Waals, hydrogen, and halogen bonding) of representative interatomic interactions with binding energies ranging from 1.01 to 1072.03 kJ/mol have been modeled canonically giving a rigorous semiempirical verification to high accuracy. However, the fundamental physical basis expected to provide the inherent characteristics of these canonical transformations has not yet been elucidated. Subsequently, it was shown through direct numerical differentiation of these potentials that their associated force curves have canonical shapes. However, this approach to analyzing force results in inherent loss of accuracy coming from numerical differentiation of the potentials. We now show that this serious obstruction can be avoided by directly demonstrating the canonical nature of force distributions from the perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. This requires only differentiation of explicitly known Coulombic potentials, and we discuss how this approach to canonical forces can be used to further explain the nature of chemical bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. All parameter values used in the canonical transformation are determined through explicit physical based algorithms, and it does not require direct consideration of electron correlation effects.

  17. Canonical Force Distributions in Pairwise Interatomic Interactions from the Perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman Theorem.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2016-05-26

    Force-based canonical approaches have recently given a unified but different viewpoint on the nature of bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. Differing molecular categories (covalent, ionic, van der Waals, hydrogen, and halogen bonding) of representative interatomic interactions with binding energies ranging from 1.01 to 1072.03 kJ/mol have been modeled canonically giving a rigorous semiempirical verification to high accuracy. However, the fundamental physical basis expected to provide the inherent characteristics of these canonical transformations has not yet been elucidated. Subsequently, it was shown through direct numerical differentiation of these potentials that their associated force curves have canonical shapes. However, this approach to analyzing force results in inherent loss of accuracy coming from numerical differentiation of the potentials. We now show that this serious obstruction can be avoided by directly demonstrating the canonical nature of force distributions from the perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. This requires only differentiation of explicitly known Coulombic potentials, and we discuss how this approach to canonical forces can be used to further explain the nature of chemical bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. All parameter values used in the canonical transformation are determined through explicit physical based algorithms, and it does not require direct consideration of electron correlation effects. PMID:27143175

  18. Excitons in solids with time-dependent density-functional theory: the bootstrap kernel and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Young-Moo; Yang, Zeng-Hui; Ullrich, Carsten

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is an efficient method to describe the optical properties of solids. Lately, a series of bootstrap-type exchange-correlation (xc) kernels have been reported to produce accurate excitons in solids, but different bootstrap-type kernels exist in the literature, with mixed results. In this presentation, we reveal the origin of the confusion and show a new empirical TDDFT xc kernel to compute excitonic properties of semiconductors and insulators efficiently and accurately. Our method can be used for high-throughput screening calculations and large unit cell calculations. Work supported by NSF Grant DMR-1408904.

  19. Refining inflation using non-canonical scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Sanil; Sahni, Varun; Toporensky, Aleksey E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2012-08-01

    This paper revisits the Inflationary scenario within the framework of scalar field models possessing a non-canonical kinetic term. We obtain closed form solutions for all essential quantities associated with chaotic inflation including slow roll parameters, scalar and tensor power spectra, spectral indices, the tensor-to-scalar ratio, etc. We also examine the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and demonstrate the existence of an inflationary attractor. Our results highlight the fact that non-canonical scalars can significantly improve the viability of inflationary models. They accomplish this by decreasing the tensor-to-scalar ratio while simultaneously increasing the value of the scalar spectral index, thereby redeeming models which are incompatible with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in their canonical version. For instance, the non-canonical version of the chaotic inflationary potential, V(φ) ∼ λφ{sup 4}, is found to agree with observations for values of λ as large as unity! The exponential potential can also provide a reasonable fit to CMB observations. A central result of this paper is that steep potentials (such as V∝φ{sup −n}) usually associated with dark energy, can drive inflation in the non-canonical setting. Interestingly, non-canonical scalars violate the consistency relation r = −8n{sub T}, which emerges as a smoking gun test for this class of models.

  20. Both Canonical and Non-Canonical Wnt Signaling Independently Promote Stem Cell Growth in Mammospheres

    PubMed Central

    Many, Alexander M.; Brown, Anthony M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of mammary stem cells, and signals that regulate their behavior, is of central importance in understanding developmental changes in the mammary gland and possibly for targeting stem-like cells in breast cancer. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a signaling mechanism associated with maintenance of self-renewing stem cells in many tissues, including mammary epithelium, and can be oncogenic when deregulated. Wnt1 and Wnt3a are examples of ligands that activate the canonical pathway. Other Wnt ligands, such as Wnt5a, typically signal via non-canonical, β-catenin-independent, pathways that in some cases can antagonize canonical signaling. Since the role of non-canonical Wnt signaling in stem cell regulation is not well characterized, we set out to investigate this using mammosphere formation assays that reflect and quantify stem cell properties. Ex vivo mammosphere cultures were established from both wild-type and Wnt1 transgenic mice and were analyzed in response to manipulation of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. An increased level of mammosphere formation was observed in cultures derived from MMTV-Wnt1 versus wild-type animals, and this was blocked by treatment with Dkk1, a selective inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling. Consistent with this, we found that a single dose of recombinant Wnt3a was sufficient to increase mammosphere formation in wild-type cultures. Surprisingly, we found that Wnt5a also increased mammosphere formation in these assays. We confirmed that this was not caused by an increase in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling but was instead mediated by non-canonical Wnt signals requiring the receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 and activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase, JNK. We conclude that both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signals have positive effects promoting stem cell activity in mammosphere assays and that they do so via independent signaling mechanisms. PMID:25019931

  1. Nonlinear projection trick in kernel methods: an alternative to the kernel trick.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Nojun

    2013-12-01

    In kernel methods such as kernel principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machines, the so called kernel trick is used to avoid direct calculations in a high (virtually infinite) dimensional kernel space. In this brief, based on the fact that the effective dimensionality of a kernel space is less than the number of training samples, we propose an alternative to the kernel trick that explicitly maps the input data into a reduced dimensional kernel space. This is easily obtained by the eigenvalue decomposition of the kernel matrix. The proposed method is named as the nonlinear projection trick in contrast to the kernel trick. With this technique, the applicability of the kernel methods is widened to arbitrary algorithms that do not use the dot product. The equivalence between the kernel trick and the nonlinear projection trick is shown for several conventional kernel methods. In addition, we extend PCA-L1, which uses L1-norm instead of L2-norm (or dot product), into a kernel version and show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Nonlinear projection trick in kernel methods: an alternative to the kernel trick.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Nojun

    2013-12-01

    In kernel methods such as kernel principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machines, the so called kernel trick is used to avoid direct calculations in a high (virtually infinite) dimensional kernel space. In this brief, based on the fact that the effective dimensionality of a kernel space is less than the number of training samples, we propose an alternative to the kernel trick that explicitly maps the input data into a reduced dimensional kernel space. This is easily obtained by the eigenvalue decomposition of the kernel matrix. The proposed method is named as the nonlinear projection trick in contrast to the kernel trick. With this technique, the applicability of the kernel methods is widened to arbitrary algorithms that do not use the dot product. The equivalence between the kernel trick and the nonlinear projection trick is shown for several conventional kernel methods. In addition, we extend PCA-L1, which uses L1-norm instead of L2-norm (or dot product), into a kernel version and show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:24805227

  3. Stem kernels for RNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Popendorf, Kris; Ogawa, Nana; Asai, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kengo

    2007-10-01

    Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars have been developed for modeling and analyzing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNA, and are used for structural alignment of RNA sequences. However, such stochastic models cannot sufficiently discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from nonmembers and hence detect noncoding RNA regions from genome sequences. A novel kernel function, stem kernel, for the discrimination and detection of functional RNA sequences using support vector machines (SVMs) is proposed. The stem kernel is a natural extension of the string kernel, specifically the all-subsequences kernel, and is tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures. The stem kernel examines all possible common base pairs and stem structures of arbitrary lengths, including pseudoknots between two RNA sequences, and calculates the inner product of common stem structure counts. An efficient algorithm is developed to calculate the stem kernels based on dynamic programming. The stem kernels are then applied to discriminate members of an RNA family from nonmembers using SVMs. The study indicates that the discrimination ability of the stem kernel is strong compared with conventional methods. Furthermore, the potential application of the stem kernel is demonstrated by the detection of remotely homologous RNA families in terms of secondary structures. This is because the string kernel is proven to work for the remote homology detection of protein sequences. These experimental results have convinced us to apply the stem kernel in order to find novel RNA families from genome sequences. PMID:17933013

  4. Kernel earth mover's distance for EEG classification.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Mohammad Reza

    2013-07-01

    Here, we propose a new kernel approach based on the earth mover's distance (EMD) for electroencephalography (EEG) signal classification. The EEG time series are first transformed into histograms in this approach. The distance between these histograms is then computed using the EMD in a pair-wise manner. We bring the distances into a kernel form called kernel EMD. The support vector classifier can then be used for the classification of EEG signals. The experimental results on the real EEG data show that the new kernel method is very effective, and can classify the data with higher accuracy than traditional methods.

  5. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels.

    PubMed

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t^{-3/2}. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius. PMID:27104730

  6. Analysis of responses to noise in the ventral cochlear nucleus using Wiener kernels.

    PubMed

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; van Dijk, Pim

    2006-01-01

    Responses to noise were recorded in ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons of anesthetized chinchillas and cats, then analyzed using Wiener-kernel theory. First-order kernels, which are proportional to reverse-correlation functions, of primary-like (PL) and primary-like with notch (PLN) neurons having low characteristic frequency (CF) are similar to those obtained in auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). Such kernels consist of lightly damped transient oscillations with frequency equal to the neuron's CF. The first-order kernel of high-CF PL and PLN neurons displays no evidence of tuning to CF. Second-order kernels of the aforementioned VCN neuron types also resemble those in the nerve, irrespective of CF. In general, first- and second-order Wiener kernels of chopper neurons are similar to those obtained in high-CF ANFs. This is likely the consequence of the poor phase-locking capabilities to near-CF tones exhibited by chopper neurons. By analyzing second-order kernels using singular-value decomposition, it was possible to estimate group delays for the entire neuronal population, regardless of the neuron's type or CF. This was done by analyzing the highest-ranking singular vector (FSV). Amplitude values of FSVs in chopper neurons in the cat are substantially larger than in high-spontaneous ANFs. PMID:16644154

  7. Agonistic and Antagonistic Roles for TNIK and MINK in Non-Canonical and Canonical Wnt Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mikryukov, Alexander; Moss, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signalling is a key regulatory factor in animal development and homeostasis and plays an important role in the establishment and progression of cancer. Wnt signals are predominantly transduced via the Frizzled family of serpentine receptors to two distinct pathways, the canonical ß-catenin pathway and a non-canonical pathway controlling planar cell polarity and convergent extension. Interference between these pathways is an important determinant of cellular and phenotypic responses, but is poorly understood. Here we show that TNIK (Traf2 and Nck-interacting kinase) and MINK (Misshapen/NIKs-related kinase) MAP4K signalling kinases are integral components of both canonical and non-canonical pathways in Xenopus. xTNIK and xMINK interact and are proteolytically cleaved in vivo to generate Kinase domain fragments that are active in signal transduction, and Citron-NIK-Homology (CNH) Domain fragments that are suppressive. The catalytic activity of the Kinase domain fragments of both xTNIK and xMINK mediate non-canonical signalling. However, while the Kinase domain fragments of xTNIK also mediate canonical signalling, the analogous fragments derived from xMINK strongly antagonize this signalling. Our data suggest that the proteolytic cleavage of xTNIK and xMINK determines their respective activities and is an important factor in controlling the balance between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling in vivo. PMID:22984420

  8. Grand and Semigrand Canonical Basin-Hopping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce grand and semigrand canonical global optimization approaches using basin-hopping with an acceptance criterion based on the local contribution of each potential energy minimum to the (semi)grand potential. The method is tested using local harmonic vibrational densities of states for atomic clusters as a function of temperature and chemical potential. The predicted global minima switch from dissociated states to clusters for larger values of the chemical potential and lower temperatures, in agreement with the predictions of a model fitted to heat capacity data for selected clusters. Semigrand canonical optimization allows us to identify particularly stable compositions in multicomponent nanoalloys as a function of increasing temperature, whereas the grand canonical potential can produce a useful survey of favorable structures as a byproduct of the global optimization search. PMID:26669731

  9. Canonical forms of multidimensional steady inviscid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Canonical forms and canonical variables for inviscid flow problems are derived. In these forms the components of the system governed by different types of operators (elliptic and hyperbolic) are separated. Both the incompressible and compressible cases are analyzed, and their similarities and differences are discussed. The canonical forms obtained are block upper triangular operator form in which the elliptic and non-elliptic parts reside in different blocks. The full nonlinear equations are treated without using any linearization process. This form enables a better analysis of the equations as well as better numerical treatment. These forms are the analog of the decomposition of the one dimensional Euler equations into characteristic directions and Riemann invariants.

  10. Elasticity theory of smectic and canonic mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Stallinga, S.; Vertogen, G. )

    1995-01-01

    The general theory of elasticity for smectic and canonic mesophases is formulated, starting from the assumption that the equilibrium state is spatially periodic. The various surface terms appearing in the deformation free energy density are considered as well. The effective description of the elastic behavior of a general nonchiral smectic mesophase involves one positional elastic constant, 16 bulk orientational elastic constants, and six surface orientational elastic constants. One additional bulk orientational elastic constant is required for the description of a general chiral smectic mesophase. The effective description of the elastic behavior of a general nonchiral canonic mesophase involves six positional elastic constants and three bulk orientational elastic constants. In this case the property of chirality does not introduce additional orientational elastic constants. The elastic constants for some relevant smectic and canonic mesophases are given, including the elastic constants for the antiferroelectric Sm-[ital C][sub [ital A

  11. Improving the Bandwidth Selection in Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Björn; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the current bandwidth selection methods in kernel equating and propose a method based on Silverman's rule of thumb for selecting the bandwidth parameters. In kernel equating, the bandwidth parameters have previously been obtained by minimizing a penalty function. This minimization process has been criticized by practitioners…

  12. An Extension of Dominance Analysis to Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huo, Yan; Budescu, David V.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance analysis (Budescu, 1993) offers a general framework for determination of relative importance of predictors in univariate and multivariate multiple regression models. This approach relies on pairwise comparisons of the contribution of predictors in all relevant subset models. In this article we extend dominance analysis to canonical…

  13. Canonical transformations and Hamiltonian evolutionary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ashhab, Samer

    2012-06-15

    In many Lagrangian field theories, one has a Poisson bracket defined on the space of local functionals. We find necessary and sufficient conditions for a transformation on the space of local functionals to be canonical in three different cases. These three cases depend on the specific dimensions of the vector bundle of the theory and the associated Hamiltonian differential operator. We also show how a canonical transformation transforms a Hamiltonian evolutionary system and its conservation laws. Finally, we illustrate these ideas with three examples.

  14. The context-tree kernel for strings.

    PubMed

    Cuturi, Marco; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2005-10-01

    We propose a new kernel for strings which borrows ideas and techniques from information theory and data compression. This kernel can be used in combination with any kernel method, in particular Support Vector Machines for string classification, with notable applications in proteomics. By using a Bayesian averaging framework with conjugate priors on a class of Markovian models known as probabilistic suffix trees or context-trees, we compute the value of this kernel in linear time and space while only using the information contained in the spectrum of the considered strings. This is ensured through an adaptation of a compression method known as the context-tree weighting algorithm. Encouraging classification results are reported on a standard protein homology detection experiment, showing that the context-tree kernel performs well with respect to other state-of-the-art methods while using no biological prior knowledge.

  15. Mapping quantitative trait loci for kernel composition in almond

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Almond breeding is increasingly taking into account kernel quality as a breeding objective. Information on the parameters to be considered in evaluating almond quality, such as protein and oil content, as well as oleic acid and tocopherol concentration, has been recently compiled. The genetic control of these traits has not yet been studied in almond, although this information would improve the efficiency of almond breeding programs. Results A map with 56 simple sequence repeat or microsatellite (SSR) markers was constructed for an almond population showing a wide range of variability for the chemical components of the almond kernel. A total of 12 putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling these chemical traits have been detected in this analysis, corresponding to seven genomic regions of the eight almond linkage groups (LG). Some QTL were clustered in the same region or shared the same molecular markers, according to the correlations already found between the chemical traits. The logarithm of the odds (LOD) values for any given trait ranged from 2.12 to 4.87, explaining from 11.0 to 33.1 % of the phenotypic variance of the trait. Conclusions The results produced in the study offer the opportunity to include the new genetic information in almond breeding programs. Increases in the positive traits of kernel quality may be looked for simultaneously whenever they are genetically independent, even if they are negatively correlated. We have provided the first genetic framework for the chemical components of the almond kernel, with twelve QTL in agreement with the large number of genes controlling their metabolism. PMID:22720975

  16. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  17. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  18. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  19. Canonical vs. micro-canonical sampling methods in a 2D Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, J.

    1990-12-01

    Canonical and micro-canonical Monte Carlo algorithms were implemented on a 2D Ising model. Expressions for the internal energy, U, inverse temperature, Z, and specific heat, C, are given. These quantities were calculated over a range of temperature, lattice sizes, and time steps. Both algorithms accurately simulate the Ising model. To obtain greater than three decimal accuracy from the micro-canonical method requires that the more complicated expression for Z be used. The overall difference between the algorithms is small. The physics of the problem under study should be the deciding factor in determining which algorithm to use. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Development of Canonical Transformations from Hamilton's Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quade, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    The theory of canonical transformations and its development are discussed with regard to its application to Hutton's principle. Included are the derivation of the equations of motion and a lack of symmetry in the formulaion with respect to Lagrangian and the fundamental commutator relations of quantum mechanics. (Author/SA)

  1. Infants' Recognition of Objects Using Canonical Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Yang, Jiale; Otsuka, Yumiko; Dan, Ippeita; Masuda, Tomohiro; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2010-01-01

    We explored infants' ability to recognize the canonical colors of daily objects, including two color-specific objects (human face and fruit) and a non-color-specific object (flower), by using a preferential looking technique. A total of 58 infants between 5 and 8 months of age were tested with a stimulus composed of two color pictures of an object…

  2. Foundations of Education: Texts and the Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Esther E.

    This paper attempts to outline the textual canon of the foundations of education in U.S. teacher education programs. Background research for the project included a review of selected texts and samples of course syllabi. Analysis of the contents and prefaces of the two volumes of "Reading in the Foundations of Education" (published in 1941 by…

  3. Canonical transformation method in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Yu. G.

    1983-08-01

    The solutions of Maxwell's equations in the parabolic equation approximation is obtained on the basis of the canonical transformation method. The Hamiltonian form of the equations for the field in an anisotropic stratified medium is also examined. The perturbation theory for the calculation of the wave reflection and transmission coefficients is developed.

  4. Reading Canonical Texts in Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Mehrunissa

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the complexity of imposing texts that are considered part of the English literary canon on students from multicultural backgrounds. It considers the rhetoric of the coalition government, in the recent drive to emphasize the importance of the literary heritage and return to English culture and how its impact has been felt in the…

  5. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Jens; Carroll, Evan; Kamikawa, Yu; Lavine, Eric; Vereen, Keon; You, Setthivoine

    2013-10-01

    Canonical flux tubes are defined by tracing areas of constant magnetic and fluid vorticity flux. This poster will present the theory for canonical flux tubes and current progress in the construction of an experiment designed to observe their evolution. In the zero flow limit, canonical flux tubes are magnetic flux tubes, but in full form, present the distinct advantage of reconciling two-fluid plasma dynamics with familiar concepts of helicity, twists and linkages. The experiment and the DCON code will be used to investigate a new MHD stability criterion for sausage and kink modes in screw pinches that has been generalized to magnetic flux tubes with skin and core currents. Camera images and a 3D array of ˙ B probes will measure tube aspect-ratio and ratio of current-to-magnetic flux, respectively, to trace these flux tube parameters in a stability space. The experiment's triple electrode planar gun is designed to generate azimuthal and axial flows. These diagnostics together with a 3D vector tomographic reconstruction of ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to verify the theory of canonical helicity transport. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  6. Canonical Transformation to the Free Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, E. N.; Scanio, Joseph J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates how to find some canonical transformations without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Constructs the transformations from the harmonic oscillator to the free particle and uses these as examples of transformations that cannot be maintained when going from classical to quantum systems. (MLH)

  7. Nonlocal energy-optimized kernel: Recovering second-order exchange in the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Laricchia, Savio; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2016-01-01

    In order to remedy some of the shortcomings of the random phase approximation (RPA) within adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) density functional theory, we introduce a short-ranged, exchange-like kernel that is one-electron self-correlation free and exact for two-electron systems in the high-density limit. By tuning a free parameter in our model to recover an exact limit of the homogeneous electron gas correlation energy, we obtain a nonlocal, energy-optimized kernel that reduces the errors of RPA for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous solids. Using wave-vector symmetrization for the kernel, we also implement RPA renormalized perturbation theory for extended systems, and demonstrate its capability to describe the dominant correlation effects with a low-order expansion in both metallic and nonmetallic systems. The comparison of ACFD structural properties with experiment is also shown to be limited by the choice of norm-conserving pseudopotential.

  8. Putting Priors in Mixture Density Mercer Kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for automatic knowledge driven data mining based on the theory of Mercer Kernels, which are highly nonlinear symmetric positive definite mappings from the original image space to a very high, possibly infinite dimensional feature space. We describe a new method called Mixture Density Mercer Kernels to learn kernel function directly from data, rather than using predefined kernels. These data adaptive kernels can en- code prior knowledge in the kernel using a Bayesian formulation, thus allowing for physical information to be encoded in the model. We compare the results with existing algorithms on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The code for these experiments has been generated with the AUTOBAYES tool, which automatically generates efficient and documented C/C++ code from abstract statistical model specifications. The core of the system is a schema library which contains template for learning and knowledge discovery algorithms like different versions of EM, or numeric optimization methods like conjugate gradient methods. The template instantiation is supported by symbolic- algebraic computations, which allows AUTOBAYES to find closed-form solutions and, where possible, to integrate them into the code. The results show that the Mixture Density Mercer-Kernel described here outperforms tree-based classification in distinguishing high-redshift galaxies from low- redshift galaxies by approximately 16% on test data, bagged trees by approximately 7%, and bagged trees built on a much larger sample of data by approximately 2%.

  9. Ideal regularization for learning kernels from labels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Binbin; Lai, Jianhuang; Shen, Lixin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of regularization that is able to utilize the label information of a data set for learning kernels. The proposed regularization, referred to as ideal regularization, is a linear function of the kernel matrix to be learned. The ideal regularization allows us to develop efficient algorithms to exploit labels. Three applications of the ideal regularization are considered. Firstly, we use the ideal regularization to incorporate the labels into a standard kernel, making the resulting kernel more appropriate for learning tasks. Next, we employ the ideal regularization to learn a data-dependent kernel matrix from an initial kernel matrix (which contains prior similarity information, geometric structures, and labels of the data). Finally, we incorporate the ideal regularization to some state-of-the-art kernel learning problems. With this regularization, these learning problems can be formulated as simpler ones which permit more efficient solvers. Empirical results show that the ideal regularization exploits the labels effectively and efficiently.

  10. Canonical brackets of a toy model for the Hodge theory without its canonical conjugate momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, D.; Bhanja, T.; Malik, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    We consider the toy model of a rigid rotor as an example of the Hodge theory within the framework of Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) formalism and show that the internal symmetries of this theory lead to the derivation of canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators of the dynamical variables where the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta is not required. We invoke only the spin-statistics theorem, normal ordering and basic concepts of continuous symmetries (and their generators) to derive the canonical brackets for the model of a one (0 + 1)-dimensional (1D) rigid rotor without using the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta anywhere. Our present method of derivation of the basic brackets is conjectured to be true for a class of theories that provide a set of tractable physical examples for the Hodge theory.

  11. Kernel score statistic for dependent data.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Dörthe; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Rosenberger, Albert; Bickeböller, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The kernel score statistic is a global covariance component test over a set of genetic markers. It provides a flexible modeling framework and does not collapse marker information. We generalize the kernel score statistic to allow for familial dependencies and to adjust for random confounder effects. With this extension, we adjust our analysis of real and simulated baseline systolic blood pressure for polygenic familial background. We find that the kernel score test gains appreciably in power through the use of sequencing compared to tag-single-nucleotide polymorphisms for very rare single nucleotide polymorphisms with <1% minor allele frequency.

  12. Structural Equation Modeling versus Ordinary Least Squares Canonical Analysis: Some Heuristic Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Thomas E.

    This paper describes structural equation modeling (SEM) in comparison with another overarching analysis within the general linear model (GLM) analytic family: canonical correlation analysis. The uninitiated reader can gain an understanding of SEM's basic tenets and applications. Latent constructs discovered via a measurement model are explored and…

  13. Applying Procrustean Rotation To Evaluate the Generalizability of Canonical Analysis Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Mary L.; Campbell, Kathleen Taylor

    Statistical invariance procedures provide a way of looking at the generalizability of research results from sample to sample when the research has not been validated by replication. This paper discusses the Procrustean Rotation invariance procedure following a canonical correlation analysis. The computer program RELATE is used to gauge the…

  14. 7 CFR 981.401 - Adjusted kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... weight of delivery 10,000 10,000 2. Percent of edible kernel weight 53.0 84.0 3. Less weight loss in... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adjusted kernel weight. 981.401 Section 981.401... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.401 Adjusted kernel weight. (a) Definition. Adjusted kernel...

  15. 7 CFR 981.401 - Adjusted kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... weight of delivery 10,000 10,000 2. Percent of edible kernel weight 53.0 84.0 3. Less weight loss in... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adjusted kernel weight. 981.401 Section 981.401... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.401 Adjusted kernel weight. (a) Definition. Adjusted kernel...

  16. 7 CFR 981.401 - Adjusted kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... weight of delivery 10,000 10,000 2. Percent of edible kernel weight 53.0 84.0 3. Less weight loss in... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adjusted kernel weight. 981.401 Section 981.401... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.401 Adjusted kernel weight. (a) Definition. Adjusted kernel...

  17. 7 CFR 981.401 - Adjusted kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... weight of delivery 10,000 10,000 2. Percent of edible kernel weight 53.0 84.0 3. Less weight loss in... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adjusted kernel weight. 981.401 Section 981.401... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.401 Adjusted kernel weight. (a) Definition. Adjusted kernel...

  18. 7 CFR 981.401 - Adjusted kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... weight of delivery 10,000 10,000 2. Percent of edible kernel weight 53.0 84.0 3. Less weight loss in... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjusted kernel weight. 981.401 Section 981.401... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.401 Adjusted kernel weight. (a) Definition. Adjusted kernel...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of complete whole kernels but which will...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of complete whole kernels but which will...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of complete whole kernels but which will...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Kernel Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Kernel Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color classifications provided in this section. When the color of kernels in a...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color classifications provided in this section. When the color of kernels in a...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Kernel Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the...

  7. KITTEN Lightweight Kernel 0.1 Beta

    2007-12-12

    The Kitten Lightweight Kernel is a simplified OS (operating system) kernel that is intended to manage a compute node's hardware resources. It provides a set of mechanisms to user-level applications for utilizing hardware resources (e.g., allocating memory, creating processes, accessing the network). Kitten is much simpler than general-purpose OS kernels, such as Linux or Windows, but includes all of the esssential functionality needed to support HPC (high-performance computing) MPI, PGAS and OpenMP applications. Kitten providesmore » unique capabilities such as physically contiguous application memory, transparent large page support, and noise-free tick-less operation, which enable HPC applications to obtain greater efficiency and scalability than with general purpose OS kernels.« less

  8. Quantum kernel applications in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the quantum mechanics of biological molecules is being driven by computational advances. The notion of quantum kernels can be introduced to simplify the formalism of quantum mechanics, making it especially suitable for parallel computation of very large biological molecules. The essential idea is to mathematically break large biological molecules into smaller kernels that are calculationally tractable, and then to represent the full molecule by a summation over the kernels. The accuracy of the kernel energy method (KEM) is shown by systematic application to a great variety of molecular types found in biology. These include peptides, proteins, DNA and RNA. Examples are given that explore the KEM across a variety of chemical models, and to the outer limits of energy accuracy and molecular size. KEM represents an advance in quantum biology applicable to problems in medicine and drug design. PMID:22857535

  9. Complex phylogenetic distribution of a non-canonical genetic code in green algae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    reassignment of both stop codons to glutamine. Instead the standard code was retained by the disappearance of the ambiguously decoding tRNAs from the genome. We correlate the emergence of a non-canonical genetic code in the Ulvophyceae to their multinucleate nature. PMID:20977766

  10. Variational Dirichlet Blur Kernel Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Mateos, Javier; Zhou, Fugen; Molina, Rafael; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2015-12-01

    Blind image deconvolution involves two key objectives: 1) latent image and 2) blur estimation. For latent image estimation, we propose a fast deconvolution algorithm, which uses an image prior of nondimensional Gaussianity measure to enforce sparsity and an undetermined boundary condition methodology to reduce boundary artifacts. For blur estimation, a linear inverse problem with normalization and nonnegative constraints must be solved. However, the normalization constraint is ignored in many blind image deblurring methods, mainly because it makes the problem less tractable. In this paper, we show that the normalization constraint can be very naturally incorporated into the estimation process by using a Dirichlet distribution to approximate the posterior distribution of the blur. Making use of variational Dirichlet approximation, we provide a blur posterior approximation that considers the uncertainty of the estimate and removes noise in the estimated kernel. Experiments with synthetic and real data demonstrate that the proposed method is very competitive to the state-of-the-art blind image restoration methods. PMID:26390458

  11. Weighted Bergman Kernels and Quantization}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engliš, Miroslav

    Let Ω be a bounded pseudoconvex domain in CN, φ, ψ two positive functions on Ω such that - log ψ, - log φ are plurisubharmonic, and z∈Ω a point at which - log φ is smooth and strictly plurisubharmonic. We show that as k-->∞, the Bergman kernels with respect to the weights φkψ have an asymptotic expansion for x,y near z, where φ(x,y) is an almost-analytic extension of &\\phi(x)=φ(x,x) and similarly for ψ. Further, . If in addition Ω is of finite type, φ,ψ behave reasonably at the boundary, and - log φ, - log ψ are strictly plurisubharmonic on Ω, we obtain also an analogous asymptotic expansion for the Berezin transform and give applications to the Berezin quantization. Finally, for Ω smoothly bounded and strictly pseudoconvex and φ a smooth strictly plurisubharmonic defining function for Ω, we also obtain results on the Berezin-Toeplitz quantization.

