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Sample records for kerogen maturation insights

  1. Characterization of Green River Kerogen upon Induced Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsinan, S.; Vanorio, T.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of organic maturity on the elastic properties of kerogen, and then model its effect on the rock elastic responses. To fulfill this objective, we present a workflow that combines nano-scale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (nanoSIMS), nanoindentation, SEM, ex situ maturation experiments, RockEval analysis and Self-Consistent modeling (SC). First, we used SEM and nanoSIMS to identify the organic rich-kerogen bodies. NanoSIMS provided maps of the secondary ion intensity distribution of H-, C- and O- which show a uniform distribution of these ions within the immature kerogen body. The measured H- /C- and O-/C- ionic intensity ratios range between 1.40 ±0.86 -1.69 ±0.61 and 0.77 ±0.72 - 1.04 ±0.44 respectively. Next, we used the nanoindentation technique to measure the elastic properties of an immature Green River kerogen, which had an average bulk modulus (K) of 3.11 ± 0.23 GPa. Then, we induced maturation using a High Temperature-High Pressure vessel that mimics reservoir conditions. Ex situ maturation resulted in a strong hydrocarbon smell, oil staining, and the expulsion of an oil-like viscous fluid. Geochemical analysis confirmed that the sample had successfully matured to the oil window. SEM time-lapse images show porosity (ϕ) development within the kerogen and surrounding matrix as a result of maturation. Once maturation was complete, we re-measured the elastic properties of the kerogen in the sample using the same nanoindentation technique. The average value of K of the mature kerogen (oil window) was 3.65 ±0.67 GPa. Therefore, we conclude that changes in the elastic properties of solid kerogen in the oil window are negligible. However, ϕ development within the kerogen, the shape of kerogen and its pores, and the presence of fluid can affect the composite rock stiffness. Therefore, we used SC modeling to investigate the effect of ϕ development within the kerogen associated with ex situ maturation, on

  2. Color of kerogen as index of organic maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, K. E.; Kaplan, I. R.; Ishiwatari, R.

    1977-01-01

    Kerogen from the Tanner basin off southern California was heated under nitrogen at different temperatures and times and subsequently was studied under the transmitted light microscope. Samples darken in color from yellow through shades of brown to black with increasing thermal maturation. The transition from dark brown to very dark brown marks the range of maximum n-alkane generation where the residue attains an atomic H/C of about 0.80 plus or minus 0.05. The apparent activation energy for this transition was about 45 plus or minus 5 kcal per mole.

  3. Direct Correlation Between Aromatization of Kerogen in Organic Shales during Maturation and Its Visible Absorption Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferralis, N.; Liu, Y.; Pomerantz, A.; Grossman, J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of the electronic visible-range optical absorption edge of isolated kerogens type 1, 2 (from organic shales) and 3 is characterized by diffuse reflectance UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all kerogens measured is in excellent agreement with the "Urbach tail" phenomenology. The Urbach decay width extracted from the exponential fit within the visible range is strongly correlated with the aliphatic/aromatic ratio in isolated kerogen, regardless of the kerogen type. The direct correlation is confirmed by density functional theory calculations on proxy ensemble models of kerogen. The correlation of the decay width with conventional maturity indicators such as vitrinite reflectance is found to be good within a particular kerogen type, but not consistent across different kerogen types. This is explained in terms of the evolution of the population of aromatic constituents in kerogen, which is instead directly measured through the Urbach decay. The optical absorption edge and the Urbach decay width are therefore presented as excellent candidates for the evaluation of thermal maturity in kerogen.

  4. Properties of gases and petroleum liquids derived from terrestrial kerogen at various maturation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connan, J.; Cassou, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a study dealing mainly with shale-sandstone series in which the disseminated kerogen is mostly composed of land-derived debris. Organic matter was characterized by microscopic and chemical techniques, while the kerogen maturity was assessed by microscopic studies, mainly by means of vitrinite reflectance measurements. The oil and gas properties are tentatively interpreted in terms of maturity, using a comparison of oil properties with the kerogen features of shales interbedded in the impregnated sandstone reservoirs. In low maturity stages (immature zone), dry gas with minor condensate is observed, whereas in higher maturity levels (oil window), wet gas with high paraffinic crudes is generally recorded. Shallow depth condensates and their related gases have been identified as immature fluids. In conclusion, it is noted that the study offers a maturity frame work as a guide for oil and gas prediction in shale sandstone sequences containing land derived kerogen.

  5. Structural Evolution of Kerogen and Bitumen during Thermal Maturation examined by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, P. R.; Le Doan, T. V.; Pomerantz, A.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen—the organic matter that is solid and insoluble in organic solvents—is a key component of organic-rich mudstones. The composition of kerogen affects the storage and transport of hydrocarbons in these unconventional resources and is known to change with thermal maturity. We report here using FTIR spectroscopy, the compositional characteristics of kerogen as a function of thermal maturity, together with the compositional characteristics of the organic phase, bitumen—the organic matter that is solid, but soluble in organic solvents. Kerogen is consumed during thermal maturation, whereas bitumen is an intermediary formed at low maturity from kerogen and consumed at higher maturities in formation of oil and gas. Bitumen relative to kerogen has higher aliphatic content, lower aromatic content, and lower abundance of oxygenated functions. At low maturity (vitrinite reflectance equivalent VRe ~ 0.5-0.9 %), the average length of aliphatic chains in bitumen increases during bitumen formation. At higher thermal maturities (VRe > 1.0-1.3 %), average aliphatic chain length decreases as bitumen is consumed. This evolution contrasts to that in kerogen, where aliphatic chain lengths shorten during all stages of maturation. Breakdown of kerogen appears to be driven by cleavage of oxygen functions at low maturity and removal of aliphatic carbons at higher maturities. These aliphatic-rich fragments may comprise the bitumen, and may in part explain the solubility of bitumen in organic solvents. Bitumen shows evidence of oxidation at low thermal maturity, a phenonemom not documented for kerogen. Bitumen maturation and degradation at higher thermal maturity is driven by cleavage and loss of aliphatic carbons, and is coincident with the maximum generation of oil and gas. The aromatic content of bitumen and of kerogen both increase during maturation as a consequence of the loss of aliphatic carbon. The oil and gas generation potential of the residual organic matter thus

  6. D/H ratios and hydrogen exchangeability of type-II kerogens with increasing thermal maturity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lis, G.P.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of non-exchangeable hydrogen (??Dn) and of carbon were measured in type-II kerogens from two suites of Late Devonian to Early Mississippian black shale, one from the New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin) and the other from the Exshaw Formation (Alberta Basin). The largely marine-derived organic matter had similar original stable isotope ratios, but today the suites of kerogens express gradients in thermal maturity that have altered their chemical and isotopic compositions. In both suites, ??D n values increase with maturation up to a vitrinite reflectance of Ro 1.5%, then level out. Increasing ??Dn values suggest isotopic exchange of organic hydrogen with water-derived deuterium and/or preferential loss of 1H-enriched chemical moieties from kerogen during maturation. The resulting changes in ??Dn values are altering the original hydrogen isotopic paleoenvironmental signal in kerogen, albeit in a systematic fashion. The specific D/H response of each kerogen suite through maturation correlates with H/C elemental ratio and can therefore be corrected to yield paleoenvironmentally relevant information for a calibrated system. With increasing thermal maturity, the abundance of hydrogen in the kerogen that is isotopically exchangeable with water hydrogen (expressed as Hex, in % of total hydrogen) first decreases to reach a minimum at Ro ??? 0.8-1.1%, followed by a substantial increase at higher thermal maturity. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of Kerogen Maturity using Transmission Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Maturity of kerogen in shale governs the productivity and generation hydrocarbon type. There are generally two accepted methods to measure kerogen maturity; one is the measurement of vitrinite reflectance, %Ro, and another is the measurement of Tmax through pyrolysis. However, each of these techniques has its own limits; vitrinite reflectance measurement cannot be applied to marine shale and pre-Silurian shales, which lack plant materials. Furthermore, %Ro, requires the isolation and identification of vitrinite macerals and statistical measurements of at least 50 macerals. Tmax measurement is questionable for mature and post-mature samples. In addition, there are questions involving the effects of solvents on Tmax determinations. Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy, FTIR, can be applied for both qualitative and quantitative assessment on organics maturity in shale. The technique does not require separating organic matter or identifying macerals. A CH2/CH3 index, RCH, calculated from FTIR spectra is more objective than other measurements. The index increases with maturity (both natural maturation and synthetic maturation through hydrous and dry pyrolysis). The new maturity index RCH can be calibrated to vitrinite reflectance which allows the definition of the following values for levels of maturity: 1) immature—RCH > 1.6±0.2; 2) oil window-- 1.6±0.2 < RCH > 1.3±0.3; 3) wet gas window--1.3±0.3 < RCH> 1.13±0.05; and 4) dry gas window RCH < 1.13±0.05.

  8. Evolution of Mineral Fabrics and Microstructures in Kimmeridge Shale upon Kerogen Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, J.; Vanorio, T.; Liu, Y.; Xiao, X.; Benmore, C.

    2013-12-01

    Shale has increasingly received attention due to its recent recognition as a potential game changer of US energy outlook. However a fundamental relationship between mineral lattice preferred orientation (LPO or fabrics), kerogen, and elastic properties of shale remains questionable. Here we present different synchrotron X-ray techniques to capture microstructural transformations in Kimmeridge Shale upon temperature-induced anhydrous maturation. At room condition, the sample is mainly composed of clays 72 vol.%, quartz (15 vol.%), pyrite (11 vol.%), and a small amount of pyrite (2 vol.%). Illite-group is the dominating clay with 50 vol.% present. Illite-mica (30 vol.%) shows the highest degree of LPO (3.33 m.r.d.), which is consistent with previous studies (Wenk et al 2008, Voltolini et al. 2009, Kanitpanyacharoen et al. 2011). However the illite-smectite group exhibits relatively weaker degree of LPO due to the disordered nature of the structure. Chlorite shows the least degree of LPO due to its total clay content, which is only 2 vol.%. Upon heating to 300 °C, the phase proportions did not change much and the degrees of all clay minerals fabrics remain fairly consistent. The high-resolution 3D imaging technique allows us to record different stages of kerogen transformation, particularly a significant gas bubble formation at 400 °C. Upon heating up to 500 °C, kerogen shrinkage (17 vol.%) and clay matrix expansion continued and appeared more pronounced after 10 hours of heating. The consistent results from both experiments confirm that no significant change of mineral fabrics and microstructural features below 300 °C observed. These findings further infer that the evolution of clay fabrics and kerogen maturation may affect elastic anisotropy consistently at the temperature below 300 °C. The reduction of kerogen greatly influences elastic anisotropy properties and the identification of the promising source in the hydrocarbon reservoir.

  9. Maturation of Green River Shale Kerogen with Hydrous Pyrolysis: Characterization of Geochemical Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q.; Darnell, M.; Bissada, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    To fully understand controlling factors of organic compound generation during oil shale maturation, and systematically assess associated carbon isotope values, a series of hydrous pyrolysis experiments are performed. Kerogen was isolated from Green River shale by a set of acid treatment. Experiments are conducted at 350 °C and 300 bars of total pressure with running time of 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. In each experiment, the reactor contains 1.5 grams of kerogen and 30 grams of deionized water. After experiments, gaseous products are removed under cryogenic conditions for chemical and carbon isotope analyses (GC-IRMS). The bitumen product is retrieved and separated into saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA) by HPLC before subsequent analyses (GC, GC-MS, and IRMS). The gaseous compounds from experiments consisted of CO2 and C1 to C4 hydrocarbons. Semiquantitative analysis indicates the yield of n-alkanes decreases with carbon number, with CO2 being more abundant than all alkanes. The δ13C value of alkanes increases with molecular weight, with CO2 having the highest value. Methane and ethane become enriched in 13C with time. In bitumen products, gravimetric analysis has shown that the abundance of aromatics increases with time, while that of asphaltenes decreases. After 72 hours, the weight percentages of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes are 2.6, 42.3, 40.1, and 15.0, respectively. High resolution GC-MS results indicate low kerogen maturation after 72 hours using saturated biomarker compounds as thermal maturity indicator, such as 22S/(22S + 22R) of C31 to C35 homohopanes, tricyclics/17(H)-hopanes, and Ts/(Ts + Tm). Bulk carbon isotope value of bitumen decreases with time, with 2.5‰ lighter than original kerogen after 72 hours. In terms of different groups, saturated hydrocarbons and resins become depleted in 13C with longer reaction time, while aromatics and asphaltenes become enriched in 13C

  10. Structurally dependent source rock maturity and kerogen facies, Estancia Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, R.F.

    1995-06-01

    The Estancia basin of central New Mexico is an asymmetric, north-south trending structural depression that originated during the Pennsylvanian. The present-day basin covers 1,600 mi{sup 2} (4,100 km{sup 2}). It is bounded on the east by the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, on the west by the Tertiary-age Manzano and Los Pinos Mountains, on the north by the Espanola basin, and on the south by Chupadera Mesa. Depth to Precambrian basement ranges from 9,000 ft (2,700 m) in a narrow graben in the eastern part of the basin to less than 1,500 ft (460 m) on a shelf to the west. Basin fill consists primarily of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian sandstones and shales in the graben and sandstones, shales, and marine limestones on the shelf Mature to marginally mature dark-gray to black Pennsylvanian shales are probable source rocks. Thermal Alteration Index ranges from 2.0 to 3.2. Shales become thermally mature with depth in the eastern graben. On the western shelf, shales become mature to the west as a result of increased heating from the Rio Grande rift. Total organic carbon exceeds 0.5% in many shales, sufficient for hydrocarbon generation. Kerogen types are mixed algal, herbaceous, and woody, indicating that gas, or possibly gas mixed with oil, was generated. Kerogens in shales of the eastern graben are entirely continental, gas-prone types. In limestones and shales of the western shelf, kerogens have a mixed marine and continental provenance, indicating that both oil and gas may have been generated on thermally mature parts of the shelf.

  11. Increasing maturity of kerogen type II reflected by alkylbenzene distribution from pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lis, G.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2008-01-01

    A series of Late Devonian to Early Mississippian type II kerogens with vitrinite reflectance values Ro 0.29-2.41% were analyzed using py-GC-MS. In addition, a low maturity kerogen with Ro 0.44% was separated into fractions via density gradient centrifugation, followed by py-GC-MS of the alginite and amorphinite maceral concentrates. Alkylbenzenes and n-alk-1-ene/n-alkane doublets represented the main compound classes identified in all pyrolysates. The pyrolysate from alginite featured 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and toluene as the two most prominent alkylbenzenes. In contrast, alkylbenzenes in pyrolysates from amorphinite and low maturity bulk kerogens with Ro 0.29-0.63% were dominated by 1,2,3,4-tetramethylbenzene. With increasing thermal maturity, pyrolysates were increasingly dominated by (i) alkylbenzenes with fewer methyl groups, namely by tri- and dimethylbenzenes at medium maturity (Ro 0.69-1.19%), and (ii) by toluene at higher maturity (Ro 1.30-2.41%). With increasing maturity of kerogen type II, the decreasing abundance of highly methyl-substituted alkylbenzenes and the parallel increase in less methyl-substituted alkylbenzenes in flash pyrolysates suggest that demethylation is an important chemical process in the thermal maturation of kerogen type II. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Testing the preservation of biomarkers during experimental maturation of an immature kerogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mißbach, H.; Duda, J.-P.; Lünsdorf, N. K.; Schmidt, B. C.; Thiel, V.

    2016-07-01

    Lipid biomarkers have been extensively applied for tracing organisms and evolutionary processes through Earth's history. They have become especially important for the reconstruction of early life on Earth and, potentially, for the detection of life in the extraterrestrial realm. However, it is not always clear how exactly biomarkers reflect a paleoecosystem as their preservation may be influenced by increasing temperatures (T) and pressures (P) during burial. While a number of biomarker indices reflecting thermal maturity have been established, it is often less well constrained to which extent biomarker ratios used for paleoreconstruction are compromised by T and P processes. In this study we conducted hydrous pyrolysis of Green River Shale (GRS) kerogen in gold capsules for 2-2400 h at 300°C to assess the maturation behaviour of several compounds used as life tracers and for the reconstruction of paleoenvironments (n-alkanes, pristane, phytane, gammacerane, steranes, hopanes and cheilanthanes). Lignite samples were maturated in parallel with the GRS kerogen to obtain exact vitrinite reflectance data at every sampling point. Our experiment confirms the applicability of biomarker-based indices and ratios as maturity indicators (e.g. total cheilanthanes/hopanes ratio; sterane and hopane isomerization indices). However, several biomarker ratios that are commonly used for paleoreconstructions (e.g. pristane/phytane, pristane/n-C17, phytane/n-C18 and total steranes/hopanes) were considerably affected by differences in the thermal degradation behaviour of the respective compounds. Short-term experiments (48 h) performed at 400°C also revealed that biomarkers >C15 (especially steranes and hopanes) and `biological' chain length preferences for n-alkanes are vanished at a vitrinite reflectance between 1.38 and 1.83% R O. Our data highlight that `thermal taphonomy' effects have to be carefully considered in the interpretation of biomarkers in ancient rocks and, potentially

  13. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  14. Release of sulfur- and oxygen-bound components from a sulfur-rich kerogen during simulated maturation by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putschew, A.; Schaeffer-Reiss, C.; Schaeffer, P.; Koopmans, M.P.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    An immature sulfur-rich marl from the Gessosso-solfifera Formation of the Vena del Gesso Basin (Messinian, Italy) has been subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (160 to 330??C) to simulate maturation under natural conditions. The kerogen of the unheated and heated samples was isolated and the hydrocarbons released by selective chemical degradation (Li/EtNH2 and HI/LiAIH4) were analysed to allow a study of the fate of sulfur- and oxygen-bound species with increasing temperature. The residues from the chemical treatments were also subjected to pyrolysis-GC to follow structural changes in the kerogens. In general, with increasing hydrous pyrolysis temperature, the amounts of sulfide- and ether-bound components in the kerogen decreased significantly. At the temperature at which the generation of expelled oil began (260??C), almost all of the bound components initially present in the unheated sample were released from the kerogen. Comparison with an earlier study of the extractable organic matter using a similar approach and the same samples provides molecular evidence that, with increasing maturation, solvent-soluble macromolecular material was initially released from the kerogen, notably as a result of thermal cleavage of weak Carbon-heteroatom bonds (sulfide, ester, ether) even at temperatures as low as 220??C. This solvent-soluble macromolecular material then underwent thermal cleavage to generate hydrocarbons at higher temperatures. This early generation of bitumen may explain the presence of unusually high amounts of extractable organic matter of macromolecular nature in very immature S-rich sediments.

  15. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chitin: 'Forgotten' Source of Nitrogen: From Modern Chitin to Thermally Mature Kerogen: Lessons from Nitrogen Isotope Ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Wintsch, R.P.; Lewan, M.D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Chitinous biomass represents a major pool of organic nitrogen in living biota and is likely to have contributed some of the fossil organic nitrogen in kerogen. We review the nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry of chitin and present preliminary results suggesting interaction between kerogen and ammonium during thermal maturation. Modern arthropod chitin may shift its nitrogen isotope ratio by a few per mil depending on the chemical method of chitin preparation, mostly because N-containing non-amino-sugar components in chemically complex chitin cannot be removed quantitatively. Acid hydrolysis of chemically complex chitin and subsequent ion-chromatographic purification of the "deacetylated chitin-monomer" D-glucosamine (in hydrochloride form) provides a chemically well-defined, pure amino-sugar substrate for reproducible, high-precision determination of ??15N values in chitin. ??15N values of chitin exhibited a variability of about one per mil within an individual's exoskeleton. The nitrogen isotope ratio differed between old and new exoskeletons by up to 4 per mil. A strong dietary influence on the ??15N value of chitin is indicated by the observation of increasing ??15N values of chitin from marine crustaceans with increasing trophic level. Partial biodegradation of exoskeletons does not significantly influence ??15N values of remaining, chemically preserved amino sugar in chitin. Diagenesis and increasing thermal maturity of sedimentary organic matter, including chitin-derived nitrogen-rich moieties, result in humic compounds much different from chitin and may significantly change bulk ??15N values. Hydrous pyrolysis of immature source rocks at 330??C in contact with 15N-enriched NH4Cl, under conditions of artificial oil generation, demonstrates the abiogenic incorporation of inorganic nitrogen into carbon-bound nitrogen in kerogen. Not all organic nitrogen in natural, thermally mature kerogen is therefore necessarily derived from original organic matter, but may

  17. Kerogen maturation data in the Uinta Basin, Utah, USA, constrain predictions of natural hydrocarbon seepage into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2014-03-01

    Natural seepage of methane from the lithosphere to the atmosphere occurs in regions with large natural gas deposits. According to some authors, it accounts for roughly 5% of the global methane budget. I explore a new approach to estimate methane fluxes based on the maturation of kerogen, which is the hydrocarbon polymer present in petroleum source rocks and whose decomposition leads to the formation of oil and natural gas. The temporal change in the atomic H/C ratio of kerogen lets us estimate the total carbon mass released by it in the form of oil and natural gas. Then the time interval of active kerogen decomposition lets us estimate the average annual formation rate of oil and natural gas in any given petroleum system, which I demonstrate here using the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah as an example. Obviously, this is an upper bound to the average annual rate at which natural gas seeps into the atmosphere. After adjusting for biooxidation of natural gas, I conclude that the average annual seepage rate in the Uinta Basin is not greater than (3100 ± 900) tonne yr-1. This is (0.5 ± 0.15)% of the total flux of methane into the atmosphere over the Basin, as measured during aircraft flights. I speculate about the difference between the regional 0.5% and the global 5% estimates.

  18. FTIR absorption indices for thermal maturity in comparison with vitrinite reflectance R0 in type-II kerogens from Devonian black shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lis, G.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Stankiewicz, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    FTIR absorbance signals in kerogens and macerals were evaluated as indices for thermal maturity. Two sets of naturally matured type-II kerogens from the New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin) and the Exshaw Formation (Western Canada Sedimentary Basin) and kerogens from hydrous pyrolysis artificial maturation of the New Albany Shale were characterized by FTIR. Good correlation was observed between the aromatic/aliphatic absorption ratio and vitrinite reflectance R 0. FTIR parameters are especially valuable for determining the degree of maturity of marine source rocks lacking vitrinite. With increasing maturity, FTIR spectra express four trends: (i) an increase in the absorption of aromatic bands, (ii) a decrease in the absorption of aliphatic bands, (iii) a loss of oxygenated groups (carbonyl and carboxyl), and (iv) an initial decrease in the CH2/CH3 ratio that is not apparent at higher maturity in naturally matured samples, but is observed throughout increasing R0 in artificially matured samples. The difference in the CH2/CH 3 ratio in samples from natural and artificial maturation at higher maturity indicates that short-term artificial maturation at high temperatures is not fully equivalent to slow geologic maturation at lower temperatures. With increasing R0, the (carboxyl + carbonyl)/aromatic carbon ratio generally decreases, except that kerogens from the Exshaw Formation and from hydrous pyrolysis experiments express an intermittent slight increase at medium maturity. FTIR-derived aromaticities correlate well with R0, although some uncertainty is due to the dependence of FTIR parameters on the maceral composition of kerogen whereas R0 is solely dependent on vitrinite. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulation of the fluorescence evolution of “live” oils from kerogens in a diamond anvil cell: Application to inclusion oils in terms of maturity and source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Huang, Wuu-Liang

    2008-08-01

    The evolution of fluorescence has been measured for "live" oils generated from 14 oil-prone kerogens or coals from varying depositional environments during closed system pyrolysis in a diamond anvil cell at three heating rates (3, 8, and 25 °C/min), and temperatures up to 600 °C. The measured fluorescence intensities of the samples, employing using violet excitation at 405 nm, increases significantly during maturation intervals within the oil window, while the fluorescence spectra of oils generated from all studied kerogens exhibit progressive blue-shift of peak wavelengths ( λmax) and red/green quotients ( I650/ I500) upon increasing maturity. The observed trend is consistent with a maturity dependence of the spectral shift, which is widely recognized in natural hydrocarbon inclusions and crude oils using ultraviolet (UV) excitation (365 nm). The data presented herein suggest that the λmax of spectra for inclusion oils shift in similar direction despite differences in composition or source kerogen. This implies that the reverse or anomalous trends reported for inclusion oils in nature may be attributed to other processes, which significantly alters the fluorescence properties of oils subsequent to their generation. Oils with the similar color ( λmax or I650/ I500) can be derived from diverse kerogens with maturities that vary by ±0.3% Ro, suggesting that the fluorescent colors of crude and inclusion oils are both maturity- and source-dependent, and therefore cannot be used as universal maturity indicators. In addition, the blue-shifts observed for cumulative oils generated from all kerogens approaches similar minima λmax values around the green-yellow wavelength (564 nm) and at I650/ I500 values around 0.6, at maturities close to the middle or late stage of oil generation. This suggests that most late-stage cumulative oils will exhibit similar colors. Oils generated during late-stage maturity intervals, however, can exhibit colors with shorter wavelengths.

  20. The Archean kerogen paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    The constituents of organic matter buried in sediments (kerogen) are classified into three types: (1) liable components that may be decomposed by aerobic and anaerobic microbes during the early diagenesis of sediments, and by thermal decomposition during the burial at ~3-5 km depths (T = 100 ~150°C) to generate bitumen (oil); (2) refractory components that may decompose into gaseous components at greater depths (T = 150-230°C); and (iii) inert components that may be converted to graphite during high temperature metamorphism. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate that matured kerogen (i.e., refractory and inert components) is decomposed during the weathering under an oxygenated atmosphere by reaction C + O2 → CO2, promoted by aerobic organisms. This has resulted in the general absence of old detrital kerogen (except debris of vascular plants) in Phanerozoic-aged sedimentary rocks. In contrast, matured kerogen would not be decomposed during the weathering under a reducing atmosphere, because the reactions C + 2H2 → CH4, C + 2H2O → CO2 + 2H2 and 2C + 2H2O → CO2 + CH4 would not proceed at low temperatures even with the aid of anaerobic organisms. If such reactions could occur at low temperatures, sedimentary rocks, regardless of their age, would have lost all their kerogen before being buried to depths ~3 km. If the Archean atmosphere had been reducing, as postulated by the dominant paradigm of the early Earth, detrital kerogen should be ubiquitously present in Archean-aged sedimentary rocks. We should also find general increasing trends in both the ratio of detrital/syngenetic kerogens and the total amount of reduced C (syngenetic and detrital kerogens) in sedimentary rocks from ~3.8 Ga to ~2.5 Ga in age. Because the detrital kerogen had been subjected to metamorphism and weathering before being transported to the oceans, detrital kerogen would have different structures, textures, and elemental and isotopic ratios compared to the syngenetic

  1. Kerogen maturation and incipient graphitization of hydrocarbon source rocks in the Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas: A combined petrographic and Raman spectrometric study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spotl, C.; Houseknecht, D.W.; Jaques, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Dispersed kerogen of the Woodford-Chattanooga and Atoka Formations from the subsurface of the Arkoma Basin show a wide range of thermal maturities (0.38 to 6.1% R(o)) indicating thermal conditions ranging from diagenesis to incipient rock metamorphism. Raman spectral analysis reveals systematic changes of both the first- and second-order spectrum with increasing thermal maturity. These changes include a pronounced increase in the D/O peak height ratio accompanied by a narrowing of the D peak, a gradual decrease in the D/O peak width ratio, and a shift of both peaks toward higher wave numbers. Second-order Raman peaks, though less intensive, also show systematic peak shifting as a function of R(o). These empirical results underscore the high potential of Raman spectrometry as a fast and reliable geothermometer of mature to supermature hydrocarbon source rocks, and as an indicator of thermal maturity levels within the anchizone.Dispersed kerogen of the Woodford-Chattanooga and Atoka Formations from the subsurface of the Arkoma Basin show a wide range of thermal maturities (0.38 to 6.1% Ro) indicating thermal conditions ranging from diagenesis to incipient rock metamorphism. Raman spectral analysis reveals systematic changes of both the first- and second-order spectrum with increasing thermal maturity. These changes include a pronounced increase in the D/O peak height ratio accompanied by a narrowing of the D peak, a gradual decrease in the D/O peak width ratio, and a shift of both peaks toward higher wave numbers. Second-order Raman peaks, though less intensive, also show systematic peak shifting as a function of Ro. These empirical results underscore the high potential of Raman spectrometry as a fast and reliable geothermometer of mature to supermature hydrocarbon source rocks, and as an indicator of thermal maturity levels within the anchizone.

  2. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  3. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  4. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A problem with estimating the pseudo- activation energy of kerogen thermal maturation from Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis as derived from first-order reaction kinetics is algebraically correct, but its application to natural petroleum generation is invalidated by the assumption that the ratio of initial kerogen concentration to degraded kerogen concentration is constant from deposition to the initiation of intense oil generation. The ratio can only remain constant if no reaction is occurring and, therefore, Connan's data on 'reaction time' in petroleum generation (assumed to be the age of the sediment) only measures the time elapsed since the system formed. Thus, the widely cited pseudo-activation energy of 11-14 kcal/mole computed from Connan's equation for the start of oil generation from kerogen is meaningless.-Author

  6. The characterization of kerogen-analytical limitations and method design

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    Methods suitable for high resolution total molecular characterization of kerogens and other polymeric SOM are necessary for a quantitative understanding of hydrocarbon maturation and migration phenomena in addition to being a requirement for a systematic understanding of kerogen based fuel utilization. Gas chromatographic methods, in conjunction with analytical pyrolysis methods, have proven successful in the rapid superficial characterization of kerogen pyrolysates. Most applications involve qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the relative concentration of aliphatic, aromatic, or oxygen-containing species in a kerogen pyrolysate. More recently, the use of alkylated polystyrene internal standards has allowed the direct determination of parameters related to the abundance of, for example, normal alkyl groups or single ring aromatic species in kerogens. The future of methods of this type for improved kerogen typing is critically discussed. The conceptual design and feasibility of methods suitable for the more complete characterization of complex geopolymers on the molecular level is discussed with practical examples.

  7. Sulphur and oxygen sequestration of n-C37 and n-C38 unsaturated ketones in an immature kerogen and the release of their carbon skeletons during early stages of thermal maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopmans, M.P.; Schaeffer-Reiss, C.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Maxwell, J.R.; Schaeffer, P.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Sedimentary rock from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation (Messinian) in the Vena del Gesso Basin (northern Italy) containing immature (Ro = 0.25%) S-rich organic matter was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis at temperatures from 160 to 330??C for 72 h to study the diagenetic fate of n-C37 and n-C38 di-and tri-unsaturated methyl and ethyl ketones (alkenones) biosynthesised by several prymnesiophyte algae. During early diagenesis, the alkenones are incorporated into the kerogen by both sulphur and oxygen cross-linking as indicated by chemical degradation experiments with the kerogen of the unheated sample. Heating at temperatures between 160 and 260??C, which still represents early stages of thermal maturation, produces large amounts (up to 1 mg/g TOC) of S-bound, O-bound, and both S-and O-bound n-C37 and n-C38 skeletons, saturated n-C37 and n-C38 methyl, ethyl, and mid-chain ketones, C37 and C38 mid-chain 2,5-di-n-alkylthiophenes, C37 and C38 1,2-di-n-alkylbenzenes, and C37 and C38 n-alkanes. With increasing thermal maturation, three forms of the n-C37 and n-C38 skeletons are relatively stable (saturated hydrocarbons, 1,2-di-n-alkylbenzenes and saturated ketones), whereas the S-and O-bound skeletons are relatively labile. These results suggest that in natural situations saturated ketones with an n-C37 and n-C38 skeleton can be expected as well as the corresponding hydrocarbons. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Megakaryopoiesis: transcriptional insights into megakaryocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Kostyak, John Creigh; Naik, Ulhas Pandurang

    2007-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cells that travel near the vessel wall during laminar flow. In response to vascular injury, platelets undergo alterations in morphology which allow them to aggregate and cover the injured site. Platelets are produced by megakaryocytes in a process that involves the formation of platelet precursors called proplatelets and subsequent release of these proplatelets into the circulation. By forming a demarcation membrane system within the cytosol, megakaryocytes contain a membrane reservoir which allows for the production of thousands of platelets per mature megakaryocyte. Interestingly, the above process known as megakaryopoiesis is not yet fully understood. However, several groups have contributed evidence to unveil the role of thrombopoietin (TPO), the principal regulator of megakaryopoiesis in vivo. TPO is necessary for megakaryocyte maturation in that TPO deficient mice display greatly reduced megakaryocyte production as well as reduced numbers of mature megakaryocytes. Several transcription factors have also been implicated in megakaryopoiesis including, GATA-1, friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2), and Fli-1. In fact, interactions among some of the transcription factors have been reported to produce synergistic effects. GATA-1 and Fli-1 interactions result in heightened GPIX and GPIb (2 components of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) receptor) expression, while GATA-1, RUNX1 and core-binding factor beta interactions result in improved alphaIIb promoter activity. Mutations in the vWF complex and alphaIIb beta3 have been linked to disorders such as Bernard-Soulier syndrome and Glazmann thrombasthenia respectively. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional control of megakaryopoiesis may lead to more effective treatments of platelet-related disorders.

  9. Characteristics of kerogens from Recent marine and lacustrine sediments: GC/MS analysis of alkaline permanganate oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, Ryoshi; Morinaga, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Machihara, Tsutomu

    Extensive studies have been carried out by many workers on sedimentary kerogens. However little is known of the details of the chemical structure of kerogens and of the relation between immature and mature kerogens on a molecular basis. The present authors have been studying young kerogens (kerogens in young sediments). This study aimed to determine the structural pecularities of young kerogens from marine and lacustrine sediments. Kerogen samples were isolated from marine (Tanner Basin, offshore California) and freshwater lake (Lake Haruna, Japan) sediments. The kerogens belong to Type II or III. These kerogens were oxidized by alkaline permanganate and analyzed for their degradation products by GC/MS. The major degradation products are aliphatic normal α,ω-dicarboxylic acids with carbon numbers of 4-14; aliphatic normal monocarboxylic acids with carbon numbers of 8-26, and benzene mono-, di- and tetracarboxylic acids. A marked difference between kerogens from two environments was observed in the distribution of aliphatic dicarboxylic acids: C 4-C 10 acids are higher for marine kerogens than for lacustrine kerogens. This difference is probably due to the difference in the fatty acid composition of precursory materials (e.g. phytoplankton). These results indicate that the molecular structure of kerogens reflects generally the molecular composition of precursory materials, and consequently the present alkaline KMnO 4 oxidation method is useful for subtyping of kerogens.

  10. Re-Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of petroleum sourced from a Type I lacustrine kerogen: insights from the natural Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin and hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cumming, Vivien M.; Selby, David; Lillis, Paul G.; Lewan, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    are mimicking the natural system. This transfer from source to bitumen to oil does not affect source rock Re–Os systematics or Os isotopic compositions. This confirms that Os isotope compositions are transferred intact from source to petroleum during petroleum generation and can be used as a powerful correlation tool. These experiments further confirm that Re–Os systematics in source rocks are not adversely affected by petroleum maturation. Overall this study illustrates that the Re–Os petroleum geochronometer and Os isotope fingerprinting tools can be used on a wide range of petroleum types sourced from variable kerogen types.

  11. Re-Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of petroleum sourced from a Type I lacustrine kerogen: Insights from the natural Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin and hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Vivien M.; Selby, David; Lillis, Paul G.; Lewan, Michael D.

    2014-08-01

    transfer from source to bitumen to oil does not affect source rock Re-Os systematics or Os isotopic compositions. This confirms that Os isotope compositions are transferred intact from source to petroleum during petroleum generation and can be used as a powerful correlation tool. These experiments further confirm that Re-Os systematics in source rocks are not adversely affected by petroleum maturation. Overall this study illustrates that the Re-Os petroleum geochronometer and Os isotope fingerprinting tools can be used on a wide range of petroleum types sourced from variable kerogen types.

  12. Practical criteria for classifying kerogens: Some observations from pyrolysis-gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, B.

    1989-04-01

    Two pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) techniques were used to gain a succinct perspective of kerogen composition and structure which, by comparison with ( 13C NMR data, appears to be representative of the kerogen structure in toto. One-step Py-GC was used to determine the chain length distribution of selected compounds in kerogen pyrolysates and, by correlation with petroleum composition, to construct a scheme for evaluating kerogen quality. This scheme indicates that, inter alia, hydrogen-deficiency is not unequivocally synonymous with inferior oil potential, and waxy crude oil can be generated from both aquatic and terrigenous organic matter. Sequential two-step Py-GC allowed kerogen composition to be further defined in terms of how petroleum precursors are distributed throughout the kerogen macro-structure (homogeneously or heterogeneously) and the ease with which these precursors are released during pyrolysis ( maturation characteristics). Routinely defining kerogen types according to not only genetic potential (from Rock-Eval) but also the aforementioned criteria is therefore a step towards unifying kerogen geochemistry and petroleum geochemistry. Maturation characteristics play a crucial role in defining the nature of the oil generation window, particularly as regards assessing the relative roles played by (1) precursor depletion and (2) product cracking, in defining the upper maturity limit of oil generation.

  13. Sorption of phenanthrene and benzene on differently structural kerogen: important role of micropore-filling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Ran, Yong

    2014-02-01

    Shale was thermally treated to obtain a series of kerogen with varied maturation. Their chemical, structural and porous properties were related to the sorption and/or desorption behaviors of phenanthrene and benzene. As the treatment temperature increases, aliphatic and carbonyl carbon of the kerogen samples decrease, while their aromaticity and maturation increase. Meanwhile, the isothermal nonlinearity of phenanthrene and benzene increases whereas the sorption capacity and micropore adsorption volumes (Vo,d) initially increase and then decrease. The Vo,d of benzene is significantly correlated with, but higher than that of phenanthrene, suggesting similar micropore filling mechanism and molecular sieve effect. The benzene desorption exhibits hysteresis, which is related to the pore deformation of the kerogen and the entrapment of solute in the kerogen matrix. The Vo,d of phenanthrene and benzene on the kerogen samples accounts for 23-46% and 36-65% of the maximum sorption volumes, respectively, displaying the importance of the micropore filling.

  14. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  15. Virus Particle Maturation: Insights into Elegantly Programmed Nano-machines

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Similar modes of virus maturation have been observed in dsDNA bacteriophages and the structurally related herpes viruses and some type of maturation occur in most animal viruses. Recently a variety of biophysical studies of maturation intermediates of bacteriophages P22, λ, and HK97 have suggested an energy landscape that drives the transitions and structure-based mechanisms for its formation. Near-atomic resolution models of subunit tertiary structures in an early intermediate of bacteriophage HK97 maturation revealed a remarkable distortion of the secondary structures when compared to the mature particle. Scaffolding proteins may induce the distortion that is maintained by quaternary structure interactions following scaffold release, making the intermediate particle meta-stable. PMID:20149636

  16. KEROGEN OIL VALUE ENHANCEMENT RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Bunger, Ph.D.; Christopher P. Russell, Ph.D.; Donald E. Cogswell, M.S.

    2002-05-22

    Three general categories of products from the Estonia Kukersite kerogen oil were defined: pure compounds, broad range concentrates, and sweet refinery feedstock. Product development and market research center on these three categories. Further attempts were made to identify and test chemical approaches for producing lower alkyl resorcinols (what the market requires) from higher alkyl resorcinols. The approaches and process conditions tested have not yet produced satisfactory results. Progress was made to interest industry in the phenolic products producible. A sample of oil from the Galoter retort was received from Estonia and characterization of this sample was initiated. The sample was batch extracted and results of yields and selectivity are reported.

  17. Insights into [FeFe]-hydrogenase structure, mechanism, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Shepard, Eric M; Meuser, Jonathan E; Joshi, Neelambari; King, Paul W; Posewitz, Matthew C; Broderick, Joan B; Peters, John W

    2011-08-10

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that are key to energy metabolism in a variety of microbial communities. Divided into three classes based on their metal content, the [Fe]-, [FeFe]-, and [NiFe]-hydrogenases are evolutionarily unrelated but share similar nonprotein ligand assemblies at their active site metal centers that are not observed elsewhere in biology. These nonprotein ligands are critical in tuning enzyme reactivity, and their synthesis and incorporation into the active site clusters require a number of specific maturation enzymes. The wealth of structural information on different classes and different states of hydrogenase enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates, and maturation enzymes has contributed significantly to understanding the biochemistry of hydrogen metabolism. This review highlights the unique structural features of hydrogenases and emphasizes the recent biochemical and structural work that has created a clearer picture of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation pathway.

  18. Pyrolysis of Precambrian kerogens: constraints and capabilities.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B

    1982-01-01

    Precambrian kerogens are currently considered to be the primary candidates for the search of biochemical fossils. Degradation of kerogens by relatively "mild" pyrolysis techniques, such as under high vacuum, can liberate indicative structural moieties which were incorporated in, and perhaps shielded by, these solid and highly condensed, basically aromatic substances. It is necessary to observe analytical constraints (sample size and shape, temperature, pressure, time, etc.) in order to prevent an overabundant yield of secondary pyrolyzates (inter- and intramolecular rearrangements) which can prevent kerogen characterization. Potential biochemical fossils have been found in Precambrian kerogens. Demonstratable syngenetic biochemical fossils are expected after kerogen diagenesis and catagenesis is understood in sufficient detail, and when pyrolysis is augmented by multiple, improved analytical techniques.

