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Sample records for ketone body metabolism

  1. Ketone body metabolism and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Ketone bodies are metabolized through evolutionarily conserved pathways that support bioenergetic homeostasis, particularly in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle when carbohydrates are in short supply. The metabolism of ketone bodies interfaces with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, sterol biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, hormonal signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the microbiome. Here we review the mechanisms through which ketone bodies are metabolized and how their signals are transmitted. We focus on the roles this metabolic pathway may play in cardiovascular disease states, the bioenergetic benefits of myocardial ketone body oxidation, and prospective interactions among ketone body metabolism, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Ketone body metabolism is noninvasively quantifiable in humans and is responsive to nutritional interventions. Therefore, further investigation of this pathway in disease models and in humans may ultimately yield tailored diagnostic strategies and therapies for specific pathological states. PMID:23396451

  2. Ketone bodies and two-compartment tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-01-01

    We have previously suggested that ketone body metabolism is critical for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, using a co-culture system employing human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts, we provide new evidence to directly support this hypothesis. More specifically, we show that the enzymes required for ketone body production are highly upregulated within cancer-associated fibroblasts. This appears to be mechanistically controlled by the stromal expression of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and/or serum starvation. In addition, treatment with ketone bodies (such as 3-hydroxy-butyrate, and/or butanediol) is sufficient to drive mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells. This observation was also validated by unbiased proteomic analysis. Interestingly, an MCT1 inhibitor was sufficient to block the onset of mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells, suggesting a possible avenue for anticancer therapy. Finally, using human breast cancer tumor samples, we directly confirmed that the enzymes associated with ketone body production (HMGCS2, HMGCL and BDH1) were preferentially expressed in the tumor stroma. Conversely, enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1) and mitochondrial biogenesis (HSP60) were selectively associated with the epithelial tumor cell compartment. Our current findings are consistent with the “two-compartment tumor metabolism” model. Furthermore, they suggest that we should target ketone body metabolism as a new area for drug discovery, for the prevention and treatment of human cancers. PMID:23082721

  3. Multi-dimensional roles of ketone bodies in fuel metabolism, signaling, and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Puchalska, Patrycja; Crawford, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Ketone body metabolism is a central node in physiological homeostasis. In this review, we discuss how ketones serve discrete fine-tuning metabolic roles that optimize organ and organism performance in varying nutrient states, and protect from inflammation and injury in multiple organ systems. Traditionally viewed as metabolic substrates enlisted only in carbohydrate restriction, recent observations underscore the importance of ketone bodies as vital metabolic and signaling mediators when carbohydrates are abundant. Complementing a repertoire of known therapeutic options for diseases of the nervous system, prospective roles for ketone bodies in cancer have arisen, as have intriguing protective roles in heart and liver, opening therapeutic options in obesity-related and cardiovascular disease. Controversies in ketone metabolism and signaling are discussed to reconcile classical dogma with contemporary observations. PMID:28178565

  4. Ketone bodies and brain glutamate and GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Daikhin, Y; Yudkoff, M

    1998-01-01

    The effects of ketone bodies on brain metabolism of glutamate and GABA were studied in three different systems: synaptosomes, cultured astrocytes and the whole animal. In synaptosomes the addition of either acetoacetate or 3-OH-butyrate was associated with diminished consumption of glutamate via transamination to aspartate and increased formation of labelled GABA from either L-[2H5-2,3,3,4, 4]glutamine or L-[15N]glutamine. There was no effect of ketone bodies on synaptosomal GABA transamination. An increase of total forebrain GABA and a diminution of aspartate was noted when mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3-OH-butyrate. In cultured astrocytes the addition of acetoacetate to the medium was associated with a significantly enhanced rate of citrate production and with a diminution in the rate of conversion of [15N]glutamate to [15N]aspartate. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the metabolism of ketone bodies to acetyl-CoA results in a diminution of the pool of brain oxaloacetate, which is consumed in the citrate synthetase reaction (oxaloacetate + acetyl-CoA --> citrate). As less oxaloacetate is available to the aspartate aminotransferase reaction, thereby lowering the rate of glutamate transamination, more glutamate becomes accessible to the glutamate decarboxylase pathway, thereby favoring the synthesis of GABA.

  5. Ketone body metabolism and its defects.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Hori, Tomohiro; Orii, Kenji; Aoyama, Yuka

    2014-07-01

    Acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), the two main ketone bodies of humans, are important vectors of energy transport from the liver to extrahepatic tissues, especially during fasting, when glucose supply is low. Blood total ketone body (TKB) levels should be evaluated in the context of clinical history, such as fasting time and ketogenic stresses. Blood TKB should also be evaluated in parallel with blood glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). The FFA/TKB ratio is especially useful for evaluation of ketone body metabolism. Defects in ketogenesis include mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase (mHS) deficiency and HMG-CoA lyase (HL) deficiency. mHS deficiency should be considered in non-ketotic hypoglycemia if a fatty acid beta-oxidation defect is suspected, but cannot be confirmed. Patients with HL deficiency can develop hypoglycemic crises and neurological symptoms even in adolescents and adults. Succinyl-CoA-3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency and beta-ketothiolase (T2) deficiency are two defects in ketolysis. Permanent ketosis is pathognomonic for SCOT deficiency. However, patients with "mild" SCOT mutations may have nonketotic periods. T2-deficient patients with "mild" mutations may have normal blood acylcarnitine profiles even in ketoacidotic crises. T2 deficient patients cannot be detected in a reliable manner by newborn screening using acylcarnitines. We review recent data on clinical presentation, metabolite profiles and the course of these diseases in adults, including in pregnancy.

  6. Ketone Bodies in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Melanie A.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures that are resistant to standard medications remain a major clinical problem. One underutilized option for patients with medication-resistant seizures is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. The diet received its name based on the observation that patients consuming this diet produce ketone bodies (e.g., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone). Although the exact mechanisms of the diet are unknown, ketone bodies have been hypothesized to contribute to the anticonvulsant and antiepileptic effects. In this review, anticonvulsant properties of ketone bodies and the ketogenic diet are discussed (including GABAergic and glutamatergic effects). Because of the importance of ketone body metabolism in the early stages of life, the effects of ketone bodies on developing neurons in vitro also are discussed. Understanding how ketone bodies exert their effects will help optimize their use in treating epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:22268909

  7. Metabolism of ketone bodies during exercise and training: physiological basis for exogenous supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Mark; Cogan, Karl E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optimising training and performance through nutrition strategies is central to supporting elite sportspeople, much of which has focused on manipulating the relative intake of carbohydrate and fat and their contributions as fuels for energy provision. The ketone bodies, namely acetoacetate, acetone and β‐hydroxybutyrate (βHB), are produced in the liver during conditions of reduced carbohydrate availability and serve as an alternative fuel source for peripheral tissues including brain, heart and skeletal muscle. Ketone bodies are oxidised as a fuel source during exercise, are markedly elevated during the post‐exercise recovery period, and the ability to utilise ketone bodies is higher in exercise‐trained skeletal muscle. The metabolic actions of ketone bodies can alter fuel selection through attenuating glucose utilisation in peripheral tissues, anti‐lipolytic effects on adipose tissue, and attenuation of proteolysis in skeletal muscle. Moreover, ketone bodies can act as signalling metabolites, with βHB acting as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, an important regulator of the adaptive response to exercise in skeletal muscle. Recent development of ketone esters facilitates acute ingestion of βHB that results in nutritional ketosis without necessitating restrictive dietary practices. Initial reports suggest this strategy alters the metabolic response to exercise and improves exercise performance, while other lines of evidence suggest roles in recovery from exercise. The present review focuses on the physiology of ketone bodies during and after exercise and in response to training, with specific interest in exploring the physiological basis for exogenous ketone supplementation and potential benefits for performance and recovery in athletes. PMID:27861911

  8. Regulation of glucose and ketone-body metabolism in brain of anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, Neil B.; Ross, Peter S.; Berger, Michael; Goodman, Michael N.

    1974-01-01

    1. The effects of starvation and diabetes on brain fuel metabolism were examined by measuring arteriovenous differences for glucose, lactate, acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate across the brains of anaesthetized fed, starved and diabetic rats. 2. In fed animals glucose represented the sole oxidative fuel of the brain. 3. After 48h of starvation, ketone-body concentrations were about 2mm and ketone-body uptake accounted for 25% of the calculated O2 consumption: the arteriovenous difference for glucose was not diminished, but lactate release was increased, suggesting inhibition of pyruvate oxidation. 4. In severe diabetic ketosis, induced by either streptozotocin or phlorrhizin (total blood ketone bodies >7mm), the uptake of ketone bodies was further increased and accounted for 45% of the brain's oxidative metabolism, and the arteriovenous difference for glucose was decreased by one-third. The arteriovenous difference for lactate was increased significantly in the phlorrhizin-treated rats. 5. Infusion of 3-hydroxybutyrate into starved rats caused marked increases in the arteriovenous differences for lactate and both ketone bodies. 6. To study the mechanisms of these changes, steady-state concentrations of intermediates and co-factors of the glycolytic pathway were determined in freeze-blown brain. 7. Starved rats had increased concentrations of acetyl-CoA. 8. Rats with diabetic ketosis had increased concentrations of fructose 6-phosphate and decreased concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, indicating an inhibition of phosphofructokinase. 9. The concentrations of acetyl-CoA, glycogen and citrate, a potent inhibitor of phosphofructokinase, were increased in the streptozotocin-treated rats. 10. The data suggest that cerebral glucose uptake is decreased in diabetic ketoacidosis owing to inhibition of phosphofructokinase as a result of the increase in brain citrate. 11. The inhibition of brain pyruvate oxidation in starvation and diabetes can be related to the

  9. Ketone bodies in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    McNally, Melanie A; Hartman, Adam L

    2012-04-01

    Seizures that are resistant to standard medications remain a major clinical problem. One underutilized option for patients with medication-resistant seizures is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. The diet received its name based on the observation that patients consuming this diet produce ketone bodies (e.g., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone). Although the exact mechanisms of the diet are unknown, ketone bodies have been hypothesized to contribute to the anticonvulsant and antiepileptic effects. In this review, anticonvulsant properties of ketone bodies and the ketogenic diet are discussed (including GABAergic and glutamatergic effects). Because of the importance of ketone body metabolism in the early stages of life, the effects of ketone bodies on developing neurons in vitro also are discussed. Understanding how ketone bodies exert their effects will help optimize their use in treating epilepsy and other neurological disorders. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) has been looked upon as a carrier of energy from liver to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB also signals via extracellular receptors and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). These recent findings support a model in which βOHB functions to link the environment, in this case the diet, and gene expression via chromatin modifications. Here, we review the regulation and functions of ketone bodies, the relationship between ketone bodies and calorie restriction, and the implications of HDAC inhibition by the ketone body βOHB in the modulation of metabolism, and diseases of aging. PMID:24140022

  11. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  12. Ketone bodies as epigenetic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hai-Bin; Crawford, Peter A

    2018-07-01

    Ketone body metabolism is a dynamic and integrated metabolic node in human physiology, whose roles include but extend beyond alternative fuel provision during carbohydrate restriction. Here we discuss the most recent observations suggesting that ketosis coordinates cellular function via epigenomic regulation. Ketosis has been linked to covalent modifications, including lysine acetylation, methylation, and hydroxybutyrylation, to key histones that serve as dynamic regulators of chromatin architecture and gene transcription. Although it remains to be fully established whether these changes to the epigenome are attributable to ketone bodies themselves or other aspects of ketotic states, the regulated genes mediate classical responses to carbohydrate restriction. Direct regulation of gene expression may occur in-vivo via through ketone body-mediated histone modifications during adherence to low-carbohydrate diets, fasting ketosis, exogenous ketone body therapy, and diabetic ketoacidosis. Additional convergent functional genomics, metabolomics, and proteomics studies are required in both animal models and in humans to identify the molecular mechanisms through which ketosis regulates nuclear signaling events in a myriad of conditions relevant to disease, and the contexts in which the benefits of ketosis might outweigh the risks.

  13. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  14. Cerebral Ketone Metabolism During Development and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism of ketones is a normal part of the process of brain development. While the mature brain relies on glucose as a primary fuel source, metabolism of ketone bodies remains an alternative energy source under conditions of starvation. The neuroprotective properties of brain ketone metabolism make this alternative substrate a viable therapeutic option for various pathologies. Since the ability to revert to utilizing ketones as an alternative substrate is greatest in the younger post-weaned brain, this particular therapeutic approach remains an untapped resource particularly for pediatric pathological conditions. PMID:22104087

  15. Evidence for hypothalamic ketone body sensing: impact on food intake and peripheral metabolic responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Fioramonti, Xavier; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-15

    Monocarboxylates have been implicated in the control of energy homeostasis. Among them, the putative role of ketone bodies produced notably during high-fat diet (HFD) has not been thoroughly explored. In this study, we aimed to determine the impact of a specific rise in cerebral ketone bodies on food intake and energy homeostasis regulation. A carotid infusion of ketone bodies was performed on mice to stimulate sensitive brain areas for 6 or 12 h. At each time point, food intake and different markers of energy homeostasis were analyzed to reveal the consequences of cerebral increase in ketone body level detection. First, an increase in food intake appeared over a 12-h period of brain ketone body perfusion. This stimulated food intake was associated with an increased expression of the hypothalamic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP as well as phosphorylated AMPK and is due to ketone bodies sensed by the brain, as blood ketone body levels did not change at that time. In parallel, gluconeogenesis and insulin sensitivity were transiently altered. Indeed, a dysregulation of glucose production and insulin secretion was observed after 6 h of ketone body perfusion, which reversed to normal at 12 h of perfusion. Altogether, these results suggest that an increase in brain ketone body concentration leads to hyperphagia and a transient perturbation of peripheral metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-13C]glucose, [1,2-13C]acetate or [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-13C]acetate and [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism. PMID:28058963

  17. Inborn errors of ketogenesis and ketone body utilization.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Ketone bodies acetoacetate and 3-hydroxy-n-butyric acid are metabolites derived from fatty acids and ketogenic amino acids such as leucine. They are mainly produced in the liver via reactions catalyzed by the ketogenic enzymes mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary-coenzyme A synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary-coenzyme A lyase. After prolonged starvation, ketone bodies can provide up to two-thirds of the brain's energy requirements. The rate-limiting enzyme of ketone body utilization (ketolysis) is succinyl-coenzyme A:3-oxoacid coenzyme A transferase. The subsequent step of ketolysis is catalyzed by 2-methylactoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase, which is also involved in isoleucine catabolism. Inborn errors of metabolism affecting those four enzymes are presented and discussed in the context of differential diagnoses. While disorders of ketogenesis can present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, inborn errors of ketolysis are characterized by metabolic decompensations with ketoacidosis. If those diseases are considered early and appropriate treatment is initiated without delay, patients with inborn errors of ketone body metabolism often have a good clinical outcome.

  18. Ketone Bodies and Exercise Performance: The Next Magic Bullet or Merely Hype?

    PubMed

    Pinckaers, Philippe J M; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Bailey, David; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-03-01

    Elite athletes and coaches are in a constant search for training methods and nutritional strategies to support training and recovery efforts that may ultimately maximize athletes' performance. Recently, there has been a re-emerging interest in the role of ketone bodies in exercise metabolism, with considerable media speculation about ketone body supplements being routinely used by professional cyclists. Ketone bodies can serve as an important energy substrate under certain conditions, such as starvation, and can modulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Dietary strategies to increase endogenous ketone body availability (i.e., a ketogenic diet) require a diet high in lipids and low in carbohydrates for ~4 days to induce nutritional ketosis. However, a high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet may impair exercise performance via reducing the capacity to utilize carbohydrate, which forms a key fuel source for skeletal muscle during intense endurance-type exercise. Recently, ketone body supplements (ketone salts and esters) have emerged and may be used to rapidly increase ketone body availability, without the need to first adapt to a ketogenic diet. However, the extent to which ketone bodies regulate skeletal muscle bioenergetics and substrate metabolism during prolonged endurance-type exercise of varying intensity and duration remains unknown. Therefore, at present there are no data available to suggest that ingestion of ketone bodies during exercise improves athletes' performance under conditions where evidence-based nutritional strategies are applied appropriately.

  19. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-07-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of Ketone Body Metabolism and the Role of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Dean, Matthew; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketogenesis and ketolysis are central metabolic processes activated during the response to fasting. Ketogenesis is regulated in multiple stages, and a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is one of the key transcription factors taking part in this regulation. PPARα is an important element in the metabolic network, where it participates in signaling driven by the main nutrient sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and induces hormonal mediators, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). This work describes the regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis in normal and malignant cells and briefly summarizes the positive effects of ketone bodies in various neuropathologic conditions. PMID:27983603

  1. Hyperpolarized ketone body metabolism in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack J; Ball, Daniel R; Lau, Angus Z; Tyler, Damian J

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the use of 13 C-labelled acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate as novel hyperpolarized substrates in the study of cardiac metabolism. [1- 13 C]Acetoacetate was synthesized by catalysed hydrolysis, and both it and [1- 13 C]β-hydroxybutyrate were hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Their metabolism was studied in isolated, perfused rat hearts. Hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]acetoacetate metabolism was also studied in the in vivo rat heart in the fed and fasted states. Hyperpolarization of [1- 13 C]acetoacetate and [1- 13 C]β-hydroxybutyrate provided liquid state polarizations of 8 ± 2% and 3 ± 1%, respectively. The hyperpolarized T 1 values for the two substrates were 28 ± 3 s (acetoacetate) and 20 ± 1 s (β-hydroxybutyrate). Multiple downstream metabolites were observed within the perfused heart, including acetylcarnitine, citrate and glutamate. In the in vivo heart, an increase in acetylcarnitine production from acetoacetate was observed in the fed state, as well as a potential reduction in glutamate. In this work, methods for the generation of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]acetoacetate and [1- 13 C]β-hydroxybutyrate were investigated, and their metabolism was assessed in both isolated, perfused rat hearts and in the in vivo rat heart. These preliminary investigations show that DNP can be used as an effective in vivo probe of ketone body metabolism in the heart. © 2018 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Perspectives on the metabolic management of epilepsy through dietary reduction of glucose and elevation of ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Greene, Amanda E; Todorova, Mariana T; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2003-08-01

    Brain cells are metabolically flexible because they can derive energy from both glucose and ketone bodies (acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate). Metabolic control theory applies principles of bioenergetics and genome flexibility to the management of complex phenotypic traits. Epilepsy is a complex brain disorder involving excessive, synchronous, abnormal electrical firing patterns of neurons. We propose that many epilepsies with varied etiologies may ultimately involve disruptions of brain energy homeostasis and are potentially manageable through principles of metabolic control theory. This control involves moderate shifts in the availability of brain energy metabolites (glucose and ketone bodies) that alter energy metabolism through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, respectively. These shifts produce adjustments in gene-linked metabolic networks that manage or control the seizure disorder despite the continued presence of the inherited or acquired factors responsible for the epilepsy. This hypothesis is supported by information on the management of seizures with diets including fasting, the ketogenic diet and caloric restriction. A better understanding of the compensatory genetic and neurochemical networks of brain energy metabolism may produce novel antiepileptic therapies that are more effective and biologically friendly than those currently available.

  3. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  4. The contribution of ketone bodies to basal and activity-dependent neuronal oxidation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Golam MI; Jiang, Lihong; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of ketone bodies to replace glucose in support of neuronal function is unresolved. Here, we determined the contributions of glucose and ketone bodies to neocortical oxidative metabolism over a large range of brain activity in rats fasted 36 hours and infused intravenously with [2,4-13C2]-D-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Three animal groups and conditions were studied: awake ex vivo, pentobarbital-induced isoelectricity ex vivo, and halothane-anesthetized in vivo, the latter data reanalyzed from a recent study. Rates of neuronal acetyl-CoA oxidation from ketone bodies (VacCoA-kbN) and pyruvate (VpdhN), and the glutamate-glutamine cycle (Vcyc) were determined by metabolic modeling of 13C label trapped in major brain amino acid pools. VacCoA-kbN increased gradually with increasing activity, as compared with the steeper change in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate (VtcaN), supporting a decreasing percentage of neuronal ketone oxidation: ∼100% (isoelectricity), 56% (halothane anesthesia), 36% (awake) with the BHB plasma levels achieved in our experiments (6 to 13 mM). In awake animals ketone oxidation reached saturation for blood levels >17 mM, accounting for 62% of neuronal substrate oxidation, the remainder (38%) provided by glucose. We conclude that ketone bodies present at sufficient concentration to saturate metabolism provides full support of basal (housekeeping) energy needs and up to approximately half of the activity-dependent oxidative needs of neurons. PMID:24780902

  5. The contribution of ketone bodies to basal and activity-dependent neuronal oxidation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Golam M I; Jiang, Lihong; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-07-01

    The capacity of ketone bodies to replace glucose in support of neuronal function is unresolved. Here, we determined the contributions of glucose and ketone bodies to neocortical oxidative metabolism over a large range of brain activity in rats fasted 36 hours and infused intravenously with [2,4-(13)C₂]-D-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Three animal groups and conditions were studied: awake ex vivo, pentobarbital-induced isoelectricity ex vivo, and halothane-anesthetized in vivo, the latter data reanalyzed from a recent study. Rates of neuronal acetyl-CoA oxidation from ketone bodies (V(acCoA-kbN)) and pyruvate (V(pdhN)), and the glutamate-glutamine cycle (V(cyc)) were determined by metabolic modeling of (13)C label trapped in major brain amino acid pools. V(acCoA-kbN) increased gradually with increasing activity, as compared with the steeper change in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate (V(tcaN)), supporting a decreasing percentage of neuronal ketone oxidation: ∼100% (isoelectricity), 56% (halothane anesthesia), 36% (awake) with the BHB plasma levels achieved in our experiments (6 to 13 mM). In awake animals ketone oxidation reached saturation for blood levels >17 mM, accounting for 62% of neuronal substrate oxidation, the remainder (38%) provided by glucose. We conclude that ketone bodies present at sufficient concentration to saturate metabolism provides full support of basal (housekeeping) energy needs and up to approximately half of the activity-dependent oxidative needs of neurons.

  6. Successful adaptation to ketosis by mice with tissue-specific deficiency of ketone body oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.; Wentz, Anna E.; André d'Avignon, D.

    2013-01-01

    During states of low carbohydrate intake, mammalian ketone body metabolism transfers energy substrates originally derived from fatty acyl chains within the liver to extrahepatic organs. We previously demonstrated that the mitochondrial enzyme coenzyme A (CoA) transferase [succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT), encoded by nuclear Oxct1] is required for oxidation of ketone bodies and that germline SCOT-knockout (KO) mice die within 48 h of birth because of hyperketonemic hypoglycemia. Here, we use novel transgenic and tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice to demonstrate that ketone bodies do not serve an obligate energetic role within highly ketolytic tissues during the ketogenic neonatal period or during starvation in the adult. Although transgene-mediated restoration of myocardial CoA transferase in germline SCOT-KO mice is insufficient to prevent lethal hyperketonemic hypoglycemia in the neonatal period, mice lacking CoA transferase selectively within neurons, cardiomyocytes, or skeletal myocytes are all viable as neonates. Like germline SCOT-KO neonatal mice, neonatal mice with neuronal CoA transferase deficiency exhibit increased cerebral glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and, while these neonatal mice exhibit modest hyperketonemia, they do not develop hypoglycemia. As adults, tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice tolerate starvation, exhibiting only modestly increased hyperketonemia. Finally, metabolic analysis of adult germline Oxct1+/− mice demonstrates that global diminution of ketone body oxidation yields hyperketonemia, but hypoglycemia emerges only during a protracted state of low carbohydrate intake. Together, these data suggest that, at the tissue level, ketone bodies are not a required energy substrate in the newborn period or during starvation, but rather that integrated ketone body metabolism mediates adaptation to ketogenic nutrient states. PMID:23233542

  7. Successful adaptation to ketosis by mice with tissue-specific deficiency of ketone body oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; Schugar, Rebecca C; Wentz, Anna E; d'Avignon, D André; Crawford, Peter A

    2013-02-15

    During states of low carbohydrate intake, mammalian ketone body metabolism transfers energy substrates originally derived from fatty acyl chains within the liver to extrahepatic organs. We previously demonstrated that the mitochondrial enzyme coenzyme A (CoA) transferase [succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT), encoded by nuclear Oxct1] is required for oxidation of ketone bodies and that germline SCOT-knockout (KO) mice die within 48 h of birth because of hyperketonemic hypoglycemia. Here, we use novel transgenic and tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice to demonstrate that ketone bodies do not serve an obligate energetic role within highly ketolytic tissues during the ketogenic neonatal period or during starvation in the adult. Although transgene-mediated restoration of myocardial CoA transferase in germline SCOT-KO mice is insufficient to prevent lethal hyperketonemic hypoglycemia in the neonatal period, mice lacking CoA transferase selectively within neurons, cardiomyocytes, or skeletal myocytes are all viable as neonates. Like germline SCOT-KO neonatal mice, neonatal mice with neuronal CoA transferase deficiency exhibit increased cerebral glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and, while these neonatal mice exhibit modest hyperketonemia, they do not develop hypoglycemia. As adults, tissue-specific SCOT-KO mice tolerate starvation, exhibiting only modestly increased hyperketonemia. Finally, metabolic analysis of adult germline Oxct1(+/-) mice demonstrates that global diminution of ketone body oxidation yields hyperketonemia, but hypoglycemia emerges only during a protracted state of low carbohydrate intake. Together, these data suggest that, at the tissue level, ketone bodies are not a required energy substrate in the newborn period or during starvation, but rather that integrated ketone body metabolism mediates adaptation to ketogenic nutrient states.

  8. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.; Matsumoto, Joyce H.

    2014-01-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. PMID:24721741

  9. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2014-12-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    De Feyter, Henk M; Behar, Kevin L; Rao, Jyotsna U; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Ketone body oxidation was studied using (13)C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a (13)C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. The level of (13)C-beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

    PubMed

    Thevenet, Jonathan; De Marchi, Umberto; Domingo, Jaime Santo; Christinat, Nicolas; Bultot, Laurent; Lefebvre, Gregory; Sakamoto, Kei; Descombes, Patrick; Masoodi, Mojgan; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides have been used as part of a ketogenic diet effective in reducing epileptic episodes. The health benefits of the derived medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are thought to result from the stimulation of liver ketogenesis providing fuel for the brain. We tested whether MCFAs have direct effects on energy metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human astrocytes and neurons. Using single-cell imaging, we observed an acute pronounced reduction of the mitochondrial electrical potential and a concomitant drop of the NAD(P)H signal in astrocytes, but not in neurons. Despite the observed effects on mitochondrial function, MCFAs did not lower intracellular ATP levels or activate the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase. ATP concentrations in astrocytes were unaltered, even when blocking the respiratory chain, suggesting compensation through accelerated glycolysis. The MCFA decanoic acid (300 μM) promoted glycolysis and augmented lactate formation by 49.6%. The shorter fatty acid octanoic acid (300 μM) did not affect glycolysis but increased the rates of astrocyte ketogenesis 2.17-fold compared with that of control cells. MCFAs may have brain health benefits through the modulation of astrocyte metabolism leading to activation of shuttle systems that provide fuel to neighboring neurons in the form of lactate and ketone bodies.-Thevenet, J., De Marchi, U., Santo Domingo, J., Christinat, N., Bultot, L., Lefebvre, G., Sakamoto, K., Descombes, P., Masoodi, M., Wiederkehr, A. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems. © FASEB.

  12. Antioxidant capacity contributes to protection of ketone bodies against oxidative damage induced during hypoglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Haces, María L; Hernández-Fonseca, Karla; Medina-Campos, Omar N; Montiel, Teresa; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Massieu, Lourdes

    2008-05-01

    Ketone bodies play a key role in mammalian energy metabolism during the suckling period. Normally ketone bodies' blood concentration during adulthood is very low, although it can rise during starvation, an exogenous infusion or a ketogenic diet. Whenever ketone bodies' levels increase, their oxidation in the brain rises. For this reason they have been used as protective molecules against refractory epilepsy and in experimental models of ischemia and excitotoxicity. The mechanisms underlying the protective effect of these compounds are not completely understood. Here, we studied a possible antioxidant capacity of ketone bodies and whether it contributes to the protection against oxidative damage induced during hypoglycemia. We report for the first time the scavenging capacity of the ketone bodies, acetoacetate (AcAc) and both the physiological and non-physiological isomers of beta-hydroxybutyrate (D- and L-BHB, respectively), for diverse reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were effectively scavenged by D- and L-BHB. In addition, the three ketone bodies were able to reduce cell death and ROS production induced by the glycolysis inhibitor, iodoacetate (IOA), while only D-BHB and AcAc prevented neuronal ATP decline. Finally, in an in vivo model of insulin-induced hypoglycemia, the administration of D- or L-BHB, but not of AcAc, was able to prevent the hypoglycemia-induced increase in lipid peroxidation in the rat hippocampus. Our data suggest that the antioxidant capacity contributes to protection of ketone bodies against oxidative damage in in vitro and in vivo models associated with free radical production and energy impairment.

  13. The Failing Heart Relies on Ketone Bodies as a Fuel.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Gregory; Martin, Ola J; Horton, Julie L; Lai, Ling; Vega, Rick B; Leone, Teresa C; Koves, Timothy; Gardell, Stephen J; Krüger, Marcus; Hoppel, Charles L; Lewandowski, E Douglas; Crawford, Peter A; Muoio, Deborah M; Kelly, Daniel P

    2016-02-23

    Significant evidence indicates that the failing heart is energy starved. During the development of heart failure, the capacity of the heart to utilize fatty acids, the chief fuel, is diminished. Identification of alternate pathways for myocardial fuel oxidation could unveil novel strategies to treat heart failure. Quantitative mitochondrial proteomics was used to identify energy metabolic derangements that occur during the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in well-defined mouse models. As expected, the amounts of proteins involved in fatty acid utilization were downregulated in myocardial samples from the failing heart. Conversely, expression of β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1, a key enzyme in the ketone oxidation pathway, was increased in the heart failure samples. Studies of relative oxidation in an isolated heart preparation using ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance combined with targeted quantitative myocardial metabolomic profiling using mass spectrometry revealed that the hypertrophied and failing heart shifts to oxidizing ketone bodies as a fuel source in the context of reduced capacity to oxidize fatty acids. Distinct myocardial metabolomic signatures of ketone oxidation were identified. These results indicate that the hypertrophied and failing heart shifts to ketone bodies as a significant fuel source for oxidative ATP production. Specific metabolite biosignatures of in vivo cardiac ketone utilization were identified. Future studies aimed at determining whether this fuel shift is adaptive or maladaptive could unveil new therapeutic strategies for heart failure. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The inverse problem of brain energetics: ketone bodies as alternative substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvetti, D.; Occhipinti, R.; Somersalo, E.

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about brain energy metabolism under ketosis, although there is evidence that ketone bodies have a neuroprotective role in several neurological disorders. We investigate the inverse problem of estimating reaction fluxes and transport rates in the different cellular compartments of the brain, when the data amounts to a few measured arterial venous concentration differences. By using a recently developed methodology to perform Bayesian Flux Balance Analysis and a new five compartment model of the astrocyte-glutamatergic neuron cellular complex, we are able to identify the preferred biochemical pathways during shortage of glucose and in the presence of ketone bodies in the arterial blood. The analysis is performed in a minimally biased way, therefore revealing the potential of this methodology for hypothesis testing.

  15. Is there an astrocyte-neuron ketone body shuttle?

    PubMed

    Guzmán, M; Blázquez, C

    2001-01-01

    Ketone bodies can replace glucose as the major source of brain energy when glucose becomes scarce. Although it is generally assumed that the liver supplies extrahepatic tissues with ketone bodies, recent evidence shows that astrocytes are also ketogenic cells. Moreover, the partitioning of fatty acids between ketogenesis and ceramide synthesis de novo might control the survival/death decision of neural cells. These findings support the notion that astrocytes might supply neurons with ketone bodies in situ, and raise the possibility that astrocyte ketogenesis is a cytoprotective pathway.

  16. Lauric Acid Stimulates Ketone Body Production in the KT-5 Astrocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yudai; Takagi, Tetsuo; Inai, Makoto; Nishimura, Shuhei; Urashima, Shogo; Honda, Kazumitsu; Aoyama, Toshiaki; Terada, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Coconut oil has recently attracted considerable attention as a potential Alzheimer's disease therapy because it contains large amounts of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) and its consumption is thought to stimulate hepatic ketogenesis, supplying an alternative energy source for brains with impaired glucose metabolism. In this study, we first reevaluated the responses of plasma ketone bodies to oral administration of coconut oil to rats. We found that the coconut oil-induced increase in plasma ketone body concentration was negligible and did not significantly differ from that observed after high-oleic sunflower oil administration. In contrast, the administration of coconut oil substantially increased the plasma free fatty acid concentration and lauric acid content, which is the major MCFA in coconut oil. Next, to elucidate whether lauric acid can activate ketogenesis in astrocytes with the capacity to generate ketone bodies from fatty acids, we treated the KT-5 astrocyte cell line with 50 and 100 μM lauric acid for 4 h. The lauric acid treatments increased the total ketone body concentration in the cell culture supernatant to a greater extent than oleic acid, suggesting that lauric acid can directly and potently activate ketogenesis in KT-5 astrocytes. These results suggest that coconut oil intake may improve brain health by directly activating ketogenesis in astrocytes and thereby by providing fuel to neighboring neurons.

  17. Regulation of hypothalamic neuronal sensing and food intake by ketone bodies and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henri M; Levin, Barry E

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) alter their activity when ambient levels of metabolic substrates, such as glucose and fatty acids (FA), change. To assess the relationship between a high-fat diet (HFD; 60%) intake on feeding and serum and VMH FA levels, rats were trained to eat a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5%) or an HFD in 3 h/day and were monitored with VMH FA microdialysis. Despite having higher serum levels, HFD rats had lower VMH FA levels but ate less from 3 to 6 h of refeeding than did LFD rats. However, VMH β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and VMH-to-serum β-OHB ratio levels were higher in HFD rats during the first 1 h of refeeding, suggesting that VMH astrocyte ketone production mediated their reduced intake. In fact, using calcium imaging in dissociated VMH neurons showed that ketone bodies overrode normal FA sensing, primarily by exciting neurons that were activated or inhibited by oleic acid. Importantly, bilateral inhibition of VMH ketone production with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase inhibitor reversed the 3- to 6-h HFD-induced inhibition of intake but had no effect in LFD-fed rats. These data suggest that a restricted HFD intake regimen inhibits caloric intake as a consequence of FA-induced VMH ketone body production by astrocytes.