  12. TICK: Transparent Incremental Checkpointing at Kernel Level

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Gioiosa, Roberto

    2004-10-25

    TICK is a software package implemented in Linux 2.6 that allows the save and restore of user processes, without any change to the user code or binary. With TICK a process can be suspended by the Linux kernel upon receiving an interrupt and saved in a file. This file can be later thawed in another computer running Linux (potentially the same computer). TICK is implemented as a Linux kernel module, in the Linux version 2.6.5

  13. The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Harold

    This book argues against the politicization of literature and presents a guide to the great works and essential writers of the ages, the "Western Canon." The book studies 26 writers and seeks to isolate the qualities that made these authors canonical, that is, authoritative in Western culture. Noting that although originally the "Canon" meant the…

  14. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  15. Symmetric Quartic Map in natural canonical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Danielle; Jones, Bilal; Settle, Talise; Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh

    2015-11-01

    The generating function for the simple map is modified by replacing the cubic term in canonical momentum by a quartic term. New parameters are introduced in the modified generating function to control the height and the width of ideal separatrix surface and the poloidal magnetic flux inside ideal separatrix. The new generating function is the generating function for the Symmetric Quartic Map (SQM). The new parameters in the generating function are chosen such that the height, width, elongation, and the poloidal flux inside the separatrix for the SQM are same as the simple map. The resulting generating function for the SQM is then transformed from the physical coordinates to the natural canonical coordinates. The equilibrium separatrix of the SQM is calculated in the natural canonical coordinates. The purpose of this research is to calculate the homoclinic tangle of the SQM and compare with the simple map. The separatrix of the simple map is open and unbounded; while the separatrix of the SQM is closed and compact. Motivation is to see what role the topology of the separatrix plays in its homoclinic tangle in single-null divertor tokamaks. This work is supported by grants DE-FG02-01ER54624, DE-FG02-04ER54793, and DE-FG02-07ER54937.

  16. A kernel autoassociator approach to pattern classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Huang, Weimin; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Bailing

    2005-06-01

    Autoassociators are a special type of neural networks which, by learning to reproduce a given set of patterns, grasp the underlying concept that is useful for pattern classification. In this paper, we present a novel nonlinear model referred to as kernel autoassociators based on kernel methods. While conventional non-linear autoassociation models emphasize searching for the non-linear representations of input patterns, a kernel autoassociator takes a kernel feature space as the nonlinear manifold, and places emphasis on the reconstruction of input patterns from the kernel feature space. Two methods are proposed to address the reconstruction problem, using linear and multivariate polynomial functions, respectively. We apply the proposed model to novelty detection with or without novelty examples and study it on the promoter detection and sonar target recognition problems. We also apply the model to mclass classification problems including wine recognition, glass recognition, handwritten digit recognition, and face recognition. The experimental results show that, compared with conventional autoassociators and other recognition systems, kernel autoassociators can provide better or comparable performance for concept learning and recognition in various domains. PMID:15971928

  17. A kernel autoassociator approach to pattern classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Huang, Weimin; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Bailing

    2005-06-01

    Autoassociators are a special type of neural networks which, by learning to reproduce a given set of patterns, grasp the underlying concept that is useful for pattern classification. In this paper, we present a novel nonlinear model referred to as kernel autoassociators based on kernel methods. While conventional non-linear autoassociation models emphasize searching for the non-linear representations of input patterns, a kernel autoassociator takes a kernel feature space as the nonlinear manifold, and places emphasis on the reconstruction of input patterns from the kernel feature space. Two methods are proposed to address the reconstruction problem, using linear and multivariate polynomial functions, respectively. We apply the proposed model to novelty detection with or without novelty examples and study it on the promoter detection and sonar target recognition problems. We also apply the model to mclass classification problems including wine recognition, glass recognition, handwritten digit recognition, and face recognition. The experimental results show that, compared with conventional autoassociators and other recognition systems, kernel autoassociators can provide better or comparable performance for concept learning and recognition in various domains.

  18. PET Image Reconstruction Using Kernel Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Image reconstruction from low-count PET projection data is challenging because the inverse problem is ill-posed. Prior information can be used to improve image quality. Inspired by the kernel methods in machine learning, this paper proposes a kernel based method that models PET image intensity in each pixel as a function of a set of features obtained from prior information. The kernel-based image model is incorporated into the forward model of PET projection data and the coefficients can be readily estimated by the maximum likelihood (ML) or penalized likelihood image reconstruction. A kernelized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is presented to obtain the ML estimate. Computer simulations show that the proposed approach can achieve better bias versus variance trade-off and higher contrast recovery for dynamic PET image reconstruction than the conventional maximum likelihood method with and without post-reconstruction denoising. Compared with other regularization-based methods, the kernel method is easier to implement and provides better image quality for low-count data. Application of the proposed kernel method to a 4D dynamic PET patient dataset showed promising results. PMID:25095249

  19. Canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial patterning by modulating levels of laminins in zebrafish appendages

    PubMed Central

    Nagendran, Monica; Arora, Prateek; Gori, Payal; Mulay, Aditya; Ray, Shinjini; Jacob, Tressa; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    The patterning and morphogenesis of body appendages – such as limbs and fins – is orchestrated by the activities of several developmental pathways. Wnt signalling is essential for the induction of limbs. However, it is unclear whether a canonical Wnt signalling gradient exists and regulates the patterning of epithelium in vertebrate appendages. Using an evolutionarily old appendage – the median fin in zebrafish – as a model, we show that the fin epithelium exhibits graded changes in cellular morphology along the proximo-distal axis. This epithelial pattern is strictly correlated with the gradient of canonical Wnt signalling activity. By combining genetic analyses with cellular imaging, we show that canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial cell morphology by modulating the levels of laminins, which are extracellular matrix components. We have unravelled a hitherto unknown mechanism involved in epithelial patterning, which is also conserved in the pectoral fins – evolutionarily recent appendages that are homologous to tetrapod limbs. PMID:25519245

  20. Multireference quantum chemistry through a joint density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Takeshi; Kurashige, Yuki; Neuscamman, Eric; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2010-01-14

    We describe the joint application of the density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory to multireference quantum chemistry. The density matrix renormalization group provides the ability to describe static correlation in large active spaces, while the canonical transformation theory provides a high-order description of the dynamic correlation effects. We demonstrate the joint theory in two benchmark systems designed to test the dynamic and static correlation capabilities of the methods, namely, (i) total correlation energies in long polyenes and (ii) the isomerization curve of the [Cu(2)O(2)](2+) core. The largest complete active spaces and atomic orbital basis sets treated by the joint DMRG-CT theory in these systems correspond to a (24e,24o) active space and 268 atomic orbitals in the polyenes and a (28e,32o) active space and 278 atomic orbitals in [Cu(2)O(2)](2+). PMID:20095661

  1. Ciliary IFT80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signalling for osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Cao, Jay; He, Xiaoning; Serra, Rosa; Qu, Jun; Cao, Xu; Yang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) are required for hedgehog (Hh) signalling transduction that is essential for bone development, however, how IFT proteins regulate Hh signalling in osteoblasts (OBs) remains unclear. Here we show that deletion of ciliary IFT80 in OB precursor cells (OPC) in mice results in growth retardation and markedly decreased bone mass with impaired OB differentiation. Loss of IFT80 blocks canonical Hh–Gli signalling via disrupting Smo ciliary localization, but elevates non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA–stress fibre signalling by increasing Smo and Gαi binding. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK activity partially restores osteogenic differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by inhibiting non-canonical Hh–RhoA–Cofilin/MLC2 signalling. Cytochalasin D, an actin destabilizer, dramatically restores OB differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by disrupting actin stress fibres and promoting cilia formation and Hh–Gli signalling. These findings reveal that IFT80 is required for OB differentiation by balancing between canonical Hh–Gli and non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA pathways and highlight IFT80 as a therapeutic target for craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. PMID:26996322

  2. Ciliary IFT80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signalling for osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Cao, Jay; He, Xiaoning; Serra, Rosa; Qu, Jun; Cao, Xu; Yang, Shuying

    2016-03-21

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) are required for hedgehog (Hh) signalling transduction that is essential for bone development, however, how IFT proteins regulate Hh signalling in osteoblasts (OBs) remains unclear. Here we show that deletion of ciliary IFT80 in OB precursor cells (OPC) in mice results in growth retardation and markedly decreased bone mass with impaired OB differentiation. Loss of IFT80 blocks canonical Hh-Gli signalling via disrupting Smo ciliary localization, but elevates non-canonical Hh-Gαi-RhoA-stress fibre signalling by increasing Smo and Gαi binding. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK activity partially restores osteogenic differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by inhibiting non-canonical Hh-RhoA-Cofilin/MLC2 signalling. Cytochalasin D, an actin destabilizer, dramatically restores OB differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by disrupting actin stress fibres and promoting cilia formation and Hh-Gli signalling. These findings reveal that IFT80 is required for OB differentiation by balancing between canonical Hh-Gli and non-canonical Hh-Gαi-RhoA pathways and highlight IFT80 as a therapeutic target for craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities.

  3. Ciliary IFT80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signalling for osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Cao, Jay; He, Xiaoning; Serra, Rosa; Qu, Jun; Cao, Xu; Yang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) are required for hedgehog (Hh) signalling transduction that is essential for bone development, however, how IFT proteins regulate Hh signalling in osteoblasts (OBs) remains unclear. Here we show that deletion of ciliary IFT80 in OB precursor cells (OPC) in mice results in growth retardation and markedly decreased bone mass with impaired OB differentiation. Loss of IFT80 blocks canonical Hh-Gli signalling via disrupting Smo ciliary localization, but elevates non-canonical Hh-Gαi-RhoA-stress fibre signalling by increasing Smo and Gαi binding. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK activity partially restores osteogenic differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by inhibiting non-canonical Hh-RhoA-Cofilin/MLC2 signalling. Cytochalasin D, an actin destabilizer, dramatically restores OB differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by disrupting actin stress fibres and promoting cilia formation and Hh-Gli signalling. These findings reveal that IFT80 is required for OB differentiation by balancing between canonical Hh-Gli and non-canonical Hh-Gαi-RhoA pathways and highlight IFT80 as a therapeutic target for craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. PMID:26996322

  4. Antibodies to S. aureus LukS-PV Attenuated Subunit Vaccine Neutralize a Broad Spectrum of Canonical and Non-Canonical Bicomponent Leukotoxin Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Rajan P.; Kort, Thomas; Shulenin, Sergey; Kanipakala, Tulasikumari; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Aman, M. Javad

    2015-01-01

    S. aureus vaccine development has proven particularly difficult. The conventional approach to achieve sterile immunity through opsonophagocytic killing has been largely unsuccessful. S. aureus is highly toxigenic and a great body of evidence suggests that a successful future vaccine for this organism should target extracellular toxins which are responsible for host tissue destruction and immunosuppression. Major staphylococcal toxins are alpha toxin (a single subunit hemolysin) along with a group of bicomponent pore-forming toxins (BCPFT), namely Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), gamma hemolysins (HlgCB and AB), LukAB and LukED. In our previous report, an attenuated mutant of LukS-PV (PVL- S subunit) named as “LukS-mut9” elicited high immunogenic response as well as provided a significant protection in a mouse sepsis model. Recent discovery of PVL receptors shows that mice lack receptors for this toxin, thus the reported protection of mice with the PVL vaccine may relate to cross protective responses against other homologous toxins. This manuscript addresses this issue by demonstrating that polyclonal antibody generated by LukS-mut9 can neutralize other canonical and non-canonical leukotoxin pairs. In this report, we also demonstrated that several potent toxins can be created by non-canonical pairing of subunits. Out of 5 pairs of canonical and 8 pairs of non-canonical toxins tested, anti-LukS-mut9 polyclonal antibodies neutralized all except for LukAB. We also studied the potential hemolytic activities of canonical and noncanonical pairs among biocomponent toxins and discovered that a novel non-canonical pair consisting of HlgA and LukD is a highly toxic combination. This pair can lyse RBC from different species including human blood far better than alpha hemolysin. Moreover, to follow-up our last report, we explored the correlation between the levels of pre-existing antibodies to new sets of leukotoxins subunits and clinical outcomes in adult patients with S

  5. A Canonical Biomechanical Vocal Fold Model

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The present article aimed at constructing a canonical geometry of the human vocal fold (VF) from subject-specific image slice data. A computer-aided design approach automated the model construction. A subject-specific geometry available in literature, three abstractions (which successively diminished in geometric detail) derived from it, and a widely used quasi two-dimensional VF model geometry were used to create computational models. The first three natural frequencies of the models were used to characterize their mechanical response. These frequencies were determined for a representative range of tissue biomechanical properties, accounting for underlying VF histology. Compared with the subject-specific geometry model (baseline), a higher degree of abstraction was found to always correspond to a larger deviation in model frequency (up to 50% in the relevant range of tissue biomechanical properties). The model we deemed canonical was optimally abstracted, in that it significantly simplified the VF geometry compared with the baseline geometry but can be recalibrated in a consistent manner to match the baseline response. Models providing only a marginally higher degree of abstraction were found to have significant deviation in predicted frequency response. The quasi two-dimensional model presented an extreme situation: it could not be recalibrated for its frequency response to match the subject-specific model. This deficiency was attributed to complex support conditions at anterior-posterior extremities of the VFs, accentuated by further issues introduced through the tissue biomechanical properties. In creating canonical models by leveraging advances in clinical imaging techniques, the automated design procedure makes VF modeling based on subject-specific geometry more realizable. PMID:22209063

  6. Canonical Notch activation in osteocytes causes osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Canalis, Ernesto; Bridgewater, David; Schilling, Lauren; Zanotti, Stefano

    2016-01-15

    Activation of Notch1 in cells of the osteoblastic lineage inhibits osteoblast differentiation/function and causes osteopenia, whereas its activation in osteocytes causes a distinct osteopetrotic phenotype. To explore mechanisms responsible, we established the contributions of canonical Notch signaling (Rbpjκ dependent) to osteocyte function. Transgenics expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the dentin matrix protein-1 (Dmp1) promoter were crossed with Rbpjκ conditional mice to generate Dmp1-Cre(+/-);Rbpjκ(Δ/Δ) mice. These mice did not have a skeletal phenotype, indicating that Rbpjκ is dispensable for osteocyte function. To study the Rbpjκ contribution to Notch activation, Rosa(Notch) mice, where a loxP-flanked STOP cassette is placed between the Rosa26 promoter and the NICD coding sequence, were crossed with Dmp1-Cre transgenic mice and studied in the context (Dmp1-Cre(+/-);Rosa(Notch);Rbpjκ(Δ/Δ)) or not (Dmp1-Cre(+/-);Rosa(Notch)) of Rbpjκ inactivation. Dmp1-Cre(+/-);Rosa(Notch) mice exhibited increased femoral trabecular bone volume and decreased osteoclasts and bone resorption. The phenotype was reversed in the context of the Rbpjκ inactivation, demonstrating that Notch canonical signaling was accountable for the phenotype. Notch activation downregulated Sost and Dkk1 and upregulated Axin2, Tnfrsf11b, and Tnfsf11 mRNA expression, and these effects were not observed in the context of the Rbpjκ inactivation. In conclusion, Notch activation in osteocytes suppresses bone resorption and increases bone volume by utilization of canonical signals that also result in the inhibition of Sost and Dkk1 and upregulation of Wnt signaling. PMID:26578715

  7. Adaptive kernels for multi-fiber reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Jian, Bing; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for multi-fiber reconstruction given a diffusion-weighted MRI dataset. There are several existing methods that employ various spherical deconvolution kernels for achieving this task. However the kernels in all of the existing methods rely on certain assumptions regarding the properties of the underlying fibers, which introduce inaccuracies and unnatural limitations in them. Our model is a non trivial generalization of the spherical deconvolution model, which unlike the existing methods does not make use of a fix-shaped kernel. Instead, the shape of the kernel is estimated simultaneously with the rest of the unknown parameters by employing a general adaptive model that can theoretically approximate any spherical deconvolution kernel. The performance of our model is demonstrated using simulated and real diffusion-weighed MR datasets and compared quantitatively with several existing techniques in literature. The results obtained indicate that our model has superior performance that is close to the theoretic limit of the best possible achievable result.

  8. Analog forecasting with dynamics-adapted kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Analog forecasting is a nonparametric technique introduced by Lorenz in 1969 which predicts the evolution of states of a dynamical system (or observables defined on the states) by following the evolution of the sample in a historical record of observations which most closely resembles the current initial data. Here, we introduce a suite of forecasting methods which improve traditional analog forecasting by combining ideas from kernel methods developed in harmonic analysis and machine learning and state-space reconstruction for dynamical systems. A key ingredient of our approach is to replace single-analog forecasting with weighted ensembles of analogs constructed using local similarity kernels. The kernels used here employ a number of dynamics-dependent features designed to improve forecast skill, including Takens’ delay-coordinate maps (to recover information in the initial data lost through partial observations) and a directional dependence on the dynamical vector field generating the data. Mathematically, our approach is closely related to kernel methods for out-of-sample extension of functions, and we discuss alternative strategies based on the Nyström method and the multiscale Laplacian pyramids technique. We illustrate these techniques in applications to forecasting in a low-order deterministic model for atmospheric dynamics with chaotic metastability, and interannual-scale forecasting in the North Pacific sector of a comprehensive climate model. We find that forecasts based on kernel-weighted ensembles have significantly higher skill than the conventional approach following a single analog.

  9. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  10. Parametrizing Fluids in Canonical Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonetti, Simone; Montani, Giovanni

    The problem of time is an unsolved issue of canonical General Relativity. A possible solution is the Brown-Kuchař mechanism which couples matter to the gravitational field and recovers a physical, i.e. non vanishing, observable Hamiltonian functional by manipulating the set of constraints. Two cases are analyzed. A generalized scalar fluid model provides an evolutionary picture, but only in a singular case. The Schutz' model provides an interesting singularity free result: the entropy per baryon enters the definition of the physical Hamiltonian. Moreover in the co-moving frame one is able to identify the time variable τ with the logarithm of entropy.

  11. Grand Canonical Ensembles in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, David; Yang, Wei-Shih

    2012-03-01

    We develop a formalism for general relativistic, grand canonical ensembles in space-times with timelike Killing fields. Using that, we derive ideal gas laws, and show how they depend on the geometry of the particular space-times. A systematic method for calculating Newtonian limits is given for a class of these space-times, which is illustrated for Kerr space-time. In addition, we prove uniqueness of the infinite volume Gibbs measure, and absence of phase transitions for a class of interaction potentials in anti-de Sitter space.

  12. Estimating the Kernel Mass Ratio in Peanuts Nondestructively Using a Low-Cost Impedance Meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Earlier, we investigated the possibility of estimating the mass of the kernels in a given volume of unshelled peanuts using a commercial impedance meter. Measurements of impedance and phase angles of peanut samples were made from 1 to 10 MHz at intervals of 1 MHz. The measured values were correlate...

  13. Constructing perturbation theory kernels for large-scale structure in generalized cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple numerical scheme for perturbation theory (PT) calculations of large-scale structure. Solving the evolution equations for perturbations numerically, we construct the PT kernels as building blocks of statistical calculations, from which the power spectrum and/or correlation function can be systematically computed. The scheme is especially applicable to the generalized structure formation including modified gravity, in which the analytic construction of PT kernels is intractable. As an illustration, we show several examples for power spectrum calculations in f (R ) gravity and Λ CDM models.

  14. Semiclassical evolution of correlations between observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozorio de Almeida, Alfredo M.; Brodier, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The trace of an arbitrary product of quantum operators with the density operator is rendered as a multiple phase space integral of the product of their Weyl symbols with the Wigner function. Interspersing the factors with various evolution operators, one obtains an evolving correlation. The kernel for the matching multiple integral that evolves within the Weyl representation is identified with the trace of a single compound unitary operator. Its evaluation within a semiclassical approximation then becomes a sum over the periodic trajectories of the corresponding classical compound canonical transformation. The search for periodic trajectories can be bypassed by an exactly equivalent initial value scheme, which involves a change of integration variable and a reduced compound unitary operator. Restriction of all the operators to observables with smooth non-oscillatory Weyl symbols leads naturally to classical evolution within a single phase space integral, if each observable undergoes independent Heisenberg evolution. The linear response function for infrared spectroscopy provides an example depending on a double phase space integral. This is compared to an alternative scheme that employs the widely used Herman-Kluk propagator.

  15. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in time at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.

  16. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in timemore » at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.« less

  17. Kernel bandwidth estimation for nonparametric modeling.

    PubMed

    Bors, Adrian G; Nasios, Nikolaos

    2009-12-01

    Kernel density estimation is a nonparametric procedure for probability density modeling, which has found several applications in various fields. The smoothness and modeling ability of the functional approximation are controlled by the kernel bandwidth. In this paper, we describe a Bayesian estimation method for finding the bandwidth from a given data set. The proposed bandwidth estimation method is applied in three different computational-intelligence methods that rely on kernel density estimation: 1) scale space; 2) mean shift; and 3) quantum clustering. The third method is a novel approach that relies on the principles of quantum mechanics. This method is based on the analogy between data samples and quantum particles and uses the SchrOdinger potential as a cost function. The proposed methodology is used for blind-source separation of modulated signals and for terrain segmentation based on topography information.

  18. Non-canonical translation in RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Viral protein synthesis is completely dependent upon the translational machinery of the host cell. However, many RNA virus transcripts have marked structural differences from cellular mRNAs that preclude canonical translation initiation, such as the absence of a 5′ cap structure or the presence of highly structured 5′UTRs containing replication and/or packaging signals. Furthermore, whilst the great majority of cellular mRNAs are apparently monocistronic, RNA viruses must often express multiple proteins from their mRNAs. In addition, RNA viruses have very compact genomes and are under intense selective pressure to optimize usage of the available sequence space. Together, these features have driven the evolution of a plethora of non-canonical translational mechanisms in RNA viruses that help them to meet these challenges. Here, we review the mechanisms utilized by RNA viruses of eukaryotes, focusing on internal ribosome entry, leaky scanning, non-AUG initiation, ribosome shunting, reinitiation, ribosomal frameshifting and stop-codon readthrough. The review will highlight recently discovered examples of unusual translational strategies, besides revisiting some classical cases. PMID:22535777

  19. Observables in classical canonical gravity: Folklore demystified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, J. M.; Salisbury, D. C.; Sundermeyer, K. A.

    2010-04-01

    We give an overview of some conceptual difficulties, sometimes called paradoxes, that have puzzled for years the physical interpetation of classical canonical gravity and, by extension, the canonical formulation of generally covariant theories. We identify these difficulties as stemming form some terminological misunderstandings as to what is meant by "gauge invariance", or what is understood classically by a "physical state". We make a thorough analysis of the issue and show that all purported paradoxes disappear when the right terminology is in place. Since this issue is connected with the search of observables - gauge invariant quantities - for these theories, we formally show that time evolving observables can be constructed for every observer. This construction relies on the fixation of the gauge freedom of diffeomorphism invariance by means of a scalar coordinatization. We stress the condition that the coordinatization must be made with scalars. As an example of our method for obtaining observables we discuss the case of the massive particle in AdS spacetime.

  20. Canon Fodder: Young Adult Literature as a Tool for Critiquing Canonicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hateley, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Young adult literature is a tool of socialisation and acculturation for young readers. This extends to endowing "reading" with particular significance in terms of what literature should be read and why. This paper considers some recent young adult fiction with an eye to its engagement with canonical literature and its representations of…

  1. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  2. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    PubMed

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Saïd; Denhez, Clément; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil.

  3. Reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Lu, MingZhe; Gao, Daqi

    2015-02-01

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is demonstrated to be flexible and effective in depicting heterogeneous data sources since MKL can introduce multiple kernels rather than a single fixed kernel into applications. However, MKL would get a high time and space complexity in contrast to single kernel learning, which is not expected in real-world applications. Meanwhile, it is known that the kernel mapping ways of MKL generally have two forms including implicit kernel mapping and empirical kernel mapping (EKM), where the latter is less attracted. In this paper, we focus on the MKL with the EKM, and propose a reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine named RMEKLM for short. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to reduce both time and space complexity of the MKL with EKM. Different from the existing MKL, the proposed RMEKLM adopts the Gauss Elimination technique to extract a set of feature vectors, which is validated that doing so does not lose much information of the original feature space. Then RMEKLM adopts the extracted feature vectors to span a reduced orthonormal subspace of the feature space, which is visualized in terms of the geometry structure. It can be demonstrated that the spanned subspace is isomorphic to the original feature space, which means that the dot product of two vectors in the original feature space is equal to that of the two corresponding vectors in the generated orthonormal subspace. More importantly, the proposed RMEKLM brings a simpler computation and meanwhile needs a less storage space, especially in the processing of testing. Finally, the experimental results show that RMEKLM owns a much efficient and effective performance in terms of both complexity and classification. The contributions of this paper can be given as follows: (1) by mapping the input space into an orthonormal subspace, the geometry of the generated subspace is visualized; (2) this paper first reduces both the time and space complexity of the EKM-based MKL; (3

  4. Utilizing Kernelized Advection Schemes in Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeh, N.; Balaji, V.

    2008-12-01

    There has been a recent effort in the ocean model community to use a set of generic FORTRAN library routines for advection of scalar tracers in the ocean. In a collaborative project called Hybrid Ocean Model Environement (HOME), vastly different advection schemes (space-differencing schemes for advection equation) become available to modelers in the form of subroutine calls (kernels). In this talk we explore the possibility of utilizing ESMF data structures in wrapping these kernels so that they can be readily used in ESMF gridded components.

  5. Kernel abortion in maize. II. Distribution of /sup 14/C among kernel carboydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, J.M.; Jones, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the uptake and distribution of /sup 14/C among fructose, glucose, sucrose, and starch in the cob, pedicel, and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays L.) kernels induced to abort by high temperature with those that develop normally. Kernels cultured in vitro at 309 and 35/sup 0/C were transferred to (/sup 14/C)sucrose media 10 days after pollination. Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C aborted prior to the onset of linear dry matter accumulation. Significant uptake into the cob, pedicel, and endosperm of radioactivity associated with the soluble and starch fractions of the tissues was detected after 24 hours in culture on atlageled media. After 8 days in culture on (/sup 14/C)sucrose media, 48 and 40% of the radioactivity associated with the cob carbohydrates was found in the reducing sugars at 30 and 35/sup 0/C, respectively. Of the total carbohydrates, a higher percentage of label was associated with sucrose and lower percentage with fructose and glucose in pedicel tissue of kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C compared to kernels cultured at 30/sup 0/C. These results indicate that sucrose was not cleaved to fructose and glucose as rapidly during the unloading process in the pedicel of kernels induced to abort by high temperature. Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C had a much lower proportion of label associated with endosperm starch (29%) than did kernels cultured at 30/sup 0/C (89%). Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C had a correspondingly higher proportion of /sup 14/C in endosperm fructose, glucose, and sucrose.