  19. Pyrolysis of Precambrian kerogens - Constraints and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, B.

    1982-01-01

    Precambrian kerogens are currently considered to be the primary candidates for the search of biochemical fossils. Degradation of kerogens by relatively 'mild' pyrolysis techniques, such as under high vacuum, can liberate indicative structural moieties which were incorporated in, and perhaps shielded by, these solid and highly condensed, basically aromatic substances. It is necessary to observe analytical constraints (sample size and shape, temperature, pressure, time, etc.) in order to prevent an overabundant yield of secondary pyrolyzates (inter- and intramolecular rearrangements) which can prevent kerogen characterization. Potential biochemical fossils have been found in Precambrian kerogens. Demonstratable syngenetic biochemical fossils are expected after kerogen diagenesis and catagenesis is understood in sufficient detail, and when pyrolysis is augmented by multiple, improved analytical techniques.

  20. D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I, II, IIS, III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310-381??C), time (12-144 h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330??C for 72 h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS > II ~ III > I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 ??C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 350??C for 72 h, or 330??C for 144 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115??C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of our results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, we suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation waters are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected

  1. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Mark Dean; Lestz, Robert Steven; Hollis, Kirk; Taylor, Craig; Kinkead, Scott; Wigand, Marcus

    2010-09-07

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  2. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Mark Dean; Lestz, Robert Steven; Hollis, Kirk; Taylor, Craig; Kinkead, Scott; Wigand, Marcus

    2009-03-10

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  3. Visual kerogen assessment of thermal history

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, N.F.; Hickey, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The microscopic particulate organic matter occurring in sedimentary rocks is referred to as visual kerogen when examined by use of strew slides prepared from a kerogen concentrate. Examination under a high-powered microscope in transmitted light yields information on both the organic matter type present and the level of organic metamorphism (LOM). This presentation concentrates on the LOM aspects of visual kerogen and addresses it from a utilization point of view. The color of the kerogen, preferably plant cuticle fragments or pollen and spores, is used to determine the level of organic metamorphism. Various scales have been proposed to reflect this change in coloration. The TAI scale is most commonly used. Visual kerogen assessment is considerably less precise than vitrinite reflectance. It is a subjective call made by the analyst. Additionally, the equivalent reflectance range broadens as higher LOMs are attained. However, the ability to visually discern differences in the suite of organic material present can override its drawbacks in precision. Caved versus indigenous populations can be recognized, as can recycled versus primary vitrinite. Thermal history can also be established in sections that are barren of vitrinite. As is the case with nearly all organic geochemical techniques, reliable interpretations can be made if the limitations of the method are considered and the results are cross-correlated with other methods.

  4. Rotational reflectance properties of Arkoma Basin dispersed vitrinite: insights for understanding reflectance populations in high thermal maturity regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bensley, D.F.; Hathon, L.A.; Kastens, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis and interpretation of dispersed vitrinite reflectance data in regions of high thermal maturity (> 2% vitrinite reflectance) have been equivocal partly because of an increase in width and complexity of reflectance histograms with increasing mean reflectance. Such complexity is illustrated by random reflectance (Rran) data from the Arkoma Basin that display a linear increase in standard deviation of Rran with an increase in mean Rran from 1 to 5%. Evaluating how much of the dispersion in these data is the result of vitrinite anisotropy and how much is the result of mixing of kerogen populations by sedimentary processes and/or sampling procedures has been problematic. Automated collection of reflectance data during polarizer rotation provides preliminary data for solution of this problem. Rotational reflectance data collected from a subset of Arkoma Basin samples reveal positive, linear relationships among maximum (R???max), random (Rran), rotational (Rrot), and minimum (R???min) reflectance, as well as a systematic increase in bireflectance (R???max-R???min) with increasing reflectance. R???max and Rrot display lower standard deviations and narrower, more nearly unimodal histograms than Rran and R???min, suggesting that R???max and Rrot are superior (less ambiguous) indices of thermal maturity. These data patterns are inferred to be mostly an indication of increasing vitrinite anisotropy with increasing thermal maturity, suggesting that the linear covariance observed between mean Rran and standard deviation in dispersed organic data sets from regions of high thermal maturity may be explained mostly as the result of increasing vitrinite anisotropy with increasing thermal maturity. ?? 1993.

  5. Characteristics of amorphous kerogens fractionated from terrigenous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki

    1984-02-01

    A preliminary attempt to fractionate amorphous kerogens from terrigenous bulk kerogen by a benzene-water two phase partition method under acidic condition was made. Microscopic observation revealed that amorphous kerogens and structured kerogens were fractionated effectively by this method. Characteristics of the amorphous and structured kerogens fractionated by this method were examined by some chemical analyses and compared with those of the bulk kerogen and humic acid isolated from the same rock sample (Haizume Formation, Pleistocene, Japan). The elemental and infrared (IR) analyses showed that the amorphous kerogen fraction had the highest atomic H/C ratio and the lowest atomic N/C ratio and was the richest in aliphatic structures and carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups. Quantities of fatty acids from the saponification products of each geopolymer were in agreement with the results of elemental and IR analyses. Distribution of the fatty acids was suggestive that more animal lipids participate in the formation of amorphous kerogens because of the abundance of relatively lower molecular weight fatty acids (such as C 16 and C 18 acids) in saponification products of amorphous kerogens. On the other hand, although the amorphous kerogen fraction tends to be rich in aliphatic structures compared with bulk kerogen of the same rock samples, van Krevelen plots of elemental compositions of kerogens from the core samples (Nishiyama Oil Field, Tertiary, Japan) reveal that the amorphous kerogen fraction is not necessarily characterized by markedly high atomic H/C ratio. This was attributed to the oxic environment of deposition and the abundance of biodegraded terrestrial amorphous organic matter in the amorphous kerogen fraction used in this work.

  6. A Fresh Look at Aging Lunar Ejecta: Insights from Optical Maturity (OMAT) and Rock Abundance (RA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai Udovicic, C.; Mazrouei, S.; Costello, E.; Ghent, R. R.; Lemelin, M.; Lucey, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    the nanometer scale differs from the rate of mechanical breakdown of rocks at the meter scale. Studying maturity at these two distinct length scales will provide insights into how the lunar surface as a whole evolves over time.

  7. Structural and Functional Insights into the HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L.; Freed, Eric O.

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  8. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L; Freed, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  9. Structural order and disorder in Precambrian kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Buseck, P.R.; Bo-Jun, H.; Miner, B.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to examine the structures of a wide range of Precambrian kerogens from rocks with ages between 0.9 and 3.8 billion years. The authors find recognizable structural ordering in samples that show little or no evidence of crystallinity by powder X-ray diffraction measurements. A wide range in degree of ordering is evident in the HRTEM images. A rough correlation exists between the ordering displayed in the HRTEM images and both the sample ages and their H/C ratios. Many kerogen samples are structurally heterogeneous, possibly reflecting a variety of precursors, and source regions. The observed structural heterogeneities probably extend to other parameters; when isotopic and X-ray measurements can be made on the same scale as HRTEM images, similar scatter presumably will also be evident.

  10. Imaging and mechanical property measurements of kerogen via nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeszotarski, Jonathan C.; Chromik, Richard R.; Vinci, Richard P.; Messmer, Marie C.; Michels, Raymond; Larsen, John W.

    2004-10-01

    Most analyses of kerogens rely on samples that have been isolated by dissolving the rock matrix. The properties of the kerogen before and after such isolation may be different and all sample orientation information is lost. We report a method of measuring kerogen mechanical properties in the rock matrix without isolation. An atomic force microscope (AFM) based nanoindenter is used to measure the hardness and reduced modulus of the kerogen within Woodford shale. The same instrument also provides useful images of polished rock sections on a submicrometer scale. Measurements were carried out both parallel and perpendicular to the bedding plane.

  11. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  12. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  13. Rainfall interception at the intrastorm scale: insights from a mature coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, S. I.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Shimizu, A.; Shimizu, T.; Tamai, K.; Nobuhiro, T.; Kabeya, N.; Noguchi, S.; Sawano, S.; Araki, M.

    2016-12-01

    Canopy interception of rainfall is a mature subject. Nonetheless, the canopy interception process is inadequately understood at the intrastorm scale. To help fill our void of knowledge of intrastorm canopy interception, we employed detailed and fine-scale temporal measurements of meteorological and hydrological measurements from a mature coniferous forest in Japan. Throughfall was collected in a total area of 4 m2 and stemflow was measured for 14 trees of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don), and hourly intensity of interception loss was calculated as the difference between hourly intensity of gross rainfall and the sum of intensities of throughfall and stemflow. We specifically compared differences in canopy interception between the first and second halves of rainfall. Our results indicated that the interception intensity was larger at the initial stage of rainfall event and that interception intensity does not depend solely on intensity of gross rainfall. The accumulated amounts of interception intensity during the first half were quite larger than those of the second half. We found the decreases in the accumulated interception intensity caused by the higher mean wind speed for only the first half. These findings strongly suggested that water storage on tree surface is the single most important factor affecting the interception loss at this site, outweighing losses by wet canopy evaporation and splash during rain. This study adds insights into intrastorm interception dynamics which are necessary to better model and forecast interception losses at the watershed scale. Publication note: This presentation is based on the following submitted article: Iida, S., Levia, D.F., Shimizu, A., Shimizu, T., Tamai, K., Nobuhiro, T., Kabeya, N., Noguchi, S., Sawano, S. and Araki, M. Intrastorm scale rainfall interception dynamics in a mature coniferous forest stand.

  14. Diagenesis and catagenesis of marine kerogen precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalska-Bloch, J.

    1987-01-01

    The approaches used were (1) investigations of marine kerogen precursors in a natural environment, e.g., in reefal carbonate sediments (in Puerto Rico and Belize) and (2) laboratory modeling of the condensation of marine kerogen precursors, i.e., amino acids and sugars and subsequent formation and reactions of melanoidin polymers. The organic facies model of a reef environment was developed from the analysis of (1) total organic carbon, (2) visual protokerogen types, (3) Rock-Eval indices and (4) sedimentological considerations. Rates of melanoidin formation, incorporation of amino acid and glucose into the melanoidin polymers and their attendant decrease in the melanoidin solutions were evaluated. The observed pattern was that of initially rapid loss of biomonomers from the melanoidin solutions and concomitant formation of melanoidin polymers. The rate of incorporation of amino acids into the polymers is related partly to glucose concentration and partly to the type of amino acid. The racemization rates of amino acids were also investigated. During the course of melanoidin formation the original amino acid abundances and stereochemistry are redistributed during simulated diagenesis. This may have implications for natural environments where diagenesis may obscure the original depositional signal and complicate geochronological studies. Catagenetic evolution of both synthetic geopolymer (lysine, histidine, arginine, glucose - melanoidin) and natural geopolymers (Belizian organic matter) was simulated using hydrous pyrolysis.

  15. Possible carotenoid-derived structures in fossil kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Machihara, T.; Ishiwatari, R.

    1987-02-01

    The unique KMnO/sub 4/ degradation products of ..beta..-carotene, previously identified as 2,2-dimethyl succinic acid (C/sub 6/) and 2,2-dimethyl glutaric acid (C/sub 7/) have been found in the oxidation products of Green River shale (Eocene, 52 x 10/sup 6/ yr) and Tasmanian Tasmanite (Permian, 220-274 x 10/sup 6/ yr) kerogens. These two compounds were also detected in KMnO/sub 4/ degradation products of young kerogens from lacustrine and marine sediments. The results indicate that kerogens incorporated carotenoids (possibly ..beta..-carotene) at the time of kerogen formation in surface sediments. Both acids are useful markers to obtain information on biological precursors contributing to the formation of fossil kerogens.

  16. Kerogen-Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Interactions: Reactivity and Contaminant Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustin, M. K.; Jew, A. D.; Harrison, A. L.; Joe-Wong, C. M.; Thomas, D.; Maher, K.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing of tight shales to produce oil and natural gas has grown significantly in recent years, yet it remains relatively inefficient, recovering only an estimated 5% and 25% of the oil and gas present, respectively. The need to improve efficiency and diminish environmental impact has prompted research into fundamental geochemical reactions occurring in shales. In particular, reactions between kerogen and fracture fluid components are poorly understood. Kerogen is the precursor of these hydrocarbons and contains metals in addition to organic material; it is also electron rich and therefore susceptible to oxidation and release of a variety of elements. Although some mineral phases in the shales are expected to undergo dissolution-precipitation reactions, kerogen is generally considered to be relatively unreactive [1]. Here we have investigated reactions between isolated kerogen and a hydraulic fracturing fluid typical of that used in the Marcellus shale. These experiments show that kerogen, as well as redox-sensitive minerals within shales, react with fracture fluid. In particular, kerogen exhibited more extensive release of certain metals (e.g. Al, Ba, Cu, among others) than was observed for bulk shale under the same experimental conditions. This evidence suggests that kerogen may be far more reactive to fracture fluids than previously thought. In particular, these results suggest that kerogen may significantly impact the compositions of produced waters, which have previously been attributed solely to mineral reactions. They also emphasize the need for further characterization of kerogen and its reactions with complex hydraulic fracturing fluids. [1] Vandenbroucke and Largeau (2007) Org. Geochem.

  17. [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation: insights into the role HydE plays in dithiomethylamine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Betz, Jeremiah N; Boswell, Nicholas W; Fugate, Corey J; Holliday, Gemma L; Akiva, Eyal; Scott, Anna G; Babbitt, Patricia C; Peters, John W; Shepard, Eric M; Broderick, Joan B

    2015-03-10

    HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine enzymes required for the maturation of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA) and produce the nonprotein organic ligands characteristic of its unique catalytic cluster. The catalytic cluster of HydA (the H-cluster) is a typical [4Fe-4S] cubane bridged to a 2Fe-subcluster that contains two carbon monoxides, three cyanides, and a bridging dithiomethylamine as ligands. While recent studies have shed light on the nature of diatomic ligand biosynthesis by HydG, little information exists on the function of HydE. Herein, we present biochemical, spectroscopic, bioinformatic, and molecular modeling data that together map the active site and provide significant insight into the role of HydE in H-cluster biosynthesis. Electron paramagnetic resonance and UV-visible spectroscopic studies demonstrate that reconstituted HydE binds two [4Fe-4S] clusters and copurifies with S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Incorporation of deuterium from D2O into 5'-deoxyadenosine, the cleavage product of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, coupled with molecular docking experiments suggests that the HydE substrate contains a thiol functional group. This information, along with HydE sequence similarity and genome context networks, has allowed us to redefine the presumed mechanism for HydE away from BioB-like sulfur insertion chemistry; these data collectively suggest that the source of the sulfur atoms in the dithiomethylamine bridge of the H-cluster is likely derived from HydE's thiol containing substrate.

  18. Trace elements geochemistry of kerogen in Upper Cretaceous sediments, Chad (Bornu) Basin, northeastern Nigeria: Origin and paleo-redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Mustapha, Khairul Azlan; Aturamu, Adeyinka Oluyemi

    2014-12-01

    Trace element contents in isolated kerogen from Upper Cretaceous sediments within Gongila and Fika formations in the Chad (Bornu) Basin, northeastern Nigeria were determined using Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), in order to infer the origin of the organic matter and the paleo-redox conditions during their sedimentation. The concentrations of the elements in the kerogen samples varied from 1.01 to 24,740 ppm. The distribution of elements shows that Fe is the most abundant element in Chad (Bornu) Basin kerogen, followed by Ce. Among the biophile elements, V is the most abundant, followed by Ni and Co in that order. Statistical evaluation of the elemental composition data shows that As, Ce, Pb, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and U exhibit good positive correlations with each other. Molybdenum, on the other hand displays no obvious correlation with most of the trace elements determined including TOC, but has good positive correlation with TS and negative correlation with Tmax, Ce and Th, which suggests that the concentration of Mo decreases with increasing maturity and vice versa. Some trace element concentrations and their ratios suggest mixed marine and terrigenous source input for the organic matter (kerogen) in Chad (Bornu) Basin. More so, the concentrations of redox-sensitive elements, such as V, Ni, Cu, Cr Mo and Mn, in the kerogen samples suggest dysoxic bottom water conditions within the Gongila and Fika sediments. Cross-plots of V and Ni and V/(V + Ni) ratio also indicate that the organic matter of these samples was deposited in slightly reducing environments.

  19. Role of NSO compounds during primary cracking of a Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behar, F.; Lorant, F.; Lewan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to follow the generation of NSO compounds during the artificial maturation of an immature Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite in order to determine the different sources of the petroleum potential during primary cracking. Experiments were carried out in closed system pyrolysis in the temperature range from 225 to 350 ??C. Two types of NSOs were recovered: one is soluble in n-pentane and the second in dichloromethane. A kinetic scheme was optimised including both kerogen and NSO cracking. It was validated by complementary experiments carried out on isolated asphaltenes generated from the Type II kerogen and on the total n-pentane and DCM extracts generated from the Type III lignite. Results show that kerogen and lignite first decompose into DCM NSOs with minor generation of hydrocarbons. Then, the main source of petroleum potential originates from secondary cracking of both DCM and n-pentane NSOs through successive decomposition reactions. These results confirm the model proposed by Tissot [Tissot, B., 1969. Premie??res donne??es sur les me??canismes et la cine??tique de la formation du pe??trole dans les bassins se??dimentaires. Simulation d'un sche??ma re??actionnel sur ordinateur. Oil and Gas Science and Technology 24, 470-501] in which the main source of hydrocarbons is not the insoluble organic matter, but the NSO fraction. As secondary cracking of the NSOs largely overlaps that of the kerogen, it was demonstrated that bulk kinetics in open system is a result of both kerogen and NSO cracking. Thus, another kinetic scheme for primary cracking in open system was built as a combination of kerogen and NSO cracking. This new kinetic scheme accounts for both the rate and amounts of hydrocarbons generated in a closed pyrolysis system. Thus, the concept of successive steps for hydrocarbon generation is valid for the two types of pyrolysis system and, for the first time, a common kinetic scheme is available for extrapolating results to natural

  20. Biological markers from Green River kerogen decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, A. K.; Clarkson, J. E.; Singleton, M. F.; Wong, C. M.; Crawford, R. W.

    1982-07-01

    Isoprenoid and other carbon skeletons that are formed in living organisms and preserved essentially intact in ancient sediments are often called biological markers. The purpose of this paper is to develop improved methods of using isoprenoid hydrocarbons to relate petroleum or shale oil to its source rock. It is demonstrated that most, but not all, of the isoprenoid hydrocarbon structures are chemically bonded in kerogen (or to minerals) in Green River oil shale. The rate constant for thermally producing isoprenoid, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons is substantially greater than for the bulk of shale oil. This may be related to the substantial quantity of CO 2 which is evolved coincident with the isoprenoid hydrocarbons but prior to substantial oil evolution. Although formation of isoprenoid alkenes is enhanced by rapid heating and high pyrolysis temperatures, the ratio of isoprenoid alkenes plus alkanes to normal alkenes plus alkanes is independent of heating rate. High-temperature laboratory pyrolysis experiments can thus be used to predict the distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in low temperature processes such as in situ shale oil production and perhaps petroleum formation. Finally, we demonstrate that significant variation in biological marker ratios occurs as a function of stratigraphy in the Green River formation. This information, combined with methods for measuring process yield from oil composition, enables one to relate time-dependent processing conditions to the corresponding time-dependent oil yield in a vertical modified- in situ retort even if there is a substantial and previously undetermined delay in drainage of shale oil from the retort.

  1. Thermal maturity of northern Appalachian Basin Devonian shales: Insights from sterane and terpane biomarkers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Ryder, Robert T.; Trippi, Michael H.; Alimi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    To better estimate thermal maturity of Devonian shales in the northern Appalachian Basin, eleven samples of Marcellus and Huron Shale were characterized via multiple analytical techniques. Vitrinite reflectance, Rock–Eval pyrolysis, gas chromatography (GC) of whole rock extracts, and GC–mass spectrometry (GCMS) of extract saturate fractions were evaluated on three transects that lie across previously documented regional thermal maturity isolines. Results from vitrinite reflectance suggest that most samples are immature with respect to hydrocarbon generation. However, bulk geochemical data and sterane and terpane biomarker ratios from GCMS suggest that almost all samples are in the oil window. This observation is consistent with the presence of thermogenic gas in the study area and higher vitrinite reflectance values recorded from overlying Pennsylvanian coals. These results suggest that vitrinite reflectance is a poor predictor of thermal maturity in early mature areas of Devonian shale, perhaps because reported measurements often include determinations of solid bitumen reflectance. Vitrinite reflectance interpretations in areas of early mature Devonian shale should be supplanted by evaluation of thermal maturity information from biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical data.

  2. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. PMID:25659933

  4. Insights into the activity of maturation inhibitor PF-46396 on HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dibya; Timilsina, Uddhav; Srivastava, Tryambak Pratap; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    HIV maturation inhibitors are an emerging class of anti-retroviral compounds that inhibit the viral protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag, CA-SP1 (capsid-spacer peptide 1) peptide to mature CA. The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B but was ineffective against other HIV-1 clades including clade C. Another pyridone-based maturation inhibitor, PF-46396 displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B. In this study, we aimed at determining the activity of PF-46396 against HIV-1 clade C. We employed various biochemical and virological assays to demonstrate that PF-46396 is effective against HIV-1 clade C. We observed a dose dependent accumulation of CA-SP1 intermediate in presence of the compound. We carried out mutagenesis in the CA- SP1 region of HIV-1 clade C Gag and observed that the mutations conferred resistance against the compound. Many mutations inhibited Gag processing thereby reducing virus release in the absence of the compound. However, presence of PF-46396 rescued these defects and enhanced virus release, replication capacity and infectivity of HIV-1 clade C. These results put together identify PF-46396 as a broadly active maturation inhibitor against HIV-1 clade B and C and help in rational designing of novel analogs with reduced toxicity and increased efficacy for its potential use in clinics. PMID:28252110

  5. Raman imagery: a new approach to assess the geochemical maturity and biogenicity of permineralized precambrian fossils.

    PubMed

    Schopf, J William; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Agresti, David G; Czaja, Andrew D; Wdowiak, Thomas J

    2005-06-01

    Laser-Raman imagery is a non-intrusive, non-destructive analytical technique, recently introduced to Precambrian paleobiology, that can be used to demonstrate a one-to-one spatial correlation between the optically discernible morphology and kerogenous composition of permineralized fossil microorganisms. Made possible by the submicron-scale resolution of the technique and its high sensitivity to the Raman signal of carbonaceous matter, such analyses can be used to determine the chemical-structural characteristics of organic-walled microfossils and associated sapropelic carbonaceous matter in acid-resistant residues and petrographic thin sections. Here we use this technique to analyze kerogenous microscopic fossils and associated carbonaceous sapropel permineralized in 22 unmetamorphosed or little-metamorphosed fine-grained chert units ranging from approximately 400 to approximately 2,100 Ma old. The lineshapes of the Raman spectra acquired vary systematically with five indices of organic geochemical maturation: (1) the mineral-based metamorphic grade of the fossil-bearing units; (2) the fidelity of preservation of the fossils studied; (3) the color of the organic matter analyzed; and both the (4) H/C and (5) N/C ratios measured in particulate kerogens isolated from bulk samples of the fossil-bearing cherts. Deconvolution of relevant spectra shows that those of relatively well-preserved permineralized kerogens analyzed in situ exhibit a distinctive set of Raman bands that are identifiable also in hydrated organic-walled microfossils and particulate carbonaceous matter freed from the cherts by acid maceration. These distinctive Raman bands, however, become indeterminate upon dehydration of such specimens. To compare quantitatively the variations observed among the spectra measured, we introduce the Raman Index of Preservation, an approximate measure of the geochemical maturity of the kerogens studied that is consistent both with the five indices of organic geochemical

  6. Molecular Imaging of Kerogen and Minerals in Shale Rocks across Micro- and Nano- Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Z.; Bechtel, H.; Sannibale, F.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Gilbert, B.; Nico, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a reliable and non-destructive quantitative method to evaluate mineralogy and kerogen content / maturity of shale rocks, although it is traditionally difficult to assess the organic and mineralogical heterogeneity at micrometer and nanometer scales due to the diffraction limit of the infrared light. However, it is truly at these scales that the kerogen and mineral content and their formation in share rocks determines the quality of shale gas reserve, the gas flow mechanisms and the gas production. Therefore, it's necessary to develop new approaches which can image across both micro- and nano- scales. In this presentation, we will describe two new molecular imaging approaches to obtain kerogen and mineral information in shale rocks at the unprecedented high spatial resolution, and a cross-scale quantitative multivariate analysis method to provide rapid geochemical characterization of large size samples. The two imaging approaches are enhanced at nearfield respectively by a Ge-hemisphere (GE) and by a metallic scanning probe (SINS). The GE method is a modified microscopic attenuated total reflectance (ATR) method which rapidly captures a chemical image of the shale rock surface at 1 to 5 micrometer resolution with a large field of view of 600 X 600 micrometer, while the SINS probes the surface at 20 nm resolution which provides a chemically "deconvoluted" map at the nano-pore level. The detailed geochemical distribution at nanoscale is then used to build a machine learning model to generate self-calibrated chemical distribution map at micrometer scale with the input of the GE images. A number of geochemical contents across these two important scales are observed and analyzed, including the minerals (oxides, carbonates, sulphides), the organics (carbohydrates, aromatics), and the absorbed gases. These approaches are self-calibrated, optics friendly and non-destructive, so they hold the potential to monitor shale gas

  7. New Insights into the Complex Relationship between Weight and Maturity of Burgundy Truffles (Tuber aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Büntgen, Ulf; Bagi, István; Fekete, Oszkár; Molinier, Virginie; Peter, Martina; Splivallo, Richard; Vahdatzadeh, Maryam; Richard, Franck; Murat, Claude; Tegel, Willy; Stobbe, Ulrich; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Sproll, Ludger; Hülsmann, Lisa; Nievergelt, Daniel; Meier, Barbara; Egli, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Despite an increasing demand for Burgundy truffles (Tuber aestivum), gaps remain in our understanding of the fungus’ overall lifecycle and ecology. Here, we compile evidence from three independent surveys in Hungary and Switzerland. First, we measured the weight and maturity of 2,656 T. aestivum fruit bodies from a three-day harvest in August 2014 in a highly productive orchard in Hungary. All specimens ranging between 2 and 755 g were almost evenly distributed through five maturation classes. Then, we measured the weight and maturity of another 4,795 T. aestivum fruit bodies harvested on four occasions between June and October 2015 in the same truffière. Again, different maturation stages occurred at varying fruit body size and during the entire fruiting season. Finally, the predominantly unrelated weight and maturity of 81 T. aestivum fruit bodies from four fruiting seasons between 2010 and 2013 in Switzerland confirmed the Hungarian results. The spatiotemporal coexistence of 7,532 small-ripe and large-unripe T. aestivum, which accumulate to ~182 kg, differs from species-specific associations between the size and ripeness that have been reported for other mushrooms. Although size-independent truffle maturation stages may possibly relate to the perpetual belowground environment, the role of mycelial connectivity, soil property, microclimatology, as well as other abiotic factors and a combination thereof, is still unclear. Despite its massive sample size and proof of concept, this study, together with existing literature, suggests consideration of a wider ecological and biogeographical range, as well as the complex symbiotic fungus-host interaction, to further illuminate the hidden development of belowground truffle fruit bodies. PMID:28125633

  8. Kerogen Characterization of Microfossils in Precambrian Cherts: Evidence for Biogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gregorio, B. T.; Sharp, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    Currently, much of our oldest evidence of life on this planet has been called into question. It is not enough for a possible microfossil to have bacterial morphology. In addition, it must also be composed of material with an unquestionably biogenic origin. Once an organism dies, the carbon it contains is altered through diagenesis and metamorphism. Most organic material is removed or remineralized, but insoluble amorphous carbon, known as kerogen, may remain. With additional heating and pressure, this kerogen is transformed into graphite, eliminating the structural biosignature of the material. No known biological process creates graphite as a product. Oxides, which form on the external surface of bacterial cell walls, may also remain after fossilization. Many microfossils are defined not by kerogen but by arrangements of small iron or manganese oxide crystals, even though kerogen may still be associated with them. Cherts from Mink Mountain locality of the Gunflint Formation (2.0 Ga) contain black, brown, and red filaments composed of both hematite crystallites up to 1 μm and kerogen. The amount of kerogenous material determines the color of the microfossil. Those with little associated kerogen appear red, the color of hematite, while those with much associated kerogen appear black. Brown microfossils are the result of remnant carbon with little or no hematite. Kerogen is also found abundantly outside of microfossils and may possibly be the remains of ancient biofilm. The crystallinity of carbon, grading from amorphous carbon to graphite, can be measured via a variety of methods, including X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Raman spectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) in TEM. However, EELS may be the best method when dealing with small patches of carbon associated with microfossils, especially if high-resolution imaging is not possible. Information about the crystallinity is given by the

  9. Insights into Eyestalk Ablation Mechanism to Induce Ovarian Maturation in the Black Tiger Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Uawisetwathana, Umaporn; Leelatanawit, Rungnapa; Klanchui, Amornpan; Prommoon, Juthatip; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2011-01-01

    Eyestalk ablation is commonly practiced in crustacean to induce ovarian maturation in captivity. The molecular mechanism of the ablation has not been well understood, preventing a search for alternative measures to induce ovarian maturation in aquaculture. This is the first study to employ cDNA microarray to examine effects of eyestalk ablation at the transcriptomic level and pathway mapping analysis to identify potentially affected biological pathways in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). Microarray analysis comparing between gene expression levels of ovaries from eyestalk-intact and eyestalk-ablated brooders revealed 682 differentially expressed transcripts. Based on Hierarchical clustering of gene expression patterns, Gene Ontology annotation, and relevant functions of these differentially expressed genes, several gene groups were further examined by pathway mapping analysis. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR analysis for some representative transcripts confirmed microarray data. Known reproductive genes involved in vitellogenesis were dramatically increased during the ablation. Besides these transcripts expected to be induced by the ablation, transcripts whose functions involved in electron transfer mechanism, immune responses and calcium signal transduction were significantly altered following the ablation. Pathway mapping analysis revealed that the activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling, calcium signaling, and progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation pathways were putatively crucial to ovarian maturation induced by the ablation. These findings shed light on several possible molecular mechanisms of the eyestalk ablation effect and allow more focused investigation for an ultimate goal of finding alternative methods to replace the undesirable practice of the eyestalk ablation in the future. PMID:21915325

  10. Low-Mr hydrocarbons generated during hydrous and dry pyrolysis of kerogen.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, E; Kaplan, I R

    1985-10-24

    The validity of applying laboratory pyrolysis experiments to simulating the maturation of organic matter in sedimentary basins has been vigorously debated. We report here results from the generation of hydrocarbons of low relative molecular mass (Mr) in both hydrous and dry pyrolysis. A principal difference is that under dry conditions in the presence of montmorillonite, catalysis occurs with respect to generation of low-Mr hydrocarbons but no such effect is evident for hydrous conditions, probably because of a reduction in the clay's acidity. In addition, olefins which were previously reported as not being present in the products of hydrous pyrolyses were found to be produced in the C2-C6 range in comparable amounts under both hydrous and dry pyrolyses at 300 degrees C and may form in the course of kerogen catagenesis in nature but disappear with geologic time due to their instability. These studies have relevance to understanding the interactions between kerogen and minerals in sedimentary rocks and to processes in the formation of natural gas.

  11. Investigating Oil-Prone Kerogen Conversion to Hydrocarbons Using AFM-based Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eoghan, D.; Cook, D.; Hackley, P. C.; Kjoller, K.; Dawson, D.; Shetty, R.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding in situ chemical changes occurring during thermal conversion of oil-prone kerogen to hydrocarbons can provide fundamental information regarding the origin of the earth's fossil fuel endowment and reduce uncertainty in hydrocarbon prospecting and resource assessment. Tasmanites algal bodies were studied using an Atomic Force Microscope-based IR spectroscopy technique (AFM-IR) that offers chemical characterization of organic materials with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. The AFM allows precise positioning within the algal bodies. A tunable IR laser irradiates the sample under the AFM probe. At absorbing wavenumbers, the sample heats up and expands. The AFM detects the expansion of the material under the probe tip to generate local IR spectra. The Tasmanites algal bodies from the Devonian-Mississippian Woodford Shale were contained in two polished rock fragment pellets. To simulate maturation, one was subjected to isothermal hydrous pyrolysis at 320 °C for 72 hours. AFM-IR spectra were collected at multiple sites on algal bodies in both samples (Figure 1). The aromatic C=C ring stretching at 1600 cm-1 (unheated) shifted to 1606 cm-1 with increased absorption in the heated algal bodies, indicating development of increased aromaticity with thermal maturation. The ratio of the 1606 cm-1 peak to peaks at 1708 cm-1 (C=O stretching) and 1460 cm-1 (CH2 wag) was higher in the heated sample, indicating loss of oxygenated functional groups and aliphatic components with thermal advance. A shift of the 1372 cm-1 peak to 1376 cm-1 with lower absorption in the heated samples suggests reduction in the abundance of methyl substituents and development of preferred localization. These results are consistent with extant information from FTIR analysis and demonstrate the ability of AFM-IR to provide in situ characterization of organic matter with respect to thermal maturity advance, and its application to understanding conversion of oil-prone kerogen to

  12. Selective preservation and origin of petroleum-forming aquatic kerogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Spiker, E. C.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of a marine algal sapropel from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda, by 13C NMR and stable carbon isotopic methods show that precursors of aquatic kerogen (insoluble, macromolecular, paraffinic humic substances) are primary components of algae and possibly associated bacteria and that these substances survive microbial decomposition and are selectively preserved during early diagenesis. ?? 1983 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Thermal alteration of young kerogen in relation to petroleum genesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishiwatari, R.; Ishiwatari, M.; Kaplan, I. R.; Rohrback, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    Kerogen, humic acid, and lipid material were separated from a young marine sediment and heated in sealed tubes in a nitrogen atmosphere at 150 and 410 C. Gaseous and liquid products generated during heating, and also the residual organic material, were characterized by gas-liquid chromatography, elemental analysis, infrared and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Upscaling of permeability in Shale with Heterogeneous Kerogen Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, G.; Lin, M.

    2016-12-01

    Apparent permeability is a vital parameter for accurate estimation of exploitable gas reserve in shale. In this paper, we introduce a new model to investigate multi-scale gas-transport phenomena in organic-rich-shale with heterogeneous kerogen distribution. The formulation is decomposed into two subdomains: kerogen and inorganic matrix. On the one hand, considering the molecular phenomena (slip and diffusive transport) is significant in kerogen for its enrichment of nanopores, we use pore-scale network model (PNM) to represent it and apply Javadpour's apparent permeability formula(2009) to calculate flow in the nanoscale throats. On the other hand, inorganic matrix, with relatively large pores, micro natural fractures and manual hydraulic fracturing cracks, its flow is approximate to Darcy, so we model it as continuum-scale models FVM. The two subdomains are coupled using mortars. Mortars are finite-element spaces employed to couple independent subdomains by ensuring interfacial pressures and fluxes are matched. Considering the local heterogeneities, kerogen is treated as several nanoporous organic material blocks randomly dispersed within the inorganic matrix. We study on four factors: the distribution of kerogen, the permeability of inorganic matrix (Ki), the magnitude of pressure, and the TOC of coupling model. The results are shown intuitively by APF (apparent permeability function) graph. We conclude that: (1) when Ki is greater than the Darcy permeability of kerogen, the APF graphs with different TOC and distribution have an intersection point, and this point is only decided by permeability of Ki and the pore size distribution of kerogen; (2) when pressure is close to or higher than the pressure of intersection point, the influence of heterogeneous distribution can be ignored, and the complex coupling model can instead by a simple equivalent model. This work is supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDB

  15. Source indicators of humic substances and proto-kerogen - Stable isotope ratios, elemental compositions and electron spin resonance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuermer, D. H.; Peters, K. E.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1978-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of C, N and H, elemental compositions, and electron spin resonance (ESR) data of humic acids and proto-kerogens from twelve widely varying sampling locations are presented. Humic acids and proto-kerogens from algal sources are more aliphatic and higher in N than those from higher plant sources. Oxygen content appears to represent a measure of maturation, even in Recent sediments, and S content may reflect redox conditions in the environment of deposition. The ESR data indicate that the transformation of humic substances to proto-kerogens in Recent sediments is accompanied by an increase in aromatic character. A combination of stable carbon isotope ratio and H/C ratio may be a simple but reliable source indicator which allows differentiation of marine-derived from terrestrially-derived organic matter. The stable nitrogen isotope ratios are useful indicators of nitrogen nutrient source. Deuterium/hydrogen isotope ratios appear to reflect variations in meteoric waters and are not reliable source indicators.

  16. Rapid and direct screening of H:C ratio in Archean kerogen via microRaman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferralis, N.; Matys, E. D.; Allwood, A.; Knoll, A. H.; Summons, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid evaluation of the preservation of biosignatures in ancient kerogens is essential for the evaluation of the usability of Earth analogues as proxies of Martian geological materials. No single, non-destructive and non-invasive technique currently exists to rapidly determine such state of preservation of the organic matter in relation to its geological and mineral environment. Due to its non-invasive nature, microRaman spectroscopy is emerging as a candidate technique for the qualitative determination maturity of organic matter, by correlating Raman spectral features and aromatic carbon cluster size. Here we will present a novel quantitative method in which before-neglected Raman spectral features are correlated directly and with excellent accuracy with the H:C ratio. In addition to providing a chemical justification of the found direct correlation, we will show its applicability and predictive capabilities in evaluating H:C in Archean kerogens. This novel method opens new opportunities for the use of Raman spectroscopy and mapping. This includes the non-invasively determination of kerogen preservation and microscale chemical diversity within a particular Earth analogue, to be potentially extended to evaluate Raman spectra acquired directly on Mars.

  17. Effects of source and thermal maturity on the distribution of aromatics and biomarkers in artificially generated oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Ju

    2010-05-01

    Ying-Ju Chang (1), Wuu-Liang Huang (2), Suh-Huey Wu (3), Cheng-Lung Kuo (3) (1) Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (r93224103@ntu.edu.tw); (2) Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; (3) Exploration and Development Research Institute, Chinese Petroleum Corp., Taiwan Oils generated from isolated kerogens from a variety of source rocks, including two marine shales, two terrestrial coals, and three lacustrine oil shales were characterized for the effects of source and maturity on the distributions of hydrocarbons compounds. Experiments were conducted by confined pressure (gold-tube) pyrolysis at 320 deg. Celsius at four laboratory maturities (0.79, 0.95, 1.10, 1.34 Easy%Ro). The results show that normal alkane distribution in oils from different kerogens exhibit distinct preference in carbon number and predominance in specific compounds. The carbon preference index (CPI) and odd-even predominance (OEP) ratios tend to approach to 1 with increasing maturity. Oils from two terrestrial kerogens show higher Pr/n-C17 ratio than lacustrine kerogens (Green-river oil shale, GR) and vice versa for Ph/n-C18 ratio. Both ratios decrease with increasing maturity but show distinct trends for different kerogens. The (Pr/n-C17) and (Ph/n-C18) ratios for the lamosite, torbanite, and two marine kerogens are very low at all studied maturities. The pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) and [(Pr/C17)/(Ph/C18)] ratios in oils from three major kerogen types vary barely with maturity but are discernible in diverse organic types, implying good source indication. The methylphenanthrene ratios (MPR) for most kerogens, which vary significantly only at maturities higher than 1.0 %Ro, are suitable for high maturity indication. The methylphenanthrene distribution fraction (MPDF), in general, increases slightly with increasing maturity, except in torbanite. The MPDF parameter for GR kerogen exhibits best linear correlation with maturity whereas

  18. Insights into the Functionality of the Putative Residues Involved in Enterocin AS-48 Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Rubén; Maqueda, Mercedes; Neira, José Luis; Valdivia, Eva; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Montalbán-López, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    AS-48 is a 70-residue, α-helical, cationic bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecalis and is very singular in its circular structure and its broad antibacterial spectrum. The AS-48 preprotein consists of an N-terminal signal peptide (SP) (35 residues) followed by a proprotein moiety that undergoes posttranslational modifications to yield the mature and active circular protein. For the study of the specificity of the region of AS-48 that is responsible for maturation, three single mutants have been generated by site-directed mutagenesis in the as-48A structural gene. The substitutions were made just in the residues that are thought to constitute a recognition site for the SP cleavage enzyme (His-1, Met1) and in those involved in circularization (Met1, Trp70). Each derivative was expressed in the enterococcal JH2-2 strain containing the necessary native biosynthetic machinery for enterocin production. The importance of these derivatives in AS-48 processing has been evaluated on the basis of the production and structural characterization of the corresponding derivatives. Notably, only two of them (Trp70Ala and Met1Ala derivatives) could be purified in different forms and amounts and are characterized for their bactericidal activity and secondary structure. We could not detect any production of AS-48 in JH2-2(pAM401-81His-1Ile) by using the conventional chromatographic techniques, despite the high efficiency of the culture conditions applied to produce this enterocin. Our results underline the different important roles of the mutated residues in (i) the elimination of the SP, (ii) the production levels and antibacterial activity of the mature proteins, and (iii) protein circularization. Moreover, our findings suggest that His-1 is critically involved in cleavage site recognition, its substitution being responsible for the blockage of processing, thereby hampering the production of the specific protein in the cellular culture supernatant. PMID:20833793

  19. Implementing NASA's Capability-Driven Approach: Insight into NASA's Processes for Maturing Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale; Rodgers, Erica; Antol, Jeff; Simon, Matthew; Hay, Jason; Larman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    NASA is engaged in transforming human spaceflight. The Agency is shifting from an exploration-based program with human activities focused on low Earth orbit (LEO) and targeted robotic missions in deep space to a more sustainable and integrated pioneering approach. Through pioneering, NASA seeks to address national goals to develop the capacity for people to work, learn, operate, live, and thrive safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time. However, pioneering space involves more than the daunting technical challenges of transportation, maintaining health, and enabling crew productivity for long durations in remote, hostile, and alien environments. This shift also requires a change in operating processes for NASA. The Agency can no longer afford to engineer systems for specific missions and destinations and instead must focus on common capabilities that enable a range of destinations and missions. NASA has codified a capability driven approach, which provides flexible guidance for the development and maturation of common capabilities necessary for human pioneers beyond LEO. This approach has been included in NASA policy and is captured in the Agency's strategic goals. It is currently being implemented across NASA's centers and programs. Throughout 2014, NASA engaged in an Agency-wide process to define and refine exploration-related capabilities and associated gaps, focusing only on those that are critical for human exploration beyond LEO. NASA identified 12 common capabilities ranging from Environmental Control and Life Support Systems to Robotics, and established Agency-wide teams or working groups comprised of subject matter experts that are responsible for the maturation of these exploration capabilities. These teams, called the System Maturation Teams (SMTs) help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the identified exploration capabilities. The SMTs are defining performance parameters and goals for each of the 12 capabilities

  20. Low polarity pyrolysis products of Permian to Recent Botryococcus-rich sediments: First evidence for the contribution of an isoprenoid algaenan to kerogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Behar, F.