  18. Regulation of Hypothalamic Neuronal Sensing and Food Intake by Ketone Bodies and Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Miziorko, Henri M.; Levin, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) alter their activity when ambient levels of metabolic substrates, such as glucose and fatty acids (FA), change. To assess the relationship between a high-fat diet (HFD; 60%) intake on feeding and serum and VMH FA levels, rats were trained to eat a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5%) or an HFD in 3 h/day and were monitored with VMH FA microdialysis. Despite having higher serum levels, HFD rats had lower VMH FA levels but ate less from 3 to 6 h of refeeding than did LFD rats. However, VMH β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and VMH-to-serum β-OHB ratio levels were higher in HFD rats during the first 1 h of refeeding, suggesting that VMH astrocyte ketone production mediated their reduced intake. In fact, using calcium imaging in dissociated VMH neurons showed that ketone bodies overrode normal FA sensing, primarily by exciting neurons that were activated or inhibited by oleic acid. Importantly, bilateral inhibition of VMH ketone production with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase inhibitor reversed the 3- to 6-h HFD-induced inhibition of intake but had no effect in LFD-fed rats. These data suggest that a restricted HFD intake regimen inhibits caloric intake as a consequence of FA-induced VMH ketone body production by astrocytes. PMID:24379353

  19. The interconversion and disposal of ketone bodies in untreated and injured post-absorptive rats

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Roger N.

    1973-01-01

    [3-14C]Acetoacetate and β-hydroxy[3-14C]butyrate were used to investigate the kinetics of ketone body metabolism in rats 3h after bilateral hind-limb ischaemia and in controls, both groups being in the post-absorptive state and in a 20°C environment. Calculations were carried out as described by Heath & Barton (1973) and the following conclusions were reached. 1. In both injured and control rats, the rates of irreversible disposal (extrahepatic utilization) of β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate were proportional within experimental error to their blood concentrations up to at least 0.4mm (the maximum found in these rats), implying that they were determined, via these concentrations, by the rates of production by the liver. 2. Conversion of blood β-hydroxybutyrate into blood acetoacetate took place mainly in the liver, but the reverse process occurred mainly in extrahepatic tissues. 3. The `metabolic clearance rate' (the volume of blood which, if completely cleared of substrate in unit time, would give a disposal rate equal to that in the whole animal) was calculated for β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate. Comparison with the cardiac output showed that in control rats the proportion of circulating β-hydroxybutyrate extracted was lower than that of acetoacetate, clearance of which appeared almost complete. After injury both metabolic clearance rates decreased, probably because of the lower cardiac output. 4. After injury, because the average blood concentrations of ketone bodies, especially acetoacetate, were higher, the mean total rate of disposal also increased. Assuming complete oxidation, the mean contribution of ketone bodies to the whole body O2 consumption rose from 7 to 15%. PMID:4798577

  20. The interconversion and disposal of ketone bodies in untreated and injured post-absorptive rats.

    PubMed

    Barton, R N

    1973-11-01

    [3-(14)C]Acetoacetate and beta-hydroxy[3-(14)C]butyrate were used to investigate the kinetics of ketone body metabolism in rats 3h after bilateral hind-limb ischaemia and in controls, both groups being in the post-absorptive state and in a 20 degrees C environment. Calculations were carried out as described by Heath & Barton (1973) and the following conclusions were reached. 1. In both injured and control rats, the rates of irreversible disposal (extrahepatic utilization) of beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate were proportional within experimental error to their blood concentrations up to at least 0.4mm (the maximum found in these rats), implying that they were determined, via these concentrations, by the rates of production by the liver. 2. Conversion of blood beta-hydroxybutyrate into blood acetoacetate took place mainly in the liver, but the reverse process occurred mainly in extrahepatic tissues. 3. The ;metabolic clearance rate' (the volume of blood which, if completely cleared of substrate in unit time, would give a disposal rate equal to that in the whole animal) was calculated for beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate. Comparison with the cardiac output showed that in control rats the proportion of circulating beta-hydroxybutyrate extracted was lower than that of acetoacetate, clearance of which appeared almost complete. After injury both metabolic clearance rates decreased, probably because of the lower cardiac output. 4. After injury, because the average blood concentrations of ketone bodies, especially acetoacetate, were higher, the mean total rate of disposal also increased. Assuming complete oxidation, the mean contribution of ketone bodies to the whole body O(2) consumption rose from 7 to 15%.

  1. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Gabriele D; Brucker, Daniel P; Bähr, Oliver; Harter, Patrick N; Hattingen, Elke; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Steinbach, Joachim P; Rieger, Johannes

    2011-07-26

    Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently target non-oxidative pathways.

  2. On the Metabolism of Exogenous Ketones in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Brianna J.; Cox, Pete J.; Evans, Rhys D.; Santer, Peter; Miller, Jack J.; Faull, Olivia K.; Magor-Elliott, Snapper; Hiyama, Satoshi; Stirling, Matthew; Clarke, Kieran

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Currently there is considerable interest in ketone metabolism owing to recently reported benefits of ketosis for human health. Traditionally, ketosis has been achieved by following a high-fat, low-carbohydrate “ketogenic” diet, but adherence to such diets can be difficult. An alternative way to increase blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate (D-βHB) concentrations is ketone drinks, but the metabolic effects of exogenous ketones are relatively unknown. Here, healthy human volunteers took part in three randomized metabolic studies of drinks containing a ketone ester (KE); (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate, or ketone salts (KS); sodium plus potassium βHB. Methods and Results: In the first study, 15 participants consumed KE or KS drinks that delivered ~12 or ~24 g of βHB. Both drinks elevated blood D-βHB concentrations (D-βHB Cmax: KE 2.8 mM, KS 1.0 mM, P < 0.001), which returned to baseline within 3–4 h. KS drinks were found to contain 50% of the L-βHB isoform, which remained elevated in blood for over 8 h, but was not detectable after 24 h. Urinary excretion of both D-βHB and L-βHB was <1.5% of the total βHB ingested and was in proportion to the blood AUC. D-βHB, but not L-βHB, was slowly converted to breath acetone. The KE drink decreased blood pH by 0.10 and the KS drink increased urinary pH from 5.7 to 8.5. In the second study, the effect of a meal before a KE drink on blood D-βHB concentrations was determined in 16 participants. Food lowered blood D-βHB Cmax by 33% (Fed 2.2 mM, Fasted 3.3 mM, P < 0.001), but did not alter acetoacetate or breath acetone concentrations. All ketone drinks lowered blood glucose, free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations, and had similar effects on blood electrolytes, which remained normal. In the final study, participants were given KE over 9 h as three drinks (n = 12) or a continuous nasogastric infusion (n = 4) to maintain blood D-βHB concentrations greater than 1 mM. Both drinks and

  3. The depolarizing action of GABA in cultured hippocampal neurons is not due to the absence of ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Jaylyn; Kim, Jimok; Alger, Bradley E; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2011-01-01

    Two recent reports propose that the depolarizing action of GABA in the immature brain is an artifact of in vitro preparations in which glucose is the only energy source. The authors argue that this does not mimic the physiological environment because the suckling rats use ketone bodies and pyruvate as major sources of metabolic energy. Here, we show that availability of physiologically relevant levels of ketone bodies has no impact on the excitatory action of GABA in immature cultured hippocampal neurons. Addition of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), the primary ketone body in the neonate rat, affected neither intracellular calcium elevation nor membrane depolarizations induced by the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol, when assessed with calcium imaging or perforated patch-clamp recording, respectively. These results confirm that the addition of ketone bodies to the extracellular environment to mimic conditions in the neonatal brain does not reverse the chloride gradient and therefore render GABA hyperpolarizing. Our data are consistent with the existence of a genuine "developmental switch" mechanism in which GABA goes from having a predominantly excitatory role in immature cells to a predominantly inhibitory one in adults.

  4. Enhancement of L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels by pantethine. Relevance to dopaminergic injury.

    PubMed

    Cornille, Emilie; Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Nieoullon, André; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2010-04-23

    The administration of the ketone bodies hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate is known to exert a protective effect against metabolic disorders associated with cerebral pathologies. This suggests that the enhancement of their endogenous production might be a rational therapeutic approach. Ketone bodies are generated by fatty acid beta-oxidation, a process involving a mitochondrial oxido-reductase superfamily, with fatty acid-CoA thioesters as substrates. In this report, emphasis is on the penultimate step of the process, i.e. L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. We determined changes in enzyme activity and in circulating ketone body levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Since the active moiety of CoA is pantetheine, mice were treated with pantethine, its naturally-occurring form. Pantethine has the advantage of being known as an anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic agent with very few side effects. We found that dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels were drastically reduced by the neurotoxin MPTP, whereas treatment with pantethine overcame these adverse effects. Pantethine prevented dopaminergic neuron loss and motility disorders. In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the protection was associated with enhancement of glutathione (GSH) production as well as restoration of respiratory chain complex I activity and mitochondrial ATP levels. Remarkably, pantethine treatment boosted the circulating ketone body levels in MPTP-intoxicated mice, but not in normal animals. These finding demonstrate the feasibility of the enhancement of endogenous ketone body production and provide a promising therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease as well as, conceivably, to other neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Mitoketoscins: Novel mitochondrial inhibitors for targeting ketone metabolism in cancer stem cells (CSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Ozsvari, Bela; Sotgia, Federica; Simmons, Katie; Trowbridge, Rachel; Foster, Richard; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have now well-established that epithelial cancer cells can utilize ketone bodies (3-hydroxybutyrate and aceto-acetate) as mitochondrial fuels, to actively promote tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. The two critical metabolic enzymes implicated in this process are OXCT1 and ACAT1, which are both mitochondrial proteins. Importantly, over-expression of OXCT1 or ACAT1 in human breast cancer cells is sufficient to genetically drive tumorigenesis and/or lung metastasis, validating that they indeed behave as metabolic “tumor promoters”. Here, we decided to target these two enzymes, which give cancer cells the ability to recycle ketone bodies into Acetyl-CoA and, therefore, to produce increased ATP. Briefly, we used computational chemistry (in silico drug design) to select a sub-set of potentially promising compounds that spatially fit within the active site of these enzymes, based on their known 3D crystal structures. These libraries of compounds were then phenotypically screened for their effects on total cellular ATP levels. Positive hits were further validated by metabolic flux analysis. Our results indicated that four of these compounds effectively inhibited mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Two of these compounds also induced a reactive glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. Most importantly, using the mammosphere assay, we showed that these compounds can be used to functionally inhibit cancer stem cell (CSC) activity and propagation. Finally, our molecular modeling studies directly show how these novel compounds are predicted to bind to the active catalytic sites of OXCT1 and ACAT1, within their Coenzyme A binding site. As such, we speculate that these mitochondrial inhibitors are partially mimicking the structure of Coenzyme A. Thus, we conclude that OXCT1 and ACAT1 are important new therapeutic targets for further drug development and optimization. We propose that this new class of drugs should be termed “mitoketoscins”, to reflect

  6. The AMP-activated protein kinase is involved in the regulation of ketone body production by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, C; Woods, A; de Ceballos, M L; Carling, D; Guzmán, M

    1999-10-01

    The possible role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a highly conserved stress-activated kinase, in the regulation of ketone body production by astrocytes was studied. AMPK activity in rat cortical astrocytes was three times higher than in rat cortical neurons. AMPK in astrocytes was shown to be functionally active. Thus, incubation of astrocytes with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), a cell-permeable activator of AMPK, stimulated both ketogenesis from palmitate and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I. This was concomitant to a decrease of intracellular malonyl-CoA levels and an inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthesis and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase/cholesterol synthesis. Moreover, in microdialysis experiments AICAR was shown to stimulate brain ketogenesis markedly. The effect of chemical hypoxia on AMPK and the ketogenic pathway was studied subsequently. Incubation of astrocytes with azide led to a remarkable drop of fatty acid beta-oxidation. However, activation of AMPK during hypoxia compensated the depression of beta-oxidation, thereby sustaining ketone body production. This effect seemed to rely on the cascade hypoxia --> increase of the AMP/ATP ratio --> AMPK stimulation --> acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibition --> decrease of malonyl-CoA concentration --> carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deinhibition --> enhanced ketogenesis. Furthermore, incubation of neurons with azide blunted lactate oxidation, but not 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. Results show that (a) AMPK plays an active role in the regulation of ketone body production by astrocytes, and (b) ketone bodies produced by astrocytes during hypoxia might be a substrate for neuronal oxidative metabolism.

  7. Ketone isosteres of 2-N-acetamidosugars as substrates for metabolic cell surface engineering

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hang, Howard C.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-22

    Novel chemical reactivity can be engendered on cell surfaces by the metabolic incorporation of unnatural sugars into cell surface glycoconjuagtes. 2-N-Acetamido sugars such as GalNAc and GlcNAc are abundant components of cell surface glycoconjugates, and hence attractive targets for metabolic cell surface engineering. Here we report (1) the synthesis of isosteric analogs bearing a ketone group in place of the N-acetamido group, and (2) evaluation of their metabolic incorporation into mammalian cell surface glycans. A ketone isostere of GalNAc was metabolized by CHO cells through the salvage pathway and delivered to O-linked glycoproteins on the cell surface. Its residence atmore » the core position of O-linked glycans is suggested by studies with a-benzyl GalNAc, an inhibitor of O-linked oligosaccharide extension. A mutant CHO cell line lacking endogenous UDP-GalNAc demonstrated enhanced metabolism of the GalNAc analog, suggesting that competition with native intermediates might limits enzymatic transformation in mammalian cells. A ketone isostere of GlcNAc could not be detected on CHO or human cell surfaces after incubation. Thus, the enzymes in the GlcNAc salvage pathway might be less permissive of unnatural substrates than those comprising the GalNAc salvage pathway. Alternatively, high levels of endogenous GlcNAc derivatives might compete with the ketone isostere and prevent its incorporation into oligosaccharides.« less

  8. Ketones blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test ... fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis . This is a ...

  9. Involvement of brain ketone bodies and the noradrenergic pathway in diabetic hyperphagia in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kinuyo; Kinoshita, Mika; Yamada, Shunji; Imamura, Takuya; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro

    2011-03-01

    Uncontrolled type 1 diabetes leads to hyperphagia and severe ketosis. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that ketone bodies act on the hindbrain as a starvation signal to induce diabetic hyperphagia. Injection of an inhibitor of monocarboxylate transporter 1, a ketone body transporter, into the fourth ventricle normalized the increase in food intake in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Blockade of catecholamine synthesis in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) also restored food intake to normal levels in diabetic animals. On the other hand, hindbrain injection of the ketone body induced feeding, hyperglycemia, and fatty acid mobilization via increased sympathetic activity and also norepinephrine release in the PVN. This result provides evidence that hyperphagia in STZ-induced type 1 diabetes is signaled by a ketone body sensed in the hindbrain, and mediated by noradrenergic inputs to the PVN.

  10. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  11. Fast quantification of short chain fatty acids and ketone bodies by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after facile derivatization coupled with liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mingfei; Cao, Huachuan

    2018-04-15

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ketone bodies recently emerged as important physiological relevant metabolites because of their association with microbiota, immunology, obesity and other metabolic states. They were commonly analyzed by GC-MS with long run time and laborious sample preparation. In this study we developed a novel LC-MS/MS method using fast derivatization coupled with liquid-liquid extraction to detect SCFA and ketone bodies in plasma and feces. Several different derivatization reagents were evaluated to compare the efficiency, the sensitivity and chromatographic separation of structural isomers. O‑benzylhydroxylamine was selected for its superior overall performance in reaction time and isomeric separation that allowed the measurement of each SCFAs and ketone bodies free from interferences. The derivatization procedure is facile and reproducible in aqueous-organic medium, which abolished the evaporation procedure hampering the analysis of volatile short chain acids. Enhancement in sensitivity remarkably improved the detection limit of SCFA and ketone bodies to sub-fmol level. This novel method was applied to quantify these metabolites in fecal and plasma samples from lean and DIO mouse. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-chain fatty acids and ketones directly regulate sympathetic nervous system via G protein-coupled receptor 41 (GPR41).

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ikuo; Inoue, Daisuke; Maeda, Takeshi; Hara, Takafumi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Makio; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2011-05-10

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis is essential for life, and its dysregulation leads to a variety of metabolic disorders. Under a fed condition, mammals use glucose as the main metabolic fuel, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by the colonic bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also contribute a significant proportion of daily energy requirement. Under ketogenic conditions such as starvation and diabetes, ketone bodies produced in the liver from fatty acids are used as the main energy sources. To balance energy intake, dietary excess and starvation trigger an increase or a decrease in energy expenditure, respectively, by regulating the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). The regulation of metabolic homeostasis by glucose is well recognized; however, the roles of SCFAs and ketone bodies in maintaining energy balance remain unclear. Here, we show that SCFAs and ketone bodies directly regulate SNS activity via GPR41, a Gi/o protein-coupled receptor for SCFAs, at the level of the sympathetic ganglion. GPR41 was most abundantly expressed in sympathetic ganglia in mouse and humans. SCFA propionate promoted sympathetic outflow via GPR41. On the other hand, a ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate, produced during starvation or diabetes, suppressed SNS activity by antagonizing GPR41. Pharmacological and siRNA experiments indicated that GPR41-mediated activation of sympathetic neurons involves Gβγ-PLCβ-MAPK signaling. Sympathetic regulation by SCFAs and ketone bodies correlated well with their respective effects on energy consumption. These findings establish that SCFAs and ketone bodies directly regulate GPR41-mediated SNS activity and thereby control body energy expenditure in maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  13. Fatty acid-induced astrocyte ketone production and the control of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Le Foll, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are major worldwide public health issues today. A relationship between total fat intake and obesity has been found. In addition, the mechanisms of long-term and excessive high-fat diet (HFD) intake in the development of obesity still need to be elucidated. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is a major site involved in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis where “metabolic sensing neurons” integrate metabolic signals from the periphery. Among these signals, fatty acids (FA) modulate the activity of VMH neurons using the FA translocator/CD36, which plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. During low-fat diet (LFD) intake, FA are oxidized by VMH astrocytes to fuel their ongoing metabolic needs. However, HFD intake causes VMH astrocytes to use FA to generate ketone bodies. We postulate that these astrocyte-derived ketone bodies are exported to neurons where they produce excess ATP and reactive oxygen species, which override CD36-mediated FA sensing and act as a signal to decrease short-term food intake. On a HFD, VMH astrocyte-produced ketones reduce elevated caloric intake to LFD levels after 3 days in rats genetically predisposed to resist (DR) diet-induced obesity (DIO), but not leptin-resistant DIO rats. This suggests that, while VMH ketone production on a HFD can contribute to protection from obesity, the inherent leptin resistance overrides this inhibitory action of ketone bodies on food intake. Thus, astrocytes and neurons form a tight metabolic unit that is able to monitor circulating nutrients to alter food intake and energy homeostasis. PMID:27122369

  14. Fatty acid-induced astrocyte ketone production and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Levin, Barry E

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are major worldwide public health issues today. A relationship between total fat intake and obesity has been found. In addition, the mechanisms of long-term and excessive high-fat diet (HFD) intake in the development of obesity still need to be elucidated. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is a major site involved in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis where "metabolic sensing neurons" integrate metabolic signals from the periphery. Among these signals, fatty acids (FA) modulate the activity of VMH neurons using the FA translocator/CD36, which plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. During low-fat diet (LFD) intake, FA are oxidized by VMH astrocytes to fuel their ongoing metabolic needs. However, HFD intake causes VMH astrocytes to use FA to generate ketone bodies. We postulate that these astrocyte-derived ketone bodies are exported to neurons where they produce excess ATP and reactive oxygen species, which override CD36-mediated FA sensing and act as a signal to decrease short-term food intake. On a HFD, VMH astrocyte-produced ketones reduce elevated caloric intake to LFD levels after 3 days in rats genetically predisposed to resist (DR) diet-induced obesity (DIO), but not leptin-resistant DIO rats. This suggests that, while VMH ketone production on a HFD can contribute to protection from obesity, the inherent leptin resistance overrides this inhibitory action of ketone bodies on food intake. Thus, astrocytes and neurons form a tight metabolic unit that is able to monitor circulating nutrients to alter food intake and energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The rate of cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies, and oxygen: a comparative in vivo study of infant and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, G; Persson, B

    1976-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by means of Celabeled microspheres in infant (20-day-old) and adult (3-month-old) rats, anesthetised with Na-5-ethyl-5-(1-methylpropyl)2-thiobarbituric acid. Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate, and oxygen and brain DNA content were determined in other groups of similarly treated infant and adult animals fed or starved for 48 or 72 hr. The mean CBF values of 0.48+/-0.04 and 0.62+/-0.07 ml/(g X min), +/- SEM, in infant and adult animals, respectively, were not significantly different. CBF was unaffected by starvation. At any given arterial concentration the cerebral arteriovenous difference of acetoacetate was significantly higher in infant than adult rats. The same was true for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate at arterial concentrations above 1 mmol/liter. There was an approximately linear relationship between arterial concentration of acetoacetate and its cerebral arteriovenous difference in both infant and adult rats. A similar relationship was found for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate only in infant animals. In the fed state, the cerebral uptake of glucose and ketone bodies (micromoles per (mg DNA X min)) was not different in infant and adult rats. During starvation, cerebral uptake of ketone bodies expressed as micromoles per (mg DNA X min) was higher in infant than adult rats, indicating a higher rate of utilization of ketone bodies per cell in these animals. For glucose, no such difference was found in either fed or starved groups (Table 3). The average percentage of the total cerebral uptake of substrates (micromoles per min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in both infant and adult rats during starvation. This percentage value was clearly higher in infant than adult rats during starvation. After 72 hr of starvation the values were 38.8% and 15.2% in infant and adult rats, respectively (Fig. 3). Calculated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), assuming complete

  16. Ketone bodies do not directly alter excitatory or inhibitory hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Thio, L L; Wong, M; Yamada, K A

    2000-01-25

    To determine the effect of the ketone bodies beta-hydroxybutyrate (betaHB) and acetoacetate (AA) on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. The ketogenic diet is presumed to be an effective anticonvulsant regimen for some children with medically intractable seizures. However, its mechanism of action remains a mystery. According to one hypothesis, ketone bodies have anticonvulsant properties. The authors examined the effect of betaHB and AA on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slices and cultured hippocampal neurons. In cultured neurons, their effect was also directly assayed on postsynaptic receptor properties. Finally, their ability to prevent spontaneous seizures was determined in a hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slice model. betaHB and AA did not alter synaptic transmission in these models. The anticonvulsant properties of the ketogenic diet do not result from a direct effect of ketone bodies on the primary voltage and ligand gated ion channels mediating excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus.

  17. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  18. Ketones and Human Performance.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan M; Deuster, Patricia A

    Everyone is seeking nutritional strategies that might benefit performance. One approach receiving much attention is ketones, or ketosis. Ketones are very simple compounds made of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen, and ketosis is a metabolic state whereby the body uses predominantly ketones. Ketosis can be achieved by fasting for longer than 72 hours or by following a very lowcarbohydrate, high-fat diet (ketogenic diet) for several days to weeks. Alternatively, ketone supplements purportedly induce ketosis rapidly and do not require strict adherence to any specific type of diet; however, much of the touted benefits are anecdotal. A potential role for ketosis as a performance enhancer was first introduced in 1983 with the idea that chronic ketosis without caloric restriction could preserve submaximal exercise capability by sparing glycogen or conserving the limited carbohydrate stores. Few human studies on the effects of a ketogenic diet on performance have yielded positive results, and most studies have yielded equivocal or null results, and a few negative results. Many questions about ketones relevant to Special Operations Forces (SOF) remain unanswered. At present, a ketogenic diet and/or a ketone supplement do not appear confer performance benefits for SOF. Instead, Operators should engage with their unit dietitian to develop individualized nutritional strategies based on unique mission requirements. The authors review the concept of a ketogenic diet, describe some potential benefits and risks of ketosis, review the performance literature and how to measure ketone status, and then summarize the landscape in 2017. 2017.

  19. The neuroprotective properties of calorie restriction, the ketogenic diet, and ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Marwan; Rho, Jong M; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-03-01

    Both calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet possess broad therapeutic potential in various clinical settings and in various animal models of neurological disease. Following calorie restriction or consumption of a ketogenic diet, there is notable improvement in mitochondrial function, a decrease in the expression of apoptotic and inflammatory mediators and an increase in the activity of neurotrophic factors. However, despite these intriguing observations, it is not yet clear which of these mechanisms account for the observed neuroprotective effects. Furthermore, limited compliance and concern for adverse effects hamper efforts at broader clinical application. Recent research aimed at identifying compounds that can reproduce, at least partially, the neuroprotective effects of the diets with less demanding changes to food intake suggests that ketone bodies might represent an appropriate candidate. Ketone bodies protect neurons against multiple types of neuronal injury and are associated with mitochondrial effects similar to those described during calorie restriction or ketogenic diet treatment. The present review summarizes the neuroprotective effects of calorie restriction, of the ketogenic diet and of ketone bodies, and compares their putative mechanisms of action.

  20. Acute nutritional ketosis: implications for exercise performance and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ketone bodies acetoacetate (AcAc) and D-β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) may provide an alternative carbon source to fuel exercise when delivered acutely in nutritional form. The metabolic actions of ketone bodies are based on sound evolutionary principles to prolong survival during caloric deprivation. By harnessing the potential of these metabolic actions during exercise, athletic performance could be influenced, providing a useful model for the application of ketosis in therapeutic conditions. This article examines the energetic implications of ketone body utilisation with particular reference to exercise metabolism and substrate energetics. PMID:25379174

  1. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    DOE PAGES

    Griffith, David A.; Kung, Daniel W.; Esler, William P.; ...

    2014-11-25

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate formore » the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. In conclusion, this demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.« less

  2. Leptin controls ketone body utilization in hypothalamic neuron.

    PubMed

    Narishima, Ryota; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoshida, Saki; Tanaka, Shinya; Fukui, Tetsuya

    2011-03-03

    Leptin is an appetite-controlling peptide secreted from adipose tissue. Previously, we showed that the gene expression of acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS), the ketone body-utilizing enzyme for lipid synthesis, was suppressed by leptin deficiency-induced obesity in white adipose tissue. In this study, to clarify the effects of leptin on ketone body utilization in the central nervous system, we examined the effects of leptin signaling on AACS expression. In situ hybridization analysis of ob/ob and db/db mice revealed that AACS mRNA level was reduced by leptin deficiency in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) in hypothalamus but not in other brain regions. Moreover, AACS mRNA level was increased by leptin treatment both in primary cultured neural cells and in N41 neural-like cells. In N41 cells, AACS level was decreased by AMPK inducer but increased by AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that the up-regulation of AACS expression by leptin is due to the suppression of AMPK activity via neural leptin signaling and that the deficiency of this regulation may be responsible for neurological disorders in central appetite control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomarkers, ketone bodies, and the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B

    2015-03-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (spAD) has three successive phases: preclinical, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia. Individuals in the preclinical phase are cognitively normal. Diagnosis of preclinical spAD requires evidence of pathologic brain changes provided by established biomarkers. Histopathologic features of spAD include (i) extra-cellular cerebral amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles that embody hyperphosphorylated tau; and (ii) neuronal and synaptic loss. Amyloid-PET brain scans conducted during spAD's preclinical phase have disclosed abnormal accumulations of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in cognitively normal, high-risk individuals. However, this measure correlates poorly with changes in cognitive status. In contrast, MRI measures of brain atrophy consistently parallel cognitive deterioration. By the time dementia appears, amyloid deposition has already slowed or ceased. When a new treatment offers promise of arresting or delaying progression of preclinical spAD, its effectiveness must be inferred from intervention-correlated changes in biomarkers. Herein, differing tenets of the amyloid cascade hypothesis (ACH) and the mitochondrial cascade hypothesis (MCH) are compared. Adoption of the ACH suggests therapeutic research continue to focus on aspects of the amyloid pathways. Adoption of the MCH suggests research emphasis be placed on restoration and stabilization of mitochondrial function. Ketone ester (KE)-induced elevation of plasma ketone body (KB) levels improves mitochondrial metabolism and prevents or delays progression of AD-like pathologic changes in several AD animal models. Thus, as a first step, it is imperative to determine whether KE-caused hyperketonemia can bring about favorable changes in biomarkers of AD pathology in individuals who are in an early stage of AD's preclinical phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ketone bodies protection against HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Bhatt, Dhaval; Geiger, Nicholas H; Rosenberger, Thad A; Haughey, Norman J; Masino, Susan A; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a syndrome that ranges clinically from subtle neuropsychological impairments to profoundly disabling HIV-associated dementia. Not only is the pathogenesis of HAND unclear, but also effective treatments are unavailable. The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription protein (HIV-1 Tat) is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, in part, because of its well-characterized ability to directly excite neurons and cause neurotoxicity. Consistent with previous findings from others, we demonstrate here that HIV-1 Tat induced neurotoxicity, increased intracellular calcium, and disrupted a variety of mitochondria functions, such as reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, and decreasing bioenergetic efficiency. Of therapeutic importance, we show that treatment of cultured neurons with ketone bodies normalized HIV-1 Tat induced changes in levels of intracellular calcium, mitochondrial function, and neuronal cell death. Ketone bodies are normally produced in the body and serve as alternative energy substrates in tissues including brain and can cross the blood-brain barrier. Ketogenic strategies have been used clinically for treatment of neurological disorders and our current results suggest that similar strategies may also provide clinical benefits in the treatment of HAND. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Role of VMH ketone bodies in adjusting caloric intake to increased dietary fat content in DIO and DR rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henry M; Levin, Barry E

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential role of astrocyte-derived ketone bodies in regulating the early changes in caloric intake of diet induced-obese (DIO) versus diet-resistant (DR) rats fed a 31.5% fat high-energy (HE) diet. After 3 days on chow or HE diet, DR and DIO rats were assessed for their ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) ketone bodies levels and neuronal ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) sensing using microdialysis coupled to continuous food intake monitoring and calcium imaging in dissociated neurons, respectively. DIO rats ate more than DR rats over 3 days of HE diet intake. On day 3 of HE diet intake, DR rats reduced their caloric intake while DIO rats remained hyperphagic. Local VMH astrocyte ketone bodies production was similar between DR and DIO rats during the first 6 h after dark onset feeding but inhibiting VMH ketone body production in DR rats on day 3 transiently returned their intake of HE diet to the level of DIO rats consuming HE diet. In addition, dissociated VMN neurons from DIO and DR rats were equally sensitive to the largely excitatory effects of β-hydroxybutyrate. Thus while DR rats respond to increased VMH ketone levels by decreasing their intake after 3 days of HE diet, this is not the case of DIO rats. These data suggest that DIO inherent leptin resistance prevents ketone bodies inhibitory action on food intake.

  6. Ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Nguyen, Kim Y.; Grant, Ryan W.; Goldberg, Emily L.; Bodogai, Monica; Kim, Dongin; D'Agostino, Dominic; Planavsky, Noah; Lupfer, Christopher; Kanneganti, Thirumala D.; Kang, Seokwon; Horvath, Tamas L.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Crawford, Peter A.; Biragyn, Arya; Alnemri, Emad; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-01-01

    Ketone bodies , β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate support mammalian survival during states of energy deficit by serving as alternative source of ATP1. BHB levels are elevated during starvation, high-intensity exercise or by the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet2. Prolonged caloric restriction or fasting reduces inflammation as immune system adapts to low glucose supply and energy metabolism switches towards mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and ketolysis2-6. However, role of ketones bodies in regulation of innate immune response is unknown. We report that BHB, but neither acetoacetate nor structurally-related short chain fatty acids, butyrate and acetate, suppresses activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to several structurally unrelated NLRP3 activators, without impacting NLRC4, AIM2 or non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, BHB inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing K+ efflux and reducing ASC oligomerization and speck formation. The inhibitory effects of BHB on NLRP3 were not dependent on chirality or classical starvation regulated mechanisms like AMPK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), autophagy or glycolytic inhibition. BHB blocked NLRP3 inflammasome without undergoing oxidation in TCA cycle, independently of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), Sirt2, receptor Gpr109a and inhibition of NLRP3 did not correlate with magnitude of histone acetylation in macrophages. BHB reduced the NLRP3 inflammasome mediated IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytes. In vivo, BHB attenuates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in mouse models of NLRP3-mediated diseases like Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), Familial Cold Autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and urate crystal induce body cavity inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of caloric restriction or ketogenic diets may be mechanistically linked to BHB-mediated inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome, and point to the potential

  7. A Ketone Ester Diet Increases Brain Malonyl-CoA and Uncoupling Proteins 4 and 5 while Decreasing Food Intake in the Normal Wistar Rat*

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Pawlosky, Robert; Markis, William; King, M. Todd; Bergman, Christian; Srivastava, Shireesh; Murray, Andrew; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Three groups of male Wistar rats were pair fed NIH-31 diets for 14 days to which were added 30% of calories as corn starch, palm oil, or R-3-hydroxybutyrate-R-1,3-butanediol monoester (3HB-BD ester). On the 14th day, animal brains were removed by freeze-blowing, and brain metabolites measured. Animals fed the ketone ester diet had elevated mean blood ketone bodies of 3.5 mm and lowered plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin. Despite the decreased plasma leptin, feeding the ketone ester diet ad lib decreased voluntary food intake 2-fold for 6 days while brain malonyl-CoA was increased by about 25% in ketone-fed group but not in the palm oil fed group. Unlike the acute effects of ketone body metabolism in the perfused working heart, there was no increased reduction in brain free mitochondrial [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio nor in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis, which was compatible with the observed 1.5-fold increase in brain uncoupling proteins 4 and 5. Feeding ketone ester or palm oil supplemented diets decreased brain l-glutamate by 15–20% and GABA by about 34% supporting the view that fatty acids as well as ketone bodies can be metabolized by the brain. PMID:20529850

  8. A ketone ester diet increases brain malonyl-CoA and Uncoupling proteins 4 and 5 while decreasing food intake in the normal Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Pawlosky, Robert; Markis, William; King, M Todd; Bergman, Christian; Srivastava, Shireesh; Murray, Andrew; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L

    2010-08-20

    Three groups of male Wistar rats were pair fed NIH-31 diets for 14 days to which were added 30% of calories as corn starch, palm oil, or R-3-hydroxybutyrate-R-1,3-butanediol monoester (3HB-BD ester). On the 14th day, animal brains were removed by freeze-blowing, and brain metabolites measured. Animals fed the ketone ester diet had elevated mean blood ketone bodies of 3.5 mm and lowered plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin. Despite the decreased plasma leptin, feeding the ketone ester diet ad lib decreased voluntary food intake 2-fold for 6 days while brain malonyl-CoA was increased by about 25% in ketone-fed group but not in the palm oil fed group. Unlike the acute effects of ketone body metabolism in the perfused working heart, there was no increased reduction in brain free mitochondrial [NAD(+)]/[NADH] ratio nor in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis, which was compatible with the observed 1.5-fold increase in brain uncoupling proteins 4 and 5. Feeding ketone ester or palm oil supplemented diets decreased brain L-glutamate by 15-20% and GABA by about 34% supporting the view that fatty acids as well as ketone bodies can be metabolized by the brain.