  6. QTL Mapping of Kernel Number-Related Traits and Validation of One Major QTL for Ear Length in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Dongao; Ning, Qiang; Shen, Xiaomeng; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zuxin

    2016-01-01

    The kernel number is a grain yield component and an important maize breeding goal. Ear length, kernel number per row and ear row number are highly correlated with the kernel number per ear, which eventually determines the ear weight and grain yield. In this study, two sets of F2:3 families developed from two bi-parental crosses sharing one inbred line were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for four kernel number-related traits: ear length, kernel number per row, ear row number and ear weight. A total of 39 QTLs for the four traits were identified in the two populations. The phenotypic variance explained by a single QTL ranged from 0.4% to 29.5%. Additionally, 14 overlapping QTLs formed 5 QTL clusters on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7, and 10. Intriguingly, six QTLs for ear length and kernel number per row overlapped in a region on chromosome 1. This region was designated qEL1.10 and was validated as being simultaneously responsible for ear length, kernel number per row and ear weight in a near isogenic line-derived population, suggesting that qEL1.10 was a pleiotropic QTL with large effects. Furthermore, the performance of hybrids generated by crossing 6 elite inbred lines with two near isogenic lines at qEL1.10 showed the breeding value of qEL1.10 for the improvement of the kernel number and grain yield of maize hybrids. This study provides a basis for further fine mapping, molecular marker-aided breeding and functional studies of kernel number-related traits in maize. PMID:27176215

  7. Accuracy of Reduced and Extended Thin-Wire Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J

    2008-11-24

    Some results are presented comparing the accuracy of the reduced thin-wire kernel and an extended kernel with exact integration of the 1/R term of the Green's function and results are shown for simple wire structures.

  8. Kernel Partial Least Squares for Nonlinear Regression and Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent results on applying the method of partial least squares (PLS) in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). A previously proposed kernel PLS regression model was proven to be competitive with other regularized regression methods in RKHS. The family of nonlinear kernel-based PLS models is extended by considering the kernel PLS method for discrimination. Theoretical and experimental results on a two-class discrimination problem indicate usefulness of the method.

  9. Fabrication of Uranium Oxycarbide Kernels for HTR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Barnes; CLay Richardson; Scott Nagley; John Hunn; Eric Shaber

    2010-10-01

    Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) has been producing high quality uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels for Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel tests at the Idaho National Laboratory. In 2005, 350-µm, 19.7% 235U-enriched UCO kernels were produced for the AGR-1 test fuel. Following coating of these kernels and forming the coated-particles into compacts, this fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 2006 until November 2009. B&W produced 425-µm, 14% enriched UCO kernels in 2008, and these kernels were used to produce fuel for the AGR-2 experiment that was inserted in ATR in 2010. B&W also produced 500-µm, 9.6% enriched UO2 kernels for the AGR-2 experiments. Kernels of the same size and enrichment as AGR-1 were also produced for the AGR-3/4 experiment. In addition to fabricating enriched UCO and UO2 kernels, B&W has produced more than 100 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels which are being used in coating development tests. Successive lots of kernels have demonstrated consistent high quality and also allowed for fabrication process improvements. Improvements in kernel forming were made subsequent to AGR-1 kernel production. Following fabrication of AGR-2 kernels, incremental increases in sintering furnace charge size have been demonstrated. Recently small scale sintering tests using a small development furnace equipped with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) has increased understanding of how kernel sintering parameters affect sintered kernel properties. The steps taken to increase throughput and process knowledge have reduced kernel production costs. Studies have been performed of additional modifications toward the goal of increasing capacity of the current fabrication line to use for production of first core fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and providing a basis for the design of a full scale fuel fabrication facility.

  10. 7 CFR 51.2295 - Half kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... the separated half of a kernel with not more than one-eighth broken off....

  11. Kernel Temporal Differences for Neural Decoding

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jihye; Sanchez Giraldo, Luis G.; Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Francis, Joseph T.; Sanchez, Justin C.; Príncipe, José C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the feasibility and capability of the kernel temporal difference (KTD)(λ) algorithm for neural decoding. KTD(λ) is an online, kernel-based learning algorithm, which has been introduced to estimate value functions in reinforcement learning. This algorithm combines kernel-based representations with the temporal difference approach to learning. One of our key observations is that by using strictly positive definite kernels, algorithm's convergence can be guaranteed for policy evaluation. The algorithm's nonlinear functional approximation capabilities are shown in both simulations of policy evaluation and neural decoding problems (policy improvement). KTD can handle high-dimensional neural states containing spatial-temporal information at a reasonable computational complexity allowing real-time applications. When the algorithm seeks a proper mapping between a monkey's neural states and desired positions of a computer cursor or a robot arm, in both open-loop and closed-loop experiments, it can effectively learn the neural state to action mapping. Finally, a visualization of the coadaptation process between the decoder and the subject shows the algorithm's capabilities in reinforcement learning brain machine interfaces. PMID:25866504

  12. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order... of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel, or brown spot, as defined in the United States Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded...

  13. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order... of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel, or brown spot, as defined in the United States Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded...

  14. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order... of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel, or brown spot, as defined in the United States Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded...

  15. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order... of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel, or brown spot, as defined in the United States Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded...

  16. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order... of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel, or brown spot, as defined in the United States Standards for Shelled Almonds, or which has embedded...

  17. A simple algorithm for computing canonical forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, H.; Hunt, L. R.; Renjeng, S.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that all linear time-invariant controllable systems can be transformed to Brunovsky canonical form by a transformation consisting only of coordinate changes and linear feedback. However, the actual procedures for doing this have tended to be overly complex. The technique introduced here is envisioned as an on-line procedure and is inspired by George Meyer's tangent model for nonlinear systems. The process utilizes Meyer's block triangular form as an intermedicate step in going to Brunovsky form. The method also involves orthogonal matrices, thus eliminating the need for the computation of matrix inverses. In addition, the Kronecker indices can be computed as a by-product of this transformation so it is necessary to know them in advance.

  18. QTLs and candidate genes for desiccation and abscisic acid content in maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    and not correlated with ABA content in either tissue. Conclusions A high resolution QTL map for kernel desiccation and ABA content in embryo and endosperm showed several precise colocations between desiccation and ABA traits. Five new members of the maize NCED gene family and another maize ZEP gene were identified and mapped. Among all the identified candidates, aquaporins and members of the Responsive to ABA gene family appeared better candidates than NCEDs and ZEPs. PMID:20047666

  19. 21 CFR 176.350 - Tamarind seed kernel powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tamarind seed kernel powder. 176.350 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.350 Tamarind seed kernel powder. Tamarind seed kernel powder may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  20. 21 CFR 176.350 - Tamarind seed kernel powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tamarind seed kernel powder. 176.350 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.350 Tamarind seed kernel powder. Tamarind seed kernel powder may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  1. 21 CFR 176.350 - Tamarind seed kernel powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tamarind seed kernel powder. 176.350 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.350 Tamarind seed kernel powder. Tamarind seed kernel powder may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  2. 21 CFR 176.350 - Tamarind seed kernel powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tamarind seed kernel powder. 176.350 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.350 Tamarind seed kernel powder. Tamarind seed kernel powder may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  3. 21 CFR 176.350 - Tamarind seed kernel powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tamarind seed kernel powder. 176.350 Section 176... Paperboard § 176.350 Tamarind seed kernel powder. Tamarind seed kernel powder may be safely used as a..., packaging, transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Tamarind...

  4. 7 CFR 868.254 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.254 Section 868.254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Governing Application of Standards § 868.254 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall...

  5. 7 CFR 868.304 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.304 Section 868.304 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Application of Standards § 868.304 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall be determined by the...

  6. 7 CFR 868.304 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.304 Section 868.304 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Application of Standards § 868.304 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall be determined by the...

  7. 7 CFR 868.254 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.254 Section 868.254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Governing Application of Standards § 868.254 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall...

  8. 7 CFR 868.304 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.304 Section 868.304 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Application of Standards § 868.304 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall be determined by the...

  9. 7 CFR 868.254 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.254 Section 868.254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Governing Application of Standards § 868.254 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall...

  10. 7 CFR 868.254 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.254 Section 868.254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Governing Application of Standards § 868.254 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of...

  12. 7 CFR 868.304 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.304 Section 868.304 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Application of Standards § 868.304 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall be determined by the...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of...

  14. 7 CFR 868.254 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.254 Section 868.254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Governing Application of Standards § 868.254 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall...

  15. 7 CFR 868.304 - Broken kernels determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broken kernels determination. 868.304 Section 868.304 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... Application of Standards § 868.304 Broken kernels determination. Broken kernels shall be determined by the...

  16. Canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling and the control of metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teperino, Raffaele; Aberger, Fritz; Esterbauer, Harald; Riobo, Natalia; Pospisilik, John Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent key healthcare challenges of our day, affecting upwards of one billion people worldwide. These individuals are at higher risk for cancer, stroke, blindness, heart and cardiovascular disease, and to date, have no effective long-term treatment options available. Recent and accumulating evidence has implicated the developmental morphogen Hedgehog and its downstream signalling in metabolic control. Generally thought to be quiescent in adults, Hedgehog is associated with several human cancers, and as such, has already emerged as a therapeutic target in oncology. Here, we attempt to give a comprehensive overview of the key signalling events associated with both canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling, and highlight the increasingly complex regulatory modalities that appear to link Hedgehog and control metabolism. We highlight these key findings and discuss their impact for therapeutic development, cancer and metabolic disease. PMID:24862854

  17. Chare kernel; A runtime support system for parallel computations

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W. ); Kale, L.V. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents the chare kernel system, which supports parallel computations with irregular structure. The chare kernel is a collection of primitive functions that manage chares, manipulative messages, invoke atomic computations, and coordinate concurrent activities. Programs written in the chare kernel language can be executed on different parallel machines without change. Users writing such programs concern themselves with the creation of parallel actions but not with assigning them to specific processors. The authors describe the design and implementation of the chare kernel. Performance of chare kernel programs on two hypercube machines, the Intel iPSC/2 and the NCUBE, is also given.

  18. Kernel weights optimization for error diffusion halftoning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, Victor

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a study to find the best error diffusion kernel for digital halftoning under various restrictions on the number of non-zero kernel coefficients and their set of values. As an objective measure of quality, WSNR was used. The problem of multidimensional optimization was solved numerically using several well-known algorithms: Nelder- Mead, BFGS, and others. The study found a kernel function that provides a quality gain of about 5% in comparison with the best of the commonly used kernel introduced by Floyd and Steinberg. Other kernels obtained allow to significantly reduce the computational complexity of the halftoning process without reducing its quality.

  19. A Canonical Analysis of Career Choice Crystallization and Vocational Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blustein, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Administered measures of vocational maturity and career choice crystallization to 158 community college students. Used canonical analysis to identify relationships between age, gender, career choice crystallization, and vocational maturity. Analysis yielded one significant canonical root, indicating most shared variance between variables was…

  20. Critical Literature Pedagogy: Teaching Canonical Literature for Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsheim-Black, Carlin; Macaluso, Michael; Petrone, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces Critical Literature Pedagogy (CLP), a pedagogical framework for applying goals of critical literacy within the context of teaching canonical literature. Critical literacies encompass skills and dispositions to understand, question, and critique ideological messages of texts; because canonical literature is often…

  1. Structuring Catholic Schools: Creative Imagination Meets Canon Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Phillip J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore the underlying requirements of canon law for establishing and administering Catholic schools, with a view toward helping to arrive at creative solutions to the question of how best to structure these schools civilly and canonically in order to ensure their temporal, spiritual, and religious well-being, and to assure that…

  2. Canonical Slippage: Why Have All the Poems Gone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Discusses many ideas the author has regarding the literature canon including what he thinks should be taught and for what reasons. Makes a case for the classroom contexts that allow students to develop into confident, enthusiastic, and responsible readers of canonical poetry. (SG)

  3. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  4. Numerical canonical transformation approach to quantum many-body problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Steven R.

    2002-10-01

    We present a new approach for numerical solutions of ab initio quantum chemistry systems. The main idea of the approach, which we call canonical diagonalization, is to diagonalize directly the second-quantized Hamiltonian by a sequence of numerical canonical transformations.

  5. The Canonical Passive Construction: Theory and Practice. CLCS Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Marzouk, Ghiath

    This paper examines problems with description of the canonical passive construction, noting how new terminology facilitates consideration of a particular approach to frequency asymmetry. It compares the canonical passive construction in Arabic and English as examples of genetically unrelated languages, referring to other languages where…

  6. [Nondestructive identification of different oil content maize kernels by near-infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lu-Da; Bai, Qi-Lin; Chen, Shao-Jiang

    2009-03-01

    Using 220 maize single kernels, containing 75 common maize single kernels, 72 high-oil maize single kernels and 73 super high-oil maize single kernels as study materials, BPANN identification model was set up for maize single kernel with different oil content based on principal components of near infrared (NIR) spectra. Four fifths of the samples were randomly selected as training set and the other samples as prediction set. Fourteen principal components from the second to the fifteenth were selected as nets input and -1, 0, 1 as nets output. Ten models were set up like this and the accurate identification rate of all the training sets can reach 100%. For prediction sets, fifteen common corn grain samples had an average accurate identification rate of 99.33%, fourteen high-oil corn grain samples had an average accurate identification rate of 97.88%, fourteen super high-oil corn grain samples had an average accurate identification rate of 91.43%, and total maize grains in prediction set had an average accurate identification rate of over 95%. Results showed that NIR spectroscopy combined with BP-ANN technology could identify maize kernels fast and nondestructively according to oil content, which offered a very useful classification method for maize seed breeding. The effect of different principal component on BPANN models was also studied. Results told us that the first principal component with over 99% of variance contribution had negative effect on the identification model. The predictive ability of identification models set up by different principal component was discriminatory, although the learning accurate identification rates were all 100%. So it is necessary to choose correlative principal component to set up identification model.

  7. Online kernel principal component analysis: a reduced-order model.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Kernel principal component analysis (kernel-PCA) is an elegant nonlinear extension of one of the most used data analysis and dimensionality reduction techniques, the principal component analysis. In this paper, we propose an online algorithm for kernel-PCA. To this end, we examine a kernel-based version of Oja's rule, initially put forward to extract a linear principal axe. As with most kernel-based machines, the model order equals the number of available observations. To provide an online scheme, we propose to control the model order. We discuss theoretical results, such as an upper bound on the error of approximating the principal functions with the reduced-order model. We derive a recursive algorithm to discover the first principal axis, and extend it to multiple axes. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, both on synthetic data set and on images of handwritten digits, with comparison to classical kernel-PCA and iterative kernel-PCA.

  8. Quantum Cauchy surfaces in canonical quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yen

    2016-09-01

    For a Dirac theory of quantum gravity obtained from the refined algebraic quantization procedure, we propose a quantum notion of Cauchy surfaces. In such a theory, there is a kernel projector for the quantized scalar and momentum constraints, which maps the kinematic Hilbert space {{K}} into the physical Hilbert space {{H}}. Under this projection, a quantum Cauchy surface isomorphically represents a physical subspace {{D}}\\subset {{H}} with a kinematic subspace {{V}}\\subset {{K}}. The isomorphism induces the complete sets of Dirac observables in {{D}}, which faithfully represent the corresponding complete sets of self-adjoint operators in {{V}}. Due to the constraints, a specific subset of the observables would be ‘frozen’ as number operators, providing a background physical time for the rest of the observables. Therefore, a proper foliation with the quantum Cauchy surfaces may provide an observer frame describing the physical states of spacetimes in a Schrödinger picture, with the evolutions under a specific physical background. A simple model will be supplied as an initiative trial.

  9. Onset of grain filling is associated with a change in properties of linker histone variants in maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Kalamajka, Rainer; Finnie, Christine; Grasser, Klaus D

    2010-04-01

    In maize kernel development, the onset of grain-filling represents a major developmental switch that correlates with a massive reprogramming of gene expression. We have isolated chromosomal linker histones from developing maize kernels before (11 days after pollination, dap) and after (16 dap) initiation of storage synthesis. Six linker histone gene products were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A marked shift of around 4 pH units was observed for the linker histone spot pattern after 2D-gel electrophoresis when comparing the proteins of 11 and 16 dap kernels. The shift from acidic to more basic protein forms suggests a reduction in the level of post-translational modifications of linker histones during kernel development. Analysis of their DNA-binding affinity revealed that the different linker histone gene products bind double-stranded DNA with similar affinity. Interestingly, the linker histones isolated from 16 dap kernels consistently displayed a lower affinity for DNA than the proteins isolated from 11 dap kernels. These findings suggest that the affinity for DNA of the linker histones may be regulated by post-translational modification and that the reduction in DNA affinity could be involved in a more open chromatin during storage synthesis.

  10. A Novel Framework for Learning Geometry-Aware Kernels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Binbin; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Xu, Chen; Chen, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The data from real world usually have nonlinear geometric structure, which are often assumed to lie on or close to a low-dimensional manifold in a high-dimensional space. How to detect this nonlinear geometric structure of the data is important for the learning algorithms. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in utilizing kernels to exploit the manifold structure of the data. Such kernels are called geometry-aware kernels and are widely used in the machine learning algorithms. The performance of these algorithms critically relies on the choice of the geometry-aware kernels. Intuitively, a good geometry-aware kernel should utilize additional information other than the geometric information. In many applications, it is required to compute the out-of-sample data directly. However, most of the geometry-aware kernel methods are restricted to the available data given beforehand, with no straightforward extension for out-of-sample data. In this paper, we propose a framework for more general geometry-aware kernel learning. The proposed framework integrates multiple sources of information and enables us to develop flexible and effective kernel matrices. Then, we theoretically show how the learned kernel matrices are extended to the corresponding kernel functions, in which the out-of-sample data can be computed directly. Under our framework, a novel family of geometry-aware kernels is developed. Especially, some existing geometry-aware kernels can be viewed as instances of our framework. The performance of the kernels is evaluated on dimensionality reduction, classification, and clustering tasks. The empirical results show that our kernels significantly improve the performance.

  11. Clinical Trials With Large Numbers of Variables: Important Advantages of Canonical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cleophas, Ton J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical analysis assesses the combined effects of a set of predictor variables on a set of outcome variables, but it is little used in clinical trials despite the omnipresence of multiple variables. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of canonical analysis as compared with traditional multivariate methods using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). As an example, a simulated data file with 12 gene expression levels and 4 drug efficacy scores was used. The correlation coefficient between the 12 predictor and 4 outcome variables was 0.87 (P = 0.0001) meaning that 76% of the variability in the outcome variables was explained by the 12 covariates. Repeated testing after the removal of 5 unimportant predictor and 1 outcome variable produced virtually the same overall result. The MANCOVA identified identical unimportant variables, but it was unable to provide overall statistics. (1) Canonical analysis is remarkable, because it can handle many more variables than traditional multivariate methods such as MANCOVA can. (2) At the same time, it accounts for the relative importance of the separate variables, their interactions and differences in units. (3) Canonical analysis provides overall statistics of the effects of sets of variables, whereas traditional multivariate methods only provide the statistics of the separate variables. (4) Unlike other methods for combining the effects of multiple variables such as factor analysis/partial least squares, canonical analysis is scientifically entirely rigorous. (5) Limitations include that it is less flexible than factor analysis/partial least squares, because only 2 sets of variables are used and because multiple solutions instead of one is offered. We do hope that this article will stimulate clinical investigators to start using this remarkable method.

  12. El Escritor y las Normas del Canon Literario (The Writer and the Norms of the Literary Canon).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Policarpo, Alcibiades

    This paper speculates about whether a literary canon exists in contemporary Latin American literature, particularly in the prose genre. The paper points to Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Mario Vargas Llosa as the three authors who might form this traditional and liberal canon with their works "La Muerte de Artemio Cruz" (Fuentes),…

  13. Quark-hadron duality: Pinched kernel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C. A.; Hernandez, L. A.; Schilcher, K.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-08-01

    Hadronic spectral functions measured by the ALEPH collaboration in the vector and axial-vector channels are used to study potential quark-hadron duality violations (DV). This is done entirely in the framework of pinched kernel finite energy sum rules (FESR), i.e. in a model independent fashion. The kinematical range of the ALEPH data is effectively extended up to s = 10 GeV2 by using an appropriate kernel, and assuming that in this region the spectral functions are given by perturbative QCD. Support for this assumption is obtained by using e+ e‑ annihilation data in the vector channel. Results in both channels show a good saturation of the pinched FESR, without further need of explicit models of DV.

  14. Wilson Dslash Kernel From Lattice QCD Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Balint; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Kalamkar, Dhiraj D.; Vaidyanathan, Karthikeyan

    2015-07-01

    Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) is a numerical technique used for calculations in Theoretical Nuclear and High Energy Physics. LQCD is traditionally one of the first applications ported to many new high performance computing architectures and indeed LQCD practitioners have been known to design and build custom LQCD computers. Lattice QCD kernels are frequently used as benchmarks (e.g. 168.wupwise in the SPEC suite) and are generally well understood, and as such are ideal to illustrate several optimization techniques. In this chapter we will detail our work in optimizing the Wilson-Dslash kernels for Intel Xeon Phi, however, as we will show the technique gives excellent performance on regular Xeon Architecture as well.

  15. Shannon Entropy of the Canonical Genetic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis

    The probability that a non-synonymous point mutation in DNA will adversely affect the functionality of the resultant protein is greatly reduced if the substitution is conservative. In that case, the amino acid coded by the mutated codon has similar physico-chemical properties to the original. Many simplified alphabets, which group the 20 common amino acids into families, have been proposed. To evaluate these schema objectively, we introduce a novel, quantitative method based on the inherent redundancy in the canonical genetic code. By calculating the Shannon information entropy carried by 1- or 2-bit messages, groupings that best leverage the robustness of the code are identified. The relative importance of properties related to protein folding - like hydropathy and size - and function, including side-chain acidity, can also be estimated. In addition, this approach allows us to quantify the average information value of nucleotide codon positions, and explore the physiological basis for distinguishing between transition and transversion mutations. Supported by NSU PFRDG Grant #335347.

  16. Finite canonical measure for nonsingular cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2011-06-01

    The total canonical (Liouville-Henneaux-Gibbons-Hawking-Stewart) measure is finite for completely nonsingular Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker classical universes with a minimally coupled massive scalar field and a positive cosmological constant. For a cosmological constant very small in units of the square of the scalar field mass, most of the measure is for nearly de Sitter solutions with no inflation at a much more rapid rate. However, if one restricts to solutions in which the scalar field energy density is ever more than twice the equivalent energy density of the cosmological constant, then the number of e-folds of rapid inflation must be large, and the fraction of the measure is low in which the spatial curvature is comparable to the cosmological constant at the time when it is comparable to the energy density of the scalar field. The measure for such classical FLRWΛ-φ models with both a big bang and a big crunch is also finite. Only the solutions with a big bang that expand forever, or the time-reversed ones that contract from infinity to a big crunch, have infinite measure.

  17. Trypanosomatid apoptosis: 'Apoptosis' without the canonical regulators.

    PubMed

    Smirlis, Despina; Soteriadou, Ketty

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a regulated process of cell death originally described in multicelullar organisms contributing to their development and functionality. There is now increasing experimental evidence that a similar form of cell death is operative in unicellular eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania. The determination of ancestral executors and regulators of 'apoptosis' in these protozoa belonging to the most primitive eukaryotes that appeared on earth 1.5 billion years ago, provide an exciting challenge in the understanding of the evolution of apoptosis-regulating processes. A review of the present knowledge of trypanosomatid apoptosis points to the fact that these dying protozoa acquire common apoptotic morphological features as metazoan cells, although they lack many of the molecules accepted today as canonical apoptosis mediators (Bcl-2 family members, caspases, TNF related family of receptors). Herein, we discuss how the knowledge of regulators and executors of trypanosomatid apoptosis may provide answers to the gaps concerning the origin of apoptosis. The aim of this addendum is to emphasize the need for classifying the ancestral death program and to discuss how this relates to the complex death programs in multicellular lineages, with the hope to stimulate further enquiry and research into this area.

  18. Searching and Indexing Genomic Databases via Kernelization

    PubMed Central

    Gagie, Travis; Puglisi, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advance of DNA sequencing technologies has yielded databases of thousands of genomes. To search and index these databases effectively, it is important that we take advantage of the similarity between those genomes. Several authors have recently suggested searching or indexing only one reference genome and the parts of the other genomes where they differ. In this paper, we survey the 20-year history of this idea and discuss its relation to kernelization in parameterized complexity. PMID:25710001

  19. Numerical integration of the extended variable generalized Langevin equation with a positive Prony representable memory kernel.

    PubMed

    Baczewski, Andrew D; Bond, Stephen D

    2013-07-28

    Generalized Langevin dynamics (GLD) arise in the modeling of a number of systems, ranging from structured fluids that exhibit a viscoelastic mechanical response, to biological systems, and other media that exhibit anomalous diffusive phenomena. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that include GLD in conjunction with external and/or pairwise forces require the development of numerical integrators that are efficient, stable, and have known convergence properties. In this article, we derive a family of extended variable integrators for the Generalized Langevin equation with a positive Prony series memory kernel. Using stability and error analysis, we identify a superlative choice of parameters and implement the corresponding numerical algorithm in the LAMMPS MD software package. Salient features of the algorithm include exact conservation of the first and second moments of the equilibrium velocity distribution in some important cases, stable behavior in the limit of conventional Langevin dynamics, and the use of a convolution-free formalism that obviates the need for explicit storage of the time history of particle velocities. Capability is demonstrated with respect to accuracy in numerous canonical examples, stability in certain limits, and an exemplary application in which the effect of a harmonic confining potential is mapped onto a memory kernel.

  20. Numerical integration of the extended variable generalized Langevin equation with a positive Prony representable memory kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Andrew D.; Bond, Stephen D.

    2013-07-01

    Generalized Langevin dynamics (GLD) arise in the modeling of a number of systems, ranging from structured fluids that exhibit a viscoelastic mechanical response, to biological systems, and other media that exhibit anomalous diffusive phenomena. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that include GLD in conjunction with external and/or pairwise forces require the development of numerical integrators that are efficient, stable, and have known convergence properties. In this article, we derive a family of extended variable integrators for the Generalized Langevin equation with a positive Prony series memory kernel. Using stability and error analysis, we identify a superlative choice of parameters and implement the corresponding numerical algorithm in the LAMMPS MD software package. Salient features of the algorithm include exact conservation of the first and second moments of the equilibrium velocity distribution in some important cases, stable behavior in the limit of conventional Langevin dynamics, and the use of a convolution-free formalism that obviates the need for explicit storage of the time history of particle velocities. Capability is demonstrated with respect to accuracy in numerous canonical examples, stability in certain limits, and an exemplary application in which the effect of a harmonic confining potential is mapped onto a memory kernel.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches—loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. In his own words: 'loop quantum gravity is an attempt to construct a mathematically rigorous, background-independent, non-perturbative quantum field theory of Lorentzian general relativity and all known matter in four spacetime dimensions, not more and not less'. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to

  2. A Fast Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Ong, Yew-Soon; Zheng, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and accurate kernel-based supervised algorithm referred to as the Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine (RKELM). In contrast to the work on Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Least Square SVM (LS-SVM), which identifies the support vectors or weight vectors iteratively, the proposed RKELM randomly selects a subset of the available data samples as support vectors (or mapping samples). By avoiding the iterative steps of SVM, significant cost savings in the training process can be readily attained, especially on Big datasets. RKELM is established based on the rigorous proof of universal learning involving reduced kernel-based SLFN. In particular, we prove that RKELM can approximate any nonlinear functions accurately under the condition of support vectors sufficiency. Experimental results on a wide variety of real world small instance size and large instance size applications in the context of binary classification, multi-class problem and regression are then reported to show that RKELM can perform at competitive level of generalized performance as the SVM/LS-SVM at only a fraction of the computational effort incurred.

  3. Semi-Supervised Kernel Mean Shift Clustering.

    PubMed

    Anand, Saket; Mittal, Sushil; Tuzel, Oncel; Meer, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Mean shift clustering is a powerful nonparametric technique that does not require prior knowledge of the number of clusters and does not constrain the shape of the clusters. However, being completely unsupervised, its performance suffers when the original distance metric fails to capture the underlying cluster structure. Despite recent advances in semi-supervised clustering methods, there has been little effort towards incorporating supervision into mean shift. We propose a semi-supervised framework for kernel mean shift clustering (SKMS) that uses only pairwise constraints to guide the clustering procedure. The points are first mapped to a high-dimensional kernel space where the constraints are imposed by a linear transformation of the mapped points. This is achieved by modifying the initial kernel matrix by minimizing a log det divergence-based objective function. We show the advantages of SKMS by evaluating its performance on various synthetic and real datasets while comparing with state-of-the-art semi-supervised clustering algorithms. PMID:26353281

  4. A Fast Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Ong, Yew-Soon; Zheng, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and accurate kernel-based supervised algorithm referred to as the Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine (RKELM). In contrast to the work on Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Least Square SVM (LS-SVM), which identifies the support vectors or weight vectors iteratively, the proposed RKELM randomly selects a subset of the available data samples as support vectors (or mapping samples). By avoiding the iterative steps of SVM, significant cost savings in the training process can be readily attained, especially on Big datasets. RKELM is established based on the rigorous proof of universal learning involving reduced kernel-based SLFN. In particular, we prove that RKELM can approximate any nonlinear functions accurately under the condition of support vectors sufficiency. Experimental results on a wide variety of real world small instance size and large instance size applications in the context of binary classification, multi-class problem and regression are then reported to show that RKELM can perform at competitive level of generalized performance as the SVM/LS-SVM at only a fraction of the computational effort incurred. PMID:26829605

  5. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Pavement Crack Detection Using Kernel-Based Techniques in Asphalt Road Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraliakbari, A.; Sok, S.; Ouma, Y. O.; Hahn, M.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing demand for the digital survey and acquisition of road pavement conditions, there is also the parallel growing need for the development of automated techniques for the analysis and evaluation of the actual road conditions. This is due in part to the resulting large volumes of road pavement data captured through digital surveys, and also to the requirements for rapid data processing and evaluations. In this study, the Canon 5D Mark II RGB camera with a resolution of 21 megapixels is used for the road pavement condition mapping. Even though many imaging and mapping sensors are available, the development of automated pavement distress detection, recognition and extraction systems for pavement condition is still a challenge. In order to detect and extract pavement cracks, a comparative evaluation of kernel-based segmentation methods comprising line filtering (LF), local binary pattern (LBP) and high-pass filtering (HPF) is carried out. While the LF and LBP methods are based on the principle of rotation-invariance for pattern matching, the HPF applies the same principle for filtering, but with a rotational invariant matrix. With respect to the processing speeds, HPF is fastest due to the fact that it is based on a single kernel, as compared to LF and LBP which are based on several kernels. Experiments with 20 sample images which contain linear, block and alligator cracks are carried out. On an average a completeness of distress extraction with values of 81.2%, 76.2% and 81.1% have been found for LF, HPF and LBP respectively.