    1994-09-01

    the pyrolysate of these four kerogens, derived from the A and/or B races, showed some differences in their degree of maturation and in the contribution of higher plant materials to their formation.

  1. Comparison of the bulk geochemical features and thermal reactivity of kerogens from Mol (Boom Clay), Bure (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) and Tournemire (Toarcian shales) underground research laboratories.

    PubMed

    Deniau, I; Devol-Brown, I; Derenne, S; Behar, F; Largeau, C

    2008-01-25

    Deep argillaceous formations are potential repositories for the long-term disposal of nuclear waste because of their low permeability and high sorption capacity with respect to radioelements and heavy metals. Such sedimentary rocks contain organic matter, mostly macromolecular and insoluble (kerogen). Upon temperature elevation related to high-level long-lived radioactive waste disposal, the kerogen may release significant quantities of gaseous and liquid effluents, especially oxygen-containing ones, which may influence the ability of the clay to retain radionuclides. The aim of the present study is to assess the global geochemical features and the thermal reactivity of the kerogens isolated from samples collected in the Bure and Tournemire sites, France (Callovo-Oxfordian Clay and Toarcian Shales, respectively) and to draw comparisons with data previously obtained for the Mol site, Belgium (Boom Clay). The study is based on a combination of elemental, spectroscopic (FTIR, solid state (13)C NMR) and pyrolytic (Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analyses. Different levels of maturity and resulting differences in the relative abundance of oxygen-containing groups were thus observed for the three kerogens. This is linked with differences in their ability to generate CO(2) and various oxygen-containing, low molecular weight, water-soluble compounds under thermal stress, decreasing from Mol to Bure and to Tournemire.

  2. RNA-seq based transcriptomic map reveals new insights into mouse salivary gland development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Christian; Min, Sangwon; Oyelakin, Akinsola; Smalley, Kirsten; Sinha, Satrajit; Romano, Rose-Anne

    2016-11-16

    Mouse models have served a valuable role in deciphering various facets of Salivary Gland (SG) biology, from normal developmental programs to diseased states. To facilitate such studies, gene expression profiling maps have been generated for various stages of SG organogenesis. However these prior studies fall short of capturing the transcriptional complexity due to the limited scope of gene-centric microarray-based technology. Compared to microarray, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) offers unbiased detection of novel transcripts, broader dynamic range and high specificity and sensitivity for detection of genes, transcripts, and differential gene expression. Although RNA-seq data, particularly under the auspices of the ENCODE project, have covered a large number of biological specimens, studies on the SG have been lacking. To better appreciate the wide spectrum of gene expression profiles, we isolated RNA from mouse submandibular salivary glands at different embryonic and adult stages. In parallel, we processed RNA-seq data for 24 organs and tissues obtained from the mouse ENCODE consortium and calculated the average gene expression values. To identify molecular players and pathways likely to be relevant for SG biology, we performed functional gene enrichment analysis, network construction and hierarchal clustering of the RNA-seq datasets obtained from different stages of SG development and maturation, and other mouse organs and tissues. Our bioinformatics-based data analysis not only reaffirmed known modulators of SG morphogenesis but revealed novel transcription factors and signaling pathways unique to mouse SG biology and function. Finally we demonstrated that the unique SG gene signature obtained from our mouse studies is also well conserved and can demarcate features of the human SG transcriptome that is different from other tissues. Our RNA-seq based Atlas has revealed a high-resolution cartographic view of the dynamic transcriptomic landscape of the mouse SG at

  3. Organization, Maturation, and Plasticity of Multisensory Integration: Insights from Computational Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cuppini, Cristiano; Magosso, Elisa; Ursino, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present two neural network models – devoted to two specific and widely investigated aspects of multisensory integration – in order to evidence the potentialities of computational models to gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying organization, development, and plasticity of multisensory integration in the brain. The first model considers visual–auditory interaction in a midbrain structure named superior colliculus (SC). The model is able to reproduce and explain the main physiological features of multisensory integration in SC neurons and to describe how SC integrative capability – not present at birth – develops gradually during postnatal life depending on sensory experience with cross-modal stimuli. The second model tackles the problem of how tactile stimuli on a body part and visual (or auditory) stimuli close to the same body part are integrated in multimodal parietal neurons to form the perception of peripersonal (i.e., near) space. The model investigates how the extension of peripersonal space – where multimodal integration occurs – may be modified by experience such as use of a tool to interact with the far space. The utility of the modeling approach relies on several aspects: (i) The two models, although devoted to different problems and simulating different brain regions, share some common mechanisms (lateral inhibition and excitation, non-linear neuron characteristics, recurrent connections, competition, Hebbian rules of potentiation and depression) that may govern more generally the fusion of senses in the brain, and the learning and plasticity of multisensory integration. (ii) The models may help interpretation of behavioral and psychophysical responses in terms of neural activity and synaptic connections. (iii) The models can make testable predictions that can help guiding future experiments in order to validate, reject, or modify the main assumptions. PMID:21687448

  4. Characterization of Clay Minerals and Kerogen in Alberta Oil Sands Geological End Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Limin

    The high degree of variability of oil sands ores can be attributed to a mixture of different geological end members, i.e., estuarine sand, estuarine clay, marine sand and marine clay. This study focused on the mineralogy, especially of clay minerals, and toluene insoluble organic matter, referred to as kerogen, in different oil sands end members. Clays and kerogens will likely have a significant impact on solvent recovery from the gangue following non-aqueous bitumen extraction. The bitumen-free solids were subjected to mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Kerogens were isolated and analyzed by various characterization methods. The types of clays were identified in oriented samples by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nitrogen to carbon ratio in the isolated kerogens is found to be higher than in bitumen. There are more type III kerogens in estuarine samples and more type II kerogens in marine samples.

  5. Oil-generation kinetics for organic facies with Type-II and -IIS kerogen in the Menilite Shales of the Polish Carpathians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Curtis, John B.; Wieclaw, D.; Kosakowski, P.

    2006-01-01

    would occur during natural maturation. Kinetic parameters derived from hydrous pyrolysis show good correlations with one another (compensation effect) and kerogen organic-sulfur contents. These correlations allow for indirect determination of hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters on the basis of the organic-sulfur mole fraction of an immature Type-II or -IIS kerogen. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen residues during maturation processes within the Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Schulz, H.-M.; Horsfield, B.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbon generation processes occur within organic-rich shales as a response to increases in thermal maturation. Shale gas reservoir quality is thought to be largely dependent on the extent to which solid organic material has been converted to pore space during catagenesis. Although pores may drastically vary in variety and abundance within differing shales, the occurrence of nanopores within organic particles has recently been documented for an important number of gas shale systems (i.e., Barnett, Haynesville, Utica, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Horn River, Marcellus, Posidonia …). However, despite their ubiquitous nature, the formation and the geochemical nature of these nanoporous organic compounds remain unclear. Here, we present the characterization of samples from the organic-rich Mississippian Barnett shale gas system (Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA) at varying stages of thermal maturation. Using a combination of compositional organic geochemistry and spectromicroscopy techniques, including synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM - data collected using the CLS 10ID-1 STXM beamline) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we document a net increase in sample geochemical heterogeneity with increasing maturity. In addition to the presence of bitumen in samples of oil window maturity, very likely genetically derived from thermally degraded kerogen, the formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen has been inferred for samples of gas window maturity, likely resulting from the formation of gaseous hydrocarbons by secondary cracking of bitumen compounds. By providing in-situ insights into the fate of bitumen and pyrobitumen as a response to the thermal evolution of the macromolecular structure of kerogen, the present contribution constitutes an important step towards better constraining hydrocarbon generation processes occurring within unconventional gas shale systems.

  7. An in situ FTIR step-scan photoacoustic investigation of kerogen and minerals in oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstadt, Kristin N.; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2012-04-01

    Step-scan photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy experiments were performed on Green River oil shale samples obtained from the Piceance Basin located in Colorado, USA. We have investigated the molecular nature of light and dark colored areas of the oil shale core using FTIR photoacoustic step-scan spectroscopy. This technique provided us with the means to analyze the oil shale in its original in situ form with the kerogen-mineral interactions intact. All vibrational bands characteristic of kerogen were found in the dark and light colored oil shale samples confirming that kerogen is present throughout the depth of the core. Depth profiling experiments indicated that there are changes between layers in the oil shale molecular structure at a length scale of micron. Comparisons of spectra from the light and dark colored oil shale core samples suggest that the light colored regions have high kerogen content, with spectra similar to that from isolated kerogen, whereas, the dark colored areas contain more mineral components which include clay minerals, dolomite, calcite, and pyrite. The mineral components of the oil shale are important in understanding how the kerogen is "trapped" in the oil shale. Comparing in situ kerogen spectra with spectra from isolated kerogen indicate significant band shifts suggesting important nonbonded molecular interactions between the kerogen and minerals.

  8. An in situ FTIR step-scan photoacoustic investigation of kerogen and minerals in oil shale.

    PubMed

    Alstadt, Kristin N; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2012-04-01

    Step-scan photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy experiments were performed on Green River oil shale samples obtained from the Piceance Basin located in Colorado, USA. We have investigated the molecular nature of light and dark colored areas of the oil shale core using FTIR photoacoustic step-scan spectroscopy. This technique provided us with the means to analyze the oil shale in its original in situ form with the kerogen-mineral interactions intact. All vibrational bands characteristic of kerogen were found in the dark and light colored oil shale samples confirming that kerogen is present throughout the depth of the core. Depth profiling experiments indicated that there are changes between layers in the oil shale molecular structure at a length scale of micron. Comparisons of spectra from the light and dark colored oil shale core samples suggest that the light colored regions have high kerogen content, with spectra similar to that from isolated kerogen, whereas, the dark colored areas contain more mineral components which include clay minerals, dolomite, calcite, and pyrite. The mineral components of the oil shale are important in understanding how the kerogen is "trapped" in the oil shale. Comparing in situ kerogen spectra with spectra from isolated kerogen indicate significant band shifts suggesting important nonbonded molecular interactions between the kerogen and minerals.

  9. Subcritical propagation of an oil-filled penny-shaped crack during kerogen-oil conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z. Q.; Jin, Z.-H.; Johnson, S. E.

    2010-09-01

    We conduct a parametric study on the subcritical propagation of an oil-filled, penny-shaped microcrack induced by the pressure increase caused by transformation of kerogen to oil. The excess oil pressure on the crack surfaces, and the subcritical crack propagation distance and duration, are obtained using a coupled model of fracture mechanics and kerogen-oil transformation kinetics. The numerical results show that the excess oil pressure and crack propagation distance/duration are significantly influenced by the temperature and elastic/fracture properties of the source rock, and the initial kerogen particle size. The subcritical propagation behaviour is relatively insensitive to the volume expansion rate associated with the conversion of kerogen to oil. Because the subcritical crack propagation rate is much faster than the kerogen-oil conversion rate, the crack propagation duration is primarily determined by the transformation kinetics.

  10. ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX

    SciTech Connect

    Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

    2011-03-31

    The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

  11. Optical constants of kerogen from 0. 15 to 40. mu. m: Comparison with meteoritic organics

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.N.; Thompson, W.R.; Sagan, C. . Lab. for Planetary Studies); Arakawa, E.T.; Meisse, C. ); Gilmour, I. )

    1989-01-01

    Kerogens are dark, complex organic materials produced on the earth primarily by geologic processing of biologic materials, but kerogens have chemical and spectral similarities to some classes of highly processed extraterrestrial organic materials. Kerogen-like solids have been proposed as constituents of the very dark reddish surfaces of some asteroids and are also spectrally similar to some carbonaceous organic residues and the Iapetus dark material. Kerogen can thus serve as a useful laboratory analogue to very dark, spectrally red extraterrestrial materials; its optical constants can be used to investigate the effects of particle size, void space and mixing of bright and dark components in models of scattering by dark asteroidal, cometary, and satellite surfaces. We report measurements of the optical constants of both Type II kerogen and of macromolecular organic residue from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite via transmission and reflection measurements on thin films. These films, of thickness 0.2--1.3 {mu}m, are produced by vacuum deposition of kerogen powder heated to 550--750{degree}C onto sapphire, CaF{sub 2}, and CsI substrates. IR spectra of the thin films show that the spectral features of the kerogen powder are retained. Apparently no substantial change in optical constants occurs upon vacuum deposition, except for the desirable loss of silicate contaminants which can be seen in the spectra of the powder.

  12. Insight into phagocytosis of mature sexual (gametocyte) stages of Plasmodium falciparum using a human monocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Geetha P; Weinstein, Corey S; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-05-01

    During natural infection malaria parasites are injected into the bloodstream of a human host by the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Both asexual and mature sexual stages of Plasmodium circulate in the blood. Asexual forms are responsible for clinical malaria while sexual stages are responsible for continued transmission via the mosquitoes. Immune responses generated against various life cycle stages of the parasite have important roles in resistance to malaria and in reducing malaria transmission. Phagocytosis of free merozoites and erythrocytic asexual stages has been well studied, but very little is known about similar phagocytic clearance of mature sexual stages, which are critical for transmission. We evaluated phagocytic uptake of mature sexual (gametocyte) stage parasites by a human monocyte cell line in the absence of immune sera. We found that intact mature stages do not undergo phagocytosis, unless they are either killed or freed from erythrocytes. In view of this observation, we propose that the inability of mature gametocytes to be phagocytized may actually result in malaria transmission advantage. On the other hand, mature gametocytes that are not transmitted to mosquitoes during infection will eventually die and undergo phagocytosis, initiating immune responses that may have transmission blocking potential. A better understanding of early phagocytic clearance and immune responses to gametocytes may identify additional targets for transmission blocking strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental controls on D/H and 13C/12C ratios of kerogen, bitumen and oil during hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Boudou, J.-P.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    Large isotopic transfers between water-derived hydrogen and organic hydrogen occurred during hydrous pyrolysis experiments of immature source rocks, in spite of only small changes in organic 13C/12C. Experiments at 330 ??C over 72 h using chips or powder containing kerogen types I and III identify the rock/water ratio as a main factor affecting ????D for water and organic hydrogen. Our data suggest that larger rock permeability and smaller rock grain size increase the H-isotopic transfer between water-derived hydrogen and thermally maturing organic matter. Increasing hydrostatic pressure may have a similar effect, but the evidence remains inconclusive. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of porphyrin concentration in the kerogen fraction of shales using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Peter N.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Sundararaman, P.

    1991-01-01

    An interpretive model for estimating porphyrin concentration in bitumen and kerogen from spectral reaflectance data in the visible and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum is derived and calibrated. Preliminary results obtained using the model are consistent with concentrations determined from the bitumen extract and suggest that 40 to 60 percent of the total porphyrin concentration remains in the kerogen after extraction of bitumen from thermally immature samples. The reflectance technique will contribute to porphyrin and kerogen studies and can be applied at its present level of development to several areas of geologic and paleo-oceanographic research.

  15. Estimation of porphyrin concentration in the kerogen fraction of shales using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Peter N.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Sundararaman, P.

    1991-01-01

    An interpretive model for estimating porphyrin concentration in bitumen and kerogen from spectral reaflectance data in the visible and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum is derived and calibrated. Preliminary results obtained using the model are consistent with concentrations determined from the bitumen extract and suggest that 40 to 60 percent of the total porphyrin concentration remains in the kerogen after extraction of bitumen from thermally immature samples. The reflectance technique will contribute to porphyrin and kerogen studies and can be applied at its present level of development to several areas of geologic and paleo-oceanographic research.

  16. Construction of a potato consensus map and QTL meta-analysis offer new insights into the genetic architecture of late blight resistance and plant maturity traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrating QTL results from independent experiments performed on related species helps to survey the genetic diversity of loci/alleles underlying complex traits, and to highlight potential targets for breeding or QTL cloning. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) late blight resistance has been thoroughly studied, generating mapping data for many Rpi-genes (R-genes to Phytophthora infestans) and QTLs (quantitative trait loci). Moreover, late blight resistance was often associated with plant maturity. To get insight into the genomic organization of late blight resistance loci as compared to maturity QTLs, a QTL meta-analysis was performed for both traits. Results Nineteen QTL publications for late blight resistance were considered, seven of them reported maturity QTLs. Twenty-one QTL maps and eight reference maps were compiled to construct a 2,141-marker consensus map on which QTLs were projected and clustered into meta-QTLs. The whole-genome QTL meta-analysis reduced by six-fold late blight resistance QTLs (by clustering 144 QTLs into 24 meta-QTLs), by ca. five-fold maturity QTLs (by clustering 42 QTLs into eight meta-QTLs), and by ca. two-fold QTL confidence interval mean. Late blight resistance meta-QTLs were observed on every chromosome and maturity meta-QTLs on only six chromosomes. Conclusions Meta-analysis helped to refine the genomic regions of interest frequently described, and provided the closest flanking markers. Meta-QTLs of late blight resistance and maturity juxtaposed along chromosomes IV, V and VIII, and overlapped on chromosomes VI and XI. The distribution of late blight resistance meta-QTLs is significantly independent from those of Rpi-genes, resistance gene analogs and defence-related loci. The anchorage of meta-QTLs to the potato genome sequence, recently publicly released, will especially improve the candidate gene selection to determine the genes underlying meta-QTLs. All mapping data are available from the Sol Genomics Network (SGN

  17. Optical constraints of kerogen from 0.15 to 40 microns: Comparison with meteoritic organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Meisse, C.; Gilmour, I.

    1990-01-01

    Kerogens are dark, complex organic materials produced on the Earth primarily by geologic processing of biologic materials, but kerogens have chemical and spectral similarities to some classes of highly processed extraterrestrial organic materials. Kerogen-like solids were proposed as constitutents of the very dark reddish surfaces of some asteroids and are also spectrally similar to some carbonaceous organic residues and the Iapetus dark material. Kerogen can thus serve as a useful laboratory analog to very dark, spectrally red extraterrestrial materials; its optical constants can be used to investigate the effects of particle size, void space and mixing of bright and dark components in models of scattering by dark asteroidal, cometary, and satellite surfaces. Measurements of the optical constants of both Type 2 kerogen and of macromolecular organic residue from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite via transmission and reflection measurements on thin films are reported. The real part of the refractive index, n, is determined by variable incidence-angle reflectance to be 1.60 + or - 0.05 from 0.4 to 2.0 micrometers wavelength. Work extending the measurement of n to longer wavelengths is in progress. The imaginary part of the refractive index, k, shows substantial structure from 0.15 to 40 micrometers. The values are accurate to + or - 20 percent in the UV and IR regions and to + or - 30 percent in the visible. The k values of organic residues were also measured from the Murchison meteorite. Comparison of the kerogen and Murchison data reveals that between 0.15 and 40 microns, Murchison has a similar structure but no bands as sharp as in kerogen, and that the k values for Murchison are significantly higher than those of kerogen.

  18. Black carbon and kerogen in soils and sediments. 1. Quantification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an; Huang, Weilin

    2002-09-15

    A comprehensive wet chemical procedure was developed by combining acid demineralization, base extraction, and dichromate oxidation for fractionation and quantitative isolation of soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) into four fractions: (1) humic acids + kerogen + BC (HKB); (2) kerogen + BC (KB); (3) humic acid (HA); and (4) BC. The soil/sediment samples tested were collected from the suburban areas of Guangzhou, a rapidly developing city of China. The results show that BC and kerogen constitute 57.8-80.6% of the total organic carbon (TOC) and that the relative content of BC ranges from 18.3% to 41.0% of the TOC, indicating that both BC and kerogen are major organic components in soils and sediments from this industrialized region. Systematic characterization of the isolated SOMs shows that both BC and kerogen have sizes ranging from a few microns to above 100 microm, relatively low O/C and H/C atomic ratios, and low contents of oxygen-containing functional groups. The isolated BC has unique fusinite and semifusinite macerals, highly porous nature, and structures indicative of its possible origins. The study indicates that SOM is highly heterogeneous and that humin, the nonextractable humus fraction, consists mainly of kerogen and BC materials in the tested soil/sediment samples. The presence of these materials in soils and sediments may have significant impacts on pollutant mass transfer and transformation processes such as desorption and bioavailability of less polar organic chemicals in surface aquatic and groundwater environments.

  19. Long-chain carboxylic acids in pyrolysates of Green River kerogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids (C10-C32), as well as C14-C21 isoprenoid acids (except for C18), have been identified in anhydrous and hydrous pyrolyses products of Green River kerogen (200-400 degrees C, 2-1000 hr). These kerogen-released fatty acids are characterized by a strong even/odd predominance (CPI: 4.8-10.2) with a maximum at C16 followed by lesser amounts of C18 and C22 acids. This distribution is different from that of unbound and bound geolipids extracted from Green River shale. The unbound fatty acids show a weak even/odd predominance (CPI: 1.64) with a maximum at C14, and bound fatty acids display an even/odd predominance (CPI: 2.8) with maxima at C18 and C30. These results suggest that fatty acids were incorporated into kerogen during sedimentation and early diagenesis and were protected from microbial and chemical changes over geological periods of time. Total quantities of fatty acids produced during heating of the kerogen ranged from 0.71 to 3.2 mg/g kerogen. Highest concentrations were obtained when kerogen was heated with water for 100 hr at 300 degrees C. Generally, their amounts did not decrease under hydrous conditions with increase in temperature or heating time, suggesting that significant decarboxylation did not occur under the pyrolysis conditions used, although hydrocarbons were extensively generated.

  20. Long-chain carboxylic acids in pyrolysates of Green River kerogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids (C10-C32), as well as C14-C21 isoprenoid acids (except for C18), have been identified in anhydrous and hydrous pyrolyses products of Green River kerogen (200-400 degrees C, 2-1000 hr). These kerogen-released fatty acids are characterized by a strong even/odd predominance (CPI: 4.8-10.2) with a maximum at C16 followed by lesser amounts of C18 and C22 acids. This distribution is different from that of unbound and bound geolipids extracted from Green River shale. The unbound fatty acids show a weak even/odd predominance (CPI: 1.64) with a maximum at C14, and bound fatty acids display an even/odd predominance (CPI: 2.8) with maxima at C18 and C30. These results suggest that fatty acids were incorporated into kerogen during sedimentation and early diagenesis and were protected from microbial and chemical changes over geological periods of time. Total quantities of fatty acids produced during heating of the kerogen ranged from 0.71 to 3.2 mg/g kerogen. Highest concentrations were obtained when kerogen was heated with water for 100 hr at 300 degrees C. Generally, their amounts did not decrease under hydrous conditions with increase in temperature or heating time, suggesting that significant decarboxylation did not occur under the pyrolysis conditions used, although hydrocarbons were extensively generated.

  1. Type IV kerogens as analogues for organic macromolecular materials in aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Matthewman, Richard; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the processes involved in the evolution of organic matter in the early Solar System requires extensive experimental work. The scientifically valuable carbonaceous chondrites are principal targets for organic analyses, but these meteorites are rare. Meteoritic analog materials available in larger quantities, on which experiments can be performed, would be highly beneficial. The bulk of the organic inventory of carbonaceous chondrites is made up of solvent-insoluble macromolecular material. This high-molecular-weight entity provides a record of thermal and aqueous parent-body alteration of precursor organic structures present at the birth of the Solar System. To identify an effective analogue for this macromolecular material, we analyzed a series of terrestrial kerogens by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Type I and II kerogens are unsuitable analogues owing to their highly aliphatic nature. Type III kerogens show some similarities to meteoritic macromolecular materials but display a substantial biological heritage. Type IV kerogens, in this study derived from Mesozoic paleosols and produced by the reworking and oxidation of organic matter, represent an effective analogue. Some isomeric differences exist between meteoritic macromolecular materials and type IV kerogens, and stepped pyrolysis indicates variations in thermal stability. In addition to being a suitable material for novel experimentation, type IV kerogens also have the potential to aid in the optimization of instruments for deployment on Mars.

  2. Biomarker generation from Type II-S kerogens in claystone and limestone during hydrous and anhydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopmans, M.P.; Carson, F.C.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.; Lewan, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A claystone and a limestone containing immature Type II-S kerogen were thermally matured in the presence and absence of water, to study the influence of water and clay minerals on the generation of biomarkers. In contrast to hydrous pyrolysis, anhydrous pyrolysis of the claystone did not generate biomarkers, which resulted in the loss of important information. Desulfurization of the polar fraction of the claystone showed that anhydrous pyrolysis is not capable of converting S-bound biomarkers to free biomarkers. For the limestone, the differences between hydrous and anhydrous pyrolysis are less dramatic. Adsorption of the polar fraction of the claystone to smectite interlayers probably leads to cross-linking reactions, preventing the generation of free biomarkers. During hydrous pyrolysis, the smectite interlayers are occupied by water so that generation of biomarkers can take place. In addition, cross-linking reactions during anhydrous pyrolysis of the claystone may be enhanced because of the presence of S-S bonds in the organic matter of the claystone. These results show that water is important in closed system laboratory experiments designed to simulate natural maturation of sedimentary organic matter.A claystone and a limestone containing immature Type II-S kerogen were thermally matured in the presence and absence of water, to study the influence of water and clay minerals on the generation of biomarkers. In contrast to hydrous pyrolysis, anhydrous pyrolysis of the claystone did not generate biomarkers, which resulted in the loss of important information. Desulfurization of the polar fraction of the claystone showed that anhydrous pyrolysis is not capable of converting S-bound biomarkers to free biomarkers. For the limestone, the differences between hydrous and anhydrous pyrolysis are less dramatic. Adsorption of the polar fraction of the claystone to smectite interlayers probably leads to cross-linking reactions, preventing the generation of free biomarkers

  3. The kinetics of sterane biological marker release and degradation processes during the hydrous pyrolysis of vitrinite kerogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, G. D.; Wang, G. Y.; Eglinton, T. I.; Home, A. K.; Petch, G. S.

    1990-09-01

    The hydrous pyrolysis of a mineral-free vitrinite kerogen (Dinantian coal Lower Carboniferous, North East England) has been carried out at four temperatures (270, 300, 330, and 350°C) for heating times ranging from 2 to 648 h. No significant differences in the epimer-based maturation parameters 20S/(20S + 20R)-5α(H),14α(H),17α(H) C 29 non-rearranged steranes and 22S/(22S+22R)-17α(H), 21β(H) homohopanes were found for a comparison between "expelled oil" and "bitumen" fractions in the resulting pyrolysates. A deuterated model compound ((20R)-5α(H),14α(H),17α(H)-[2,2,4,4-d 4] cholestane) was added to a number of preextracted kerogens (vitrinite, Kimmeridge, Messel and Monterey) and the mixtures were heated under typical hydrous pyrolysis conditions. These experiments showed that direct chiral isomerisation at C-20 in the non-rearranged steranes appears to be relatively unimportant during hydrous pyrolysis which has also been suggested by other recent studies on geological samples.A kinetic model comprising consecutive release and degradation processes was derived to measure first-order rate coefficients from the bi-exponential concentration-time functions of both the (20R)-and (20S)-5α(H),14α(H),17α(H) C 29 "free" steranes in the vitrinite kerogen pyrolysates. This data was then used to calculate preliminary Arrhenius parameters for release ((20S): ΔEa = 125 ± 30 kJ mol -1, A ≈ 4.7 × 10 5 s -1;(20R): ΔEa = 151 ± 39 kJ mol -1, A ≈ 2.7 × 10 9 s -1) and degradation ((20S): ΔEa = 104 ± 22 kJ mol -1, A ≈ 5.8 × 10 3 s -1; (20R): Δa = 87 ± 6 kJ mol -1, A ≈ 2.2 × 10 2 s -1) of the above individual isomers and the values were found to be consistent with a free-radical chain mechanism. This work helps in the greater understanding of the important biomarker reactions that prevail in hydrous pyrolysis experiments.

  4. Geochemical significance of alkylbenzene distributions in flash pyrolysates of kerogens, coals, and asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Walter A.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1994-04-01

    The distribution of C 0-C 5 alkylbenzenes in flash pyrolysates of forty-seven immature kerogens and coals from different geographical locations and of different ages were studied using gas chromatography (GC) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) in order to decipher the origin of aromatic moieties in macromolecular matter. All possible structural isomers of the alkylated benzenes were determined, and, in some cases, absolute yields were calculated. Sulphur-rich (Type II-S) kerogens yield higher absolute amounts of alkylbenzenes in comparison to Type I, II, and III kerogens. The variations in internal distribution patterns of C 2-C 4 alkylbenzenes were analyzed using multivariate analysis techniques (principal component analysis; PCA). Major variations in alkylbenzene distributions were due to an increased abundance of specific alkylbenzenes, which are related to specific precursor moieties in the macromolecular structure assuming that they are mainly formed via β-cleavage. Alkylbenzenes possessing "linear" carbon skeletons are enhanced in flash pyrolysates of Guttenberg and Estonian Kukersite kerogens (Type I) and are proposed to be derived from linear precursors which have undergone cyclization/aromatization. Relatively high amounts of 1,2,3,4- and 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzenes were found in flash pyrolysates of Womble and Duvernay kerogens (Type II) which are likely to be derived from macromolecularly bound diaromatic carotenoids. The relatively high abundance of 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene and 1,3-/1,4-dimethylbenzene in pyrolysates of Monterey kerogens (Type II-S) is proposed to be indicative of the presence of bound nonaromatic carotenoids (e.g., β,β-carotene) which have undergone aromatization and/or loss of methyl groups upon diagenesis. 1-methyl-4-isopropylbenzene, which appears in relatively high amounts in flash pyrolysates of Walcott Chuar kerogen (Type II) and Catalan coals (Type III), is thought to be derived from a heteroatom-bound precursor. These

  5. Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean and Mesoproterozoic kerogens via hydropyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, Jochen J.; Love, Gordon D.; Snape, Colin E.; Logan, Graham A.; Summons, Roger E.; Buick, Roger

    2003-04-01

    Hydrogen-lean kerogens (atomic H/C<0.4) isolated from the 2.5-billion-year-old (Ga) Mt. McRae Shale, Hamersley Group, at Tom Price, Western Australia, were studied via hydropyrolysis, a continuous-flow technique that degrades organic matter in a stream of high-pressure hydrogen assisted by a dispersed Mo catalyst. The hydropyrolysates yielded predominantly phenanthrene and pyrene, and higher polyaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated homologues were generated in low relative concentrations. Saturated hydrocarbons were not detected. The molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of the hydropyrolysates are very similar to aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by solvent extraction of the host rocks. Because molecular structures covalently attached to kerogen are unaffected by contamination, this indicates that both the bound and extractable aromatic fractions are syngenetic with the host rocks. Therefore, the results of the hydropyrolysis experiments provide compelling evidence for preserved bitumen of Archean age. The very high proportion of nonalkylated polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the hydropyrolysates is consistent with hydrothermal dehydrogenation of the kerogen, and a marked concentration difference of pyrene in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates might be explained by hydrothermal redistribution of the bitumen. The kerogen and bitumen composition is therefore consistent with models suggesting a hydrothermal origin for the giant iron ore deposits at Mt. Tom Price. Comparison of the Archean samples with hydropyrolysates from immature Mesoproterozoic kerogens from the Roper Group, McArthur Basin, Northern Territory, and with pyrolysis experiments on Proterozoic kerogens in the literature suggests that Precambrian kerogens are frequently highly aromatic and lipid-poor regardless of their degree of thermal preservation.

  6. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  7. Fracturing of shales during internal fluid production: insights from laboratory experiments and tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F.; Kobchenko, M.; Panahi, H.; Galland, O.; Dysthe, D.; Meakin, P.; Jamtveit, B.

    2013-12-01

    In the past ten years, the increasing development of shale gas resources has shed new light on the mechanics of shales and fracturing mechanisms in hydrocarbon source rocks. In fact, exploitation by hydrofracturing is dependent on the initial degree of microfracking of these rocks. Because these rocks have been heated during diagenesis, the kerogen they contained has been transformed into hydrocarbons. The reaction has created local volume increase, generating over-pressures leading to the formation of microfractures that control fluid expulsion. In two sets of complementary experiments, we have reproduced and imaged this mechanism. Firstly several samples of Green River Shale were heated either under atmospheric pressure or in pressure vessels. The samples were imaged using either synchrotron time-lapse X-ray tomography or a laboratory tomograph. Secondly, a set of analogue experiments was developed to reproduce the internal generation of a gas into an elastic solid medium and the formation of a network of fractures that control the drainage. For this, a 2D layer of gelatin that contained yeast and dissolved sugar was prepared. The production of carbon dioxide by the yeast upon sugar consumption inside the gelatin induced local oversaturation, formation of gas bubbles, which escaped by creating their fracture network. The characteristics of the fracture network were shown to be specific compared to other natural drainage network. The experiments with shale showed that microfractures are produced, due to volume increase produced by the maturation of kerogen and the production of hydrocarbon fluids. These fractures initiate in organic-rich layers of the shale sample, and coalesce and intersect in 3D, allowing the development of a connected fracture network. To conclude, these sets of experiments provide new insights on the coupled reaction-deformation mechanisms that control the formation of networks of microfractures in shales during the decomposition of kerogen

  8. Histological assessment of organs in sexually mature and post-spawning steelhead trout and insights into iteroparity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penney, Zachary L.; Moffitt, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are anadromous and iteroparous, but repeat-spawning rates are generally low. Like other anadromous salmonids, steelhead trout fast during freshwater spawning migrations, but little is known about the changes that occur in vital organs and tissues. We hypothesized that fish capable of repeat-spawning would not undergo the same irreversible degeneration and cellular necrosis documented in semelparous salmon. Using Snake River steelhead trout as a model we used histological analysis to assess the cellular architecture in the pyloric stomach, ovary, liver, and spleen in sexually mature and kelt steelhead trout. We observed 38 % of emigrating kelts with food or fecal material in the gastrointestinal tract. Evidence of feeding was more likely in good condition kelts, and feeding was associated with a significant renewal of villi in the pyloric stomach. No vitellogenic oocytes were observed in sections of kelt ovaries, but perinucleolar and early/late stage cortical alveolus oocytes were present suggesting iteroparity was possible. We documented a negative correlation between the quantity of perinucleolar oocytes in ovarian tissues and fork length of kelts suggesting that larger steelhead trout may invest more into a single spawning event. Liver and spleen tissues of both mature and kelt steelhead trout had minimal cellular necroses. Our findings indicate that the physiological processes causing rapid senescence and death in semelparous salmon are not evident in steelhead trout, and recovery begins in fresh water. Future management efforts to increase iteroparity in steelhead trout and Atlantic salmon must consider the physiological processes that influence post-spawning recovery.

  9. Steranes and triterpanes generated from kerogen pyrolysis in the absence and presence of minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in the degree of isomerization of steranes and triterpanes during kerogen pyrolysis in the absence or presence of minerals are described. Kerogen from a Monterey Formation diatomite core sample was pyrolyzed under reduced pressure at 300 C for 2-1000 hrs in the presence or absence of calcite, illite, and montmorillonite. It is observed that the extent of isomerization of biomakers in C-20 in 14 alpha(H), 17 alpha(H)-steranes, at C-22 in 17 alpha(H), 21 beta(H)-hopanes and of 17 beta(H), 21 beta(H)-hopanes correlates to early diagenetic stages in rock extracts from sedimentary basins, and faster isomerization for steranes and triterpanes in the bitumen then for those in the kerogen structure are detected. The effects of the minerals on the isomerization reactions are examined; calcite inhibits, and illite and montmorillonite catalyze the reactions.

  10. Alterations of neocortical development and maturation in autism: insight from valproic acid exposure and animal models of autism.

    PubMed

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined brain disorder affecting approximately 1 in 88 children. Many pathological studies have shown that ASD is frequently associated with grey and white matter changes that can be described by their deviations from the normal trajectory of cortical maturation. For example, during the early (i.e. <2 years) postnatal period there is marked and selective tissue overgrowth in the higher-order temporal and frontal networks involved in emotional, social, and communication functions. In this focused review we first summarize some basic principles of neocortical neural organization and how they are disrupted in ASD. We will then highlight some of the potential mechanisms by which the normal developmental trajectory and organization of neocortical networks can be altered based on animal studies of valproic acid, a teratogen widely used in animal models of ASD. We argue that the trajectory of postnatal cerebral neocortex development may be influenced by several cellular and molecular mechanisms that may all converge to produce a neuropathology characterized by premature or accelerated neuronal growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  12. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G.; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6–7 years and 8–12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13–17 years) and adults (18–34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8–12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers. PMID:26903915

  13. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development.

    PubMed

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual's capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6-7 years and 8-12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13-17 years) and adults (18-34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8-12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants' proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers.

  14. Geochemistry of the alginite and amorphous organic matter from type II-S kerogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stankiewicz, B.A.; Kruge, M.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Salmon, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Maceral fractions of the Type II-S kerogens from the Monterey Formation (Miocene. California. U.S.A.) and Duwi Formation (Campanian/Maastrichtian, Egypt) were separated by density gradient centrifugation. The Monterey Fm. kerogen sample was comprised chiefly of light red-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM), the flash pyrolyzate of which was characterized by a predominance of alkylbenzenes, alkylthiophenes and alkylpyrroles. In contrast, the pyrolyzates of its alginite concentrate showed a highly aliphatic character, typical of this maceral, with the series of n-alkenes and n-alkanes (C6- C26) predominating. The pyrolyzate of the dominant light brown-fluorescing AOM of the Duwi Fm. kerogen had a relatively high concentration of alkylbenzenes and alkylthiophenes, while its elginite concentrate showed a more aliphatic character upon pyrolysis. There was a marked enrichment of thiophenic sulfur in the light-colored AOM of both samples (and also pyrrolic nitrogen in the case of the Monterey) relative to the alginite. The results support a bacterially-mediated, degradative origin for Type II-S amorphous organic matter, with algal remains as the primary source of the kerogen.

  15. Impact of kerogen heterogeneity on sorption of organic pollutants. 2. Sorption equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Yu, Z.Q.; Xiao, B.H.; Huang, W.L.; Fu, J.M.; Dang, Z.

    2009-08-15

    Phenanthrene and naphthalene sorption isotherms were measured for three different series of kerogen materials using completely mixed batch reactors. Sorption isotherms were nonlinear for each sorbate-sorbent system, and the Freundlich isotherm equation fit the sorption data well. The Freundlich isotherm linearity parameter n ranged from 0.192 to 0.729 for phenanthrene and from 0.389 to 0.731 for naphthalene. The n values correlated linearly with rigidity and aromaticity of the kerogen matrix, but the single-point, organic carbon-normalized distribution coefficients varied dramatically among the tested sorbents. A dual-mode sorption equation consisting of a linear partitioning domain and a Langmuir adsorption domain adequately quantified the overall sorption equilibrium for each sorbent-sorbate system. Both models fit the data well, with r{sup 2} values of 0.965 to 0.996 for the Freundlich model and 0.963 to 0.997 for the dual-mode model for the phenanthrene sorption isotherms. The dual-mode model fitting results showed that as the rigidity and aromaticity of the kerogen matrix increased, the contribution of the linear partitioning domain to the overall sorption equilibrium decreased, whereas the contribution of the Langmuir adsorption domain increased. The present study suggested that kerogen materials found in soils and sediments should not be treated as a single, unified, carbonaceous sorbent phase.

  16. The use of kerogen data in understanding the properties and evolution of interstellar carbonaceous dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoular, R.