  9. GABA action in immature neocortical neurons directly depends on the availability of ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Rheims, Sylvain; Holmgren, Carl D; Chazal, Genevieve; Mulder, Jan; Harkany, Tibor; Zilberter, Tanya; Zilberter, Yuri

    2009-08-01

    In the early postnatal period, energy metabolism in the suckling rodent brain relies to a large extent on metabolic pathways alternate to glucose such as the utilization of ketone bodies (KBs). However, how KBs affect neuronal excitability is not known. Using recordings of single NMDA and GABA-activated channels in neocortical pyramidal cells we studied the effects of KBs on the resting membrane potential (E(m)) and reversal potential of GABA-induced anionic currents (E(GABA)), respectively. We show that during postnatal development (P3-P19) if neocortical brain slices are adequately supplied with KBs, E(m) and E(GABA) are both maintained at negative levels of about -83 and -80 mV, respectively. Conversely, a KB deficiency causes a significant depolarization of both E(m) (>5 mV) and E(GABA) (>15 mV). The KB-mediated shift in E(GABA) is largely determined by the interaction of the NKCC1 cotransporter and Cl(-)/HCO3 transporter(s). Therefore, by inducing a hyperpolarizing shift in E(m) and modulating GABA signaling mode, KBs can efficiently control the excitability of neonatal cortical neurons.

  10. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew J.; Knight, Nicholas S.; Cole, Mark A.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Carter, Emma; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Pichulik, Tica; Gulston, Melanie K.; Atherton, Helen J.; Schroeder, Marie A.; Deacon, Robert M. J.; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Pawlosky, Robert; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Tyler, Damian J.; Griffin, Julian L.; Robertson, Jeremy; Veech, Richard L.; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies are the most energy-efficient fuel and yield more ATP per mole of substrate than pyruvate and increase the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis. Elevation of circulating ketones via high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets has been used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease. Ketones may also be beneficial for muscle and brain in times of stress, such as endurance exercise. The challenge has been to raise circulating ketone levels by using a palatable diet without altering lipid levels. We found that blood ketone levels can be increased and cholesterol and triglycerides decreased by feeding rats a novel ketone ester diet: chow that is supplemented with (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate as 30% of calories. For 5 d, rats on the ketone diet ran 32% further on a treadmill than did control rats that ate an isocaloric diet that was supplemented with either corn starch or palm oil (P < 0.05). Ketone-fed rats completed an 8-arm radial maze test 38% faster than did those on the other diets, making more correct decisions before making a mistake (P < 0.05). Isolated, perfused hearts from rats that were fed the ketone diet had greater free energy available from ATP hydrolysis during increased work than did hearts from rats on the other diets as shown by using [31P]-NMR spectroscopy. The novel ketone diet, therefore, improved physical performance and cognitive function in rats, and its energy-sparing properties suggest that it may help to treat a range of human conditions with metabolic abnormalities.—Murray, A. J., Knight, N. S., Cole, M. A., Cochlin, L. E., Carter, E., Tchabanenko, K., Pichulik, T., Gulston, M. K., Atherton, H. J., Schroeder, M. A., Deacon, R. M. J., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T., Pawlosky, R., Rawlins, J. N. P., Tyler, D. J., Griffin, J. L., Robertson, J., Veech, R. L., Clarke, K. Novel ketone diet enhances physical and cognitive performance. PMID:27528626

  11. Concentrations of ketone bodies in the blood of the green lizard Ameiva ameiva (Teiidae) in different physiological situations.

    PubMed

    Pontes, R de C; Cartaxo, A C; Jonas, R

    1988-01-01

    1. The concentrations of acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate have been determined in the blood of the green lizard Ameiva ameiva (Teiidae) in fed animals and in animals starved for periods from one week to about four months. 2. The concentrations of acetoacetate are low and unaltered in fed and starved animals, being in the range from 0.014 to 0.018 mM. 3. The concentrations of 3-hydroxybutyrate are high: 2.67 mM, in fed animals, falling during starvation down to 0.26 mM. 4. The 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio is high, 151, in fed animals, falling down to 17. 5. The possible importance of ketone bodies in the metabolism of Ameiva ameiva is discussed.

  12. Pyruvate and ketone-body transport across the mitochondrial membrane. Exchange properties, pH-dependence and mechanism of the carrier.

    PubMed

    Halestrap, A P

    1978-06-15

    The effects of exchangeable ions and pH on the efflux of pyruvate from preloaded mitochondria are reported. Efflux obeys first-order kinetics, and the stimulation of efflux by exchangeable ions such as acetoacetate and lactate obeys Michaelis--Menten kinetics. The apparent Km value +/- S.E. for acetoacetate was 0.56 +/- 0.14 mM (n = 5) and that for lactate 12.3 +/- 2.3 mM (n = 6). The Vmax. values +/- S.E. at 0 degrees C were 16.2 +/- 2.0 and 21.9 +/- 2.7 nmol/min per mg of protein. The exchange of a variety of other substituted monocarboxylates was also studied. Efflux was also stimulated by increasing the external pH. The data gave a pK for the transport process of 8.35 and a Vmax. of 3.31 +/- 0.14 nmol/min per mg. The similarity of the Vmax. values for various exchangeable ions but the difference of this from the Vmax. in the absence of exchangeable ions may indicate that transport of pyruvate occurs with H+ and not in exchange for an OH- ion. The inhibition of transport by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate took several seconds to reach completion at 0 degrees C. It is proposed that inhibition occurs by binding to the substrate site and subsequent reaction with an -SH group on the inside of the membrane. The inhibitor can be displaced by substrates that can also enter the mitochondria independently of the carrier and so compete with the inhibitor for the substrate-binding site on the inside of the membrane. A mechanism for transport is proposed that invokes a transition state of pyruvate involving addition of an -SH group to the 2-carbon of pyruvate. Evidence is presented that suggests that ketone bodies may cross the mitochondrial membrane either on the carrier or by free diffusion. The physiological involvement of the carrier in ketone-body metabolism is discussed. The role of ketone bodies and pH in the physiological regulation of pyruvate transport is considered.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone bodies...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone bodies...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... acidity of body fluids) or ketosis (a condition characterized by increased production of ketone bodies...

  16. Targeting of astrocytic glucose metabolism by beta-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Valdebenito, Rocío; Ruminot, Iván; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Forero-Quintero, Linda; Alegría, Karin; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W; Barros, L Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness of ketogenic diets and intermittent fasting against neurological disorders has brought interest to the effects of ketone bodies on brain cells. These compounds are known to modify the metabolism of neurons, but little is known about their effect on astrocytes, cells that control the supply of glucose to neurons and also modulate neuronal excitability through the glycolytic production of lactate. Here we have used genetically-encoded Förster Resonance Energy Transfer nanosensors for glucose, pyruvate and ATP to characterize astrocytic energy metabolism at cellular resolution. Our results show that the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate strongly inhibited astrocytic glucose consumption in mouse astrocytes in mixed cultures, in organotypic hippocampal slices and in acute hippocampal slices prepared from ketotic mice, while blunting the stimulation of glycolysis by physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. The inhibition of glycolysis was paralleled by an increased ability of astrocytic mitochondria to metabolize pyruvate. These results support the emerging notion that astrocytes contribute to the neuroprotective effect of ketone bodies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  18. Glycemia, ketonemia, and brain enzymes of ketone body utilization in suckling and adult rats undernourished from intrauterine life.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, F; Rodríguez, C; Pascual-Leone, A M

    1985-05-01

    The effect of undernutrition from the 16th day of pregnancy up to 70th day of life on blood glucose and ketone bodies and on several brain mitochondrial enzymes related to energy metabolism or biosynthetic function was investigated. Undernutrition in perinatal period was established by means of a food restriction to pregnant rats and, later, to the lactating mother; undernourished postweaned rats received half the diet consumed by the controls. Body and brain weight from undernourished rats was less than controls throughout the entire period studied. Glycemia and ketonemia were also always lower than controls. Cytochrome c oxidase, citrate synthase, 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, 3-oxoacid coenzyme A transferase, and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase activities during the suckling period were in most stages lower than controls; subsequently, activities in undernourished rats reached or surpassed the control values. These results could explain the "catch up" phenomenon in several ultrastructural parameters found by other authors in undernourished postweaned rats.

  19. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  20. Metabolic organization of the spotted ratfish, Hydrolagus colliei (Holocephali: Chimaeriformes): insight into the evolution of energy metabolism in the chondrichthyan fishes.

    PubMed

    Speers-Roesch, Ben; Robinson, Jacob William; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2006-08-01

    The metabolic organization of a holocephalan, the spotted ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei), was assessed using measurements of key enzymes of several metabolic pathways in four tissues and plasma concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) to ascertain if the Holocephali differ metabolically from the Elasmobranchii since these groups diverged ca. 400 Mya. Activities of carnitine palmitoyl transferase indicate that fatty acid oxidation occurs in liver and kidney but not in heart or white muscle. This result mirrors the well-established absence of lipid oxidation in elasmobranch muscle, and more recent studies showing that elasmobranch kidney possesses a capacity for lipid oxidation. High activities in oxidative tissues of enzymes of ketone body metabolism, including D-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, indicate that, like elasmobranchs, ketone bodies are of central importance in spotted ratfish. Like many carnivorous fishes, enzyme activities demonstrate that amino acids are metabolically important, although the concentration of plasma FAA was relatively low. NEFA concentrations are lower than in teleosts, but higher than in most elasmobranchs and similar to that in some "primitive" ray-finned fishes. NEFA composition is comparable to other marine temperate fishes, including high levels of n-6 and especially n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The metabolic organization of the spotted ratfish is similar to that of elasmobranchs: a reduced capacity for lipid oxidation in muscle, lower plasma NEFA levels, and an emphasis on ketone bodies as oxidative fuel. This metabolic strategy was likely present in the common chondrichthyan ancestor, and may be similar to the ancestral metabolic state of fishes. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. A Bio-Catalytic Approach to Aliphatic Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Mingyong; Deng, Jin; Woodruff, Adam P.; Zhu, Minshan; Zhou, Jun; Park, Sun Wook; Li, Hui; Fu, Yao; Zhang, Kechun

    2012-01-01

    Depleting oil reserves and growing environmental concerns have necessitated the development of sustainable processes to fuels and chemicals. Here we have developed a general metabolic platform in E. coli to biosynthesize carboxylic acids. By engineering selectivity of 2-ketoacid decarboxylases and screening for promiscuous aldehyde dehydrogenases, synthetic pathways were constructed to produce both C5 and C6 acids. In particular, the production of isovaleric acid reached 32 g/L (0.22 g/g glucose yield), which is 58% of the theoretical yield. Furthermore, we have developed solid base catalysts to efficiently ketonize the bio-derived carboxylic acids such as isovaleric acid and isocaproic acid into high volume industrial ketones: methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, yield 84%), diisobutyl ketone (DIBK, yield 66%) and methyl isoamyl ketone (MIAK, yield 81%). This hybrid “Bio-Catalytic conversion” approach provides a general strategy to manufacture aliphatic ketones, and represents an alternate route to expanding the repertoire of renewable chemicals. PMID:22416247

  2. A bio-catalytic approach to aliphatic ketones.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Mingyong; Deng, Jin; Woodruff, Adam P; Zhu, Minshan; Zhou, Jun; Park, Sun Wook; Li, Hui; Fu, Yao; Zhang, Kechun

    2012-01-01

    Depleting oil reserves and growing environmental concerns have necessitated the development of sustainable processes to fuels and chemicals. Here we have developed a general metabolic platform in E. coli to biosynthesize carboxylic acids. By engineering selectivity of 2-ketoacid decarboxylases and screening for promiscuous aldehyde dehydrogenases, synthetic pathways were constructed to produce both C5 and C6 acids. In particular, the production of isovaleric acid reached 32 g/L (0.22 g/g glucose yield), which is 58% of the theoretical yield. Furthermore, we have developed solid base catalysts to efficiently ketonize the bio-derived carboxylic acids such as isovaleric acid and isocaproic acid into high volume industrial ketones: methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, yield 84%), diisobutyl ketone (DIBK, yield 66%) and methyl isoamyl ketone (MIAK, yield 81%). This hybrid "Bio-Catalytic conversion" approach provides a general strategy to manufacture aliphatic ketones, and represents an alternate route to expanding the repertoire of renewable chemicals.

  3. Clinical review: Ketones and brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although much feared by clinicians, the ability to produce ketones has allowed humans to withstand prolonged periods of starvation. At such times, ketones can supply up to 50% of basal energy requirements. More interesting, however, is the fact that ketones can provide as much as 70% of the brain's energy needs, more efficiently than glucose. Studies suggest that during times of acute brain injury, cerebral uptake of ketones increases significantly. Researchers have thus attempted to attenuate the effects of cerebral injury by administering ketones exogenously. Hypertonic saline is commonly utilized for management of intracranial hypertension following cerebral injury. A solution containing both hypertonic saline and ketones may prove ideal for managing the dual problems of refractory intracranial hypertension and low cerebral energy levels. The purpose of the present review is to explore the physiology of ketone body utilization by the brain in health and in a variety of neurological conditions, and to discuss the potential for ketone supplementation as a therapeutic option in traumatic brain injury. PMID:21489321

  4. Sirtuin 3 mediates neuroprotection of ketones against ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junxiang; Han, Pengcheng; Tang, Zhiwei; Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death. Growing evidence indicates that ketone bodies have beneficial effects in treating stroke, but their underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study showed ketone bodies reduced reactive oxygen species by using NADH as an electron donor, thus increasing the NAD+/NADH ratio. In this study, we investigated whether mitochondrial NAD+-dependent Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) could mediate the neuroprotective effects of ketone bodies after ischemic stroke. We injected mice with either normal saline or ketones (beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) at 30 minutes after ischemia induced by transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. We found that ketone treatment enhanced mitochondria function, reduced oxidative stress, and therefore reduced infarct volume. This led to improved neurologic function after ischemia, including the neurologic score and the performance in Rotarod and open field tests. We further showed that ketones' effects were achieved by upregulating NAD+-dependent SIRT3 and its downstream substrates forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the penumbra region since knocking down SIRT3 in vitro diminished ketones' beneficial effects. These results provide us a foundation to develop novel therapeutics targeting this SIRT3-FoxO3a-SOD2 pathway. PMID:26058697

  5. Cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies and oxygen in starving infant rats and the effect of intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, G

    1976-10-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate and oxygen and brain DNA content was measured at 20 days of age in intrauterine growth retarded (IUGR) rats and normal littermates after 48 and 72 h of starvation. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with labeled microspheres in other comparable groups of IUGR and control rats. CBF was similar in IUGR and normal littermates (0.57+/-0.09 and 0.58+/-0.10 ml/min respectively). After 48 h of starvation, arterial glucose was significantly lower in IUGR than control animals but the arterial concentrations of ketone bodies were similar. After 48 h of starvation, cerebral arteriovenous difference of beta-hydroxybutyrate was significantly higher in control than IUGR rats also when expressed per mg brain DNA as was the fractional uptake of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate. After 72 h of starvation, arterial concentrations of ketone bodies were significantly lower in IUGR rats than controls but the fractional uptake of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate was increased compared to IUGR rats starved for 48 h. The average percentage of calculated total substrate uptake (mumol/min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in control animals from 31.1% after 48 h of starvation to 41.0% after 72 h of starvation. In IUGR rats these percentage values were 26.5 and 25.7 respectively. After 72 h of starvation the fraction of total cerebral uptake of substrates accounted for by ketone bodies was significantly higher in control that IUGR rats. As total cerebral uptake of substrates was similar between IUGR and control animals it is concluded that IUGR rats are more dependent on glucose as a substrate for the brain during starvation.

  6. Engineering β-oxidation in Yarrowia lipolytica for methyl ketone production.

    PubMed

    Hanko, Erik K R; Denby, Charles M; Sànchez I Nogué, Violeta; Lin, Weiyin; Ramirez, Kelsey J; Singer, Christine A; Beckham, Gregg T; Keasling, Jay D

    2018-05-28

    Medium- and long-chain methyl ketones are fatty acid-derived compounds that can be used as biofuel blending agents, flavors and fragrances. However, their large-scale production from sustainable feedstocks is currently limited due to the lack of robust microbial biocatalysts. The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising biorefinery platform strain for the production of methyl ketones from renewable lignocellulosic biomass due to its natively high flux towards fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we report the metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica to produce long- and very long-chain methyl ketones. Truncation of peroxisomal β-oxidation by chromosomal deletion of pot1 resulted in the biosynthesis of saturated, mono-, and diunsaturated methyl ketones in the C 13 -C 23 range. Additional overexpression and peroxisomal targeting of a heterologous bacterial methyl ketone biosynthesis pathway yielded an initial titer of 151.5 mg/L of saturated methyl ketones. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the cultures were found to substantially impact cell morphology and methyl ketone biosynthesis. Bioreactor cultivation under optimized conditions resulted in a titer of 314.8 mg/L of total methyl ketones, representing more than a 6000-fold increase over the parental strain. This work highlights the potential of Y. lipolytica to serve as chassis organism for the biosynthesis of acyl-thioester derived long- and very long-chain methyl ketones. Copyright © 2018 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. BAD-Dependent Regulation of Fuel Metabolism and KATP Channel Activity Confers Resistance to Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fisher, Jill K.; Szlyk, Benjamin; Polak, Klaudia; Wiwczar, Jessica; Tanner, Geoffrey R.; Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary; Danial, Nika N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neuronal excitation can be substantially modulated by alterations in metabolism, as evident from the anticonvulsant effect of diets that reduce glucose utilization and promote ketone body metabolism. We provide genetic evidence that BAD, a protein with dual functions in apoptosis and glucose metabolism, imparts reciprocal effects on metabolism of glucose and ketone bodies in brain cells. These effects involve phospho-regulation of BAD and are independent of its apoptotic function. BAD modifications that reduce glucose metabolism produce a marked increase in the activity of metabolically sensitive KATP channels in neurons, as well as resistance to behavioral and electrographic seizures in vivo. Seizure resistance is reversed by genetic ablation of the KATP channel, implicating the BAD-KATP axis in metabolic control of neuronal excitation and seizure responses. PMID:22632729

  8. BAD-dependent regulation of fuel metabolism and K(ATP) channel activity confers resistance to epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fisher, Jill K; Szlyk, Benjamin; Polak, Klaudia; Wiwczar, Jessica; Tanner, Geoffrey R; Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary; Danial, Nika N

    2012-05-24

    Neuronal excitation can be substantially modulated by alterations in metabolism, as evident from the anticonvulsant effect of diets that reduce glucose utilization and promote ketone body metabolism. We provide genetic evidence that BAD, a protein with dual functions in apoptosis and glucose metabolism, imparts reciprocal effects on metabolism of glucose and ketone bodies in brain cells. These effects involve phosphoregulation of BAD and are independent of its apoptotic function. BAD modifications that reduce glucose metabolism produce a marked increase in the activity of metabolically sensitive K(ATP) channels in neurons, as well as resistance to behavioral and electrographic seizures in vivo. Seizure resistance is reversed by genetic ablation of the K(ATP) channel, implicating the BAD-K(ATP) axis in metabolic control of neuronal excitation and seizure responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HMGCS2 promotes autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein through ketone body-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Tian; Zhu, Bing-Lin; Lai, Yu-Jie; Long, Yan; Zha, Jing-Si; Hu, Xiao-Tong; Zhang, John H; Chen, Guo-Jun

    2017-04-29

    HMGCS2 (mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-COA synthase 2) is a control enzyme in ketogenesis. The mitochondrial localization and interaction with APP (β-amyloid precursor protein) suggest that HMGCS2 may play a role in the pathophysiology of AD (Alzheimer's disease). Here we report that overexpression of HMGCS2 decreased levels of APP and related CTFs (carboxy-terminal fragments), which was largely prevented by an autophagic inhibitor chloroquine. In addition, HMGCS2 enhancement of autophagic marker LC3II was diminished by rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin. Moreover, deprivation of EBSS (Earle's Balanced Salt Solution) significantly augmented the effect of HMGCS2 on LC3II, while acetoacetate reversed the reduction of LC3II, APP and CTFs which was induced by HMGCS2 knockdown. In the presence of acetoacetate, rapamycin failed to induce further increase of LC3II, which mimicked the effect of HMGCS2 overexpression. Finally, HMGCS2 enhanced the antioxidant response. Collectively, HMGCS2 shares with ketone bodies common features in autophagic clearance of APP and CTFs, suggesting that ketone bodies play an important role in HMGCS2 regulation of the autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters in hepatocytes, and these complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as VLDL particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source of endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue to release nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in the liver though mitochondrial β oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver metabolic processes are tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal systems. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis, but suppresses gluconeogenesis; glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze the rate-limiting steps of liver metabolic processes, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). PMID:24692138

  11. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lund, Trine M; Ploug, Kenneth B; Iversen, Anne; Jensen, Anders A; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate for neurons, and ketone bodies are known to be alternative substrates. However, the capacity of ketone bodies to support different neuronal functions is still unknown. Thus, a change in energy substrate from glucose alone to a combination of glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, whereas a direct effect of the ketone body on transmitter release was absent. However, the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate augmented transmitter release induced by the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide, thus giving an indirect indication of the involvement of KATP channels in the effects of ketone bodies on transmitter release. Energy metabolism and neurotransmission are linked and involve ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP ) channels. However, it is still unclear how and to what degree available energy substrate affects this link. We investigated the effect of changing energy substrate from only glucose to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Valproate causes metabolic disturbance in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, D M; Dick, D J; Wilson, L; Sherratt, H S; Alberti, K G

    1986-01-01

    Valproate is an important anticonvulsant which is rarely associated with fatal hepatotoxicity. Previous experiments have shown that valproate inhibits several metabolic processes in isolated rat hepatocytes and when administered to starved rats causes a fall in the blood concentrations of glucose and ketone bodies. Since these changes may be related to the hepatotoxicity, the effect of valproate administration on intermediary metabolism in man was studied. One gram of valproate given orally to fasted normal humans caused a 78% fall in the concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate and a 60% fall in total ketones. Also the concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, alanine and glycerol increased after valproate administration. Similar changes were observed after intravenous administration of 400 mg of valproate. Valproate clearly has a significant effect on intermediary metabolism in the liver and this is probably related to the mechanism of the hepatotoxicity. PMID:3084712

  13. Energy metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic function is controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is converted into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is subsequently oxidized in the mitochondria to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and/or cholesterol esters in hepatocytes. These complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as very low-density lipoprotein particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source for endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue, resulting in release of nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in hepatic mitochondria though β-oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver energy metabolism is tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal signals. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis but suppresses gluconeogenesis, and glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze key steps of metabolic pathways, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  14. Engineering ..beta..-Oxidation in Yarrowia lipolytica for Methyl Ketone Production

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sanchez i Nogue, Violeta; Ramirez, Kelsey J; Singer, Christine

    Medium- and long-chain methyl ketones are fatty acid-derived compounds that can be used as biofuel blending agents, flavors and fragrances. However, their large-scale production from sustainable feedstocks is currently limited due to the lack of robust microbial biocatalysts. The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising biorefinery platform strain for the production of methyl ketones from renewable lignocellulosic biomass due to its natively high flux towards fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we report the metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica to produce long- and very long-chain methyl ketones. Truncation of peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation by chromosomal deletion of pot1 resulted in themore » biosynthesis of saturated, mono-, and diunsaturated methyl ketones in the C13-C23 range. Additional overexpression and peroxisomal targeting of a heterologous bacterial methyl ketone biosynthesis pathway yielded an initial titer of 151.5 mg/L of saturated methyl ketones. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the cultures were found to substantially impact cell morphology and methyl ketone biosynthesis. Bioreactor cultivation under optimized conditions resulted in a titer of 314.8 mg/L of total methyl ketones, representing more than a 6000-fold increase over the parental strain. This work highlights the potential of Y. lipolytica to serve as chassis organism for the biosynthesis of acyl-thioester derived long- and very long-chain methyl ketones.« less

  15. Activation of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase is associated with elevated ketone body levels in the elasmobranch Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Crockett, Elizabeth L; Driedzic, William R

    2006-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes are an ancient group of vertebrates that have unusual lipid metabolism whereby storage lipids are mobilized from the liver for peripheral oxidation largely as ketone bodies rather than as nonesterified fatty acids under normal conditions. This reliance on ketones, even when feeding, implies that elasmobranchs are chronically ketogenic. Compared to specimens sampled within 2 d of capture (recently captured), spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias that were held for 16-33 d without apparent feeding displayed a 4.5-fold increase in plasma concentration of d- beta -hydroxybutyrate (from 0.71 to 3.2 mM) and were considered ketotic. Overt activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in liver mitochondria from ketotic dogfish was characterized by an increased apparent maximal activity, a trend of increasing affinity (reduced apparent K(m); P=0.09) for l-carnitine, and desensitization to the inhibitor malonyl-CoA relative to recently captured animals. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (ACoAT) activity in isolated liver mitochondria was also markedly increased in the ketotic dogfish compared to recently captured fish, whereas no difference in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase activity was found between these groups, suggesting that ACoAT plays a more important role in the activation of ketogenesis in spiny dogfish than in mammals and birds.

  16. Ketone Bodies as a Possible Adjuvant to Ketogenic Diet in PDHc Deficiency but Not in GLUT1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Habarou, F; Bahi-Buisson, N; Lebigot, E; Pontoizeau, C; Abi-Warde, M T; Brassier, A; Le Quan Sang, K H; Broissand, C; Vuillaumier-Barrot, S; Roubertie, A; Boutron, A; Ottolenghi, C; de Lonlay, P

    2018-01-01

    Ketogenic diet is the first line therapy for neurological symptoms associated with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDHD) and intractable seizures in a number of disorders, including GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS). Because high-fat diet raises serious compliance issues, we investigated if oral L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate administration could be as effective as ketogenic diet in PDHD and GLUT1-DS. We designed a partial or total progressive substitution of KD with L,D-3-hydroxybutyrate in three GLUT1-DS and two PDHD patients. In GLUT1-DS patients, we observed clinical deterioration including increased frequency of seizures and myoclonus. In parallel, ketone bodies in CSF decreased after introducing 3-hydroxybutyrate. By contrast, two patients with PDHD showed clinical improvement as dystonic crises and fatigability decreased under basal metabolic conditions. In one of the two PDHD children, 3-hydroxybutyrate has largely replaced the ketogenic diet, with the latter that is mostly resumed only during febrile illness. Positive direct effects on energy metabolism in PDHD patients were suggested by negative correlation between ketonemia and lactatemia (r 2  = 0.59). Moreover, in cultured PDHc-deficient fibroblasts, the increase of CO 2 production after 14 C-labeled 3-hydroxybutyrate supplementation was consistent with improved Krebs cycle activity. However, except in one patient, ketonemia tended to be lower with 3-hydroxybutyrate administration compared to ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate may be an adjuvant treatment to ketogenic diet in PDHD but not in GLUT1-DS under basal metabolic conditions. Nevertheless, ketogenic diet is still necessary in PDHD patients during febrile illness.

  17. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    increased ADP/ATP, NAD +/NADH and oxygen consumption in docetaxel treated cells compared to control knock down cells, therefore induced metabolic...substrate for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP biosynthesis. Next, we examined NAD +/NADH levels in OXC1 knock down prostate cancer cells...The results showed that after docetaxel treatment, NAD + level was significantly increased in OXCT1 knock down cells compared to control knock down

  18. Ketones Prevent Oxidative Impairment of Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity through KATP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G.; Lee, Soo Han; O’Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J.; Duff, Henry J.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Rho, Jong M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels. PMID:25848768

  19. A new way to produce hyperketonemia: use of ketone ester in a case of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Newport, Mary T; VanItallie, Theodore B; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, Michael Todd; Veech, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Providing ketone bodies to the brain can bypass metabolic blocks to glucose utilization and improve function in energy-starved neurons. For this, plasma ketones must be elevated well above the ≤ 0.2 mM default concentrations normally prevalent. Limitations of dietary methods currently used to produce therapeutic hyperketonemia have stimulated the search for better approaches. Described herein is a new way to produce therapeutic hyperketonemia, entailing prolonged oral administration of a potent ketogenic agent--ketone monoester (KME)--to a patient with Alzheimer's disease dementia and a pretreatment Mini-Mental State Examination score of 12. The patient improved markedly in mood, affect, self-care, and cognitive and daily activity performance. The KME was well tolerated throughout the 20-month treatment period. Cognitive performance tracked plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, with noticeable improvements in conversation and interaction at the higher levels, compared with predose levels. KME-induced hyperketonemia is robust, convenient, and safe, and the ester can be taken as an oral supplement without changing the habitual diet. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 deficiency and ketone utilization.

    PubMed

    van Hasselt, Peter M; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Monroe, Glen R; Ruiter, Jos P N; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Geerlings, Maartje J; Duran, Karen; Harakalova, Magdalena; van der Zwaag, Bert; Monavari, Ardeshir A; Okur, Ilyas; Sharrard, Mark J; Cleary, Maureen; O'Connell, Nuala; Walker, Valerie; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; de Vries, Maaike C; Visser, Gepke; Houwen, Roderick H J; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Wanders, Ronald J A; van Haaften, Gijs

    2014-11-13

    Ketoacidosis is a potentially lethal condition caused by the imbalance between hepatic production and extrahepatic utilization of ketone bodies. We performed exome sequencing in a patient with recurrent, severe ketoacidosis and identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding monocarboxylate transporter 1 (SLC16A1, also called MCT1). Genetic analysis in 96 patients suspected of having ketolytic defects yielded seven additional inactivating mutations in MCT1, both homozygous and heterozygous. Mutational status was found to be correlated with ketoacidosis severity, MCT1 protein levels, and transport capacity. Thus, MCT1 deficiency is a novel cause of profound ketoacidosis; the present work suggests that MCT1-mediated ketone-body transport is needed to maintain acid-base balance.

  1. Value of point-of-care ketones in assessing dehydration and acidosis in children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jason A; Waltzman, Mark; Monuteaux, Michael C; Bachur, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    Children with gastroenteritis often develop dehydration with metabolic acidosis. Serum ketones are frequently elevated in this population. The goal was to determine the relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and both the degree of dehydration and the magnitude of acidosis. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective trial of crystalloid administration for rapid rehydration. Children 6 months to 6 years of age with gastroenteritis and dehydration were enrolled. A point-of-care serum ketone (beta-hydroxybutyrate) concentration was obtained at the time of study enrollment. The relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and a prospectively assigned and previously validated clinical dehydration score, and serum bicarbonate concentration, was analyzed. A total of 188 patients were enrolled. The median serum ketone concentration was elevated at 3.1 mmol/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 1.2 to 4.6 mmol/L), and the median dehydration score was consistent with moderate dehydration. A significant positive relationship was found between serum ketone concentration and the clinical dehydration score (Spearman's rho = 0.22, p = 0.003). Patients with moderate dehydration had a higher median serum ketone concentration than those with mild dehydration (3.6 mmol/L vs. 1.4 mmol/L, p = 0.007). Additionally, the serum ketone concentration was inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate concentration (ρ = -0.26, p < 0.001). Children with gastroenteritis and dehydration have elevated serum ketone concentrations that correlate with both degree of dehydration and magnitude of metabolic acidosis. Point-of-care serum ketone measurement may be a useful tool to inform management decisions at the point of triage or in the initial evaluation of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Inverse relationship between brain glucose and ketone metabolism in adults during short-term moderate dietary ketosis: A dual tracer quantitative positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Hennebelle, Marie; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2017-07-01

    Ketones (principally β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (AcAc)) are an important alternative fuel to glucose for the human brain, but their utilisation by the brain remains poorly understood. Our objective was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the impact of diet-induced moderate ketosis on cerebral metabolic rate of acetoacetate (CMRa) and glucose (CMRglc) in healthy adults. Ten participants (35 ± 15 y) received a very high fat ketogenic diet (KD) (4.5:1; lipid:protein plus carbohydrates) for four days. CMRa and CMRglc were quantified by PET before and after the KD with the tracers, 11 C-AcAc and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), respectively. During the KD, plasma ketones increased 8-fold ( p = 0.005) while plasma glucose decreased by 24% ( p = 0.005). CMRa increased 6-fold ( p = 0.005), whereas CMRglc decreased by 20% ( p = 0.014) on the KD. Plasma ketones were positively correlated with CMRa (r = 0.93; p < 0.0001). After four days on the KD, CMRa represented 17% of whole brain energy requirements in healthy adults with a 2-fold difference across brain regions (12-24%). The CMR of ketones (AcAc and β-hydroxybutyrate combined) while on the KD was estimated to represent about 33% of brain energy requirements or approximately double the CMRa. Whether increased ketone availability raises CMR of ketones to the same extent in older people as observed here or in conditions in which chronic brain glucose hypometabolism is present remains to be determined.