  7. Non-canonical WNT signalling in the lung.

    PubMed

    Li, Changgong; Bellusci, Saverio; Borok, Zea; Minoo, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    The role of WNT signalling in metazoan organogenesis has been a topic of widespread interest. In the lung, while the role of canonical WNT signalling has been examined in some detail by multiple studies, the non-canonical WNT signalling has received limited attention. Reliable evidence shows that this important signalling mechanism constitutes a major regulatory pathway in lung development. In addition, accumulating evidence has also shown that the non-canonical WNT pathway is critical for maintaining lung homeostasis and that aberrant activation of this pathway may underlie several debilitating lung diseases. Functional analyses have further revealed that the non-canonical WNT pathway regulates multiple cellular activities in the lung that are dependent on the specific cellular context. In most cell types, non-canonical WNT signalling regulates canonical WNT activity, which is also critical for many aspects of lung biology. This review will summarize what is currently known about the role of non-canonical WNT signalling in lung development, homeostasis and pathogenesis of disease.

  8. Multiple kernel learning with random effects for predicting longitudinal outcomes and data integration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianle; Zeng, Donglin; Wang, Yuanjia

    2015-12-01

    Predicting disease risk and progression is one of the main goals in many clinical research studies. Cohort studies on the natural history and etiology of chronic diseases span years and data are collected at multiple visits. Although, kernel-based statistical learning methods are proven to be powerful for a wide range of disease prediction problems, these methods are only well studied for independent data, but not for longitudinal data. It is thus important to develop time-sensitive prediction rules that make use of the longitudinal nature of the data. In this paper, we develop a novel statistical learning method for longitudinal data by introducing subject-specific short-term and long-term latent effects through a designed kernel to account for within-subject correlation of longitudinal measurements. Since the presence of multiple sources of data is increasingly common, we embed our method in a multiple kernel learning framework and propose a regularized multiple kernel statistical learning with random effects to construct effective nonparametric prediction rules. Our method allows easy integration of various heterogeneous data sources and takes advantage of correlation among longitudinal measures to increase prediction power. We use different kernels for each data source taking advantage of the distinctive feature of each data modality, and then optimally combine data across modalities. We apply the developed methods to two large epidemiological studies, one on Huntington's disease and the other on Alzheimer's Disease (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, ADNI) where we explore a unique opportunity to combine imaging and genetic data to study prediction of mild cognitive impairment, and show a substantial gain in performance while accounting for the longitudinal aspect of the data.

  9. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not.

  10. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not. PMID:27627242

  11. Isothermal-sweep theorems for ultracold quantum gases in a canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.

    2011-03-15

    After deriving the isothermal Hellmann-Feynman theorem (IHFT) that is suitable for mixed states in a canonical ensemble, we use this theorem to obtain the isothermal magnetic-field sweep theorems for the free, average, and trapping energies and for the entropy, specific heat, pressure, and atomic compressibility of strongly correlated ultracold quantum gases. In particular, we apply the sweep theorems to two-component Fermi gases in the weakly interacting Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer and Bose-Einstein condensate limits, showing that the temperature dependence of the contact parameter can be determined by varying either the entropy or specific heat with respect to the scattering length. We also use the IHFT to obtain the virial theorem in a canonical ensemble and discuss its implications for quantum gases.

  12. Interpreting medium ring canonical conformers by a triangular plane tessellation of the macrocycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Pegah; Barnett, Christopher B.; Naidoo, Kevin J.

    2013-05-01

    Cyclic conformational coordinates are essential for the distinction of molecular ring conformers as the use of Cremer-Pople coordinates have illustrated for five- and six-membered rings. Here, by tessellating medium rings into triangular planes and using the relative angles made between triangular planes we are able to assign macrocyclic pucker conformations into canonical pucker conformers such as chairs, boats, etc. We show that the definition is straightforward compared with other methods popularly used for small rings and that it is computationally simple to implement for complex macrocyclic rings. These cyclic conformational coordinates directly couple to the motion of individual nodes of a ring. Therefore, they are useful for correlating the physical properties of macrocycles with their ring pucker and measuring the dynamic ring conformational behavior. We illustrate the triangular tessellation, assignment, and pucker analysis on 7- and 8-membered rings. Sets of canonical states are given for cycloheptane and cyclooctane that have been previously experimentally analysed.

  13. The shape of the spatial kernel and its implications for biological invasions in patchy environments.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Tom; Håkansson, Nina; Wennergren, Uno

    2011-05-22

    Ecological and epidemiological invasions occur in a spatial context. We investigated how these processes correlate to the distance dependence of spread or dispersal between spatial entities such as habitat patches or epidemiological units. Distance dependence is described by a spatial kernel, characterized by its shape (kurtosis) and width (variance). We also developed a novel method to analyse and generate point-pattern landscapes based on spectral representation. This involves two measures: continuity, which is related to autocorrelation and contrast, which refers to variation in patch density. We also analysed some empirical data where our results are expected to have implications, namely distributions of trees (Quercus and Ulmus) and farms in Sweden. Through a simulation study, we found that kernel shape was not important for predicting the invasion speed in randomly distributed patches. However, the shape may be essential when the distribution of patches deviates from randomness, particularly when the contrast is high. We conclude that the speed of invasions depends on the spatial context and the effect of the spatial kernel is intertwined with the spatial structure. This implies substantial demands on the empirical data, because it requires knowledge of shape and width of the spatial kernel, and spatial structure.

  14. The shape of the spatial kernel and its implications for biological invasions in patchy environments

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Tom; Håkansson, Nina; Wennergren, Uno

    2011-01-01

    Ecological and epidemiological invasions occur in a spatial context. We investigated how these processes correlate to the distance dependence of spread or dispersal between spatial entities such as habitat patches or epidemiological units. Distance dependence is described by a spatial kernel, characterized by its shape (kurtosis) and width (variance). We also developed a novel method to analyse and generate point-pattern landscapes based on spectral representation. This involves two measures: continuity, which is related to autocorrelation and contrast, which refers to variation in patch density. We also analysed some empirical data where our results are expected to have implications, namely distributions of trees (Quercus and Ulmus) and farms in Sweden. Through a simulation study, we found that kernel shape was not important for predicting the invasion speed in randomly distributed patches. However, the shape may be essential when the distribution of patches deviates from randomness, particularly when the contrast is high. We conclude that the speed of invasions depends on the spatial context and the effect of the spatial kernel is intertwined with the spatial structure. This implies substantial demands on the empirical data, because it requires knowledge of shape and width of the spatial kernel, and spatial structure. PMID:21047854

  15. Resistant-starch formation in high-amylose maize starch during Kernel development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxin; Lio, Junyi; Blanco, Mike; Campbell, Mark; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2010-07-14

    The objective of this study was to understand the resistant-starch (RS) formation during kernel development of a high-amylose maize, GEMS-0067 line. The RS content of the starch, determined using AOAC method 991.43 for total dietary fiber, increased with kernel maturation and increase in the amylose/intermediate component (IC) content of the starch. Gelatinization of the native starches showed a major thermal transition with peak temperature at 76.6-81.0 degrees C. An additional peak ( approximately 97.1 degrees C) first appeared 20 days after pollination and then developed into a significant peak on later dates. After removal of lipids from the starch, this peak disappeared, but the conclusion gelatinization temperature remained the same. The proportion of the enthalpy change of the thermal transition above 95 degrees C, calculated from the thermogram of the defatted starch, increased with kernel maturation and was significantly correlated with the RS content of the starch (r = 0.98). These results showed that the increase in crystallites of amylose/IC long-chain double helices in the starch resulted in the increase in the RS content of the starch during kernel development.

  16. Canonical and non-canonical barriers facing antimiR cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark; Slack, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Once considered genetic "oddities", microRNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as key epigenetic regulators of numerous biological processes, including some with a causal link to the pathogenesis, maintenance, and treatment of cancer. The crux of small RNA-based therapeutics lies in the antagonism of potent cellular targets; the main shortcoming of the field in general, lies in ineffective delivery. Inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs is a relatively nascent therapeutic concept, but as with predecessor RNA-based therapies, success hinges on delivery efficacy. This review will describes the canonical (e.g. pharmacokinetics and clearance, cellular uptake, endosome escape, etc.) and non-canonical (e.g. spatial localization and accessibility of miRNA, technical limitations of miRNA inhibition, off-target impacts, etc.) challenges to the delivery of antisense-based anti-miRNA therapeutics (i.e. antimiRs) for the treatment of cancer. Emphasis will be placed on how the current leading antimiR platforms-ranging from naked chemically modified oligonucleotides to nanoscale delivery vehicles-are affected by and overcome these barriers. The perplexity of antimiR delivery presents both engineering and biological hurdles that must be overcome in order to capitalize on the extensive pharmacological benefits of antagonizing tumor-associated miRNAs.

  17. Small convolution kernels for high-fidelity image restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for computing the mean-square-optimal values for small, image-restoration kernels. The algorithm is based on a comprehensive, end-to-end imaging system model that accounts for the important components of the imaging process: the statistics of the scene, the point-spread function of the image-gathering device, sampling effects, noise, and display reconstruction. Subject to constraints on the spatial support of the kernel, the algorithm generates the kernel values that restore the image with maximum fidelity, that is, the kernel minimizes the expected mean-square restoration error. The algorithm is consistent with the derivation of the spatially unconstrained Wiener filter, but leads to a small, spatially constrained kernel that, unlike the unconstrained filter, can be efficiently implemented by convolution. Simulation experiments demonstrate that for a wide range of imaging systems these small kernels can restore images with fidelity comparable to images restored with the unconstrained Wiener filter.

  18. Multiple kernel learning for sparse representation-based classification.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Patel, Vishal M; Chellappa, Rama

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiple kernel learning (MKL) algorithm that is based on the sparse representation-based classification (SRC) method. Taking advantage of the nonlinear kernel SRC in efficiently representing the nonlinearities in the high-dimensional feature space, we propose an MKL method based on the kernel alignment criteria. Our method uses a two step training method to learn the kernel weights and sparse codes. At each iteration, the sparse codes are updated first while fixing the kernel mixing coefficients, and then the kernel mixing coefficients are updated while fixing the sparse codes. These two steps are repeated until a stopping criteria is met. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using several publicly available image classification databases and it is shown that this method can perform significantly better than many competitive image classification algorithms. PMID:24835226

  19. Visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging by sensitivity maps.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Lund, Torben Ellegaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-04-01

    There is significant current interest in decoding mental states from neuroimages. In this context kernel methods, e.g., support vector machines (SVM) are frequently adopted to learn statistical relations between patterns of brain activation and experimental conditions. In this paper we focus on visualization of such nonlinear kernel models. Specifically, we investigate the sensitivity map as a technique for generation of global summary maps of kernel classification models. We illustrate the performance of the sensitivity map on functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) data based on visual stimuli. We show that the performance of linear models is reduced for certain scan labelings/categorizations in this data set, while the nonlinear models provide more flexibility. We show that the sensitivity map can be used to visualize nonlinear versions of kernel logistic regression, the kernel Fisher discriminant, and the SVM, and conclude that the sensitivity map is a versatile and computationally efficient tool for visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging.

  20. Canonical Approaches to Applications of the Virial Theorem.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2016-02-11

    Canonical approaches are applied for investigation of the extraordinarily accurate electronic ground state potentials of H2(+), H2, HeH(+), and LiH using the virial theorem. These approaches will be dependent on previous investigations involving the canonical nature of E(R), the Born-Oppenheimer potential, and F(R), the associated force of E(R), that have been demonstrated to be individually canonical to high accuracy in the case of the systems investigated. Now, the canonical nature of the remaining functions in the virial theorem [the electronic kinetic energy T(R), the electrostatic potential energy V(R), and the function W(R) = RF(R)] are investigated and applied to H2, HeH(+), and LiH with H2(+) chosen as reference. The results will be discussed in the context of a different perspective of molecular bonding that goes beyond previous direct applications of the virial theorem.

  1. Canonical distributions on Riemannian homogeneous k-symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashchenko, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that distributions generated by almost product structures are applicable, in particular, to some problems in the theory of Monge-Ampère equations. In this paper, we characterize canonical distributions defined by canonical almost product structures on Riemannian homogeneous k-symmetric spaces in the sense of types AF (anti-foliation), F (foliation), TGF (totally geodesic foliation). Algebraic criteria for all these types on k-symmetric spaces of orders k = 4, 5, 6 were obtained. Note that canonical distributions on homogeneous k-symmetric spaces are closely related to special canonical almost complex structures and f-structures, which were recently applied by I. Khemar to studying elliptic integrable systems.

  2. Canonical Approaches to Applications of the Virial Theorem.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2016-02-11

    Canonical approaches are applied for investigation of the extraordinarily accurate electronic ground state potentials of H2(+), H2, HeH(+), and LiH using the virial theorem. These approaches will be dependent on previous investigations involving the canonical nature of E(R), the Born-Oppenheimer potential, and F(R), the associated force of E(R), that have been demonstrated to be individually canonical to high accuracy in the case of the systems investigated. Now, the canonical nature of the remaining functions in the virial theorem [the electronic kinetic energy T(R), the electrostatic potential energy V(R), and the function W(R) = RF(R)] are investigated and applied to H2, HeH(+), and LiH with H2(+) chosen as reference. The results will be discussed in the context of a different perspective of molecular bonding that goes beyond previous direct applications of the virial theorem. PMID:26788937

  3. Monte Carlo Code System for Electron (Positron) Dose Kernel Calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    CHIBANI, OMAR

    1999-05-12

    Version 00 KERNEL performs dose kernel calculations for an electron (positron) isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium. First, the auxiliary code PRELIM is used to prepare cross section data for the considered medium. Then the KERNEL code simulates the transport of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons through the medium until all particles reach their cutoff energies. The deposited energy is scored in concentric spherical shells at a radial distance ranging from zero to twice the source particle range.

  4. A Kernel-based Account of Bibliometric Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takahiko; Shimbo, Masashi; Kudo, Taku; Matsumoto, Yuji

    The application of kernel methods to citation analysis is explored. We show that a family of kernels on graphs provides a unified perspective on the three bibliometric measures that have been discussed independently: relatedness between documents, global importance of individual documents, and importance of documents relative to one or more (root) documents (relative importance). The framework provided by the kernels establishes relative importance as an intermediate between relatedness and global importance, in which the degree of `relativity,' or the bias between relatedness and importance, is naturally controlled by a parameter characterizing individual kernels in the family.

  5. Embedded real-time operating system micro kernel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-hui; Li, Ming-qiang; Wang, Xin-zheng

    2005-12-01

    Embedded systems usually require a real-time character. Base on an 8051 microcontroller, an embedded real-time operating system micro kernel is proposed consisting of six parts, including a critical section process, task scheduling, interruption handle, semaphore and message mailbox communication, clock managent and memory managent. Distributed CPU and other resources are among tasks rationally according to the importance and urgency. The design proposed here provides the position, definition, function and principle of micro kernel. The kernel runs on the platform of an ATMEL AT89C51 microcontroller. Simulation results prove that the designed micro kernel is stable and reliable and has quick response while operating in an application system.

  6. Robust visual tracking via speedup multiple kernel ridge regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Breckon, Toby P.; Li, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Most of the tracking methods attempt to build up feature spaces to represent the appearance of a target. However, limited by the complex structure of the distribution of features, the feature spaces constructed in a linear manner cannot characterize the nonlinear structure well. We propose an appearance model based on kernel ridge regression for visual tracking. Dense sampling is fulfilled around the target image patches to collect the training samples. In order to obtain a kernel space in favor of describing the target appearance, multiple kernel learning is introduced into the selection of kernels. Under the framework, instead of a single kernel, a linear combination of kernels is learned from the training samples to create a kernel space. Resorting to the circulant property of a kernel matrix, a fast interpolate iterative algorithm is developed to seek coefficients that are assigned to these kernels so as to give an optimal combination. After the regression function is learned, all candidate image patches gathered are taken as the input of the function, and the candidate with the maximal response is regarded as the object image patch. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art tracking methods.

  7. Kernel-based machine learning techniques for infrasound signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Matthias; Igel, Christian; Mialle, Pierrick

    2014-05-01

    Infrasound monitoring is one of four remote sensing technologies continuously employed by the CTBTO Preparatory Commission. The CTBTO's infrasound network is designed to monitor the Earth for potential evidence of atmospheric or shallow underground nuclear explosions. Upon completion, it will comprise 60 infrasound array stations distributed around the globe, of which 47 were certified in January 2014. Three stages can be identified in CTBTO infrasound data processing: automated processing at the level of single array stations, automated processing at the level of the overall global network, and interactive review by human analysts. At station level, the cross correlation-based PMCC algorithm is used for initial detection of coherent wavefronts. It produces estimates for trace velocity and azimuth of incoming wavefronts, as well as other descriptive features characterizing a signal. Detected arrivals are then categorized into potentially treaty-relevant versus noise-type signals by a rule-based expert system. This corresponds to a binary classification task at the level of station processing. In addition, incoming signals may be grouped according to their travel path in the atmosphere. The present work investigates automatic classification of infrasound arrivals by kernel-based pattern recognition methods. It aims to explore the potential of state-of-the-art machine learning methods vis-a-vis the current rule-based and task-tailored expert system. To this purpose, we first address the compilation of a representative, labeled reference benchmark dataset as a prerequisite for both classifier training and evaluation. Data representation is based on features extracted by the CTBTO's PMCC algorithm. As classifiers, we employ support vector machines (SVMs) in a supervised learning setting. Different SVM kernel functions are used and adapted through different hyperparameter optimization routines. The resulting performance is compared to several baseline classifiers. All

  8. Robust kernel collaborative representation for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaohui; Ma, Yanbo; Jiang, Yuzheng; Zhu, Yinghui; Jin, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges of representation-based face recognition is that the training samples are usually insufficient. In other words, the training set usually does not include enough samples to show varieties of high-dimensional face images caused by illuminations, facial expressions, and postures. When the test sample is significantly different from the training samples of the same subject, the recognition performance will be sharply reduced. We propose a robust kernel collaborative representation based on virtual samples for face recognition. We think that the virtual training set conveys some reasonable and possible variations of the original training samples. Hence, we design a new object function to more closely match the representation coefficients generated from the original and virtual training sets. In order to further improve the robustness, we implement the corresponding representation-based face recognition in kernel space. It is noteworthy that any kind of virtual training samples can be used in our method. We use noised face images to obtain virtual face samples. The noise can be approximately viewed as a reflection of the varieties of illuminations, facial expressions, and postures. Our work is a simple and feasible way to obtain virtual face samples to impose Gaussian noise (and other types of noise) specifically to the original training samples to obtain possible variations of the original samples. Experimental results on the FERET, Georgia Tech, and ORL face databases show that the proposed method is more robust than two state-of-the-art face recognition methods, such as CRC and Kernel CRC.

  9. LFK. Livermore FORTRAN Kernel Computer Test

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, F.H.

    1990-05-01

    LFK, the Livermore FORTRAN Kernels, is a computer performance test that measures a realistic floating-point performance range for FORTRAN applications. Informally known as the Livermore Loops test, the LFK test may be used as a computer performance test, as a test of compiler accuracy (via checksums) and efficiency, or as a hardware endurance test. The LFK test, which focuses on FORTRAN as used in computational physics, measures the joint performance of the computer CPU, the compiler, and the computational structures in units of Megaflops/sec or Mflops. A C language version of subroutine KERNEL is also included which executes 24 samples of C numerical computation. The 24 kernels are a hydrodynamics code fragment, a fragment from an incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient code, the standard inner product function of linear algebra, a fragment from a banded linear equations routine, a segment of a tridiagonal elimination routine, an example of a general linear recurrence equation, an equation of state fragment, part of an alternating direction implicit integration code, an integrate predictor code, a difference predictor code, a first sum, a first difference, a fragment from a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code, a part of a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code, an example of how casually FORTRAN can be written, a Monte Carlo search loop, an example of an implicit conditional computation, a fragment of a two-dimensional explicit hydrodynamics code, a general linear recurrence equation, part of a discrete ordinates transport program, a simple matrix calculation, a segment of a Planckian distribution procedure, a two-dimensional implicit hydrodynamics fragment, and determination of the location of the first minimum in an array.

  10. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical discs.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J; Canup, R M

    2014-09-13

    Impacts that leave the Earth-Moon system with a large excess in angular momentum have recently been advocated as a means of generating a protolunar disc with a composition that is nearly identical to that of the Earth's mantle. We here investigate the accretion of the Moon from discs generated by such 'non-canonical' impacts, which are typically more compact than discs produced by canonical impacts and have a higher fraction of their mass initially located inside the Roche limit. Our model predicts a similar overall accretional history for both canonical and non-canonical discs, with the Moon forming in three consecutive steps over hundreds of years. However, we find that, to yield a lunar-mass Moon, the more compact non-canonical discs must initially be more massive than implied by prior estimates, and only a few of the discs produced by impact simulations to date appear to meet this condition. Non-canonical impacts require that capture of the Moon into the evection resonance with the Sun reduced the Earth-Moon angular momentum by a factor of 2 or more. We find that the Moon's semi-major axis at the end of its accretion is approximately 7R⊕, which is comparable to the location of the evection resonance for a post-impact Earth with a 2.5 h rotation period in the absence of a disc. Thus, the dynamics of the Moon's assembly may directly affect its ability to be captured into the resonance.

  11. The role of the Wnt canonical signaling in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin or Wnt canonical pathway controls multiple biological processes throughout development and adult life. Growing evidences have suggested that deregulation of the Wnt canonical pathway could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The Wnt canonical signaling is a pathway tightly regulated, which activation results in the inhibition of the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK-3β) function and in increased β-catenin activity, that migrates into the nucleus, activating the transcription of the Wnt target genes. Conversely, when the Wnt canonical pathway is turned off, increased levels of GSK-3β promote β-catenin degradation. Hence, GSK-3β could be considered as a key regulator of the Wnt canonical pathway. Of note, GSK-3β has also been involved in the modulation of inflammation and apoptosis, determining the delicate balance between immune tolerance/inflammation and neuronal survival/neurodegeneration. In this review, we have summarized the current acknowledgements about the role of the Wnt canonical pathway in the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with particular regard to the main in vitro and in vivo studies in this field, by reviewing 85 research articles about. PMID:27370940

  12. The role of the Wnt canonical signaling in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin or Wnt canonical pathway controls multiple biological processes throughout development and adult life. Growing evidences have suggested that deregulation of the Wnt canonical pathway could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The Wnt canonical signaling is a pathway tightly regulated, which activation results in the inhibition of the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK-3β) function and in increased β-catenin activity, that migrates into the nucleus, activating the transcription of the Wnt target genes. Conversely, when the Wnt canonical pathway is turned off, increased levels of GSK-3β promote β-catenin degradation. Hence, GSK-3β could be considered as a key regulator of the Wnt canonical pathway. Of note, GSK-3β has also been involved in the modulation of inflammation and apoptosis, determining the delicate balance between immune tolerance/inflammation and neuronal survival/neurodegeneration. In this review, we have summarized the current acknowledgements about the role of the Wnt canonical pathway in the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with particular regard to the main in vitro and in vivo studies in this field, by reviewing 85 research articles about.

  13. Distinguishing k-defects from their canonical twins

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Melinda; Lewandowski, Matt; Trodden, Mark; Wesley, Daniel

    2010-11-15

    We study k-defects--topological defects in theories with more than two derivatives and second-order equations of motion--and describe some striking ways in which these defects both resemble and differ from their analogues in canonical scalar field theories. We show that, for some models, the homotopy structure of the vacuum manifold is insufficient to establish the existence of k-defects, in contrast to the canonical case. These results also constrain certain families of Dirac-Born-Infeld instanton solutions in the 4-dimensional effective theory. We then describe a class of k-defect solutions, which we dub ''doppelgaengers,'' that precisely match the field profile and energy density of their canonical scalar field theory counterparts. We give a complete characterization of Lagrangians which admit doppelgaenger domain walls. By numerically computing the fluctuation eigenmodes about domain wall solutions, we find different spectra for doppelgaengers and canonical walls, allowing us to distinguish between k-defects and the canonical walls they mimic. We search for doppelgaengers for cosmic strings by numerically constructing solutions of Dirac-Born-Infeld and canonical scalar field theories. Despite investigating several examples, we are unable to find doppelgaenger cosmic strings, hence the existence of doppelgaengers for defects with codimension >1 remains an open question.

  14. Oil point pressure of Indian almond kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregbesola, O.; Olatunde, G.; Esuola, S.; Owolarafe, O.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of preprocessing conditions such as moisture content, heating temperature, heating time and particle size on oil point pressure of Indian almond kernel was investigated. Results showed that oil point pressure was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by above mentioned parameters. It was also observed that oil point pressure reduced with increase in heating temperature and heating time for both coarse and fine particles. Furthermore, an increase in moisture content resulted in increased oil point pressure for coarse particles while there was a reduction in oil point pressure with increase in moisture content for fine particles.

  15. Verification of Chare-kernel programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bhansali, S.; Kale, L.V. )

    1989-01-01

    Experience with concurrent programming has shown that concurrent programs can conceal bugs even after extensive testing. Thus, there is a need for practical techniques which can establish the correctness of parallel programs. This paper proposes a method for showing how to prove the partial correctness of programs written in the Chare-kernel language, which is a language designed to support the parallel execution of computation with irregular structures. The proof is based on the lattice proof technique and is divided into two parts. The first part is concerned with the program behavior within a single chare instance, whereas the second part captures the inter-chare interaction.

  16. Prediction of kernel density of corn using single-kernel near infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn hardness as is an important property for dry and wet-millers, food processors and corn breeders developing hybrids for specific markets. Of the several methods used to measure hardness, kernel density measurements are one of the more repeatable methods to quantify hardness. Near infrared spec...

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Candidate Genes for Starch Content Regulation in Maize Kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xue, Yadong; Guo, Zhanyong; Li, Weihua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L.) as it accounts for 65-75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60 to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM) as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001), among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437) is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops. PMID:27512395

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Candidate Genes for Starch Content Regulation in Maize Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xue, Yadong; Guo, Zhanyong; Li, Weihua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L.) as it accounts for 65–75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60 to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM) as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001), among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437) is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops. PMID:27512395

  19. L-Kuramoto-Sivashinsky SPDEs in one-to-three dimensions: L-KS kernel, sharp Hölder regularity, and Swift-Hohenberg law equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouba, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Generalizing the L-Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (L-KS) kernel from our earlier work, we give a novel explicit-kernel formulation useful for a large class of fourth order deterministic, stochastic, linear, and nonlinear PDEs in multispatial dimensions. These include pattern formation equations like the Swift-Hohenberg and many other prominent and new PDEs. We first establish existence, uniqueness, and sharp dimension-dependent spatio-temporal Hölder regularity for the canonical (zero drift) L-KS SPDE, driven by white noise on {R+×Rd} d = 1 3 . The spatio-temporal Hölder exponents are exactly the same as the striking ones we proved for our recently introduced Brownian-time Brownian motion (BTBM) stochastic integral equation, associated with time-fractional PDEs. The challenge here is that, unlike the positive BTBM density, the L-KS kernel is the Gaussian average of a modified, highly oscillatory, and complex Schrödinger propagator. We use a combination of harmonic and delicate analysis to get the necessary estimates. Second, attaching order parameters ε1 to the L-KS spatial operator and ε2 to the noise term, we show that the dimension-dependent critical ratio ε2 /ε1d/8 controls the limiting behavior of the L-KS SPDE, as ε1, ε2 ↘ 0; and we compare this behavior to that of the less regular second order heat SPDEs. Finally, we give a change-of-measure equivalence between the canonical L-KS SPDE and nonlinear L-KS SPDEs. In particular, we prove uniqueness in law for the Swift-Hohenberg and the law equivalence-and hence the same Hölder regularity-of the Swift-Hohenberg SPDE and the canonical L-KS SPDE on compacts in one-to-three dimensions.