    2001-11-01

    A number of authors have, in the past decade, pointed to the similarity of the 3.4-mu m band of kerogen with that of the Galactic Centre (GC). Kerogen is a family of solid terrestrial sedimentary materials essentially made of C, H and O interlocked in a disordered, more or less aliphatic, structure. Here, the most recent results of the astronomical literature and the rich quantitative geochemical literature are tapped with two purposes in mind: extend the analogy to the mid-IR bands and, based on these new constraints, quantitatively assess the properties of the carrier dust. It is shown that the great diversity of IR astronomical IS (interstellar) dust is paralleled by the changes in kerogen spectra as the material spontaneously and continuously evolves (aromatizes) in the earth. Since the composition and structure of kerogen are known all along its evolution, it is possible, by spectral analogy, to estimate these properties for the corresponding astronomical carriers. The Galactic Centre 3.4 mu m feature is thus found to correspond to an early stage of evolution, for which the composition in C, H and O and the structure of the corresponding kerogen are known and reported here. The role of oxygen in the subsequent evolution and its contribution to different bands are stressed. The above provides new arguments in favour of the 3.4-mu m band, as well as the observed accompanying mid-IR bands, being carried by kerogen-like dust born in CS (circumstellar) envelopes, mostly of AGB (asymptotic giant branch) objects. Subsequent dust evolution in composition and structure (aromatization) is fast enough that the unidentified infrared bands can already show up in well-developed planetary nebulae (PNe), as observed. A fraction of incompletely evolved dust can escape into the diffuse IS medium and molecular clouds. As a consequence, aliphatic and aromatic features can both be detected in the sky, in emission (Proto-PNe, PNe and PDRs (photo-dissociation regions)) as well as in

  17. Alkaline permanganate oxidation of kerogens from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by diabase intrusions and laboratory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, Ryoshi; Morinaga, Shigeo; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    1985-08-01

    Potassium permanganate oxidative degradations were conducted for kerogens isolated from Cretaceous black shales (DSDP Leg 41, Site 368), thermally altered during the Miocene by diabase intrusions and from unaltered samples heated under laboratory conditions (250-500°C). Degradation products of less altered kerogens are dominated by normal C4-C15 α,ω-dicarboxylic acids, with lesser amounts of n-C16 and n-C18 monocarboxylic acids, and benzene mono-to-tetracarboxylic acids. On the other hand, thermally altered kerogens show benzene di-to-tetracarboxylic acids as dominant degradation products, with lesser or no amounts (variable depending on the degree of thermal alteration) of α,ω-dicarboxylic acids. Essentially no differences between the oxidative degradation products of naturally- and artificially-altered kerogens are observed. As a result of this study, five indices of aromatization (total aromatic acids/kerogen; apparent aromaticity; benzenetetracarboxylic acids/total aromatic acids; benzene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid/benzenedicarboxylic acids; benzene-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid/benzenetricarboxylic acids) and two indices of aliphatic character (Total aliphatic acids/kerogen; Aliphaticity) are proposed to characterize the degree of thermal alteration of kerogens. Furthermore, a good correlation is observed between apparent aromaticity estimated by the present KMnO4 oxidation method and that from the 13C NMR method (DENNIS et al., 1982).

  18. Mature salivary gland rests within sonic hedgehog-positive medulloblastoma: case report and insights into the molecular genetics and embryopathology of ectopic intracranial salivary gland analogs.

    PubMed

    Shammassian, Berje; Manjila, Sunil; Cox, Efrem; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Wang, Dehua; Rodgers, Mark; Stearns, Duncan; Selman, Warren R

    2016-12-01

    Intracranial ectopic salivary gland rests within dural-based lesions are reported very infrequently in the literature. The authors report the unique case of a 12-year-old boy with a cerebellar medulloblastoma positive for sonic hedgehog (Shh) that contained intraaxial mature ectopic salivary gland rests. The patient underwent clinical and radiological monitoring postoperatively, until he died of disseminated disease. An autopsy showed no evidence of salivary glands within disseminated lesions. The intraaxial presence of salivary gland rests and concomitant Shh positivity of the described tumor point to a disorder in differentiation as opposed to ectopic developmental foci, which are uniformly dural based in the described literature. The authors demonstrate the characteristic "papilionaceous" appearance of the salivary glands with mucicarmine stain and highlight the role of Shh signaling in explaining the intraaxial presence of seromucous gland analogs. This article reports the first intraaxial posterior fossa tumor with heterotopic salivary gland rests, and it provides molecular and embryopathological insights into the development of these lesions.

  19. Developmental insights into mature cognition.

    PubMed

    Keil, Frank C

    2015-02-01

    Three cases are described that illustrate new ways in which developmental research is informing the study of cognition in adults: statistical learning, neural substrates of cognition, and extended concepts. Developmental research has made clear the ubiquity of statistical learning while also revealing is limitations as a stand-alone way to acquire knowledge. With respect to neural substrates, development has uncovered links between executive processing and fronto-striatal circuits while also pointing to many aspects of high-level cognition that may not be neatly reducible to coherent neural descriptions. For extended concepts, children have made especially clear the weaknesses of intuitive theories in both children and adults while also illustrating other cognitive capacities that are used at all ages to navigate the socially distributed aspects of knowledge.

  20. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2% of organic geopolymers) of low molecular weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 degrees C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early diagenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play the following geochemically important roles under natural conditions: (1) the diacids dissolve carbonates and clay minerals to increase porosity and permeability, which enhances migration of oils and gas generated from catagenesis of kerogen dispersed in shale, and (2) the diacids may form organo-metal complexes, which are important for mobilization, transport and accumulation of trace metals in sedimentary basins.

  1. Deciphering pyritization-kerogenization gradient for fish soft-tissue preservation.

    PubMed

    Osés, Gabriel L; Petri, Setembrino; Voltani, Cibele G; Prado, Gustavo M E M; Galante, Douglas; Rizzutto, Marcia A; Rudnitzki, Isaac D; da Silva, Evandro P; Rodrigues, Fabio; Rangel, Elidiane C; Sucerquia, Paula A; Pacheco, M L A F

    2017-05-03

    Soft-tissue preservation provides palaeobiological information that is otherwise lost during fossilization. In Brazil, the Early Cretaceous Santana Formation contains fish with integument, muscles, connective tissues, and eyes that are still preserved. Our study revealed that soft-tissues were pyritized or kerogenized in different microfacies, which yielded distinct preservation fidelities. Indeed, new data provided the first record of pyritized vertebrate muscles and eyes. We propose that the different taphonomic pathways were controlled by distinct sedimentation rates in two different microfacies. Through this process, carcasses deposited in each of these microfacies underwent different residence times in sulphate-reduction and methanogenesis zones, thus yielding pyritized or kerogenized soft-tissues, and a similar process has previously been suggested in studies of a late Ediacaran lagerstätte.

  2. Isotopic characterisation of kerogen-like material in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, John F.; Chang, Sherwood; Shipp, Ruth

    1987-01-01

    Data on isotopic composition of C, H, and N in insoluble organic fraction from the Murchison CM chondrite were used to discriminate between different theories for the origin of prebiotic organic material in the early solar system. Considerable isotopic variability was found among the samples and attributed to kerogen-like organic fraction. Three to four different isotopic components, two of them of polycyclic aromatic nature, were tentatively identified. Aliphatic moieties in the kerogen-like material, most of the polycyclic aromatic network, and extractable amino acids were found to carry a highly D-enriched component believed to have originated in an interstellar molecular cloud. A least part of the polycyclic aromatic fraction may also represent interstellar material.

  3. Isotopic characterization of kerogen-like material in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kerridge, J.F.; Chang, S.; Shipp, R.

    1987-09-01

    Isotopic data for C, H and N in acid-resistant residues from carbonaceous chondrites show substantial variability during stepwise pyrolysis and/or combustion. After subtraction of contributions due apparently to inorganic C grains, of probably circumstellar origin, considerable isotopic variability remains, attributable to the kerogen-like organic fraction. That variability may be interpreted in terms of three of four distinct components, based on C, H and N isotopes. The relative proportions of those components vary significantly from sample to sample. The different isotopic components are tentatively identified in terms of specific chemical/structural moieties within the kerogen-like material. This combination of chemical, structural and isotopic information suggests a complex history for meteoritic organic matter. At least three components within the organic population as a whole still carry a signature of apparently interstellar D-enrichment. Part, at least, of the interstellar carrier consisted of reactive entities, not solely polymers.

  4. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e., highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C 40 isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an "isoprenoid" algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350°C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C 1 to C 40 pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution of linear chains and their relationships with the C 40 isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the different groups of products then released, nature of the primary cleavages, origin and mode of formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  5. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: Geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e, highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C{sub 40} isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an {open_quotes}isoprenoid{close_quotes} algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350{degrees}C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C{sub 1} to C{sub 40} pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution to linear chains and their relationships with the C{sub 40} isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  6. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we use molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  7. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we usemore » molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.« less

  8. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. PMID:27306967

  9. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  10. Inverse carbon isotope patterns of lipids and kerogen record heterogeneous primary biomass.

    PubMed

    Close, H G; Bovee, R; Pearson, A

    2011-05-01

    Throughout the Proterozoic δ(13)C values for preserved n-alkyl lipids are more positive than for syngenetic kerogen. This pattern is the inverse of biosynthetic expectations. It has been suggested that this isotopic inversion results from selective preservation of lipids from (13)C-enriched heterotrophic populations, while the bulk of kerogen derives from primary producers. Here, we formulate a degradation model to calculate the (13)C content of sedimentary total organic carbon and lipid. The model addresses two scenarios. The first scenario explores preferential preservation of heterotrophic lipid, thereby quantifying the existing hypothesis. In the second, we suggest that an inverse signature could be the result of prokaryotic phytoplankton contributing the majority of the total ecosystem biomass. Photosynthetic prokaryotes bearing a relative (13)C enrichment would contribute much of the resulting preserved lipids, while primary eukaryotic biomass would dominate the total organic carbon. We find that our hypothesis of a mixed primary producer community generates inverse isotopic patterns while placing far fewer requirements on specific degradation conditions. It also provides a possible explanation as to why there are large variations in the (13)C content of the isoprenoid lipids pristane and phytane relative to n-alkyl lipid, while the difference between n-alkyl lipid and kerogen is more constant. Our results suggest that the disappearance of the inverse (13)C signature in the late Ediacaran is a natural consequence of the fundamental shift to oceans in which export production has a higher ratio of eukaryotic biomass.

  11. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  12. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  13. Temperature effects on kerogen and on molecular and isotopic composition of organic matter in Pierre Shale near an igneous dike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, J.L.; Bostick, N.H.

    1986-01-01

    A suite of siltstone samples from the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale from the contact zone of a 130-cm thick igneous dike near Wolcott, Colorado, U.S.A., was taken from the contact to 170 cm from the dike to study the effects of temperature on the organic matter. The sampled bedding interval was about 10 cm thick, so variation in lithology and type of organic matter is minimal. Vitrinite reflectance values (R0) increase from 0.4 far from the dike, to 3.3% near the dike contact. Geochemical measurements show systematic thermal effects analogous to those often observed for catagenesis and metagenesis in the depth range of 1-4 km within a sedimentary basin. The H/C ratio of kerogen and the hydrogen index (Rock-Eval) decrease most rapidly in the 0.6-1.7% R0 range, in which the transformation ratio (Rock-Eval) increases from 0.1 to 0.3. Based on extraction of C15+ compounds, the main increase of hydrocarbons and total extractable organic matter occurs between 0.6 and 1.0% reflectance. The saturated/aromatic hydrocarbon ratio increases almost twofold in this range of maturity. However, the pristane/phytane ratio is essentially constant through the hydrocarbon generation zone but decreases slightly at high levels of thermal alteration (R0 > 1.2%). The ??13C values for aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons are about -27 and -29???, respectively, and are constant to about 1.0% R0, then both become heavier by about 2??? at higher R0 values. ?? 1986.

  14. Sulphur incorporation in Jurassic marine mudrocks and their bitumens at low thermal maturity, Cleveland Basin, England

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, M.J.; Hill, A.F.M.; Fallick, A.E.; Ecuvillon, S.

    1996-11-01

    The distribution of sulphur between pyrite, kerogen, elemental sulphur, and the aromatic fraction of mudrock bitumens has been quantitated in two cored sections of immature marine Kimmeridgian strata which have experienced different levels of thermal stress. Strata in the two boreholes (Ebberston and Reighton) were deposited in different basinal settings (basinal marine and platform, respectively) and occasional euxinic (laminated) horizons are present at Ebberston, otherwise dysoxic deposition was the norm at both localities. Pyrite, the dominant sulphur carrier in all the mudrocks, has a sulphur isotopic composition consistent with mineralisation in a system mainly open to sulphate diffusion. Kerogens are mostly low sulphur (atomic S/C < 0.02) and account for between 5 and 10% of rock sulphur although occasionally up to 30%. Kerogen sulphur is closely correlated with TOC and highest in laminated mudrocks consistent with most effective sulphurization of kerogen under anoxic conditions. Although kerogen compositions in both cores vary with organic richness, no systematic differences in organic input between the borehole localities are recognised geochemically. Some thermal effects on sulphur geochemistry are, therefore, interpreted from a comparison of stratigraphically equivalent sections from the two cores. Bitumen yields and abundances of aromatic sulphur in the more thermally-stressed Ebberston section, although variable, are generally much higher than in the Reighton section and are partly related to kerogen sulphur content. This is tentatively attributed to thermal release of additional extractable bitumen from macromolecules. Elemental sulphur (S{sup 0}) in bitumen is unrelated in abundance to other sulphur species and isotopically heavier than coexisting pyrite. The distribution of individual sulphur-aromatic compound classes have features related both to maturity and stratigraphy. 55 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Influences of kerogen-rich bedrock on the molecular and isotopic composition of modern soils; implications for global C cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2016-12-01

    Kerogen represents the largest terrestrial organic carbon (OC) reservoir on earth and is vulnerable to remineralization upon exposure to earth's atmosphere. Oxidative weathering of ancient sedimentary organic matter is an immensely transformative process with poorly-constrained mechanisms and flux values in contemporary carbon cycle models. The weathered residuum of organic-rich mudrocks serves as parent material for many modern soils, and it is likely that the structure and dynamics of the resulting soil organic matter pool is inherited directly from kerogen-rich bedrock. We used a combination of solid-state 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and carbon isotope techniques to describe molecular and isotopic changes that occur throughout oxidative weathering of marine kerogens, and the subsequent formation of modern soils, in two outcropping Cretaceous mudstones of the Eagle Ford and Pepper Formations in central, TX. Gradational production of O-containing functionalities was observed, coupled with reductions in characteristically abundant polymethylenic components of type II kerogens. Organic matter structural parameters, derived from C-H dephasing NMR experiments, also provide the basis for a novel weathering index that accounts for the degree of post-sedimentary diagenetic alteration of samples along the kerogen-soil continuum. Molecular and isotopic mixing models were employed in estimating the proportions of modern and ancient C in soils, as increased incorporation and vulnerability of ancient OC under climatic shifts in temperature and/or precipitation is likely.

  16. Pore Accessibility and Connectivity of Mineral and Kerogen Phases for Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Hu, Q.; Gao, Z.; Ewing, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000, improvements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the US have led to a dramatic increase of production of hydrocarbon (gas and oil) from shale formations, and changed the energy picture of US and across the world. Fluid flow and mass transport in porous media is controlled by pore structure, which has both geometric and topological characteristics; these characteristics therefore affect exploration and production of hydrocarbons. Analysis of 65,000 US shale wells shows that hydrocarbon production typically drops by 60% within the first year and is down to 80-95% after three years. The main barrier to sustainable development of US shale, the pore structure of the nanopores storing and transporting hydrocarbon, has been quietly ignored. Considering the composition of mineral and kerogen phases and their associated nanopores in shales, we have studied tracer distribution and its association with mineral and organic kerogen phases, from three complementary tests: vacuum saturation with vacuum-pulling on dry shale followed with tracer introduction, saturated diffusion with tracer diffusing into initially saturated shale, and imbibition with fluids (water or n-decane) imbibing into dry shale. All three tests use tracer-bearing fluids to examine the association of tracers with mineral and kerogen phases, using a combination of elemental mapping and high-resolution SEM approaches. After these tests, the samples are freeze-dried, and imaged with SEM imaging before destructive 3-D laser ablation-ICP-MS mapping. These innovative approaches help examine the limited accessibility and connectivity of nanopores in shales and resultant hydrocarbon production behavior.

  17. Ancient carbon and noble gas fractionation. [in carbonaceous meteorites and terrestrial kerogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Chang, S.

    1977-01-01

    Noble gases in ancient terrestrial kerogen and meteoritic carbonaceous residues are compared in terms of their elemental fractionation with respect to atmospheric and the cosmic reservoirs, respectively. Fractionation factors for the heavy noble gases are almost identical in both types of samples. Therefore, some features of the interaction between carbon phases and noble gases in very different environments of origin appear to be similar. These findings underscore the plausibility of the meteoritic carbonaceous residues as a noble gas carrier and as a novel vehicle for achieving the elemental fractionation required to derive the planetary noble gas pattern from cosmic abundances.

  18. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2 percent of organic geopolymers) of low-molecular-weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric, and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early digenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play geochemically important roles under natural conditions.

  19. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2 percent of organic geopolymers) of low-molecular-weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric, and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early digenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play geochemically important roles under natural conditions.

  20. Evidence for porphyrins bound, via ester bonds, to the Messel oil shale kerogen by selective chemical degradation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseby, B.; Ocampo, R.

    1997-09-01

    High amounts of nickel mono- and di-acid porphyrins were released from Messel oil shale kerogen (Eocene, Germany) by selective chemical degradation (acid and base hydrolysis). The released porphyrin fractions were quantified (UV-vis) and their constituents isolated and characterized at the molecular level (UV-vis, MS, NMR). The mono-acid porphyrin fraction released contained four compounds of similar abundance which arise from an obvious chlorophyll or bacteriochlorophyll precursor. The di-acid porphyrin fraction was, however, dominated by far by one compound, mesoporphyrin IX, which must have originated from heme-like precursors (heme, cytochromes, etc.). These results show unambigously that the released mono- and di-acid porphyrins were linked to the macromolecular kerogen network via ester bonds and suggest that precursor heme-like pigments could be selectively and/or more readily incorporated into the macromolecular kerogen network than precursor chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls.

  1. Role of water in hydrocarbon generation from Type-I kerogen in Mahogany oil shale of the Green River Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Roy, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrous and anhydrous closed-system pyrolysis experiments were conducted on a sample of Mahogany oil shale (Eocene Green River Formation) containing Type-I kerogen to determine whether the role of water had the same effect on petroleum generation as reported for Type-II kerogen in the Woodford Shale. The experiments were conducted at 330 and 350??C for 72h to determine the effects of water during kerogen decomposition to polar-rich bitumen and subsequent bitumen decomposition to hydrocarbon-rich oil. The results showed that the role of water was more significant in bitumen decomposition to oil at 350??C than in kerogen decomposition to bitumen at 330??C. At 350??C, the hydrous experiment generated 29% more total hydrocarbon product and 33% more C15+ hydrocarbons than the anhydrous experiment. This is attributed to water dissolved in the bitumen serving as a source of hydrogen to enhance thermal cracking and facilitate the expulsion of immiscible oil. In the absence of water, cross linking is enhanced in the confines of the rock, resulting in formation of pyrobitumen and molecular hydrogen. These differences are also reflected in the color and texture of the recovered rock. Despite confining liquid-water pressure being 7-9 times greater in the hydrous experiments than the confining vapor pressure in the anhydrous experiments, recovered rock from the former had a lighter color and expansion fractures parallel to the bedding fabric of the rock. The absence of these open tensile fractures in the recovered rock from the anhydrous experiments indicates that water promotes net-volume increase reactions like thermal cracking over net-volume decrease reactions like cross linking, which results in pyrobitumen. The results indicate the role of water in hydrocarbon and petroleum formation from Type-I kerogen is significant, as reported for Type-II kerogen. ?? 2010.

  2. Sorption of methane, ethane, propane, butane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen on kerogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribylov, A. A.; Skibitskaya, N. A.; Zekel', L. A.

    2014-06-01

    Sorption isotherms of nitrogen, methane (in the pressure range of 0.1-40 MPa), ethane (0.1-3.7MPa), propane (0.01-1 MPa), butane (0.01-0.2 MPa), and carbon dioxide (0.1-6 MPa) are measured on two adsorbents with kerogen contents of 16 and 75% at temperatures of 303, 323, 343 K. Adsorption volumes are calculated for all adsorption systems using two independent methods. The BET technique is used to determine the surface area values of the two adsorbents on the basis of sorption data for ethane, propane, butane, and carbon dioxide. The initial and isosteric adheat of sorption values are calculated on the basis of sorption isotherms of ethane, propane, butane, carbon dioxide measured at three temperatures. It is found from comparing the dependences of isosteric heat of sorption on the two adsorbents that molecules of the above gases diffuse into its bulk (adsorbent 2) in addition to sorbing on the outside surface formed by kerogen molecules, while sorption of the same gases on the rock (adsorbent 1) is similar to sorption on a smooth hard adsorbent surface.

  3. Processing of the L1 52/55k Protein by the Adenovirus Protease: a New Substrate and New Insights into Virion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Mangel, Walter F.; McGrath, William J.; Graziano, Vito; Flint, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Late in adenovirus assembly, the viral protease (AVP) becomes activated and cleaves multiple copies of three capsid and three core proteins. Proteolytic maturation is an absolute requirement to render the viral particle infectious. We show here that the L1 52/55k protein, which is present in empty capsids but not in mature virions and is required for genome packaging, is the seventh substrate for AVP. A new estimate on its copy number indicates that there are about 50 molecules of the L1 52/55k protein in the immature virus particle. Using a quasi-in vivo situation, i.e., the addition of recombinant AVP to mildly disrupted immature virus particles, we show that cleavage of L1 52/55k is DNA dependent, as is the cleavage of the other viral precursor proteins, and occurs at multiple sites, many not conforming to AVP consensus cleavage sites. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other capsid and core proteins, providing a mechanism for its removal during viral maturation. Our results support a model in which the role of L1 52/55k protein during assembly consists in tethering the viral core to the icosahedral shell and in which maturation proceeds simultaneously with packaging, before the viral particle is sealed. PMID:24227847

  4. Insights into the Maturation of Hyperthermophilic Pyrolysin and the Roles of Its N-Terminal Propeptide and Long C-Terminal Extension

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zheng; Fu, Heting; Zhang, Yufeng; Zeng, Jing; Tang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysin-like proteases from hyperthermophiles are characterized by large insertions and long C-terminal extensions (CTEs). However, little is known about the roles of these extra structural elements or the maturation of these enzymes. Here, the recombinant proform of Pyrococcus furiosus pyrolysin (Pls) and several N- and C-terminal deletion mutants were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Pls was converted to mature enzyme (mPls) at high temperatures via autoprocessing of both the N-terminal propeptide and the C-terminal portion of the long CTE, indicating that the long CTE actually consists of the C-terminal propeptide and the C-terminal extension (CTEm), which remains attached to the catalytic domain in the mature enzyme. Although the N-terminal propeptide deletion mutant PlsΔN displayed weak activity, this mutant was highly susceptible to autoproteolysis and/or thermogenic hydrolysis. The N-terminal propeptide acts as an intramolecular chaperone to assist the folding of pyrolysin into its thermostable conformation. In contrast, the C-terminal propeptide deletion mutant PlsΔC199 was converted to a mature form (mPlsΔC199), which is the same size as but less stable than mPls, suggesting that the C-terminal propeptide is not essential for folding but is important for pyrolysin hyperthermostability. Characterization of the full-length (mPls) and CTEm deletion (mPlsΔC740) mature forms demonstrated that CTEm not only confers additional stability to the enzyme but also improves its catalytic efficiency for both proteineous and small synthetic peptide substrates. Our results may provide important clues about the roles of propeptides and CTEs in the adaptation of hyperthermophilic proteases to hyperthermal environments. PMID:22504813

  5. Insights into the maturation of hyperthermophilic pyrolysin and the roles of its N-terminal propeptide and long C-terminal extension.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zheng; Fu, Heting; Zhang, Yufeng; Zeng, Jing; Tang, Bing; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Pyrolysin-like proteases from hyperthermophiles are characterized by large insertions and long C-terminal extensions (CTEs). However, little is known about the roles of these extra structural elements or the maturation of these enzymes. Here, the recombinant proform of Pyrococcus furiosus pyrolysin (Pls) and several N- and C-terminal deletion mutants were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Pls was converted to mature enzyme (mPls) at high temperatures via autoprocessing of both the N-terminal propeptide and the C-terminal portion of the long CTE, indicating that the long CTE actually consists of the C-terminal propeptide and the C-terminal extension (CTEm), which remains attached to the catalytic domain in the mature enzyme. Although the N-terminal propeptide deletion mutant PlsΔN displayed weak activity, this mutant was highly susceptible to autoproteolysis and/or thermogenic hydrolysis. The N-terminal propeptide acts as an intramolecular chaperone to assist the folding of pyrolysin into its thermostable conformation. In contrast, the C-terminal propeptide deletion mutant PlsΔC199 was converted to a mature form (mPlsΔC199), which is the same size as but less stable than mPls, suggesting that the C-terminal propeptide is not essential for folding but is important for pyrolysin hyperthermostability. Characterization of the full-length (mPls) and CTEm deletion (mPlsΔC740) mature forms demonstrated that CTEm not only confers additional stability to the enzyme but also improves its catalytic efficiency for both proteineous and small synthetic peptide substrates. Our results may provide important clues about the roles of propeptides and CTEs in the adaptation of hyperthermophilic proteases to hyperthermal environments.

  6. Hydrocarbon biomarkers, thermal maturity, and depositional setting of tasmanite oil shales from Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revill, A. T.; Volkman, J. K.; O'Leary, T.; Summons, R. E.; Boreham, C. J.; Banks, M. R.; Denwer, K.

    1994-09-01

    This study represents the first geological and organic geochemical investigation of samples of tasmanite oil shale representing different thermal maturities from three separate locations in Tasmania, Australia. The most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon in the immature oil shale from Latrobe is a C 19 tricyclic alkane, whereas in the more mature samples from Oonah and Douglas River low molecular weight n- alkanes dominate the extractable hydrocarbon distribution. The aromatic hydrocarbons are predominantly derivatives of tricyclic compounds, with 1,2,8-trimethylphenanthrene increasing in relative abundance with increasing maturity. Geological and geochemical evidence suggests that the sediments were deposited in a marine environment of high latitude with associated cold waters and seasonal seaice. It is proposed that the organism contributing the bulk of the kerogen, Tasmanites, occupied an environmental niche similar to that of modern sea-ice diatoms and that bloom conditions coupled with physical isolation from atmospheric CO 2 led to the distinctive "isotopically heavy" δ 13C values (-13.5‰ to -11.7‰) for the kerogen. δ 13C data from modern sea-ice diatoms (-7‰) supports this hypothesis. Isotopic analysis of n- alkanes in the bitumen (-13.5 to -31‰) suggest a multiple source from bacteria and algae. On the other hand, the n- alkanes generated from closed-system pyrolysis of the kerogen (-15‰) are mainly derived from the preserved Tasmanites biopolymer algaenan. The tricyclic compounds (mean -8‰) both in the bitumen and pyrolysate, have a common precursor. They are consistently enriched in 13C compared with the kerogen and probably have a different source from the n- alkanes. The identification of a location where the maturity of the tasmanite oil shale approaches the "oil window" raises the possibility that it may be a viable petroleum source rock.

  7. Organic geochemical studies on kerogen precursors in recently deposited algal mats and oozes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Calvin, M.; Brown, S.; Yang, E.

    1978-01-01

    The same kerogen-like residue from the algal mats and oozes at Laguna Mormona, Baja California, is examined following degradation by saponification, alkaline KMnO4 oxidation, and HBr treatment. For comparison, pyrolytic degradation is performed for the residue and five others, two of which are obtained from algal mats at Baffin Bay, Texas. Major conclusions are that (1) Saponification of a residue specimen from the algal-ooze residue results in minor amounts of components bonded to it as esters; (2) Alkaline KMnO4 oxidation reveals that the same residue consists of a cross-linked aliphatic nucleus with additional components attached to it as esters; (3) the major products from pyrolysis of the residue include phytenes, pristenes, sterenes, and triterpenes; and (4) the HBr treatment yielded only one product, indicating the absence of a large number of ether-linkages readily cleaved by HBr.

  8. Organic geochemical studies on kerogen precursors in recently deposited algal mats and oozes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Calvin, M.; Brown, S.; Yang, E.

    1978-01-01

    The same kerogen-like residue from the algal mats and oozes at Laguna Mormona, Baja California, is examined following degradation by saponification, alkaline KMnO4 oxidation, and HBr treatment. For comparison, pyrolytic degradation is performed for the residue and five others, two of which are obtained from algal mats at Baffin Bay, Texas. Major conclusions are that (1) Saponification of a residue specimen from the algal-ooze residue results in minor amounts of components bonded to it as esters; (2) Alkaline KMnO4 oxidation reveals that the same residue consists of a cross-linked aliphatic nucleus with additional components attached to it as esters; (3) the major products from pyrolysis of the residue include phytenes, pristenes, sterenes, and triterpenes; and (4) the HBr treatment yielded only one product, indicating the absence of a large number of ether-linkages readily cleaved by HBr.

  9. Preparation of bitumen and kerogen through microwave assisted extraction and digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Dickneider, T.A.; Martin, S.

    1996-12-31

    Microwave procedures are replacing Soxhlet and ultrasonic extractions in many applications and are also finding widespread use in acid digestion procedures. In microwave extractions solvent choice is not dictated by boiling point considerations, so the choice of solvent(s) can be made based on polarity. It is possible to operate at temperatures above the solvent boiling point and at increased pressures. As a result these extractions are characterized by high solvent efficiency, small sample size, low solvent volumes, and short extraction times. These characteristics are ideal for bitumen extractions. Similarly, in digestion procedures, a high recovery yield is obtained in a minimum time using smaller volumes of acids. We report a convenient procedure for preparation of both bitumen and kerogen from shale samples based on a study of the efficiency of a series of solvents of varying polarity for bitumen recovery and testing of acid composition and volumes at different microwave powers and digestion times.

  10. Physical maturation, life-history classes and age estimates of free-ranging western gorillas--insights from Mbeli Bai, Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Thomas; Hockemba, Mireille Breuer-Ndoundou; Olejniczak, Claudia; Parnell, Richard J; Stokes, Emma J

    2009-02-01

    Physical maturation and life-history parameters are seen as evolutionary adaptations to different ecological and social conditions. Comparison of life-history patterns of closely related species living in diverse environments helps to evaluate the validity of these assumptions but empirical data are lacking. The two gorilla species exhibit substantial differences in their environment, which allows investigation into the role of increased frugivory in shaping western gorilla life histories. We present behavioral and morphological data on western gorilla physical maturation and life-history parameters from a 12.5-year study at Mbeli Bai, a forest clearing in the Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in northern Congo. We assign photographs of known individuals to different life-history classes and propose new age boundaries for life-history classes in western gorillas, which can be used and tested at other western gorilla research sites. Our results show that western gorillas are weaned at a later age compared with mountain gorillas and indicate slower physical maturation of immatures. These findings support the risk-aversion hypothesis for more frugivorous species. However, our methods need to be applied and tested with other gorilla populations. The slow life histories of western gorillas could have major consequences for social structure, mortality patterns and population growth rates that will affect recovery from population crashes of this critically endangered species. We emphasize that long-term studies can provide crucial demographic and life-history data that improve our understanding of life-history evolution and adaptation and help to refine conservation strategies.

  11. Ratio between mature and immature enzymatic cross-links correlates with post-yield cortical bone behavior: An insight into greenstick fractures of the child fibula.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Gineyts, Evelyne; Pithioux, Martine; Baron, Cécile; Boivin, Georges; Lasaygues, Philippe; Chabrand, Patrick; Follet, Hélène

    2015-10-01

    As a determinant of skeletal fragility, the organic matrix is responsible for the post-yield and creep behavior of bone and for its toughness, while the mineral apatite acts on stiffness. Specific to the fibula and ulna in children, greenstick fractures show a plastic in vivo mechanical behavior before bone fracture. During growth, the immature form of collagen enzymatic cross-links gradually decreases, to be replaced by the mature form until adolescence, subsequently remaining constant throughout adult life. However, the link between the cortical bone organic matrix and greenstick fractures in children remains to be explored. Here, we sought to determine: 1) whether plastic bending fractures can occur in vitro, by testing cortical bone samples from children's fibula and 2) whether the post-yield behavior (ωp plastic energy) of cortical bone before fracture is related to total quantity of the collagen matrix, or to the quantity of mature and immature enzymatic cross-links and the quantity of non-enzymatic cross-links. We used a two-step approach; first, a 3-point microbending device tested 22 fibula machined bone samples from 7 children and 3 elderly adults until fracture. Second, biochemical analysis by HPLC was performed on the sample fragments. When pooling two groups of donors, children and elderly adults, results show a rank correlation between total energy dissipated before fracture and age and a linear correlation between plastic energy dissipated before fracture and ratio of immature/mature cross-links. A collagen matrix with more immature cross-links (i.e. a higher immature/mature cross-link ratio) is more likely to plastically deform before fracture. We conclude that this ratio in the sub-nanostructure of the organic matrix in cortical bone from the fibula may go some way towards explaining the variance in post-yield behavior. From a clinical point of view, therefore, our results provide a potential explanation of the presence of greenstick fractures in

  12. Effect of concentration of dispersed organic matter on optical maturity parameters: Interlaboratory results of the organic matter concentration working group of the ICCP.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Borrego, A.G.; Cook, A.; Flores, D.; Hackley, P.; Hower, J.C.; Kern, M.L.; Kommeren, K.; Kus, J.; Mastalerz, Maria; Mendonca, J.O.; Menezes, T.R.; Newman, J.; Ranasinghe, P.; Souza, I.V.A.F.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Ujiie, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the effect of the kerogen isolation procedures on maturity parameters of organic matter using optical microscopes. This work represents the results of the Organic Matter Concentration Working Group (OMCWG) of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) during the years 2008 and 2009. Four samples have been analysed covering a range of maturity (low and moderate) and terrestrial and marine geological settings. The analyses comprise random vitrinite reflectance measured on both kerogen concentrate and whole rock mounts and fluorescence spectra taken on alginite. Eighteen participants from twelve laboratories from all over the world performed the analyses. Samples of continental settings contained enough vitrinite for participants to record around 50 measurements whereas fewer readings were taken on samples from marine setting. The scatter of results was also larger in the samples of marine origin. Similar vitrinite reflectance values were in general recorded in the whole rock and in the kerogen concentrate. The small deviations of the trend cannot be attributed to the acid treatment involved in kerogen isolation but to reasons related to components identification or to the difficulty to achieve a good polish of samples with high mineral matter content. In samples difficult to polish, vitrinite reflectance was measured on whole rock tended to be lower. The presence or absence of rock fabric affected the selection of the vitrinite population for measurement and this also had an influence in the average value reported and in the scatter of the results. Slightly lower standard deviations were reported for the analyses run on kerogen concentrates. Considering the spectral fluorescence results, it was observed that the ??max presents a shift to higher wavelengths in the kerogen concentrate sample in comparison to the whole-rock sample, thus revealing an influence of preparation methods (acid treatment) on

  13. Hydrocarbon source potential and maturation in eocene New Zealand vitrinite-rich coals: Insights from traditional coal analyses, and Rock-Eval and biomarker studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, J.; Price, L.C.; Johnston, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The results of traditional methods of coal characterisation (proximate, specific energy, and ultimate analyses) for 28 Eocene coal samples from the West Coast of New Zealand correspond well with biomarker ratios and Rock-Eval analyses. Isorank variations in vitrinite fluorescence and reflectance recorded for these samples are closely related to their volatile-matter content, and therefore indicate that the original vitrinite chemistry is a key controlling factor. By contrast, the mineral-matter content and the proportion of coal macerals present appear to have had only a minor influence on the coal samples' properties. Our analyses indicate that a number of triterpane biomarker ratios show peak maturities by high volatile bituminous A rank; apparent maturities are then reversed and decline at the higher medium volatile bituminous rank. The Rock-Eval S1 +S2 yield also maximizes by high volatile bituminous A rank, and then declines; however, this decline is retarded in samples with the most hydrogen-rich (perhydrous) vitrinites. These Rock-Eval and biomarker trends, as well as trends in traditional coal analyses, are used to define the rank at which expulsion of gas and oil occurs from the majority of the coals. This expulsion commences at high volatile A bituminous rank, and persists up to the threshold of medium volatile bituminous rank (c. 1.1% Ro ran. or 1.2% Ro max in this sample set), where marked hydrocarbon expulsion from perhydrous vitrinites begins to take place.

  14. Mechanisms of Hierarchical Cortical Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Cortical information processing is structurally and functionally organized into hierarchical pathways, with primary sensory cortical regions providing modality specific information and associative cortical regions playing a more integrative role. Historically, there has been debate as to whether primary cortical regions mature earlier than associative cortical regions, or whether both primary and associative cortical regions mature simultaneously. Identifying whether primary and associative cortical regions mature hierarchically or simultaneously will not only deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate brain maturation, but it will also provide fundamental insight into aspects of adolescent behavior, learning, neurodevelopmental disorders and computational models of neural processing. This mini-review article summarizes the current evidence supporting the sequential and hierarchical nature of cortical maturation, and then proposes a new cellular model underlying this process. Finally, unresolved issues associated with hierarchical cortical maturation are also addressed. PMID:28959187

  15. Differential susceptibility and maturation of thymocyte subsets during Salmonella Typhimurium infection: insights on the roles of glucocorticoids and Interferon-gamma

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Shamik; Deobagkar-Lele, Mukta; Adiga, Vasista; Raghavan, Abinaya; Wadhwa, Nitin; Ahmed, Syed Moiz; Rananaware, Supriya Rajendra; Chakraborty, Subhashish; Joy, Omana; Nandi, Dipankar

    2017-01-01

    The thymus is known to atrophy during infections; however, a systematic study of changes in thymocyte subpopulations has not been performed. This aspect was investigated, using multi-color flow cytometry, during oral infection of mice with Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). The major highlights are: First, a block in the developmental pathway of CD4−CD8− double negative (DN) thymocytes is observed. Second, CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes, mainly in the DP1 (CD5loCD3lo) and DP2 (CD5hiCD3int), but not DP3 (CD5intCD3hi), subsets are reduced. Third, single positive (SP) thymocytes are more resistant to depletion but their maturation is delayed, leading to accumulation of CD24hiCD3hi SP. Kinetic studies during infection demonstrated differences in sensitivity of thymic subpopulations: Immature single positive (ISP) > DP1, DP2 > DN3, DN4 > DN2 > CD4+ > CD8+. Upon infection, glucocorticoids (GC), inflammatory cytokines, e.g. Ifnγ, etc are induced, which enhance thymocyte death. Treatment with RU486, the GC receptor antagonist, increases the survival of most thymic subsets during infection. Studies with Ifnγ−/− mice demonstrated that endogenous Ifnγ produced during infection enhances the depletion of DN2-DN4 subsets, promotes the accumulation of DP3 and delays the maturation of SP thymocytes. The implications of these observations on host cellular responses during infections are discussed. PMID:28091621

  16. Thermal-maturity limit for primary thermogenic-gas generation from humic coals as determined by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, Michael; Kotarba, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrous-pyrolysis experiments at 360°C (680°F) for 72 h were conducted on 53 humic coals representing ranks from lignite through anthracite to determine the upper maturity limit for hydrocarbon-gas generation from their kerogen and associated bitumen (i.e., primary gas generation). These experimental conditions are below those needed for oil cracking to ensure that generated gas was not derived from the decomposition of expelled oil generated from some of the coals (i.e., secondary gas generation). Experimental results showed that generation of hydrocarbon gas ends before a vitrinite reflectance of 2.0%. This reflectance is equivalent to Rock-Eval maximum-yield temperature and hydrogen indices (HIs) of 555°C (1031°F) and 35 mg/g total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. At these maturity levels, essentially no soluble bitumen is present in the coals before or after hydrous pyrolysis. The equivalent kerogen atomic H/C ratio is 0.50 at the primary gas-generation limit and indicates that no alkyl moieties are remaining to source hydrocarbon gases. The convergence of atomic H/C ratios of type-II and -I kerogen to this same value at a reflectance of indicates that the primary gas-generation limits for humic coal and type-III kerogen also apply to oil-prone kerogen. Although gas generation from source rocks does not exceed vitrinite reflectance values greater than , trapped hydrocarbon gases can remain stable at higher reflectance values. Distinguishing trapped gas from generated gas in hydrous-pyrolysis experiments is readily determined by of the hydrocarbon gases when a -depleted water is used in the experiments. Water serves as a source of hydrogen in hydrous pyrolysis and, as a result, the use of -depleted water is reflected in the generated gases but not pre-existing trapped gases.