  3. Flipping the Metabolic Switch: Understanding and Applying Health Benefits of Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Moehl, Keelin; Donahoo, William T.; Marosi, Krisztina; Lee, Stephanie; Mainous, Arch G.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Mattson, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a term used to describe a variety of eating patterns in which no or few calories are consumed for time periods that can range from 12 hours to several days, on a recurring basis. Here we focus on the physiological responses of major organ systems, including the musculoskeletal system, to the onset of the metabolic switch – the point of negative energy balance at which liver glycogen stores are depleted and fatty acids are mobilized (typically beyond 12 hours after cessation of food intake). Emerging findings suggest the metabolic switch from glucose to fatty acid-derived ketones represents an evolutionarily conserved trigger point that shifts metabolism from lipid/cholesterol synthesis and fat storage to mobilization of fat through fatty acid oxidation and fatty-acid derived ketones, which serve to preserve muscle mass and function. Thus, IF regimens that induce the metabolic switch have the potential to improve body composition in overweight individuals. Moreover, IF regimens also induce the coordinated activation of signaling pathways that optimize physiological function, enhance performance, and slow aging and disease processes. Future randomized controlled IF trials should use biomarkers of the metabolic switch (e.g., plasma ketone levels) as a measure of compliance and the magnitude of negative energy balance during the fasting period. PMID:29086496

  4. Metabolism as a tool for understanding human brain evolution: lipid energy metabolism as an example.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Pei; Yang, Hao; Wu, Jiang Wei; Gauthier, Nicolas; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant A

    2014-12-01

    Genes and the environment both influence the metabolic processes that determine fitness. To illustrate the importance of metabolism for human brain evolution and health, we use the example of lipid energy metabolism, i.e. the use of fat (lipid) to produce energy and the advantages that this metabolic pathway provides for the brain during environmental energy shortage. We briefly describe some features of metabolism in ancestral organisms, which provided a molecular toolkit for later development. In modern humans, lipid energy metabolism is a regulated multi-organ pathway that links triglycerides in fat tissue to the mitochondria of many tissues including the brain. Three important control points are each suppressed by insulin. (1) Lipid reserves in adipose tissue are released by lipolysis during fasting and stress, producing fatty acids (FAs) which circulate in the blood and are taken up by cells. (2) FA oxidation. Mitochondrial entry is controlled by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1). Inside the mitochondria, FAs undergo beta oxidation and energy production in the Krebs cycle and respiratory chain. (3) In liver mitochondria, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) pathway produces ketone bodies for the brain and other organs. Unlike most tissues, the brain does not capture and metabolize circulating FAs for energy production. However, the brain can use ketone bodies for energy. We discuss two examples of genetic metabolic traits that may be advantageous under most conditions but deleterious in others. (1) A CPT1A variant prevalent in Inuit people may allow increased FA oxidation under nonfasting conditions but also predispose to hypoglycemic episodes. (2) The thrifty genotype theory, which holds that energy expenditure is efficient so as to maximize energy stores, predicts that these adaptations may enhance survival in periods of famine but predispose to obesity in modern dietary environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exercise-Induced Changes in Metabolic Resposes to Infection in Trained Rats.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-20

    superimposed on fasting reduced it in sedentary rats (24). Swimming amplified fasting ketosis and diminished infection ketonemia and markedly decreased...Ketone body metabolism in the ketosis of starvation and alloxan diabetes. J. Biol. Chem. 245:4382-4390, 1970. 22. MOSES, L. E. Determination of oxygen

  6. Effect of alternate energy substrates on mammalian brain metabolism during ischemic events.

    PubMed

    Koppaka, S S; Puchowicz; LaManna, J C; Gatica, J E

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of brain metabolism and cerebral blood flow involves complex control systems with several interacting variables at both cellular and organ levels. Quantitative understanding of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous brain control mechanisms during internal and external stimuli requires the development and validation of a computational (mathematical) model of metabolic processes in brain. This paper describes a computational model of cellular metabolism in blood-perfused brain tissue, which considers the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis. The model structure consists of neurons, astrocytes, extra-cellular space, and a surrounding capillary network. Each cell is further compartmentalized into cytosol and mitochondria. Inter-compartment interaction is accounted in the form of passive and carrier-mediated transport. Our model was validated against experimental data reported by Crumrine and LaManna, who studied the effect of ischemia and its recovery on various intra-cellular tissue substrates under standard diet conditions. The effect of ketone bodies on brain metabolism was also examined under ischemic conditions following cardiac resuscitation through our model simulations. The influence of ketone bodies on lactate dynamics on mammalian brain following ischemia is studied incorporating experimental data.

  7. Raspberry Ketone

    MedlinePlus

    ... raspberry ketone solution to the scalp might increase hair growth in people with hair loss. Male pattern baldness ( ... raspberry ketone solution to the scalp might increase hair growth in people with male pattern baldness Obesity. Early ...

  8. Ketones block amyloid entry and improve cognition in an Alzheimer's model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun Xiang; Maalouf, Marwan; Han, Pengcheng; Zhao, Minglei; Gao, Ming; Dharshaun, Turner; Ryan, Christopher; Whitelegge, Julian; Wu, Jie; Eisenberg, David; Reiman, Eric M; Schweizer, Felix E; Shi, Jiong

    2016-03-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is responsible for 60%-80% of dementia cases, and the most opportune time for preventive intervention is in the earliest stage of its preclinical phase. As traditional mitochondrial energy substrates, ketone bodies (ketones, for short), beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate, have been reported to provide symptomatic improvement and disease-modifying activity in epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, ketones are thought as more than just metabolites and also as endogenous factors protecting against AD. In this study, we discovered a novel neuroprotective mechanism of ketones in which they blocked amyloid-β 42, a pathologic hallmark protein of AD, entry into neurons. The suppression of intracellular amyloid-β 42 accumulation rescued mitochondrial complex I activity, reduced oxidative stress, and improved synaptic plasticity. Most importantly, we show that peripheral administration of ketones significantly reduced amyloid burden and greatly improved learning and memory ability in a symptomatic mouse model of AD. These observations provide us insights to understand and to establish a novel therapeutic use of ketones in AD prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid Intravenous Sodium Acetoacetate Infusion in Man METABOLIC AND KINETIC RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Owen, O. E.; Reichard, G. A.; Markus, H.; Boden, G.; Mozzoli, M. A.; Shuman, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolic and kinetic responses to rapidly intravenously administered sodium acetoacetate (1.0 mmol/kg body wt) was studied after an overnight fast in 12 male and female adults weighing between 88 and 215% of average body weight. Blood was obtained before, during, and after the infusion for determination of circulating concentrations of immunoreactive insulin, glucose, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and free fatty acids. In three obese subjects the studies were repeated after 3 and 24 days of total starvation. After the overnight fast acetoacetate rose rapidly reaching a peak concentration at the end of the infusion; β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations also increased rapidly and exceeded those of acetoacetate 10 min postinfusion. Total ketone body concentration at the end of the infusion period was comparable to that found after prolonged starvation. After the initial mixing period, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and total ketone bodies rapidly declined in a parallel manner. There were no obvious differences between the subjects with regard to their blood concentrations of ketone bodies. The mean plasma free fatty acid concentration decreased significantly during the 20th to 90th min postinfusion period; for example the control concentration of 0.61 mmol/liter fell to 0.43 mmol/liter at 60 min. In the three obese subjects studied repeatedly, fasting plasma free fatty acids decreased with acetoacetate infusion from 0.92 to 0.46 mmol/liter after the 3 day fast and from 1.49 to 0.71 mmol/liter after the 24 day fast. Acetoacetate infusion caused no changes in blood glucose concentration after an overnight fast. However, in the three obese subjects restudied after 3- and 24-day fasts blood glucose decreased, respectively, from 3.49 to 3.22 mmol/liter and from 4.07 to 3.49 mmol/liter. The mean serum insulin concentration in all subjects significantly increased from 21 to 46 μU/ml at the completion of the infusion and rapidly declined. In the three obese subjects

  10. Caffeine intake increases plasma ketones: an acute metabolic study in humans.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Camille; St-Pierre, Valérie; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Hennebelle, Marie; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2017-04-01

    Brain glucose uptake declines during aging and is significantly impaired in Alzheimer's disease. Ketones are the main alternative brain fuel to glucose so they represent a potential approach to compensate for the brain glucose reduction. Caffeine is of interest as a potential ketogenic agent owing to its actions on lipolysis and lipid oxidation but whether it is ketogenic in humans is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the acute ketogenic effect of 2 doses of caffeine (2.5; 5.0 mg/kg) in 10 healthy adults. Caffeine given at breakfast significantly stimulated ketone production in a dose-dependent manner (+88%; +116%) and also raised plasma free fatty acids. Whether caffeine has long-term ketogenic effects or could enhance the ketogenic effect of medium chain triglycerides remains to be determined.

  11. Uptake of aldehydes and ketones at typical indoor concentrations by houseplants.

    PubMed

    Tani, Akira; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-11-01

    The uptake rates of low-molecular weight aldehydes and ketones by peace lily (Spathiphyllum clevelandii) and golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum) leaves at typical indoor ambient concentrations (10(1)-10(2) ppbv) were determined. The C3-C6 aldehydes and C4-C6 ketones were taken up by the plant leaves, but the C3 ketone acetone was not. The uptake rate normalized to the ambient concentration C(a) ranged from 7 to 19 mmol m(-2) s(-1) and from 2 to 7 mmol m(-2) s(-1) for the aldehydes and ketones, respectively. Longer-term fumigation results revealed that the total uptake amounts were 30-100 times as much as the amounts dissolved in the leaf, suggesting that volatile organic carbons are metabolized in the leaf and/or translocated through the petiole. The ratio of the intercellular concentration to the external (ambient) concentration (C(i)/C(a)) was significantly lower for most aldehydes than for most ketones. In particular, a linear unsaturated aldehyde, crotonaldehyde, had a C(i)/C(a) ratio of approximately 0, probably because of its highest solubility in water.

  12. Ketones and lactate increase cancer cell “stemness”, driving recurrence, metastasis and poor clinical outcome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lin, Zhao; Pavlides, Stephanos; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Knudsen, Erik S; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that high-energy metabolites (lactate and ketones) “fuel” tumor growth and experimental metastasis in an in vivo xenograft model, most likely by driving oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells. To mechanistically understand how these metabolites affect tumor cell behavior, here we used genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Human breast cancer cells (MCF7) were cultured with lactate or ketones, and then subjected to transcriptional analysis (exon-array). Interestingly, our results show that treatment with these high-energy metabolites increases the transcriptional expression of gene profiles normally associated with “stemness”, including genes upregulated in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Similarly, we observe that lactate and ketones promote the growth of bonafide ES cells, providing functional validation. The lactate- and ketone-induced “gene signatures” were able to predict poor clinical outcome (including recurrence and metastasis) in human breast cancer patients. Taken together, our results are consistent with the idea that lactate and ketone utilization in cancer cells promotes the “cancer stem cell” phenotype, resulting in significant decreases in patient survival. One possible mechanism by which high-energy metabolites might induce stemness is by increasing the pool of Acetyl-CoA, leading to increased histone acetylation and elevated gene expression. Thus, our results mechanistically imply that clinical outcome in breast cancer could simply be determined by epigenetics and energy metabolism, rather than by the accumulation of specific “classical” gene mutations. We also suggest that high-risk cancer patients (identified by the lactate/ketone gene signatures) could be treated with new therapeutics that target oxidative mitochondrial metabolism, such as the anti-oxidant and “mitochondrial poison” metformin. Finally, we propose that this new approach to personalized cancer medicine be termed

  13. Flipping the Metabolic Switch: Understanding and Applying the Health Benefits of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Anton, Stephen D; Moehl, Keelin; Donahoo, William T; Marosi, Krisztina; Lee, Stephanie A; Mainous, Arch G; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Mattson, Mark P

    2018-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a term used to describe a variety of eating patterns in which no or few calories are consumed for time periods that can range from 12 hours to several days, on a recurring basis. This review is focused on the physiological responses of major organ systems, including the musculoskeletal system, to the onset of the metabolic switch: the point of negative energy balance at which liver glycogen stores are depleted and fatty acids are mobilized (typically beyond 12 hours after cessation of food intake). Emerging findings suggest that the metabolic switch from glucose to fatty acid-derived ketones represents an evolutionarily conserved trigger point that shifts metabolism from lipid/cholesterol synthesis and fat storage to mobilization of fat through fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid-derived ketones, which serve to preserve muscle mass and function. Thus, IF regimens that induce the metabolic switch have the potential to improve body composition in overweight individuals. Moreover, IF regimens also induce the coordinated activation of signaling pathways that optimize physiological function, enhance performance, and slow aging and disease processes. Future randomized controlled IF trials should use biomarkers of the metabolic switch (e.g., plasma ketone levels) as a measure of compliance and of the magnitude of negative energy balance during the fasting period. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  14. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  15. Optimized preoperative fasting times decrease ketone body concentration and stabilize mean arterial blood pressure during induction of anesthesia in children younger than 36 months: a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Nils; Beck, Christiane; Huber, Dirk; Sander, Bjoern; Boehne, Martin; Boethig, Dietmar; Leffler, Andreas; Sümpelmann, Robert

    2016-08-01

    In pediatric anesthesia, preoperative fasting guidelines are still often exceeded. The objective of this noninterventional clinical observational cohort study was to evaluate the effect of an optimized preoperative fasting management (OPT) on glucose concentration, ketone bodies, acid-base balance, and change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during induction of anesthesia in children. Children aged 0-36 months scheduled for elective surgery with OPT (n = 50) were compared with peers studied before optimizing preoperative fasting time (OLD) (n = 50) who were matched for weight, age, and height. In children with OPT (n = 50), mean fasting time (6.0 ± 1.9 h vs 8.5 ± 3.5 h, P < 0.001), deviation from guideline (ΔGL) (1.2 ± 1.4 h vs 3.7 ± 3.1 h, P < 0.001, ΔGL>2 h 8% vs 70%), ketone bodies (0.2 ± 0.2 mmol·l(-1) vs 0.6 ± 0.6 mmol·l(-1) , P < 0.001), and incidence of hypotension (MAP <40 mmHg, 0 vs 5, P = 0.022) were statistically significantly lower and MAP after induction was statistically significantly higher (55.2 ± 9.5 mmHg vs 50.3 ± 9.8 mmHg, P = 0.015) as compared to children in the OLD (n = 50) group. Glucose, lactate, bicarbonate, base excess, and anion gap did not significantly differ. Optimized fasting times improve the metabolic and hemodynamic condition during induction of anesthesia in children younger than 36 months of age. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Energy metabolism in feasting and fasting.

    PubMed

    Owen, O E; Reichard, G A; Patel, M S; Boden, G

    1979-01-01

    During feasting on a balanced carbohydrate, fat, and protein meal resting metabolic rate, body temperature and respiratory quotient all increase. The dietary components are utilized to replenish and augment glycogen and fat stores in the body. Excessive carbohydrate is also converted to lipid in the liver and stored along with the excessive lipids of dietary origin as triglycerides in adipose tissue, the major fuel storage depot. Amino acids in excess of those needed for protein synthesis are preferentially catabolized over glucose and fat for energy production. This occurs because there are no significant storage sites for amino acids or proteins, and the accumulation of nitrogenous compounds is ill tolerated. During fasting, adipose tissue, muscle, liver, and kidneys work in concert to supply, to convert, and to conserve fuels for the body. During the brief postabsorptive period, blood fuel homeostasis is maintained primarily by hepatic glycogenolysis and adipose tissue lipolysis. As fasting progresses, muscle proteolysis supplies glycogenic amino acids for heightened hepatic gluconeogenesis for a short period of time. After about three days of starvation, the metabolic profile is set to conserve protein and to supply greater quantities of alternate fuels. In particular, free fatty acids and ketone bodies are utilized to maintain energy needs. The ability of the kidney to conserve ketone bodies prevents the loss of large quantities of these valuable fuels in the urine. This delicate interplay among liver, muscle, kidney, and adipose tissue maintains blood fuel homeostasis and allows humans to survive caloric deprivation for extended periods.

  17. Decreased carbon shunting from glucose towards oxidative metabolism in diet-induced ketotic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Shenghui; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Puchowicz, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic link of ketosis to neuroprotection under certain pathological conditions continues to be explored. We investigated whether chronic ketosis induced by ketogenic diet results in the partitioning of ketone bodies towards oxidative metabolism in brain. We hypothesized that diet-induced ketosis results in increased shunting of ketone bodies towards citric acid cycle (CAC) and amino acids with decreased carbon shunting from glucose. Rats were fed standard (STD) or ketogenic (KG) diets for 3.5 weeks and then infused with [U-13C]glucose or [U-13C]acetoacetate tracers. Concentrations and 13C-labeling pattern of CAC intermediates and amino acids were analyzed from brain homogenates using stable isotopomer mass spectrometry analysis. The contribution of [U-13C]glucose to acetyl-CoA and amino acids decreased by ~30% in the KG group vs STD, whereas [U-13C]acetoacetate contributions were more than 2-fold higher. The concentration of GABA remained constant across all groups; however, the 13C-labeling of GABA was markedly increased in the KG group infused with [U-13C]acetoacetate compared to STD. This study reveals that there is a significant contribution of ketone bodies to oxidative metabolism and GABA in diet-induced ketosis. We propose that this represents a fundamental mechanism of neuroprotection under pathological conditions. PMID:25314677

  18. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  19. Ketone esters increase brown fat in mice and overcome insulin resistance in other tissues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Veech, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is classically activated by sympathetic nervous stimulation resulting from exposure to cold. Feeding a high-fat diet also induces development of brown fat, but is decreased by caloric restriction. Blood ketone bodies, which function as alternative energy substrates to glucose, are increased during caloric restriction. Here we discuss the unexpected observation that feeding an ester of ketone bodies to the mouse, which increases blood ketone body concentrations, results in an activation of brown fat. The mechanism of this activation of brown fat is similar to that occurring from cold exposure in that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) levels are increased as are levels of the transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein, which is also increased by ketone ester feeding. Other effects of feeding ketone esters, in addition to their ability to induce brown fat, are discussed such as their ability to overcome certain aspects of insulin resistance and to ameliorate the accumulation of amyloid and phosphorylated tau protein in brain, and improve cognitive function, in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Effects of independently altering body weight and body mass on the metabolic cost of running.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Lennart P J; Grabowski, Alena; Kram, Rodger

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic cost of running is substantial, despite the savings from elastic energy storage and return. Previous studies suggest that generating vertical force to support body weight and horizontal forces to brake and propel body mass are the major determinants of the metabolic cost of running. In the present study, we investigated how independently altering body weight and body mass affects the metabolic cost of running. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that reducing body weight would decrease metabolic rate proportionally, and adding mass and weight would increase metabolic rate proportionally. Further, because previous studies show that adding mass alone does not affect the forces generated on the ground, we hypothesized that adding mass alone would have no substantial effect on metabolic rate. We manipulated the body weight and body mass of 10 recreational human runners and measured their metabolic rates while they ran at 3 m s(-1). We reduced weight using a harness system, increased mass and weight using lead worn about the waist, and increased mass alone using a combination of weight support and added load. We found that net metabolic rate decreased in less than direct proportion to reduced body weight, increased in slightly more than direct proportion to added load (added mass and weight), and was not substantially different from normal running with added mass alone. Adding mass alone was not an effective method for determining the metabolic cost attributable to braking/propelling body mass. Runners loaded with mass alone did not generate greater vertical or horizontal impulses and their metabolic costs did not substantially differ from those of normal running. Our results show that generating force to support body weight is the primary determinant of the metabolic cost of running. Extrapolating our reduced weight data to zero weight suggests that supporting body weight comprises at most 74% of the net cost of running. However, 74% is probably an

  1. Metabolic changes in serum metabolome in response to a meal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Aahana; Müllner, Elisabeth; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu; Moazzami, Ali A

    2017-03-01

    The change in serum metabolic response from fasting state to postprandial state provides novel insights into the impact of a single meal on human metabolism. Therefore, this study explored changes in serum metabolite profile after a single meal. Nineteen healthy postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance participated in the study. They received a meal consisting of refined wheat bread (50 g carbohydrates, 9 g protein, 4.2 g fat and 2.7 g dietary fibre), 40 g cucumber and 300 mL noncaloric orange drink. Blood samples were collected at fasting and five postprandial time points. Metabolic profile was measured by nuclear magnetic resonance and targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Changes over time were assessed with multivariate models and ANOVA, with baseline as control. The metabolomic analyses demonstrated alterations in phospholipids, amino acids and their breakdown products, glycolytic products, acylcarnitines and ketone bodies after a single meal. More specifically, phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines and citrate displayed an overall declining pattern, while leucine, isoleucine, methionine and succinate increased initially but declined thereafter. A sharp decline in acylcarnitines and ketone bodies and increase in glycolytic products postprandially suggest a switch in the body's energy source from β-oxidation to glycolysis. Moreover, individuals with relatively high postprandial insulin responses generated a higher postprandial leucine responses compared to participants with lower insulin responses. The study demonstrated complex changes from catabolic to anabolic metabolism after a meal and indicated that the extent of postprandial responses is different between individuals with high and low insulin response.

  2. Ontogenetic body-mass scaling of resting metabolic rate covaries with species-specific metabolic level and body size in spiders and snakes.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2009-08-01

    According to common belief, metabolic rate usually scales with body mass to the 3/4-power, which is considered by some to be a universal law of nature. However, substantial variation in the metabolic scaling exponent (b) exists, much of which can be related to the overall metabolic level (L) of various taxonomic groups of organisms, as predicted by the recently proposed metabolic-level boundaries (MLB) hypothesis. Here the MLB hypothesis was tested using data for intraspecific (ontogenetic) body-mass scaling of resting metabolic rate in spiders and boid snakes. As predicted, in both animal groups b varies mostly between 2/3 and 1, and is significantly negatively related to L. L is, in turn, negatively related to species-specific body mass (M(m): estimated as the mass at the midpoint of a scaling relationship), and as a result, larger species tend to have steeper metabolic scaling slopes (b) than smaller species. After adjusting for the effects of M(m), b and L are still negatively related, though significantly only in the spiders, which exhibit a much wider range of L than the snakes. Therefore, in spiders and snakes the intraspecific scaling of metabolic rate with body mass itself scales with interspecific variation in both metabolic level and body mass.

  3. Ketone bodies effectively compete with glucose for neuronal acetyl-CoA generation in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Valente-Silva, Paula; Lemos, Cristina; Köfalvi, Attila; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Jones, John G

    2015-09-01

    Ketone bodies can be used for cerebral energy generation in situ, when their availability is increased as during fasting or ingestion of a ketogenic diet. However, it is not known how effectively ketone bodies compete with glucose, lactate, and pyruvate for energy generation in the brain parenchyma. Hence, the contributions of exogenous 5.0 mM [1-(13)C]glucose and 1.0 mM [2-(13)C]lactate + 0.1 mM pyruvate (combined [2-(13)C]lactate + [2-(13)C]pyruvate) to acetyl-CoA production were measured both without and with 5.0 mM [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate in superfused rat hippocampal slices by (13)C NMR non-steady-state isotopomer analysis of tissue glutamate and GABA. Without [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, combined lactate + pyruvate, and unlabeled endogenous sources contributed (mean ± SEM) 70 ± 7%, 10 ± 2%, and 20 ± 8% of acetyl-CoA, respectively. With [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose contributions significantly fell from 70 ± 7% to 21 ± 3% (p < 0.0001), combined lactate + pyruvate and endogenous contributions were unchanged, and [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate became the major acetyl-CoA contributor (68 ± 3%)--about three-times higher than glucose. A direct analysis of the GABA carbon 2 multiplet revealed that [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate contributed approximately the same acetyl-CoA fraction as glucose, indicating that it was less avidly oxidized by GABAergic than glutamatergic neurons. The appearance of superfusate lactate derived from glycolysis of [1-(13)C]glucose did not decrease significantly in the presence of 3-hydroxybutyrate, hence total glycolytic flux (Krebs cycle inflow + exogenous lactate formation) was attenuated by 3-hydroxybutyrate. This indicates that, under these conditions, 3-hydroxybutyrate inhibited glycolytic flux upstream of pyruvate kinase. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Toxigenic and metabolic causes of ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Martina M; Hajja, Waddah; Al-Khatib, Sofian; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Sreedhar, Dharmashree; Li, Rebecca Na; Wong-McKinstry, Edna; Carlson, Richard W

    2012-10-01

    Ketoacidotic syndromes are frequently encountered in acute care medicine. This article focuses on ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes associated with intoxications, alcohol abuse, starvation, and certain dietary supplements as well as inborn errors of metabolism. Although all of these various processes are characterized by the accumulation of ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis, there are differences in the mechanisms, clinical presentations, and principles of therapy for these heterogeneous disorders. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for these disorders are presented, as well as guidance regarding identification and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Both thyroid hormone levels and resting metabolic rate decrease in African striped mice when food availability decreases.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, Rebecca; Pillay, Neville; Schradin, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    In response to variation in food availability and ambient temperature ( T a ), many animals show seasonal adaptations in their physiology. Laboratory studies showed that thyroid hormones are involved in the regulation of metabolism, and their regulatory function is especially important when the energy balance of an individual is compromised. However, little is known about the relationship between thyroid hormones and metabolism in free-living animals and animals inhabiting seasonal environments. Here, we studied seasonal changes in triiodothyronine (T 3 ) levels, resting metabolic rate (RMR) and two physiological markers of energy balance (blood glucose and ketone bodies) in 61 free-living African striped mice ( Rhabdomys pumilio ) that live in an semi-arid environment with food shortage during the dry season. We predicted a positive relationship between T 3 levels and RMR. Further, we predicted higher T 3 levels, blood glucose levels and RMR, but lower ketone body concentrations, during the moist season when food availability is high compared with summer when food availability is low. RMR and T 3 levels were negatively related in the moist season but not in the dry season. Both RMR and T 3 levels were higher in the moist than in the dry season, and T 3 levels increased with increasing food availability. In the dry season, blood glucose levels were lower but ketone body concentrations were higher, indicating a change in substrate use. Seasonal adjustments in RMR and T 3 levels permit a reduction of energy expenditure when food is scarce, and reflect an adaptive response to reduced food availability in the dry season. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Ketone bodies are protective against oxidative stress in neocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Young; Davis, Laurie M; Sullivan, Patrick G; Maalouf, Marwan; Simeone, Timothy A; van Brederode, Johannes; Rho, Jong M

    2007-06-01

    Ketone bodies (KB) have been shown to prevent neurodegeneration in models of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, but the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. One possibility is that KB may exert antioxidant activity. In the current study, we explored the effects of KB on rat neocortical neurons exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or diamide - a thiol oxidant and activator of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). We found that: (i) KB completely blocked large inward currents induced by either H(2)O(2) or diamide; (ii) KB significantly decreased the number of propidium iodide-labeled cells in neocortical slices after exposure to H(2)O(2) or diamide; (iii) KB significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in dissociated neurons and in isolated neocortical mitochondria; (iv) the electrophysiological effects of KB in neurons exposed to H(2)O(2) or diamide were mimicked by bongkrekic acid and cyclosporin A, known inhibitors of mPT, as well as by catalase and DL - dithiothreitol, known antioxidants; (v) diamide alone did not significantly alter basal ROS levels in neurons, supporting previous studies indicating that diamide-induced neuronal injury may be mediated by mPT opening; and (vi) KB significantly increased the threshold for calcium-induced mPT in isolated mitochondria. Taken together, our data suggest that KB may prevent mPT and oxidative injury in neocortical neurons, most likely by decreasing mitochondrial ROS production.

  8. Effects of intraoperative administration of carbohydrates during long-duration oral and maxillofacial surgery on the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Seiji; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance in patients undergoing invasive surgery impairs glucose and lipid metabolism and increases muscle protein catabolism, which may result in delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. We examined whether intraoperative administration of carbohydrates during long-duration oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia affects carbohydrate, proteins, and lipid metabolism and the length of hospital stay. We studied 16 patients with normal liver, kidney, and endocrine functions, and ASA physical status I or II, but without diabetes. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 0.1 g/kg/h of (n = 8) or lactated Ringer's solution (n = 8). Blood was collected before (T0) and 4 h after (T1) the start of surgery. We analyzed the plasma levels of glucose, ketone bodies, 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), and the length of hospital stay. At T0, no statistically significant differences were observed in the levels of glucose, ketone bodies, and 3-MH between the groups. At T1, no statistically significant difference in glucose levels was found between the groups. However, ketone bodies were significantly lower, and the changes in 3-MH levels were significantly less pronounced in the glucose-treated group compared with controls. No significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of length of hospital stay. The administration of low doses of glucose during surgery was safe, did not cause hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, and inhibited lipid metabolism and protein catabolism. Additional experiments with larger cohorts will be necessary to investigate whether intraoperative management with glucose facilitates postoperative recovery of patients with oral cancer.

  9. Gravity, body mass and composition, and metabolic rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The scale effects of increased gravitational loading by chronic centrifugation on metabolic rate and body composition in metabolically mature mammals were investigated. Individual oxygen consumption rates in groups of 12 each, 8-month-old, hamster, rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits were measured at weekly intervals at 1.0 g, then 2.0 g for 6 weeks. Metabolic rate was increased significantly in all species, and stabilized after 2 weeks at 2.0 g. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the larger the animal the greater was the increase in mass-specific metabolic rate, or metabolic intensity, over the 1.0 g value for the same animal, with the result that the interspecies allometric scaling relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass is different at 2.0 g compared 10 1.0 g. Analysis of covariance shows that the postioning constant at 2.0 g is increased by 17% at 2.0 g at the P .001 level, and the exponent is increased by 8% at the P = 0.008 level. Thus, the hypothesis that augmented gravitational loading should shift the allometric relationship between metabolic rate and body size by an increase in both parameters is supported.

  10. Impact of Hypoglycemia on Brain Metabolism During Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rehni, Ashish K; Dave, Kunjan R

    2018-04-10

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease afflicting millions of people worldwide. A substantial fraction of world's total healthcare expenditure is spent on treating diabetes. Hypoglycemia is a serious consequence of anti-diabetic drug therapy, because it induces metabolic alterations in the brain. Metabolic alterations are one of the central mechanisms mediating hypoglycemia-related functional changes in the brain. Acute, chronic, and/or recurrent hypoglycemia modulate multiple metabolic pathways, and exposure to hypoglycemia increases consumption of alternate respiratory substrates such as ketone bodies, glycogen, and monocarboxylates in the brain. The aim of this review is to discuss hypoglycemia-induced metabolic alterations in the brain in glucose counterregulation, uptake, utilization and metabolism, cellular respiration, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and the significance of other sources of energy. The present review summarizes information on hypoglycemia-induced metabolic changes in the brain of diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and the manner in which they may affect brain function.

  11. Identity of SMCT1 (SLC5A8) as a neuron-specific Na+-coupled transporter for active uptake of L-lactate and ketone bodies in the brain.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pamela M; Gopal, Elangovan; Ananth, Sudha; Zhuang, Lina; Itagaki, Shiro; Prasad, Balakrishna M; Smith, Sylvia B; Prasad, Puttur D; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2006-07-01

    SMCT1 is a sodium-coupled (Na(+)-coupled) transporter for l-lactate and short-chain fatty acids. Here, we show that the ketone bodies, beta-d-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, and the branched-chain ketoacid, alpha-ketoisocaproate, are also substrates for the transporter. The transport of these compounds via human SMCT1 is Na(+)-coupled and electrogenic. The Michaelis constant is 1.4 +/- 0.1 mm for beta-d-hydroxybutyrate, 0.21 +/- 0.04 mm for acetoacetate and 0.21 +/- 0.03 mm for alpha-ketoisocaproate. The Na(+) : substrate stoichiometry is 2 : 1. As l-lactate and ketone bodies constitute primary energy substrates for neurons, we investigated the expression pattern of this transporter in the brain. In situ hybridization studies demonstrate widespread expression of SMCT1 mRNA in mouse brain. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that SMCT1 protein is expressed exclusively in neurons. SMCT1 protein co-localizes with MCT2, a neuron-specific Na(+)-independent monocarboxylate transporter. In contrast, there was no overlap of signals for SMCT1 and MCT1, the latter being expressed only in non-neuronal cells. We also demonstrate the neuron-specific expression of SMCT1 in mixed cultures of rat cortical neurons and astrocytes. This represents the first report of an Na(+)-coupled transport system for a major group of energy substrates in neurons. These findings suggest that SMCT1 may play a critical role in the entry of l-lactate and ketone bodies into neurons by a process driven by an electrochemical Na(+) gradient and hence, contribute to the maintenance of the energy status and function of neurons.

  12. Engineering E. coli for simultaneous glucose–xylose utilization during methyl ketone production

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, Xi; Goh, Ee-Been; Beller, Harry R.

    Previously, we developed an E. coli strain that overproduces medium-chain methyl ketones for potential use as diesel fuel blending agents or as flavors and fragrances. To date, the strain's performance has been optimized during growth with glucose. However, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates also contain a substantial portion of hemicellulose-derived xylose, which is typically the second most abundant sugar after glucose. Commercialization of the methyl ketone-producing technology would benefit from the increased efficiency resulting from simultaneous, rather than the native sequential (diauxic), utilization of glucose and xylose. In this study, genetic manipulations were performed to alleviate carbon catabolite repression in our mostmore » efficient methyl ket one-producing strain. A strain engineered for constitutive expression of xylF and xylA (involved in xylose transport and metabolism) showed synchronized glucose and xylose consumption rates. However, this newly acquired capability came at the expense of methyl ketone titer, which decreased fivefold. Further efforts were made to improve methyl ketone production in this strain, and we found that two strategies were effective at enhancing methyl ketone titer: (1) chromosomal deletion of pgi (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase) to increase intracellular NADPH supply and (2) downregulation of CRP (cAMP receptor protein) expression by replacement of the native RBS with an RBS chosen based upon mutant library screening results. Combining these strategies resulted in the most favorable overall phenotypes for simultaneous glucose-xylose consumption without compromising methyl ketone titer at both 1 and 2% total sugar concentrations in shake flasks. This work demonstrated a strategy for engineering simultaneous utilization of C 6 and C 5 sugars in E. coli without sacrificing production of fatty acid-derived compounds.« less

  13. Engineering E. coli for simultaneous glucose–xylose utilization during methyl ketone production

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xi; Goh, Ee-Been; Beller, Harry R.