  20. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  1. Linear and kernel methods for multi- and hypervariate change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan A.; Canty, Morton J.

    2010-10-01

    The iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection (IR-MAD) algorithm may be used both for unsuper- vised change detection in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing imagery as well as for automatic radiometric normalization of multi- or hypervariate multitemporal image sequences. Principal component analysis (PCA) as well as maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) and minimum noise fraction (MNF) analyses of IR-MAD images, both linear and kernel-based (which are nonlinear), may further enhance change signals relative to no-change background. The kernel versions are based on a dual formulation, also termed Q-mode analysis, in which the data enter into the analysis via inner products in the Gram matrix only. In the kernel version the inner products of the original data are replaced by inner products between nonlinear mappings into higher dimensional feature space. Via kernel substitution, also known as the kernel trick, these inner products between the mappings are in turn replaced by a kernel function and all quantities needed in the analysis are expressed in terms of the kernel function. This means that we need not know the nonlinear mappings explicitly. Kernel principal component analysis (PCA), kernel MAF and kernel MNF analyses handle nonlinearities by implicitly transforming data into high (even innite) dimensional feature space via the kernel function and then performing a linear analysis in that space. In image analysis the Gram matrix is often prohibitively large (its size is the number of pixels in the image squared). In this case we may sub-sample the image and carry out the kernel eigenvalue analysis on a set of training data samples only. To obtain a transformed version of the entire image we then project all pixels, which we call the test data, mapped nonlinearly onto the primal eigenvectors. IDL (Interactive Data Language) implementations of IR-MAD, automatic radiometric normalization and kernel PCA/MAF/MNF transformations have been written

  2. Fructan metabolism in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) kernels.

    PubMed

    Verspreet, Joran; Cimini, Sara; Vergauwen, Rudy; Dornez, Emmie; Locato, Vittoria; Le Roy, Katrien; De Gara, Laura; Van den Ende, Wim; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2013-12-01

    Although fructans play a crucial role in wheat kernel development, their metabolism during kernel maturation is far from being understood. In this study, all major fructan-metabolizing enzymes together with fructan content, fructan degree of polymerization and the presence of fructan oligosaccharides were examined in developing wheat kernels (Triticum aestivum L. var. Homeros) from anthesis until maturity. Fructan accumulation occurred mainly in the first 2 weeks after anthesis, and a maximal fructan concentration of 2.5 ± 0.3 mg fructan per kernel was reached at 16 days after anthesis (DAA). Fructan synthesis was catalyzed by 1-SST (sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase) and 6-SFT (sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase), and to a lesser extent by 1-FFT (fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase). Despite the presence of 6G-kestotriose in wheat kernel extracts, the measured 6G-FFT (fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase) activity levels were low. During kernel filling, which lasted from 2 to 6 weeks after anthesis, kernel fructan content decreased from 2.5 ± 0.3 to 1.31 ± 0.12 mg fructan per kernel (42 DAA) and the average fructan degree of polymerization decreased from 7.3 ± 0.4 (14 DAA) to 4.4 ± 0.1 (42 DAA). FEH (fructan exohydrolase) reached maximal activity between 20 and 28 DAA. No fructan-metabolizing enzyme activities were registered during the final phase of kernel maturation, and fructan content and structure remained unchanged. This study provides insight into the complex metabolism of fructans during wheat kernel development and relates fructan turnover to the general phases of kernel development.

  3. Aligning Biomolecular Networks Using Modular Graph Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towfic, Fadi; Greenlee, M. Heather West; Honavar, Vasant

    Comparative analysis of biomolecular networks constructed using measurements from different conditions, tissues, and organisms offer a powerful approach to understanding the structure, function, dynamics, and evolution of complex biological systems. We explore a class of algorithms for aligning large biomolecular networks by breaking down such networks into subgraphs and computing the alignment of the networks based on the alignment of their subgraphs. The resulting subnetworks are compared using graph kernels as scoring functions. We provide implementations of the resulting algorithms as part of BiNA, an open source biomolecular network alignment toolkit. Our experiments using Drosophila melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the DIP repository of protein-protein interaction data demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithms (as measured by % GO term enrichment of subnetworks identified by the alignment) is competitive with some of the state-of-the-art algorithms for pair-wise alignment of large protein-protein interaction networks. Our results also show that the inter-species similarity scores computed based on graph kernels can be used to cluster the species into a species tree that is consistent with the known phylogenetic relationships among the species.

  4. Bergman kernel, balanced metrics and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevtsov, Semyon

    In this thesis we explore the connections between the Kahler geometry and Landau levels on compact manifolds. We rederive the expansion of the Bergman kernel on Kahler manifolds developed by Tian, Yau, Zelditch, Lu and Catlin, using path integral and perturbation theory. The physics interpretation of this result is as an expansion of the projector of wavefunctions on the lowest Landau level, in the special case that the magnetic field is proportional to the Kahler form. This is a geometric expansion, somewhat similar to the DeWitt-Seeley-Gilkey short time expansion for the heat kernel, but in this case describing the long time limit, without depending on supersymmetry. We also generalize this expansion to supersymmetric quantum mechanics and more general magnetic fields, and explore its applications. These include the quantum Hall effect in curved space, the balanced metrics and Kahler gravity. In particular, we conjecture that for a probe in a BPS black hole in type II strings compactified on Calabi-Yau manifolds, the moduli space metric is the balanced metric.

  5. Delimiting Areas of Endemism through Kernel Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ubirajara; Brescovit, Antonio D.; Santos, Adalberto J.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for identification of areas of endemism, the Geographical Interpolation of Endemism (GIE), based on kernel spatial interpolation. This method differs from others in being independent of grid cells. This new approach is based on estimating the overlap between the distribution of species through a kernel interpolation of centroids of species distribution and areas of influence defined from the distance between the centroid and the farthest point of occurrence of each species. We used this method to delimit areas of endemism of spiders from Brazil. To assess the effectiveness of GIE, we analyzed the same data using Parsimony Analysis of Endemism and NDM and compared the areas identified through each method. The analyses using GIE identified 101 areas of endemism of spiders in Brazil GIE demonstrated to be effective in identifying areas of endemism in multiple scales, with fuzzy edges and supported by more synendemic species than in the other methods. The areas of endemism identified with GIE were generally congruent with those identified for other taxonomic groups, suggesting that common processes can be responsible for the origin and maintenance of these biogeographic units. PMID:25611971

  6. Pareto-path multitask multiple kernel learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C

    2015-01-01

    A traditional and intuitively appealing Multitask Multiple Kernel Learning (MT-MKL) method is to optimize the sum (thus, the average) of objective functions with (partially) shared kernel function, which allows information sharing among the tasks. We point out that the obtained solution corresponds to a single point on the Pareto Front (PF) of a multiobjective optimization problem, which considers the concurrent optimization of all task objectives involved in the Multitask Learning (MTL) problem. Motivated by this last observation and arguing that the former approach is heuristic, we propose a novel support vector machine MT-MKL framework that considers an implicitly defined set of conic combinations of task objectives. We show that solving our framework produces solutions along a path on the aforementioned PF and that it subsumes the optimization of the average of objective functions as a special case. Using the algorithms we derived, we demonstrate through a series of experimental results that the framework is capable of achieving a better classification performance, when compared with other similar MTL approaches. PMID:25532155

  7. Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2007-04-04

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of using the recently-released STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. First, we introduce a performance model for Cell and apply it to several key scientific computing kernels: dense matrix multiply, sparse matrix vector multiply, stencil computations, and 1D/2D FFTs. The difficulty of programming Cell, which requires assembly level intrinsics for the best performance, makes this model useful as an initial step in algorithm design and evaluation. Next, we validate the accuracy of our model by comparing results against published hardware results, as well as our own implementations on a 3.2GHz Cell blade. Additionally, we compare Cell performance to benchmarks run on leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (Intel Itanium2), and vector (Cray X1E) architectures. Our work also explores several different mappings of the kernels and demonstrates a simple and effective programming model for Cell's unique architecture. Finally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  8. Pareto-path multitask multiple kernel learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C

    2015-01-01

    A traditional and intuitively appealing Multitask Multiple Kernel Learning (MT-MKL) method is to optimize the sum (thus, the average) of objective functions with (partially) shared kernel function, which allows information sharing among the tasks. We point out that the obtained solution corresponds to a single point on the Pareto Front (PF) of a multiobjective optimization problem, which considers the concurrent optimization of all task objectives involved in the Multitask Learning (MTL) problem. Motivated by this last observation and arguing that the former approach is heuristic, we propose a novel support vector machine MT-MKL framework that considers an implicitly defined set of conic combinations of task objectives. We show that solving our framework produces solutions along a path on the aforementioned PF and that it subsumes the optimization of the average of objective functions as a special case. Using the algorithms we derived, we demonstrate through a series of experimental results that the framework is capable of achieving a better classification performance, when compared with other similar MTL approaches.

  9. Stable Local Volatility Calibration Using Kernel Splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas F.; Li, Yuying; Wang, Cheng

    2010-09-01

    We propose an optimization formulation using L1 norm to ensure accuracy and stability in calibrating a local volatility function for option pricing. Using a regularization parameter, the proposed objective function balances the calibration accuracy with the model complexity. Motivated by the support vector machine learning, the unknown local volatility function is represented by a kernel function generating splines and the model complexity is controlled by minimizing the 1-norm of the kernel coefficient vector. In the context of the support vector regression for function estimation based on a finite set of observations, this corresponds to minimizing the number of support vectors for predictability. We illustrate the ability of the proposed approach to reconstruct the local volatility function in a synthetic market. In addition, based on S&P 500 market index option data, we demonstrate that the calibrated local volatility surface is simple and resembles the observed implied volatility surface in shape. Stability is illustrated by calibrating local volatility functions using market option data from different dates.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of Ginkgo biloba kernels

    PubMed Central

    He, Bing; Gu, Yincong; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jianwen; Cao, Fuliang; Xu, Li-an

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a dioecious species native to China with medicinally and phylogenetically important characteristics; however, genomic resources for this species are limited. In this study, we performed the first transcriptome sequencing for Ginkgo kernels at five time points using Illumina paired-end sequencing. Approximately 25.08-Gb clean reads were obtained, and 68,547 unigenes with an average length of 870 bp were generated by de novo assembly. Of these unigenes, 29,987 (43.74%) were annotated in publicly available plant protein database. A total of 3,869 genes were identified as significantly differentially expressed, and enrichment analysis was conducted at different time points. Furthermore, metabolic pathway analysis revealed that 66 unigenes were responsible for terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, with up to 12 up-regulated unigenes involved in the biosynthesis of ginkgolide and bilobalide. Differential gene expression analysis together with real-time PCR experiments indicated that the synthesis of bilobalide may have interfered with the ginkgolide synthesis process in the kernel. These data can remarkably expand the existing transcriptome resources of Ginkgo, and provide a valuable platform to reveal more on developmental and metabolic mechanisms of this species. PMID:26500663

  11. Canonical feature selection for joint regression and multi-class identification in Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Suk, Heung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Fusing information from different imaging modalities is crucial for more accurate identification of the brain state because imaging data of different modalities can provide complementary perspectives on the complex nature of brain disorders. However, most existing fusion methods often extract features independently from each modality, and then simply concatenate them into a long vector for classification, without appropriate consideration of the correlation among modalities. In this paper, we propose a novel method to transform the original features from different modalities to a common space, where the transformed features become comparable and easy to find their relation, by canonical correlation analysis. We then perform the sparse multi-task learning for discriminative feature selection by using the canonical features as regressors and penalizing a loss function with a canonical regularizer. In our experiments on the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images to jointly predict clinical scores of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and also identify multi-class disease status for Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. The experimental results showed that the proposed canonical feature selection method helped enhance the performance of both clinical score prediction and disease status identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26254746

  12. [Distribution characteristics of phthalic acid esters in soils and peanut kernels in main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province, China].

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming-Ming; Wang, Kai-Rong; Wang, Lin-Lin; Shi, Yan-Xi

    2013-12-01

    Surface soil (0-20 cm) and peanut kernel samples were collected in four main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province, and the contents of six PAEs chemicals that classified by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants were determined by gas chromatography (GC). The results indicated that the total concentration of six PAEs (sigma PAEs) ranged from 0.34 to 2.81 mg x kg(-1), and the mean was 1.22 mg x kg(-1). In four different areas, the order of sigmaPAEs concentration in soil was hilly area of middle southern Shandong > western plain of Shandong > Jiaodong Peninsula > northern plain of Shandong. The concentration of DBP in four main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province seriously exceeded the control limit in USA. The content of PAEs ranged from 0.17 to 0.66 mg x kg(-1) in peanut kernels, with the average value 0.34 mg x kg(-1) which was less than the suggested targets in USA and Europe and of low health risk. DEHP and DBP were the main components of PAEs both in soils and peanut kernels, with higher percentage content and detection rate. The sigma PAEs contents in soils or peanut kernels under plastic mulching were significantly higher than that of open field cultivation pattern. The PAEs concentrations in peanut kernels and soils had significant correlation, with the Pearson coefficient 0. 786 (sigma PAEs), 0.747 (DBP) and 0.511 (DEHP), respectively.

  13. Comparison of Kernel Equating and Item Response Theory Equating Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

  14. Evidence-based kernels: fundamental units of behavioral influence.

    PubMed

    Embry, Dennis D; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior.

  15. Evidence-based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior–influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior. PMID:18712600

  16. 7 CFR 51.1441 - Half-kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1441 Half-kernel. Half-kernel means one of...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1441 - Half-kernel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1441 Half-kernel. Half-kernel means one of...

  18. Evidence-Based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embry, Dennis D.; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of…

  19. Optimal Bandwidth Selection in Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häggström, Jenny; Wiberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The selection of bandwidth in kernel equating is important because it has a direct impact on the equated test scores. The aim of this article is to examine the use of double smoothing when selecting bandwidths in kernel equating and to compare double smoothing with the commonly used penalty method. This comparison was made using both an equivalent…

  20. Sugar uptake into kernels of tunicate tassel-seed maize

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.A.; Felker, F.C.; Crawford, C.G. )

    1990-05-01

    A maize (Zea mays L.) strain expressing both the tassel-seed (Ts-5) and tunicate (Tu) characters was developed which produces glume-covered kernels on the tassel, often born on 7-10 mm pedicels. Vigorous plants produce up to 100 such kernels interspersed with additional sessile kernels. This floral unit provides a potentially valuable experimental system for studying sugar uptake into developing maize seeds. When detached kernels (with glumes and pedicel intact) are placed in incubation solution, fluid flows up the pedicel and into the glumes, entering the pedicel apoplast near the kernel base. The unusual anatomical features of this maize strain permit experimental access to the pedicel apoplast with much less possibility of kernel base tissue damage than with kernels excised from the cob. ({sup 14}C)Fructose incorporation into soluble and insoluble fractions of endosperm increased for 8 days. Endosperm uptake of sucrose, fructose, and D-glucose was significantly greater than that of L-glucose. Fructose uptake was significantly inhibited by CCCP, DNP, and PCMBS. These results suggest the presence of an active, non-diffusion component of sugar transport in maize kernels.

  1. Introduction to Kernel Methods: Classification of Multivariate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauvel, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this chapter, kernel methods are presented for the classification of multivariate data. An introduction example is given to enlighten the main idea of kernel methods. Then emphasis is done on the Support Vector Machine. Structural risk minimization is presented, and linear and non-linear SVM are described. Finally, a full example of SVM classification is given on simulated hyperspectral data.

  2. 7 CFR 981.60 - Determination of kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.60 Determination of kernel weight. (a) Almonds for which settlement is made on kernel weight. All lots of almonds, whether shelled or unshelled, for which...

  3. 7 CFR 981.60 - Determination of kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.60 Determination of kernel weight. (a) Almonds for which settlement is made on kernel weight. All lots of almonds, whether shelled or unshelled, for which...

  4. 7 CFR 981.60 - Determination of kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.60 Determination of kernel weight. (a) Almonds for which settlement is made on kernel weight. All lots of almonds, whether shelled or unshelled, for which...

  5. 7 CFR 981.60 - Determination of kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.60 Determination of kernel weight. (a) Almonds for which settlement is made on kernel weight. All lots of almonds, whether shelled or unshelled, for which...

  6. 7 CFR 981.60 - Determination of kernel weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.60 Determination of kernel weight. (a) Almonds for which settlement is made on kernel weight. All lots of almonds, whether shelled or unshelled, for which...

  7. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of plant tissues: spectral visualization of Triticum aestivum kernel and Arabidopsis leaf microstructure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Frederick J; Perston, Benjamin B; Galindez-Najera, Silvia P; Edwards, Cathrina H; Powell, Prudence O; Mandalari, Giusy; Campbell, Grant M; Butterworth, Peter J; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy is a tool with potential for studies of the microstructure, chemical composition and functionality of plants at a subcellular level. Here we present the use of high-resolution bench top-based infrared microspectroscopy to investigate the microstructure of Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) kernels and Arabidopsis leaves. Images of isolated wheat kernel tissues and whole wheat kernels following hydrothermal processing and simulated gastric and duodenal digestion were generated, as well as images of Arabidopsis leaves at different points during a diurnal cycle. Individual cells and cell walls were resolved, and large structures within cells, such as starch granules and protein bodies, were clearly identified. Contrast was provided by converting the hyperspectral image cubes into false-colour images using either principal component analysis (PCA) overlays or by correlation analysis. The unsupervised PCA approach provided a clear view of the sample microstructure, whereas the correlation analysis was used to confirm the identity of different anatomical structures using the spectra from isolated components. It was then demonstrated that gelatinized and native starch within cells could be distinguished, and that the loss of starch during wheat digestion could be observed, as well as the accumulation of starch in leaves during a diurnal period.

  8. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of plant tissues: spectral visualization of Triticum aestivum kernel and Arabidopsis leaf microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Frederick J; Perston, Benjamin B; Galindez-Najera, Silvia P; Edwards, Cathrina H; Powell, Prudence O; Mandalari, Giusy; Campbell, Grant M; Butterworth, Peter J; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy is a tool with potential for studies of the microstructure, chemical composition and functionality of plants at a subcellular level. Here we present the use of high-resolution bench top-based infrared microspectroscopy to investigate the microstructure of Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) kernels and Arabidopsis leaves. Images of isolated wheat kernel tissues and whole wheat kernels following hydrothermal processing and simulated gastric and duodenal digestion were generated, as well as images of Arabidopsis leaves at different points during a diurnal cycle. Individual cells and cell walls were resolved, and large structures within cells, such as starch granules and protein bodies, were clearly identified. Contrast was provided by converting the hyperspectral image cubes into false-colour images using either principal component analysis (PCA) overlays or by correlation analysis. The unsupervised PCA approach provided a clear view of the sample microstructure, whereas the correlation analysis was used to confirm the identity of different anatomical structures using the spectra from isolated components. It was then demonstrated that gelatinized and native starch within cells could be distinguished, and that the loss of starch during wheat digestion could be observed, as well as the accumulation of starch in leaves during a diurnal period. PMID:26400058

  9. A shortest-path graph kernel for estimating gene product semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Existing methods for calculating semantic similarity between gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO) often rely on external resources, which are not part of the ontology. Consequently, changes in these external resources like biased term distribution caused by shifting of hot research topics, will affect the calculation of semantic similarity. One way to avoid this problem is to use semantic methods that are "intrinsic" to the ontology, i.e. independent of external knowledge. Results We present a shortest-path graph kernel (spgk) method that relies exclusively on the GO and its structure. In spgk, a gene product is represented by an induced subgraph of the GO, which consists of all the GO terms annotating it. Then a shortest-path graph kernel is used to compute the similarity between two graphs. In a comprehensive evaluation using a benchmark dataset, spgk compares favorably with other methods that depend on external resources. Compared with simUI, a method that is also intrinsic to GO, spgk achieves slightly better results on the benchmark dataset. Statistical tests show that the improvement is significant when the resolution and EC similarity correlation coefficient are used to measure the performance, but is insignificant when the Pfam similarity correlation coefficient is used. Conclusions Spgk uses a graph kernel method in polynomial time to exploit the structure of the GO to calculate semantic similarity between gene products. It provides an alternative to both methods that use external resources and "intrinsic" methods with comparable performance. PMID:21801410

  10. Improvement of SVM-Based Speech/Music Classification Using Adaptive Kernel Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungsoo; Chang, Joon-Hyuk

    In this paper, we propose a way to improve the classification performance of support vector machines (SVMs), especially for speech and music frames within a selectable mode vocoder (SMV) framework. A myriad of techniques have been proposed for SVMs, and most of them are employed during the training phase of SVMs. Instead, the proposed algorithm is applied during the test phase and works with existing schemes. The proposed algorithm modifies a kernel parameter in the decision function of SVMs to alter SVM decisions for better classification accuracy based on the previous outputs of SVMs. Since speech and music frames exhibit strong inter-frame correlation, the outputs of SVMs can guide the kernel parameter modification. Our experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has the potential for adaptively tuning classifications of support vector machines for better performance.

  11. Nonlinear feature extraction using kernel principal component analysis with non-negative pre-image.

    PubMed

    Kallas, Maya; Honeine, Paul; Richard, Cedric; Amoud, Hassan; Francis, Clovis

    2010-01-01

    The inherent physical characteristics of many real-life phenomena, including biological and physiological aspects, require adapted nonlinear tools. Moreover, the additive nature in some situations involve solutions expressed as positive combinations of data. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear feature extraction method, with a non-negativity constraint. To this end, the kernel principal component analysis is considered to define the most relevant features in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space. These features are the nonlinear principal components with high-order correlations between input variables. A pre-image technique is required to get back to the input space. With a non-negative constraint, we show that one can solve the pre-image problem efficiently, using a simple iterative scheme. Furthermore, the constrained solution contributes to the stability of the algorithm. Experimental results on event-related potentials (ERP) illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. Accumulation of storage products in oat during kernel development.

    PubMed

    Banaś, A; Dahlqvist, A; Debski, H; Gummeson, P O; Stymne, S

    2000-12-01

    Lipids, proteins and starch are the main storage products in oat seeds. As a first step in elucidating the regulatory mechanisms behind the deposition of these compounds, two different oat varieties, 'Freja' and 'Matilda', were analysed during kernel development. In both cultivars, the majority of the lipids accumulated at very early stage of development but Matilda accumulated about twice the amount of lipids compared to Freja. Accumulation of proteins and starch started also in the early stage of kernel development but, in contrast to lipids, continued over a considerably longer period. The high-oil variety Matilda also accumulated higher amounts of proteins than Freja. The starch content in Freja kernels was higher than in Matilda kernels and the difference was most pronounced during the early stage of development when oil synthesis was most active. Oleosin accumulation continued during the whole period of kernel development.

  13. Anatomically-aided PET reconstruction using the kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchcroft, Will; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper extends the kernel method that was proposed previously for dynamic PET reconstruction, to incorporate anatomical side information into the PET reconstruction model. In contrast to existing methods that incorporate anatomical information using a penalized likelihood framework, the proposed method incorporates this information in the simpler maximum likelihood (ML) formulation and is amenable to ordered subsets. The new method also does not require any segmentation of the anatomical image to obtain edge information. We compare the kernel method with the Bowsher method for anatomically-aided PET image reconstruction through a simulated data set. Computer simulations demonstrate that the kernel method offers advantages over the Bowsher method in region of interest quantification. Additionally the kernel method is applied to a 3D patient data set. The kernel method results in reduced noise at a matched contrast level compared with the conventional ML expectation maximization algorithm.

  14. Direct Measurement of Wave Kernels in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Solar f-mode waves are surface-gravity waves which propagate horizontally in a thin layer near the photosphere with a dispersion relation approximately that of deep water waves. At the power maximum near 3 mHz, the wavelength of 5 Mm is large enough for various wave scattering properties to be observable. Gizon and Birch (2002,ApJ,571,966)h ave calculated kernels, in the Born approximation, for the sensitivity of wave travel times to local changes in damping rate and source strength. In this work, using isolated small magnetic features as approximate point-sourc'e scatterers, such a kernel has been measured. The observed kernel contains similar features to a theoretical damping kernel but not for a source kernel. A full understanding of the effect of small magnetic features on the waves will require more detailed modeling.

  15. OSKI: A Library of Automatically Tuned Sparse Matrix Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Vuduc, R; Demmel, J W; Yelick, K A

    2005-07-19

    The Optimized Sparse Kernel Interface (OSKI) is a collection of low-level primitives that provide automatically tuned computational kernels on sparse matrices, for use by solver libraries and applications. These kernels include sparse matrix-vector multiply and sparse triangular solve, among others. The primary aim of this interface is to hide the complex decision-making process needed to tune the performance of a kernel implementation for a particular user's sparse matrix and machine, while also exposing the steps and potentially non-trivial costs of tuning at run-time. This paper provides an overview of OSKI, which is based on our research on automatically tuned sparse kernels for modern cache-based superscalar machines.

  16. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs.

  17. The degeneracy problem in non-canonical inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Powell, Brian A. E-mail: brian.powell007@gmail.com

    2013-03-01

    While attempting to connect inflationary theories to observational physics, a potential difficulty is the degeneracy problem: a single set of observables maps to a range of different inflaton potentials. Two important classes of models affected by the degeneracy problem are canonical and non-canonical models, the latter marked by the presence of a non-standard kinetic term that generates observables beyond the scalar and tensor two-point functions on CMB scales. The degeneracy problem is manifest when these distinguishing observables go undetected. We quantify the size of the resulting degeneracy in this case by studying the most well-motivated non-canonical theory having Dirac-Born-Infeld Lagrangian. Beyond the scalar and tensor two-point functions on CMB scales, we then consider the possible detection of equilateral non-Gaussianity at Planck-precision and a measurement of primordial gravitational waves from prospective space-based laser interferometers. The former detection breaks the degeneracy with canonical inflation but results in poor reconstruction prospects, while the latter measurement enables a determination of n{sub T} which, while not breaking the degeneracy, can be shown to greatly improve the non-canonical reconstruction.

  18. Interference Mitigation Based on Intelligent Location Selection in a Canonical Communication Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Junyue; Cai, Yueming; Zheng, Jianchao; Yang, Wendong; Yang, Weiwei; Hu, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, the interference mitigation in a canonical communication network is discussed from the perspective of intelligent location selection. A potential game model is constructed and a location-selection algorithm is designed combining no-regret procedure. With the proposed algorithm, all nodes can update their strategies with limited information exchange. Specifically, our proposed algorithm can converge to a set of correlated equilibria which are the globally or locally optimal solution to the problem of interference minimization. Moreover, our proposed algorithm can achieve distributed implementation without a central node. Simulation results demonstrate that the total interference can be mitigated efficiently with our proposed algorithm. And the proposed algorithm can converge fast.

  19. Reaction Kernel Structure of a Slot Jet Diffusion Flame in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, F.; Katta, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion flame stabilization in normal earth gravity (1 g) has long been a fundamental research subject in combustion. Local flame-flow phenomena, including heat and species transport and chemical reactions, around the flame base in the vicinity of condensed surfaces control flame stabilization and fire spreading processes. Therefore, gravity plays an important role in the subject topic because buoyancy induces flow in the flame zone, thus increasing the convective (and diffusive) oxygen transport into the flame zone and, in turn, reaction rates. Recent computations show that a peak reactivity (heat-release or oxygen-consumption rate) spot, or reaction kernel, is formed in the flame base by back-diffusion and reactions of radical species in the incoming oxygen-abundant flow at relatively low temperatures (about 1550 K). Quasi-linear correlations were found between the peak heat-release or oxygen-consumption rate and the velocity at the reaction kernel for cases including both jet and flat-plate diffusion flames in airflow. The reaction kernel provides a stationary ignition source to incoming reactants, sustains combustion, and thus stabilizes the trailing diffusion flame. In a quiescent microgravity environment, no buoyancy-induced flow exits and thus purely diffusive transport controls the reaction rates. Flame stabilization mechanisms in such purely diffusion-controlled regime remain largely unstudied. Therefore, it will be a rigorous test for the reaction kernel correlation if it can be extended toward zero velocity conditions in the purely diffusion-controlled regime. The objectives of this study are to reveal the structure of the flame-stabilizing region of a two-dimensional (2D) laminar jet diffusion flame in microgravity and develop a unified diffusion flame stabilization mechanism. This paper reports the recent progress in the computation and experiment performed in microgravity.

  20. Feasibility of near infrared spectroscopy for analyzing corn kernel damage and viability of soybean and corn kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current US corn grading system accounts for the portion of damaged kernels, which is measured by time-consuming and inaccurate visual inspection. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a non-destructive and fast analytical method, was tested as a tool for discriminating corn kernels with heat and f...