  17. Compound Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Type II and III Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Pernia, Denet; Evans, Michael; Fu, Qi; Bissada, Kadry K.; Curiale, Joseph A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Hydrogen (H) isotopes in understanding oil and gas resource plays is in its infancy. Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from oil and gas shale-derived kerogen. Application of this technique will progress our understanding. This work complements that of Pernia et al. (2013, this meeting) by providing a novel method for the H isotope analysis of specific compounds in the characterization of kerogen extracted by analytically diverse techniques. Hydrogen isotope analyses were carried out entirely "on-line" utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC Ultra interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make semi-quantitative compositional measurements of the extracted compounds. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II and III) were dehydrated (heated to 80 C overnight in vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace (1450 C) which quantitatively forms H2, following a modified method of Burgoyne and Hayes, (1998, Anal. Chem., 70, 5136-5141). Samples ranging from approximately 0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800 C for 30s. Compounds were separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. Hydrogen isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight compounds. Water (H2O) average deltaD = -215.2 (V-SMOW), ranging from -271.8 for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9 for the Polish Shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average deltaD of -89.7 0/00, ranging from -156.0 for the Barnett Shale to -50.0 for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during formation within each basin. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes

  18. Methane and CO2 Adsorption Capacities of Kerogen in the Eagle Ford Shale from Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Psarras, Peter; Holmes, Randall; Vishal, Vikram; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2017-08-15

    Over the past decade, the United States has become a world leader in natural gas production, thanks in part to a large-fold increase in recovery from unconventional resources, i.e., shale rock and tight oil reservoirs. In an attempt to help mitigate climate change, these depleted formations are being considered for their long-term CO2 storage potential. Because of the variability in mineral and structural composition from one formation to the next (even within the same region), it is imperative to understand the adsorption behavior of CH4 and CO2 in the context of specific conditions and pore surface chemistry, i.e., relative total organic content (TOC), clay, and surface functionality. This study examines two Eagle Ford shale samples, both recovered from shale that was extracted at depths of approximately 3800 m and having low clay content (i.e., less than 5%) and similar mineral compositions but distinct TOCs (i.e., 2% and 5%, respectively). Experimentally validated models of kerogen were used to the estimate CH4 and CO2 adsorption capacities. The pore size distributions modeled were derived from low-pressure adsorption isotherm data using CO2 and N2 as probe gases for micropores and mesopores, respectively. Given the presence of water in these natural systems, the role of surface chemistry on modeled kerogen pore surfaces was investigated. Several functional groups associated with surface-dissociated water were considered. Pressure conditions from 10 to 50 bar were investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations along with typical outgassing temperatures used in many shale characterization and adsorption studies (i.e., 60 and 250 °C). Both CO2 and N2 were used as probe gases to determine the total pore volume available for gas adsorption spanning pore diameters ranging from 0.3 to 30 nm. The impacts of surface chemistry, outgassing temperature, and the inclusion of nanopores with diameters of less than 1.5 nm were determined for applications of CH4

  19. New insights into the biology and origin of mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas by combined epigenomic, genomic, and transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Martín-Subero, José I; Kreuz, Markus; Bibikova, Marina; Bentink, Stefan; Ammerpohl, Ole; Wickham-Garcia, Eliza; Rosolowski, Maciej; Richter, Julia; Lopez-Serra, Lidia; Ballestar, Esteban; Berger, Hilmar; Agirre, Xabier; Bernd, Heinz-Wolfram; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Cogliatti, Sergio B; Drexler, Hans G; Fan, Jian-Bing; Fraga, Mario F; Hansmann, Martin L; Hummel, Michael; Klapper, Wolfram; Korn, Bernhard; Küppers, Ralf; Macleod, Roderick A F; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Prosper, Felipe; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schwaenen, Carsten; Schübeler, Dirk; Seifert, Marc; Stürzenhofecker, Benjamin; Weber, Michael; Wessendorf, Swen; Loeffler, Markus; Trümper, Lorenz; Stein, Harald; Spang, Rainer; Esteller, Manel; Barker, David; Hasenclever, Dirk; Siebert, Reiner

    2009-03-12

    Lymphomas are assumed to originate at different stages of lymphocyte development through chromosomal aberrations. Thus, different lymphomas resemble lymphocytes at distinct differentiation stages and show characteristic morphologic, genetic, and transcriptional features. Here, we have performed a microarray-based DNA methylation profiling of 83 mature aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (maB-NHLs) characterized for their morphologic, genetic, and transcriptional features, including molecular Burkitt lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Hierarchic clustering indicated that methylation patterns in maB-NHLs were not strictly associated with morphologic, genetic, or transcriptional features. By supervised analyses, we identified 56 genes de novo methylated in all lymphoma subtypes studied and 22 methylated in a lymphoma subtype-specific manner. Remarkably, the group of genes de novo methylated in all lymphoma subtypes was significantly enriched for polycomb targets in embryonic stem cells. De novo methylated genes in all maB-NHLs studied were expressed at low levels in lymphomas and normal hematopoietic tissues but not in nonhematopoietic tissues. These findings, especially the enrichment for polycomb targets in stem cells, indicate that maB-NHLs with different morphologic, genetic, and transcriptional background share a similar stem cell-like epigenetic pattern. This suggests that maB-NHLs originate from cells with stem cell features or that stemness was acquired during lymphomagenesis by epigenetic remodeling.

  20. Dynamic rupture propagation on geometrically complex fault with along-strike variation of fault maturity: insights from the 2014 Northern Nagano earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryosuke; Imanishi, Kazutoshi; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Kobayashi, Tomokazu

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the effect of the complex fault geometry on the dynamic rupture process and discriminating it from the complexity originating from the rheological properties of faults, is an essential subject in earthquake science. The 2014 Northern Nagano earthquake, which occurred near the end zone of a major active fault system, provided unique observations that enabled us to investigate both the detailed geometrical fault structure and surface deformation patterns as well as the temporal sequence led up from a prominent foreshock activity. We first develop a geometrical fault model with a substantial variation along strike, and a model for the regional stress field, which is well constrained by the observations. This significant along-strike variation in fault geometry probably reflects the difference of fault maturity at the end zone of the complex fault system. We used this model in order to conduct a set of dynamic rupture simulations using the highly efficient spatiotemporal boundary integral equation method. Based on our simulations, we show that the observed surface deformation can be reasonably explained as the effect of the non-planar fault geometry with a number of branch faults and bends.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Electron-probe microanalysis of light elements in coal and other kerogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bustin, R.M.; Mastalerz, Maria; Raudsepp, M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in electron microprobe technology including development of layered synthetic microstructures, more stable electronics and better matrix-correction programs facilitated routine microanalysis of the light elements in coal. Utilizing an appropriately equipped electron microprobe with suitable standards, it is now possible to analyze directly the light elements (C, O and N, if abundant) in coal macerals and other kerogen. The analytical results are both accurate compared to ASTM methods and highly precise, and provide an opportunity to access the variation in coal chemistry at the micrometre scale. Our experiments show that analyses using a 10 kV accelerating voltage and 10 nA beam current yield the most reliable data and result in minimum sample damage and contamination. High sample counts were obtained for C, O and N using a bi-elemental nickel-carbon pseudo-crystal (2d = 9.5 nm) as an analyzing crystal. Vitrinite isolated from anthracite rank coal proves the best carbon standard and is more desirable than graphite which has higher porosity, whereas lower rank vitrinite is too heterogeneous to use routinely as a standard. Other standards utilized were magnesite for oxygen and BN for nitrogen. No significant carbon, oxygen or nitrogen X-ray peak shifts or peak-shape changes occur between standards and the kerogen analyzed. Counting rates for carbon and oxygen were found to be constant over a range of beam sizes and currents for counting times up to 160 s. Probe-determined carbon and oxygen contents agree closely with those reported from ASTM analyses. Nitrogen analyses compare poorly to ASTM values which probably is in response to overlap between the nitrogen Ka peak with the carbon K-adsorption edge and the overall low nitrogen content of most of our samples. Our results show that the electron microprobe technique provides accurate compositional data for both minor and major elements in coal without the necessity and inherent problems associated with

  2. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of kerogen from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by basaltic intrusions and laboratory simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, L.W.; Maciel, G.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Cretaceous black shales from DSDP Leg 41, Site 368 in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean were thermally altered during the Miocene by an intrusive basalt. The sediments overlying and underlying the intrusive body were subjected to high temperatures (up to ~ 500??C) and, as a result, their kerogen was significantly altered. The extent of this alteration has been determined by examination by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, using cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). Results indicate that the kerogen becomes progressively more aromatic in the vicinity of the intrusive body. Laboratory heating experiments, simulating the thermal effects of the basaltic intrusion, produced similar results on unaltered shale from the drill core. The 13C CP/MAS results appear to provide a good measure of thermal alteration. ?? 1982.

  3. Probing the influential factors of NMR T1-T2 spectra in the characterization of the kerogen by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Chen, Hua; Deng, Shaogui; Cao, Yingchang; Zahid, Muhammad Aleem

    2015-11-01

    The low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize the longitudinal and transversal relaxation (T1-T2) spectrum of unconventional resources such as shale gas and tight oil containing significant proportions of kerogen and bitumen. However, it requires exquisite design of the acquisition model and the inversion algorithm due to the fast relaxation nature of the kerogen and bitumen. A new direct two dimensional (2D) inversion algorithm combined the iterative truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) and the Akaiake Information Criterion (AIC) is presented to perform the data inversion efficiently. The fluid component decomposition (FCD) is applied to construct the forward T1-T2 model of the kerogen, and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate factors which may influence inversion results including echo spacing, recovery time series, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the maximal iteration time. Results show that the T2 component is heavily impaired by the echo spacing, whereas the T1 component is influenced by the recovery time series but with limited effects. The inversion precision is greatly affected by the quality of the data. The inversed spectrum deviates from the model seriously when the SNR of the artificial noise is lower than 50, and the T2 component is more sensitive to the noise than the T1 component. What's more, the maximal iteration time can also affect the inversion result, especially when the maximal iteration time is smaller than 500. Proper acquisition and inversion parameters for the characterization of the kerogen are obtained considering the precision and the computational cost.

  4. Probing the influential factors of NMR T1-T2 spectra in the characterization of the kerogen by numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Chen, Hua; Deng, Shaogui; Cao, Yingchang; Zahid, Muhammad Aleem

    2015-11-01

    The low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize the longitudinal and transversal relaxation (T1-T2) spectrum of unconventional resources such as shale gas and tight oil containing significant proportions of kerogen and bitumen. However, it requires exquisite design of the acquisition model and the inversion algorithm due to the fast relaxation nature of the kerogen and bitumen. A new direct two dimensional (2D) inversion algorithm combined the iterative truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) and the Akaiake Information Criterion (AIC) is presented to perform the data inversion efficiently. The fluid component decomposition (FCD) is applied to construct the forward T1-T2 model of the kerogen, and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate factors which may influence inversion results including echo spacing, recovery time series, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the maximal iteration time. Results show that the T2 component is heavily impaired by the echo spacing, whereas the T1 component is influenced by the recovery time series but with limited effects. The inversion precision is greatly affected by the quality of the data. The inversed spectrum deviates from the model seriously when the SNR of the artificial noise is lower than 50, and the T2 component is more sensitive to the noise than the T1 component. What's more, the maximal iteration time can also affect the inversion result, especially when the maximal iteration time is smaller than 500. Proper acquisition and inversion parameters for the characterization of the kerogen are obtained considering the precision and the computational cost.

  5. The Vigna unguiculata Gene Expression Atlas (VuGEA) from de novo assembly and quantification of RNA-seq data provides insights into seed maturation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shaolun; Jiang, Chuan; Huang, Ziyue; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Chang, Junil; Zhang, Heng; Udvardi, Michael; Liu, Renyi; Verdier, Jerome

    2016-10-01

    Legume research and cultivar development are important for sustainable food production, especially of high-protein seed. Thanks to the development of deep-sequencing technologies, crop species have been taken to the front line, even without completion of their genome sequences. Black-eyed pea (Vigna unguiculata) is a legume species widely grown in semi-arid regions, which has high potential to provide stable seed protein production in a broad range of environments, including drought conditions. The black-eyed pea reference genotype has been used to generate a gene expression atlas of the major plant tissues (i.e. leaf, root, stem, flower, pod and seed), with a developmental time series for pods and seeds. From these various organs, 27 cDNA libraries were generated and sequenced, resulting in more than one billion reads. Following filtering, these reads were de novo assembled into 36 529 transcript sequences that were annotated and quantified across the different tissues. A set of 24 866 unique transcript sequences, called Unigenes, was identified. All the information related to transcript identification, annotation and quantification were stored into a gene expression atlas webserver (http://vugea.noble.org), providing a user-friendly interface and necessary tools to analyse transcript expression in black-eyed pea organs and to compare data with other legume species. Using this gene expression atlas, we inferred details of molecular processes that are active during seed development, and identified key putative regulators of seed maturation. Additionally, we found evidence for conservation of regulatory mechanisms involving miRNA in plant tissues subjected to drought and seeds undergoing desiccation.

  6. Influence of thermal maturity on the hydrogen isotope content of extractable hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Bechtel, A.; Püttmann, W.; Gleixner, G.

    2003-04-01

    Based on hydrogen isotope analysis of hydrocarbons from recent sediments it is suggested that compound specific hydrogen isotope ratios are a new proxy to reconstruct the palaeoclimate (Sauer et al., 2001). However, it remains unclear if transformation of carbon bound hydrogen with environmental water during maturation or thermal methanogenesis might influence the observed values. Short-term experiments excluded exchange reactions of deuterium from alkanes (Schimmelmann et al., 1999), however, thermally stressed kerogens are enriched in deuterium (Schoell, 1984). Therefore, we investigated the influence of maturity on the deltaD-values of alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids. In the Kupferschiefer horizon from the Polish Zechstein Basin thermal maturity of organic matter is correlated to burial depth yielding a natural long-term exchange experiment. The deltaD-values of extracted hydrocarbons linearly correlated with thermal maturity. These results enable the correction of deltaD values from biomarkers with known maturity and therefore expanding palaeoclimatic reconstructions using deltaD values to the geological past. References: SAUER, P.E., EGLINTON, T.I., HAYES, J.M., SCHIMMELMANN, A. &SESSIONS, A.L. (2001) Compound specific D/H ratios of lipid biomarkers from sediments as a proxy for environmental and climatic conditions. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 65(2), 213-222. SCHIMMELMANN, A., LEWAN, M.D. &WINTSCH, R.P. (1999) D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 63(22), 3751-3766. SCHOELL, M. (1984) Wasserstoff- und Kohlenstoffisotope in organischen Substanzen, Erdölen und Erdgasen. Schweitzerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart. Reihe D (67), 161pp.

  7. Unique distributions of hydrocarbons and sulphur compounds released by flash pyrolysis from the fossilised alga Gloeocapsomorpha prisca , a major constituent in one of four Ordovician kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, A. G.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe; Fowler, M. G.; Eglinton, T. I.; de Leeuw, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Kerogens isolated from four rocks of Ordovician age from North America have been analysed by combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to compare and contrast the type and distribution of sulphur-containing compounds and aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons present in the pyrolysates. When pyrolysed, all of the kerogens released several series of heterocyclic sulphur compounds including alkylthiophenes, alkylthiolanes, alkylthianes and alkylbenzothiophenes together with n-alkanes, n-alklenes and alkylcyclohexanes as well as alkyl-substituted benzenes and naphthalenes. One of the kerogens, isolated from the Guttenberg oil rock, consisted predominantly of the alga Gloeocapsomorpha prisca, which produced sulphur compounds and hydrocarbons with fingerprint pyrograms that were different from those of the other three kerogens. The data provide prima facie evidence that these distributions may act as pseudo "biological markers" for this species of alga, namely that unsaturated kerogen moieties available for the uptake of sulphur, or which can cyclise to form hydrocarbons, distinguish Gloeocapsomorpha prisca from the contributing organisms of the other kerogens analysed.

  8. Sensing of kerogens and lignens using laser-induced fluorescence at deep-UV wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Davis, Richard E.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical and biological (Chem-Bio) sensors for detection and tracking of hazardous and toxic agents are primarily being developed for homeland security and defense applications at various government laboratories and research institutions. However, several groups at NASA and various universities are working on similar sensors for space-based applications. The quest for answers to questions on the origins of life on the Martian enironment is continuing at NASA. Recent studies on a Martian meteorite have kindled interest in the possibilities of past life on Mars. The existance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh fracture surfaces have promoted further studies to examine the evidence for possibilities of the existenc of life on Martian surface soil in the past. Lignins and kerogens containing aromatic and polyaromatic components which are considered precursors of life on Mars. Likwise, tholins are considered possible precurors for life on some outerbodies in our Solar system. Laser induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Raman based techniques with emphasis in the deep ultraviolet (UV) (200-300 nm) spectral region are anticipated to play a significant role in characterizing these precursors. In this paper, previous stuides done on these precursors in the UV are examined for the development of a wavelength agile LIF system for in situ and remote sensing experiments in the deep-UV spectral region.

  9. Virus maturation.

    PubMed

    Delgui, Laura R; Rodríguez, José F

    2013-01-01

    The formation of infectious virus particles is a highly complex process involving a series of sophisticated molecular events. In most cases, the assembly of virus structural elements results in the formation of immature virus particles unable to initiate a productive infection. Accordingly, for most viruses the final stage of the assembly pathway entails a set of structural transitions and/or biochemical modifications that transform inert precursor particles into fully infectious agents. In this chapter, we review the most relevant maturation mechanisms involved in the generation of infectious virions for a wide variety of viruses.

  10. Petroleum Source Rock Maturation Data Constrain Predictions of Natural Hydrocarbon Seepage into the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Natural seepage of methane from the lithosphere to the atmosphere occurs in regions with large natural gas deposits. According to some authors, it accounts for roughly 5% of the global methane budget. I explore a new approach to estimate methane fluxes based on the maturation of kerogen, which is the hydrocarbon polymer present in petroleum source rocks, and whose pyrolysis leads to the formation of oil and natural gas. The temporal change in the atomic H/C ratio of kerogen lets us estimate the total carbon mass released by it in the form of oil and natural gas. Then the time interval of active kerogen pyrolysis lets us estimate the average annual formation rate of oil and natural gas in any given petroleum system. Obviously, this is an upper bound to the average annual rate at which natural gas seeps into the atmosphere. After adjusting for bio-oxidation of natural gas, I conclude that the average annual seepage rate in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah is not greater than (3100 × 900) tonne/y. This is (0.5 × 0.15)% of the total flux of methane into the atmosphere over the Basin, as measured during aircraft flights. I speculate about the difference between the regional 0.5% and the global 5% estimates.

  11. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities.

    PubMed

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  12. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    PubMed Central

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix. PMID:26136731

  13. Thermal and hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1985-02-01

    Hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California must consider thermal and geochemical constraints imposed by plate tectonics, diagenetic reactions, and the sedimentation history of the region. Plate tectonism drastically effects the thermal history of California basins in many ways. Initially, temperatures in the crust of coastal California are suppressed during subduction of the Farallon plate. With the passage of the Mendocino triple junction, subduction ceases and a void is created into which asthenosphere moves. This elevates temperatures in the basins in a complex manner depending on the time of passage of the Mendocino triple junction and the location of a specific basin. Finite-difference numerical models were developed to approximate the thermal effects of subduction and lithospheric upwelling. Diagenetic reactions and sedimentation history affect both the maturation model and thermal history of a basin. Diagenetic reactions through time in the Miocene Monterey Formation may change thermal conductivity values by 70%. Facies changes also have an important effect on sediment thermal conductivity and hence sediment temperatures. Maturation models indicate varying levels of maturity depending on the method used. Models using the Time Temperature Index of Lopatin indicate the lowest level of maturity. Tissot and Espitalie's method, which uses multiple activation energies and varying constants for the kerogen types, results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results from the use of the Tissot and Espitalie method modified by using a single activation energy of 178.69 kJ mole/sup -1/ and a constant of 4.92 x 10/sup 13/ hour/sup -1/ as reported by M.D. Lewan for shale from the Phosphoria Formation.

  14. Paleovegetation changes recorded by n-alkyl lipids bound in macromolecules of plant fossils and kerogens from the Cretaceous sediments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Sawada, K.; Nakamura, H.; Takashima, R.; Takahashi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Resistant macromolecules composing living plant tissues tend to be preserved through degradation and diagenesis, hence constituate major parts of sedimentary plant-derived organic matter (kerogen), and their monomer compositions vary widely among different plant taxa, organs and growth stages. Thus, analysis of such macromolecule may serve as new technique for paleobotanical evaluation distinctive from classical paleobotnical studies depends on morphological preservation of fossils. In the present study, we analyzed plant fossils and kerogens in sediments from the Cretaceous strata in Japan to examine chemotaxonomic characteristics of fossil macromolecules and to reconstruct paleovegetation change by kerogen analysis. The kerogens were separated from the powdered sediments of Cretaceous Yezo Group, Hokkaido, Japan. All kerogens have been confirmed to be mostly originated from land plant tissues by microscopic observation. Mummified angiosperm and gymnosperm fossil leaves were separated from carbonaceous sandstone of the Cretaceous Ashizawa Formation, Futaba Group. The kerogens and plant fossils were extracted with methanol and dichloromethane, and were subsequently refluxed under 110°C to remove free compounds completely. The residues are hydrolyzed by KOH/methanol under 110°C. These released compounds are analyzed by GC-MS. As main hydrolyzed products (ester-bound molecular units) from all kerogens, C10-C28 n-alkanoic acids and C10-C30 n-alkanols were detected. Recent studies on the hydrolysis products of plant tissues suggested the long chain (>C20) n-alkanols were predominantly abundant in deciduous broadleaved angiosperms. Correspondingly, the stratigraphic variation of the ratios of long chain (>C20) n-alkanols to fatty acids was concordant with the variation of angiosperm/gymnosperm ratios recorded by land plant-derived terpenoid biomarkers. In addition, we found that the long chain n-alkanols/fatty acids ratio in the angiosperm fossil leaf was

  15. Hydrogen (H) Isotope Composition of Type II Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS: Terrestrial Shale deposits as Martian Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R.; Pernia, D.; Bissada, K. K.; Curiale, J. A.; Evans, M.; Fu, Q.; Niles, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from kerogens isolated from gas- and liquid-rich shales. Application of this technique will progress the understanding of the use of H isotopes not only in potential kerogen occurrences on Mars, but also in terrestrial oil and gas resource plays. H isotope extraction and analyses were carried out utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make qualitative and semi-quantitative compositional measurements of these products. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II, II-S) were dehydrated (heated to 80°C overnight under vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace, quantitatively forming H2. Samples ranging from ~0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800°C for 30s. and separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. H isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight. H2O average δD = -215.2‰ (V-SMOW), ranging from -271.8‰ for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9‰ for a Polish shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average δD of -89.7‰, ranging from -156.0‰ for the Barnett Shale to -50.0‰ for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during basin formation. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes readily exchange with water, these data may provide some useful information on gas-water or oil-water interaction in resource plays, and further as a possible indicator of paleo-environmental conditions. Alternatively, our data may be an indication of H isotope exchange with water and/or acid during the kerogen isolation process. Either

  16. Hydrogen (H) Isotope Composition of Type II Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS: Terrestrial Shale Deposits as Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Pernia, Denet; Evans, Michael; Fu, Qi; Bissada, Kadry K.; Curiale, Joseph A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from kerogens isolated from gas- and liquids-rich shales. Application of this technique will progress the understanding of the use of H isotopes not only in potential kerogen occurrences on Mars, but also in terrestrial oil and gas resource plays. H isotope extraction and analyses were carried out utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make qualitative and semi-quantitative compositional measurements of these products. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II and II-S) were dehydrated (heated to 80 C overnight under vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace (1450 C), which quantitatively forms H2. Samples ranging from 0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800 C for 30s. and separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. H isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight. H2O average delta D = -215.2 per mille (V-SMOW), ranging from - 271.8 per mille for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9 per mille for a Polish shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average delta D of -89.7 per mille, ranging from -156.0 per mille for the Barnett Shale to -50.0 per mille for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during basin formation. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes readily exchange with water, these data may provide some useful information on gas-water or oil-water interaction in resource plays, and further as a possible indicator of paleoenvironmental conditions. Alternatively, our data may be an indication of H isotope exchange with

  17. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  18. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Beukes, N J; Klein, C; Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  19. Effect of organic-matter type and thermal maturity on methane adsorption in shale-gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Yang, Rongsheng

    2012-01-01

    A series of methane (CH4) adsorption experiments on bulk organic rich shales and their isolated kerogens were conducted at 35 °C, 50 °C and 65 °C and CH4 pressure of up to 15 MPa under dry conditions. Samples from the Eocene Green River Formation, Devonian–Mississippian Woodford Shale and Upper Cretaceous Cameo coal were studied to examine how differences in organic matter type affect natural gas adsorption. Vitrinite reflectance values of these samples ranged from 0.56–0.58 %Ro. In addition, thermal maturity effects were determined on three Mississippian Barnett Shale samples with measured vitrinite reflectance values of 0.58, 0.81 and 2.01 %Ro. For all bulk and isolated kerogen samples, the total amount of methane adsorbed was directly proportional to the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the sample and the average maximum amount of gas sorption was 1.36 mmol of methane per gram of TOC. These results indicate that sorption on organic matter plays a critical role in shale-gas storage. Under the experimental conditions, differences in thermal maturity showed no significant effect on the total amount of gas sorbed. Experimental sorption isotherms could be fitted with good accuracy by the Langmuir function by adjusting the Langmuir pressure (PL) and maximum sorption capacity (Γmax). The lowest maturity sample (%Ro = 0.56) displayed a Langmuir pressure (PL) of 5.15 MPa, significantly larger than the 2.33 MPa observed for the highest maturity (%Ro > 2.01) sample at 50 °C. The value of the Langmuir pressure (PL) changes with kerogen type in the following sequence: type I > type II > type III. The thermodynamic parameters of CH4 adsorption on organic rich shales were determined based on the experimental CH4 isotherms. For the adsorption of CH4 on organic rich shales and their isolated kerogen, the heat of adsorption (q) and the standard entropy (Δs0) range from 7.3–28.0 kJ/mol and from −36.2 to −92.2 J/mol/K, respectively.

  20. Isotopically exchangeable organic hydrogen in coal relates to thermal maturity and maceral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic exchangeability (Hex) and ??Dn values of non-exchangeable organic hydrogen were investigated in coal kerogens ranging in rank from lignite to graphite. The relative abundance of Hex is highest in lignite with about 18% of total hydrogen being exchangeable, and decreases to around 2.5% in coals with Ro of 1.7 to ca. 5.7%. At Still higher rank (Ro > 6%), Hex increases slightly, although the abundance of total hydrogen decreases. ??Dn is influenced by original biochemical D/H ratios and by thermal maturation in contact with water. Therefore, ??Dn does not show an overall consistent trend with maturity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distribution, richness, quality, and thermal maturity of source rock units on the North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Bird, K.J.; Keller, M.A.; Lillis, P.G.; Magoon, L.B.

    2003-01-01

    Four source rock units on the North Slope were identified, characterized, and mapped to better understand the origin of petroleum in the area: Hue-gamma ray zone (Hue-GRZ), pebble shale unit, Kingak Shale, and Shublik Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, total organic carbon analysis, and well logs were used to map the present-day thickness, organic quantity (TOC), quality (hydrogen index, HI), and thermal maturity (Tmax) of each unit. To map these units, we screened all available geochemical data for wells in the study area and assumed that the top and bottom of the oil window occur at Tmax of ~440° and 470°C, respectively. Based on several assumptions related to carbon mass balance and regional distributions of TOC, the present-day source rock quantity and quality maps were used to determine the extent of fractional conversion of the kerogen to petroleum and to map the original organic richness prior to thermal maturation.

  2. Investigation of Methane/Carbon Dioxide Partitioning onto Woodford Shale and Kerogen Analogs Using In Situ Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Martin, P. F.; Glezakou, V. A.; Owen, T.; McGrail, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Production of natural gas from shale gas reservoirs is curtailed by sorption of methane (CH4) onto minerals and organic constituents in the shale matrix. Recently, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has been proposed as a working fluid that could be utilized to enable recovery of unproduced CH4 from these low permeability environments. This strategy depends upon a competitive adsorption process in which CO2 drives desorption of CH4 from the shale matrix. However, relative sorption of gases on organic-rich shales is not well understood and appears to depend on several factors, such as clay mineral composition, total organic carbon content, microporosity, and moisture content. Moreover, little is known about the migration mechanisms for CH4 transport from kerogen sources to a production well and the enhanced transport rates that result from formation changes induced by the injection of CO2. In this work, a newly developed high-pressure titration system with in situ spectroscopic detection was used to investigate the sorption behavior of CH4 and CO2 onto Woodford shale and kerogen analogs. The apparatus consists of a custom-designed titanium reactor fitted with quartz windows, switching valves, a fixed-volume injection loop, stainless steel tubing, and a near-infrared spectrometer capable of monitoring gas-phase concentrations at pressures up to 190 bar and temperatures to 100 °C. Quantitative CH4 sorption measurements were conducted in two steps. First, the empty cell was titrated with CH4 to identify a correlation between concentration and the near-infrared absorbance of the CH combination and overtone bands. Next, the process was repeated with a sorbent present in the cell, and the difference between the integrated absorbance from the two titrations was used to determine the sorbed concentration of CH4. Additional experiments were conducted in which the sorbent was initially exposed to CH4, and then scCO2 was titrated into the reactor to desorb the CH4. The results from

  3. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  4. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  5. MatureP: prediction of secreted proteins with exclusive information from their mature regions.

    PubMed

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Markaki, Maria; Chatzi, Katerina; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Economou, Anastassios

    2017-06-12

    More than a third of the cellular proteome is non-cytoplasmic. Most secretory proteins use the Sec system for export and are targeted to membranes using signal peptides and mature domains. To specifically analyze bacterial mature domain features, we developed MatureP, a classifier that predicts secretory sequences through features exclusively computed from their mature domains. MatureP was trained using Just Add Data Bio, an automated machine learning tool. Mature domains are predicted efficiently with ~92% success, as measured by the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC). Predictions were validated using experimental datasets of mutated secretory proteins. The features selected by MatureP reveal prominent differences in amino acid content between secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Amino-terminal mature domain sequences have enhanced disorder, more hydroxyl and polar residues and less hydrophobics. Cytoplasmic proteins have prominent amino-terminal hydrophobic stretches and charged regions downstream. Presumably, secretory mature domains comprise a distinct protein class. They balance properties that promote the necessary flexibility required for the maintenance of non-folded states during targeting and secretion with the ability of post-secretion folding. These findings provide novel insight in protein trafficking, sorting and folding mechanisms and may benefit protein secretion biotechnology.

  6. Metals in Devonian kerogenous marine strata at Gibellini and Bisoni properties in southern Fish Creek Range, Eureka County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Poole, F.G.; Hose, R.K.; Radtke, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    A kerogen-rich sequence of siliceous mudstone, siltstone, and chert as much as 60 m thick on ridge 7129 in the southern Fish Creek Range, referred to as Gibellini facies of the Woodruff Formation, has been evaluated on the surface and in drill holes principally for its potential resources of vanadium, zinc, selenium, molybdenum, and syncrude oil content. The strata are part of a strongly deformed allochthonous mass of eugeosynclinal Devonian marine rocks that overlie deformed allochthonous Mississippian siliceous rocks and relatively undeformed autochthonous Mississippian Antler flysch at this locality. The vanadium in fresh black rocks obtained from drill holes and fresh exposures in trenches and roadcuts occurs chiefly in organic matter. Concentrations of vanadium oxide (V2O5) in unoxidized samples range from 3,000 to 7,000 ppm. In oxidized and bleached rock that is prevalent at the surface, concentrations of vanadium oxide range from 6,000 to 8,000 ppm, suggesting a tendency toward enrichment due to surficial weathering and ground-water movement. Zinc occurs in sphalerite, and selenium occurs in organic matter; molybdenum appears to occur both in molybdenite and in organic matter. Concentrations of zinc in unoxidized rock range from 4,000 to 18,000 ppm, whereas in oxidized rock they range from 30 to 100 ppm, showing strong depletion due to weathering. Concentrations of selenium in unoxidized rock range from 30 to 200 ppm, whereas in oxidized rock they range from 200 to 400 ppm, indicating some enrichment upon weathering. Concentrations of molybdenum in unoxidized rock range from 70 to 960 ppm, whereas in oxidized rock they range from 30 to 80 ppm, indicating strong depletion upon weathering. Most fresh black rock is low-grade oil shale, and yields as much as 12 gallons/short ton of syncrude oil. Metahewettite is the principal vanadium mineral in the oxidized zone, but it also occurs sparsely as small nodules and fillings of microfractures in unweathered strata

  7. Amorphization and D/H fractionation of kerogens during experimental electron irradiation: Comparison with chondritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Remusat, Laurent; Bernard, Sylvain; Brearley, Adrian J.; Leroux, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Irradiation is common in the interstellar medium and the protosolar nebula. We have investigated the effects of electron irradiation on kerogens of type I and III in a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM), at 293 K and 92 K, using various fluences. Using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and NanoSIMS, we have demonstrated a progressive amorphization coupled with hydrogen loss and a significant deuterium to hydrogen ratio (D/H) fractionation, with δD increasing by up to 1000‰. Hydrogen loss is non-linearly related to the fluence. Irradiation under cryogenic conditions (92 K) hinders amorphization and D/H elevation. We suggest that these effects are controlled by radiolysis (carbonsbnd hydrogen bonds are broken and hydrogen is lost), coupled with recombination. The amorphization and hydrogen loss are rate-limited by defect diffusion which controls the recombination probability. The D/H increase appears to follow a Rayleigh distillation law with an apparent fractionation factor similar to the equilibrium fractionation factor of the isotopic exchange reaction CH4 + HD ↔ CH3D + H2. This study represents a first step to estimate the kinetics and timescales of D/H fractionation under ionizing radiation. Extrapolatation of this fractionation behavior to natural environments remains difficult at this point because simultaneous irradiation by protons and other cosmic rays at various energies also occurs. However, the present results show that isotopic fractionation by electron irradiation at 200 kV alone might have been kinetically inhibited at the low temperatures of the interstellar medium and the outer region of the protosolar nebula. In addition, we show that STXM or NanoSIMS experiments should not be performed on organic samples that have already been investigated using TEM, even under low flux electron irradiation conditions.

  8. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  9. Artificial maturation of an immature sulfur- and organic matter-rich limestone from the Ghareb Formation, Jordan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopmans, M.P.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Damste, J.S.S.

    1998-01-01

    An immature (Ro=0.39%), S-rich (S(org)/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt. % TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220 ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The alkylthiophene isomer distributions do not change significantly with increasing thermal maturation, indicating the applicability of alkylthiophenes as biomarkers at relatively high levels of thermal maturity. For a given carbon skeleton, the saturated hydrocarbon, alkylthiophenes and alkylbenzo[b]thiophenes are stable forms at relatively high temperatures, whereas the alkylsulfides are not stable. The large amount of alkylthiophenes produced relative to the alkanes may be explained by the large number of monosulfide links per carbon skeleton. These results are in good agreement with those obtained previously for an artificial maturation series of an immature S-rich sample from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation.An immature (Ro = 0.39%), S-rich (Sorg/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt.% TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220, ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The

  10. Steps towards choosing Martian samples for fossil biosignature analysis of kerogen: fluorescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy applications to various analog samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Answering whether life existed on Mars is likely to come via searching for fossil biosignatures.1 Although definitive identification of Martian life may not be possible remotely, Mars Sample Return (MSR) is a logical next step in this endeavor, if the returned samples have been selected by precursor in situ missions.1 Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are useful tools for in situ identification of kerogen (insoluble carbonaceous matter of biological origin) within mineral matrices without altering samples, making them appealing tools for selecting samples to return. Still, a successful surface analysis system has yet to be flown to Mars. Examples of the challenges involved with these techniques are drawn from the development of the Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer (MMRS), which is a prototype instrument for a landed Mars mission, designed to provide on-surface determination of mineralogy and to assist in sample selection.2 While Raman spectroscopy alone cannot prove a sample's biogenicity,3 more development of this technique as well as coupling with other techniques could make it a promising tool for not only in-situ analysis but also for sample selection for MSR. The goal of this work is to identify the challenges of laser Raman by analysing a suite of natural materials containing kerogen, and to offer recommendations for further steps and development. This work analyzed 7 thin sections from samples representing diverse Mars analog environments and ages. Samples included an Archean chert, a Proterozoic chert, two Permian sulfates, an Eocene oil shale, a Holocene stromatolitic limestone, and a Holocene sulfate. This was done coupling three techniques: (1) mapping and imaging the suspected kerogen regions using UV fluorescence (330-380 nm, 540 nm, and 450-490 nm excitation ranges) and petrographic analyses to understand microtextural context, (2) using a commercial micro-Raman system (523 nm laser, point analysis configuration, 90-2000 cm-1 range) to perform

  11. [Adolescent brain maturation].

    PubMed

    Holzer, L; Halfon, O; Thoua, V

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in neuroscience has yielded major findings regarding brain maturation during adolescence. Unlike the body, which reaches adult size and morphology during this period, the adolescent brain is still maturing. The prefrontal cortex appears to be an important locus of maturational change subserving executive functions that may regulate emotional and motivational issues. The recent expansion of the adolescent period has increased the lag between the onset of emotional and motivational changes activated by puberty and the completion of cognitive development-the maturation of self-regulatory capacities and skills that are continuing to develop long after puberty has occurred. This "disconnect" predicts risk for a broad set of behavioral and emotional problems. Adolescence is a critical period for high-level cognitive functions such as socialization that rely on maturation of the prefrontal cortex. Intervention during the period of adolescent brain development provides opportunities and requires an interdisciplinary approach.

  12. The maturation mechanism of γ-glutamyl transpeptidases: Insights from the crystal structure of a precursor mimic of the enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis and from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Pica, Andrea; Chi, Meng-Chun; Chen, Yi-Yu; d'Ischia, Marco; Lin, Long-Liu; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-02-01

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidases (γ-GTs) are members of N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. They are synthetized as single-chain precursors, which are then cleaved to form mature enzymes. Basic aspects of autocatalytic processing of these pro-enzymes are still unknown. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the precursor mimic of Bacillus licheniformis γ-GT (BlGT), obtained by mutating catalytically important threonine to alanine (T399A-BlGT), and report results of autoprocessing of mutants of His401, Thr415, Thr417, Glu419 and Arg571. Data suggest that Thr417 is in a competent position to activate the catalytic threonine (Thr399) for nucleophilic attack of the scissile peptide bond and that Thr415 plays a major role in assisting the process. On the basis of these new structural results, a possible mechanism of autoprocessing is proposed. This mechanism, which guesses the existence of a six-membered transition state involving one carbonyl and two hydroxyl groups, is in agreement with all the available experimental data collected on γ-GTs from different species and with our new Ala-scanning mutagenesis data.

  13. Fast and precise method for Pb isotope ratio determination in complex matrices using GC-MC-ICPMS: application to crude oil, kerogen, and asphaltene samples.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ortega, Georgia; Pécheyran, Christophe; Bérail, Sylvain; Donard, Olivier F X

    2012-09-18

    A new method to determine Pb isotope ratio without ion-exchange-matrix separation is proposed. After acid digestion, Pb was ethylated to Et(4)Pb, separated from the digested solution (black shale, asphaltene, crude oil and kerogen) by extraction in isooctane, and then injected into a gas chromatograph coupled to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Seven isotopes ((202)Hg, (203)Tl, (204)Pb, (205)Tl, (206)Pb, (207)Pb, (208)Pb) were monitored simultaneously with peak duration of 23 s. GC elution was operated under wet plasma conditions where a thallium standard solution was introduced to the mass spectrometer for mass bias correction. The total time of the procedure (sample preparation and analysis, after acid digestion) was reduced by a factor of 15 compared to conventional-continuous sample introduction. Data treatment was carried out using the linear regression slope method. Mass bias was corrected using the double correction method (first thallium normalization followed by classical bracketing). For the (208/206)Pb and (207/206)Pb ratios, precision (2RSD(EXT), n = 21) was 49 and 69 ppm, and the bias between experimental results and reference values was better than 0.0033 and 0.0007 ‰, when injecting 1.2 ng of ethylated Pb SRM NIST 981 solution. Results obtained by this method were validated by comparison with those obtained via conventional-continuous sample introduction. The applicability of this approach was demonstrated with the analysis of black shale, asphaltene, crude oil and kerogen samples.

  14. Insights into secondary reactions occurring during atmospheric ablation of micrometeoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, Richard W.; Tan, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Ablation of micrometeoroids during atmospheric entry yields volatile gases such as water, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, capable of altering atmospheric chemistry and hence the climate and habitability of the planetary surface. While laboratory experiments have revealed the yields of these gases during laboratory simulations of ablation, the reactions responsible for the generation of these gases have remained unclear, with a typical assumption being that species simply undergo thermal decomposition without engaging in more complex chemistry. Here, pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that mixtures of meteorite-relevant materials undergo secondary reactions during simulated ablation, with organic matter capable of taking part in carbothermic reduction of iron oxides and sulfates, resulting in yields of volatile gases that differ from those predicted by simple thermal decomposition. Sulfates are most susceptible to carbothermic reduction, producing greater yields of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide at lower temperatures than would be expected from simple thermal decomposition, even when mixed with meteoritically relevant abundances of low-reactivity Type IV kerogen. Iron oxides were less susceptible, with elevated yields of water, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide only occurring when mixed with high abundances of more reactive Type III kerogen. We use these insights to reinterpret previous ablation simulation experiments and to predict the reactions capable of occurring during ablation of carbonaceous micrometeoroids in atmospheres of different compositions.