    2018-01-27

    Previously, we developed an E. coli strain that overproduces medium-chain methyl ketones for potential use as diesel fuel blending agents or as flavors and fragrances. To date, the strain's performance has been optimized during growth with glucose. However, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates also contain a substantial portion of hemicellulose-derived xylose, which is typically the second most abundant sugar after glucose. Commercialization of the methyl ketone-producing technology would benefit from the increased efficiency resulting from simultaneous, rather than the native sequential (diauxic), utilization of glucose and xylose. In this study, genetic manipulations were performed to alleviate carbon catabolite repression in our mostmore » efficient methyl ket one-producing strain. A strain engineered for constitutive expression of xylF and xylA (involved in xylose transport and metabolism) showed synchronized glucose and xylose consumption rates. However, this newly acquired capability came at the expense of methyl ketone titer, which decreased fivefold. Further efforts were made to improve methyl ketone production in this strain, and we found that two strategies were effective at enhancing methyl ketone titer: (1) chromosomal deletion of pgi (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase) to increase intracellular NADPH supply and (2) downregulation of CRP (cAMP receptor protein) expression by replacement of the native RBS with an RBS chosen based upon mutant library screening results. Combining these strategies resulted in the most favorable overall phenotypes for simultaneous glucose-xylose consumption without compromising methyl ketone titer at both 1 and 2% total sugar concentrations in shake flasks. This work demonstrated a strategy for engineering simultaneous utilization of C 6 and C 5 sugars in E. coli without sacrificing production of fatty acid-derived compounds.« less

  14. A Ketone Ester Drink Increases Postexercise Muscle Glycogen Synthesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, David A; Cox, Peter J; Kirk, Tom; Stradling, Huw; Impey, Samuel G; Clarke, Kieran

    2017-09-01

    Physical endurance can be limited by muscle glycogen stores, in that glycogen depletion markedly reduces external work. During carbohydrate restriction, the liver synthesizes the ketone bodies, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate from fatty acids. In animals and in the presence of glucose, D-β-hydroxybutyrate promotes insulin secretion and increases glycogen synthesis. Here we determined whether a dietary ketone ester, combined with plentiful glucose, can increase postexercise glycogen synthesis in human skeletal muscle. After an interval-based glycogen depletion exercise protocol, 12 well-trained male athletes completed a randomized, three-arm, blinded crossover recovery study that consisted of consumption of either a taste-matched, zero-calorie control or a ketone monoester drink, followed by a 10-mM glucose clamp or saline infusion for 2 h. The three postexercise conditions were control drink then saline infusion, control drink then hyperglycemic clamp, or ketone ester drink then hyperglycemic clamp. Skeletal muscle glycogen content was determined in muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis taken before and after the 2-h clamps. The ketone ester drink increased blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations to a maximum of 5.3 versus 0.7 mM for the control drink (P < 0.0001). During the 2-h glucose clamps, insulin levels were twofold higher (31 vs 16 mU·L, P < 0.01) and glucose uptake 32% faster (1.66 vs 1.26 g·kg, P < 0.001). The ketone drink increased by 61 g, the total glucose infused for 2 h, from 197 to 258 g, and muscle glycogen was 50% higher (246 vs 164 mmol glycosyl units per kilogram dry weight, P < 0.05) than after the control drink. In the presence of constant high glucose concentrations, a ketone ester drink increased endogenous insulin levels, glucose uptake, and muscle glycogen synthesis.

  15. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Neissa M.; Aukema, Kelly G.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. PMID:21712420

  16. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Carola W.; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses. PMID:28824441

  17. Intermittent metabolic switching, neuroplasticity and brain health

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Moehl, Keelin; Ghena, Nathaniel; Schmaedick, Maggie; Cheng, Aiwu

    2018-01-01

    During evolution, individuals whose brains and bodies functioned well in a fasted state were successful in acquiring food, enabling their survival and reproduction. With fasting and extended exercise, liver glycogen stores are depleted and ketones are produced from adipose-cell-derived fatty acids. This metabolic switch in cellular fuel source is accompanied by cellular and molecular adaptations of neural networks in the brain that enhance their functionality and bolster their resistance to stress, injury and disease. Here, we consider how intermittent metabolic switching, repeating cycles of a metabolic challenge that induces ketosis (fasting and/or exercise) followed by a recovery period (eating, resting and sleeping), may optimize brain function and resilience throughout the lifespan, with a focus on the neuronal circuits involved in cognition and mood. Such metabolic switching impacts multiple signalling pathways that promote neuroplasticity and resistance of the brain to injury and disease. PMID:29321682

  18. Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Maurya, Santosh K; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) (∼ 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to "internal desynchrony" between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.

  19. Hibernation in black bears: independence of metabolic suppression from body temperature.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Edgar, Dale M; Grahn, Dennis A; Heller, H Craig; Barnes, Brian M

    2011-02-18

    Black bears hibernate for 5 to 7 months a year and, during this time, do not eat, drink, urinate, or defecate. We measured metabolic rate and body temperature in hibernating black bears and found that they suppress metabolism to 25% of basal rates while regulating body temperature from 30° to 36°C, in multiday cycles. Heart rates were reduced from 55 to as few as 9 beats per minute, with profound sinus arrhythmia. After returning to normal body temperature and emerging from dens, bears maintained a reduced metabolic rate for up to 3 weeks. The pronounced reduction and delayed recovery of metabolic rate in hibernating bears suggest that the majority of metabolic suppression during hibernation is independent of lowered body temperature.

  20. EXTRACTION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES WITH METHYL ETHYL KETONE, METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ACETOPHENONE OR MENTHONE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1961-08-01

    A process is described for extracting tetravalent plutonium from an aqueous acid solution with methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or acetophenone and with the extraction of either tetravalent or hexavalent plutonium into menthone. (AEC)

  1. High anion gap metabolic acidosis induced by cumulation of ketones, L- and D-lactate, 5-oxoproline and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Heireman, Laura; Mahieu, Boris; Helbert, Mark; Uyttenbroeck, Wim; Stroobants, Jan; Piqueur, Marian

    2017-07-27

    Frequent causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) are lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and impaired renal function. In this case report, a HAGMA caused by ketones, L- and D-lactate, acute renal failure as well as 5-oxoproline is discussed. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with lowered consciousness, hyperventilation, diarrhoea and vomiting. The patient had suffered uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, underwent gastric bypass surgery in the past and was chronically treated with high doses of paracetamol and fosfomycin. Urosepsis was diagnosed, whilst laboratory analysis of serum bicarbonate concentration and calculation of the anion gap indicated a  HAGMA. L-lactate, D-lactate, β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone and 5-oxoproline serum levels were markedly elevated and renal function was impaired. We concluded that this case of HAGMA was induced by a variety of underlying conditions: sepsis, hyperglycaemia, prior gastric bypass surgery, decreased renal perfusion and paracetamol intake. Risk factors for 5-oxoproline intoxication present in this case are female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, chronic antibiotic treatment with fosfomycin might have played a role in the increased production of 5-oxoproline. Paracetamol-induced 5-oxoproline intoxication should be considered as a cause of HAGMA in patients with female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function or uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, even when other more obvious causes of HAGMA such as lactate, ketones or renal failure can be identified.

  2. CardioNet: a human metabolic network suited for the study of cardiomyocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karlstädt, Anja; Fliegner, Daniela; Kararigas, Georgios; Ruderisch, Hugo Sanchez; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-08-29

    Availability of oxygen and nutrients in the coronary circulation is a crucial determinant of cardiac performance. Nutrient composition of coronary blood may significantly vary in specific physiological and pathological conditions, for example, administration of special diets, long-term starvation, physical exercise or diabetes. Quantitative analysis of cardiac metabolism from a systems biology perspective may help to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrient supply and efficiency of metabolic processes required for an adequate cardiac output. Here we present CardioNet, the first large-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte comprising 1793 metabolic reactions, including 560 transport processes in six compartments. We use flux-balance analysis to demonstrate the capability of the network to accomplish a set of 368 metabolic functions required for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the cell. Taking the maintenance of ATP, biosynthesis of ceramide, cardiolipin and further important phospholipids as examples, we analyse how a changed supply of glucose, lactate, fatty acids and ketone bodies may influence the efficiency of these essential processes. CardioNet is a functionally validated metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte that enables theorectical studies of cellular metabolic processes crucial for the accomplishment of an adequate cardiac output.

  3. Metabolic organization of freshwater, euryhaline, and marine elasmobranchs: implications for the evolution of energy metabolism in sharks and rays.

    PubMed

    Speers-Roesch, B; Ip, Y K; Ballantyne, J S

    2006-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the preference for ketone bodies rather than lipids as oxidative fuel in elasmobranchs evolved in response to the appearance of urea-based osmoregulation, we measured total non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma as well as maximal activities of enzymes of intermediary metabolism in tissues from marine and freshwater elasmobranchs, including: the river stingray Potamotrygon motoro (<1 mmol l(-1) plasma urea); the marine stingray Taeniura lymma, and the marine shark Chiloscyllium punctatum (>300 mmol l(-1) plasma urea); and the euryhaline freshwater stingray Himantura signifer, which possesses intermediate levels of urea. H. signifer also were acclimated to half-strength seawater (15 per thousand) for 2 weeks to ascertain the metabolic effects of the higher urea level that results from salinity acclimation. Our results do not support the urea hypothesis. Enzyme activities and plasma NEFA in salinity-challenged H. signifer were largely unchanged from the freshwater controls, and the freshwater elasmobranchs did not show an enhanced capacity for extrahepatic lipid oxidation relative to the marine species. Importantly, and contrary to previous studies, extrahepatic lipid oxidation does occur in elasmobranchs, based on high carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) activities in kidney and rectal gland. Heart CPT in the stingrays was detectable but low, indicating some capacity for lipid oxidation. CPT was undetectable in red muscle, and almost undetectable in heart, from C. punctatum as well as in white muscle from T. lymma. We propose a revised model of tissue-specific lipid oxidation in elasmobranchs, with high levels in liver, kidney and rectal gland, low or undetectable levels in heart, and none in red or white muscle. Plasma NEFA levels were low in all species, as previously noted in elasmobranchs. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (d-beta-HBDH) was high in most tissues confirming the importance of ketone bodies in elasmobranchs

  4. 40 CFR 721.4568 - Methylpolychloro aliphatic ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylpolychloro aliphatic ketone. 721... Substances § 721.4568 Methylpolychloro aliphatic ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... ketone (PMN No. P-91-1321) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  5. Rhodium-catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Dehydroamino Ketones: A General Approach to Chiral α-amino Ketones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenchao; Wang, Qingli; Xie, Yun; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    Rhodium/DuanPhos-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aliphatic α-dehydroamino ketones has been achieved and afforded chiral α-amino ketones in high yields and excellent enantioselectives (up to 99 % ee), which could be reduced further to chiral β-amino alcohols by LiAlH(tBuO)3 with good yields. This protocol provides a readily accessible route for the synthesis of chiral α-amino ketones and chiral β-amino alcohols. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dynamic Reorganization of Metabolic Enzymes into Intracellular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Zhao, Alice; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Both focused and large-scale cell biological and biochemical studies have revealed that hundreds of metabolic enzymes across diverse organisms form large intracellular bodies. These proteinaceous bodies range in form from fibers and intracellular foci—such as those formed by enzymes of nitrogen and carbon utilization and of nucleotide biosynthesis—to high-density packings inside bacterial microcompartments and eukaryotic microbodies. Although many enzymes clearly form functional mega-assemblies, it is not yet clear for many recently discovered cases whether they represent functional entities, storage bodies, or aggregates. In this article, we survey intracellular protein bodies formed by metabolic enzymes, asking when and why such bodies form and what their formation implies for the functionality—and dysfunctionality—of the enzymes that comprise them. The panoply of intracellular protein bodies also raises interesting questions regarding their evolution and maintenance within cells. We speculate on models for how such structures form in the first place and why they may be inevitable. PMID:23057741

  7. INSECT FAT BODY: ENERGY, METABOLISM, AND REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Arrese, Estela L.; Soulages, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    The fat body plays major roles in the life of insects. It is a dynamic tissue involved in multiple metabolic functions. One of these functions is to store and release energy in response to the energy demands of the insect. Insects store energy reserves in the form of glycogen and triglycerides in the adipocytes, the main fat body cell. Insect adipocytes can store a great amount of lipid reserves as cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Lipid metabolism is essential for growth and reproduction and provides energy needed during extended nonfeeding periods. This review focuses on energy storage and release and summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes in insects. PMID:19725772

  8. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Joseph M.; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A.; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we interrogated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) specimens (n = 12) to examine if different metabolic compartments (oxidative vs. glycolytic) co-exist in human tumors. A large panel of well-established biomarkers was employed to determine the metabolic state of proliferative cancer cells. Interestingly, cell proliferation in cancer cells, as marked by Ki-67 immunostaining, was strictly correlated with oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and the uptake of mitochondrial fuels, as detected via MCT1 expression (p < 0.001). More specifically, three metabolic tumor compartments were delineated: (1) proliferative and mitochondrial-rich cancer cells (Ki-67+/TOMM20+/COX+/MCT1+); (2) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor cancer cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−); and (3) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor stromal cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−). In addition, high oxidative stress (MCT4+) was very specific for cancer tissues. Thus, we next evaluated the prognostic value of MCT4 in a second independent patient cohort (n = 40). Most importantly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in non-proliferating epithelial cancer cells predicted poor clinical outcome (tumor recurrence; p < 0.0001; log-rank test), and was functionally associated with FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.04). Similarly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in tumor stromal cells was specifically associated with higher tumor stage (p < 0.03), and was a highly specific marker for cancer-associated fibroblasts (p < 0.001). We propose that oxidative stress is a key hallmark of tumor tissues that drives high-energy metabolism in adjacent proliferating mitochondrial-rich cancer cells, via the paracrine transfer of mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketone bodies). New antioxidants and MCT4 inhibitors should be developed to metabolically target “three-compartment tumor metabolism” in head and neck cancers. It is remarkable that two “non-proliferating” populations of cells (Ki-67−/MCT4+) within the

  9. Cortical substrate oxidation during hyperketonemia in the fasted anesthetized rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lihong; Mason, Graeme F; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-12-01

    Ketone bodies are important alternate brain fuels, but their capacity to replace glucose and support neural function is unclear. In this study, the contributions of ketone bodies and glucose to cerebral cortical metabolism were measured in vivo in halothane-anesthetized rats fasted for 36 hours (n=6) and receiving intravenous [2,4-(13)C(2)]-D-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Time courses of (13)C-enriched brain amino acids (glutamate-C4, glutamine-C4, and glutamate and glutamine-C3) were measured at 9.4 Tesla using spatially localized (1)H-[(13)C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolic rates were estimated by fitting a constrained, two-compartment (neuron-astrocyte) metabolic model to the (13)C time-course data. We found that ketone body oxidation was substantial, accounting for 40% of total substrate oxidation (glucose plus ketone bodies) by neurons and astrocytes. D-β-Hydroxybutyrate was oxidized to a greater extent in neurons than in astrocytes (≈ 70:30), and followed a pattern closely similar to the metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose reported in previous studies. Total neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in hyperketonemic rats was similar to values reported for normal (nonketotic) anesthetized rats infused with [1-(13)C]glucose, but neuronal glucose oxidation was 40% to 50% lower, indicating that ketone bodies had compensated for the reduction in glucose use.

  10. Cortical substrate oxidation during hyperketonemia in the fasted anesthetized rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lihong; Mason, Graeme F; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    Ketone bodies are important alternate brain fuels, but their capacity to replace glucose and support neural function is unclear. In this study, the contributions of ketone bodies and glucose to cerebral cortical metabolism were measured in vivo in halothane-anesthetized rats fasted for 36 hours (n=6) and receiving intravenous [2,4-13C2]--β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Time courses of 13C-enriched brain amino acids (glutamate-C4, glutamine-C4, and glutamate and glutamine-C3) were measured at 9.4 Tesla using spatially localized 1H-[13C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolic rates were estimated by fitting a constrained, two-compartment (neuron–astrocyte) metabolic model to the 13C time-course data. We found that ketone body oxidation was substantial, accounting for 40% of total substrate oxidation (glucose plus ketone bodies) by neurons and astrocytes. -β-Hydroxybutyrate was oxidized to a greater extent in neurons than in astrocytes (∼70:30), and followed a pattern closely similar to the metabolism of [1-13C]glucose reported in previous studies. Total neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in hyperketonemic rats was similar to values reported for normal (nonketotic) anesthetized rats infused with [1-13C]glucose, but neuronal glucose oxidation was 40% to 50% lower, indicating that ketone bodies had compensated for the reduction in glucose use. PMID:21731032

  11. Volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The overall mass-transfer coefficients for the volatilization from water of acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured simultaneously with the oxygen-absorption coefficient in a laboratory stirred water bath. The liquid-film and gas-film coefficients of the two-film model were determined for the ketones from the overall coefficients, and both film resistances were important for volatilization of the ketones.The liquid-film coefficients for the ketones varied with the 0.719 power of the molecular-diffusion coefficient, in agreement with the literature. The liquid-film coefficients showed a variable dependence on molecular weight, with the dependence ranging from the −0.263 power for acetone to the −0.378 power for 2-octanone. This is in contrast with the literature where a constant −0.500 power dependence on the molecular weight is assumed.The gas-film coefficients for the ketones showed no dependence on molecular weight, in contrast with the literature where a −0.500 power is assumed.

  12. Metabolic remodeling of substrate utilization during heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Song, Jiangping; Hu, Shengshou

    2018-05-23

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome caused by a decline in cardiac systolic or diastolic function, which leaves the heart unable to pump enough blood to meet the normal physiological requirements of the human body. It is a serious disease burden worldwide affecting nearly 23 million patients. The concept that heart failure is "an engine out of fuel" has been generally accepted and metabolic remodeling has been recognized as an important aspect of this condition; it is characterized by defects in energy production and changes in metabolic pathways involved in the regulation of essential cellular functions such as the process of substrate utilization, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and high-energy phosphate metabolism. Advances in second-generation sequencing, proteomics, and metabolomics have made it possible to perform comprehensive tests on genes and metabolites that are crucial in the process of HF, thereby providing a clearer and comprehensive understanding of metabolic remodeling during HF. In recent years, new metabolic changes such as ketone bodies and branched-chain amino acids were demonstrated as alternative substrates in end-stage HF. This systematic review focuses on changes in metabolic substrate utilization during the progression of HF and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Accordingly, the conventional concepts of metabolic remodeling characteristics are reviewed, and the latest developments, particularly multi-omics studies, are compiled.

  13. Hormonal and Metabolic Responses to a Single Bout of Resistance Exercise in Prader-Willi Syndrome
.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniela A; Clark, Susan J; Haqq, Andrea M; Castner, Diobel M; Ng, Jason; Judelson, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by excessive adiposity. Excess adiposity negatively affects hormonal and metabolic responses to aerobic exercise. This study determined whether PWS and/or adiposity affected hormonal and metabolic responses to resistance exercise. Eleven children with PWS (11.4 ± 3.1 years, 43.9 ± 7.5% body fat), 12 lean children (9.3 ± 1.4 years, 18.3 ± 4.9% body fat), and 13 obese children (9.6 ± 1.3 years, 40.3 ± 5.2% body fat) participated. The children stepped onto an elevated platform while wearing a weighted vest for 6 sets of 10 repetitions per leg (sets separated by 1 min of rest). For the children with PWS, the platform height was 23.0 cm and vest load was computed as (20% of stature × 50% of lean body mass)/23.0 cm. For the controls, the platform height was 20% of the stature and vest load 50% of the lean body mass. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after, and during recovery from exercise (+15, +30, and +60 min). All groups had similar catecholamine, insulin, and glucagon responses. The groups showed no major differences in glucose and lactate levels. The PWS children demonstrated earlier increases in fatty acids during recovery and higher glycerol and ketone levels than the controls. The PWS children demonstrated largely intact hormonal, glycolytic, and lipolytic responses to lower-body resistance exercise. In PWS, elevated ketone levels suggest an incomplete fat oxidation.
. This is a work of the US Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the USA. Foreign copyrights may apply. Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Ketone-DNA: a versatile postsynthetic DNA decoration platform.

    PubMed

    Dey, S; Sheppard, T L

    2001-12-13

    [reaction: see text] A general strategy for the functional diversification of DNA oligonucleotides under physiological conditions was developed. We describe the synthesis of DNA molecules bearing ketone ports (ketone-DNA) and the efficient postsynthetic decoration of ketone-DNA with structurally diverse aminooxy compounds.

  15. Metabolic changes in malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Emery, P W

    2005-10-01

    This paper is concerned with malnutrition caused by inadequate intake of all the major nutrients rather than deficiency diseases relating to a single micronutrient. Three common situations are recognised: young children in third world countries with protein-energy malnutrition; adults in the same countries who are chronically adapted to subsisting on marginally inadequate diets; and patients who become malnourished as a result of chronic diseases. In all these situations infectious diseases are often also present, and this complicates the interpretation of biochemical and physiological observations. The metabolic response to starvation is primarily concerned with maintaining a supply of water-soluble substrates to supply energy to the brain. Thus there is an initial rise in metabolic rate, reflecting gluconeogenic activity. As fasting progresses, gluconeogenesis is suppressed to minimise muscle protein breakdown and ketones become the main fuel for the brain. With chronic underfeeding the basal metabolic rate per cell appears to fall, but the mechanistic basis for this is not clear. The main adaptation to chronic energy deficiency is slow growth and low adult body size, although the reduction in energy requirement achieved by this is partially offset by the preservation of the more metabolically active organs at the expense of muscle, which has a lower metabolic rate. The interaction between malnutrition and the metabolic response to trauma has been studied using an animal model. The rise in energy expenditure and urinary nitrogen excretion following surgery were significantly attenuated in malnourished rats, suggesting that malnutrition impairs the ability of the body to mobilise substrates to support inflammatory and reparative processes. However, the healing process in wounded muscle remained unimpaired in malnutrition, suggesting that this process has a high biological priority.

  16. Ketone EC50 values in the Microtox test.

    PubMed

    Chen, H F; Hee, S S

    1995-03-01

    The Microtox EC50 values for the following ketones are reported in the following homologous series: straight chain methyl ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-hepatonone, 2-octanone, 2-decanone, and 2-tridecanone); methyl ketones substituted at one alpha carbon (3-methyl-2-butanone; 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone); methyl substituted at two alpha carbons (2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-3-pentanone); phenyl groups replacing methyl in acetone (acetophenone; benzophenone); methyl groups substituted at the alpha carbons of cyclohexanone; and 2,3- 2,4-, and 2,5-hexanediones, most for the first time. While there were linear relationships between log EC50 and MW for the straight chain methyl ketones, and for methyl substitution at the alpha carbon for methyl ketones, there were no other linear relationships. As molecular weight increased, the EC50 values of soluble ketones decreased; as distance between two carbonyl groups decreased so too did EC50 values. Thus, for the ketones the geometry around the carbonyl group is an important determinant of toxicity as well as MW, water solubility, and octanol/water coefficient.

  17. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H; Sweet, Ian R; Hurley, James B

    2016-02-26

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5'-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Metabolic Control of Vesicular Glutamate Transport and Release

    PubMed Central

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A.; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl−. Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl− acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl− at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses, and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. PMID:20920794

  19. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone productionmore » as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  20. Novel proton exchange membranes based on structure-optimized poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s and nanocrystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chuangjiang; Wei, Yingcong; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Baijun; Sun, Zhaoyan; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Two sulfonated fluorenyl-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) were synthesized as the matrix of composite proton exchange membranes by directly sulfonating copolymer precursors comprising non-sulfonatable fluorinated segments and sulfonatable fluorenyl-containing segments. Surface-modified nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was produced as the "performance-enhancing" filler by treating the microcrystalline cellulose with acid. Two families of SFPEEKK/NCC nanocomposite membranes with various NCC contents were prepared via a solution-casting procedure. Results revealed that the insertion of NCC at a suitable ratio could greatly enhance the proton conductivity of the pristine membranes. For example, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK-60/NCC-4 (SFPEEKK with 60% fluorenyl segments in the repeating unit, and inserted with 4% NCC) composite membrane was as high as 0.245 S cm-1 at 90 °C, which was 61.2% higher than that of the corresponding pure SFPEEKK-60 membrane. This effect could be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bond networks and proton conduction paths through the interaction between -SO3H/-OH groups on the surface of NCC particles and -SO3H groups on the SFPEEKK backbones. Furthermore, the chemically modified NCC filler and the optimized chemical structure of the SFPEEKK matrix also provided good dimensional stability and mechanical properties of the obtained nanocomposites. In conclusion, these novel nanocomposites can be promising proton exchange membranes for fuel cells at moderate temperatures.

  1. Potential Synergies of β-Hydroxybutyrate and Butyrate on the Modulation of Metabolism, Inflammation, Cognition, and General Health

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The low-carbohydrate high-fat diet (LCHFD), also known as the ketogenic diet, has cycled in and out of popularity for decades as a therapeutic program to treat metabolic syndrome, weight mismanagement, and drug-resistant disorders as complex as epilepsy, cancer, dementia, and depression. Despite the benefits of this diet, health care professionals still question its safety due to the elevated serum ketones it induces and the limited dietary fiber. To compound the controversy, patient compliance with the program is poor due to the restrictive nature of the diet and symptoms related to energy deficit and gastrointestinal adversity during the introductory and energy substrate transition phase of the diet. The studies presented here demonstrate safety and efficacy of the diet including the scientific support and rationale for the administration of exogenous ketone bodies and ketone sources as a complement to the restrictive dietary protocol or as an alternative to the diet. This review also highlights the synergy provided by exogenous ketone, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), accompanied by the short chain fatty acid, butyrate (BA) in the context of cellular and physiological outcomes. More work is needed to unveil the molecular mechanisms by which this program provides health benefits.

  2. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carola W; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Rectal probing is subject to procedural bias. This method is suitable for first-line phenotyping, provided probe depth and measurement duration are standardized. It is also useful for detecting individuals with out-of-range body temperatures (during hypothermia, torpor).The colonic temperature attained by inserting the probe >2 cm deep is a measure of deep (core) body temperature.IR imaging of the skin is useful for detecting heat leaks and autonomous thermoregulatory alterations, but it does not measure body temperature.Temperature of the hairy or shaved skin covering the inter-scapular brown adipose tissue can be used as a measure of BAT thermogenesis. However, obtaining such measurements of sufficient quality is very difficult, and interpreting them can be tricky. Temperature differences between the inter-scapular and lumbar areas can be a better measure of the thermogenic activity of inter-scapular brown adipose tissue.Implanted probes for precise determination of BAT temperature (changes) should be fixed close to the Sulzer's vein. For measurement of BAT thermogenesis, core body temperature and BAT temperature should be recorded simultaneously.Tail temperature is suitable to compare the presence or absence of vasoconstriction or vasodilation.Continuous, longitudinal monitoring of core body temperature is preferred over single probing, as the readings are taken in a non-invasive, physiological context.Combining core body temperature measurements with metabolic rate measurements yields insights into the interplay between heat production and heat loss (thermal conductance), potentially revealing novel thermoregulatory phenotypes. Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from

  3. Engineering of bacterial methyl ketone synthesis for biofuels.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ee-Been; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Beller, Harry R

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce saturated and monounsaturated aliphatic methyl ketones in the C₁₁ to C₁₅ (diesel) range; this group of methyl ketones includes 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, which are of importance to the flavor and fragrance industry and also have favorable cetane numbers (as we report here). We describe specific improvements that resulted in a 700-fold enhancement in methyl ketone titer relative to that of a fatty acid-overproducing E. coli strain, including the following: (i) overproduction of β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters achieved by modification of the β-oxidation pathway (specifically, overexpression of a heterologous acyl-CoA oxidase and native FadB and chromosomal deletion of fadA) and (ii) overexpression of a native thioesterase (FadM). FadM was previously associated with oleic acid degradation, not methyl ketone synthesis, but outperformed a recently identified methyl ketone synthase (Solanum habrochaites MKS2 [ShMKS2], a thioesterase from wild tomato) in β-ketoacyl-CoA-overproducing strains tested. Whole-genome transcriptional (microarray) studies led to the discovery that FadM is a valuable catalyst for enhancing methyl ketone production. The use of a two-phase system with decane enhanced methyl ketone production by 4- to 7-fold in addition to increases from genetic modifications.

  4. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to reporting...

  6. Body composition and risk for metabolic alterations in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Gontijo, Cristiana Araújo; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo C.; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G.; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study anthropometrical and body composition variables as predictors of risk for metabolic alterations and metabolic syndrome in female adolescents. METHODS: Biochemical, clinical and corporal composition data of 100 adolescents from 14 to 17 years old, who attended public schools in Viçosa, Southeastern Brazil, were collected. RESULTS: Regarding nutritional status, 83, 11 and 6% showed eutrophia, overweight/obesity and low weight, respectively, and 61% presented high body fat percent. Total cholesterol presented the highest percentage of inadequacy (57%), followed by high-density lipoprotein (HDL - 50%), low-density lipoprotein (LDL - 47%) and triacylglycerol (22%). Inadequacy was observed in 11, 9, 3 and 4% in relation to insulin resistance, fasting insulin, blood pressure and glycemia, respectively. The highest values of the fasting insulin and the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were verified at the highest quartiles of body mass index (BMI), waist perimeter, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percent. Body mass index, waist perimeter, and waist-to-height ratio were the better predictors for high levels of HOMA-IR, blood glucose and fasting insulin. Waist-to-hip ratio was associated to arterial hypertension diagnosis. All body composition variables were effective in metabolic syndrome diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Waist perimeter, BMI and waist-to-height ratio showed to be good predictors for metabolic alterations in female adolescents and then should be used together for the nutritional assessment in this age range. PMID:25119752

  7. Homologation Reaction of Ketones with Diazo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Nuno R; Paterna, Roberta; Gois, Pedro M P

    2016-03-09

    This review covers the addition of diazo compounds to ketones to afford homologated ketones, either in the presence or in the absence of promoters or catalysts. Reactions with diazoalkanes, aryldiazomethanes, trimethylsilyldiazomethane, α-diazo esters, and disubstituted diazo compounds are covered, commenting on the complex regiochemistry of the reaction and the nature of the catalysts and promoters. The recent reports on the enantioselective version of ketone homologation reactions are gathered in one section, followed by reports on the use of cyclic ketones ring expansion in total synthesis. Although the first reports of this reaction appeared in the literature almost one century ago, the recent achievements, in particular, for the asymmetric version, forecast the development of new breakthroughs in the synthetically valuable field of diazo chemistry.

  8. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity. PMID:20712885

  9. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence: MCT1 and MCT4 are functional biomarkers of metabolic symbiosis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Curry, Joseph M; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E

    2013-05-01

    Here, we interrogated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) specimens (n = 12) to examine if different metabolic compartments (oxidative vs. glycolytic) co-exist in human tumors. A large panel of well-established biomarkers was employed to determine the metabolic state of proliferative cancer cells. Interestingly, cell proliferation in cancer cells, as marked by Ki-67 immunostaining, was strictly correlated with oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and the uptake of mitochondrial fuels, as detected via MCT1 expression (p < 0.001). More specifically, three metabolic tumor compartments were delineated: (1) proliferative and mitochondrial-rich cancer cells (Ki-67+/TOMM20+/COX+/MCT1+); (2) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor cancer cells (Ki-67-/TOMM20-/COX-/MCT1-); and (3) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor stromal cells (Ki-67-/TOMM20-/COX-/MCT1-). In addition, high oxidative stress (MCT4+) was very specific for cancer tissues. Thus, we next evaluated the prognostic value of MCT4 in a second independent patient cohort (n = 40). Most importantly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in non-proliferating epithelial cancer cells predicted poor clinical outcome (tumor recurrence; p < 0.0001; log-rank test), and was functionally associated with FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.04). Similarly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in tumor stromal cells was specifically associated with higher tumor stage (p < 0.03), and was a highly specific marker for cancer-associated fibroblasts (p < 0.001). We propose that oxidative stress is a key hallmark of tumor tissues that drives high-energy metabolism in adjacent proliferating mitochondrial-rich cancer cells, via the paracrine transfer of mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketone bodies). New antioxidants and MCT4 inhibitors should be developed to metabolically target "three-compartment tumor metabolism" in head and neck cancers. It is remarkable that two "non-proliferating" populations of cells (Ki-67-/MCT4+) within the tumor can actually

  10. Ketogenic Medium Chain Triglycerides Increase Brain Energy Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Richard, Marie Anne; Fortier, Mélanie; Nugent, Scott; Lepage, Martin; Duchesne, Simon; Whittingstall, Kevin; Turcotte, Éric E; Bocti, Christian; Fülöp, Tamàs; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2018-06-09

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is unknown whether the brain can utilize additional ketones as fuel when they are derived from a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) supplement. To assess whether brain ketone uptake in AD increases in response to MCT as it would in young healthy adults. Mild-moderate AD patients sequentially consumed 30 g/d of two different MCT supplements, both for one month: a mixture of caprylic (55%) and capric acids (35%) (n = 11), followed by a wash-out and then tricaprylin (95%; n = 6). Brain ketone (11C-acetoacetate) and glucose (FDG) uptake were quantified by PET before and after each MCT intervention. Brain ketone consumption doubled on both types of MCT supplement. The slope of the relationship between plasma ketones and brain ketone uptake was the same as in healthy young adults. Both types of MCT increased total brain energy metabolism by increasing ketone supply without affecting brain glucose utilization. Ketones from MCT compensate for the brain glucose deficit in AD in direct proportion to the level of plasma ketones achieved.

  11. Transcriptome survey of the lipid metabolic pathways involved in energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis in the salmon louse Caligus rogercresseyi (Crustacea: Copepoda).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Teresa; Farlora, Rodolfo; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to identify and analyze the lipid metabolic pathways involved in energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis in the ectoparasite copepod Caligus rogercresseyi. Massive transcriptome sequencing analysis was performed during the infectious copepodid larval stage, during the attached chalimus larval stage, and also in female and male adults. Thirty genes were selected for describing the pathways, and these were annotated for proteins or enzymes involved in lipid digestion, absorption, and transport; fatty acid degradation; the synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies; and steroid and ecdysteroid syntheses. Differential expression of these genes was analyzed by ontogenic stage and discussed considering each stage's feeding habits and energetic needs. Copepodids showed a low expression of fatty acid digestion genes, reflected by a non-feeding behavior, and the upregulation of genes involved in steroid biosynthesis, which was consistent with a pathway for cholesterol synthesis during ecdysis. The chalimus stage showed an upregulation of genes related to fatty acid digestion, absorption, and transport, as well as to fatty acid degradation and the synthesis of ketone bodies, therefore suggesting that lipids ingested from the mucus and skin of the host fish are metabolized as important sources of energy. Adult females also showed a pattern of high lipid metabolism for energy supply and mobilization in relation to reproduction and vitellogenesis. Adult females and males revealed different lipid metabolism patterns that reflected different energetic needs. This study reports for the first time the probable lipid metabolic pathways involved in the energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis of C. rogercresseyi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic control of vesicular glutamate transport and release.