  1. A visualization tool for the kernel-driven model with improved ability in data analysis and kernel assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yadong; Jiao, Ziti; Zhang, Hu; Bai, Dongni; Zhang, Xiaoning; Li, Yang; He, Dandan

    2016-10-01

    The semi-empirical, kernel-driven Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model has been widely used for many aspects of remote sensing. With the development of the kernel-driven model, there is a need to further assess the performance of newly developed kernels. The use of visualization tools can facilitate the analysis of model results and the assessment of newly developed kernels. However, the current version of the kernel-driven model does not contain a visualization function. In this study, a user-friendly visualization tool, named MaKeMAT, was developed specifically for the kernel-driven model. The POLDER-3 and CAR BRDF datasets were used to demonstrate the applicability of MaKeMAT. The visualization of inputted multi-angle measurements enhances understanding of multi-angle measurements and allows the choice of measurements with good representativeness. The visualization of modeling results facilitates the assessment of newly developed kernels. The study shows that the visualization tool MaKeMAT can promote the widespread application of the kernel-driven model.

  2. Privacy preserving RBF kernel support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Xiong, Li; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is challenging but important for healthcare research. Methods for privacy-preserving data dissemination based on the rigorous differential privacy standard have been developed but they did not consider the characteristics of biomedical data and make full use of the available information. This often results in too much noise in the final outputs. We hypothesized that this situation can be alleviated by leveraging a small portion of open-consented data to improve utility without sacrificing privacy. We developed a hybrid privacy-preserving differentially private support vector machine (SVM) model that uses public data and private data together. Our model leverages the RBF kernel and can handle nonlinearly separable cases. Experiments showed that this approach outperforms two baselines: (1) SVMs that only use public data, and (2) differentially private SVMs that are built from private data. Our method demonstrated very close performance metrics compared to nonprivate SVMs trained on the private data. PMID:25013805

  3. Point-Kernel Shielding Code System.

    1982-02-17

    Version 00 QAD-BSA is a three-dimensional, point-kernel shielding code system based upon the CCC-48/QAD series. It is designed to calculate photon dose rates and heating rates using exponential attenuation and infinite medium buildup factors. Calculational provisions include estimates of fast neutron penetration using data computed by the moments method. Included geometry routines can describe complicated source and shield geometries. An internal library contains data for many frequently used structural and shielding materials, enabling the codemore » to solve most problems with only source strengths and problem geometry required as input. This code system adapts especially well to problems requiring multiple sources and sources with asymmetrical geometry. In addition to being edited separately, the total interaction rates from many sources may be edited at each detector point. Calculated photon interaction rates agree closely with those obtained using QAD-P5A.« less

  4. Kernel density estimation using graphical processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarko, Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Kernel density estimation for particles distributed over a 2-dimensional space is calculated using a single graphical processing unit (GTX 660Ti GPU) and CUDA-C language. Parallel calculations are done for particles having bivariate normal distribution and by assigning calculations for equally-spaced node points to each scalar processor in the GPU. The number of particles, blocks and threads are varied to identify favorable configuration. Comparisons are obtained by performing the same calculation using 1, 2 and 4 processors on a 3.0 GHz CPU using MPICH 2.0 routines. Speedups attained with the GPU are in the range of 88 to 349 times compared the multiprocessor CPU. Blocks of 128 threads are found to be the optimum configuration for this case.

  5. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  6. Labeled Graph Kernel for Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiqi; Martinez, Aleix M

    2016-08-01

    Automatic behavior analysis from video is a major topic in many areas of research, including computer vision, multimedia, robotics, biology, cognitive science, social psychology, psychiatry, and linguistics. Two major problems are of interest when analyzing behavior. First, we wish to automatically categorize observed behaviors into a discrete set of classes (i.e., classification). For example, to determine word production from video sequences in sign language. Second, we wish to understand the relevance of each behavioral feature in achieving this classification (i.e., decoding). For instance, to know which behavior variables are used to discriminate between the words apple and onion in American Sign Language (ASL). The present paper proposes to model behavior using a labeled graph, where the nodes define behavioral features and the edges are labels specifying their order (e.g., before, overlaps, start). In this approach, classification reduces to a simple labeled graph matching. Unfortunately, the complexity of labeled graph matching grows exponentially with the number of categories we wish to represent. Here, we derive a graph kernel to quickly and accurately compute this graph similarity. This approach is very general and can be plugged into any kernel-based classifier. Specifically, we derive a Labeled Graph Support Vector Machine (LGSVM) and a Labeled Graph Logistic Regressor (LGLR) that can be readily employed to discriminate between many actions (e.g., sign language concepts). The derived approach can be readily used for decoding too, yielding invaluable information for the understanding of a problem (e.g., to know how to teach a sign language). The derived algorithms allow us to achieve higher accuracy results than those of state-of-the-art algorithms in a fraction of the time. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and datasets, including multimodal data.

  7. Probability-confidence-kernel-based localized multiple kernel learning with lp norm.

    PubMed

    Han, Yina; Liu, Guizhong

    2012-06-01

    Localized multiple kernel learning (LMKL) is an attractive strategy for combining multiple heterogeneous features in terms of their discriminative power for each individual sample. However, models excessively fitting to a specific sample would obstacle the extension to unseen data, while a more general form is often insufficient for diverse locality characterization. Hence, both learning sample-specific local models for each training datum and extending the learned models to unseen test data should be equally addressed in designing LMKL algorithm. In this paper, for an integrative solution, we propose a probability confidence kernel (PCK), which measures per-sample similarity with respect to probabilistic-prediction-based class attribute: The class attribute similarity complements the spatial-similarity-based base kernels for more reasonable locality characterization, and the predefined form of involved class probability density function facilitates the extension to the whole input space and ensures its statistical meaning. Incorporating PCK into support-vectormachine-based LMKL framework, we propose a new PCK-LMKL with arbitrary l(p)-norm constraint implied in the definition of PCKs, where both the parameters in PCK and the final classifier can be efficiently optimized in a joint manner. Evaluations of PCK-LMKL on both benchmark machine learning data sets (ten University of California Irvine (UCI) data sets) and challenging computer vision data sets (15-scene data set and Caltech-101 data set) have shown to achieve state-of-the-art performances.

  8. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical discs.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J; Canup, R M

    2014-09-13

    Impacts that leave the Earth-Moon system with a large excess in angular momentum have recently been advocated as a means of generating a protolunar disc with a composition that is nearly identical to that of the Earth's mantle. We here investigate the accretion of the Moon from discs generated by such 'non-canonical' impacts, which are typically more compact than discs produced by canonical impacts and have a higher fraction of their mass initially located inside the Roche limit. Our model predicts a similar overall accretional history for both canonical and non-canonical discs, with the Moon forming in three consecutive steps over hundreds of years. However, we find that, to yield a lunar-mass Moon, the more compact non-canonical discs must initially be more massive than implied by prior estimates, and only a few of the discs produced by impact simulations to date appear to meet this condition. Non-canonical impacts require that capture of the Moon into the evection resonance with the Sun reduced the Earth-Moon angular momentum by a factor of 2 or more. We find that the Moon's semi-major axis at the end of its accretion is approximately 7R⊕, which is comparable to the location of the evection resonance for a post-impact Earth with a 2.5 h rotation period in the absence of a disc. Thus, the dynamics of the Moon's assembly may directly affect its ability to be captured into the resonance. PMID:25114307

  9. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  10. Gaussian kernel width optimization for sparse Bayesian learning.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Yalda; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2015-04-01

    Sparse kernel methods have been widely used in regression and classification applications. The performance and the sparsity of these methods are dependent on the appropriate choice of the corresponding kernel functions and their parameters. Typically, the kernel parameters are selected using a cross-validation approach. In this paper, a learning method that is an extension of the relevance vector machine (RVM) is presented. The proposed method can find the optimal values of the kernel parameters during the training procedure. This algorithm uses an expectation-maximization approach for updating kernel parameters as well as other model parameters; therefore, the speed of convergence and computational complexity of the proposed method are the same as the standard RVM. To control the convergence of this fully parameterized model, the optimization with respect to the kernel parameters is performed using a constraint on these parameters. The proposed method is compared with the typical RVM and other competing methods to analyze the performance. The experimental results on the commonly used synthetic data, as well as benchmark data sets, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in reducing the performance dependency on the initial choice of the kernel parameters. PMID:25794377

  11. Bridging the gap between the KERNEL and RT-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hendra, R.G.

    1981-06-01

    A software package is proposed to allow users of the PL-11 language, and the LSI-11 KERNEL in general, to use their PL-11 programs under RT-11. Further, some general purpose extensions to the KERNEL are proposed that facilitate some number conversions and strong manipulations. A Floating Point Package of procedures to allow full use of the hardware floating point capability of the LSI-11 computers is proposed. Extensions to the KERNEL that allow a user to read, write and delete disc files in the manner of RT-11 is also proposed. A device directory listing routine is also included.

  12. Spectrophotometric method for determination of phosphine residues in cashew kernels.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, J R

    1988-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method reported for determination of phosphine (PH3) residues in wheat has been extended for determination of these residues in cashew kernels. Unlike the spectrum for wheat, the spectrum of PH3 residue-AgNO3 chromophore from cashew kernels does not show an absorption maximum at 400 nm; nevertheless, reading the absorbance at 400 nm afforded good recoveries of 90-98%. No interference occurred from crop materials, and crop controls showed low absorbance; the method can be applied for determinations as low as 0.01 ppm PH3 residue in cashew kernels.

  13. Initial-state splitting kernels in cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovanesyan, Grigory; Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We derive medium-induced splitting kernels for energetic partons that undergo interactions in dense QCD matter before a hard-scattering event at large momentum transfer Q2. Working in the framework of the effective theory SCETG, we compute the splitting kernels beyond the soft gluon approximation. We present numerical studies that compare our new results with previous findings. We expect the full medium-induced splitting kernels to be most relevant for the extension of initial-state cold nuclear matter energy loss phenomenology in both p+A and A+A collisions.

  14. Kernel simplex growing algorithm for hyperspectral endmember extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liaoying; Zheng, Junpeng; Li, Xiaorun; Wang, Lijiao

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively extract endmembers for hyperspectral imagery where linear mixing model may not be appropriate due to multiple scattering effects, this paper extends the simplex growing algorithm (SGA) to its kernel version. A new simplex volume formula without dimension reduction is used in SGA to form a new simplex growing algorithm (NSGA). The original data are nonlinearly mapped into a high-dimensional space where the scatters can be ignored. To avoid determining complex nonlinear mapping, a kernel function is used to extend the NSGA to kernel NSGA (KNSGA). Experimental results of simulated and real data prove that the proposed KNSGA approach outperforms SGA and NSGA.

  15. Multitasking kernel for the C and Fortran programming languages

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, E.D. III

    1984-09-01

    A multitasking kernel for the C and Fortran programming languages which runs on the Unix operating system is presented. The kernel provides a multitasking environment which serves two purposes. The first is to provide an efficient portable environment for the coding, debugging and execution of production multiprocessor programs. The second is to provide a means of evaluating the performance of a multitasking program on model multiprocessors. The performance evaluation features require no changes in the source code of the application and are implemented as a set of compile and run time options in the kernel.

  16. Monte Carlo Code System for Electron (Positron) Dose Kernel Calculations.

    1999-05-12

    Version 00 KERNEL performs dose kernel calculations for an electron (positron) isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium. First, the auxiliary code PRELIM is used to prepare cross section data for the considered medium. Then the KERNEL code simulates the transport of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons through the medium until all particles reach their cutoff energies. The deposited energy is scored in concentric spherical shells at a radial distance ranging from zero to twicemore » the source particle range.« less

  17. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    PubMed

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF.

  18. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    PubMed

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF. PMID:26835237

  19. A Non-Local, Energy-Optimized Kernel: Recovering Second-Order Exchange and Beyond in Extended Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jefferson; Laricchia, Savio; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is quickly becoming a standard method beyond semi-local Density Functional Theory that naturally incorporates weak interactions and eliminates self-interaction error. RPA is not perfect, however, and suffers from self-correlation error as well as an incorrect description of short-ranged correlation typically leading to underbinding. To improve upon RPA we introduce a short-ranged, exchange-like kernel that is one-electron self-correlation free for one and two electron systems in the high-density limit. By tuning the one free parameter in our model to recover an exact limit of the homogeneous electron gas correlation energy we obtain a non-local, energy-optimized kernel that reduces the errors of RPA for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous solids. To reduce the computational cost of the standard kernel-corrected RPA, we also implement RPA renormalized perturbation theory for extended systems, and demonstrate its capability to describe the dominant correlation effects with a low-order expansion in both metallic and non-metallic systems. Furthermore we stress that for norm-conserving implementations the accuracy of RPA and beyond RPA structural properties compared to experiment is inherently limited by the choice of pseudopotential. Current affiliation: King's College London.

  20. Dickkopf-1 induced apoptosis in human placental choriocarcinoma is independent of canonical Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sha; Miao Chenglin; Li Jing; Fan Xiujun; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui . E-mail: duane@ioz.ac.cn

    2006-11-24

    Placental choriocarcinoma, a reproductive system carcinoma in women, has about 0.81% occurrence frequency in China, which leads to over 90% lethality due to indistinct pathogenesis and the absence of efficient therapeutic treatment. In the present study, using immunostaining and reverse transcription PCR, we reported that Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is prominently expressed in human cytotrophoblast (CTB) cell, but absent in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and JEG3, implicating an unknown correlation between Dkk-1 and carcinogenesis of placental choriocarcinoma. Further, through exogenous introduction of Dkk-1, we found repressed proliferation in JAR and JEG3, induced apoptosis in JAR, and discovered significant tumor suppression effects of Dkk-1 in placental choriocarcinoma. Moreover we found that this function of Dkk-1 is achieved through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), whereas the canonical Wnt pathway may not have a great role. This discovery is not symphonic to previous functional understanding of Dkk-1, a canonical Wnt signaling antagonist. Together, our data indicate the possible correlation between Dkk-1 and human placental choriocarcinoma and suggest potential applications of Dkk-1 in treatment of human placental choriocarcinomas.

  1. Catechistic Teaching, National Canons, and the Regimentation of Students' Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroon, Sjaak

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on key incident analysis of classroom transcripts from Bashkortostan, France, North Korea, and Suriname, this article discusses the relationship between an increasingly canonical content of education and the discursive organization of teaching processes at the expense of both teachers' and students' voice. It argues that canonical…

  2. Canonical realization of Bondi-Metzner-Sachs symmetry: Quadratic Casimir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We study the canonical realization of Bondi-Metzner-Sacks symmetry for a massive scalar field introduced by Longhi and Materassi [J. Math. Phys. 40, 480 (1999)]. We construct an invariant scalar product for the generalized momenta. As a consequence we introduce a quadratic Casimir with the supertranslations.

  3. A Problem-Centered Approach to Canonical Matrix Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a problem-centered approach to the topic of canonical matrix forms in a second linear algebra course. In this approach, abstract theory, including such topics as eigenvalues, generalized eigenspaces, invariant subspaces, independent subspaces, nilpotency, and cyclic spaces, is developed in response to the patterns discovered…

  4. Courtroom Access: Clarification and Recommendation for Canon 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forston, Robert F.; Forston, Anne L.

    Canon 35, concerning improper publicizing of court proceedings, is one of the professional codes of the American Bar Association. First adopted in 1937, it has twice been amended and is widely observed by most courts throughout the United States. Reasons for barring radio or television coverage of trials are based on concerns that broadcasting…

  5. Reputation, Canon-Formation, Pedagogy: George Orwell in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodden, John

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the process by which books become canonized in British and U.S. schools and universities. Uses the case of George Orwell to examine the institutional and historical factors which condition the inclusion and exclusion of writer's work in Anglo-American classrooms. (SR)

  6. Connection coefficients between orthogonal polynomials and the canonical sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroni, P.; Da Rocha, Z.

    2008-03-01

    We deal with the problem of obtaining closed formulas for the connection coefficients between orthogonal polynomials and the canonical sequence. We use a recurrence relation fulfilled by these coefficients and symbolic computation with the Mathematica language. We treat the cases of Gegenbauer, Jacobi and a new semi-classical sequence.

  7. General Entropic Approximations for Canonical Systems Described by Kinetic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, V.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we extend the general construction of entropic approximation for kinetic operators modelling canonical systems. More precisely, this paper aims at pursuing to thermalized systems the works of Levermore, Schneider and Junk on moments problems relying on entropy minimization in order to construct BGK approximations and moments based equations.

  8. Connecting the Canon to Current Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybakova, Katie; Roccanti, Rikki

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss the respective roles of young adult literature and literary texts in the secondary level English Language Arts classroom and explore the connections that can be made between popular young adult books and the traditional canon. We provide examples showing how young adult literature bestsellers such as "The Book…

  9. The Problematics of Postmodernism: The Double-Voiced Honors Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Tim

    Honors education is not immune from the current controversy concerning the role of the literary canon. Indeed, the problem seems especially crucial for honors programs, for their curriculums are often multi-disciplinary in their approaches to culture and history. The solution may lie in what Linda Hutcheon calls the "poetics of the postmodern."…

  10. Canonical orbital elements in terms of an arbitrary independent variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.; Janin, G.

    1981-01-01

    Within the framework of the Hamiltonian mechanics in the extended phase space, a set of canonical elements of the Delaunay type is developed in terms of an arbitary independent angular variable. Application to the four classical anomalies - eccentric, true, elliptic, and mean - is presented. Particular attention is given to the generalized time equation and its conjugate energy equation.

  11. Prognostic factors of sciatica in the Canon of Avicenna.

    PubMed

    Minaee, Bagher; Abbassian, Alireza; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Rostamian, Abdorrahman

    2013-12-01

    Prognosis studies are fast developing and very practical types of medical research. Sciatica is one of the common types of low back pain and identifying prognostic factors of the illness can help physicians and patients to choose best method of practice. The prognostic factors of sciatica are presented from the Canon of Avicenna, one of the most famous physicians in the history of medicine.

  12. The Catholic School According to the Code of Canon Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grocholewski, Zenon Cardinal

    2008-01-01

    For close to three decades, his Eminence Zenon Cardinal Grocholeski, worked at the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura as notary, chancellor, secretary and prefect. A professor, scholar, and canonist of exceptional ability, he is considered one of the world's most prominent experts on the Code of Canon Law. In light of his competence and…

  13. Adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation DFT for the structural properties of solids—The renormalized ALDA and electron gas kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations of the correlation energies of crystalline solids and isolated systems within the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation formulation of density-functional theory. We perform a quantitative comparison of a set of model exchange-correlation kernels originally derived for the homogeneous electron gas (HEG), including the recently introduced renormalized adiabatic local-density approximation (rALDA) and also kernels which (a) satisfy known exact limits of the HEG, (b) carry a frequency dependence, or (c) display a 1/k2 divergence for small wavevectors. After generalizing the kernels to inhomogeneous systems through a reciprocal-space averaging procedure, we calculate the lattice constants and bulk moduli of a test set of 10 solids consisting of tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors (C, Si, SiC), ionic compounds (MgO, LiCl, LiF), and metals (Al, Na, Cu, Pd). We also consider the atomization energy of the H2 molecule. We compare the results calculated with different kernels to those obtained from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and to experimental measurements. We demonstrate that the model kernels correct the RPA's tendency to overestimate the magnitude of the correlation energy whilst maintaining a high-accuracy description of structural properties.

  14. Adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation DFT for the structural properties of solids—The renormalized ALDA and electron gas kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Christopher E. Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2015-09-14

    We present calculations of the correlation energies of crystalline solids and isolated systems within the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation formulation of density-functional theory. We perform a quantitative comparison of a set of model exchange-correlation kernels originally derived for the homogeneous electron gas (HEG), including the recently introduced renormalized adiabatic local-density approximation (rALDA) and also kernels which (a) satisfy known exact limits of the HEG, (b) carry a frequency dependence, or (c) display a 1/k{sup 2} divergence for small wavevectors. After generalizing the kernels to inhomogeneous systems through a reciprocal-space averaging procedure, we calculate the lattice constants and bulk moduli of a test set of 10 solids consisting of tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors (C, Si, SiC), ionic compounds (MgO, LiCl, LiF), and metals (Al, Na, Cu, Pd). We also consider the atomization energy of the H{sub 2} molecule. We compare the results calculated with different kernels to those obtained from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and to experimental measurements. We demonstrate that the model kernels correct the RPA’s tendency to overestimate the magnitude of the correlation energy whilst maintaining a high-accuracy description of structural properties.

  15. Survey of Salmonella contamination of edible nut kernels on retail sale in the UK.

    PubMed

    Little, C L; Rawal, N; de Pinna, E; McLauchlin, J

    2010-02-01

    Consumption of nut kernels has shown an upward trend due to people's increasing tendency to eat healthy snacks. The purpose of this survey was to establish the microbiological safety of retail edible nut kernel samples of different varieties. Overall Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli were detected from 0.1% and 0.8% of 2886 edible nut kernels, respectively. S. Senftenberg and S. Tennessee were detected from two pre-packed samples of Brazil nuts (0.4%) and S. Anatum from a pre-packed mixed nuts sample (0.9%; mix: almonds, Brazils, cashews, peanuts, walnuts) indicating a risk to health. The levels of Salmonella ranged from <0.01 to 0.23/g. E. coli at unsatisfactory levels (150/g) was present in another pre-packed Brazils nuts sample (0.2%). E. coli was additionally found at lower levels (range: 3.6-43/g) in Brazils (1.9%), macadamia (1.5%), pistachios (1.1%), walnuts (0.7%), peanuts (0.7%), hazels (0.5%), cashews (0.4%), and almonds (0.3%). Levels of E. coli did not correlate with the presence of Salmonella. The batches contaminated with Salmonella were recalled and Food Standards Agency food alerts were issued to advise against the consumption of the affected products. The presence of Salmonella is unacceptable in ready-to-eat foods and follows that the need for applying good agricultural and hygiene practices and effective decontamination procedures during the production of edible kernels cannot be overemphasized.

  16. Survey of Salmonella contamination of edible nut kernels on retail sale in the UK.

    PubMed

    Little, C L; Rawal, N; de Pinna, E; McLauchlin, J

    2010-02-01

    Consumption of nut kernels has shown an upward trend due to people's increasing tendency to eat healthy snacks. The purpose of this survey was to establish the microbiological safety of retail edible nut kernel samples of different varieties. Overall Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli were detected from 0.1% and 0.8% of 2886 edible nut kernels, respectively. S. Senftenberg and S. Tennessee were detected from two pre-packed samples of Brazil nuts (0.4%) and S. Anatum from a pre-packed mixed nuts sample (0.9%; mix: almonds, Brazils, cashews, peanuts, walnuts) indicating a risk to health. The levels of Salmonella ranged from <0.01 to 0.23/g. E. coli at unsatisfactory levels (150/g) was present in another pre-packed Brazils nuts sample (0.2%). E. coli was additionally found at lower levels (range: 3.6-43/g) in Brazils (1.9%), macadamia (1.5%), pistachios (1.1%), walnuts (0.7%), peanuts (0.7%), hazels (0.5%), cashews (0.4%), and almonds (0.3%). Levels of E. coli did not correlate with the presence of Salmonella. The batches contaminated with Salmonella were recalled and Food Standards Agency food alerts were issued to advise against the consumption of the affected products. The presence of Salmonella is unacceptable in ready-to-eat foods and follows that the need for applying good agricultural and hygiene practices and effective decontamination procedures during the production of edible kernels cannot be overemphasized. PMID:19913709

  17. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical discs

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J.; Canup, R. M

    2014-01-01

    Impacts that leave the Earth–Moon system with a large excess in angular momentum have recently been advocated as a means of generating a protolunar disc with a composition that is nearly identical to that of the Earth's mantle. We here investigate the accretion of the Moon from discs generated by such ‘non-canonical’ impacts, which are typically more compact than discs produced by canonical impacts and have a higher fraction of their mass initially located inside the Roche limit. Our model predicts a similar overall accretional history for both canonical and non-canonical discs, with the Moon forming in three consecutive steps over hundreds of years. However, we find that, to yield a lunar-mass Moon, the more compact non-canonical discs must initially be more massive than implied by prior estimates, and only a few of the discs produced by impact simulations to date appear to meet this condition. Non-canonical impacts require that capture of the Moon into the evection resonance with the Sun reduced the Earth–Moon angular momentum by a factor of 2 or more. We find that the Moon's semi-major axis at the end of its accretion is approximately 7R⊕, which is comparable to the location of the evection resonance for a post-impact Earth with a 2.5 h rotation period in the absence of a disc. Thus, the dynamics of the Moon's assembly may directly affect its ability to be captured into the resonance. PMID:25114307

  18. Kernel-based Linux emulation for Plan 9.

    SciTech Connect

    Minnich, Ronald G.

    2010-09-01

    CNKemu is a kernel-based system for the 9k variant of the Plan 9 kernel. It is designed to provide transparent binary support for programs compiled for IBM's Compute Node Kernel (CNK) on the Blue Gene series of supercomputers. This support allows users to build applications with the standard Blue Gene toolchain, including C++ and Fortran compilers. While the CNK is not Linux, IBM designed the CNK so that the user interface has much in common with the Linux 2.0 system call interface. The Plan 9 CNK emulator hence provides the foundation of kernel-based Linux system call support on Plan 9. In this paper we discuss cnkemu's implementation and some of its more interesting features, such as the ability to easily intermix Plan 9 and Linux system calls.

  19. Inheritance of Kernel Color in Corn: Explanations and Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Rosemary H.

    2000-01-01

    Offers a new perspective on traditional problems in genetics on kernel color in corn, including information about genetic regulation, metabolic pathways, and evolution of genes. (Contains 15 references.) (ASK)

  20. Intelligent classification methods of grain kernels using computer vision analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choon Young; Yan, Lei; Wang, Tianfeng; Lee, Sang Ryong; Park, Cheol Woo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a digital image analysis method was developed to classify seven kinds of individual grain kernels (common rice, glutinous rice, rough rice, brown rice, buckwheat, common barley and glutinous barley) widely planted in Korea. A total of 2800 color images of individual grain kernels were acquired as a data set. Seven color and ten morphological features were extracted and processed by linear discriminant analysis to improve the efficiency of the identification process. The output features from linear discriminant analysis were used as input to the four-layer back-propagation network to classify different grain kernel varieties. The data set was divided into three groups: 70% for training, 20% for validation, and 10% for testing the network. The classification experimental results show that the proposed method is able to classify the grain kernel varieties efficiently.

  1. Isolation and purification of D-mannose from palm kernel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Pan, Ziguo; Qian, Chao; Chen, Xinzhi

    2009-09-01

    An economically viable procedure for the isolation and purification of d-mannose from palm kernel was developed in this research. The palm kernel was catalytically hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid at 100 degrees C and then fermented by mannan-degrading enzymes. The solution after fermentation underwent filtration in a silica gel column, desalination by ion-exchange resin, and crystallization in ethanol to produce pure d-mannose in a total yield of 48.4% (based on the weight of the palm kernel). Different enzymes were investigated, and the results indicated that endo-beta-mannanase was the best enzyme to promote the hydrolysis of the oligosaccharides isolated from the palm kernel. The pure d-mannose sample was characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectra.

  2. A kernel adaptive algorithm for quaternion-valued inputs.

    PubMed

    Paul, Thomas K; Ogunfunmi, Tokunbo

    2015-10-01

    The use of quaternion data can provide benefit in applications like robotics and image recognition, and particularly for performing transforms in 3-D space. Here, we describe a kernel adaptive algorithm for quaternions. A least mean square (LMS)-based method was used, resulting in the derivation of the quaternion kernel LMS (Quat-KLMS) algorithm. Deriving this algorithm required describing the idea of a quaternion reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), as well as kernel functions suitable with quaternions. A modified HR calculus for Hilbert spaces was used to find the gradient of cost functions defined on a quaternion RKHS. In addition, the use of widely linear (or augmented) filtering is proposed to improve performance. The benefit of the Quat-KLMS and widely linear forms in learning nonlinear transformations of quaternion data are illustrated with simulations. PMID:25594982

  3. Effects of strain rate and curvature on the propagation of a spherical flame kernel in the thin-reaction-zones regime

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, K.W.; Klein, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Cant, R.S.