  15. Toward Teacher Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickle, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The essence of teacher maturity can be synthesized into personal, professional, and process domains. Although overlapping, these categories add a multidimensional approach to the search for what is good in teaching and provide a model for professional development. (MT)

  16. A PACS maturity model: a systematic meta-analytic review on maturation and evolvability of PACS in the hospital enterprise.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Rogier; Batenburg, Ronald

    2009-02-01

    With PACS and medical imaging technology maturing, the importance of organizational maturity and effective deployment of PACS in the hospital enterprise are becoming significant. The objective of this paper is twofold. Firstly, PACS literature on maturity and evolvability in the hospital enterprise is analyzed, resulting in an overview of the relevant developments concerning maturity of PACS. Secondly, this paper looks at the development of a maturity model for PACS technology. Using structured search queries, we identified 34 papers reporting relevant aspects of maturity and evolvability of PACS. From the results of a meta-analytic review on PACS maturity and evolvability, we propose a model--the PACS maturity model (PMM)--that describes five levels of PACS maturity and the corresponding process focus. We argue that this model can help hospitals to gain insights into their (strategic) objectives for growth and maturity with regard to PACS, the electronic patient record (EPR) and other health information systems. Moreover, the proposed model can be applied as a valuable tool for organizational assessments, monitoring and benchmarking purposes. Hence, the PMM contributes to an integral alignment model for PACS technology.

  17. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  18. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael S.; Hopper, Catherine A.; Hutchison, Keith W.

    1989-01-01

    The time course of maturation in eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi] K. Koch) was examined by grafting scions from trees of different ages onto 2-year-old root stock and following scion development for several years. Height, diameter, foliar chlorophyll content, and rooting ability of scion-derived cuttings all varied linearly as a function of log10 age. Chlorophyll content (milligrams per gram of dry weight) increased while height, diameter, and ability to root decreased with age (P < 0.01). The tendency toward orthotropic growth and branch formation per centimeter of main stem decreased abruptly between age 1 and 5 years (P < 0.01). Total chlorophyll content of both long and short shoot foliage increased by 30 to 50% with increasing age, but the chlorophyll a/b ratio did not change. Also, juvenile long shoot needles were significantly longer than mature (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, the juvenile scions produced more total strobili over two successive years, but the mature scions produced a significantly higher proportion of male strobili (P < 0.001 year 1; P < 0.02 year 2). The age-related changes in foliar traits were not associated with changes in DNA methylation between juvenile and mature scions. Using HPLC, we found that 20% of foliar DNA cytosine residues were methylated in both scion types. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666785

  19. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  20. Mature Students Studying Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Discusses mature students in the single subject area of mathematics in a single institution and makes comparisons with traditional universities. Reviews some features of the age distribution, entry qualifications, degree-class distribution, non-completion rates and gender distribution. (Author/ASK)

  1. Brain maturation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Milh, Mathieu; Holmes, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    At full term, both glutamate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are excitatory; cortical synapses are beginning to appear, there is little myelin in the cerebral hemispheres, and long tracts hardly start to develop. Neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy can result from premature activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) transmission. Benign neonatal seizures and migrating partial seizures in infancy could involve excessive or premature excitability of deep cortical layers. Benign rolandic epilepsy and continuous spike waves in slow sleep are consistent with an excess of both excitatory and inhibitory cortical synapses. West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes express age-related diffuse cortical hyperexcitability, the pattern depending on the age of occurrence; synchronization of spikes is becoming possible with maturation of the myelin. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is itself modulated by maturation that causes frontal hyperexcitability generating myoclonic-astatic seizures, between the ages of infantile and juvenile myoclonic epilepsies. Physiological delay of hippocampo-neocortical pathways maturation could account for the delayed occurrence of mesial temporal epilepsy following infantile damage, whereas premature maturation could contribute to fronto-temporal damage characteristic of fever-induced epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children, a dramatic school-age epileptic encephalopathy.

  2. Hydrocarbon maturation in thrust belts: Thermal considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Edman, Janell D.

    Sedimentary strata within thrust belts experience transient thermal histories which perturb the maturation paths of organic material contained within the rocks. Calculation of the thermal history, including perturbations which occur with overthrusting, for a particular sequence of tectonic events, allows us to evaluate the timing of maturation reactions and the remaining generative potential in the source rock during the evolution of the geologic terrain. In addition, thermal-maturation indicators can be used to constrain tectonic models for a region and eliminate nonviable geologic interpretations. We have utilized a numerical model to evaluate the thermal response to burial, erosion and thrusting. This model allows us to specify reasonably complex (and geologically reasonable) tectonic histories, including time varying erosion and sedimentation, syn-thrusting erosion, and multiple thrusting events. Such complexities are not easily incorporated in analytic thermal models of thrust belt evolution. In case studies of the western overthrust belt of Wyoming, thermal modeling of geologic histories provides insight into maturation processes, timing and geometries of thrust sheets, and pre-thrusting tectonism. In particular, the timing of thrust sheet motion in the Wyoming portion of the thrust belt appears to be younger than normally thought. Much of the thin skinned thrusting evaluated here appears (from a thermal perspective) to be of similar age to Laramide thrusting in the region.

  3. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  4. Hydrocarbon potential of Cretaceous sediments in the Lower and Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria: Insights from new source rock facies evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akande, Samuel O.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Obaje, Nuhu G.; Ojo, Olusola J.; Adekeye, Olabisi A.; Erdtmann, Bernd D.

    2012-02-01

    The Nigerian Benue Trough is an intracratonic rift structure which evolution is related to the Early Cretaceous opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Guinea. Previous hydrocarbon potential assessments of the successions in the trough revealed a number of organic rich intervals capable of yielding significant quantities of hydrocarbons in the Cretaceous sections. Stratigraphic continuity of these intervals suggests their potentials for hydrocarbons if thermally mature and both oil and gas can be generated. The present study have expanded on some previously reported source rock data of the Cretaceous formations in the Benue Trough by detailed mapping of the stratigraphic intervals with source rock potentials on the basis of their structural setting, lithologic characteristics, and depositional environments. Further characterization of the organic matter within the Cenomanian to Coniacian on one hand and the Campanian to Maastrichtian intervals were carried out to determine the geochemical character of the organic rich zones, their maturity and effectiveness to generate and expel hydrocarbons. In the Lower Benue Trough, mature facies of the Cenomanian to Turonian Eze-Aku Formation with a predominance of Types II and III kerogen, the Turonian to Coniacian Type III dominated Awgu Formation and the Type III dominated Lower Maastrichtian sub-bituminous coals of the Mamu Formation have proven potentials as oil and gas source rocks. In the Middle Benue Basin, the preserved mature intervals of the Awgu Formation shales and coals are good gas source rocks with some oil prone units in view of the predominating Type III kerogen. Targets for hydrocarbons generated by these source rock intervals should focus on the non-emergent Cretaceous reservoirs within the pre-Santonian successions whereas, the mature equivalents of the sub-bituminous coal facies would generate and charge both Upper Cretaceous reservoirs and possibly the sub-Niger Delta successions in the sub-surface.

  5. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  6. Capability Maturity Model for Software,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    This paper provides a technical overview of the Capability Maturity Model for Software and reflects the most current version. Specifically, this...paper, in combination with the Key Practices of the Capability Maturity Model , is intended to help software organizations use the CMM as a guide to improve the maturity of their software process.

  7. Wnt trafficking: new insights into Wnt maturation, secretion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Port, Fillip; Basler, Konrad

    2010-10-01

    Proteins of the Wnt family are secreted signaling molecules that regulate multiple processes in animal development and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Wnts spread over considerable distances to regulate gene expression in cells located at distant sites. Paradoxically, Wnts are poorly mobile because of their posttranslational modification with lipids. Recent evidence suggests that several pathways exist that are capable of transforming hydrophobic, insoluble Wnts into long-range signaling molecules. Furthermore, the discovery of Wntless as a protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt suggests that Wnt trafficking through the secretory pathway is already under special scrutiny. Here, we review recent data on the molecular machinery that controls Wnt secretion and discuss how Wnts can be mobilized for long-range signaling.

  8. MatureBayes: A Probabilistic Algorithm for Identifying the Mature miRNA within Novel Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Gkirtzou, Katerina; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Tsakalides, Panagiotis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single stranded RNAs with a key role in post-transcriptional regulation of thousands of genes across numerous species. While several computational methods are currently available for identifying miRNA genes, accurate prediction of the mature miRNA remains a challenge. Existing approaches fall short in predicting the location of mature miRNAs but also in finding the functional strand(s) of miRNA precursors. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present a computational tool that incorporates a Naive Bayes classifier to identify mature miRNA candidates based on sequence and secondary structure information of their miRNA precursors. We take into account both positive (true mature miRNAs) and negative (same-size non-mature miRNA sequences) examples to optimize sensitivity as well as specificity. Our method can accurately predict the start position of experimentally verified mature miRNAs for both human and mouse, achieving a significantly larger (often double) performance accuracy compared with two existing methods. Moreover, the method exhibits a very high generalization performance on miRNAs from two other organisms. More importantly, our method provides direct evidence about the features of miRNA precursors which may determine the location of the mature miRNA. We find that the triplet of positions 7, 8 and 9 from the mature miRNA end towards the closest hairpin have the largest discriminatory power, are relatively conserved in terms of sequence composition (mostly contain a Uracil) and are located within or in very close proximity to the hairpin loop, suggesting the existence of a possible recognition site for Dicer and associated proteins. Conclusions This work describes a novel algorithm for identifying the start position of mature miRNA(s) produced by miRNA precursors. Our tool has significantly better (often double) performance than two existing approaches and provides new insights about the potential use of specific

  9. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  10. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Keith W.; Sherman, Christopher D.; Weber, Jill; Smith, Sandra Schiller; Singer, Patricia B.; Greenwood, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of maturation on the morphological and photosynthetic characteristics, as well as the expression of two genes involved in photosynthesis in the developing, current year foliage of Eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi]) is described. These effects were observed on foliage during the third growing season after grafting of scions from trees of different ages onto 2 year old rootstock. Specific leaf weight (gram dry weight per square meter), leaf cross-sectional area (per square millimeter), and chlorophyll content (milligram per gram dry weight) all increase with increasing age in long shoot foliage from both indoor- and outdoor-grown trees. Net photosynthesis (NPS) (mole of CO2 per square millimeter per second) increases with age on indoor- but not outdoor-grown trees. NPS also increases with increased chlorophyll content, but outdoor-grown scions of all ages had higher chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll does not appear to be limiting for NPS outdoors. To extend these studies of maturation-related differences in foliar morphology and physiology to the molecular genetic level, sequences were cloned from the cab and rbsS gene families of larch. Both cab and rbcS gene families are expressed in foliage but not in roots, and they are expressed in light-grown seedlings of larch but only at very low levels in dark-grown seedlings (~2% of light-grown seedlings). Steady-state cab mRNA levels are relatively higher (~40%) in newly expanding short shoot foliage from juvenile plants compared to mature plants. Unlike cab, the expression of the rbcS gene family did not seem to vary with age. These data show that the maturation-related changes in morphological and physiological phenotypes are associated with changes in gene expression. No causal relationship has been established, however. Indeed, we conclude that the faster growth of juvenile scions reported previously (MS Greenwood, CA Hopper, KW Hutchison [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 406-412) is not due to increased NPS

  11. The Raman-Derived Carbonization Continuum: A Tool to Select the Best Preserved Molecular Structures in Archean Kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarue, Frédéric; Rouzaud, Jean-Noël; Derenne, Sylvie; Bourbin, Mathilde; Westall, Frances; Kremer, Barbara; Sugitani, Kenichiro; Deldicque, Damien; Robert, François

    2016-06-01

    The search for indisputable traces of life in Archean cherts is of prime importance. However, their great age and metamorphic history pose constraints on the study of molecular biomarkers. We propose a quantitative criterion to document the thermal maturity of organic matter in rocks in general, and Archean rocks in particular. This is definitively required to select the best candidates for seeking non-altered sample remnants of life. Analysis of chemical (Raman spectroscopy, 13C NMR, elemental analysis) and structural (HRTEM) features of Archean and non-Archean carbonaceous matter (CM) that was submitted to metamorphic grades lower than, or equal to, that of greenschist facies showed that these features had all undergone carbonization but not graphitization. Raman-derived quantitative parameters from the present study and from literature spectra, namely, R1 ratio and FWHM-D1, were used to draw a carbonization continuum diagram showing two carbonization stages. While non-Archean samples can be seen to dominate the first stage, the second stage mostly consists of the Archean samples. In this diagram, some Archean samples fall at the boundary with non-Archean samples, which thus demonstrates a low degree of carbonization when compared to most Archean CM. As a result, these samples constitute candidates that may contain preserved molecular signatures of Archean CM. Therefore, with regard to the search for the oldest molecular traces of life on Earth, we propose the use of this carbonization continuum diagram to select the Archean CM samples.

  12. Mitofusin-2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Teng; Gao, Si-Hua; Wang, Ke; Yang, Xiu-Yan; Mo, Fang-Fang; Na Yu; An, Tian; Li, Yu-Feng; Hu, Ji-Wei; Jiang, Guang-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is essential for embryonic development, anti-apoptotic events, protection against free radical-induced lesions, and mitochondrial fusion in many cells. However, little is known about its mechanism and function during oocyte maturation. In this study, we found that Mfn2 was expressed in the cytoplasm during different stages of mouse oocyte maturation. Mfn2 was mainly associated with α-tubulin during oocyte maturation. Knockdown of Mfn2 by specific siRNA injection into oocytes caused the mitochondrial morphology and quantity to change, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes. This led to metaphase I arrest and the failure of first polar body extrusion. Furthermore, Mfn2 depletion from GV stage oocytes caused the redistribution of p38 MAPK in oocyte cytoplasm. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated cellular alterations, which may have significant implications for oocyte maturation. PMID:27485634

  13. Extensive sorption of organic compounds to black carbon, coal, and kerogen in sediments and soils: mechanisms and consequences for distribution, bioaccumulation, and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Gustafsson, Orjan; Bucheli, Thomas D; Jonker, Michiel T O; Koelmans, Albert A; van Noort, Paul C M

    2005-09-15

    Evidence is accumulating that sorption of organic chemicals to soils and sediments can be described by "dual-mode sorption": absorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM) and adsorption to carbonaceous materials such as black carbon (BC), coal, and kerogen, collectively termed "carbonaceous geosorbents" (CG). Median BC contents as a fraction of total organic carbon are 9% for sediments (number of sediments, n approximately 300) and 4% for soils (n = 90). Adsorption of organic compounds to CG is nonlinear and generally exceeds absorption in AOM by a factor of 10-100. Sorption to CG is particularly extensive for organic compounds that can attain a more planar molecular configuration. The CG adsorption domain probably consists of surface sites and nanopores. In this review it is shown that nonlinear sorption to CG can completely dominate total sorption at low aqueous concentrations (<10(-6) of maximum solid solubility). Therefore, the presence of CG can explain (i) sorption to soils and sediments being up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected on the basis of sorption to AOM only (i.e., "AOM equilibrium partitioning"), (ii) low and variable biota to sediment accumulation factors, and (iii) limited potential for microbial degradation. On the basis of these consequences of sorption to CG, it is advocated that the use of generic organic carbon-water distribution coefficients in the risk assessment of organic compounds is not warranted and that bioremediation endpoints could be evaluated on the basis of freely dissolved concentrations instead of total concentrations in sediment/soil.

  14. The Raman-Derived Carbonization Continuum: A Tool to Select the Best Preserved Molecular Structures in Archean Kerogens

    PubMed Central

    Rouzaud, Jean-Noël; Derenne, Sylvie; Bourbin, Mathilde; Westall, Frances; Kremer, Barbara; Sugitani, Kenichiro; Deldicque, Damien; Robert, François

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The search for indisputable traces of life in Archean cherts is of prime importance. However, their great age and metamorphic history pose constraints on the study of molecular biomarkers. We propose a quantitative criterion to document the thermal maturity of organic matter in rocks in general, and Archean rocks in particular. This is definitively required to select the best candidates for seeking non-altered sample remnants of life. Analysis of chemical (Raman spectroscopy, 13C NMR, elemental analysis) and structural (HRTEM) features of Archean and non-Archean carbonaceous matter (CM) that was submitted to metamorphic grades lower than, or equal to, that of greenschist facies showed that these features had all undergone carbonization but not graphitization. Raman-derived quantitative parameters from the present study and from literature spectra, namely, R1 ratio and FWHM-D1, were used to draw a carbonization continuum diagram showing two carbonization stages. While non-Archean samples can be seen to dominate the first stage, the second stage mostly consists of the Archean samples. In this diagram, some Archean samples fall at the boundary with non-Archean samples, which thus demonstrates a low degree of carbonization when compared to most Archean CM. As a result, these samples constitute candidates that may contain preserved molecular signatures of Archean CM. Therefore, with regard to the search for the oldest molecular traces of life on Earth, we propose the use of this carbonization continuum diagram to select the Archean CM samples. Key Words: Archean—Early life—Kerogen—Raman spectroscopy—Carbonization. Astrobiology 16, 407–417. PMID:27186810

  15. Correlation between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwei; Hu, Haikun; Guo, Jing; Liu, Zeping; Liu, Renkai; Li, Fan; Zou, Shujuan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dental and skeletal maturity. Digital panoramic radiographs and lateral skull cephalograms of 302 patients (134 boys and 168 girls, ranging from 8 to 16 years of age) were examined. Dental maturity was assessed by calcification stages of the mandibular canines, first and second premolars, and second molars, whereas skeletal maturity was estimated by the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient was used to measure the association between CVM stage and dental calcification stage of individual teeth. The mean chronologic age of girls was significantly lower than that of boys in each CVM stage. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity ranged from 0.391 to 0.582 for girls and from 0.464 to 0.496 for boys (P < 0.05). In girls, the mandibular second molar had the highest and the canine the lowest correlation. In boys, the canine had the highest and the first premolar the lowest correlation. Tooth calcification stage was significantly correlated with cervical vertebral maturation stage. The development of the mandibular second molar in females and that of the mandibular canine in males had the strongest correlations with cervical vertebral maturity. Therefore, it is practical to consider the relationship between dental and skeletal maturity when planning orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  17. Preliminary thermal-maturity map of the Cameo and Fairfield or equivalent coal zone in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuccio, Vito F.; Johnson, Ronald C.

    1983-01-01

    This map was prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project and was constructed to show the thermal maturity of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation (or Group) in the Piceance Creek Basin. The ability of a source rock to generate oil and gas is directly related to its kerogen content and thermal maturity; hence, thermal maturity is commonly used as an exploration tool. This publication consists of two parts: a coal rank map for the basinwide Cameo and Fairfield or equivalent coal zone and three cross sections showing the variation in a coal rank for the entire Mesaverde. Structure contours on the map show the top of the Rollins Sandstone Member of the Mesaverde Formation and its equivalent the Trout Creek Sandstone Member of the Iles Formation of the Mesaverde Group, which immediately underlie the Cameo and Fairfield zone. The structure contours show the fairly strong correlation between structure and coal rank in the basin, suggesting that maximum overburden was the key factor in determining the coal ranks. Even in the southern part of the basin where extensive plutonism occurred during the Oligocene, coal ranks still generally follow structure; indicating that the plutons had little affect on the coals. On the cross sections both the top of the Rollins and Trout Creek, and the top of the Mesaverde Formation/Group are shown. A complete analysis of the entire Mesaverde in the basin would require more information than is presently available.

  18. In vitro maturation of oocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, G D

    2001-10-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) of human oocytes is an emerging assisted reproductive technology with great promise. To be successful, this process must entail both nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation. Endogenous regulation of oocyte maturation is a complex sequence of events regulated by endocrine parameters, oocyte/follicular cross-talk, and intra-oocyte kinase/phosphatase interactions. Although nuclear maturation during human oocyte IVM progresses normally, cytoplasmic maturation is significantly lacking, as exemplified by poor embryonic developmental competence and pregnancy rates. Advances made in immature oocyte isolation and oocyte and embryo culture conditions have increased the clinical feasibility of IVM. However, in order to achieve acceptable birth rates, future studies should focus on characterization and regulation of oocyte cytoplasmic maturation, and how oocyte-derived factors influence zygotic genome activation and embryonic developmental competence.

  19. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  20. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  1. The Mature Athlete

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Moira M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Aging changes the biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function of tendons and ligaments and results in common clinical pathologies that present to orthopedic surgeons, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers. A better understanding of the age-related changes in these connective tissues will allow better patient care. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in December 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to age-related changes in tendons and ligaments. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges associated with age-dependent changes in the rotator cuff, Achilles tendon, lateral humeral epicondylar tendons, quadriceps tendon, and patellar tendon. The anterior cruciate ligament and the medial collateral ligament are the most studied intra-articular and extra-articular ligaments, and both are associated with age-dependent changes. Conclusion: Tendons and ligaments are highly arranged connective tissue structures that maintain joint motion and joint stability. These structures are subject to vascular and compositional changes with increasing age that alter their mechanotransduction, biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function. Emerging research into the etiology of age-dependent changes will provide further information to help combat the age-related clinical complications associated with the injuries that occur to tendons and ligaments. PMID:24427441

  2. Career Maturity of Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, Carol M.

    To investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients, this thesis examines six independent variables: (1) race; (2) sex; (3) age; (4) level of formal education; (5) general intelligence; and (6) locus of control. Scales taken from the Career Maturity Inventory served as the dependent variables. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who…

  3. Treating mature stands for wildlife

    Treesearch

    William H. Healy; Gary F. Houf

    1989-01-01

    Stands older than 60 years or that are medium to large sawtimber size generally provide good wildlife habitat. Mature trees usually produce abundant mast and provide den sites (see fig. 1 in Note 9.04 Treating Immature Stands). The undergrowth in these stands produces moderate amounts of browse and herbage. Mature stands also provide opportunities for management...

  4. Financial maturity of yellow birch

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak

    1969-01-01

    The methods used to compute financial maturity of yellow birch sawtimber are similar to those used for paper birch sawtimber, except for minor differences in detail. The procedure followed for yellow-birch veneer-log trees was also similar, except that local veneer grades and local veneer-log prices were used as the basis for the financial maturity computations.

  5. Career Education and Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebilco, Geoffrey R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between career maturity and career curriculum in 38 Melbourne metropolitan secondary schools (N=2280 students) using an Australian adaption of the Career Development Inventory. Results confirmed that schools with career education programs achieved higher gains in student career maturity. (JAC)

  6. Extensive sorption of organic compounds to black carbon, coal, and kerogen in sediments and soils: mechanisms and consequences for distribution, bioaccumulation, and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard Cornelissen; Oerjan Gustafsson; Thomas D. Bucheli; Michiel T. O. Jonker; Albert A. Koelmans; Paul C. M. van Noort

    2005-09-15

    Evidence is accumulating that sorption of organic chemicals to soils and sediments can be described by 'dual-mode sorption': absorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM) and adsorption to carbonaceous materials such as black carbon (BC), coal, and kerogen, collectively termed 'carbonaceous geosorbents' (CG). Median BC contents as a fraction of total organic carbon are 9% for sediments (number of sediments, n {approx} 300) and 4% for soils (n = 90). Adsorption of organic compounds to CG is nonlinear and generally exceeds absorption in AOM by a factor of 10-100. Sorption to CG is particularly extensive for organic compounds that can attain a more planar molecular configuration. The CG adsorption domain probably consists of surface sites and nanopores. In this review it is shown that nonlinear sorption to CG can completely dominate total sorption at low aqueous concentrations ({lt}10{sup -6} of maximum solid solubility). Therefore, the presence of CG can explain (i) sorption to soils and sediments being up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected on the basis of sorption to AOM only (i.e., 'AOM equilibrium partitioning'), (ii) low and variable biota to sediment accumulation factors, and (iii) limited potential for microbial degradation. On the basis of these consequences of sorption to CG, it is advocated that the use of generic organic carbon-water distribution coefficients in the risk assessment of organic compounds is not warranted and that bioremediation endpoints could be evaluated on the basis of freely dissolved concentrations instead of total concentrations in sediment/soil. The study was funded by the European Union (the ABACUS project). 186 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Source and thermal maturity of bitumen in Precambrian Nonesuch Formation inferred from isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Hieshima, G.B. )

    1991-03-01

    As part of a continuing study of organic geochemistry of the 1.05 Ga Nonesuch Formation in the North American Mid-Continents rift, isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes were measured using compound-specific isotopic analysis. This is a relatively new technique that can be used in conjunction with traditional biomarker analysis in interpretation of thermal maturity, oil-source rock correlation, and paleoecologic reconstruction. Carbon-isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes from C{sub 15} to C{sub 25} in five bitumens and one oil from Nonesuch strata vary from {minus}28.8 to {minus}34.5{per thousand} (versus PDB). Within a given sample, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes span a range of 2 to 4 {per thousand}%. Homologues from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} are isotopically light (depleted) by approximately 0.5{per thousand} relative to higher homologues from C{sub 20} to C{sub 25}. Two sources of normal alkanes are interpreted from the distribution of isotopic compositions. Based on chain length, the series from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} may have been derived from algal components. Isotopically heavy, higher homologues are suspected to have been derived from bacterial sources. The pattern of isotopic compositions of bitumens is similar to that of the oil, demonstrating an oil-source rock relationship. Superimposed upon this primary, bimodal distribution of normal alkanes is the influence of thermal maturity on isotopic composition. Normal alkanes in samples of higher thermal maturity are enriched isotopically by 0.25 to 2{per thousand} relative to those of lower thermal maturity. Isotopic enrichment with increasing thermal maturity is interpreted to be the result of either addition of isotopically heavy components derived from kerogen and/or preferential loss through cracking of isotopically light components in bitumen.

  8. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  9. Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM).

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Urbina, Angel

    2010-10-01

    Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a communication tool that must include a dicussion of the supporting evidence. PCMM is a tool for managing risk in the use of modeling and simulation. PCMM is in the service of organizing evidence to help tell the modeling and simulation (M&S) story. PCMM table describes what activities within each element are undertaken at each of the levels of maturity. Target levels of maturity can be established based on the intended application. The assessment is to inform what level has been achieved compared to the desired level, to help prioritize the VU activities & to allocate resources.

  10. Bitumen II from the Paleoproterozoic Here’s Your Chance Pb/Zn/Ag deposit: Implications for the analysis of depositional environment and thermal maturity of hydrothermally-altered sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Alex I.; Grice, Kliti; Jaraula, Caroline M. B.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2014-08-01

    The formation of sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) Pb/Zn deposits is linked to ocean euxinia, but recent evidence suggests that ferruginous conditions may have dominated the deep ocean during the Middle Proterozoic, a maximum period for SEDEX distribution. Biomarkers of sulfate-reducing and sulfide-oxidising bacteria are valuable indicators of euxinic conditions in such settings. Organic matter (OM) from SEDEX deposits is often affected by alteration and/or migration, but OM entrapped within the kerogen/mineral matrix (Bitumen II) may be less affected than the freely-extractable OM (Bitumen I). We analysed Bitumen II from the Paleoproterozoic Here’s Your Chance (HYC) Pb/Zn/Ag deposit to find evidence of euxinic conditions in the depositional environment. n-Alkane distributions in Bitumen II are markedly distinct from previously-reported Bitumen I. Bitumen II contains long-chain n-alkanes (up to C36 or C38) and a strong even-over-odd distribution in a number of samples, which are 4‰ to 7‰ depleted in 13C compared to n-alkanes in Bitumen I and verified as indigenous by comparison with δ13C of isolated kerogen. These features are interpreted as evidence of sulfate-reducing and sulfide-oxidising bacteria, confirming that HYC was deposited under euxinic conditions. Bitumen II has the potential to reveal information from OM that is degraded and/or overprinted in Bitumen I. Commonly-used methylphenanthrene maturity ratios give conflicting information as to the relative maturity of Bitumens I and II. Bitumen I contains a far higher proportion of methylated phenanthrenes than Bitumen II. As Bitumen II is sequestered within the kerogen/mineral matrix it may have restricted access to the ‘methyl pool’ of organic compounds that can donate methyl groups to aromatic hydrocarbons. Parameters that include both phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes do not appear suitable to compare the maturity of Bitumens I and II; hence there is no clear evidence that Bitumen II is of

  11. Bovine mature adipocytes readily return to a proliferative state.

    PubMed

    Wei, S; Duarte, M S; Du, M; Paulino, P V R; Jiang, Z; Albrecht, E; Fernyhough-Culver, M; Zan, L; Hausman, G J; Dodson, M V

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of human and animal adipogenesis has been defined using several traditional cell systems including stromal vascular cells and adipocyte-related cell lines. But a relatively new cell system using progeny cells stemming from the dedifferentiation of purified cultures of mature adipocytes may be used for studying the development and biology of adipocytes. In this research, we show that isolated (and purified) mature adipocytes derived from Wagyu cattle dedifferentiate into progeny cells, and that these spindle-shaped, proliferative-competent daughter cells possess ability to proliferate. We outline the optimum cell culture system and offer precautionary thoughts for effective mature adipocyte culture. Collectively, this represents a novel cell model which may provide new insights into cell development, physiology and use as a model for animal production/composition, tissue engineering and disease treatment.

  12. Low temperature hydrothermal maturation of organic matter in sediments form the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.; Grimalt, J.O.; Hayes, J.M.; Hartman, H.

    1987-04-01

    Hydrocarbons and bulk organic matter of two sediment cores located within the Atlantis II Deep have been analyzed. Although the brines overlying the coring areas were reported to be sterile, microbial inputs and minor terrestrial sources represent the major sedimentary organic material. This input is derived from the upper water column above the brines. Both steroid and triterpenoid hydrocarbons show that extensive acid-catalyzed reactions are occurring in the sediments. In comparison with other hydrothermal or intrusive systems, the Atlantis II Deep exhibits a lower degree of thermal maturation. This is easily deduced from the elemental composition of the kerogens and the absence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of a pyrolytic origin in the bitumen. The lack of carbon number preference among the n-alkanes suggests, especially in the case of the long chain homologs, that the organic matter of Atlantis II Deep sediments has undergone some degree catagenesis. However, the yields of hydrocarbons are much lower than those observed in other hydrothermal areas. The effect of lower temperature and poor source-rock characteristics appear to be responsible for the differences.

  13. Occurrence of non-hydrolysable amides in the macromolecular constituent of Scenedesmus quadricauda cell wall as revealed by [sup 15]N NMR: Origin of n-alkylnitriles in pyrolysates of ultralaminai-containing kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C. ); Taulelle, F. )

    1993-02-01

    New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently shown to occur in kerogens from numerous oil shales and source rocks. Morphological and chemical studies revealed that ultralaminae originate from the selective preservation of the non-hydrolysable biomacromolecules (algaenans) building up the thin outer walls of several Chlorophyceae (green microalgae) including the cosmopolitan general Scenedesmus and Chlorella. The chemical correlation between such algaenans and fossil ultralaminae was mainly based on the production, on pyrolysis, of nitrogen compounds, n-alkylnitriles, with specific distributions depending on the lacustrine of marine origin of the considered samples. In addition, these bio-and geopolymers were characterized by quite high N levels.

  14. Maturation of sugar maple seed

    Treesearch

    Clayton M., Jr. Carl; Albert G., Jr. Snow; Albert G. Snow

    1971-01-01

    The seeds of a sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum Marsh.) do not mature at the same time every year. And different trees mature their seeds at different times. So time of year is not a reliable measure of when seeds are ripe. Better criteria are needed. In recent studies we have found that moisture content and color are the best criteria for judging when sugar maple...

  15. Naturally Engineered Maturation of Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scuderi, Gaetano J.; Butcher, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains one of the most prominent causes of mortalities worldwide with heart transplantation being the gold-standard treatment option. However, due to the major limitations associated with heart transplants, such as an inadequate supply and heart rejection, there remains a significant clinical need for a viable cardiac regenerative therapy to restore native myocardial function. Over the course of the previous several decades, researchers have made prominent advances in the field of cardiac regeneration with the creation of in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte tissue engineered constructs. However, these engineered constructs exhibit a functionally immature, disorganized, fetal-like phenotype that is not equivalent physiologically to native adult cardiac tissue. Due to this major limitation, many recent studies have investigated approaches to improve pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation to close this large functionality gap between engineered and native cardiac tissue. This review integrates the natural developmental mechanisms of cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation. The variety of ways researchers have attempted to improve cardiomyocyte maturation in vitro by mimicking natural development, known as natural engineering, is readily discussed. The main focus of this review involves the synergistic role of electrical and mechanical stimulation, extracellular matrix interactions, and non-cardiomyocyte interactions in facilitating cardiomyocyte maturation. Overall, even with these current natural engineering approaches, pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes within three-dimensional engineered heart tissue still remain mostly within the early to late fetal stages of cardiomyocyte maturity. Therefore, although the end goal is to achieve adult phenotypic maturity, more emphasis must be placed on elucidating how the in vivo fetal microenvironment drives cardiomyocyte maturation. This

  16. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal...

  18. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal...

  19. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure...

  20. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure...

  1. Impact of dia- and catagenesis on sulphur and oxygen sequestration of biomarkers as revealed by artificial maturation of an immature sedimentary rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopmans, M.P.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis of an immature (R(a)??? 0.25%) sulphur-rich marl from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation (Messinian) in the Vena del Gesso Basin was carried out at 160C ??? T ???330 C for 72 h, to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the abundance and distribution of sulphur-containing and sulphur- and oxygen-linked carbon skeletons in low-molecular-weight and highmolecular-weight fractions (e.g. kerogen). To this end, compounds in the saturated hydrocarbon fraction, monoaromatic hydrocarbon fraction, polyaromatic hydrocarbon fraction, alkylsulphide fraction and ketone fraction were quantified, as well as compounds released after desulphurisation of the polar fraction and HI/LiAIH4 treatment of the desulphurised polar fraction. Sulphur-bound phytane and (20R)-5??,14??,17??(H) and (20R)-5??,14??,17??(H) C27 C29 steranes in the polar fraction become less abundant with increasing maturation temperature, whereas the amount of their corresponding hydrocarbons increases in the saturated hydrocarbon fraction. Carbon skeletons that are bound in the kerogen by multiple bonds (e.g. C38 n-alkane and isorenieratane) are first released into the polar fraction, and then as free hydrocarbons. These changes occur at relatively low levels of thermal maturity (R(a) <0.6%), as evidenced by the 'immature' values of biomarker maturity parameters such as the ????/(????+ ???? + ????) C35 hopane ratio and the 22S/(22S + 22R)-17??,21??(H) C35 hopane ratio. Sulphur- and oxygen-bound moieties, present in the polar fraction, are not stable with increasing thermal maturation. However, alkylthiophenes, ketones. 1,2-di-n-alkylbenzenes and free n-alkanes seem to be stable thermal degradation products of these sulphur- and oxygen-bound moieties. Thus, apart from free n-alkanes, which are abundantly present in more mature sedimentary rocks and crude oils, alkylthiophenes, 1,2-di-n-alkylbenzenes and ketones can also be expected to occur. The positions of the thiophene

  2. Thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) versus maturation and their effects on hydrogen stable isotopes of very dry alkane gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the first study of the effect of thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) on the hydrogen isotopes of natural gas. Variably sour (H2S-bearing) and very dry (>97% methane) gas samples from Lower Triassic, Permian and Carboniferous marine carbonate reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin, China, have been analysed. All gases seem to have been sourced from mature marine kerogen and contain H2S that resulted from TSR. The Carboniferous samples are largely unaffected by TSR and were used to assess the effects of normal thermal maturation processes on the carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane and ethane as a function of gas dryness (a proxy for thermal maturity). Maturation led to heavier carbon isotopes of methane and ethane and hydrogen isotopes of ethane; in contrast methane hydrogen isotopes seem to have little systematic variation with increasing maturity. TSR did not have a systematic effect on the hydrogen isotopes of methane, although the spread of values diminished (ending up at a constant -120‰) as TSR proceeded. This was possibly due to the partial thermochemical sulphate reduction of ethane adding isotopically light methane and thus offsetting the Rayleigh fractionation effects of TSR of methane. In contrast, hydrogen isotopes of ethane became much heavier as TSR proceeded, to values greater than those for samples only influenced by maturation. Under some circumstances, the effects of TSR can be identified and discerned from the effects of normal thermal maturation by plotting the difference between the carbon isotope compositions of methane and ethane and the difference between the hydrogen isotope compositions of methane and ethane. Do the hydrogen isotope ratios of alkane gases systematically vary as a function of dryness or sourness? Do the hydrogen isotope ratios of alkane gases from the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic dry gas reservoirs help reveal the maturity and/or extent of TSR in the Sichuan Basin? Is it possible to separate and

  3. KEROGEN OIL VALUE ENHANCEMENT RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Bunger, Ph.D.; Christopher P. Russell, Ph.D.; Donald E. Cogswell, M.S.

    2002-01-11

    Task 13 (a) was approved on December 21, 2001. Minimal work was performed for the quarter during the approval process. Laboratory and equipment facilities have been maintained in anticipation of the work to be done. The PI communicated with DOE and Estonia researchers during this period, providing advice and direction for the startup of the Estonia research, and preparing a Draft Teaming Agreement. The PI participated in an industrial liaison meeting with DOE personnel. This meeting is expected to lead to formal cooperation between industry and government.

  4. Mineralogical maturity in dunefields of North America, Africa and Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of dunefields in central and western North America show that mineralogical maturity can provide new insights into the origin and evolution of aeolian sand bodies. Many of the world's great sand seas in Africa, Asia and Australia are quartz-dominated and thus can be considered to be mineralogically mature. The Algodones (California) and Parker (Arizona) dunes in the southwestern United States are also mature, but have inherited a high degree of mineralogical maturity from quartz-rich sedimentary rocks drained by the Colorado River. In Libya, sediments of the Zallaf sand sea, which are almost pure quartz, may have originated in a similar fashion. The Fort Morgan (Colorado) and Casper (Wyoming) dunefields in the central Great Plains of North America, and the Namib sand sea of southern Africa have an intermediate degree of mineralogical maturity because their sources are large rivers that drained both unweathered plutonic and metamorphic rocks and mature sedimentary rocks. Mojave Desert dunefields in the southwestern United States are quite immature because they are in basins adjacent to plutonic rocks that were their sources. Other dunefields in the Great Plains of North America (those in Nebraska and Texas) are more mature than any possible source sediments and therefore reflect mineralogical evolution over time. Such changes in composition can occur because of either of two opposing long-term states of the dunefield. In one state, dunes are stable for long periods of time and chemical weathering depletes feldspars and other weatherable minerals in the sediment body. In the other state, which is most likely for the Great Plains, abrasion and ballistic impacts deplete the carbonate minerals and feldspars because the dunes are active for longer periods than they are stable. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mineralogical maturity in dunefields of North America, Africa and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2004-04-01

    Studies of dunefields in central and western North America show that mineralogical maturity can provide new insights into the origin and evolution of aeolian sand bodies. Many of the world's great sand seas in Africa, Asia and Australia are quartz-dominated and thus can be considered to be mineralogically mature. The Algodones (California) and Parker (Arizona) dunes in the southwestern United States are also mature, but have inherited a high degree of mineralogical maturity from quartz-rich sedimentary rocks drained by the Colorado River. In Libya, sediments of the Zallaf sand sea, which are almost pure quartz, may have originated in a similar fashion. The Fort Morgan (Colorado) and Casper (Wyoming) dunefields in the central Great Plains of North America, and the Namib sand sea of southern Africa have an intermediate degree of mineralogical maturity because their sources are large rivers that drained both unweathered plutonic and metamorphic rocks and mature sedimentary rocks. Mojave Desert dunefields in the southwestern United States are quite immature because they are in basins adjacent to plutonic rocks that were their sources. Other dunefields in the Great Plains of North America (those in Nebraska and Texas) are more mature than any possible source sediments and therefore reflect mineralogical evolution over time. Such changes in composition can occur because of either of two opposing long-term states of the dunefield. In one state, dunes are stable for long periods of time and chemical weathering depletes feldspars and other weatherable minerals in the sediment body. In the other state, which is most likely for the Great Plains, abrasion and ballistic impacts deplete the carbonate minerals and feldspars because the dunes are active for longer periods than they are stable.

  6. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity dates. 1421.101 Section 1421.101 Agriculture... Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than the... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for...

  7. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity dates. 1421.101 Section 1421.101 Agriculture... Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than the... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for...

  8. 38 CFR 7.7 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maturity. 7.7 Section 7.7... Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act Amendments of 1942 § 7.7 Maturity. (a) The phrase maturity of a policy as a death claim or otherwise (SSCRA, as amended) will not include a termination or maturity of a...

  9. 38 CFR 7.7 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maturity. 7.7 Section 7.7... Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act Amendments of 1942 § 7.7 Maturity. (a) The phrase maturity of a policy as a death claim or otherwise (SSCRA, as amended) will not include a termination or maturity of a...

  10. 38 CFR 7.7 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maturity. 7.7 Section 7.7... Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act Amendments of 1942 § 7.7 Maturity. (a) The phrase maturity of a policy as a death claim or otherwise (SSCRA, as amended) will not include a termination or maturity of a...

  11. 38 CFR 7.7 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maturity. 7.7 Section 7.7... Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act Amendments of 1942 § 7.7 Maturity. (a) The phrase maturity of a policy as a death claim or otherwise (SSCRA, as amended) will not include a termination or maturity of a...

  12. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity dates. 1421.101 Section 1421.101 Agriculture... Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than the... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for...

  13. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity dates. 1421.101 Section 1421.101 Agriculture... Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than the... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for...

  14. Career Maturity and Physically Disabled College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhead, E. Jane; Cope, Corrine S.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationships between career maturity, sex, physical disability, and grades in 40 disabled and 46 nondisabled college students. Results showed disabled students were more vocationally mature than nondisabled students and female students were more vocationally mature than males. Type of disability was not related to career maturity.…

  15. 7 CFR 51.2841 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.2841 Section 51.2841 Agriculture... Creole Types) Definitions § 51.2841 Mature. Mature means well cured. Midseason onions which are not customarily held in storage shall be considered mature when harvested in accordance with good commercial...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2841 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.2841 Section 51.2841 Agriculture... Mature. Mature means well cured. Midseason onions which are not customarily held in storage shall be considered mature when harvested in accordance with good commercial practice at a stage which will not result...