    PubMed

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-10-06

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl(-). Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl(-) acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl(-) at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination of aerobic exercise and an arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine mixture increases fat mobilization and ketone body synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Takai, Shoko; Ikegami, Shuji; Fujita, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    During exercise, blood levels of several hormones increase acutely. We hypothesized that consumption of a specific combination of amino acids (arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine; A-mix) may be involved in secretion of glucagon, and when combined with exercise may promote fat catabolism. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomized in a crossover study to ingest either A-mix (3 g/dose) or placebo (3 g of dextrin/dose). Thirty minutes after ingesting, each condition subsequently performed workload trials on a cycle ergometer at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption for 1 h. After oral intake of A-mix, the concentrations of plasma ketone bodies and adrenalin during and post-exercise were significantly increased. The area under the curve for glycerol and glucagon was significantly increased in the post-exercise by A-mix administration. These results suggest that pre-exercise ingestion of A-mix causes a shift of energy source from carbohydrate to fat combustion by increasing secretion of adrenalin and glucagon.

  14. Scaling of number, size, and metabolic rate of cells with body size in mammals.

    PubMed

    Savage, Van M; Allen, Andrew P; Brown, James H; Gillooly, James F; Herman, Alexander B; Woodruff, William H; West, Geoffrey B

    2007-03-13

    The size and metabolic rate of cells affect processes from the molecular to the organismal level. We present a quantitative, theoretical framework for studying relationships among cell volume, cellular metabolic rate, body size, and whole-organism metabolic rate that helps reveal the feedback between these levels of organization. We use this framework to show that average cell volume and average cellular metabolic rate cannot both remain constant with changes in body size because of the well known body-size dependence of whole-organism metabolic rate. Based on empirical data compiled for 18 cell types in mammals, we find that many cell types, including erythrocytes, hepatocytes, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells, follow a strategy in which cellular metabolic rate is body size dependent and cell volume is body size invariant. We suggest that this scaling holds for all quickly dividing cells, and conversely, that slowly dividing cells are expected to follow a strategy in which cell volume is body size dependent and cellular metabolic rate is roughly invariant with body size. Data for slowly dividing neurons and adipocytes show that cell volume does indeed scale with body size. From these results, we argue that the particular strategy followed depends on the structural and functional properties of the cell type. We also discuss consequences of these two strategies for cell number and capillary densities. Our results and conceptual framework emphasize fundamental constraints that link the structure and function of cells to that of whole organisms.

  15. Scaling of metabolic rate on body mass in small laboratory mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smith, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    The scaling of metabolic heat production rate on body mass is investigated for five species of small laboratory mammal in order to define selection of animals of metabolic rates and size range appropriate for the measurement of changes in the scaling relationship upon exposure to weightlessness in Shuttle/Spacelab experiment. Metabolic rates were measured according to oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production for individual male and female Swiss-Webster mice, Syrian hamsters, Simonsen albino rats, Hartley guinea pigs and New Zealand white rabbits, which range in mass from 0.05 to 5 kg mature body size, at ages of 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 12, 18 and 24 months. The metabolic intensity, defined as the heat produced per hour per kg body mass, is found to decrease dramatically with age until the animals are 6 to 8 months old, with little or no sex difference. When plotted on a logarithmic graph, the relation of metabolic rate to total body mass is found to obey a power law of index 0.676, which differs significantly from the classical value of 0.75. When the values for the mice are removed, however, an index of 0.749 is obtained. It is thus proposed that six male animals, 8 months of age, of each of the four remaining species be used to study the effects of gravitational loading on the metabolic energy requirements of terrestrial animals.

  16. SIRT3 mediates multi-tissue coupling for metabolic fuel switching.

    PubMed

    Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E; Richards, Alicia L; Fan, Jing; Smallegan, Michael J; Fotuhi Siahpirani, Alireza; Kemmerer, Zachary A; Prolla, Tomas A; Roy, Sushmita; Coon, Joshua J; Denu, John M

    2015-04-07

    SIRT3 is a member of the Sirtuin family of NAD(+)-dependent deacylases and plays a critical role in metabolic regulation. Organism-wide SIRT3 loss manifests in metabolic alterations; however, the coordinating role of SIRT3 among metabolically distinct tissues is unknown. Using multi-tissue quantitative proteomics comparing fasted wild-type mice to mice lacking SIRT3, innovative bioinformatic analysis, and biochemical validation, we provide a comprehensive view of mitochondrial acetylation and SIRT3 function. We find SIRT3 regulates the acetyl-proteome in core mitochondrial processes common to brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle, but differentially regulates metabolic pathways in fuel-producing and fuel-utilizing tissues. We propose an additional maintenance function for SIRT3 in liver and kidney where SIRT3 expression is elevated to reduce the acetate load on mitochondrial proteins. We provide evidence that SIRT3 impacts ketone body utilization in the brain and reveal a pivotal role for SIRT3 in the coordination between tissues required for metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mauna Kea III: Metabolic Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate Supplementation During Exercise at 4100 M Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    not significantly altered by altitude or diet. B-hydroxybutyrate was measured in urine and serum as an index of ketosis . Uzine B-hydroxybutyrate in 24...h urine samples is shown in Table 6. In general, Urin B-ydrxybtyrae i 24h uine10 44~ -W the incidence of ketosis was markedly less in the EX + CHO...Ketone body metabolism in ketosis of starvation and alloxan diabetes. J. Biol. Chem. 245:4382-4390, 1970. 22. NORTON, A.C. Development and testing of a

  18. The sedentary (r)evolution: Have we lost our metabolic flexibility?

    PubMed

    Freese, Jens; Klement, Rainer Johannes; Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Schwarz, Sebastian; Lötzerich, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    During the course of evolution, up until the agricultural revolution, environmental fluctuations forced the human species to develop a flexible metabolism in order to adapt its energy needs to various climate, seasonal and vegetation conditions. Metabolic flexibility safeguarded human survival independent of food availability. In modern times, humans switched their primal lifestyle towards a constant availability of energy-dense, yet often nutrient-deficient, foods, persistent psycho-emotional stressors and a lack of exercise. As a result, humans progressively gain metabolic disorders, such as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain types of cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer´s disease, wherever the sedentary lifestyle spreads in the world. For more than 2.5 million years, our capability to store fat for times of food shortage was an outstanding survival advantage. Nowadays, the same survival strategy in a completely altered surrounding is responsible for a constant accumulation of body fat. In this article, we argue that the metabolic disease epidemic is largely based on a deficit in metabolic flexibility. We hypothesize that the modern energetic inflexibility, typically displayed by symptoms of neuroglycopenia, can be reversed by re-cultivating suppressed metabolic programs, which became obsolete in an affluent environment, particularly the ability to easily switch to ketone body and fat oxidation. In a simplified model, the basic metabolic programs of humans' primal hunter-gatherer lifestyle are opposed to the current sedentary lifestyle. Those metabolic programs, which are chronically neglected in modern surroundings, are identified and conclusions for the prevention of chronic metabolic diseases are drawn.

  19. The sedentary (r)evolution: Have we lost our metabolic flexibility?

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Jens; Klement, Rainer Johannes; Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Schwarz, Sebastian; Lötzerich, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    During the course of evolution, up until the agricultural revolution, environmental fluctuations forced the human species to develop a flexible metabolism in order to adapt its energy needs to various climate, seasonal and vegetation conditions. Metabolic flexibility safeguarded human survival independent of food availability. In modern times, humans switched their primal lifestyle towards a constant availability of energy-dense, yet often nutrient-deficient, foods, persistent psycho-emotional stressors and a lack of exercise. As a result, humans progressively gain metabolic disorders, such as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain types of cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer´s disease, wherever the sedentary lifestyle spreads in the world. For more than 2.5 million years, our capability to store fat for times of food shortage was an outstanding survival advantage. Nowadays, the same survival strategy in a completely altered surrounding is responsible for a constant accumulation of body fat. In this article, we argue that the metabolic disease epidemic is largely based on a deficit in metabolic flexibility. We hypothesize that the modern energetic inflexibility, typically displayed by symptoms of neuroglycopenia, can be reversed by re-cultivating suppressed metabolic programs, which became obsolete in an affluent environment, particularly the ability to easily switch to ketone body and fat oxidation. In a simplified model, the basic metabolic programs of humans’ primal hunter-gatherer lifestyle are opposed to the current sedentary lifestyle. Those metabolic programs, which are chronically neglected in modern surroundings, are identified and conclusions for the prevention of chronic metabolic diseases are drawn. PMID:29225776

  20. Increasing metabolic rate despite declining body weight in an adult parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Casas, Jérôme; Body, Mélanie; Gutzwiller, Florence; Giron, David; Lazzari, Claudio R; Pincebourde, Sylvain; Richard, Romain; Llandres, Ana L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic rate is a positive function of body weight, a rule valid for most organisms and the basis of several theories of metabolic ecology. For adult insects, however, the diversity of relationships between body mass and respiration remains unexplained. The aim of this study is to relate the respiratory metabolism of a parasitoid with body weight and foraging activity. We compared the metabolic rate of groups of starving and host-fed females of the parasitoid Eupelmus vuilleti recorded with respirometry for 7days, corresponding to the mean lifetime of starving females and over half of the lifetime of foraging females. The dynamics of carbohydrate, lipid and protein in the body of foraging females were quantified with biochemical techniques. Body mass and all body nutrients declined sharply from the first day onwards. By contrast, the CO2 produced and the O2 consumed increased steadily. Starving females showed the opposite trend, identifying foraging as the reason for the respiration increase of feeding females. Two complementary physiological processes explain the unexpected relationship between increasing metabolic rate and declining body weight. First, host hemolymph is a highly unbalanced food, and the excess nutrients (protein and carbohydrate) need to be voided, partially through excretion and partially through respiration. Second, a foraging young female produces eggs at an increasing rate during the first half of its lifetime, a process that also increases respiration. We posit that the time-varying metabolic rate contributions of the feeding and reproductive processes supplements the contribution of the structural mass and lead to the observed trend. We extend our explanations to other insect groups and discuss the potential for unification using Dynamic Energy Budget theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Deranged Cardiac Metabolism and the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the neuro-hormonal system is a pathophysiological consequence of heart failure. Neuro-hormonal activation promotes metabolic changes, such as insulin resistance, and determines an increased use of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. Fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation are increased in patients with heart failure, yielding a state of metabolic inefficiency. The net result is additional depletion of myocardial adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase levels with further decreased efficiency of mechanical work. In this context, manipulation of cardiac energy metabolism by modification of substrate use by the failing heart has produced positive clinical results. The results of current research support the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and towards glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. The additional use of drugs able to partially inhibit fatty acids oxidation in patients with heart failure may therefore yield a significant protective effect for clinical symptoms and cardiac function improvement, and simultaneously ameliorate left ventricular remodelling. Certainly, to clarify the exact therapeutic role of metabolic therapy in heart failure, a large multicentre, randomised controlled trial should be performed. PMID:28785448

  2. Can ketones compensate for deteriorating brain glucose uptake during aging? Implications for the risk and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Vandenberghe, Camille; Pierotti, Tyler; Fortier, Mélanie; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    Brain glucose uptake is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key question is whether cognitive decline can be delayed if this brain energy defect is at least partly corrected or bypassed early in the disease. The principal ketones (also called ketone bodies), β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, are the brain's main physiological alternative fuel to glucose. Three studies in mild-to-moderate AD have shown that, unlike with glucose, brain ketone uptake is not different from that in healthy age-matched controls. Published clinical trials demonstrate that increasing ketone availability to the brain via moderate nutritional ketosis has a modest beneficial effect on cognitive outcomes in mild-to-moderate AD and in mild cognitive impairment. Nutritional ketosis can be safely achieved by a high-fat ketogenic diet, by supplements providing 20-70 g/day of medium-chain triglycerides containing the eight- and ten-carbon fatty acids octanoate and decanoate, or by ketone esters. Given the acute dependence of the brain on its energy supply, it seems reasonable that the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at AD mandates consideration of how the underlying problem of deteriorating brain fuel supply can be corrected or delayed. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Lipid metabolism and body composition in Gclm(-/-) mice

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kendig, Eric L.; Center for Environmental Genetics, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, P.O. Box 670056, Cincinnati, OH 45267; Chen, Ying

    2011-12-15

    In humans and experimental animals, high fat diets (HFD) are associated with risk factors for metabolic diseases, such as excessive weight gain and adiposity, insulin resistance and fatty liver. Mice lacking the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene (Gclm(-/-)) and deficient in glutathione (GSH), are resistant to HFD-mediated weight gain. Herein, we evaluated Gclm-associated regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. C57BL/6J Gclm(-/-) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls received a normal diet or an HFD for 11 weeks. HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not display a decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that they are unable to process lipidmore » for metabolism. Although dietary energy consumption and intestinal lipid absorption were unchanged in Gclm(-/-) mice, feeding these mice an HFD did not produce excess body weight nor fat storage. Gclm(-/-) mice displayed higher basal metabolic rates resulting from higher activities of liver mitochondrial NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, thus elevating respiration. Although Gclm(-/-) mice exhibited strong systemic and hepatic oxidative stress responses, HFD did not promote glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not develop fatty liver, likely resulting from very low expression levels of genes encoding lipid metabolizing enzymes. We conclude that Gclm is involved in the regulation of basal metabolic rate and the metabolism of dietary lipid. Although Gclm(-/-) mice display a strong oxidative stress response, they are protected from HFD-induced excessive weight gain and adipose deposition, insulin resistance and steatosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not produce body weight and fat gain in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not induce steatosis or insulin resistance in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gclm(-/-) mice have high basal metabolism and

  4. Ketones prevent synaptic dysfunction induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Vallejo, Johana; Rho, Jong M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ketones have previously shown beneficial effects in models of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly against associated mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive impairment. However, evidence of a synaptic protective effect of ketones remains lacking. We tested the effects of ketones on synaptic impairment induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex (MRC) inhibitors using electrophysiological, reactive oxygen species (ROS) imaging and biochemical techniques. MRC inhibitors dose-dependently suppressed both population spike (PS) and field potential amplitudes in the CA1 hippocampus. Pre-treatment with ketones strongly prevented changes in the PS, whereas partial protection was seen in the field potential. Rotenone (Rot; 100 nmol/L), a MRC I inhibitor, suppressed synaptic function without altering ROS levels and PS depression by Rot was unaffected by antioxidants. In contrast, antioxidant-induced PS recovery against the MRC II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 1 mmol/L) was similar to the synaptic protective effects of ketones. Ketones also suppressed ROS generation induced by 3-NP. Finally, ketones reversed the decreases in ATP levels caused by Rot and 3-NP. In summary, our data demonstrate that ketones can preserve synaptic function in CA1 hippocampus induced by MRC dysfunction, likely through an antioxidant action and enhanced ATP generation. PMID:20374433

  5. Integrating Cellular Metabolism into a Multiscale Whole-Body Model

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Markus; Schaller, Stephan; Borchers, Steffen; Findeisen, Rolf; Lippert, Jörg; Kuepfer, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Cellular metabolism continuously processes an enormous range of external compounds into endogenous metabolites and is as such a key element in human physiology. The multifaceted physiological role of the metabolic network fulfilling the catalytic conversions can only be fully understood from a whole-body perspective where the causal interplay of the metabolic states of individual cells, the surrounding tissue and the whole organism are simultaneously considered. We here present an approach relying on dynamic flux balance analysis that allows the integration of metabolic networks at the cellular scale into standardized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models at the whole-body level. To evaluate our approach we integrated a genome-scale network reconstruction of a human hepatocyte into the liver tissue of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of a human adult. The resulting multiscale model was used to investigate hyperuricemia therapy, ammonia detoxification and paracetamol-induced toxication at a systems level. The specific models simultaneously integrate multiple layers of biological organization and offer mechanistic insights into pathology and medication. The approach presented may in future support a mechanistic understanding in diagnostics and drug development. PMID:23133351

  6. A body composition model to estimate mammalian energy stores and metabolic rates from body mass and body length, with application to polar bears.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Péter K; Klanjscek, Tin; Derocher, Andrew E; Obbard, Martyn E; Lewis, Mark A

    2009-08-01

    Many species experience large fluctuations in food availability and depend on energy from fat and protein stores for survival, reproduction and growth. Body condition and, more specifically, energy stores thus constitute key variables in the life history of many species. Several indices exist to quantify body condition but none can provide the amount of stored energy. To estimate energy stores in mammals, we propose a body composition model that differentiates between structure and storage of an animal. We develop and parameterize the model specifically for polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps) but all concepts are general and the model could be easily adapted to other mammals. The model provides predictive equations to estimate structural mass, storage mass and storage energy from an appropriately chosen measure of body length and total body mass. The model also provides a means to estimate basal metabolic rates from body length and consecutive measurements of total body mass. Model estimates of body composition, structural mass, storage mass and energy density of 970 polar bears from Hudson Bay were consistent with the life history and physiology of polar bears. Metabolic rate estimates of fasting adult males derived from the body composition model corresponded closely to theoretically expected and experimentally measured metabolic rates. Our method is simple, non-invasive and provides considerably more information on the energetic status of individuals than currently available methods.

  7. Colorimetric Recognition of Aldehydes and Ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Fang, Ming; LaGasse, Maria K; Askim, Jon R; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2017-08-07

    A colorimetric sensor array has been designed for the identification of and discrimination among aldehydes and ketones in vapor phase. Due to rapid chemical reactions between the solid-state sensor elements and gaseous analytes, distinct color difference patterns were produced and digitally imaged for chemometric analysis. The sensor array was developed from classical spot tests using aniline and phenylhydrazine dyes that enable molecular recognition of a wide variety of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes and ketones, as demonstrated by hierarchical cluster, principal component, and support vector machine analyses. The aldehyde/ketone-specific sensors were further employed for differentiation among and identification of ten liquor samples (whiskies, brandy, vodka) and ethanol controls, showing its potential applications in the beverage industry. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Lanthanum tricyanide-catalyzed acyl silane-ketone benzoin additions.

    PubMed

    Tarr, James C; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2009-09-03

    Lanthanum tricyanide efficiently catalyzes a benzoin-type coupling between acyl silanes and ketones. Yields range from moderate to excellent over a broad substrate scope encompassing aryl, alkyl, electron-rich, and sterically hindered ketones.

  9. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b) Color...

  10. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b) Color...

  11. Lanthanum Tricyanide-Catalyzed Acyl Silane-Ketone Benzoin Additions

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, James C.; Johnson, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanum tricyanide efficiently catalyzes a benzoin-type coupling between acyl silanes and ketones. Yields range from moderate to excellent over a broad substrate scope encompassing aryl, alkyl, electron-rich, and sterically hindered ketones. PMID:19655731

  12. Metabolic connectomics targeting brain pathology in dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Caminiti, Silvia P; Tettamanti, Marco; Sala, Arianna; Presotto, Luca; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cappa, Stefano F; Magnani, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies is characterized by α-synuclein accumulation and degeneration of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways. To gain an overview of brain systems affected by neurodegeneration, we characterized the [18F]FDG-PET metabolic connectivity in 42 dementia with Lewy bodies patients, as compared to 42 healthy controls, using sparse inverse covariance estimation method and graph theory. We performed whole-brain and anatomically driven analyses, targeting cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways, and the α-synuclein spreading. The first revealed substantial alterations in connectivity indexes, brain modularity, and hubs configuration. Namely, decreases in local metabolic connectivity within occipital cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, and increases within frontal, temporal, parietal, and basal ganglia regions. There were also long-range disconnections among these brain regions, all supporting a disruption of the functional hierarchy characterizing the normal brain. The anatomically driven analysis revealed alterations within brain structures early affected by α-synuclein pathology, supporting Braak’s early pathological staging in dementia with Lewy bodies. The dopaminergic striato-cortical pathway was severely affected, as well as the cholinergic networks, with an extensive decrease in connectivity in Ch1-Ch2, Ch5-Ch6 networks, and the lateral Ch4 capsular network significantly towards the occipital cortex. These altered patterns of metabolic connectivity unveil a new in vivo scenario for dementia with Lewy bodies underlying pathology in terms of changes in whole-brain metabolic connectivity, spreading of α-synuclein, and neurotransmission impairment. PMID:27306756

  13. Cellular metabolic rates from primary dermal fibroblast cells isolated from birds of different body masses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-10-01

    The rate of metabolism is the speed at which organisms use energy, an integration of energy transformations within the body; it governs biological processes that influence rates of growth and reproduction. Progress at understanding functional linkages between whole organism metabolic rate and underlying mechanisms that influence its magnitude has been slow despite the central role this issue plays in evolutionary and physiological ecology. Previous studies that have attempted to relate how cellular processes translate into whole-organism physiology have done so over a range of body masses of subjects. However, the data still remains controversial when observing metabolic rates at the cellular level. To bridge the gap between these ideas, we examined cellular metabolic rate of primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from 49 species of birds representing a 32,000-fold range in body masses to test the hypothesis that metabolic rate of cultured cells scales with body size. We used a Seahorse XF-96 Extracellular flux analyzer to measure cellular respiration in fibroblasts. Additionally, we measured fibroblast size and mitochondrial content. We found no significant correlation between cellular metabolic rate, cell size, or mitochondrial content and body mass. Additionally, there was a significant relationship between cellular basal metabolic rate and proton leak in these cells. We conclude that metabolic rate of cells isolated in culture does not scale with body mass, but cellular metabolic rate is correlated to growth rate in birds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting metabolic adaptation, body weight change, and energy intake in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complex interactions between carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism underlie the body's remarkable ability to adapt to a variety of diets. But any imbalances between the intake and utilization rates of these macronutrients will result in changes in body weight and composition. Here, I present the first computational model that simulates how diet perturbations result in adaptations of fuel selection and energy expenditure that predict body weight and composition changes in both obese and nonobese men and women. No model parameters were adjusted to fit these data other than the initial conditions for each subject group (e.g., initial body weight and body fat mass). The model provides the first realistic simulations of how diet perturbations result in adaptations of whole body energy expenditure, fuel selection, and various metabolic fluxes that ultimately give rise to body weight change. The validated model was used to estimate free-living energy intake during a long-term weight loss intervention, a variable that has never previously been measured accurately. PMID:19934407

  15. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

  16. Ketogenic diet metabolites reduce firing in central neurons by opening K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Berg, Jim; Yellen, Gary

    2007-04-04

    A low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet remains one of the most effective (but mysterious) treatments for severe pharmacoresistant epilepsy. We have tested for an acute effect of physiological ketone bodies on neuronal firing rates and excitability, to discover possible therapeutic mechanisms of the ketogenic diet. Physiological concentrations of ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate or acetoacetate) reduced the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in slices from rat or mouse substantia nigra pars reticulata. This region is thought to act as a "seizure gate," controlling seizure generalization. Consistent with an anticonvulsant role, the ketone body effect is larger for cells that fire more rapidly. The effect of ketone bodies was abolished by eliminating the metabolically sensitive K(ATP) channels pharmacologically or by gene knock-out. We propose that ketone bodies or glycolytic restriction treat epilepsy by augmenting a natural activity-limiting function served by K(ATP) channels in neurons.

  17. Predictive value of body mass index to metabolic syndrome risk factors in Syrian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Al-Bachir, Mahfouz; Bakir, Mohamad Adel

    2017-06-25

    Obesity has become a serious epidemic health problem in both developing and developed countries. There is much evidence that obesity among adolescents contributed significantly to the development of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease in adulthood. Very limited information exists on the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and associated metabolic risk factors among Syrian adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between obesity determined by body mass index and the major metabolic risk factors among Syrian adolescents. A cross-sectional study of a randomly selected sample of 2064 apparently healthy Syrian adolescents aged 18 to 19 years from Damascus city, in Syria, was performed. Body mass index and blood pressure were measured. Serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were determined. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the national criteria for each determined metabolic risk factor. Individuals with a body mass index 25 to 29.9 were classified as overweight, whereas individuals with a body mass index ≥30 were classified as obese. A receiver operating characteristics curve was drawn to determine appropriate cut-off points of the body mass index for defining overweight and obesity, and to indicate the performance of body mass index as a predictor of risk factors. The obtained data showed that blood pressure and the overall mean concentrations of fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were significantly higher in overweight and obese adolescent groups (p <0.0001) in comparison with the normal group. Based on receiver operating characteristics calculation for body mass index and some metabolic risks, the data suggest the best body mass index cut-offs ranged between 23.25 and 24.35 kg/m 2 . A strong association

  18. Efficacy comparison of Korean ginseng and American ginseng on body temperature and metabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Mi-Hwi; Kim, Eung-Hwi; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Park, In-Sun; Yang, Duck-Choon; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Ginseng has beneficial effects in cancer, diabetes and aging. There are two main varieties of ginseng: Panax ginseng (Korean ginseng) and Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng). There are anecdotal reports that American ginseng helps reduce body temperature, whereas Korean ginseng improves blood circulation and increases body temperature; however, their respective effects on body temperature and metabolic parameters have not been studied. We investigated body temperature and metabolic parameters in mice using a metabolic cage. After administering ginseng extracts acutely (single dose of 1000 mg/kg) or chronically (200 mg/kg/day for four weeks), core body temperature, food intake, oxygen consumption and activity were measured, as well as serum levels of pyrogen-related factors and mRNA expression of metabolic genes. Acute treatment with American ginseng reduced body temperature compared with PBS-treated mice during the night; however, there was no significant effect of ginseng treatment on body temperature after four weeks of treatment. VO 2, VCO 2, food intake, activity and energy expenditure were unchanged after both acute and chronic ginseng treatment compared with PBS treatment. In acutely treated mice, serum thyroxin levels were reduced by red and American ginseng, and the serum prostaglandin E2 level was reduced by American ginseng. In chronically treated mice, red and white ginseng reduced thyroxin levels. We conclude that Korean ginseng does not stimulate metabolism in mice, whereas a high dose of American ginseng may reduce night-time body temperature and pyrogen-related factors.

  19. Role of leptin in body temperature regulation and lipid metabolism following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, T S; Amorim, C E N; Barros, C C; Haro, A S; Wasinski, F; Russo, F J; Bacurau, R F P; Araujo, R C

    2015-12-01

    The physiological changes in serum triglycerides and body temperature that are induced by splenectomy are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate parameters related to lipid and glucose metabolism, as well as thermoregulation, in splenectomized mice. Splenectomized and sham-operated WT mice (C57Bl/6) and ob/ob mice were randomly divided and treated with a standard or high fat diet, and several metabolic parameters and the body temperature were investigated. Splenectomy induced a significant increase in triglyceride levels regardless of the diet. It was found that the splenectomized WT mice showed greater serum leptin and insulin levels compared with the sham-operated mice. Additionally, the body temperatures of the splenectomized WT mice were greater than the body temperatures of the control animals regardless of diet; this result too was observed without any significant change in the temperature of the splenectomized ob/ob animals. The results suggest that splenectomy interferes with serum triglyceride metabolism and body temperature regardless of the fat content in the diet and that leptin is involved in the regulation of body temperature related to splenectomy.

  20. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; West,; Ryan, M [Madison, WI

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  1. [THE OPTIMIZATION OF NUTRITION FUNCTION UNDER SYNDROME OF RESISTANCE TO INSULIN, DISORDER OF FATTY ACIDS' METABOLISM AND ABSORPTION OF GLUCOSE BY CELLS (A LECTURE)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic processes continue to proceed in Homo Sapiens. At the very early stages ofphylogenesis, the ancient Archaea that formed mitochondria under symbiotic interaction with later bacterial cells conjointly formed yet another system. In this system, there are no cells' absorption of glucose if it is possible to absorb fatty acids from intercellular medium in the form of unesterfied fatty acids or ketonic bodies--metabolites of fatty acids. This is caused by objectively existed conditions and subsequent availability of substrates at the stages ofphylogenesis: acetate, ketonic bodies, fatty acids and only later glucose. The phylogenetically late insulin used after billions years the same dependencies at formation of regulation ofmetabolism offatty acids and cells' absorption of glucose. In order that syndrome ofresistance ceased to exist as afoundation of metabolic pandemic Homo Sapiens has to understand the following. After successful function ofArchaea+bacterial cells and considered by biology action of insulin for the third time in phylogenesis and using biological function of intelligence the content ofphylogenetically earlier palmitic saturated fatty acid infood can't to exceed possibilities of phylogenetically late lipoproteins to transfer it in intercellular medium and blood and cells to absorb it. It is supposed that at early stages of phylogenesis biological function of intelligence is primarily formed to bring into line "unconformities" of regulation of metabolism against the background of seeming relative biological "perfection". These unconformities were subsequently and separately formed at the level of cells in paracrin regulated cenosises of cells and organs and at the level of organism. The prevention of resistance to insulin basically requires biological function of intelligence, principle of self-restraint, bringing into line multiple desires of Homo Sapiens with much less extensive biological possibilities. The "unconformities" of

  2. Fuel cell performance of pendent methylphenyl sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyu; Stanis, Ronald J.; Song, Yang; Hu, Wei; Cornelius, Chris J.; Shi, Qiang; Liu, Baijun; Guiver, Michael D.

    2017-11-01

    Meta- and para-linked homopolymers bearing 3-methylphenyl (Me) pendent groups were postsulfonated to create sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) (SPEEKK) backbone isomers, which are referred to as Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK. Their thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties, dimensional stability, methanol permeability, and proton conductivity are characterized. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK proton conductivities at 100 °C are 116 and 173 mS cm-1, respectively. Their methanol permeabilities are 3.3-3.9 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, and dimensional swelling at 100 °C is 16.4-17.5%. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and electrochemical properties were evaluated within a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). When O2 is used as the oxidant at 80 °C and 100% RH, the maximum power density of Me-m-SPEEKK reaches 657 mW cm-2, which is higher than those of Nafion 115 (552 mW cm-2). DMFC performance is 85 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with 2.0 M methanol using Me-p-SPEEKK due to its low MeOH crossover. In general, these electrochemical results are comparable to Nafion. These ionomer properties, combined with a potentially less expensive and scalable polymer manufacturing process, may broaden their potential for many practical applications.

  3. Ovariectomy induces a shift in fuel availability and metabolism in the hippocampus of the female transgenic model of familial Alzheimer's.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that reproductive senescence in female triple transgenic Alzheimer's (3×TgAD) mice was paralleled by a shift towards a ketogenic profile with a concomitant decline in mitochondrial activity in brain, suggesting a potential association between ovarian hormone loss and alteration in the bioenergetic profile of the brain. In the present study, we investigated the impact of ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol replacement on brain energy substrate availability and metabolism in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's (3×TgAD). Results of these analyses indicated that ovarian hormones deprivation by ovariectomy (OVX) induced a significant decrease in brain glucose uptake indicated by decline in 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake measured by microPET-imaging. Mechanistically, OVX induced a significant decline in blood-brain-barrier specific glucose transporter expression, hexokinase expression and activity. The decline in glucose availability was accompanied by a significant rise in glial LDH5 expression and LDH5/LDH1 ratio indicative of lactate generation and utilization. In parallel, a significant rise in ketone body concentration in serum occurred which was coupled to an increase in neuronal MCT2 expression and 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase (SCOT) required for conversion of ketone bodies to acetyl-CoA. In addition, OVX-induced decline in glucose metabolism was paralleled by a significant increase in Aβ oligomer levels. 17β-estradiol preserved brain glucose-driven metabolic capacity and partially prevented the OVX-induced shift in bioenergetic substrate as evidenced by glucose uptake, glucose transporter expression and gene expression associated with aerobic glycolysis. 17β-estradiol also partially prevented the OVX-induced increase in Aβ oligomer levels. Collectively, these data indicate that ovarian hormone loss in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's was paralleled by a shift towards the metabolic pathway required for metabolism of

  4. Upper body fat predicts metabolic syndrome similarly in men and women.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M; Williams, Corbin; Vega, Gloria L

    2018-04-23

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, hypertension, a pro-inflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. All of these factors are accentuated by obesity. However, obesity can be defined by body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, or by body fat distribution. The latter consists of upper body fat (subcutaneous and visceral fat) and lower body fat (gluteofemoral fat). Waist circumference is a common surrogate marker for upper body fat. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for the years 1999-2006 was examined for associations of metabolic risk factors with percent body fat, waist circumference, and BMI. Associations between absolute measures of waist circumference and risk factors were similiar for men and women. The similarities of associations between waist circumference and risk factors suggests that greater visceral fat in men does not accentuate the influence of upper body fat on risk factors. Different waist concumference values should not be used to define abdominal obesity in men and women. © 2018 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  5. Energy metabolism, fuel selection and body weight regulation

    PubMed Central

    Galgani, J; Ravussin, E

    2010-01-01

    Energy homeostasis is critical for the survival of species. Therefore, multiple and complex mechanisms have evolved to regulate energy intake and expenditure to maintain body weight. For weight maintenance, not only does energy intake have to match energy expenditure, but also macronutrient intake must balance macronutrient oxidation. However, this equilibrium seems to be particularly difficult to achieve in individuals with low fat oxidation, low energy expenditure, low sympathetic activity or low levels of spontaneous physical activity, as in addition to excess energy intake, all of these factors explain the tendency of some people to gain weight. Additionally, large variability in weight change is observed when energy surplus is imposed experimentally or spontaneously. Clearly, the data suggest a strong genetic influence on body weight regulation implying a normal physiology in an ‘obesogenic’ environment. In this study, we also review evidence that carbohydrate balance may represent the potential signal that regulates energy homeostasis by impacting energy intake and body weight. Because of the small storage capacity for carbohydrate and its importance for metabolism in many tissues and organs, carbohydrate balance must be maintained at a given level. This drive for balance may in turn cause increased energy intake when consuming a diet high in fat and low in carbohydrate. If sustained over time, such an increase in energy intake cannot be detected by available methods, but may cause meaningful increases in body weight. The concept of metabolic flexibility and its impact on body weight regulation is also presented. PMID:19136979

  6. 27 CFR 21.118 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 21.118 Section 21.118 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....118 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b) Color...

  7. 27 CFR 21.118 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 21.118 Section 21.118 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....118 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b) Color...