    2006-04-15

    Strain rate and curvature effects on the propagation of turbulent premixed flame kernels have been investigated in the thin-reaction-zones regime using three-dimensional compressible direct numerical simulations (DNS) with single-step Arrhenius chemistry. An initially spherical laminar flame kernel is allowed to interact with the surrounding turbulent fluid motion to provide a propagating turbulent flame with a strong mean spherical curvature. The statistical behavior of the local displacement speed in response to strain and curvature is investigated in detail. The results demonstrate clearly that the mean curvature inherent to the flame kernel configuration has a significant influence on the propagation of the flame. It has been found that the mean density-weighted displacement speed rS{sub d} in the case of flame kernels varies significantly over the flame brush and remains different from r{sub 0}S{sub L} (where r{sub 0} is the reactant density and S{sub L} is laminar flame speed), unlike statistically planar flames. It is also shown that the magnitude of reaction progress variable gradient ||c| is negatively correlated with curvature in the case of flame kernels, in contrast to the weak correlation between ||c| and curvature in the case of planar flames. This correlation induces a net positive correlation between the combined reaction and normal diffusion components of displacement speed (S{sub r}+S{sub n}) and curvature in flame kernels, whereas the previous studies based on statistically planar flames did not observe any appreciable correlation between (S{sub r}+S{sub n}) and curvature. (author)

  4. The Dynamic Kernel Scheduler-Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelmann, Andreas; Locans, Uldis; Suter, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Emerging processor architectures such as GPUs and Intel MICs provide a huge performance potential for high performance computing. However developing software that uses these hardware accelerators introduces additional challenges for the developer. These challenges may include exposing increased parallelism, handling different hardware designs, and using multiple development frameworks in order to utilise devices from different vendors. The Dynamic Kernel Scheduler (DKS) is being developed in order to provide a software layer between the host application and different hardware accelerators. DKS handles the communication between the host and the device, schedules task execution, and provides a library of built-in algorithms. Algorithms available in the DKS library will be written in CUDA, OpenCL, and OpenMP. Depending on the available hardware, the DKS can select the appropriate implementation of the algorithm. The first DKS version was created using CUDA for the Nvidia GPUs and OpenMP for Intel MIC. DKS was further integrated into OPAL (Object-oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) in order to speed up a parallel FFT based Poisson solver and Monte Carlo simulations for particle-matter interaction used for proton therapy degrader modelling. DKS was also used together with Minuit2 for parameter fitting, where χ2 and max-log-likelihood functions were offloaded to the hardware accelerator. The concepts of the DKS, first results, and plans for the future will be shown in this paper.

  5. Protoribosome by quantum kernel energy method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Krupkin, Miri; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada; Massa, Lou

    2013-09-10

    Experimental evidence suggests the existence of an RNA molecular prebiotic entity, called by us the "protoribosome," which may have evolved in the RNA world before evolution of the genetic code and proteins. This vestige of the RNA world, which possesses all of the capabilities required for peptide bond formation, seems to be still functioning in the heart of all of the contemporary ribosome. Within the modern ribosome this remnant includes the peptidyl transferase center. Its highly conserved nucleotide sequence is suggestive of its robustness under diverse environmental conditions, and hence on its prebiotic origin. Its twofold pseudosymmetry suggests that this entity could have been a dimer of self-folding RNA units that formed a pocket within which two activated amino acids might be accommodated, similar to the binding mode of modern tRNA molecules that carry amino acids or peptidyl moieties. Using quantum mechanics and crystal coordinates, this work studies the question of whether the putative protoribosome has properties necessary to function as an evolutionary precursor to the modern ribosome. The quantum model used in the calculations is density functional theory--B3LYP/3-21G*, implemented using the kernel energy method to make the computations practical and efficient. It occurs that the necessary conditions that would characterize a practicable protoribosome--namely (i) energetic structural stability and (ii) energetically stable attachment to substrates--are both well satisfied.

  6. Local Kernel for Brains Classification in Schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, U.; Rossato, E.; Murino, V.; Bellani, M.; Rambaldelli, G.; Tansella, M.; Brambilla, P.

    In this paper a novel framework for brain classification is proposed in the context of mental health research. A learning by example method is introduced by combining local measurements with non linear Support Vector Machine. Instead of considering a voxel-by-voxel comparison between patients and controls, we focus on landmark points which are characterized by local region descriptors, namely Scale Invariance Feature Transform (SIFT). Then, matching is obtained by introducing the local kernel for which the samples are represented by unordered set of features. Moreover, a new weighting approach is proposed to take into account the discriminative relevance of the detected groups of features. Experiments have been performed including a set of 54 patients with schizophrenia and 54 normal controls on which region of interest (ROI) have been manually traced by experts. Preliminary results on Dorso-lateral PreFrontal Cortex (DLPFC) region are promising since up to 75% of successful classification rate has been obtained with this technique and the performance has improved up to 85% when the subjects have been stratified by sex.

  7. Kernel spectral clustering with memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Rocco; Alzate, Carlos; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2013-05-01

    Evolving graphs describe many natural phenomena changing over time, such as social relationships, trade markets, metabolic networks etc. In this framework, performing community detection and analyzing the cluster evolution represents a critical task. Here we propose a new model for this purpose, where the smoothness of the clustering results over time can be considered as a valid prior knowledge. It is based on a constrained optimization formulation typical of Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), where the objective function is designed to explicitly incorporate temporal smoothness. The latter allows the model to cluster the current data well and to be consistent with the recent history. We also propose new model selection criteria in order to carefully choose the hyper-parameters of our model, which is a crucial issue to achieve good performances. We successfully test the model on four toy problems and on a real world network. We also compare our model with Evolutionary Spectral Clustering, which is a state-of-the-art algorithm for community detection of evolving networks, illustrating that the kernel spectral clustering with memory effect can achieve better or equal performances.

  8. Resummed memory kernels in generalized system-bath master equations

    SciTech Connect

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-08-07

    Generalized master equations provide a concise formalism for studying reduced population dynamics. Usually, these master equations require a perturbative expansion of the memory kernels governing the dynamics; in order to prevent divergences, these expansions must be resummed. Resummation techniques of perturbation series are ubiquitous in physics, but they have not been readily studied for the time-dependent memory kernels used in generalized master equations. In this paper, we present a comparison of different resummation techniques for such memory kernels up to fourth order. We study specifically the spin-boson Hamiltonian as a model system bath Hamiltonian, treating the diabatic coupling between the two states as a perturbation. A novel derivation of the fourth-order memory kernel for the spin-boson problem is presented; then, the second- and fourth-order kernels are evaluated numerically for a variety of spin-boson parameter regimes. We find that resumming the kernels through fourth order using a Padé approximant results in divergent populations in the strong electronic coupling regime due to a singularity introduced by the nature of the resummation, and thus recommend a non-divergent exponential resummation (the “Landau-Zener resummation” of previous work). The inclusion of fourth-order effects in a Landau-Zener-resummed kernel is shown to improve both the dephasing rate and the obedience of detailed balance over simpler prescriptions like the non-interacting blip approximation, showing a relatively quick convergence on the exact answer. The results suggest that including higher-order contributions to the memory kernel of a generalized master equation and performing an appropriate resummation can provide a numerically-exact solution to system-bath dynamics for a general spectral density, opening the way to a new class of methods for treating system-bath dynamics.

  9. The Weighted Super Bergman Kernels Over the Supermatrix Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhiming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is threefold. Firstly, using Howe duality for , we obtain integral formulas of the super Schur functions with respect to the super standard Gaussian distributions. Secondly, we give explicit expressions of the super Szegö kernels and the weighted super Bergman kernels for the Cartan superdomains of type I. Thirdly, combining these results, we obtain duality relations of integrals over the unitary groups and the Cartan superdomains, and the marginal distributions of the weighted measure.

  10. Kernel approximation for solving few-body integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.; Eyre, D.

    1986-06-01

    This paper investigates an approximate method for solving integral equations that arise in few-body problems. The method is to replace the kernel by a degenerate kernel defined on a finite dimensional subspace of piecewise Lagrange polynomials. Numerical accuracy of the method is tested by solving the two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equation with non-separable potentials, and the three-body Amado-Lovelace equation with separable two-body potentials.

  11. An Ensemble Approach to Building Mercer Kernels with Prior Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for automatic knowledge driven data mining based on the theory of Mercer Kernels, which are highly nonlinear symmetric positive definite mappings from the original image space to a very high, possibly dimensional feature space. we describe a new method called Mixture Density Mercer Kernels to learn kernel function directly from data, rather than using pre-defined kernels. These data adaptive kernels can encode prior knowledge in the kernel using a Bayesian formulation, thus allowing for physical information to be encoded in the model. Specifically, we demonstrate the use of the algorithm in situations with extremely small samples of data. We compare the results with existing algorithms on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and demonstrate the method's superior performance against standard methods. The code for these experiments has been generated with the AUTOBAYES tool, which automatically generates efficient and documented C/C++ code from abstract statistical model specifications. The core of the system is a schema library which contains templates for learning and knowledge discovery algorithms like different versions of EM, or numeric optimization methods like conjugate gradient methods. The template instantiation is supported by symbolic-algebraic computations, which allows AUTOBAYES to find closed-form solutions and, where possible, to integrate them into the code.

  12. Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 Amplifies Canonical Wnt Signaling in Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Kiran; Gu, Jingsheng; Werner, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Tumor Endothelial Marker 8/Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 (TEM8/ANTXR1) expression is induced in the vascular compartment of multiple tumors and therefore, is a candidate molecule to target tumor therapies. This cell surface molecule mediates anthrax toxin internalization, however, its physiological function in blood vessels remains largely unknown. We identified the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) as a model system to study the endogenous function of TEM8 in blood vessels as we found that TEM8 expression was induced transiently between day 10 and 12 of embryonic development, when the vascular tree is undergoing final development and growth. We used the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen (PA), to engage endogenous TEM8 receptors and evaluate the effects of PA-TEM8 complexes on vascular development. PA applied at the time of highest TEM8 expression reduced vascular density and disrupted hierarchical branching as revealed by quantitative morphometric analysis of the vascular tree after 48h. PA-dependent reduced branching phenotype was partially mimicked by Wnt3a application and ameliorated by the Wnt antagonist, Dikkopf-1. These results implicate TEM8 expression in endothelial cells in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway at this day of CAM development. Consistent with this model, PA increased beta catenin levels acutely in CAM blood vessels in vivo and in TEM8 transfected primary human endothelial cells in vitro. TEM8 expression in Hek293 cells, which neither express endogenous PA-binding receptors nor Wnt ligands, stabilized beta catenin levels and amplified beta catenin-dependent transcriptional activity induced by Wnt3a. This agonistic function is supported by findings in the CAM, where the increase in TEM8 expression from day 10 to day 12 and PA application correlated with Axin 2 induction, a universal reporter gene for canonical Wnt signaling. We postulate that the developmentally controlled expression of TEM8 modulates

  13. Classification and quantification analysis of peach kernel from different origins with near-infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Qing, Jian-Ping; Li, Hong-Juan; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peach kernels which contain kinds of fatty acids play an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and biological functions. Objective: To establish an innovative and rapid diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIR) analysis method along with chemometric techniques for the qualitative and quantitative determination of a peach kernel. Materials and Methods: Peach kernel samples from nine different origins were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a reference method. DR-NIR is in the spectral range 1100-2300 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm were applied to obtain prediction models, The Savitzky-Golay derivative and first derivative were adopted for the spectral pre-processing, PCA was applied to classify the varieties of those samples. For the quantitative calibration, the models of linoleic and oleinic acids were established with the PLSR algorithm and the optimal principal component (PC) numbers were selected with leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation. The established models were evaluated with the root mean square error of deviation (RMSED) and corresponding correlation coefficients (R2). Results: The PCA results of DR-NIR spectra yield clear classification of the two varieties of peach kernel. PLSR had a better predictive ability. The correlation coefficients of the two calibration models were above 0.99, and the RMSED of linoleic and oleinic acids were 1.266% and 1.412%, respectively. Conclusion: The DR-NIR combined with PCA and PLSR algorithm could be used efficiently to identify and quantify peach kernels and also help to solve variety problem. PMID:25422544

  14. Stability Performance of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry-Phenotyped Kernel Minerals Concentration and Grain Yield in Maize in Different Agro-Climatic Zones.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjuna, Mallana Gowdra; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Hossain, Firoz; Bhat, Jayant S; Jha, Shailendra K; Rathore, Abhishek; Agrawal, Pawan Kumar; Pattanayak, Arunava; Reddy, Sokka S; Gularia, Satish Kumar; Singh, Anju Mahendru; Manjaiah, Kanchikeri Math; Gupta, Hari Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of iron and zinc causes micronutrient malnutrition or hidden hunger, which severely affects ~25% of global population. Genetic biofortification of maize has emerged as cost effective and sustainable approach in addressing malnourishment of iron and zinc deficiency. Therefore, understanding the genetic variation and stability of kernel micronutrients and grain yield of the maize inbreds is a prerequisite in breeding micronutrient-rich high yielding hybrids to alleviate micronutrient malnutrition. We report here, the genetic variability and stability of the kernel micronutrients concentration and grain yield in a set of 50 maize inbred panel selected from the national and the international centres that were raised at six different maize growing regions of India. Phenotyping of kernels using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed considerable variability for kernel minerals concentration (iron: 18.88 to 47.65 mg kg(-1); zinc: 5.41 to 30.85 mg kg(-1); manganese: 3.30 to 17.73 mg kg(-1); copper: 0.53 to 5.48 mg kg(-1)) and grain yield (826.6 to 5413 kg ha(-1)). Significant positive correlation was observed between kernel iron and zinc within (r = 0.37 to r = 0.52, p < 0.05) and across locations (r = 0.44, p < 0.01). Variance components of the additive main effects and multiplicative interactions (AMMI) model showed significant genotype and genotype × environment interaction for kernel minerals concentration and grain yield. Most of the variation was contributed by genotype main effect for kernel iron (39.6%), manganese (41.34%) and copper (41.12%), and environment main effects for both kernel zinc (40.5%) and grain yield (37.0%). Genotype main effect plus genotype-by-environment interaction (GGE) biplot identified several mega environments for kernel minerals and grain yield. Comparison of stability parameters revealed AMMI stability value (ASV) as the better representative of the AMMI stability parameters. Dynamic stability parameter

  15. Stability Performance of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry-Phenotyped Kernel Minerals Concentration and Grain Yield in Maize in Different Agro-Climatic Zones

    PubMed Central

    Mallikarjuna, Mallana Gowdra; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Hossain, Firoz; Bhat, Jayant S.; Jha, Shailendra K.; Rathore, Abhishek; Agrawal, Pawan Kumar; Pattanayak, Arunava; Reddy, Sokka S.; Gularia, Satish Kumar; Singh, Anju Mahendru; Manjaiah, Kanchikeri Math; Gupta, Hari Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of iron and zinc causes micronutrient malnutrition or hidden hunger, which severely affects ~25% of global population. Genetic biofortification of maize has emerged as cost effective and sustainable approach in addressing malnourishment of iron and zinc deficiency. Therefore, understanding the genetic variation and stability of kernel micronutrients and grain yield of the maize inbreds is a prerequisite in breeding micronutrient-rich high yielding hybrids to alleviate micronutrient malnutrition. We report here, the genetic variability and stability of the kernel micronutrients concentration and grain yield in a set of 50 maize inbred panel selected from the national and the international centres that were raised at six different maize growing regions of India. Phenotyping of kernels using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed considerable variability for kernel minerals concentration (iron: 18.88 to 47.65 mg kg–1; zinc: 5.41 to 30.85 mg kg–1; manganese: 3.30 to17.73 mg kg–1; copper: 0.53 to 5.48 mg kg–1) and grain yield (826.6 to 5413 kg ha–1). Significant positive correlation was observed between kernel iron and zinc within (r = 0.37 to r = 0.52, p < 0.05) and across locations (r = 0.44, p < 0.01). Variance components of the additive main effects and multiplicative interactions (AMMI) model showed significant genotype and genotype × environment interaction for kernel minerals concentration and grain yield. Most of the variation was contributed by genotype main effect for kernel iron (39.6%), manganese (41.34%) and copper (41.12%), and environment main effects for both kernel zinc (40.5%) and grain yield (37.0%). Genotype main effect plus genotype-by-environment interaction (GGE) biplot identified several mega environments for kernel minerals and grain yield. Comparison of stability parameters revealed AMMI stability value (ASV) as the better representative of the AMMI stability parameters. Dynamic stability parameter

  16. Fusarium-damaged kernels and deoxynivalenol in Fusarium-infected U.S. winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Bai, Guihua; Zhang, Dadong; Dong, Yanhong; Ma, Lingjian; Bockus, William; Dowell, Floyd

    2014-05-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease that threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum) production in many areas worldwide. FHB infection results in Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) and deoxynivalenol (DON) that dramatically reduce grain yield and quality. More effective and accurate disease evaluation methods are imperative for successful identification of FHB-resistant sources and selection of resistant cultivars. To determine the relationships among different types of resistance, 363 (74 soft and 289 hard) U.S. winter wheat accessions were repeatedly evaluated for FDK and DON concentration in greenhouse and field experiments. Single-kernel near-infrared (SKNIR)-estimated FDK and DON were compared with visually estimated FDK and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy-estimated DON. Significant correlations were detected between percentage of symptomatic spikelets and visual FDK in the greenhouse and field, although correlations were slightly lower in the field. High correlation coefficients also were observed between visually scored FDK and SKNIR-estimated FDK (0.72, P < 0.001) and SKNIR-estimated DON (0.68, P < 0.001); therefore, both visual scoring and SKNIR methods are useful for estimating FDK and DON in breeding programs.

  17. Determination and characterization of kernel biochemical composition and functional compounds of Persian walnut oil.

    PubMed

    Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hamedi, Manouchehr; Khodaiyan, Faramarz

    2014-01-01

    Kernel chemical composition and fatty acids profile of three walnut cultivars (Toyserkan, Chaboksar and Karaj) was analyzed. Some physicochemical properties, total phenolics content (TPC), ortho-diphenols content (ODC) and total tocopherol concentration (TTC) of extracted oils from the walnuts were also determined. The antioxidant activity of oil was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity and β-carotene bleaching assays. The analysis of chemical composition revealed that protein and dietary fiber was highest in Toyserkan cultivar. Phosphorus was the most abundant element in the walnut kernels, followed by potassium, magnesium and calcium. The linoleic acid and linolenic contents ranged from 50.15% to 51.36% and 10.48% to 12.04%, respectively. Also, the results demonstrated that acid value, saponification value and viscosity of extracted oil had significantly varied between all cultivars. The extracted oil from Chaboksar cultivar illustrated more hydro peroxides and secondary products than those obtained from other cultivars. A positive correlation was found between Rancimat values and oleic acid content (r = 0.60), but considerably negative correlation with TTC (r = -0.81) and TPC (r = -0.92). The relationship between percentage of remaining DPPH radical and β-carotene of walnut oils showed high correlation among three selected cultivars (r = -0.94 to -0.97). PMID:24426045

  18. A Gabor-Block-Based Kernel Discriminative Common Vector Approach Using Cosine Kernels for Human Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Arindam; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Nasipuri, Mita; Kundu, Mahantapas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a nonlinear Gabor Wavelet Transform (GWT) discriminant feature extraction approach for enhanced face recognition is proposed. Firstly, the low-energized blocks from Gabor wavelet transformed images are extracted. Secondly, the nonlinear discriminating features are analyzed and extracted from the selected low-energized blocks by the generalized Kernel Discriminative Common Vector (KDCV) method. The KDCV method is extended to include cosine kernel function in the discriminating method. The KDCV with the cosine kernels is then applied on the extracted low-energized discriminating feature vectors to obtain the real component of a complex quantity for face recognition. In order to derive positive kernel discriminative vectors, we apply only those kernel discriminative eigenvectors that are associated with nonzero eigenvalues. The feasibility of the low-energized Gabor-block-based generalized KDCV method with cosine kernel function models has been successfully tested for classification using the L1, L2 distance measures; and the cosine similarity measure on both frontal and pose-angled face recognition. Experimental results on the FRAV2D and the FERET database demonstrate the effectiveness of this new approach. PMID:23365559

  19. Volcano clustering determination: Bivariate Gauss vs. Fisher kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2013-05-01

    Underlying many studies of volcano clustering is the implicit assumption that vent distribution can be studied by using kernels originally devised for distribution in plane surfaces. Nevertheless, an important change in topology in the volcanic context is related to the distortion that is introduced when attempting to represent features found on the surface of a sphere that are being projected into a plane. This work explores the extent to which different topologies of the kernel used to study the spatial distribution of vents can introduce significant changes in the obtained density functions. To this end, a planar (Gauss) and a spherical (Fisher) kernels are mutually compared. The role of the smoothing factor in these two kernels is also explored with some detail. The results indicate that the topology of the kernel is not extremely influential, and that either type of kernel can be used to characterize a plane or a spherical distribution with exactly the same detail (provided that a suitable smoothing factor is selected in each case). It is also shown that there is a limitation on the resolution of the Fisher kernel relative to the typical separation between data that can be accurately described, because data sets with separations lower than 500 km are considered as a single cluster using this method. In contrast, the Gauss kernel can provide adequate resolutions for vent distributions at a wider range of separations. In addition, this study also shows that the numerical value of the smoothing factor (or bandwidth) of both the Gauss and Fisher kernels has no unique nor direct relationship with the relevant separation among data. In order to establish the relevant distance, it is necessary to take into consideration the value of the respective smoothing factor together with a level of statistical significance at which the contributions to the probability density function will be analyzed. Based on such reference level, it is possible to create a hierarchy of

  20. Canonically Transformed Detectors Applied to the Classical Inverse Scattering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Seligman, T. H.; Torres, J. M.

    The concept of measurement in classical scattering is interpreted as an overlap of a particle packet with some area in phase space that describes the detector. Considering that usually we record the passage of particles at some point in space, a common detector is described e.g. for one-dimensional systems as a narrow strip in phase space. We generalize this concept allowing this strip to be transformed by some, possibly non-linear, canonical transformation, introducing thus a canonically transformed detector. We show such detectors to be useful in the context of the inverse scattering problem in situations where recently discovered scattering echoes could not be seen without their help. More relevant applications in quantum systems are suggested.

  1. Some reference formulas for the generating functions of canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-02-01

    We study some properties of the canonical transformations in classical mechanics and quantum field theory and give a number of practical formulas concerning their generating functions. First, we give a diagrammatic formula for the perturbative expansion of the composition law around the identity map. Then we propose a standard way to express the generating function of a canonical transformation by means of a certain "componential" map, which obeys the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. We derive the diagrammatic interpretation of the componential map, work out its relation with the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and derive its time-ordered version. Finally, we generalize the results to the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, where the conjugate variables may have both bosonic and fermionic statistics, and describe applications to quantum field theory.

  2. Canonical Visual Size for Real-World Objects

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2012-01-01

    Real-world objects can be viewed at a range of distances and thus can be experienced at a range of visual angles within the visual field. Given the large amount of visual size variation possible when observing objects, we examined how internal object representations represent visual size information. In a series of experiments which required observers to access existing object knowledge, we observed that real-world objects have a consistent visual size at which they are drawn, imagined, and preferentially viewed. Importantly, this visual size is proportional to the logarithm of the assumed size of the object in the world, and is best characterized not as a fixed visual angle, but by the ratio of the object and the frame of space around it. Akin to the previous literature on canonical perspective, we term this consistent visual size information the canonical visual size. PMID:20822298

  3. Thermodynamic Lower Bounds of Deviation from Instantaneous Canonical State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Takaaki

    2016-04-01

    We address the issue of the characterization of the nonequilibrium states for the time-dependent processes of a system interacting with a large reservoir, which is initially prepared in an equilibrium state. During the time evolution, we apply an external force to the system so that the actual density matrix is quantitatively different from the canonical state specified by the time-dependent system Hamiltonian. To express how the external forcing causes the deviation from equilibrium, we give a class of thermodynamic expressions for the lower bounds of the distance between the actual nonequilibrium state and the corresponding canonical state. The lower bounds are thermodynamically expressed only in terms of the strength of the forcing and its consequent entropy production rate.

  4. The Canon Group's effort: working toward a merged model.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, C; Huff, S M; Hersh, W R; Pattison-Gordon, E; Cimino, J J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a representational schema for clinical data for use in exchanging data and applications, using a collaborative approach. DESIGN: Representational models for clinical radiology were independently developed manually by several Canon Group members who had diverse application interests, using sample reports. These models were merged into one common model through an iterative process by means of workshops, meetings, and electronic mail. RESULTS: A core merged model for radiologic findings present in a set of reports that subsumed the models that were developed independently. CONCLUSIONS: The Canon Group's modeling effort focused on a collaborative approach to developing a representational schema for clinical concepts, using chest radiography reports as the initial experiment. This effort resulted in a core model that represents a consensus. Further efforts in modeling will extend the representational coverage and will also address issues such as scalability, automation, evaluation, and support of the collaborative effort. PMID:7895135

  5. Gabor-based kernel PCA with fractional power polynomial models for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengjun

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a novel Gabor-based kernel Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method by integrating the Gabor wavelet representation of face images and the kernel PCA method for face recognition. Gabor wavelets first derive desirable facial features characterized by spatial frequency, spatial locality, and orientation selectivity to cope with the variations due to illumination and facial expression changes. The kernel PCA method is then extended to include fractional power polynomial models for enhanced face recognition performance. A fractional power polynomial, however, does not necessarily define a kernel function, as it might not define a positive semidefinite Gram matrix. Note that the sigmoid kernels, one of the three classes of widely used kernel functions (polynomial kernels, Gaussian kernels, and sigmoid kernels), do not actually define a positive semidefinite Gram matrix either. Nevertheless, the sigmoid kernels have been successfully used in practice, such as in building support vector machines. In order to derive real kernel PCA features, we apply only those kernel PCA eigenvectors that are associated with positive eigenvalues. The feasibility of the Gabor-based kernel PCA method with fractional power polynomial models has been successfully tested on both frontal and pose-angled face recognition, using two data sets from the FERET database and the CMU PIE database, respectively. The FERET data set contains 600 frontal face images of 200 subjects, while the PIE data set consists of 680 images across five poses (left and right profiles, left and right half profiles, and frontal view) with two different facial expressions (neutral and smiling) of 68 subjects. The effectiveness of the Gabor-based kernel PCA method with fractional power polynomial models is shown in terms of both absolute performance indices and comparative performance against the PCA method, the kernel PCA method with polynomial kernels, the kernel PCA method with fractional power

  6. Harmonic superposition method for grand-canonical ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Wales, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic superposition method provides a unified framework to the equilibrium and relaxation kinetics on complex potential energy landscapes. Here we extend it to grand-canonical statistical ensembles governed by chemical potentials or chemical potential differences, by sampling energy minima corresponding to the various relevant sizes or compositions. The method is applied and validated against conventional Monte Carlo simulations for the problems of chemical equilibrium in nanoalloys and hydrogen absorption in bulk and nanoscale palladium.

  7. The canonical Kravchuk basis for discrete quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakioglu, Tugrul; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2000-04-01

    The well known Kravchuk formalism of the harmonic oscillator obtained from the direct discretization method is shown to be a new way of formulating discrete quantum phase space. It is shown that the Kravchuk oscillator Hamiltonian has a well defined unitary canonical partner which we identify with the quantum phase of the Kravchuk oscillator. The generalized discrete Wigner function formalism based on the action and angle variables is applied to the Kravchuk oscillator and its continuous limit is examined.

  8. Anomaly-free cosmological perturbations in effective canonical quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Barrau, Aurelien; Calcagni, Gianluca; Grain, Julien E-mail: bojowald@gravity.psu.edu E-mail: julien.grain@ias.u-psud.fr

    2015-05-01

    This article lays out a complete framework for an effective theory of cosmological perturbations with corrections from canonical quantum gravity. Since several examples exist for quantum-gravity effects that change the structure of space-time, the classical perturbative treatment must be rethought carefully. The present discussion provides a unified picture of several previous works, together with new treatments of higher-order perturbations and the specification of initial states.

  9. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Julien; Canup, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    The generally accepted scenario for the formation of the Moon involves the impact of a Mars-size object into the proto-Earth, resulting in the formation of a disk from which the Moon accretes (Cameron and Ward 1976). In a first paper (Salmon & Canup 2012), we showed that the disks resulting from these “canonical” impacts can lead to the accretion of a 1 lunar mass object on a timescale of order 10^2 yr. Recent works have focused on alternative impact configurations: bigger impactors (Canup 2012) or higher speed impacts into a fast spinning Earth (Cuk & Stewart 2012). These impacts leave the Earth-Moon system with an angular momentum about twice that in the current system. This quantity can be made consistent with its current value if the newly formed Moon is captured for a prolonged period in the evection resonance with the Sun (Cuk & Stewart 2012). The protolunar disks that are formed from these “non-canonical” impacts are generally more massive and more compact, containing a much greater fraction of their total disk mass in the Roche-interior portion of the disk, compared to canonical impacts. We have investigated the dynamics of the accretion of the Moon from such disks. While the overall accretion process is similar to that found from disks typical of canonical impacts, the more massive, compact disks typically produce a final moon with a much larger initial eccentricity, i.e. > 0.1 vs. 10^-3 to 10^-2 in canonical disks. Such high initial eccentricities may substantially reduce the probability of capture of the Moon into the evection resonance (e.g., Touma & Wisdom 1998), which is required to lower the angular momentum of the system in the non-canonical impacts. We will discuss which disk configurations can lead to the successful formation of the Moon, and how the Moon’s initial orbital properties vary for different impact scenarios.

  10. Canonical Transformation for Stiff Matter Models in Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, C.; Monerat, G. A.; Corrêa Silva, E. V.; Ferreira Filho, L. G.; Oliveira-Neto, G.