  17. 7 CFR 51.484 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.484 Section 51.484 Agriculture Regulations..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.484 Mature. Mature means that the cantaloup has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion...

  18. 7 CFR 51.484 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.484 Section 51.484 Agriculture Regulations..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.484 Mature. Mature means that the cantaloup has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2841 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.2841 Section 51.2841 Agriculture... Creole Types) Definitions § 51.2841 Mature. Mature means well cured. Midseason onions which are not customarily held in storage shall be considered mature when harvested in accordance with good commercial...

  20. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  1. Burial History, Thermal Maturity, and Oil and Gas Generation History of Source Rocks in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Laura N.R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Lewan, Michael D.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Burial history, thermal maturity, and timing of oil and gas generation were modeled for seven key source-rock units at eight well locations throughout the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Also modeled was the timing of cracking to gas of Phosphoria Formation-sourced oil in the Permian Park City Formation reservoirs at two well locations. Within the basin boundary, the Phosphoria is thin and only locally rich in organic carbon; it is thought that the Phosphoria oil produced from Park City and other reservoirs migrated from the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Other petroleum source rocks include the Cretaceous Thermopolis Shale, Mowry Shale, Frontier Formation, Cody Shale, Mesaverde and Meeteetse Formations, and the Tertiary (Paleocene) Fort Union Formation. Locations (wells) selected for burial history reconstructions include three in the deepest parts of the Bighorn Basin (Emblem Bench, Red Point/Husky, and Sellers Draw), three at intermediate depths (Amoco BN 1, Santa Fe Tatman, and McCulloch Peak), and two at relatively shallow locations (Dobie Creek and Doctor Ditch). The thermal maturity of source rocks is greatest in the deep central part of the basin and decreases to the south, east, and north toward the basin margins. The Thermopolis and Mowry Shales are predominantly gas-prone source rocks, containing a mix of Type-III and Type-II kerogens. The Frontier, Cody, Mesaverde, Meeteetse, and Fort Union Formations are gas-prone source rocks containing Type-III kerogen. Modeling results indicate that in the deepest areas, (1) the onset of petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred from early Paleocene through early Eocene time, (2) peak petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred during Eocene time, and (3) onset of gas generation from the Fort Union Formation occurred during early Eocene time and peak generation occurred from late Eocene to early Miocene time. Only in the deepest part of the basin did the oil generated from the Thermopolis and

  2. Geochemical and isotopic composition of organic matter in the Kupferschiefer of the Polish Zechstein basin: relation to maturity and base metal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, A.; Gratzer, R.; Püttmann, W.; Oszczepalski, S.

    Drill core samples from the Kupferschiefer of Poland were collected throughout the Zechstein basin. The samples included oxidized Kupferschiefer from Rote Fäule zones, adjacent Cu-mineralized Kupferschiefer of southwestern Poland, and drill cores from the central and northern parts of the Zechstein basin. The Kupferschiefer samples reflect differences in base metal mineralization and in burial depth (630-5067m). The organic matter of the Kupferschiefer is characterized by Rock-Eval and GC-MS analyses. Classification of kerogen by hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI, OI), correlations of Tmax vs the present depth of the Kupferschiefer, soluble organic matter (SOM) yields, and relative proportions of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons of the SOM provide evidence for an oxidative alteration of organic matter in highly mineralized Kupferschiefer samples near the Rote Fäule zones. This is confirmed by differences in the composition of the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of the soluble organic matter: Saturated hydrocarbons from Rote Fäule samples are dominated by short-chain n-alkanes and higher abundances of pristane and phytane relative to heptadecane (n-C17) and octadecane (n-C18), respectively, compared with samples more distant to the Rote Fäule zone. Compositional changes of the aromatic hydrocarbon fractions with decreasing distance to that zone are characterized by the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elevated ratios of phenanthrene to methylphenanthrenes that are attributed to demethylation reactions and resulted in a decrease of the methylphenanthrene index (MPI1). Kupferschiefer samples from the barren zone of the Polish Basin do not show these alteration patterns. The observed variations in organic matter composition with burial depth are consistent with changes due to increasing thermal maturation. Maturity assessment is achieved from MPI1 and the methyldibenzothiophene ratio (MDR). From the relationship between the maturity

  3. North Slope, Alaska: Source rock distribution, richness, thermal maturity, and petroleum charge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Magoon, L.B.; Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C.; Keller, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Four key marine petroleum source rock units were identified, characterized, and mapped in the subsurface to better understand the origin and distribution of petroleum on the North Slope of Alaska. These marine source rocks, from oldest to youngest, include four intervals: (1) Middle-Upper Triassic Shublik Formation, (2) basal condensed section in the Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Kingak Shale, (3) Cretaceous pebble shale unit, and (4) Cretaceous Hue Shale. Well logs for more than 60 wells and total organic carbon (TOC) and Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses for 1183 samples in 125 well penetrations of the source rocks were used to map the present-day thickness of each source rock and the quantity (TOC), quality (hydrogen index), and thermal maturity (Tmax) of the organic matter. Based on assumptions related to carbon mass balance and regional distributions of TOC, the present-day source rock quantity and quality maps were used to determine the extent of fractional conversion of the kerogen to petroleum and to map the original TOC (TOCo) and the original hydrogen index (HIo) prior to thermal maturation. The quantity and quality of oil-prone organic matter in Shublik Formation source rock generally exceeded that of the other units prior to thermal maturation (commonly TOCo > 4 wt.% and HIo > 600 mg hydrocarbon/g TOC), although all are likely sources for at least some petroleum on the North Slope. We used Rock-Eval and hydrous pyrolysis methods to calculate expulsion factors and petroleum charge for each of the four source rocks in the study area. Without attempting to identify the correct methods, we conclude that calculations based on Rock-Eval pyrolysis overestimate expulsion factors and petroleum charge because low pressure and rapid removal of thermally cracked products by the carrier gas retards cross-linking and pyrobitumen formation that is otherwise favored by natural burial maturation. Expulsion factors and petroleum charge based on hydrous pyrolysis may also be high

  4. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  5. Psychosocial Maturity or Social Desirability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen

    The psychosocial maturity scale (PSM) described in several earlier papers is a self-report questionnaire. It is vulnerable, as are other questionnaires of this type, to respondents' wishes to present themselves in a socially desirable light. In this study, scores on two social desirability scales are examined in relation to PSM. Correlations…

  6. Human oocyte maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coticchio, Giovanni; Dal-Canto, Mariabeatrice; Guglielmo, Maria-Cristina; Mignini-Renzini, Mario; Fadini, Rubens

    2012-01-01

    Oocytes from medium-sized antral follicles have already completed their growth phase and, if released from the follicular environment and cultured in vitro, are able to resume the meiotic process and mature. However, in vitro maturation (IVM) does not entirely support all the nuclear and cytoplasmic changes that occur physiologically as an effect of the ovulatory stimulus. Regardless, oocyte IVM is widely applied for the breeding of agriculturally important species. In assisted reproduction technology, IVM has been proposed as an alternative treatment to circumvent the drawbacks of standard ovarian stimulation regimens. Initially introduced to eliminate the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome afflicting women presenting with polycystic ovaries, subsequently IVM has been suggested to represent an additional approach suitable also for normovulatory patients. So far, in children born from IVM cycles, no doubts of an increased incidence of congenital abnormalities have been raised. Many more births would be achieved if novel IVM systems, currently dominated by empiricism, could be conceived according to more physiological criteria. Recent findings shedding new light on the control of meiotic progression, the support of cumulus cells to the oocyte cellular reorganization occurring during maturation, and the modulation of the stimulus that promotes oocyte maturation downstream the mid-cycle gonadotropin signal are likely to provide crucial hints for the development of more efficient IVM systems.

  7. Vineland Social Maturity Scale Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    The Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS), despite its limitations, is an excellent clinical technique and includes psychometric and questionnaire characteristics. It is a good single measure of adaptive behavior. The VSMS Profile in this paper uses content categories different from the original Scale, but based upon the same items. It lends…

  8. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  9. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  10. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  11. Financial maturity of paper birch

    Treesearch

    Joseph J. Mendel

    1969-01-01

    One objective in forestry is to earn the greatest possible return on the capital invested in growing timber. To do this, the forester not only must know which silvicultural methods to use, but also ought to know the methods of economic analysis that will help him make the decisions that will lead to the greatest return. The financial maturity concept provides a method...

  12. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  13. Loop nucleotides control primary and mature miRNA function in target recognition and repression

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Si-Biao; Deis Trujillo, Robin; Tang, Yujie; O'Gorman, William E

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) genes produce three major RNA products; primary (pri-), precursor (pre-), and mature miRNAs. Each product includes sequences complementary to cognate targets, thus they all can in principle interact with the targets. In a recent study we showed that pri-miRNAs play a direct role in target recognition and repression in the absence of functional mature miRNAs. Here we examined the functional contribution of pri-miRNAs in target regulation when full-length functional miRNAs are present. We found that pri-let-7 loop nucleotides control the production of the 5′ end of mature miRNAs and modulate the activity of the miRNA gene. This insight enabled us to modulate biogenesis of functional mature miRNAs and dissect the causal relationships between mature miRNA biogenesis and target repression. We demonstrate that both pri- and mature miRNAs can contribute to target repression and that their contributions can be distinguished by the differences between the pri- and mature miRNAs' sensitivity to bind to the first seed nucleotide. Our results demonstrate that the regulatory information encoded in the pri-/pre-miRNA loop nucleotides controls the activities of pri-miRNAs and mature let-7 by influencing pri-miRNA and target complex formation and the fidelity of mature miRNA seed generation. PMID:22142974

  14. A low-temperature hydrothermal maturation mechanism for sedimentary basins associated with volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summer, Neil S.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    Data from sediments associated with volcanic rocks around the world demonstrate that a generally unrecognized maturation mechanism is operating in certain geologically active areas. This mechanism is hydrothermal in nature and involves the transport of heat away from intrusive bodies or deep penetrating faults by laterally-flowing aquifers. The mechanism accounts for regional maturation and diagenetic effects which cannot be explained by conductive heat transfer. In many cases economically important hydrocarbon accumulations can be associated with volcanism via a hydrothermal maturation model, wherein thermal fluids playa major role in the maturation of source rocks and assist in migration of the evolved hydrocarbons. Applying the model would not only give new insights into the thermal history of basin sediments but may assist in determining areas of highest exploration potential. Overall, volcanism has played a larger role in the thermal maturation of certain sedimentary basins than has previously been assumed.

  15. New insights on timing of oil and gas generation in the central Gulf Coast interior zone based on hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, Michael D.; Dutton, Shirley P.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Hentz, Tucker F.

    2002-01-01

    Timing of oil and gas generation from Turonian and Smackover source rocks in the central Gulf CoastInterior Zone was determined in one-dimensional burial-history curves (BHCs) using hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters. The results predict that basal Smackover source-rock intervals with Type-IIS kerogen completed oil generation between 121 and 99 Ma, and Turonian source-rocks with Type-II kerogen remain immature over most of the same area. The only exception to the latter occurs in the northwestern part of the Mississippi salt basin, where initial stages of oil generation have started as a result of higher thermal gradients. This maturity difference between Turonian and Smackover source rocks is predicted with present-day thermal gradients. Predicted oil generation prior to the Sabine and Monroe uplifts suggests that a significant amount of the oil emplaced in Cretaceous reservoirs of these uplifts would have been lost during periods of erosion. Hydrous-pyrolysis kineticparameters predict that cracking of Smackover oil to gas started 52 Ma, which postdates major uplift and erosional events of the Sabine and Monroe uplifts. This generated gas would accumulate and persist in these uplift areas as currently observed. The predicted timing of oil and gas generation with hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters is in accordance with the observed scarcity of oil from Turonian source rocks, predominance of gas accumulations on the Sabine and Monroe uplifts, and predominance of oil accumulations along the northern rim of the Interior Zone.

  16. Oil/source rock correlations in the Polish Flysch Carpathians and Mesozoic basement and organic facies of the Oligocene Menilite Shales: Insights from hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, John B.; Kotarba, M.J.; Lewan, M.D.; Wieclaw, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Oligocene Menilite Shales in the study area in the Polish Flysch Carpathians are organic-rich and contain varying mixtures of Type-II, Type-IIS and Type-III kerogen. The kerogens are thermally immature to marginally mature based on atomic H/C ratios and Rock-Eval data. This study defined three organic facies, i.e., sedimentary strata with differing hydrocarbon-generation potentials due to varying types and concentrations of organic matter. These facies correspond to the Silesian Unit and the eastern and western portions of the Skole Unit. Analysis of oils generated by hydrous pyrolysis of outcrop samples of Menilite Shales demonstrates that natural crude oils reservoired in the flysch sediments appear to have been generated from the Menilite Shales. Natural oils reservoired in the Mesozoic basement of the Carpathian Foredeep appear to be predominantly derived and migrated from Menilite Shales, with a minor contribution from at least one other source rock most probably within Middle Jurassic strata. Definition of organic facies may have been influenced by the heterogeneous distribution of suitable Menilite Shales outcrops and producing wells, and subsequent sample selection during the analytical phases of the study. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Steroid signaling in mature follicles is important for Drosophila ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Although ecdysteroid signaling regulates multiple steps in oogenesis, it is not known whether it regulates Drosophila ovulation, a process involving a matrix metalloproteinase-dependent follicle rupture. In this study, we demonstrated that ecdysteroid signaling is operating in mature follicle cells to control ovulation. Moreover, knocking down shade (shd), encoding the monooxygenase that converts ecdysone (E) to the more active 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), specifically in mature follicle cells, blocked follicle rupture, which was rescued by ectopic expression of shd or exogenous 20E. In addition, disruption of the Ecdysone receptor (EcR) in mature follicle cells mimicked shd-knockdown defects, which were reversed by ectopic expression of EcR.B2 but not by EcR.A or EcR.B1 isoforms. Furthermore, we showed that ecdysteroid signaling is essential for the proper activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2) for follicle rupture. Our data strongly suggest that 20E produced in follicle cells before ovulation activates EcR.B2 to prime mature follicles to be responsive to neuronal ovulatory stimuli, thus providing mechanistic insights into steroid signaling in Drosophila ovulation. PMID:28069934

  18. Maturation of Oocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2016-01-01

    Only a fraction of oocytes present in the ovaries at birth are ever ovulated during the lifetime of a female mammal. In vitro maturation (IVM) offers the possibility to exploit what is a largely untapped biological resource. Although IVM is used routinely for the in vitro production of embryos in domestic species, especially cattle, its clinical use in human-assisted reproduction is still evolving. The successful recapitulation in vitro of the events associated with successful oocyte maturation is not always achieved, with the majority of immature oocytes typically failing to develop to the blastocyst stage. Evidence suggests that although culture conditions throughout in vitro embryo production may have a modest influence on the developmental potential of the early embryo, the quality of the oocyte at the start of the process is the key factor determining the proportion of oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage.

  19. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  20. Maturation of the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults - intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain's region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex, disease

  1. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Long Chain Fatty Acids Present in a Type I Kerogen Using Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry: Compared with BF3/MeOH Methylation/GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamga, Albert W.; Behar, Fancoise; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2014-05-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are present in various natural samples and are easily detectable using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) in negative ion mode. The capability of the ESI-FT-ICR-MS for quantifying LCFAs was evaluated by performing a standard addition followed by an internal standard methodology to several kerogen extracts using n-C20 fatty acid as standard. As the concentration of the standard increased, the magnitude of its peak ( m/z 311.29525) increased linearly but with two separate slopes, leaving the entire mass spectra relatively unchanged, which shows evidence of reproducibility. Response factors of other LCFAs are obtained using a standard addition approach. We employed five LCFA standards ( n-C15, n-C19, n-C24, n-C26, and n-C30) with different carbon numbers. This allowed us to determine the response factor of all fatty acids (with carbon number between 15 and 30) by plotting the slope of each standard versus its carbon number. With the observed response factors and use of the internal standard, the concentrations of LCFAs in four kerogen extracts were measured by ESI-FT-ICR-MS and compared with those from GC-FID. The carbon number distribution obtained by ESI-FT-ICR-MS matched well the GC-FID distribution (5%-50%) with the exception of C16 and C18, considering that ESI-FT-ICR-MS does not differentiate between normal and branched LCFAs, whereas GC-FID does. This allows one to quantitatively compare samples with a relatively similar matrix for specific compounds such as LCFAs with no need of time-consuming derivatization procedures. Moreover, the calibration can be extended to higher carbon numbers with ESI-FT-ICR-MS, beyond the capabilities of GC/MS.

  3. Quantitative analysis of long chain fatty acids present in a Type I kerogen using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: compared with BF₃/MeOH methylation/GC-FID.

    PubMed

    Kamga, Albert W; Behar, Fancoise; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2014-05-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are present in various natural samples and are easily detectable using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) in negative ion mode. The capability of the ESI-FT-ICR-MS for quantifying LCFAs was evaluated by performing a standard addition followed by an internal standard methodology to several kerogen extracts using n-C₂₀ fatty acid as standard. As the concentration of the standard increased, the magnitude of its peak (m/z 311.29525) increased linearly but with two separate slopes, leaving the entire mass spectra relatively unchanged, which shows evidence of reproducibility. Response factors of other LCFAs are obtained using a standard addition approach. We employed five LCFA standards (n-C₁₅, n-C₁₉, n-C₂₄, n-C₂₆, and n-C₃₀) with different carbon numbers. This allowed us to determine the response factor of all fatty acids (with carbon number between 15 and 30) by plotting the slope of each standard versus its carbon number. With the observed response factors and use of the internal standard, the concentrations of LCFAs in four kerogen extracts were measured by ESI-FT-ICR-MS and compared with those from GC-FID. The carbon number distribution obtained by ESI-FT-ICR-MS matched well the GC-FID distribution (5%–50%) with the exception of C₁₆ and C₁₈, considering that ESI-FT-ICR-MS does not differentiate between normal and branched LCFAs, whereas GC-FID does. This allows one to quantitatively compare samples with a relatively similar matrix for specific compounds such as LCFAs with no need of time-consuming derivatization procedures. Moreover, the calibration can be extended to higher carbon numbers with ESI-FT-ICR-MS, beyond the capabilities of GC/MS.

  4. Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Maturation of Serotonin Neuron Identity and Function.

    PubMed

    Spencer, William C; Deneris, Evan S

    2017-01-01

    these processes may result in long-lasting changes in brain function in adulthood. Further study of 5-HT neuron gene regulatory networks is likely to provide additional insight into how neurons acquire their mature identities and how terminal selector-type TFs function in postmitotic vertebrate neurons.

  5. A Patient-Centered Framework for Evaluating Digital Maturity of Health Services: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara; Mayer, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital maturity is the extent to which digital technologies are used as enablers to deliver a high-quality health service. Extensive literature exists about how to assess the components of digital maturity, but it has not been used to design a comprehensive framework for evaluation. Consequently, the measurement systems that do exist are limited to evaluating digital programs within one service or care setting, meaning that digital maturity evaluation is not accounting for the needs of patients across their care pathways. Objective The objective of our study was to identify the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity and to create a novel, evidence-based tool for evaluating digital maturity across patient care pathways. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature to find the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity. We searched the PubMed database for all papers relevant to digital maturity evaluation. Papers were selected if they provided insight into how to appraise digital systems within the health service and if they indicated the factors that constitute or facilitate digital maturity. Papers were analyzed to identify methodology for evaluating digital maturity and indicators of digitally mature systems. We then used the resulting information about methodology to design an evaluation framework. Following that, the indicators of digital maturity were extracted and grouped into increasing levels of maturity and operationalized as metrics within the evaluation framework. Results We identified 28 papers as relevant to evaluating digital maturity, from which we derived 5 themes. The first theme concerned general evaluation methodology for constructing the framework (7 papers). The following 4 themes were the increasing levels of digital maturity: resources and ability (6 papers), usage (7 papers), interoperability (3 papers), and impact (5 papers). The framework includes metrics for each of these levels at each

  6. A Patient-Centered Framework for Evaluating Digital Maturity of Health Services: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Flott, Kelsey; Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara; Mayer, Erik

    2016-04-14

    Digital maturity is the extent to which digital technologies are used as enablers to deliver a high-quality health service. Extensive literature exists about how to assess the components of digital maturity, but it has not been used to design a comprehensive framework for evaluation. Consequently, the measurement systems that do exist are limited to evaluating digital programs within one service or care setting, meaning that digital maturity evaluation is not accounting for the needs of patients across their care pathways. The objective of our study was to identify the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity and to create a novel, evidence-based tool for evaluating digital maturity across patient care pathways. We systematically reviewed the literature to find the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity. We searched the PubMed database for all papers relevant to digital maturity evaluation. Papers were selected if they provided insight into how to appraise digital systems within the health service and if they indicated the factors that constitute or facilitate digital maturity. Papers were analyzed to identify methodology for evaluating digital maturity and indicators of digitally mature systems. We then used the resulting information about methodology to design an evaluation framework. Following that, the indicators of digital maturity were extracted and grouped into increasing levels of maturity and operationalized as metrics within the evaluation framework. We identified 28 papers as relevant to evaluating digital maturity, from which we derived 5 themes. The first theme concerned general evaluation methodology for constructing the framework (7 papers). The following 4 themes were the increasing levels of digital maturity: resources and ability (6 papers), usage (7 papers), interoperability (3 papers), and impact (5 papers). The framework includes metrics for each of these levels at each stage of the typical patient care pathway

  7. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a...

  8. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a...

  9. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1530 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION... Mature. “Mature” means that the fruit has reached the stage of maturity which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1530 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1 2 (INSPECTION... Mature. “Mature” means that the fruit has reached the stage of maturity which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  14. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a stage of growth which will insure a proper completion of...

  15. Career Maturity: The Construct and its Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    Describes vocational maturity and assists counselors in identifying what the various career maturity instruments measure. Discusses task variable measures, intervening variable measures, response variable measures, and methods of choosing an instrument. (JAC)

  16. Career Maturity: The Construct and its Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    Describes vocational maturity and assists counselors in identifying what the various career maturity instruments measure. Discusses task variable measures, intervening variable measures, response variable measures, and methods of choosing an instrument. (JAC)

  17. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  18. The thermal maturation degree of organic matter from source rocks revealed by wells logs including examples from Murzuk Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, V.; Gheorghe, A.

    1995-08-01

    The customary technique used to know the organic matter quantity per rock volume it as well as the organic matter maturation stage is based on geochemical analyses accomplished on a preselected number of samples and cuttings drawn from boreholes during the drilling period. But the same objectives can be approached without any extra cost using the continuous measurements of well logs recorded in each well from the ground surface to the total depth. During the diagenetic stage, the identification of potential source rocks out of which no hydrocarbon have been generated may be carried out using a well logging suite including Gamma Ray Spectrometry, the Compensated Neutron/Litho Density combination and a Dual Induction/Sonic Log. During the catagenetic stage the onset of oil generation brings some important changes in the organic matter structure as well as in the fluid distribution throughout the pore space of source rocks. The replacement of electric conductive water by electric non-conductive hydrocarbons, together with water and oil being expelled from source rocks represent a process of different intensities dependent of time/temperature geohistory and kerogen type. The different generation and expulsion scenarios of hydrocarbons taking place during the catagenetic and metagenetic stages of source rocks are very well revealed by Induction and Laterolog investigations. Several crossplots relating vitrinite reflectance, total organic carbon and log-derived physical parameters are illustrated and discussed. The field applications are coming from Murzuk Basin, where Rompetrol of Libya is operating.

  19. Hydrocarbon Maturation and Os Mixing on Bolide Impact at the Frasnian-Famennian Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H.; Zimmerman, A.; Yang, G.; Hannah, J.; Egenhoff, S.

    2009-04-01

    An intractable problem in the application of Re-Os geochemistry has been knowledge of the distribution of Re and Os between source rock and generated hydrocarbon. Solutions lie in combined experimental work with controlled and induced maturation, and field studies optimized by known source rock and time of hydrocarbon generation. The Siljan impact site with its variably tilted but largely intact Ordovician-Silurian sections provides an unsurpassed opportunity to examine the Re-Os systematics of source rock and generated crude oil, and the Re-Os imprint of the bolide. This three-component system contains (1) a time pin for maturation (377 ± 2 Ma; laser argon dating of impact melt, Reimold et al. 2005) arguably at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary, (2) known source rocks with kerogens still intact, and (3) crude oils generated on impact. Modeling takes into consideration the possibility of pre-impact maturation as well. At Siljan, numerous quarries expose the Upper Ordovician Boda and Kullsberg limestone mounds, and locally, the underlying and laterally equivalent Tretaspis (Fjäcka) shale. We obtained a sample of crude oil seeping from a drill hole in the quarry floor at Solberga. Preliminary Re-Os analyses on four aliquots of this oil form an excellent linear array in 187Re/188Os versus 187Os/188Os space. The associated age, however, is impossibly old (Neoproterozoic), and the initial 187Os/188Os unreasonably low (0.2). Rather, this linear array fits a mixing line between a meteoritic component and a hydrocarbon generated from the Tretaspis shale. We are presently performing further tests to isolate the two end-members. Filtering suggests that the extraterrestrial component consists of small physical particles which can be largely removed from the petroleum fraction. The extreme contrast in Re-Os composition between meteorite (known) and black shale (in progress) end-members maximizes the sensitivity of the isotopic study. Reimold, W.U., Kelley, S.P., Sherlock, S

  20. 7 CFR 51.1554 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1554 Mature. Mature means that the skins of the potatoes... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1554 Section 51.1554 Agriculture...-tenth of the skin missing or “feathered.” ...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1585 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1585 Mature. Mature means that the outer skin (epidermis... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1585 Section 51.1585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1585 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1585 Mature. Mature means that the outer skin (epidermis... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mature. 51.1585 Section 51.1585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1554 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1554 Mature. Mature means that the skins of the potatoes... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mature. 51.1554 Section 51.1554 Agriculture...-tenth of the skin missing or “feathered.” ...

  4. 25 CFR 101.14 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 101.14 Section 101.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.14 Maturity. The maturity of any United States direct loan shall not exceed thirty years. Loans...

  5. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity means...

  6. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933... Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in the Federal Register the available maturities for a 504 loan and the Debenture that funds it. Such available...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3039 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3039 Section 29.3039 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. Tobacco is mature when it reaches its prime state of development. The...

  8. 25 CFR 101.14 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maturity. 101.14 Section 101.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.14 Maturity. The maturity of any United States direct loan shall not exceed thirty years. Loans...

  9. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.27 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity not to...

  10. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities. (a... the original loan to the final maturity of the refinanced loan shall not exceed: (i) In the case of a...

  11. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity means...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3039 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3039 Section 29.3039 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. Tobacco is mature when it reaches its prime state of development. The...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3039 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3039 Section 29.3039 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. Tobacco is mature when it reaches its prime state of development. The...

  14. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity...

  15. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.27 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity not to...

  16. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity means...

  17. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity means...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3039 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3039 Section 29.3039 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. Tobacco is mature when it reaches its prime state of development. The...

  19. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity...

  20. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933... Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in the Federal Register the available maturities for a 504 loan and the Debenture that funds it. Such available...

  1. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity...

  2. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.27 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity not to...

  3. 7 CFR 1710.115 - Final maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final maturity. 1710.115 Section 1710.115 Agriculture... Basic Policies § 1710.115 Final maturity. (a) RUS is authorized to make loans and loan guarantees with a final maturity of up to 35 years. The borrower may elect a repayment period for a loan not longer than...

  4. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity...

  5. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933... Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in the Federal Register the available maturities for a 504 loan and the Debenture that funds it. Such available...

  6. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3039 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3039 Section 29.3039 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. Tobacco is mature when it reaches its prime state of development. The...

  8. 25 CFR 101.14 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 101.14 Section 101.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.14 Maturity. The maturity of any United States direct loan shall not exceed thirty years. Loans...

  9. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity means...

  10. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.27 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity not to...

  11. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933... Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in the Federal Register the available maturities for a 504 loan and the Debenture that funds it. Such available...

  12. 25 CFR 101.14 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maturity. 101.14 Section 101.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.14 Maturity. The maturity of any United States direct loan shall not exceed thirty years. Loans...

  13. 25 CFR 101.14 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Maturity. 101.14 Section 101.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.14 Maturity. The maturity of any United States direct loan shall not exceed thirty years. Loans...

  14. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.27 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity not to...

  15. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933... Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in the Federal Register the available maturities for a 504 loan and the Debenture that funds it. Such available...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These orange maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These orange maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  20. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  1. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  2. Career Maturity in High School Age Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Joan Daniels

    1982-01-01

    Examined career maturity in high school females by using a set of general career-maturity and gender-specific, career-related measures, and an alternate career-maturity criterion measure, career-planning involvement. Results indicated significant relationships between achievement orientation and occupational information and knowledge of women's…

  3. 7 CFR 51.1351 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.1351 Section 51.1351 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1351 Mature. Mature means that the pear has reached the...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.1238 Section 51.1238 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that the shells are firm and well developed. ...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.1238 Section 51.1238 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that the shells are firm and well developed. ...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1554 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.1554 Section 51.1554 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1554 Mature. Mature means that the skins of the potatoes are generally firmly set and not more than 5 percent of the...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1351 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.1351 Section 51.1351 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1351 Mature. Mature...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1238 Section 51.1238 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that the...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1351 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.1351 Section 51.1351 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1351 Mature. Mature...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1554 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.1554 Section 51.1554 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1554 Mature. Mature means that the skins of the potatoes...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1585 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.1585 Section 51.1585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1585 Mature. Mature...

  12. 7 CFR 51.3203 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.3203 Section 51.3203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.3203 Mature. Mature means that the onion is fairly well cured, and at least fairly firm. ...

  13. 7 CFR 51.3203 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.3203 Section 51.3203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Bermuda-Granex-Grano Type Onions Definitions § 51.3203 Mature. Mature means that the...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1585 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.1585 Section 51.1585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1585 Mature. Mature means that the outer skin (epidermis...

  15. 7 CFR 51.3203 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.3203 Section 51.3203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.3203 Mature. Mature means that the onion is fairly well cured, and at least fairly firm. ...

  16. 7 CFR 51.693 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mature. 51.693 Section 51.693 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.693 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1907 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.1907 Section 51.1907 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1907 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion...

  18. 7 CFR 51.631 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mature. 51.631 Section 51.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...) Definitions § 51.631 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1351 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1351 Section 51.1351 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1351 Mature. Mature means that the pear has reached the...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1585 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.1585 Section 51.1585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1585 Mature. Mature...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2930 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.2930 Section 51.2930 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2930 Mature. Mature means having reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the...

  2. 7 CFR 51.3203 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mature. 51.3203 Section 51.3203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Bermuda-Granex-Grano Type Onions Definitions § 51.3203 Mature. Mature means that the...

  3. 7 CFR 51.631 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.631 Section 51.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.631 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning...

  4. 7 CFR 51.2930 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.2930 Section 51.2930 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2930 Mature. Mature means having reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1554 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.1554 Section 51.1554 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1554 Mature. Mature means that the skins of the potatoes are generally firmly set and not more than 5 percent of the...

  6. 7 CFR 51.2930 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.2930 Section 51.2930 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2930 Mature. Mature means having reached the stage of...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2930 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.2930 Section 51.2930 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2930 Mature. Mature means having reached the stage of...

  8. 7 CFR 51.693 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.693 Section 51.693 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.693 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  9. 7 CFR 51.631 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.631 Section 51.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...) Definitions § 51.631 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  10. 7 CFR 51.693 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.693 Section 51.693 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.693 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.1238 Section 51.1238 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that the...

  12. 7 CFR 51.631 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.631 Section 51.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.631 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning...

  13. 7 CFR 51.631 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.631 Section 51.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...) Definitions § 51.631 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  14. 7 CFR 51.693 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.693 Section 51.693 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.693 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned that term in the laws and...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1907 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.1907 Section 51.1907 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1907 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion...

  16. 7 CFR 51.3203 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.3203 Section 51.3203 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Bermuda-Granex-Grano Type Onions Definitions § 51.3203 Mature. Mature means that the...

  17. 7 CFR 51.693 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.693 Section 51.693 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.693 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning currently assigned...

  18. Micropropagation of juvenile and mature american beech

    Treesearch

    Melanie J. Barker; Paula M. Pijut; Michael E. Ostry; David R. Houston

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to micropropagate juvenile and mature American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) resistant to beech bark disease. Shoot tips (from juvenile seedlings and root sprouts of mature trees) and buds from branches of mature trees, were cultured and multiplied on aspen culture medium supplemented with 0.89 ?M 6-benzyladenine, 0.27 ?M a-...

  19. [Arrest of maturation in spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Bellocci, M; Martini, M; Bruno, B; Moscardelli, S; Fabbrini, A; Properzi, G

    1982-07-30

    The ultrastructural aspects of the germinal epithelium of 10 infertile men affected by maturative arrest of spermatogenesis were studied. We noted an increased number of malformed germinal cells. Marginal nuclear vescicles were present in spermatogonia of patients affected by spermatogonial arrest. The few spermatid present in the germinal epithelium of the patients affected by a spermatidic arrest presented changes of the nuclear condensation, the acrosome, and the tail. The Sertoli cells presented an immature aspect of the nucleus and changes of the "mantle". A possible correlation between the Sertoli cells changes and the altered spermatogenesis was proposed.

  20. Phenotype of normal hairline maturation.

    PubMed

    Rassman, William R; Pak, Jae P; Kim, Jino

    2013-08-01

    Hairlines change shape with age, starting at birth. A good head of hair is frequently present some time after ages 3 to 5 years. The look of childhood has its corresponding hairline, and, as the child grows and develops into adulthood, facial morphology migrate changes from a childlike look to a more mature look. This article discusses the dynamics of hairline evolution and the phenotypic variations of the front and side hairlines in men and women. A modeling system is introduced that provides a common language to define the various anatomic points of the full range of hairlines.

  1. Academic Achievement of High School Students in Relation to Their Anxiety, Emotional Maturity and Social Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puar, Surjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the non-cognitive variables like anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity and their relationship with academic achievement and also to see the locale-wise differences on the basis of their anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity. The study was conducted over a sample of 400 (200…

  2. Validation of endoscopy for determination of maturity in small salmonids and sex of mature individuals

    Treesearch

    Erica A. Swenson; Amanda E. Rosenberger; Philip J. Howell

    2007-01-01

    Fish maturity status, sex ratio, and age and size at first maturity are important parameters in population assessments and life history studies. In most empirical studies of these variables, fish are sacrificed and dissected to obtain data. However, maturity status and the sex of mature individuals can be determined by inserting an endoscope through a small incision in...

  3. The Relationship Between Cognitive Career Maturity and Self-Reported Career Maturity of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated relationship between scores on measures of cognitive career maturity and self-reported career maturity in high school sophomores (N=391) and juniors (N=283). Results suggest that there is no relationship between measured career maturity competencies and self-reported career maturity competencies of high school students. (Author/NB)

  4. A Maturity Model for Enterprise Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Chen, David; Naudet, Yannick

    Existing interoperability maturity models are fragmented and only cover some interoperability aspects. This paper tentatively proposes a maturity model for enterprise interoperability which is elaborated on the basis of existing ones. It is also consistent to the Enterprise Interoperability Framework currently under the standardization process. After a brief introduction, the paper reviews existing maturity models for interoperability and recalls the basic concepts of the Enterprise Interoperability Framework. Then the proposed maturity model for enterprise interoperability is discussed in details. Metrics for determining maturity levels are presented as well. Finally the last part of the paper gives the conclusions and perspectives for future work.

  5. Sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus

    SciTech Connect

    Tardif, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an examination of the process of female sexual maturation in the cotton-top tamarin, Saguinus oedipus oedipus, a South-American primate of the family, Callitrichidae. Two types of questions are addressed. The first question is whether the type of social grouping in which a young female lives affects the rate of her sexual maturation. Specifically, is there a difference between the maturation rate of a female housed with a strange adult male and a female housed with her natal group (i.e., her parents and various siblings). Second, the effect of sexual maturation on various social interactions is examined. Specifically are male-female interactions in mated pairs and mother-daughter interactions in natal groups changed by the sexual maturation of the young females. The mother's presence was not related to the daughter's maturation age. However, whether the natal group, as a whole, inhibited maturation, or unrelated males accelerated maturation, or both, remains unknown. Most of the behavioral interactions involving maturing females were unchanged by maturation. There was some indication that certain behaviors were affected by maturation, but only if a strange unrelated male was present.

  6. Neural networks predict tomato maturity stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Federico

    1999-03-01

    Almost 40% of the total horticultural produce exported from Mexico the USA is tomato, and quality is fundamental for maintaining the market. Many fruits packed at the green-mature stage do not mature towards a red color as they were harvested before achieving its physiological maturity. Tomato gassed for advancing maturation does not respond on those fruits, and repacking is necessary at terminal markets, causing losses to the producer. Tomato spectral signatures are different on each maturity stage and tomato size was poorly correlated against peak wavelengths. A back-propagation neural network was used to predict tomato maturity using reflectance ratios as inputs. Higher success rates were achieved on tomato maturity stage recognition with neural networks than with discriminant analysis.

  7. Physiological thermoregulation of mature alligators.

    PubMed

    Smith, E N; Standora, E A; Robertson, S L

    1984-01-01

    A 67.1 kg alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), tested in air, heated twice as fast as it cooled. The cooling thermal time constant was 425 min while alive. Warming and cooling thermal time constants were 421 min after death. The thermal time constant was not appropriate in describing warming in air of mature alligators. Surface and subdermal heat flow measurements of the 67.1 kg animal indicate greater blood flow in the skin during warming compared to cooling. Two mature alligators, 49.9 and 103 kg, were heated and cooled in water. Warming time constants were 67 and 110 min respectively. Cooling time constants were 180 and 246 min. Data from this study were combined with previously published thermal time constants for alligators providing regression equations for alligators ranging from 37 g to 103 kg. Regression equations for alligators tested in water are: tau w = 8.81 M050 tau c = 12.6 M0.62. Time constants (tau) are in minutes (w = warming, c = cooling) with all measurements in stirred water; mass, M, is in kg. Thermal conductance and metabolism data are combined to provide an estimate of the amount the body temperature of theoretical alligators ranging from 50 g to 1000 kg would be elevated by metabolism. A body temperature of 34.2 degrees C is predicted for a 1000 kg theoretical alligator in 30 degrees C water.

  8. Membrane remodeling during reticulocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Xinhua; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    The transition of reticulocytes into erythrocytes is accompanied by extensive changes in the structure and properties of the plasma membrane. These changes include an increase in shear resistance, loss of surface area, and acquisition of a biconcave shape. The processes by which these changes are effected have remained largely undefined. Here we examine how the expression of 30 distinct membrane proteins and their interactions change during murine reticulocyte maturation. We show that tubulin and cytosolic actin are lost, whereas the membrane content of myosin, tropomyosin, intercellular adhesion molecule-4, glucose transporter-4, Na-K-ATPase, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, glycophorin A, CD47, Duffy, and Kell is reduced. The degradation of tubulin and actin is, at least in part, through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In regard to the protein-protein interactions, the formation of membrane-associated spectrin tetramers from dimers is unperturbed, whereas the interactions responsible for the formation of the membrane-skeletal junctions are weaker in reticulocytes, as is the attachment of transmembrane proteins to these structures. This weakness, in part, results from the elevated phosphorylation of 4.1R in reticulocytes, which leads to a decrease in shear resistance by reducing its interaction with spectrin and actin. These observations begin to unravel the mechanistic basis of crucial changes accompanying reticulocyte maturation. PMID:20038785

  9. Sexual maturation in kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, S.D.; Scarnecchia, D.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used observational and experimental approaches to obtain information on factors affecting the timing of maturation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka, a semelparous, landlocked salmon. Gonadal staging criteria were developed and applied to three kokanee populations in Idaho lakes and reservoirs. Testes were classified into three stages: immature (stage one, S1), maturing (S2), and mature (S3). Ovaries were classified into eight stages: immature (S1-S3), transitional (stage S4), maturing (S5-S7), and mature (S8). Males entered the maturing stage (S2) in February through April of the spawning year. Females entered maturing stage (S5) as early as July of the year before the spawning year, and as late as March of the spawning year. Three hatchery experiments demonstrated that attainment of a larger body size 10 to 16 months before spawning increased the likelihood of initiation of maturation in both sexes. No gonads in a state of regression were observed. A gonadosomatic index above 0.1 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing male, and a gonadosomatic index above 1.0 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing female. Instantaneous growth rates were not good predictors of maturation, but attaining a size threshold of 18 to 19 cm in the fall was a good predictor of maturation the following year. This improved knowledge of kokanee maturation will permit more effectively management of the species for age, growth and size at maturity as well as for contributions to fisheries. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Importance of the CEP215-pericentrin interaction for centrosome maturation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjae; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of mitosis, the centrosome undergoes maturation, which is characterized by a drastic expansion of the pericentriolar material (PCM) and a robust increase in microtubule-organizing activity. CEP215 is one of the major PCM components which accumulates at the centrosome during mitosis. The depletion phenotypes indicate that CEP215 is essential for centrosome maturation and bipolar spindle formation. Here, we performed a series of knockdown-rescue experiments to link the protein-protein interaction properties of CEP215 to its biological functions. The results showed that CEP215 and pericentrin, another major PCM component, is interdependent for their accumulation at the spindle poles during mitosis. As a result, The CEP215-pericentrin interaction is required for centrosome maturation and subsequent bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. On the other hand, CEP215 interaction with γ-tubulin is dispensable for centrosome maturation. Our results provide an insight how PCM components are assembled to form a spindle pole during mitosis.