  8. Thermoneutral zone and scaling of metabolic rate on body mass in small mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    A 4-species animal model suitable for experimental study of the effect of change in gravitational loading on the scale relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass is used to study the effect of temperature on metabolic rate in six male animals, 8-10 months of age, of each of the four species in the ambient temperature range 20-36 C. The measurements taken permitted partitioning of total body heat output into sensible heat loss by radiation, conduction and convection, and into latent heat loss by evaporation of water from the body surface. It is shown that the condition of thermoneutrality is important for metabolic scale effect studies, and that the thermoneutral zone for the species considered here is a narrow one.

  9. Depolarizing actions of GABA in immature neurons depend neither on ketone bodies nor on pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Tyzio, Roman; Allene, Camille; Nardou, Romain; Picardo, Michel A; Yamamoto, Sumii; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Caiati, Maddalena D; Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Milh, Mathieu; Ferré, Pascal; Khazipov, Rustem; Romette, Jean-Louis; Lorquin, Jean; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Nehlig, Astrid; Cherubini, Enrico; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2011-01-05

    GABA depolarizes immature neurons because of a high [Cl(-)](i) and orchestrates giant depolarizing potential (GDP) generation. Zilberter and coworkers (Rheims et al., 2009; Holmgren et al., 2010) showed recently that the ketone body metabolite DL-3-hydroxybutyrate (DL-BHB) (4 mM), lactate (4 mM), or pyruvate (5 mM) shifted GABA actions to hyperpolarizing, suggesting that the depolarizing effects of GABA are attributable to inadequate energy supply when glucose is the sole energy source. We now report that, in rat pups (postnatal days 4-7), plasma D-BHB, lactate, and pyruvate levels are 0.9, 1.5, and 0.12 mM, respectively. Then, we show that DL-BHB (4 mM) and pyruvate (200 μM) do not affect (i) the driving force for GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents (DF(GABA)) in cell-attached single-channel recordings, (2) the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in perforated patch recordings, (3) the action potentials triggered by focal GABA applications, or (4) the GDPs determined with electrophysiological recordings and dynamic two-photon calcium imaging. Only very high nonphysiological concentrations of pyruvate (5 mM) reduced DF(GABA) and blocked GDPs. Therefore, DL-BHB does not alter GABA signals even at the high concentrations used by Zilberter and colleagues, whereas pyruvate requires exceedingly high nonphysiological concentrations to exert an effect. There is no need to alter conventional glucose enriched artificial CSF to investigate GABA signals in the developing brain.

  10. Et3B-mediated radical-polar crossover reaction for single-step coupling of O,Te-acetal, α,β-unsaturated ketones, and aldehydes/ketones.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Daigo; Urabe, Daisuke; Nagatomo, Masanori; Inoue, Masayuki

    2013-10-04

    Et3B-mediated three-component coupling reactions between O,Te-acetal, α,β-unsaturated ketones, and aldehydes/ketones were developed. Et3B promoted the generation of the potently reactive bridgehead radical from the O,Te-acetal of the trioxaadamantane structure and converted the α-carbonyl radical of the resultant two-component adduct to the boron enolate, which then underwent a stereoselective aldol reaction with the aldehyde/ketone. This powerful, yet mild, radical-polar crossover reaction efficiently connected the hindered linkages between the three units and selectively introduced three new stereocenters.

  11. Catalyst-free dehydrative α-alkylation of ketones with alcohols: green and selective autocatalyzed synthesis of alcohols and ketones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Chen, Jianhui; Tian, Haiwen; Yuan, Xueqin; Li, Shuangyan; Zhou, Chongkuan; Liu, Jianping

    2014-01-03

    Direct dehydrative α-alkylation reactions of ketones with alcohols are now realized under simple, practical, and green conditions without using external catalysts. These catalyst-free autocatalyzed alkylation methods can efficiently afford useful alkylated ketone or alcohol products in a one-pot manner and on a large scale by CC bond formation of the in situ generated intermediates with subsequent controllable and selective Meerwein-Pondorf-Verley-Oppenauer-type redox processes. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database....

  13. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Body Mass Index-Independent Metabolic Alterations in Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Di Dalmazi, Guido; Ribichini, Danilo; Vicennati, Valentina; Pizza, Fabio; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montagna, Pasquale; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To contribute to the anthropometric and metabolic phenotyping of orexin-A–deficient narcoleptic patients, and to explore a possible risk of their developing a metabolic syndrome. Design: We performed a cross-sectional study comparing metabolic alterations in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) and patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Fourteen patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy and 14 sex and age-matched patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and results: Metabolic parameters were evaluated by measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (also with abdominal computed tomography), blood pressure, and daily calorie intake (3-day diary). Chronotypes were assessed through the morningness-eveningness questionnaire. Lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A determination and HLA typing were performed. Patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (all HLA DQB1*0602 positive and with cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A levels < 110 pg/mL) had a higher BMI and BMI-independent metabolic alterations, namely waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose/insulin ratio (an insulin resistance index), with respect to patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A levels > 300 pg/mL). Despite lower daily food intake, patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy displayed significant alterations in metabolic parameters resulting in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in more than half the cases. Conclusions: BMI-independent metabolic alterations and the relative hypophagia of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, as compared with patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time, suggest that orexin-A influences the etiology of this phenotype. Moreover, considering that these dysmetabolic alterations are present from a young age, a careful metabolic

  15. Low dielectric fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) film and coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Patrick E. (Inventor); Tullos, Gordon L. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to film and coating materials prepared from novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketones). A fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) is prepared by reacting a bisphenol with 1,1,1,3,3,3 hexafluoro-2,2-bis 4-(4-halobenzoyl) phenyl propane (wherein halo is fluoro or chloro), which is a novel monomer formed as the reaction product of halobenzene (wherein halo is fluoro or chloro) and 1,1,1,3,3,3 hexafluoro-2,2-bis (p-chloro formyl phenyl) propane. Especially beneficial results of this invention are that films and coating materials prepared from the novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketone) are essentially optically transparent/colorless and have a lower dielectric constant than otherwise comparable, commercially available poly(phenylene ether ketones). Moreover, unlike the otherwise comparable commercially available materials, the novel fluorinated poly(phenylene ether ketones) of the present invention can be solution cast or sprayed to produce the films and coatings. Furthermore, the long term thermal stability of the polymers of the present invention is superior to that of the commercially available materials.

  16. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone ( MEK ) ( CASRN 78 - 93 - 3 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  17. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl Isobutyl Ketone ( MIBK ) ; CASRN 108 - 10 - 1 ; Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  18. Activity affects intraspecific body-size scaling of metabolic rate in ectothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas Stewart

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic rate is commonly thought to scale with body mass (M) to the 3/4 power. However, the metabolic scaling exponent (b) may vary with activity state, as has been shown chiefly for interspecific relationships. Here I use a meta-analysis of literature data to test whether b changes with activity level within species of ectothermic animals. Data for 19 species show that b is usually higher during active exercise (mean +/- 95% confidence limits = 0.918 +/- 0.038) than during rest (0.768 +/- 0.069). This significant upward shift in b to near 1 is consistent with the metabolic level boundaries hypothesis, which predicts that maximal metabolic rate during exercise should be chiefly influenced by volume-related muscular power production (scaling as M (1)). This dependence of b on activity level does not appear to be a simple temperature effect because body temperature in ectotherms changes very little during exercise.

  19. Enantioselective Organocatalytic α-Fluorination of Cyclic Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Beeson, Teresa D.; Conrad, Jay C.

    2011-01-01

    The first highly enantioselective α-fluorination of ketones using organocatalysis has been accomplished. The long-standing problem of enantioselective ketone α-fluorination via enamine activation has been overcome via high-throughput evaluation of a new library of amine catalysts. The optimal system, a primary amine functionalized Cinchona alkaloid, allows the direct and asymmetric α-fluorination of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic substrates. Furthermore, this protocol also provides diastereo-, regio- and chemoselective catalyst control in fluorinations involving complex carbonyl systems. PMID:21247133

  20. Carotid body, insulin, and metabolic diseases: unraveling the links

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V.; Sacramento, Joana F.; Guarino, Maria P.; Gonzalez, Constancio; Obeso, Ana; Diogo, Lucilia N.; Monteiro, Emilia C.; Ribeiro, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The carotid bodies (CB) are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2, and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN). CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future. PMID:25400585

  1. Metabolism and acetylation contribute to leucine-mediated inhibition of cardiac glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Renguet, Edith; Ginion, Audrey; Gélinas, Roselle; Bultot, Laurent; Auquier, Julien; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Daneault, Caroline; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Des Rosiers, Christine; Hue, Louis; Horman, Sandrine; Beauloye, Christophe; Bertrand, Luc

    2017-08-01

    High plasma leucine levels strongly correlate with type 2 diabetes. Studies of muscle cells have suggested that leucine alters the insulin response for glucose transport by activating an insulin-negative feedback loop driven by the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (mTOR/p70S6K) pathway. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism involved in leucine's action on cardiac glucose uptake. Leucine was indeed able to curb glucose uptake after insulin stimulation in both cultured cardiomyocytes and perfused hearts. Although leucine activated mTOR/p70S6K, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin did not prevent leucine's inhibitory action on glucose uptake, ruling out the contribution of the insulin-negative feedback loop. α-Ketoisocaproate, the first metabolite of leucine catabolism, mimicked leucine's effect on glucose uptake. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with [ 13 C]leucine ascertained its metabolism to ketone bodies (KBs), which had a similar negative impact on insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Both leucine and KBs reduced glucose uptake by affecting translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. Finally, we found that leucine elevated the global protein acetylation level. Pharmacological inhibition of lysine acetyltransferases counteracted this increase in protein acetylation and prevented leucine's inhibitory action on both glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation. Taken together, these results indicate that leucine metabolism into KBs contributes to inhibition of cardiac glucose uptake by hampering the translocation of GLUT4-containing vesicles via acetylation. They offer new insights into the establishment of insulin resistance in the heart. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Catabolism of the branched-chain amino acid leucine into ketone bodies efficiently inhibits cardiac glucose uptake through decreased translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the plasma membrane. Leucine increases protein acetylation. Pharmacological inhibition of acetylation

  2. Direct α-alkylation of ketones with alcohols in water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoqiang; Li, Qiong; Feng, Jiange; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Zuojun; Wang, Xicheng; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Mu, Xindong

    2014-01-01

    The direct α-alkylation of ketones with alcohols has emerged as a new green protocol to construct C-C bonds with H2 O as the sole byproduct. In this work, a very simple and convenient Pd/C catalytic system for the direct α-alkylation of ketones with primary alcohols in pure water is developed. Based on this catalytic system, aqueous mixtures of dilute acetone, 1-butanol, and ethanol (mimicking ABE fermentation products) can be directly transformed into C5 -C11 or longer-chain ketones and alcohols, which are precursors to fuels. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Brain glucose and acetoacetate metabolism: a comparison of young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Scott; Tremblay, Sebastien; Chen, Kewei W; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Roontiva, Auttawut; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Fortier, Melanie; Roy, Maggie; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Bocti, Christian; Lepage, Martin; Turcotte, Eric; Fulop, Tamas; Reiman, Eric M; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2014-06-01

    The extent to which the age-related decline in regional brain glucose uptake also applies to other important brain fuels is presently unknown. Ketones are the brain's major alternative fuel to glucose, so we developed a dual tracer positron emission tomography protocol to quantify and compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and the ketone, acetoacetate. Twenty healthy young adults (mean age, 26 years) and 24 healthy older adults (mean age, 74 years) were studied. In comparison with younger adults, older adults had 8 ± 6% (mean ± SD) lower cerebral metabolic rates for glucose in gray matter as a whole (p = 0.035), specifically in several frontal, temporal, and subcortical regions, as well as in the cingulate and insula (p ≤ 0.01, false discovery rate correction). The effect of age on cerebral metabolic rates for acetoacetate in gray matter did not reach significance (p = 0.11). Rate constants (min(-1)) of glucose (Kg) and acetoacetate (Ka) were significantly lower (-11 ± 6%; [p = 0.005], and -19 ± 5%; [p = 0.006], respectively) in older adults compared with younger adults. There were differential effects of age on Kg and Ka as seen by significant interaction effects in the caudate (p = 0.030) and post-central gyrus (p = 0.023). The acetoacetate index, which expresses the scaled residuals of the voxel-wise linear regression of glucose on ketone uptake, identifies regions taking up higher or lower amounts of acetoacetate relative to glucose. The acetoacetate index was higher in the caudate of young adults when compared with older adults (p ≤ 0.05 false discovery rate correction). This study provides new information about glucose and ketone metabolism in the human brain and a comparison of the extent to which their regional use changes during normal aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic adaptations to HFHS overfeeding: how whole body and tissues postprandial metabolic flexibility adapt in Yucatan mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Rémond, Didier; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Rambeau, Mathieu; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Comte, Blandine; Dardevet, Dominique; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we aimed to metabolically characterize the postprandial adaptations of the major tissues involved in energy, lipids and amino acids metabolisms in mini-pigs. Mini-pigs were fed on high-fat-high-sucrose (HFHS) diet for 2 months and several tissues explored for metabolic analyses. Further, the urine metabolome was followed over the time to picture the metabolic adaptations occurring at the whole body level following overfeeding. After 2 months of HFHS consumption, mini-pigs displayed an obese phenotype characterized by high circulating insulin, triglycerides and cholesterol levels. At the tissue level, a general (muscle, adipose tissue, intestine) reduction in the capacity to phosphorylate glucose was observed. This was also supported by the enhanced hepatic gluconeogenesis potential, despite the concomitant normoglycaemia, suggesting that the high circulating insulin levels would be enough to maintain glucose homoeostasis. The HFHS feeding also resulted in a reduced capacity of two other pathways: the de novo lipogenesis, and the branched-chain amino acids transamination. Finally, the follow-up of the urine metabolome over the time allowed determining breaking points in the metabolic trajectory of the animals. Several features confirmed the pertinence of the animal model, including increased body weight, adiposity and porcine obesity index. At the metabolic level, we observed a perturbed glucose and amino acid metabolism, known to be related to the onset of the obesity. The urine metabolome analyses revealed several metabolic pathways potentially involved in the obesity onset, including TCA (citrate, pantothenic acid), amino acids catabolism (cysteine, threonine, leucine).

  5. Study of AMPK-Regulated Metabolic Fluxes in Neurons Using the Seahorse XFe Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Claudia; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe; Buée, Luc; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2018-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is the intracellular master energy sensor and metabolic regulator. AMPK is involved in cell energy homeostasis through the regulation of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial biogenesis. Interestingly, metabolic dysfunctions and AMPK deregulations are observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's. While these deregulations could play a key role in the development of these diseases, the study of metabolic fluxes has remained quite challenging and time-consuming. In this chapter, we describe the Seahorse XFe respirometry assay as a fundamental experimental tool to investigate the role of AMPK in controlling and modulating cell metabolic fluxes in living and intact differentiated primary neurons. The Seahorse XFe respirometry assay allows the real-time monitoring of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration from different kind of cells, tissues, and isolated mitochondria. Here, we specify a protocol optimized for primary neuronal cells using several energy substrates such as glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glutamine, and ketone bodies. Nevertheless, this protocol can easily be adapted to monitor metabolic fluxes from other types of cells, tissues, or isolated mitochondria by taking into account the notes proposed for each key step of this assay.

  6. Weight-adjusted lean body mass and calf circumference are protective against obesity-associated insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Toshinari; Kita, Yuki; Nakagen, Masatoshi; Sakurai, Masaru; Isobe, Yuki; Takeshita, Yumie; Kawai, Kohzo; Urabe, Takeshi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2017-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that preserved muscle mass is protective against obesity-associated insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities, we analyzed the relationship of lean body mass and computed tomography-assessed sectional areas of specific skeletal muscles with insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities in a healthy cohort. A total of 195 subjects without diabetes who had completed a medical examination were included in this study. Various anthropometric indices such as circumferences of the arm, waist, hip, thigh, and calf were measured. Body composition (fat and lean body mass) was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Sectional areas of specific skeletal muscles (iliopsoas, erector spinae, gluteus, femoris, and rectus abdominis muscles) were measured using computed tomography. Fat and lean body mass were significantly correlated with metabolic abnormalities and insulin resistance indices. When adjusted by weight, relationships of fat and lean body mass with metabolic parameters were mirror images of each other. The weight-adjusted lean body mass negatively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures; fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, alanine aminotransferase, and triglyceride, and insulin levels; and hepatic insulin resistance indices, and positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol levels and muscle insulin sensitivity indices. Compared with weight-adjusted lean body mass, weight-adjusted sectional areas of specific skeletal muscles showed similar, but not as strong, correlations with metabolic parameters. Among anthropometric measures, the calf circumference best reflected lean body mass, and weight-adjusted calf circumference negatively correlated with metabolic abnormalities and insulin resistance indices. Weight-adjusted lean body mass and skeletal muscle area are protective against weight-associated insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities. The calf circumference reflects lean body mass and may be useful as a protective

  7. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  8. Extractive recovery of phenol and p-alkylphenols from aqueous solutions with hydrophobic ketones

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Korenman, Ya.I.; Ermolaeva, T.N.; Podolina, E.A.

    1994-03-10

    Aliphatic and cyclic hydrophobic ketones were used for extractive recovery of phenol and p-alkylphenols from aqueous solutions, giving a 95-98% extraction of toxicants under the recommended conditions. The extracting agents were cyclohexanone, methylcyclohexanone, butyl methyl ketone, and isobutyl methyl ketone.

  9. Gravity, Body Mass and Composition, and Metabolic Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolic rate and body composition as a function of sex and age were defined in 5 species of common laboratory mammals, the mouse, hamster, rat, guinea pig and rabbit. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production rates were measured individually in 6 male and 6 female animals for each of 8 age cohorts ranging from 1 month to 2 years, and for each of the species. From the results it is evident that among these small mammals there is no indication of scaling of muscularity to body size, despite the 100-fold difference in body mass represented by the skeletal musculature seems to reach a pronounced peak value at age 2 to 3 months and then declines, the fraction of the fat-free body represented by other body components in older animals must increase complementarily. Under normal gravity conditions muscularity in small laboratory mammals displays large, systematic variation as a function both of species and age. This variation must be considered when such animals are subjects of experiments to study the effects of altered gravitational loading on the skeletal musculature of the mammal.

  10. Bacterial production of methyl ketones

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of methyl ketones in a genetically modified host cell that overproduces .beta.-ketoacyl-CoAs through a re-engineered .beta.-oxidation pathway and overexpresses FadM.

  11. The relationship between body mass and field metabolic rate among individual birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lawrence N; Isaac, Nick J B; Reuman, Daniel C

    2013-09-01

    1. The power-law dependence of metabolic rate on body mass has major implications at every level of ecological organization. However, the overwhelming majority of studies examining this relationship have used basal or resting metabolic rates, and/or have used data consisting of species-averaged masses and metabolic rates. Field metabolic rates are more ecologically relevant and are probably more directly subject to natural selection than basal rates. Individual rates might be more important than species-average rates in determining the outcome of ecological interactions, and hence selection. 2. We here provide the first comprehensive database of published field metabolic rates and body masses of individual birds and mammals, containing measurements of 1498 animals of 133 species in 28 orders. We used linear mixed-effects models to answer questions about the body mass scaling of metabolic rate and its taxonomic universality/heterogeneity that have become classic areas of controversy. Our statistical approach allows mean scaling exponents and taxonomic heterogeneity in scaling to be analysed in a unified way while simultaneously accounting for nonindependence in the data due to shared evolutionary history of related species. 3. The mean power-law scaling exponents of metabolic rate vs. body mass relationships were 0.71 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.625-0.795] for birds and 0.64 (95% CI 0.564-0.716) for mammals. However, these central tendencies obscured meaningful taxonomic heterogeneity in scaling exponents. The primary taxonomic level at which heterogeneity occurred was the order level. Substantial heterogeneity also occurred at the species level, a fact that cannot be revealed by species-averaged data sets used in prior work. Variability in scaling exponents at both order and species levels was comparable to or exceeded the differences 3/4-2/3 = 1/12 and 0.71-0.64. 4. Results are interpreted in the light of a variety of existing theories. In particular, results

  12. Effects of season, temperature, and body mass on the standard metabolic rate of tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae).

    PubMed

    Toledo, Luís F; Brito, Simone P; Milsom, William K; Abe, Augusto S; Andrade, Denis V

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This study examined how the standard metabolic rate of tegu lizards, a species that undergoes large ontogenetic changes in body weight with associated changes in life-history traits, is affected by changes in body mass, body temperature, season, and life-history traits. We measured rates of oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) in 90 individuals ranging in body mass from 10.4 g to 3.75 kg at three experimental temperatures (17 degrees , 25 degrees , and 30 degrees C) over the four seasons. We found that standard metabolic rate scaled to the power of 0.84 of body mass at all experimental temperatures in all seasons and that thermal sensitivity of metabolism was relatively low (Q(10) approximately 2.0-2.5) over the range from 17 degrees to 30 degrees C regardless of body size or season. Metabolic rates did vary seasonally, being higher in spring and summer than in autumn and winter at the same temperatures, and this was true regardless of animal size. Finally, in this study, the changes in life-history traits that occurred ontogenetically were not accompanied by significant changes in metabolic rate.

  13. A Cause of Permanent Ketosis: GLUT-1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Alexis; Vuillaumier-Barrot, Sandrine; Seta, Nathalie; Kuster, Alice

    2015-01-01

    GLUT-1-deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS; OMIM 606777) is a treatable metabolic disorder caused by a mutation of SLC2A1 gene. The functional deficiency of the GLUT1 protein leads to an impaired glucose transport into the brain, resulting in neurologic disorders.We report on a 6-month-old boy with preprandial malaises who was treated monthly by a sorcerer because of a permanent acetonemic odor. He subsequently developed pharmaco-resistant seizures with microcephaly and motor abnormalities. Metabolic explorations were unremarkable except for a fasting glucose test which revealed an abnormal increase of blood ketone bodies. At the age of 35 months, GLUT1-DS was diagnosed based on hypoglycorrhachia with a decreased CSF to blood glucose ratio, and subsequent direct sequencing of the SLC2A1 gene revealed a de novo heterozygous mutation, c.349A>T (p.Lys117X) on exon 4. It was noteworthy that the patient adapted to the deficient cerebral glucose transport by permanent ketone body production since early life. Excessive ketone body production in this patient provided an alternative energy substrate for his brain. We suggest a cerebral metabolic adaptation with upregulation of monocarboxylic acid transporter proteins (MCT1) at the blood-brain barrier provoked by neuroglycopenia and allowing ketone body utilization by the brain. This case illustrates that GLUT1-DS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of permanent ketosis.

  14. Medium-chain triglycerides in infant formulas and their relation to plasma ketone body concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wu, P Y; Edmond, J; Auestad, N; Rambathla, S; Benson, J; Picone, T

    1986-04-01

    A mild ketosis is known to prevail in the mother, fetus, and newborn infant during the 3rd trimester and in the early neonatal period. It has been shown that during an equivalent period in the rat ketone bodies are readily oxidized and serve as key substrates for lipogenesis in brain. Since medium-chain triglycerides are known to be ketogenic, preterm infants may benefit from dietary medium-chain triglycerides beyond the point of enhanced fat absorption. Our objective was to determine the ketogenic response in preterm infants (gestational age: 33 +/- 0.8 wk) fed three different isocaloric formulas by measuring the concentrations of 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate in the plasma of these infants. At the time of entrance to the study the infants were receiving 110 kcal/kg/24 h. Study I (11 infants): the infants were fed sequentially in the order; PM 60/40 (PM), Special Care Formula (SCF), and Similac 20 (SIM). In SCF greater than 50% of the fat consists of medium-chain length fatty acids while PM and SIM contain about 25%. The concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate in plasma was significantly higher when infants were fed SCF than PM and SIM [0.14 +/- 0.03, 0.06 +/- 0.01, and 0.05 +/- 0.01 mM, respectively (p less than 0.01)]. Study II (12 infants); the infants were fed SCF, then SIM, or the reverse. The concentration of acetoacetate in plasma was 0.05 +/- 0.01 and 0.03 +/- 0.01 mM when infants were fed SCF and SIM, respectively (0.1 greater than p greater than 0.05). The concentrations of 3-hydroxybutyrate in plasma were similar to those measured in study I for the respective formulas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Energy metabolism, body composition, and urea generation rate in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Sivakumar; Vilar, Enric; Berdeprado, Jocelyn; Farrington, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) adequacy is currently assessed using normalized urea clearance (Kt/V), although scaling based on Watson volume (V) may disadvantage women and men with low body weight. Alternative scaling factors such as resting energy expenditure and high metabolic rate organ mass have been suggested. The relationship between such factors and uremic toxin generation has not been established. We aimed to study the relationship between body size, energy metabolism, and urea generation rate. A cross-sectional cohort of 166 HD patients was studied. Anthropometric measurements were carried on all. Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry, fat-free mass by bio-impedance and total energy expenditure by combining resting energy expenditure with a questionnaire-derived physical activity data. High metabolic rate organ mass was calculated using a published equation and urea generation rate using formal urea kinetic modeling. Metabolic factors including resting energy expenditure, total energy expenditure and fat-free mass correlated better with urea generation rate than did Watson volume. Total energy expenditure and fat-free mass (but not Watson Volume) were independent predictors of urea generation rate, the model explaining 42% of its variation. Small women (metabolism, body composition and physical activity play important roles in small solute uremic toxin generation in HD patients and hence may impact on minimum dialysis requirements. Small women generate relatively more small solute toxins than other groups and thus may have a higher relative need for dialysis. © 2013 The Authors. Hemodialysis

  16. Plasticity in body temperature and metabolic capacity sustains winter activity in a small endotherm (Rattus fuscipes).

    PubMed

    Glanville, Elsa J; Seebacher, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Small mammals that remain active throughout the year at a constant body temperature have a much greater energy and food requirement in winter. Lower body temperatures in winter may offset the increased energetic cost of remaining active in the cold, if cellular metabolism is not constrained by a negative thermodynamic effect. We aimed to determine whether variable body temperatures can be advantageous for small endotherms by testing the hypothesis that body temperature fluctuates seasonally in a wild rat (Rattus fuscipes); conferring an energy saving and reducing food requirements during resource restricted winter. Additionally we tested whether changes in body temperature affected tissue specific metabolic capacity. Winter acclimatized rats had significantly lower body temperatures and thicker fur than summer acclimatized rats. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the activity of enzymes that control oxidative (citrate synthase, cytochrome c-oxidase) and anaerobic (lactate dehydrogenase) metabolism were elevated in winter and were not negatively affected by the lower body temperature. Energy transfer modeling showed that lower body temperatures in winter combined with increased fur thickness to confer a 25 kJ day(-1) energy saving, with up to 50% owing to reduced body temperature alone. We show that phenotypic plasticity at multiple levels of organization is an important component of the response of a small endotherm to winter. Mitochondrial function compensates for lower winter body temperatures, buffering metabolic heat production capacity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gas-chromatographic resolution of enantiomeric secondary alcohols. Stereoselective reductive metabolism of ketones in rabbit-liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Gal, J; DeVito, D; Harper, T W

    1981-01-01

    Chiral secondary alcohols were treated with (S)-(-)-1-phenylethyl isocyanate. For each racemic alcohol, the resulting diastereomeric urethane derivatives were resolved on flexible fused-silica capillary GLC columns with retention times of 15 min or less. Derivatization of individual enantiomers showed that the urethane derivatives of (R)-(-)-2-octanol, (R)-(+)-1-phenylethyl alcohol, and (S)-(+)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol are eluted before the corresponding diastereomers. The procedure is simple and rapid, and is suitable for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of chiral alcohols extracted from biological media. A series of aliphatic alcohols, aryl alkyl carbinols, and arylalkyl alkyl carbinols were resolved with the procedure, and the degree of resolution varied from good to excellent. Eight achiral ketones were incubated, individually, with rabbit-liver 90,000 g supernatant fractions, and the enantiomeric composition of the alcohol metabolites was determined with the GLC procedure. The reductions proceeded with high stereoselectivity to give alcohol products of 90% or greater enantiomeric purity. The reduction of 2-octanone and acetophenone gave predominant alcohols of (S)-configuration, in agreement with the Baumann-Prelog rule. The configuration of the predominant alcohols arising in the reduction of the remainder of the ketones could not be firmly established, but the evidence suggests that they are also of the (S)-configuration. Fluorine or methyl substitution in the ortho position of acetophenone produced an increase in the stereoselectivity, and the alcohol produced from ortho-methylacetophenone was enantiomerically greater than 99% pure.

  18. Stereoselective Borylative Ketone-Diene Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Yeon; Yu, Zhiyong; Morken, James P.

    2011-01-01

    In the presence of catalytic Ni(cod)2 and P(t-Bu)3, ketones, dienes, and B2(pin)2 undergo a stereoselective multicomponent coupling reaction. Upon oxidation, the reaction furnishes 1,3-diols as the major reaction product. PMID:21905748

  19. Metabolic, thermoregulatory, and perceptual responses during exercise after lower vs. whole body precooling.

    PubMed

    White, Andrea T; Davis, Scott L; Wilson, Thad E

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the thermoregulatory, metabolic, and perceptual effects of lower body (LBI) and whole body (WBI) immersion precooling techniques during submaximal exercise. Eleven healthy men completed two 30-min cycling bouts at 60% of maximal O(2) uptake preceded by immersion to the suprailiac crest (LBI) or clavicle (WBI) in 20 degrees C water. WBI produced significantly lower rectal temperature (T(re)) during minutes 24-30 of immersion and lower T(re), mean skin temperature, and mean body temperature for the first 24, 14, and 16 min of exercise, respectively. Body heat storage rates differed significantly for LBI and WBI during immersion and exercise, although no net differences were observed between conditions. For WBI, metabolic heat production and heart rate were significantly higher during immersion but not during exercise. Thermal sensation was significantly lower (felt colder) and thermal discomfort was significantly higher (less comfortable) for WBI during immersion and exercise. In conclusion, WBI and LBI attenuated T(re) increases during submaximal exercise and produced similar net heat storage over the protocol. LBI minimized metabolic increases and negative perceptual effects associated with WBI.

  20. Mammalian basal metabolic rate is proportional to body mass2/3

    PubMed Central

    White, Craig R.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between mammalian basal metabolic rate (BMR, ml of O2 per h) and body mass (M, g) has been the subject of regular investigation for over a century. Typically, the relationship is expressed as an allometric equation of the form BMR = aMb. The scaling exponent (b) is a point of contention throughout this body of literature, within which arguments for and against geometric (b = 2/3) and quarter-power (b = 3/4) scaling are made and rebutted. Recently, interest in the topic has been revived by published explanations for quarter-power scaling based on fractal nutrient supply networks and four-dimensional biology. Here, a new analysis of the allometry of mammalian BMR that accounts for variation associated with body temperature, digestive state, and phylogeny finds no support for a metabolic scaling exponent of 3/4. Data encompassing five orders of magnitude variation in M and featuring 619 species from 19 mammalian orders show that BMR ∝ M2/3. PMID:12637681

  1. Nutritional Ketosis Affects Metabolism and Behavior in Sprague-Dawley Rats in Both Control and Chronic Stress Environments

    PubMed Central

    Brownlow, Milene L.; Jung, Seung H.; Moore, Raquel J.; Bechmann, Naomi; Jankord, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional ketosis may enhance cerebral energy metabolism and has received increased interest as a way to improve or preserve performance and resilience. Most studies to date have focused on metabolic or neurological disorders while anecdotal evidence suggests that ketosis may enhance performance in the absence of underlying dysfunction. Moreover, decreased availability of glucose in the brain following stressful events is associated with impaired cognition, suggesting the need for more efficient energy sources. We tested the hypotheses that ketosis induced by endogenous or exogenous ketones could: (a) augment cognitive outcomes in healthy subjects; and (b) prevent stress-induced detriments in cognitive parameters. Adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were used to investigate metabolic and behavioral outcomes in 3 dietary conditions: ketogenic (KD), ketone supplemented (KS), or NIH-31 control diet in both control or chronic stress conditions. Acute administration of exogenous ketones resulted in reduction in blood glucose and sustained ketosis. Chronic experiments showed that in control conditions, only KD resulted in pronounced metabolic alterations and improved performance in the novel object recognition test. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response revealed that KD-fed rats maintained peripheral ketosis despite increases in glucose whereas no diet effects were observed in ACTH or CORT levels. Both KD and KS-fed rats decreased escape latencies on the third day of water maze, whereas only KD prevented stress-induced deficits on the last testing day and improved probe test performance. Stress-induced decrease in hippocampal levels of β-hydroxybutyrate was attenuated in KD group while both KD and KS prevented stress effects on BDNF levels. Mitochondrial enzymes associated with ketogenesis were increased in both KD and KS hippocampal samples and both endothelial and neuronal glucose transporters were affected by stress but only in the control diet group

  2. [Pollution Characteristics of Aldehydes and Ketones Compounds in the Exhaust of Beijing Typical Restaurants].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-chen; Cui, Tong; He, Wan-qing; Nie, Lei; Wang, Jun-ling; Pan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Aldehydes and ketones compounds, as one of the components in the exhaust of restaurants, are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with strong chemical reactivity. However, there is no systematic study on aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of restaurants. To further clarify the food source emission levels of aldehydes and ketones compounds and controlling measures, to access city group catering VOCs emissions control decision-making basis, this study selected 8 Beijing restaurants with different types. The aldehydes and ketones compounds were sampled using DNPH-silica tube, and then ultra performance liquid chromatography was used for quantitative measurement. The aldehydes and ketones concentrations of reference volume condition from 8 restaurants in descending order were Roasted Duck restaurant, Chinese Style Barbecue, Home Dishes, Western Fast-food, School Canteen, Chinese Style Fast-food, Sichuan Cuisine, Huaiyang Cuisine. The results showed that the range of aldehydes and ketones compounds (C1-C9) concentrations of reference volume condition in the exhaust of restaurants was 115.47-1035.99 microg x m(-3). The composition of aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of sampled restaurants was obviously different. The percentages of C1-C3 were above 40% in the exhaust from Chinese style restaurants. Fast food might emit more C4-C9 aldehydes and ketones compounds. From the current situation of existing aldehydes and ketones compounds control, the removal efficiency of high voltage electrostatic purifiers widely used in Beijing is limited.