    2011-06-01

    In the present work we consider Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models in the presence of a stiff matter perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. We write the superhamiltonian of these models using the Schutz's variational formalism. We notice that the resulting superhamiltonians have terms that will lead to factor ordering ambiguities when they are written as quantum operators. In order to remove these ambiguities, we introduce appropriate coordinate transformations and prove that these transformations are canonical using the symplectic method.

  11. 3d mirror symmetry as a canonical transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Nadav; Felix, Jan

    2015-05-01

    We generalize the free Fermi-gas formulation of certain 3d super-symmetric Chern-Simons-matter theories by allowing Fayet-Iliopoulos couplings as well as mass terms for bifundamental matter fields. The resulting partition functions are given by simple modifications of the argument of the Airy function found previously. With these extra parameters it is easy to see that mirror-symmetry corresponds to linear canonical transformations on the phase space (or operator algebra) of the 1-dimensional fermions.

  12. White Noise: The Attack on Political Correctness and the Struggle for the Western Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Bill; Kalantzis, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Reviews debates about political correctness, multiculturalism, and the Western Canon in education, analyzing why the Canon needs defending and what it says about education. The paper describes flaws in the arguments of those attacking political correctness and defending the Canon, suggesting that the case for multiculturalism and diversified…

  13. Memory, Literacy, and Invention: Reimagining the Canon of Memory for the Writing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Kathleen J.

    2004-01-01

    This article challenges the assumption that the canon of memory means memorization and transcription, and, as a result, has little relevance for the writing classroom. An examination of the canon's historical legacy and its relationships to literacy and invention open a space for redefining the canon of memory as "rememoried knowing." In brief,…

  14. Visual Search for Object Orientation Can Be Modulated by Canonical Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballaz, Cecile; Boutsen, Luc; Peyrin, Carole; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Marendaz, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The authors studied the influence of canonical orientation on visual search for object orientation. Displays consisted of pictures of animals whose axis of elongation was either vertical or tilted in their canonical orientation. Target orientation could be either congruent or incongruent with the object's canonical orientation. In Experiment 1,…

  15. Treason Our Text: Feminist Challenges to the Literary Canon. Working Paper No. 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lillian S.

    Designed to make readers more aware of the systematic neglect of women's experience in the traditional literary canon, the paper presents feminist alternatives to the male-dominated canon, an assessment of their impact on the standard canon, and a proposal for new directions for further work. Two suggested approaches for feminist criticism are (1)…

  16. Memory as Muse: An Argument for a Reconsideration of Memory as a Canon of Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Janine

    Although memory was one of the five canons of classical rhetoric, the more contemporary, narrower definition of memory as the training of the mind to remember certain things has eliminated memory as a useful rhetorical canon. However, teachers of writing who do regard memory highly, can redefine memory to restore it as one of the canons of…

  17. Reducing canonical Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway confers protection against mutant Huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pascale; Besson, Marie-Thérèse; Devaux, Jérôme; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by movement disorders, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. HD is caused by expanded CAG tract within the coding region of Huntingtin protein. Despite major insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to HD, no effective cure is yet available. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) has been reported to alter the stability and levels of β-Catenin, a key molecule in cell adhesion and signal transduction in Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway. However it remains to establish whether manipulation of Wg/Wnt signaling can impact HD pathology. We here investigated the phenotypic interactions between mHtt and Wg/Wnt signaling by using the power of Drosophila genetics. We provide compelling evidence that reducing Armadillo/β-Catenin levels confers protection and that this beneficial effect is correlated with the inactivation of the canonical Wg/Wnt signaling pathway. Knockdowns of Wnt ligands or of the downstream transcription factor Pangolin/TCF both ameliorate the survival of HD flies. Similarly, overexpression of one Armadillo/β-Catenin destruction complex component (Axin, APC2 or Shaggy/GSK-3β) increases the lifespan of HD flies. Loss of functional Armadillo/β-Catenin not only abolishes neuronal intrinsic but also glia-induced alterations in HD flies. Our findings highlight that restoring canonical Wg/Wnt signaling may be of therapeutic value. PMID:22531500

  18. Reducing canonical Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway confers protection against mutant Huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pascale; Besson, Marie-Thérèse; Devaux, Jérôme; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by movement disorders, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. HD is caused by expanded CAG tract within the coding region of Huntingtin protein. Despite major insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to HD, no effective cure is yet available. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) has been reported to alter the stability and levels of β-Catenin, a key molecule in cell adhesion and signal transduction in Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway. However it remains to establish whether manipulation of Wg/Wnt signaling can impact HD pathology. We here investigated the phenotypic interactions between mHtt and Wg/Wnt signaling by using the power of Drosophila genetics. We provide compelling evidence that reducing Armadillo/β-Catenin levels confers protection and that this beneficial effect is correlated with the inactivation of the canonical Wg/Wnt signaling pathway. Knockdowns of Wnt ligands or of the downstream transcription factor Pangolin/TCF both ameliorate the survival of HD flies. Similarly, overexpression of one Armadillo/β-Catenin destruction complex component (Axin, APC2 or Shaggy/GSK-3β) increases the lifespan of HD flies. Loss of functional Armadillo/β-Catenin not only abolishes neuronal intrinsic but also glia-induced alterations in HD flies. Our findings highlight that restoring canonical Wg/Wnt signaling may be of therapeutic value.

  19. Generalized network structures: The configuration model and the canonical ensemble of simplicial complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Owen T.; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-06-01

    Simplicial complexes are generalized network structures able to encode interactions occurring between more than two nodes. Simplicial complexes describe a large variety of complex interacting systems ranging from brain networks to social and collaboration networks. Here we characterize the structure of simplicial complexes using their generalized degrees that capture fundamental properties of one, two, three, or more linked nodes. Moreover, we introduce the configuration model and the canonical ensemble of simplicial complexes, enforcing, respectively, the sequence of generalized degrees of the nodes and the sequence of the expected generalized degrees of the nodes. We evaluate the entropy of these ensembles, finding the asymptotic expression for the number of simplicial complexes in the configuration model. We provide the algorithms for the construction of simplicial complexes belonging to the configuration model and the canonical ensemble of simplicial complexes. We give an expression for the structural cutoff of simplicial complexes that for simplicial complexes of dimension d =1 reduces to the structural cutoff of simple networks. Finally, we provide a numerical analysis of the natural correlations emerging in the configuration model of simplicial complexes without structural cutoff.

  20. Thermal-to-visible face recognition using multiple kernel learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuowen; Gurram, Prudhvi; Kwon, Heesung; Chan, Alex L.

    2014-06-01

    Recognizing faces acquired in the thermal spectrum from a gallery of visible face images is a desired capability for the military and homeland security, especially for nighttime surveillance and intelligence gathering. However, thermal-tovisible face recognition is a highly challenging problem, due to the large modality gap between thermal and visible imaging. In this paper, we propose a thermal-to-visible face recognition approach based on multiple kernel learning (MKL) with support vector machines (SVMs). We first subdivide the face into non-overlapping spatial regions or blocks using a method based on coalitional game theory. For comparison purposes, we also investigate uniform spatial subdivisions. Following this subdivision, histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) features are extracted from each block and utilized to compute a kernel for each region. We apply sparse multiple kernel learning (SMKL), which is a MKLbased approach that learns a set of sparse kernel weights, as well as the decision function of a one-vs-all SVM classifier for each of the subjects in the gallery. We also apply equal kernel weights (non-sparse) and obtain one-vs-all SVM models for the same subjects in the gallery. Only visible images of each subject are used for MKL training, while thermal images are used as probe images during testing. With subdivision generated by game theory, we achieved Rank-1 identification rate of 50.7% for SMKL and 93.6% for equal kernel weighting using a multimodal dataset of 65 subjects. With uniform subdivisions, we achieved a Rank-1 identification rate of 88.3% for SMKL, but 92.7% for equal kernel weighting.

  1. Protein fold recognition using geometric kernel data fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Pooya; Jeuris, Ben; Vandebril, Raf; Moreau, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Various approaches based on features extracted from protein sequences and often machine learning methods have been used in the prediction of protein folds. Finding an efficient technique for integrating these different protein features has received increasing attention. In particular, kernel methods are an interesting class of techniques for integrating heterogeneous data. Various methods have been proposed to fuse multiple kernels. Most techniques for multiple kernel learning focus on learning a convex linear combination of base kernels. In addition to the limitation of linear combinations, working with such approaches could cause a loss of potentially useful information. Results: We design several techniques to combine kernel matrices by taking more involved, geometry inspired means of these matrices instead of convex linear combinations. We consider various sequence-based protein features including information extracted directly from position-specific scoring matrices and local sequence alignment. We evaluate our methods for classification on the SCOP PDB-40D benchmark dataset for protein fold recognition. The best overall accuracy on the protein fold recognition test set obtained by our methods is ∼86.7%. This is an improvement over the results of the best existing approach. Moreover, our computational model has been developed by incorporating the functional domain composition of proteins through a hybridization model. It is observed that by using our proposed hybridization model, the protein fold recognition accuracy is further improved to 89.30%. Furthermore, we investigate the performance of our approach on the protein remote homology detection problem by fusing multiple string kernels. Availability and implementation: The MATLAB code used for our proposed geometric kernel fusion frameworks are publicly available at http://people.cs.kuleuven.be/∼raf.vandebril/homepage/software/geomean.php?menu=5/ Contact: pooyapaydar@gmail.com or yves

  2. [Performance stability of CANON reactor and temperature impact].

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Dong; Meng, Xue-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    In order to study long-term effect of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) reactor, performance stability was investigated by using synthetic inorganic ammonia-rich wastewater as raw water with a continuous flow CANON reactor. Both performances of short-cut nitrification and ANAMMOX were stable for more than one year. Under the condition that inner temperature at 35 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.39 and 8.01, and hydraulic retention time 3.7-5.1 h, the average total nitrogen removal load was 1.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), and the average and maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency were 65.09% and 81.65% respectively. Under sudden low temperature conditions, both ANAMMOX bacteria and AOB were inhibited, however, the ANAMMOX bacteria were inhibited more, which caused highly accumulated nitrite. When temperature increased to 35 degrees C as normal, the performance of CANON reactor recovered soon, which means low temperature impact will have no significant influence on stability. When the temperature reached more than 50 degrees C, the activity of ANAMMOX bacteria was completely destroyed, so high temperature must be avoided, though AOB can recovered to normal in one week.

  3. A Canonical Theory of Dynamic Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John; Cooper, Richard P.; Glasspool, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Decision-making behavior is studied in many very different fields, from medicine and economics to psychology and neuroscience, with major contributions from mathematics and statistics, computer science, AI, and other technical disciplines. However the conceptualization of what decision-making is and methods for studying it vary greatly and this has resulted in fragmentation of the field. A theory that can accommodate various perspectives may facilitate interdisciplinary working. We present such a theory in which decision-making is articulated as a set of canonical functions that are sufficiently general to accommodate diverse viewpoints, yet sufficiently precise that they can be instantiated in different ways for specific theoretical or practical purposes. The canons cover the whole decision cycle, from the framing of a decision based on the goals, beliefs, and background knowledge of the decision-maker to the formulation of decision options, establishing preferences over them, and making commitments. Commitments can lead to the initiation of new decisions and any step in the cycle can incorporate reasoning about previous decisions and the rationales for them, and lead to revising or abandoning existing commitments. The theory situates decision-making with respect to other high-level cognitive capabilities like problem solving, planning, and collaborative decision-making. The canonical approach is assessed in three domains: cognitive and neuropsychology, artificial intelligence, and decision engineering. PMID:23565100

  4. Grand-canonical Monte Carlo method for Donnan equilibria.

    PubMed

    Barr, S A; Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2012-07-01

    We present a method that enables the direct simulation of Donnan equilibria. The method is based on a grand-canonical Monte Carlo scheme that properly accounts for the unequal partitioning of small ions on the two sides of a semipermeable membrane, and can be used to determine the Donnan electrochemical potential, osmotic pressure, and other system properties. Positive and negative ions are considered separately in the grand-canonical moves. This violates instantaneous charge neutrality, which is usually considered a prerequisite for simulations using the Ewald sum to compute the long-range charge-charge interactions. In this work, we show that if the system is neutral only in an average sense, it is still possible to get reliable results in grand-canonical simulations of electrolytes performed with Ewald summation of electrostatic interactions. We compare our Donnan method with a theory that accounts for differential partitioning of the salt, and find excellent agreement for the electrochemical potential, the osmotic pressure, and the salt concentrations on the two sides. We also compare our method with experimental results for a system of charged colloids confined by a semipermeable membrane and to a constant-NVT simulation method, which does not account for salt partitioning. Our results for the Donnan potential are much closer to the experimental results than the constant-NVT method, highlighting the important effect of salt partitioning on the Donnan potential. PMID:23005559

  5. A canonical theory of dynamic decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fox, John; Cooper, Richard P; Glasspool, David W

    2013-01-01

    Decision-making behavior is studied in many very different fields, from medicine and economics to psychology and neuroscience, with major contributions from mathematics and statistics, computer science, AI, and other technical disciplines. However the conceptualization of what decision-making is and methods for studying it vary greatly and this has resulted in fragmentation of the field. A theory that can accommodate various perspectives may facilitate interdisciplinary working. We present such a theory in which decision-making is articulated as a set of canonical functions that are sufficiently general to accommodate diverse viewpoints, yet sufficiently precise that they can be instantiated in different ways for specific theoretical or practical purposes. The canons cover the whole decision cycle, from the framing of a decision based on the goals, beliefs, and background knowledge of the decision-maker to the formulation of decision options, establishing preferences over them, and making commitments. Commitments can lead to the initiation of new decisions and any step in the cycle can incorporate reasoning about previous decisions and the rationales for them, and lead to revising or abandoning existing commitments. The theory situates decision-making with respect to other high-level cognitive capabilities like problem solving, planning, and collaborative decision-making. The canonical approach is assessed in three domains: cognitive and neuropsychology, artificial intelligence, and decision engineering. PMID:23565100

  6. Canonical wnt signaling is required for commissural axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Evelyn C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morphogens have been identified as guidance cues for postcrossing commissural axons in the spinal cord. Shh has a dual effect on postcrossing commissural axons: a direct repellent effect mediated by Hhip as a receptor, and an indirect effect by shaping a Wnt activity gradient. Wnts were shown to be attractants for postcrossing commissural axons in both chicken and mouse embryos. In mouse, the effects of Wnts on axon guidance were concluded to depend on the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Canonical Wnt signaling was excluded based on the absence of axon guidance defects in mice lacking Lrp6 which is an obligatory coreceptor for Fzd in canonical Wnt signaling. In the loss‐of‐function studies reported here, we confirmed a role for the PCP pathway in postcrossing commissural axon guidance also in the chicken embryo. However, taking advantage of the precise temporal control of gene silencing provided by in ovo RNAi, we demonstrate that canonical Wnt signaling is also required for proper guidance of postcrossing commissural axons in the developing spinal cord. Thus, axon guidance does not seem to depend on any one of the classical Wnt signaling pathways but rather involve a network of Wnt receptors and downstream components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 190–208, 2016 PMID:26014644

  7. An optical space domain volume holographic correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Philip; Gardezi, Akber; Mitra, Bhargav; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2009-04-01

    We propose a novel space domain volume holographic correlator system. One of the limitations of conventional correlators is the bandwidth limits imposed by updating the filter and the readout speed of the CCD. The volume holographic correlator overcomes these by storing a large number of filters that can be interrogated simultaneously. By using angle multiplexing, the match can be read out onto a high speed linear array of sensors. A scanning window can be used to implement shift invariance, thus, making the system operate like a space domain correlator. The space domain correlation method offers an advantage over the frequency domain correlator in that the correlation filter no longer has shift invariance imposed on it since the kernel can be modified depending on its position. This maybe used for normalising the kernel or imposing some non-linearity in an attempt to improve performance. However, one of the key advantages of the frequency domain method is lost using this technique, namely the speed of the computation. A large kernel space-domain correlation, performed on a computer, will be very slow compared to what is achievable using a 4f optical correlator. We propose a method of implementing this using the scanning holographic memory based correlator.

  8. Kernel Machine Testing for Risk Prediction with Stratified Case Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rebecca; Neykov, Matey; Jensen, Majken Karoline; Cai, Tianxi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Large assembled cohorts with banked biospecimens offer valuable opportunities to identify novel markers for risk prediction. When the outcome of interest is rare, an effective strategy to conserve limited biological resources while maintaining reasonable statistical power is the case cohort (CCH) sampling design, in which expensive markers are measured on a subset of cases and controls. However, the CCH design introduces significant analytical complexity due to outcome-dependent, finite-population sampling. Current methods for analyzing CCH studies focus primarily on the estimation of simple survival models with linear effects; testing and estimation procedures that can efficiently capture complex non-linear marker effects for CCH data remain elusive. In this paper, we propose inverse probability weighted (IPW) variance component type tests for identifying important marker sets through a Cox proportional hazards kernel machine (CoxKM) regression framework previously considered for full cohort studies (Cai et al., 2011). The optimal choice of kernel, while vitally important to attain high power, is typically unknown for a given dataset. Thus we also develop robust testing procedures that adaptively combine information from multiple kernels. The proposed IPW test statistics have complex null distributions that cannot easily be approximated explicitly. Furthermore, due to the correlation induced by CCH sampling, standard resampling methods such as the bootstrap fail to approximate the distribution correctly. We therefore propose a novel perturbation resampling scheme that can effectively recover the induced correlation structure. Results from extensive simulation studies suggest that the proposed IPW CoxKM testing procedures work well in finite samples. The proposed methods are further illustrated by application to a Danish CCH study of Apolipoprotein C-III markers on the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:26692376

  9. Anthraquinones isolated from the browned Chinese chestnut kernels (Castanea mollissima blume)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Qi, J. H.; Qin, L.; Wang, F.; Pang, M. X.

    2016-08-01

    Anthraquinones (AQS) represent a group of secondary metallic products in plants. AQS are often naturally occurring in plants and microorganisms. In a previous study, we found that AQS were produced by enzymatic browning reaction in Chinese chestnut kernels. To find out whether non-enzymatic browning reaction in the kernels could produce AQS too, AQS were extracted from three groups of chestnut kernels: fresh kernels, non-enzymatic browned kernels, and browned kernels, and the contents of AQS were determined. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods were used to identify two compounds of AQS, rehein(1) and emodin(2). AQS were barely exists in the fresh kernels, while both browned kernel groups sample contained a high amount of AQS. Thus, we comfirmed that AQS could be produced during both enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning process. Rhein and emodin were the main components of AQS in the browned kernels.

  10. Lesser grain borers, Rhyzopertha dominica, select rough rice kernels with cracked hulls for reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Athanassiou, Christos G; Arthur, Frank H; Throne, James E

    2012-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine whether the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae), selects rough rice (Oryza sativa L. (Poales: Poaceae)) kernels with cracked hulls for reproduction when these kernels are mixed with intact kernels. Differing amounts of kernels with cracked hulls (0, 5, 10, and 20%) of the varieties Francis and Wells were mixed with intact kernels, and the number of adult progeny emerging from intact kernels and from kernels with cracked hulls was determined. The Wells variety had been previously classified as tolerant to R. dominica, while the Francis variety was classified as moderately susceptible. Few F 1 progeny were produced in Wells regardless of the percentage of kernels with cracked hulls, few of the kernels with cracked hulls had emergence holes, and little firass was produced from feeding damage. At 10 and 20% kernels with cracked hulls, the progeny production, number of emergence holes in kernels with cracked hulls, and the amount of firass was greater in Francis than in Wells. The proportion of progeny emerging from kernels with cracked hulls increased as the proportion of kernels with cracked hulls increased. The results indicate that R. dominica select kernels with cracked hulls for reproduction.

  11. Travel-time sensitivity kernels in long-range propagation.

    PubMed

    Skarsoulis, E K; Cornuelle, B D; Dzieciuch, M A

    2009-11-01

    Wave-theoretic travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs) are calculated in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments and their behavior with increasing propagation range is studied and compared to that of ray-theoretic TSKs and corresponding Fresnel-volumes. The differences between the 2D and 3D TSKs average out when horizontal or cross-range marginals are considered, which indicates that they are not important in the case of range-independent sound-speed perturbations or perturbations of large scale compared to the lateral TSK extent. With increasing range, the wave-theoretic TSKs expand in the horizontal cross-range direction, their cross-range extent being comparable to that of the corresponding free-space Fresnel zone, whereas they remain bounded in the vertical. Vertical travel-time sensitivity kernels (VTSKs)-one-dimensional kernels describing the effect of horizontally uniform sound-speed changes on travel-times-are calculated analytically using a perturbation approach, and also numerically, as horizontal marginals of the corresponding TSKs. Good agreement between analytical and numerical VTSKs, as well as between 2D and 3D VTSKs, is found. As an alternative method to obtain wave-theoretic sensitivity kernels, the parabolic approximation is used; the resulting TSKs and VTSKs are in good agreement with normal-mode results. With increasing range, the wave-theoretic VTSKs approach the corresponding ray-theoretic sensitivity kernels.

  12. Characterization of the desiccation of wheat kernels by multivariate imaging.

    PubMed

    Jaillais, B; Perrin, E; Mangavel, C; Bertrand, D

    2011-06-01

    Variations in the quality of wheat kernels can be an important problem in the cereal industry. In particular, desiccation conditions play an essential role in both the technological characteristics of the kernel and its ability to sprout. In planta desiccation constitutes a key stage in the determinism of the functional properties of seeds. The impact of desiccation on the endosperm texture of seed is presented in this work. A simple imaging system had previously been developed to acquire multivariate images to characterize the heterogeneity of food materials. A special algorithm for the use under principal component analysis (PCA) was developed to process the acquired multivariate images. Wheat grains were collected at physiological maturity, and were subjected to two types of drying conditions that induced different kinetics of water loss. A data set containing 24 images (dimensioned 702 × 524 pixels) corresponding to the different desiccation stages of wheat kernels was acquired at different wavelengths and then analyzed. A comparison of the images of kernel sections highlighted changes in kernel texture as a function of their drying conditions. Slow drying led to a floury texture, whereas fast drying caused a glassy texture. The automated imaging system thus developed is sufficiently rapid and economical to enable the characterization in large collections of grain texture as a function of time and water content.

  13. Boundary conditions for gas flow problems from anisotropic scattering kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Quy-Dong; Vu, Van-Huyen; Lauriat, Guy; Léonard, Céline

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an interface model for gas flowing through a channel constituted of anisotropic wall surfaces. Using anisotropic scattering kernels and Chapman Enskog phase density, the boundary conditions (BCs) for velocity, temperature, and discontinuities including velocity slip and temperature jump at the wall are obtained. Two scattering kernels, Dadzie and Méolans (DM) kernel, and generalized anisotropic Cercignani-Lampis (ACL) are examined in the present paper, yielding simple BCs at the wall fluid interface. With these two kernels, we rigorously recover the analytical expression for orientation dependent slip shown in our previous works [Pham et al., Phys. Rev. E 86, 051201 (2012) and To et al., J. Heat Transfer 137, 091002 (2015)] which is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results. More important, our models include both thermal transpiration effect and new equations for the temperature jump. While the same expression depending on the two tangential accommodation coefficients is obtained for slip velocity, the DM and ACL temperature equations are significantly different. The derived BC equations associated with these two kernels are of interest for the gas simulations since they are able to capture the direction dependent slip behavior of anisotropic interfaces.

  14. [Utilizable value of wild economic plant resource--acron kernel].

    PubMed

    He, R; Wang, K; Wang, Y; Xiong, T

    2000-04-01

    Peking whites breeding hens were selected. Using true metabolizable energy method (TME) to evaluate the available nutritive value of acorn kernel, while maize and rice were used as control. The results showed that the contents of gross energy (GE), apparent metabolizable energy (AME), true metabolizable energy (TME) and crude protein (CP) in the acorn kernel were 16.53 mg/kg-1, 11.13 mg.kg-1, 11.66 mg.kg-1 and 10.63%, respectively. The apparent availability and true availability of crude protein were 45.55% and 49.83%. The gross content of 17 amino acids, essential amino acids and semiessential amino acids were 9.23% and 4.84%. The true availability of amino acid and the content of true available amino acid were 60.85% and 6.09%. The contents of tannin and hydrocyanic acid were 4.55% and 0.98% in acorn kernel. The available nutritive value of acorn kernel is similar to maize or slightly lower, but slightly higher than that of rice. Acorn kernel is a wild economic plant resource to exploit and utilize but it contains higher tannin and hydrocyanic acid. PMID:11767593

  15. Sliding Window Generalized Kernel Affine Projection Algorithm Using Projection Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavakis, Konstantinos; Theodoridis, Sergios

    2008-12-01

    Very recently, a solution to the kernel-based online classification problem has been given by the adaptive projected subgradient method (APSM). The developed algorithm can be considered as a generalization of a kernel affine projection algorithm (APA) and the kernel normalized least mean squares (NLMS). Furthermore, sparsification of the resulting kernel series expansion was achieved by imposing a closed ball (convex set) constraint on the norm of the classifiers. This paper presents another sparsification method for the APSM approach to the online classification task by generating a sequence of linear subspaces in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). To cope with the inherent memory limitations of online systems and to embed tracking capabilities to the design, an upper bound on the dimension of the linear subspaces is imposed. The underlying principle of the design is the notion of projection mappings. Classification is performed by metric projection mappings, sparsification is achieved by orthogonal projections, while the online system's memory requirements and tracking are attained by oblique projections. The resulting sparsification scheme shows strong similarities with the classical sliding window adaptive schemes. The proposed design is validated by the adaptive equalization problem of a nonlinear communication channel, and is compared with classical and recent stochastic gradient descent techniques, as well as with the APSM's solution where sparsification is performed by a closed ball constraint on the norm of the classifiers.

  16. Aleurone cell identity is suppressed following connation in maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Geisler-Lee, Jane; Gallie, Daniel R

    2005-09-01

    Expression of the cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyl transferase enzyme under the control of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SAG12 senescence-inducible promoter reverses the normal abortion of the lower floret from a maize (Zea mays) spikelet. Following pollination, the upper and lower floret pistils fuse, producing a connated kernel with two genetically distinct embryos and the endosperms fused along their abgerminal face. Therefore, ectopic synthesis of cytokinin was used to position two independent endosperms within a connated kernel to determine how the fused endosperm would affect the development of the two aleurone layers along the fusion plane. Examination of the connated kernel revealed that aleurone cells were present for only a short distance along the fusion plane whereas starchy endosperm cells were present along most of the remainder of the fusion plane, suggesting that aleurone development is suppressed when positioned between independent starchy endosperms. Sporadic aleurone cells along the fusion plane were observed and may have arisen from late or imperfect fusion of the endosperms of the connated kernel, supporting the observation that a peripheral position at the surface of the endosperm and not proximity to maternal tissues such as the testa and pericarp are important for aleurone development. Aleurone mosaicism was observed in the crown region of nonconnated SAG12-isopentenyl transferase kernels, suggesting that cytokinin can also affect aleurone development.

  17. Kernel Methods for Mining Instance Data in Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloehdorn, Stephan; Sure, York

    The amount of ontologies and meta data available on the Web is constantly growing. The successful application of machine learning techniques for learning of ontologies from textual data, i.e. mining for the Semantic Web, contributes to this trend. However, no principal approaches exist so far for mining from the Semantic Web. We investigate how machine learning algorithms can be made amenable for directly taking advantage of the rich knowledge expressed in ontologies and associated instance data. Kernel methods have been successfully employed in various learning tasks and provide a clean framework for interfacing between non-vectorial data and machine learning algorithms. In this spirit, we express the problem of mining instances in ontologies as the problem of defining valid corresponding kernels. We present a principled framework for designing such kernels by means of decomposing the kernel computation into specialized kernels for selected characteristics of an ontology which can be flexibly assembled and tuned. Initial experiments on real world Semantic Web data enjoy promising results and show the usefulness of our approach.

  18. Insights from Classifying Visual Concepts with Multiple Kernel Learning

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Alexander; Nakajima, Shinichi; Kloft, Marius; Müller, Christina; Samek, Wojciech; Brefeld, Ulf; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Kawanabe, Motoaki

    2012-01-01

    Combining information from various image features has become a standard technique in concept recognition tasks. However, the optimal way of fusing the resulting kernel functions is usually unknown in practical applications. Multiple kernel learning (MKL) techniques allow to determine an optimal linear combination of such similarity matrices. Classical approaches to MKL promote sparse mixtures. Unfortunately, 1-norm regularized MKL variants are often observed to be outperformed by an unweighted sum kernel. The main contributions of this paper are the following: we apply a recently developed non-sparse MKL variant to state-of-the-art concept recognition tasks from the application domain of computer vision. We provide insights on benefits and limits of non-sparse MKL and compare it against its direct competitors, the sum-kernel SVM and sparse MKL. We report empirical results for the PASCAL VOC 2009 Classification and ImageCLEF2010 Photo Annotation challenge data sets. Data sets (kernel matrices) as well as further information are available at http://doc.ml.tu-berlin.de/image_mkl/(Accessed 2012 Jun 25). PMID:22936970

  19. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM.

  20. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM. PMID:27114339