  11. Maturity group classification and maturity locus genotyping of early-maturing soybean varieties from high-latitude cold regions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongchang; Jiang, Bingjun; Wu, Cunxiang; Lu, Wencheng; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Yan, Hongrui; Han, Tianfu

    2014-01-01

    With the migration of human beings, advances of agricultural sciences, evolution of planting patterns and global warming, soybeans have expanded to both tropical and high-latitude cold regions (HCRs). Unlike other regions, HCRs have much more significant and diverse photoperiods and temperature conditions over seasons or across latitudes, and HCR soybeans released there show rich diversity in maturity traits. However, HCR soybeans have not been as well classified into maturity groups (MGs) as other places. Therefore, it is necessary to identify MGs in HCRs and to genotype the maturity loci. Local varieties were collected from the northern part of Northeast China and the far-eastern region of Russia. Maturity group reference (MGR) soybeans of MGs MG000, MG00, and MG0 were used as references during field experiments. Both local varieties and MGR soybeans were planted for two years (2010-2011) in Heihe (N 50°15', E 127°27', H 168.5 m), China. The days to VE (emergence), R1 (beginning bloom) and R7 (beginning maturity) were recorded and statistically analyzed. Furthermore, some varieties were further genotyped at four molecularly-identified maturity loci E1, E2, E3 and E4. The HCR varieties were classified into MG0 or even more early-maturing. In Heihe, some varieties matured much earlier than MG000, which is the most early-maturing known MG, and clustered into a separate group. We designated the group as MG0000, following the convention of MGs. HCR soybeans had relatively stable days to beginning bloom from emergence. The HCR varieties diversified into genotypes of E1, E2, E3 and E4. These loci had different effects on maturity. HCRs diversify early-maturing MGs of soybean. MG0000, a new MG that matures much earlier than known MGs, was developed. HCR soybean breeding should focus more on shortening post-flowering reproductive growth. E1, E2, E3, and E4 function differentially.

  12. Structural Maturation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-A Metamorphic Solution to Genomic Instability.

    PubMed

    London, Robert E

    2016-09-27

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT)-a critical enzyme of the viral life cycle-undergoes a complex maturation process, required so that a pair of p66 precursor proteins can develop conformationally along different pathways, one evolving to form active polymerase and ribonuclease H (RH) domains, while the second forms a non-functional polymerase and a proteolyzed RH domain. These parallel maturation pathways rely on the structural ambiguity of a metamorphic polymerase domain, for which the sequence-structure relationship is not unique. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies utilizing selective labeling techniques, and structural characterization of the p66 monomer precursor have provided important insights into the details of this maturation pathway, revealing many aspects of the three major steps involved: (1) domain rearrangement; (2) dimerization; and (3) subunit-selective RH domain proteolysis. This review summarizes the major structural changes that occur during the maturation process. We also highlight how mutations, often viewed within the context of the mature RT heterodimer, can exert a major influence on maturation and dimerization. It is further suggested that several steps in the RT maturation pathway may provide attractive targets for drug development.

  13. Structural Maturation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase—A Metamorphic Solution to Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    London, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT)—a critical enzyme of the viral life cycle—undergoes a complex maturation process, required so that a pair of p66 precursor proteins can develop conformationally along different pathways, one evolving to form active polymerase and ribonuclease H (RH) domains, while the second forms a non-functional polymerase and a proteolyzed RH domain. These parallel maturation pathways rely on the structural ambiguity of a metamorphic polymerase domain, for which the sequence–structure relationship is not unique. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies utilizing selective labeling techniques, and structural characterization of the p66 monomer precursor have provided important insights into the details of this maturation pathway, revealing many aspects of the three major steps involved: (1) domain rearrangement; (2) dimerization; and (3) subunit-selective RH domain proteolysis. This review summarizes the major structural changes that occur during the maturation process. We also highlight how mutations, often viewed within the context of the mature RT heterodimer, can exert a major influence on maturation and dimerization. It is further suggested that several steps in the RT maturation pathway may provide attractive targets for drug development. PMID:27690082

  14. Experimental investigation of changes in methane adsorption of bitumen-free Woodford Shale with thermal maturation induced by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, Haiyan; Zhang, Tongwei; Wiggins-Camacho, Jaclyn D.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lewan, Michael D.; Zhang, Xiayong

    2014-01-01

    This study quantifies the effects of organic-matter (OM) thermal maturity on methane (CH4) sorption, on the basis of five samples that were artificially matured through hydrous pyrolysis achieved by heating samples of immature Woodford Shale under five different time–temperature conditions. CH4-sorption isotherms at 35 °C, 50 °C, and 65 °C, and pressures up to 14 MPa on dry, solvent-extracted samples of the artificially matured Woodford Shale were measured. The results showed that CH4-sorption capacity, normalized to TOC, varied with thermal maturity, following the trend: maximum oil (367 °C) > oil cracking (400 °C) > maximum bitumen/early oil (333 °C) > early bitumen (300 °C) > immature stage (130 °C). The Langmuir constants for the samples at maximum-oil and oil-cracking stages are larger than the values for the bitumen-forming stages. The total pore volume, determined by N2 physisorption at 77 K, increases with increased maturation: mesopores, 2–50 nm in width, were created during the thermal conversion of organic-matter and a dramatic increase in porosity appeared when maximum-bitumen and maximum-oil generation stages were reached. A linear relationship between thermal maturity and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area suggests that the observed increase in CH4-sorption capacity may be the result of mesopores produced during OM conversion. No obvious difference is observed in pore-size distribution and pore volume for samples with pores 2 physisorption at 273 K. The isosteric heat of adsorption and the standard entropy for artificially matured samples ranged from 17.9 kJ mol−1 to 21.9 kJ mol−1 and from −85.4 J mol−1 K−1 to −101.8 J mol−1 K−1, respectively. These values are similar to the values of immature Woodford kerogen concentrate previously observed, but are larger than naturally matured organic-rich shales. High-temperature hydrous pyrolysis might have induced Lewis acid sites on both organic and mineral surfaces

  15. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  16. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  17. Optical maturation of asteroid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, D. I.; Golubeva, L. F.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of laboratory experiments simulating space weathering optical effects on atmosphereless planetary bodies reveals that the time needed to alter the spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope of an S-type asteroid is about ˜105 yr. The time required to reduce the visible albedo of samples to ˜0.05 is ˜106 yr. Since both these timescales are much less than the average collisional lifetime of asteroids larger than several kilometers in size, numerous low-albedo asteroids having reddish spectra with subdued absorption bands should be observed instead of an S-type dominated population. This is not the case because asteroid surfaces cannot be considered as undisturbed, unlike laboratory samples. We have estimated the number of collisions occurring in the time of ˜105 yr between asteroids and projectiles of various sizes and show that impact-activated motions of regolith particles counteract the progress of optical maturation of asteroid surfaces. We suppose that the maturation level of asteroid surfaces may be a compromise resulting from a competition between impact resurfacing and solar wind darkening, and that after reaching some steady state after a relatively short time (˜7 × 105 yr), thereafter depends only slightly on time. Spectroscopic analysis, using relatively invariant spectral parameters, such as band centers and band area ratios, can determine whether the surface of an S asteroid has chondritic composition or not. In this sense, the bodies with the ordinary chondrite composition cannot be masked among S asteroids. Differences in the environment of the main asteroid belt versus that at 1 AU, and the physical difference between the Moon and main belt asteroids (i.e., size) can account for the lack of lunar-type weathering on main belt asteroids.

  18. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  19. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  20. Skeletal maturation determined by cervical vertebrae development.

    PubMed

    San Román, Paloma; Palma, Juan Carlos; Oteo, M Dolores; Nevado, Esther

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of cervical vertebrae radiographic assessment to predict skeletal maturation. Left hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 958 Spanish children from 5 to 18 years of age were measured. On the left hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Grave and Brown was used to assess skeletal maturation. Cervical vertebrae maturation was evaluated with lateral cephalometric radiographs using the stages described by Lamparski and by Hassel and Farman. A new method to evaluate the cervical maturation by studying the changes in the concavity of the lower border, height, and shape of the vertebral body was created. Correlation coefficients were calculated to establish the relationship between skeletal maturation values obtained by the three classifications of vertebral and skeletal maturation measured at the wrist. All correlation values obtained were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The results suggest that this new method to determine skeletal maturation is very reliable. A simple method based on morphological characteristics of the cervical vertebral bodies to evaluate the maturation stage has been designed. In the population investigated, this method is as accurate as the Hassel and Farman classification and superior to the Lamparski classification. The morphological vertebral parameter best able to estimate the maturation is the concavity of the lower border of the body.

  1. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Erguen, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecting demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  2. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecing demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  3. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  4. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  5. Solving the puzzle of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation: piece by piece

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, David J.; Lee, Desy S.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for in vitro models which can serve as platforms for drug screening and basic research. Human adult cardiomyocytes cannot be readily obtained or cultured, and so pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes appear to be an attractive option. Unfortunately, these cells are structurally and functionally immature—more comparable to foetal cardiomyocytes than adult. A recent study by Ruan et al., provides new insights into accelerating the maturation process and takes us a step closer to solving the puzzle of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation. PMID:28462223

  6. Pioneering contributions by Robert Edwards to oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Thompson, J G; Gilchrist, R B

    2013-12-01

    The history of in vitro maturation (IVM) of mammalian oocytes, especially of human oocytes, holds a special place for Robert Edwards. He was the first to comprehensively examine and demonstrate maturation of human oocytes in vitro and in so doing he changed the course of medicine by fertilizing them in vitro. In reviewing his contribution, we have examined the state of the field at the time and discuss his pioneering insights into mammalian oocyte biology. We will also discuss how some of the major concepts and challenges identified by Edwards 50 years ago remain among the major challenges facing IVM today.

  7. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a stage of growth which will insure a proper completion of the...

  8. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  9. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  10. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  11. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  12. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that...

  13. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  14. Thinned Mature Deciduous Forest Silvopastures for Appalachia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little information is available on effective management and utilization of silvopastures developed from the ubiquitous mature woodlots which comprise 40-50% of small Appalachian farm acreage. We thinned a white oak dominated mature second growth forested area establishing two 0.5 ha, eight-paddock,...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1034 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.1034 Section 29.1034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1034 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality Chart.) ...

  16. 24 CFR 241.1060 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maturity. 241.1060 Section 241.1060 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements § 241.1060 Maturity. (a) Equity loans shall have a term not to exceed 40 years; and (b...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3531 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3531 Section 29.3531 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3531 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality, § 29.3586, and Rule 16...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3531 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3531 Section 29.3531 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3531 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality, § 29.3586, and Rule 16...

  19. 7 CFR 29.2281 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2281 Section 29.2281 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart, § 29.2351.) ...

  20. 24 CFR 241.1060 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 241.1060 Section 241.1060 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements § 241.1060 Maturity. (a) Equity loans shall have a term not to exceed 40 years; and (b...

  1. 24 CFR 241.1060 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maturity. 241.1060 Section 241.1060 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements § 241.1060 Maturity. (a) Equity loans shall have a term not to exceed 40 years; and (b...

  2. 7 CFR 29.2281 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2281 Section 29.2281 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart, § 29.2351.) ...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2533 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2533 Section 29.2533 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2533 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See...

  4. 24 CFR 241.1060 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maturity. 241.1060 Section 241.1060 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements § 241.1060 Maturity. (a) Equity loans shall have a term not to exceed 40 years; and (b...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1034 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.1034 Section 29.1034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1034 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality Chart.) [42 FR 21092, Apr...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2281 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2281 Section 29.2281 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart, § 29.2351.) ...

  7. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.) ...

  8. 7 CFR 29.1034 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.1034 Section 29.1034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1034 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality Chart.) [42 FR 21092, Apr...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2281 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2281 Section 29.2281 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart, § 29.2351.) ...

  10. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.) ...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3531 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3531 Section 29.3531 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3531 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality, § 29.3586, and Rule 16...

  12. 7 CFR 29.1034 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.1034 Section 29.1034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1034 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality Chart.) [42 FR 21092, Apr...

  13. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.) ...

  14. 7 CFR 29.2281 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2281 Section 29.2281 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart, § 29.2351.) ...

  15. 24 CFR 241.1060 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 241.1060 Section 241.1060 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... Requirements § 241.1060 Maturity. (a) Equity loans shall have a term not to exceed 40 years; and (b...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3531 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3531 Section 29.3531 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3531 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality, § 29.3586, and Rule 16...

  17. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.) ...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1034 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.1034 Section 29.1034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1034 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality Chart.) ...

  19. 7 CFR 29.2533 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2533 Section 29.2533 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2533 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2533 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2533 Section 29.2533 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2533 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See...

  1. 7 CFR 29.2533 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2533 Section 29.2533 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2533 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See...

  2. 7 CFR 29.2533 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity. 29.2533 Section 29.2533 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2533 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See...

  3. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.) ...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3531 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.3531 Section 29.3531 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3531 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See Elements of Quality, § 29.3586, and Rule 16...

  5. Relationship of Vocational Maturity to Work Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael F.

    1974-01-01

    Two hypotheses were tested: (1) Vocational maturity is positively related to differentiation of work values within subjects. (2) Vocational maturity is positively associated with intrinsic work values and negatively associated with extrinsic work values. Data analyses supported hypothesis 1 for females, but not for males, and partially supported…

  6. Cone and Seed Maturation of Southern Pines

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett

    1976-01-01

    If slightly reduced yields and viability are acceptable, loblolly and slash cone collections can begin 2 to 3 weeks before maturity if the cones are stored before processing. Longleaf(P. palestris Mill.) pine cones should be collected only when mature, as storage decreased germination of seeds from immature cones. Biochemical analyses to determine reducing sugar...

  7. Canopy temperature and maturity in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat units are a widely used indicator of maturity in cotton. It is generally assumed that it takes approximately 2200°F (1222°C) heat units for a cotton plant on the South High Plains of Texas to mature. This value is based on a typical planting date of May 15 with ample irrigation. As water for c...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1530 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Definitions § 51.1530 Mature. “Mature” means that the fruit has reached the stage of maturity which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature pear becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness depending upon the stage of the ripening...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1530 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Definitions § 51.1530 Mature. “Mature” means that the fruit has reached the stage of maturity which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1530 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Definitions § 51.1530 Mature. “Mature” means that the fruit has reached the stage of maturity which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature pear becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness depending upon the stage of the ripening...

  13. Toward the Measurement of Psychosocial Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen; And Others

    The concept of psychosocial maturity is reviewed in preparation for the exploration of the feasibility of constructing a scale that measures maturity. Investigation produced a preliminary 54-item scale with high reliability and moderate validity, which is appended. A factor analysis of the scale supports the a priori structure by the theoretical…

  14. Egg maturation dynamics of Homalodisca vitripennis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The egg maturation dynamics of holometabolous insects are particularly well studied compared to those of hemimetabolous insects. The wealth of knowledge produced from studies on holometabolous insects has allowed researchers to test for correlations between egg maturation schedule and specific life...

  15. Technology Evaluation Cycles and Maturity Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    reserved. tManager: Technology Selection Requirements View Concept Refinement View Maturity View Us er Ne ed s eBusiness ServicesRisk Analysis C ustom er...Technology Selection Requirements View Concept Refinement View Maturity View Us er Ne ed s eBusiness ServicesRisk Analysis C ustom er D eveloper

  16. Maturation of Sweetgum and American Sycamore Seeds

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner

    1972-01-01

    Over three consecutive years in central Mississippi, sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) fruits had nearly reached full-size by late June. Sweetgum seeds were physiologically mature by mid-August, but dry weight increased until late September. As sweetgum seeds matured, the crude fat level rose to 27 percent of seed dry weight...

  17. A Spectropolarimetric Maturity Index of Lunar Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Skobeleva, T. P.; Kvaratskhelia, O. I.

    2003-05-01

    The lunar soil maturity is the most important parameter of the Moon's surface material. The degree of regolith processing should be taken into account in remote determinations of the chemical and mineralogical surface compositions. However, the possibilities for directly determining the lunar regolith maturity are limited to laboratory studies of the fine fraction and microparticles of samples returned to Earth. In these conditions, the urgency of developing methods for remotely determining the lunar soil maturity increases sharply. The suggested method of using spectropolarimetric data to quantitatively estimate the maturity of the surface material has an advantage that the derived maturity index is determined only by structural parameters of the reflecting layer and is completely free from the effects of chemical and mineralogical surface rock compositions. The reference catalog of spectropolarimetric indices contains values for 92 objects on the Moon's visible hemisphere and includes a wide range of structures with various degrees of maturity of the surface material. We obtained correlations with other maturity indices determined by laboratory and remote sensing techniques and the time scale that represents the correspondence between the spectropolarimetric maturity index and the soil exposure age.

  18. The FMI: Dimensions of Follower Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Loren I.

    1976-01-01

    The Follower Maturity Index (FMI) is an instrument derived from leadership theory and based on observations of verbal and nonverbal behavior of followers in task groups. Dimensions of follower maturity--achievement, responsibility, experience, activity, dependence, variety, interests, perspective, position, and awareness--are discussed. For…

  19. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  20. 7 CFR 51.3153 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mature. 51.3153 Section 51.3153 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Nectarines Definitions § 51.3153 Mature. “Mature” means that the nectarine has reached the stage of growth which will insure a proper completion of...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1218 Section 51.1218 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the...

  2. 7 CFR 51.3153 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mature. 51.3153 Section 51.3153 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Nectarines Definitions § 51.3153 Mature. “Mature” means that the nectarine has reached the stage of growth which will insure a proper completion of...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mature. 51.1218 Section 51.1218 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the...

  4. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify "semantic linguistic maturity" (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human…

  5. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  6. The Mature Woman and the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jeffrey M.; Mantz, Concetta M.

    1976-01-01

    The factors and motivations contributing to the presence of increasing numbers of mature women in college are examined, and seven proposals are offered, representing an attempt to develop a total community college program which will meet the needs of mature women students. (NHM)

  7. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify "semantic linguistic maturity" (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human…

  8. Overview of the People Capability Maturity Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    This document provides an overview and an introduction to the People Capability Maturity Model (P-CMM) (Curtis95). Specifically, this document...capability. The document is intended to provide an overview of the concepts of the P-CMM, while the People Capability Maturity Model (Curtis95) describes the key practices for each level of the P-CMM.

  9. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness...

  10. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness...

  11. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans § 1421.101 Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than the...

  12. Comparison of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Feiyue; Wang, Jiongkun; Hu, Mingqian; Yu, Yu; Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Jing

    2011-07-01

    A comparative study of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was first performed through an atomic force microscope (AFM) to clarify differences of their nanostructure and adhesion force. AFM images revealed that the immature BMDCs treated by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor plus IL-4 mainly appeared round with smooth surface, whereas the mature BMDCs induced by lipopolysaccharide displayed an irregular shape with numerous pseudopodia or lamellapodia and ruffles on the cell membrane besides becoming larger, flatter, and longer. AFM quantitative analysis further showed that the surface roughness of the mature BMDCs greatly increased and that the adhesion force of them was fourfold more than that of the immature BMDCs. The nano-features of the mature BMDCs were supported by a high level of IL-12 produced from the mature BMDCs and high expression of MHC-II on the surface of them. These findings provide a new insight into the nanostructure of the immature and mature BMDCs.

  13. Maturity Group Classification and Maturity Locus Genotyping of Early-Maturing Soybean Varieties from High-Latitude Cold Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wencheng; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Yan, Hongrui; Han, Tianfu

    2014-01-01

    Background With the migration of human beings, advances of agricultural sciences, evolution of planting patterns and global warming, soybeans have expanded to both tropical and high-latitude cold regions (HCRs). Unlike other regions, HCRs have much more significant and diverse photoperiods and temperature conditions over seasons or across latitudes, and HCR soybeans released there show rich diversity in maturity traits. However, HCR soybeans have not been as well classified into maturity groups (MGs) as other places. Therefore, it is necessary to identify MGs in HCRs and to genotype the maturity loci. Methods Local varieties were collected from the northern part of Northeast China and the far-eastern region of Russia. Maturity group reference (MGR) soybeans of MGs MG000, MG00, and MG0 were used as references during field experiments. Both local varieties and MGR soybeans were planted for two years (2010-2011) in Heihe (N 50°15′, E 127°27′, H 168.5 m), China. The days to VE (emergence), R1 (beginning bloom) and R7 (beginning maturity) were recorded and statistically analyzed. Furthermore, some varieties were further genotyped at four molecularly-identified maturity loci E1, E2, E3 and E4. Results The HCR varieties were classified into MG0 or even more early-maturing. In Heihe, some varieties matured much earlier than MG000, which is the most early-maturing known MG, and clustered into a separate group. We designated the group as MG0000, following the convention of MGs. HCR soybeans had relatively stable days to beginning bloom from emergence. The HCR varieties diversified into genotypes of E1, E2, E3 and E4. These loci had different effects on maturity. Conclusion HCRs diversify early-maturing MGs of soybean. MG0000, a new MG that matures much earlier than known MGs, was developed. HCR soybean breeding should focus more on shortening post-flowering reproductive growth. E1, E2, E3, and E4 function differentially. PMID:24740097

  14. [On the notions of "maturity" and "maturation" of a newborn infant in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Efimov, A A; Nekliudov, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    The notions of "maturity" and "maturation" of newborn infants are discussed in the context of forensic medical expertise based on the publications of the authors studying this problem. It is suggested that "maturation" should be considered to be a morphological notion in contrast to "maturity" to be regarded as a chronological notion. From this point of view, the solution of the maturity problem during forensic medical examination of the infant's corpse is beyond the scope of competence of the forensic medical expert. The authors emphasize the importance of differentiation between the above notions for the unambiguous interpretation of the results of examination by different experts.

  15. Thermal maturation of incrementally assembled plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D. S.; Heizler, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous zoned intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) were each assembled over 8-11 million years through incremental amalgamation of sheeted intrusions. Emplacement as small sheet-like increments inhibits development of a voluminous zone of melt bearing rock; instead the active magma body represents only a small portion of the total volume intruded. Plutons formed incrementally will have a protracted thermal history (T-t) that can be elucidated using thermochronologic techniques yielding insights into the thermal evolution of the lithosphere at magma chamber-pluton scales. Thermal histories are derived for plutons from the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mount Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), both located in the eastern-central SNB, by correlating estimated zircon saturation and argon closure temperatures with U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar amphibole, biotite, and K-feldspar ages. Close agreement among zircon and hornblende ages indicate rapid cooling following intrusion. However, hornblende and biotite ages are separated by 6-9 million years indicating slow protracted cooling. We interpret these data to reflect the thermal maturation of an incrementally assembled magma system in which temperatures cycled between ~500-300°C for millions of years. Hornblende ages were not reset by younger intrusions, therefore maximum reheating temperatures did not exceed ~500°C for geologically significant durations. T-t cooling curves from the intrusive suites are used to calibrate finite difference numerical simulations of pluton assembly. Intrusion geometries are modeled (HEAT 3D, Wohletz, 2007) by stacking horizontal increments from the top-down and bottom-up and vertical increments are emplaced syntaxially and antitaxially and are designed to generate plutons of the approximate dimensions, depth of emplacement, and age range of the Sierran suites. Numerical simulations yield the following general observations: 1) an

  16. Late maturers at a performance disadvantage to their more mature peers in junior Australian football.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents mature at different rates such that individuals competing in the same competition may differ in physical and biological maturity despite being of similar chronological age. Whether or not differences translate into on-field performance in competition is relatively unknown. This study investigated the influence of biological maturity on fitness and match running performance in junior Australian football. Eighty-seven under-15 years players were categorised into early (n = 20), average (n = 45) and late (n = 22) maturity groups based on self-reported and anthropometric assessment of biological maturity. Running movements during competition were collected using GPS (5 Hz) technology. Early maturers were heavier and taller than all other boys (P < 0.05), while biological maturity was significantly correlated to 20 m sprint (r = 0.53, P < 0.01). Total distance, high-intensity (>14.4 km · h(-1)) running distance and number of high-intensity efforts were significantly greater (20.8%, 53.6%, 31.7%, respectively; P < 0.01) in early compared to late maturers. Number of sprints and peak speed in competition were not different. Pubertal development and maturity status partially explained the differences between players in physical size, functional running fitness and match running performance. Late maturing players in this Australian football under-15 age group were at a physical and performance disadvantage to their earlier maturing peers.

  17. Sleep inspires insight.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ullrich; Gais, Steffen; Haider, Hilde; Verleger, Rolf; Born, Jan

    2004-01-22

    Insight denotes a mental restructuring that leads to a sudden gain of explicit knowledge allowing qualitatively changed behaviour. Anecdotal reports on scientific discovery suggest that pivotal insights can be gained through sleep. Sleep consolidates recent memories and, concomitantly, could allow insight by changing their representational structure. Here we show a facilitating role of sleep in a process of insight. Subjects performed a cognitive task requiring the learning of stimulus-response sequences, in which they improved gradually by increasing response speed across task blocks. However, they could also improve abruptly after gaining insight into a hidden abstract rule underlying all sequences. Initial training establishing a task representation was followed by 8 h of nocturnal sleep, nocturnal wakefulness, or daytime wakefulness. At subsequent retesting, more than twice as many subjects gained insight into the hidden rule after sleep as after wakefulness, regardless of time of day. Sleep did not enhance insight in the absence of initial training. A characteristic antecedent of sleep-related insight was revealed in a slowing of reaction times across sleep. We conclude that sleep, by restructuring new memory representations, facilitates extraction of explicit knowledge and insightful behaviour.

  18. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  19. Hydrocarbon potential of Early Cretaceous lacustrine sediments from Bima Formation, Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria: Insight from organic geochemistry and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode; Maigari, A. S.; Haruna, A. I.; Yaro, Usman Y.

    2017-05-01

    The Early Cretaceous lacustrine sediments from Bima Formation in the Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were studied based on organic geochemistry and petrology. This is in other to provide information on hydrocarbon generation potential; organic matter type (quality), richness (quantity), origin/source inputs, redox conditions (preservation) and thermal maturation in relation to thermal effect of Tertiary volcanics. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents ranges from 0.38 to 0.86 wt % with extractable organic matter (EOM) below 1000 ppm and pyrolysis S2 yield values from 0.16 to 0.68 mg/g, suggesting poor to fair source rock richness. Based on kerogen pyrolysis and microscopy coupled with biomarker parameters, the organic matters contain Type I (lacustrine algae), Type III (terrestrially derived land-plants) and Type IV kerogens deposited in a mixed lacustrine-terrestrial environment under suboxic to relatively anoxic conditions. This suggest potential occurrence of Early Cretaceous lacustrine sediments (perhaps Lower Cretaceous petroleum system) in Yola Sub-basin of the Northern Benue Trough as present in the neighbouring basins of Chad, Niger and Sudan Republics that have both oil and gas generation potential within the same rift trend (WCARS). Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro) and Tmax values of the lacustrine shales ranges from 1.12 to 2.32 VRo% and 448-501 °C, respectively, indicating peak-late to post-maturity stage. This is supported by the presence of dark brown palynomorphs, amorphous organic matter and phytoclasts as well as inertinite macerals. Consequently, the organic matters in the lacustrine shales of Bima Formation in the Yola Sub-basin appeared as a source of oil (most likely even waxy) and gas prone at a relatively deeper part of the basin. However, the high thermal maturity enhanced the organic matters and most of the hydrocarbons that formed in the course of thermal maturation were likely expelled to the reservoir rock units

  20. The postcranial skeletal maturation of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Noel; Bogin, Barry; Bolter, Debra; Berger, Lee R

    2017-07-01

    In 2008, an immature hominin defined as the holotype of the new species Australopithecus sediba was discovered at the 1.9 million year old Malapa site in South Africa. The specimen (MH1) includes substantial post-cranial skeletal material, and provides a unique opportunity to assess its skeletal maturation. Skeletal maturity indicators observed on the proximal and distal humerus, proximal ulna, distal radius, third metacarpal, ilium and ischium, proximal femur and calcaneus were used to assess the maturity of each bone in comparison to references for modern humans and for wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In comparison to humans the skeletal maturational ages for Au. sediba correspond to between 12.0 years and 15.0 years with a mean (SD) age of 13.1 (1.1) years. In comparison to the maturational pattern of chimpanzees the Au. sediba indicators suggest a skeletal maturational age of 9-11 years. Based on either of these skeletal maturity estimates and the body length at death of MH1, an adult height of 150-156 cm is predicted. We conclude that the skeletal remains of MH1 are consistent with an ape-like pattern of maturity when dental age estimates are also taken into consideration. This maturity schedule in australopiths is consistent with ape-like estimates of age at death for the Nariokotome Homo erectus remains (KMN-WT 15000), which are of similar postcranial immaturity to MH1. The findings suggest that humans may have distinctive and delayed post-cranial schedules from australopiths and H. erectus, implicating a recent evolution of somatic and possibly life history strategies in human evolution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The exosome complex establishes a barricade to erythroid maturation

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Skye C.; Kang, Yoon-A; DeVilbiss, Andrew W.; O’Driscoll, Chelsea A.; Ouellette, Jonathan N.; Pope, Nathaniel J.; Camprecios, Genis; Chang, Chan-Jung; Yang, David; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Complex genetic networks control hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into progenitors that give rise to billions of erythrocytes daily. Previously, we described a role for the master regulator of erythropoiesis, GATA-1, in inducing genes encoding components of the autophagy machinery. In this context, the Forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, amplified GATA-1–mediated transcriptional activation. To determine the scope of the GATA-1/Foxo3 cooperativity, and to develop functional insights, we analyzed the GATA-1/Foxo3-dependent transcriptome in erythroid cells. GATA-1/Foxo3 repressed expression of Exosc8, a pivotal component of the exosome complex, which mediates RNA surveillance and epigenetic regulation. Strikingly, downregulating Exosc8, or additional exosome complex components, in primary erythroid precursor cells induced erythroid cell maturation. Our results demonstrate a new mode of controlling erythropoiesis in which multiple components of the exosome complex are endogenous suppressors of the erythroid developmental program. PMID:25115889

  2. Metabolic Remodeling in early development and cardiomyocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kreipke, Rebecca; Wang, Yuliang; Miklas, Jason Wayne; Mathieu, Julie; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Aberrations in metabolism contribute to a large number of diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, that have a substantial impact on the mortality rates and quality of life worldwide. However, the mechanisms leading to these changes in metabolic state – and whether they are conserved between diseases – is not well understood. Changes in metabolism similar to those seen in pathological conditions are observed during normal development in a number of different cell types. This provides hope that understanding the mechanism of these metabolic switches in normal development may provide useful insight in correcting them in pathological cases. Here, we focus on the metabolic remodeling observed both in early stage embryonic stem cells and during the maturation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:26912118

  3. Sexual maturity in western Atlantic bluefin tuna

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Gilad; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Knapp, Jessica M.; Gordin, Hillel; Lutcavage, Molly E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel endocrine approach for assessing the unresolved matter of the timing of sexual maturation in western Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT), a highly migratory population whose status remains uncertain. Ratios of follicle stimulating hormone to luteinizing hormone, a sexual maturity indicator, in all ABFT ≥134 cm curved fork length (CFL) were <0.4, similar to Mediterranean spawners, indicating that western ABFT mature at considerably smaller sizes and at a much younger age than currently assumed (≥185 cm CFL). PMID:25431301

  4. Delayed visual maturation and lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Gulson, B L; Yui, L A; Howarth, D

    1998-12-11

    Three children were born in the Broken Hill Australia lead mining community with delayed visual maturation of the optic nerve (blindness) within a period of 19 months. Because of the association with the lead pollution, the delayed visual maturation was attributed to lead exposure of the fetus during pregnancy. Lead isotopic analyses of the shed deciduous teeth from the three children demonstrate that they were not exposed to increased levels of lead from a mining or any other source during pregnancy and the etiology of the delayed visual maturation must be sought elsewhere.

  5. Graphic representation of skeletal maturity determinations.

    PubMed

    Boechat, M Ines; Lee, David Choen

    2007-10-01

    Skeletal maturation determinations are usually reported as numeric data indicating accordance with chronologic age. However, significant changes in skeletal maturation can occur without falling outside two SDs. The purpose of our study was to design simple computer-generated sex-based charts to enhance the evaluation of skeletal maturation, especially when frequent assessments are made. The graphic representation of successive reports clearly depicts whether values retain their position in relation to the mean. In addition, the report includes computation of the exact SD score.

  6. Game Maturity Model for Health Care.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan C; Adriani, Paul; van Houwelingen, Jan Willem; Geerts, A

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the Game Maturity Model for the healthcare industry as an extension to the general Game Maturity Model and describes the usage by two case studies of applied health games. The Game Maturity Model for healthcare provides a practical and value-adding method to assess existing games and to determine strategic considerations for application of applied health games. Our forecast is that within 5 years the use and development of applied games will have a role in our daily lives and the way we organize health care that will be similar to the role social media has today.

  7. Mineralogical, chemical and K-Ar isotopic changes in Kreyenhagen Shale whole rocks and <2 µm clay fractions during natural burial and hydrous-pyrolysis experimental maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Lewan, Michael D.; Dolan, Michael P.; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Curtis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of smectite layers in the illite–smectite mixed layers of the pyrolyzed outcrop <2 μm fraction remain during thermal experiments, especially above 310 °C. With no illitization detected above 310 °C, smectite appears to have inhibited rather than promoted generation of expelled oil from decomposition of bitumen. This hindrance is interpreted to result from bitumen impregnating the smectite interlayer sites and rock matrix. Bitumen remains in the <2 μm fraction despite leaching with H2O2. Its presence in the smectite interlayers is apparent by the inability of the clay fraction to fully expand or collapse once bitumen generation from the thermal decomposition of the kerogen is completed, and by almost invariable K–Ar ages confirming for the lack of any K supply and/or radiogenic 40Ar removal. This suggests that once bitumen impregnates the porosity of a progressively maturing source rock, the pore system is no longer wetted by water and smectite to illite conversion ceases. Experimental attempts to evaluate the smectite conversion to illite should preferentially use low-TOC rocks to avoid inhibition of the reaction by bitumen impregnation.

  8. Oxygen isotope perspective on Precambrian crustal growth and maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, W.H.; King, E.M.; Valley, J.W.

    2000-04-01

    In this study the authors contrast insights on Precambrian crustal growth and maturation from radiogenic and oxygen isotope systematics in the Superior (3.0--2.7 Ga) and Grenville (1.3--1.0 Ga) Provinces of the Canadian shield. Oxygen isotope ratios in zircon provide the best evidence of supracrustal input into ancient orogens. Archean Superior Province zircons have relatively low {delta}{sup 18}O values and a limited range (5.7{per_thousand} {+-} 0.6{per_thousand}), while Proterozoic Grenville Province zircons have elevated {delta}{sup 18}O values and a wider range (8.2{per_thousand} {+-} 1.7{per_thousand}). These data reflect fundamental differences in crustal evolution and maturation between the Superior and the Grenville Provinces. In the Grenville Province, radiogenically juvenile supracrustal material with high {delta}{sup 18}O values was buried (or subducted) to the base of the crust within 150 m.y. of initial crust production, causing high magmatic {delta}{sup 18}O values ({delta}{sup 18}O [zircon] {ge} 8{per_thousand}) in anorthosite suite and subsequent plutons. Information about large volumes and rapid recycling of Grenville crust is not accessible from radiogenic isotope data alone. The Grenville data contrast with the restricted {delta}{sup 18}O values of Superior Province magmatism, where subtle ({approximately}1{per_thousand}) elevation in {delta}{sup 18}O occurs only in volumetrically minor, late to postorogenic (sanukitoid) plutons. Differences in sediment {delta}{sup 18}O values between the Superior and Grenville Provinces are predominantly a function of the {delta}{sup 18}O of source materials, rather than differences in chemical maturity or erosion styles. This study shows that zircon is a robust reference mineral to compare igneous processes in rocks that have undergone radically different histories.

  9. Optical Maturity on the Walls of Lunar Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungsoo; Sim, Chaekyung; Lucey, Paul; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Choi, Young-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies found that the optical maturity (OMAT) and the mean grain size of the lunar regolith have latitude dependences, probably because of the reduced flux of space-weathering agents at high latitudes. Here we extend our previous work (Jeong et al.) to the inner walls of lunar impact craters, dividing the wall into four quadrants. We consider the ~3000 craters whose latitude is between -58° and +58° and whose diameter is between 5 km and 120 km in the Lunar Impact Crater Database 2015 from the LPI. We adopt the topography-corrected OMAT data from the Kaguya/MI observations. The OMAT differences between the northern and southern walls are insignificant near the equator, but at high latitudes, the equator-facing walls have generally smaller (more mature) OMAT values than the pole-facing walls. This is consistent with the global latitudinal dependence of the OMAT and values found in previous researches. The overall mean value curve of [OMAT(E) - OMAT(W)] has a minimum and maximum near longitudes -60° and +60°, respectively. This is thought to be due to the shielding of solar wind particles during the Moon's passage through the Earth's magneto-tail. Further analyses on the longitudinal dependencies of OMAT and will give us insights on the relative importance of solar wind particles and micrometeoroids on the space weathering of the lunar regolith grains.

  10. Impaired oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm infants: Potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Erik; Heijnen, Cobi J; Benders, Manon J; van Bel, Frank; Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre; Nijboer, Cora H

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is an evolving challenge in neonatal health care. Despite declining mortality rates among extremely premature neonates, morbidity rates remain very high. Currently, perinatal diffuse white matter injury (WMI) is the most commonly observed type of brain injury in preterm infants and has become an important research area. Diffuse WMI is associated with impaired cognitive, sensory and psychological functioning and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for autism-spectrum disorders, ADHD, and other psychological disturbances. No treatment options are currently available for diffuse WMI and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are far from being completely understood. Preterm birth is associated with maternal inflammation, perinatal infections and disrupted oxygen supply which can affect the cerebral microenvironment by causing activation of microglia, astrogliosis, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. This intricate interplay of events negatively influences oligodendrocyte development, causing arrested oligodendrocyte maturation or oligodendrocyte cell death, which ultimately results in myelination failure in the developing white matter. This review discusses the current state in perinatal WMI research, ranging from a clinical perspective to basic molecular pathophysiology. The complex regulation of oligodendrocyte development in healthy and pathological conditions is described, with a specific focus on signaling cascades that may play a role in WMI. Furthermore, emerging concepts in the field of WMI and issues regarding currently available animal models are put forward. Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying impeded oligodendrocyte maturation in diffuse WMI may aid the development of novel treatment options which are desperately needed to improve the quality-of-life of preterm neonates.

  11. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation.

    PubMed

    Suess, Daniel L M; Britt, R David

    2015-09-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H(+) and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN(-) ligands of the H-cluster, tracing (57)Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe-S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN(-) ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications.

  12. Types of Insight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadler, Holly

    1984-01-01

    Presents a conceptual model of insight that is distinct from any theory or philosophy. Six types of insight are described: associative, aggregate, discrete process, ontogenetic process, phylogenetic process, and transcendent process. The model offers counselors a method for the enhancement of empathy and the development of client insight…

  13. 7 CFR 1710.115 - Final maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maturities for loans for the implementation of programs for demand side management and energy resource conservation and on and off grid renewable energy sources not owned by the borrower will be determined by...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1351 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. ...

  15. Maps Characterizing the Lunar Regolith Maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaydash, V.; Shkuratov, Y.; Stankevich, D.; Omelchenko, V.; Pieters, C.; Taylor, L.

    2004-01-01

    There are several parameters characterizing maturity of the lunar regolith. Most reliable of them are the ratio Is/FeO, characterizing relative concentration of nano-phase reduced iron, and the agglutinate content. The ratio Is/FeO is often called the degree of maturity of the lunar regolith. Studies of lunar samples show that the agglutinate content correlates with the maturity degree. Besides, the abundance of crystalline component, independently of its composition, anti-correlates with the maturity degree. In present paper we examine these correlations, mapping the parameter Is/FeO, the abundance of agglutinates in the lunar regolith, and the abundance of the crystalline component presented with pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, and ilmenite. We use measurements of lunar samples made by Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) and multispectral lunar data of high spatial resolution available after the Clementine mission to the Moon.

  16. 7 CFR 51.484 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal ripening process. ...

  17. 7 CFR 51.484 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal ripening process. ...

  18. 7 CFR 51.484 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the normal ripening process. ...

  19. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-10-01

    We propose a method to quantify semantic linguistic maturity (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human raters we found that SELMA predicted the rating of semantic maturity made by human raters over and above the prediction made using a child's age and number of words produced. We conclude that the semantic content of narratives changes in a predictable pattern with children's age and argue that SELMA is a measure quantifying semantic linguistic maturity. The study opens up the possibility of using quantitative measures for studying the development of semantic representation in children's narratives, and emphasizes the importance of word co-occurrences for understanding the development of meaning.

  20. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the stage of growth which will ensure a proper completion of the...