  3. Presence and potential significance of aromatic-ketone groups in aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wilson, M.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Aquatic humic- and fulvic-acid standards of the International Humic Substances Society were characterized, with emphasis on carbonyl-group nature and content, by carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. After comparing spectral results of underivatized humic and fulvic acids with spectral results of chemically modified derivatives, that allow improved observation of the carbonyl group, the data clearly indicated that aromatic ketone groups comprised the majority of the carbonyl-group content. About one ketone group per monocyclic aromatic ring was determined for both humic and fulvic acids. Aromatic-ketone groups were hypothesized to form by photolytic rearrangements and oxidation of phenolic ester and hydrocarbon precursors; these groups have potential significance regarding haloform formation in water, reactivity resulting from active hydrogen of the methyl and methylene adjacent to the ketone groups, and formation of hemiketal and lactol structures. Aromatic-ketone groups also may be the point of attachment between aliphatic and aromatic moieties of aquatic humic-substance structure. ?? 1987.

  4. Metabolic sensing neurons and the control of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barry E

    2006-11-30

    The brain and periphery carry on a constant conversation; the periphery informs the brain about its metabolic needs and the brain provides for these needs through its control of somatomotor, autonomic and neurohumoral pathways involved in energy intake, expenditure and storage. Metabolic sensing neurons are the integrators of a variety of metabolic, humoral and neural inputs from the periphery. Such neurons, originally called "glucosensing", also respond to fatty acids, hormones and metabolites from the periphery. They are integrated within neural pathways involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Unlike most neurons, they utilize glucose and other metabolites as signaling molecules to regulate their membrane potential and firing rate. For glucosensing neurons, glucokinase acts as the rate-limiting step in glucosensing while the pathways that mediate responses to metabolites like lactate, ketone bodies and fatty acids are less well characterized. Many metabolic sensing neurons also respond to insulin and leptin and other peripheral hormones and receive neural inputs from peripheral organs. Each set of afferent signals arrives with different temporal profiles and by different routes and these inputs are summated at the level of the membrane potential to produce a given neural firing pattern. In some obese individuals, the relative sensitivity of metabolic sensing neurons to various peripheral inputs is genetically reduced. This may provide one mechanism underlying their propensity to become obese when exposed to diets high in fat and caloric density. Thus, metabolic sensing neurons may provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity.

  5. Electronic Interactions of Michler's Ketone with DNA Bases in Synthetic Hairpins.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Young, Ryan M; Eaton, Samuel W; Wasielewski, Michael R; Lewis, Frederick D

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism and dynamics of photoinduced electron transfer in two families of DNA hairpins possessing Michler's ketone linkers have been investigated by means of steady state and time-resolved transient absorption and emission spectroscopies. The excited state behavior of the diol linker employed in hairpin synthesis is similar to that of Michler's ketone in methanol solution. Hairpins possessing only a Michler's ketone linker undergo fast singlet state charge separation and charge recombination with an adjacent purine base, attributed to well-stacked ground state conformations, and intersystem crossing to the triplet state, attributed to poorly stacked ground state conformations. The failure of the triplet to undergo electron transfer reactions on the 7 ns time scale of our measurements is attributed to the low triplet energy and reduction potential of the twisted triplet state. Hairpins possessing both a Michler's ketone linker and a perylenediimide base surrogate separated by four base pairs undergo photoinduced hole transport from the diimide to Michler's ketone upon excitation of the diimide. The efficiency of hole transport is dependent upon the sequence of the intervening purine bases. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Volatilization is a significant process in determining the fate of many organic compounds in streams and rivers. Quantifying this process requires knowledge of the mass-transfer coefficient from water, which is a function of the gas-film and liquid-film coefficients. The gas-film coefficient can be determined by measuring the flux for the volatilization of pure organic liquids. Volatilization fluxes for acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured in the laboratory over a range of temperatures. Gas-film coefficients were then calculated from these fluxes and from vapor pressure data from the literature. An equation was developed for predicting the volatilization flux of pure liquid ketones as a function of vapor pressure and molecular weight. Large deviations were found for acetone, and these were attributed to the possibility that acetone may be hydrogen bonded. A second equation for predicting the flux as a function of molecular weight and temperature resulted in large deviations for 4methyl-2-pentanone. These deviations were attributed to the branched structure of this ketone. Four factors based on the theory of volatilization and relating the volatilization flux or rate to the vapor pressure, molecular weight, temperature, and molecular diffusion coefficient were not constant as suggested by the literature. The factors generally increased with molecular weight and with temperature. Values for acetone corresponded to ketones with a larger molecular weight, and the acetone factors showed the greatest dependence on temperature. Both of these results are characteristic of compounds that are hydrogen bonded. Relations from the literature commonly used for describing the dependence of the gas-film coefficient on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient were not applicable to the ketone gas-film coefficients. The dependence on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient was in

  7. Stereoselective borylative ketone-diene coupling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Yeon; Yu, Zhiyong; Morken, James P

    2011-10-07

    In the presence of catalytic Ni(cod)(2) and P(t-Bu)(3), ketones, dienes, and B(2)(pin)(2) undergo a stereoselective multicomponent coupling reaction. Upon oxidation, the reaction furnishes 1,3-diols as the major reaction product. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Metabolic costs of capital energy storage in a small-bodied ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Griffen, Blaine D

    2017-04-01

    Reproduction is energetically financed using strategies that fall along a continuum from animals that rely on stored energy acquired prior to reproduction (i.e., capital breeders) to those that rely on energy acquired during reproduction (i.e., income breeders). Energy storage incurs a metabolic cost. However, previous studies suggest that this cost may be minimal for small-bodied ectotherms. Here I test this assumption. I use a laboratory feeding experiment with the European green crab Carcinus maenas to establish individuals with different amounts of energy storage. I then demonstrate that differences in energy storage account for 26% of the variation in basal metabolic costs. The magnitudes of these costs for any individual crab vary through time depending on the amount of energy it has stored, as well as on temperature-dependent metabolism. I use previously established relationships between temperature- and mass-dependent metabolic rates, combined with a feasible annual pattern of energy storage in the Gulf of Maine and annual sea surface temperature patterns in this region, to estimate potential annual metabolic costs expected for mature female green crabs. Results indicate that energy storage should incur an ~8% increase in metabolic costs for female crabs, relative to a hypothetical crab that did not store any energy. Translated into feeding, for a medium-sized mature female (45 mm carapace width), this requires the consumption of an additional ~156 mussels annually to support the metabolic cost of energy storage. These results indicate, contrary to previous assumptions, that the cost of energy storage for small-bodied ectotherms may represent a considerable portion of their basic operating energy budget. An inability to meet these additional costs of energy storage may help explain the recent decline of green crabs in the Gulf of Maine where reduced prey availability and increased consumer competition have combined to hamper green crab foraging success in

  9. Gallium (III) triflate catalyzed efficient Strecker reaction of ketones and their fluorinated analogs

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Mathew, Thomas; Panja, Chiradeep; Alconcel, Steevens; Vaghoo, Habiba; Do, Clement; Olah, George A.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of α-aminonitriles and their fluorinated analogs has been carried out in high yield and purity by the Strecker reaction from the corresponding ketones and amines with trimethylsilyl cyanide using gallium triflate in dichloromethane. Monofluoro-, difluro-, or trifluoromethyl groups can be incorporated into the α-aminonitrile product by varying the nature of the fluorinated ketones. Study with various fluorinated and nonfluorinated ketones reveals that the choice of proper catalyst and the solvent system (suitable metal triflates as a catalyst and dichloromethane as a solvent) plays the key role in the direct Strecker reactions of ketones. PMID:17360416

  10. The influence of metabolic heat production on body temperature of a small lizard, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard P; Au, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Little is known about the impact of increased metabolism on body temperatures of small ectotherms. We found that postprandial metabolic rates of 5 g Anolis carolinensis lizards were elevated by factorial increases of 2.3+/-1.0 (mean+/-S.E.) at 26 degrees C and 3.8+/-2.1 at 30 degrees C over their fasting rates. Cloacal body temperatures exceeded environmental temperatures by a small amount in fasted individuals (26 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C), and by a significantly larger amount in fed individuals (26 degrees C: 1.0+/-0.06 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.8+/-0.08 degrees C). We conclude that an increased metabolic rate due to specific dynamic action leads to a small but significant elevation of body temperature in this species. Comparisons with thermal increments reported for a large (750 g) varanid lizard suggest that body size has only a minor influence on body-air temperature differentials of ectotherms. This is consistent with theoretical predictions. Finally, endogenous heat production could help elevate body temperatures in the wild and therefore play a minor role in thermoregulation.

  11. Rhodium Catalyzed Intramolecular C-H Insertion of α-Aryl-α-diazo Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Douglass F.; Tian, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    Direct diazo transfer proceeds smoothly with α-aryl ketones. The derived α-aryl-α-diazo ketones cyclize efficiently with Rh catalysis to give the corresponding α-aryl cyclopentanones. PMID:17385917

  12. Hormonal and metabolic responses to endurance exercise in children with Prader-Willi syndrome and non-syndromic obesity.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniela A; Clark, Susan J; Ng, Jason; Castner, Diobel M; Haqq, Andrea M; Judelson, Daniel A

    2015-03-01

    Excess adiposity affects endocrine and metabolic function at rest and during exercise. This study evaluated the endocrine and metabolic responses to exercise in syndromic (Prader-Willi syndrome) and non-syndromic pediatric obesity. Eleven PWS (10.9±1.6 y, 45.4±9.5% body fat), 12 lean (9.4±1.2 y, 17.5±4.6% body fat), and 12 obese (9.2±1.2 y, 39.9±6.8% body fat) children completed ten two-minute cycling exercise bouts, separated by one-minute rest. Blood samples were obtained at rest pre-exercise (PRE), immediately post-exercise (IP), and 15, 30 and 60 minutes into recovery. Samples were analyzed for hormones and metabolites. Growth hormone increased in response to exercise in lean and obese but not PWS (IP>PRE; IP: lean>obese). Epinephrine increased with exercise in lean (IP>PRE), while norepinephrine increased in lean and obese (IP>PRE) but not PWS; no differences were observed between lean and obese groups at IP. No other significant hormonal group interactions existed. Glucose, lactate, free fatty acid, glycerol and ketone responses were similar among groups. PWS children exhibited altered stress hormone responses to exercise. However, glucose-regulating hormones and metabolic responses to exercise appeared normal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  14. Acyl hydrazides as acyl donors for the synthesis of diaryl and aryl alkyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Akhbar, Ahmed R; Chudasama, Vijay; Fitzmaurice, Richard J; Powell, Lyn; Caddick, Stephen

    2014-01-21

    In this communication we describe a novel strategy for the formation of valuable diaryl and aryl alkyl ketones from acyl hydrazides. A wide variety of ketones are prepared and the mild reaction conditions allow for the use of a range of functionalities, especially in the synthesis of diaryl ketones.

  15. Influence of sulfur oxidation state and steric bulk upon trifluoromethyl ketone (TFK) binding kinetics to carboxylesterases and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Nishi, Kosuke; Ying, Andy; Jones, Paul D.; Colvin, Michael E.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Carboxylesterases metabolize numerous exogenous and endogenous ester-containing compounds including the chemotherapeutic agent CPT-11, anti-influenza viral agent oseltamivir and many agrochemicals. Trifluoromethyl ketone (TFK)-containing compounds with a sulfur atom beta to the ketone moiety are some of the most potent carboxylesterase and amidase inhibitors identified to date. This study examined the effects of alkyl chain length (i.e., steric effects) and sulfur oxidation state upon TFK inhibitor potency (IC50) and binding kinetics (ki). The selective carboxylesterase inhibitor benzil was used as a non-TFK containing control. These effects were examined using two commercial esterases (porcine and rabbit liver esterase) and two human recombinant esterases (hCE-1 and hCE-2) as well as human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In addition, the inhibition mechanism was examined using a combination of 1H NMR, X-ray crystallography and ab initio calculations. Overall, the data show that while sulfur oxidation state profoundly affects both inhibitor potency and binding kinetics, the steric effects dominate and override the contributions of sulfur oxidation. In addition, the data suggest that inclusion of a sulfur atom beta to the ketone contributes an increase (~5-fold) in inhibitor potency due to effects upon ketone hydration and/or intramolecular hydrogen bond formation. These results provide further information on the nature of the TFK binding interaction and will be useful in increasing our understanding of this basic biochemical process. PMID:18023188

  16. Artificial photosynthesis of. beta. -ketocarboxylic acids from carbon dioxide and ketones via enolate complexes of aluminum porphyrin

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hirai, Yasuhiro; Aida, Takuzo; Inoue, Shohei

    1989-04-12

    Photochemical fixation of carbon dioxide is of much interest in connection with biological photosynthesis by green plants as well as from the viewpoint of carbon resource utilization. One of the important steps in the assimilation of carbon dioxide is the carboxylation of a carbonyl compound into ketocarboxylic acid, where the reaction proceeds via an enolate species as reactive intermediate. For example, in four carbon (C{sub 4}) pathway and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) processes, pyruvate is converted with the aid of ATP into phosphoenolpyruvate, which is subsequently carboxylated to give oxaloacetate by the action of pyruvate carboxylase. In relation to thismore » interesting biological process, some artificial systems have been exploited for the synthesis of {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid derivatives from carbon dioxide and ketones using nucleophiles such as metal carbonates, thiazolates, phenolates, alkoxides, and strong organic as well as inorganic basis, which promote the enolization of ketones in the intermediate step. We wish to report here a novel, visible light-induced fixation of carbon dioxide with the enolate complex of aluminum porphyrin, giving {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid under mild conditions.« less

  17. The effect of caffeine and albuterol on body composition and metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ann G.; Arceneaux, Kenneth P.; Chu, Jessica T.; Jacob, Gregory; Schreiber, Allyson L.; Tipton, Russell C.; Yu, Ying; Johnson, William D.; Greenway, Frank L.; Primeaux, Stefany D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Caffeine and ephedrine was an effective combination therapy for weight loss until ephedrine was removed from the market due to safety concerns. We investigated the combination of caffeine and albuterol as a possibly safer alternative to ephedrine. Design and Methods In a series of experiments using cultured adipocytes, rat models, and humans, we evaluated the effects of caffeine and albuterol on lipolysis, metabolic rate, food intake, and body composition. Results Both caffeine and albuterol enhanced lipolysis in cultured adipocytes. Acute treatment of humans with caffeine and/or albuterol increased resting metabolic rate. Longer-term studies of rats revealed a trend for increased metabolic rate with albuterol treatment. There was increased lean mass gain concurrent with decreased fat mass gain with caffeine/albuterol treatment that was greater than albuterol treatment alone. Conclusions In rats, albuterol with caffeine produced significantly greater increases in lean body mass and reductions in fat mass without changes in food intake after 4-8 weeks of treatment. Since caffeine and albuterol are approved for the treatment of asthma in children and adolescents at the doses tested and change body composition without changing food intake, this combination may deserve further exploration for use in treating pediatric obesity. PMID:26239482

  18. ESR, electrochemical and cyclodextrin-inclusion studies of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones and dipyridyl ketones derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olea-Azar, C.; Abarca, B.; Norambuena, E.; Opazo, L.; Jullian, C.; Valencia, S.; Ballesteros, R.; Chadlaoui, M.

    2008-11-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of free radicals obtained by electrolytic reduction of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones and dipyridyl ketones derivatives were measured in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The hyperfine patterns indicate that the spin density delocalization is dependent of the rings presented in the molecule. The electrochemistry of these compounds was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, in DMSO as solvent. When one carbonyl is present in the molecule one step in the reduction mechanism was observed while two carbonyl are present two steps were detected. The first wave was assigned to the generation of the correspondent free radical species, and the second wave was assigned to the dianion derivatives. The phase-solubility measurements indicated an interaction between molecules selected and cyclodextrins in water. These inclusion complexes are 1:1 with βCD, and HP-βCD. The values of Ks showed a different kind of complexes depending on which rings are included. AM1 and DFT calculations were performed to obtain the optimized geometries, theoretical hyperfine constants, and spin distributions, respectively. The theoretical results are in complete agreement with the experimental ones.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  2. Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are less sensitive to the odor of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Moa; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Aliphatic ketones are widely present in body-borne and food odors of primates. Therefore, we used an operant conditioning paradigm and determined olfactory detection thresholds in four spider monkeys for a homologous series of aliphatic 2-ketones (2-butanone to 2-nonanone) and two of their isomers (3- and 4-heptanone). We found that, with the exception of the two shortest-chained ketones, all animals detected concentrations <1 ppm (parts per million), and with five odorants individual animals even reached threshold values <0.1 ppm. Further, we found a significant correlation between olfactory sensitivity of the spider monkeys and carbon chain length of the 2-ketones which can best be described as a U-shaped function. In contrast, no significant correlation was found between olfactory sensitivity and position of the functional carbonyl group. Across-odorant and across-species comparisons revealed the following: spider monkeys are significantly less sensitive to the odors of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds (1-alcohols, n-aldehydes, n-acetic esters, and n-carboxylic acids) sharing the same carbon length. Spider monkeys do not differ significantly in their olfactory sensitivity for aliphatic ketones from squirrel monkeys and pigtail macaques, but are significantly less sensitive to these odorants compared to human subjects and mice. These findings support the notion that neuroanatomical and genetic properties do not allow for reliable predictions with regard to a species' olfactory sensitivity. Further, we conclude that the frequency of occurrence of a class of odorants in a species' chemical environment does not allow for reliable predictions of the species' olfactory sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of a 3-day fast and of ethanol on splanchnic metabolism of FFA, amino acids, and carbohydrates in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, B M; Havel, J R; Marliss, E B; Kane, J P; Seymour, J; Ahuja, S P

    1976-02-01

    Splanchnic metabolism was studied to quantify changes underlying the fatty liver, hyperlipemia, and hypoglycemia produced by ethanol. Four subjects fasted for 15 h were compared with five subjects fasted for 69 h under basal conditions and during continuous intravenous infusion of sufficient ethanol to give a concentration of 3-5 mM in arterial blood plasma. Splanchnic storage of fatty acids was estimated from the difference between uptake of FFA and secretion of derived products. Basal values for splanchnic uptake of FFA were twofold higher after the 69-h fast while splanchnic storage of fatty acids and production of ketone bodies increased threefold. Values for basal secreation into the blood of triglycerides derived from FFA were similar in the two groups. In both nutritional states, the fraction of FFA taken up in the splanchnic region oxidized to ketone bodies and to CO2 fell when ethanol was given because of preferential oxidation of ethanol to acetate, and the fraction esterified rose. However, systemic transport and splanchnic uptake of FFA fell with ethanol in subjects fasted 15 h, so that neither storage of triglycerides in splanchnic tissues nor secretion into the blood increased. In subjects fasted 69 h, ethanol increased transport of FFA and splanchnic storage of fat. In all but one subject it also increased secretion of triglycerides into the blood. The concentration of glucose in blood fell during ethanol infusion in all five subjects undergoing the 69-h fast. Mean splanchnic glucose production was maintained at about one-half of the pre-ethanol value, despite virtual cessation of splanchnic uptake of lactate and of those amino acids that are metabolized via malate. Quantitative estimates of extrasplanchnic metabolism suggest that enhanced formation of alpha-glycerophosphate from glucose, in addition to impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis, may contribute to ethanol-induced hypoglycemia in man.

  4. Effects of very-low-carbohydrate (horsemeat- or beef-based) diets and restricted feeding on weight gain, feed and energy efficiency, as well as serum levels of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, insulin and ketone bodies in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Youn; Yang, Young-Hoon; Kim, Choong-Nam; Lee, Chong-Eon; Kim, Kyu-Il

    2008-01-01

    The beneficial or harmful effect of the low-carbohydrate (low-carb), high-protein, high-fat diet (Atkins diet) has not been clearly demonstrated. We determined the effect of a low-carb diet and restricted feeding (70% ad libitum intake) on serum levels of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, ketone bodies and insulin in rats. In experiment 1, each of 4 groups with 10 adult rats was assigned to a high-carb diet (AIN-93G) + ad libitum intake or restricted feeding, or a low-carb diet (53% horsemeat) + ad libitum intake or restricted feeding (2 x 2 factorial). In experiment 2, each of 3 groups with 10 adult rats was assigned to a control (AIN-93G) or low-carb diets (53% beef or horsemeat). Restricted feeding and the low-carb diet reduced (p<0.01) serum triacylglycerol compared with ad libitum intake and the AIN-93G diet, respectively (experiment 1). The dietary effect on serum total cholesterol, high-density or low-density lipid cholesterol appeared to be inconsistent, but restricted feeding increased the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The serum ketone body level was increased by the low-carb diet compared with AIN-93G (experiment 2). Restricted feeding and a low-carb diet are beneficial for alleviating cardiovascular disease risk factors, and their effects are additive, restricted feeding being more pronounced. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Effect of oral cinnamon intervention on metabolic profile and body composition of Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome: a randomized double -blind control trial.

    PubMed

    Gupta Jain, Sonal; Puri, Seema; Misra, Anoop; Gulati, Seema; Mani, Kalaivani

    2017-06-12

    Nutritional modulation remains central to the management of metabolic syndrome. Intervention with cinnamon in individuals with metabolic syndrome remains sparsely researched. We investigated the effect of oral cinnamon consumption on body composition and metabolic parameters of Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome. In this 16-week double blind randomized control trial, 116 individuals with metabolic syndrome were randomized to two dietary intervention groups, cinnamon [6 capsules (3 g) daily] or wheat flour [6 capsules (2.5 g) daily]. Body composition, blood pressure and metabolic parameters were assessed. Significantly greater decrease [difference between means, (95% CI)] in fasting blood glucose (mmol/L) [0.3 (0.2, 0.5) p = 0.001], glycosylated haemoglobin (mmol/mol) [2.6 (0.4, 4.9) p = 0.023], waist circumference (cm) [4.8 (1.9, 7.7) p = 0.002] and body mass index (kg/m2 ) [1.3 (0.9, 1.5) p = 0.001] was observed in the cinnamon group compared to placebo group. Other parameters which showed significantly greater improvement were: waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Prevalence of defined metabolic syndrome was significantly reduced in the intervention group (34.5%) vs. the placebo group (5.2%). A single supplement intervention with 3 g cinnamon for 16 weeks resulted in significant improvements in all components of metabolic syndrome in a sample of Asian Indians in north India. The clinical trial was retrospectively registered (after the recruitment of the participants) in ClinicalTrial.gov under the identification number: NCT02455778 on 25th May 2015.

  6. Iridium-Catalyzed Diastereoselective and Enantioselective Allylic Substitutions with Acyclic α-Alkoxy Ketones

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xingyu; Chen, Wenyong; Hartwig, John F.

    2016-04-01

    The asymmetric alkylation of acyclic ketones is a longstanding challenge in organic synthesis. Here, are the diastereoselective and enantioselective allylic substitutions with acyclic α-alkoxy ketones catalyzed by a metallacyclic iridium complex to form products with contiguous stereogenic centers derived from the nucleophile and electrophile. These reactions occur between allyl methyl carbonates and unstabilized copper(I) enolates generated in situ from acyclic α-alkoxy ketones. The resulting products can be readily converted into enantioenriched tertiary alcohols and tetrahydrofuran derivatives without erosion of enantiomeric purity.

  7. Iridium-Catalyzed Diastereoselective and Enantioselective Allylic Substitutions with Acyclic α-Alkoxy Ketones

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jiang, Xingyu; Chen, Wenyong; Hartwig, John F.

    The asymmetric alkylation of acyclic ketones is a longstanding challenge in organic synthesis. Here, are the diastereoselective and enantioselective allylic substitutions with acyclic α-alkoxy ketones catalyzed by a metallacyclic iridium complex to form products with contiguous stereogenic centers derived from the nucleophile and electrophile. These reactions occur between allyl methyl carbonates and unstabilized copper(I) enolates generated in situ from acyclic α-alkoxy ketones. The resulting products can be readily converted into enantioenriched tertiary alcohols and tetrahydrofuran derivatives without erosion of enantiomeric purity.

  8. Enantioselective synthesis of 2,2-disubstituted terminal epoxides via catalytic asymmetric Corey-Chaykovsky epoxidation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Sone, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Akitake; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2012-02-07

    Catalytic asymmetric Corey-Chaykovsky epoxidation of various ketones with dimethyloxosulfonium methylide using a heterobimetallic La-Li(3)-BINOL complex (LLB) is described. The reaction proceeded smoothly at room temperature in the presence of achiral phosphine oxide additives, and 2,2-disubstituted terminal epoxides were obtained in high enantioselectivity (97%-91% ee) and yield ( > 99%-88%) from a broad range of methyl ketones with 1-5 mol% catalyst loading. Enantioselectivity was strongly dependent on the steric hindrance, and other ketones, such as ethyl ketones and propyl ketones resulted in slightly lower enantioselectivity (88%-67% ee).

  9. Fasting induces a biphasic adaptive metabolic response in murine small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Sokolović, Milka; Wehkamp, Diederik; Sokolović, Aleksandar; Vermeulen, Jacqueline; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A; van Haaften, Rachel IM; Nikolsky, Yuri; Evelo, Chris TA; van Kampen, Antoine HC; Hakvoort, Theodorus BM; Lamers, Wouter H

    2007-01-01

    Background The gut is a major energy consumer, but a comprehensive overview of the adaptive response to fasting is lacking. Gene-expression profiling, pathway analysis, and immunohistochemistry were therefore carried out on mouse small intestine after 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of fasting. Results Intestinal weight declined to 50% of control, but this loss of tissue mass was distributed proportionally among the gut's structural components, so that the microarrays' tissue base remained unaffected. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarrays revealed that the successive time points separated into distinct branches. Pathway analysis depicted a pronounced, but transient early response that peaked at 12 hours, and a late response that became progressively more pronounced with continued fasting. Early changes in gene expression were compatible with a cellular deficiency in glutamine, and metabolic adaptations directed at glutamine conservation, inhibition of pyruvate oxidation, stimulation of glutamate catabolism via aspartate and phosphoenolpyruvate to lactate, and enhanced fatty-acid oxidation and ketone-body synthesis. In addition, the expression of key genes involved in cell cycling and apoptosis was suppressed. At 24 hours of fasting, many of the early adaptive changes abated. Major changes upon continued fasting implied the production of glucose rather than lactate from carbohydrate backbones, a downregulation of fatty-acid oxidation and a very strong downregulation of the electron-transport chain. Cell cycling and apoptosis remained suppressed. Conclusion The changes in gene expression indicate that the small intestine rapidly looses mass during fasting to generate lactate or glucose and ketone bodies. Meanwhile, intestinal architecture is maintained by downregulation of cell turnover. PMID:17925015

  10. Fasting induces a biphasic adaptive metabolic response in murine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Sokolović, Milka; Wehkamp, Diederik; Sokolović, Aleksandar; Vermeulen, Jacqueline; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A; van Haaften, Rachel I M; Nikolsky, Yuri; Evelo, Chris T A; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Hakvoort, Theodorus B M; Lamers, Wouter H

    2007-10-09

    The gut is a major energy consumer, but a comprehensive overview of the adaptive response to fasting is lacking. Gene-expression profiling, pathway analysis, and immunohistochemistry were therefore carried out on mouse small intestine after 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of fasting. Intestinal weight declined to 50% of control, but this loss of tissue mass was distributed proportionally among the gut's structural components, so that the microarrays' tissue base remained unaffected. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarrays revealed that the successive time points separated into distinct branches. Pathway analysis depicted a pronounced, but transient early response that peaked at 12 hours, and a late response that became progressively more pronounced with continued fasting. Early changes in gene expression were compatible with a cellular deficiency in glutamine, and metabolic adaptations directed at glutamine conservation, inhibition of pyruvate oxidation, stimulation of glutamate catabolism via aspartate and phosphoenolpyruvate to lactate, and enhanced fatty-acid oxidation and ketone-body synthesis. In addition, the expression of key genes involved in cell cycling and apoptosis was suppressed. At 24 hours of fasting, many of the early adaptive changes abated. Major changes upon continued fasting implied the production of glucose rather than lactate from carbohydrate backbones, a downregulation of fatty-acid oxidation and a very strong downregulation of the electron-transport chain. Cell cycling and apoptosis remained suppressed. The changes in gene expression indicate that the small intestine rapidly looses mass during fasting to generate lactate or glucose and ketone bodies. Meanwhile, intestinal architecture is maintained by downregulation of cell turnover.

  11. Phosphine-catalyzed cycloadditions of allenic ketones: new substrates for nucleophilic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Debra J; Sidda, Rachel L; Reamer, Robert A

    2007-02-02

    A range of phosphine-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions of allenic ketones have been studied, extending the scope of these processes from the more widely used 2,3-butadienoates to allow access to a number of synthetically useful products. Reaction of allenyl methyl ketone 4 with exo-enones afforded spirocyclic compounds in good regioselectivity and promising enantioselectivity via a [2 + 3] cycloaddtion. Aromatic allenyl ketones undergo a phosphine-promoted dimerization to afford functionalized pyrans, leading to a formal [2 + 4] Diels-Alder product, but did not react in the [2 + 3] cycloaddition. The results from other reactions that had found utility with 2,3-butadienoates are also reported.

  12. Whole body protein metabolism in children with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, S E; Pearson, A D; Craft, A W; Kernahan, J; Wyllie, R A; Price, L; Brock, C; Hetherington, C; Halliday, D; Bartlett, K

    1996-01-01

    Whole body protein synthesis and catabolism were measured using the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine and [1-13C]leucine primed constant infusion technique in 32 paediatric patients with cancer at different stages of treatment. Rates of synthesis (S) and catabolism (C) derived from the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine and [1-13C]leucine models were 4.7 (SD 1.3) (S) and 6.0 (1.5) (C) g/d/kg, and 5.5 (0.8) (S) and 6.8 (1.2) (C) g/d/kg, respectively. These results show that these two tracer techniques give similar results in this study population. Comparison of these values with results previously reported for groups of control children using the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine model (S = 3.69 and 3.93; C = 4.09 and 4.28 g/d/kg) and the [1-13C]leucine model (S = 4.32; C = 4.85 g/d/kg) show that rates of synthesis and catabolism were higher in cancer patients than in controls. Thus whole body protein turnover is increased in children under treatment for cancer. Other indices of metabolism such as plasma amino acids and intermediary metabolites were also measured and showed that, although subjects were in isotopic steady state, there were significant metabolic changes during the course of the primed constant infusions used to measure protein turnover. PMID:8984910

  13. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan

    2004-09-01

    This article describes the history of the reaction converting carboxylic acids to ketones. The reaction has been rediscovered several times, yet has actually been known for centuries. The best known version of the process is the Dakin West reaction (1928), which applies to α-amino acids and also involves the simultaneous conversion of the amine group to amido functionality. Unlike other examples, this particular reaction has attracted a reasonable amount of attention and it appears to be better known than the conversion of simple carboxylic acids to ketones. However, this reaction was described as long ago as 1612, when Beguin published an account of it in his book, Tyrocinium Chymicum . Since then, many chemists have rediscovered the reaction, apparently independently. One of the earliest modern accounts was by W. H. Perkin, Sr., in 1886, who made various simple ketones by refluxing the appropriate carboxylic acids with base. However, this work has been largely ignored, including by his son, W. H. Perkin, Jr., who used a more complicated base-catalyzed ketonization to prepare small ring compounds in the early years of the 20th century. Other articles detailing the application of ketonization to organic acids are discussed, including our own work, which employed the process to crosslink carboxylated polymers for possible technical application in coatings. Despite its relative obscurity, the reaction was used by Woodward et al. in the total synthesis of strychnine, reported in 1963, and this is discussed in detail at the end of the article. See Featured Molecules .

  14. Efficient palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohu; Liu, Delong; Xie, Fang; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Wanbin

    2011-03-21

    Palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of ketones, via enamines generated in situ as nucleophiles, were carried out smoothly with chiral metallocene-based P,N-ligands. Under the same conditions, however, reactions of aldehydes could hardly be observed. Subsequently, this obstacle was resolved by using chiral metallocene-based P,P-ligands. Both ketones and aldehydes afforded excellent enantioselectivities with up to 98% ee and 94% ee, respectively.

  15. Body Temperature and Energy Metabolism of Brown Lemming in Relation to Running Speed,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    ADASOG 382 ARCTIC INST OF NORTH AMERICA ARLINGTON VA F/B 6/16 BOOT TEMPERATURE AND ENERGY METABOLISM OF BROWN LEMMING IN RELA--ETC(U) W4LSIID 1979 T...M CASEY N00014-75-C-0635UNCLASSIFIEDh l o I - Body temperature and energy metabolism *of brown lemming in relation to running speed) by Timothy M...Casey Dept. of E. Physiology Cook College, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 C2 Running head: Metabolism and Tb of running lemmings. ALU

  16. Interaction of gabaergic ketones with model membranes: A molecular dynamics and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Virginia; Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; García, Daniel A

    2018-08-01

    γ-Aminobutyric-acid receptor (GABA A -R), a membrane intrinsic protein, is activated by GABA and modulated by a wide variety of recognized drugs. GABA A -R is also target for several insecticides which act by recognition of a non-competitive blocking site. Mentha oil is rich in several ketones with established activity against various insects/pests. Considering that mint ketones are highly lipophilic, their action mechanism could involve, at least in part, a non-specific receptor modulation by interacting with the surrounding lipids. In the present work, we studied in detail the effect on membranes of five cyclic ketones present in mint plants, with demonstrated insecticide and gabaergic activity. Particularly, we have explored their effect on the organization and dynamics of the membrane, by using Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation studies in a bilayer model of DPPC. We performed free diffusion MD and obtained spatially resolved free energy profiles of ketones partition into bilayers based on umbrella sampling. The most favored location of ketones in the membrane corresponded to the lower region of the carbonyl groups. Both hydrocarbon chains were slightly affected by the presence of ketones, presenting an ordering effect for the methylene groups closer to the carbonyl. MD simulations results were also contrasted with experimental data from fluorescence anisotropy studies which evaluate changes in membrane fluidity. In agreement, these assays indicated that the presence of ketones between lipid molecules induced an enhancement of the intermolecular interaction, increasing the molecular order throughout the bilayer thickness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fat body glycogen serves as a metabolic safeguard for the maintenance of sugar levels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayuki; Habara, Okiko; Kubo, Hitomi; Nishimura, Takashi

    2018-03-14

    Adapting to changes in food availability is a central challenge for survival. Glucose is an important resource for energy production, and therefore many organisms synthesize and retain sugar storage molecules. In insects, glucose is stored in two different forms: the disaccharide trehalose and the branched polymer glycogen. Glycogen is synthesized and stored in several tissues, including in muscle and the fat body. Despite the major role of the fat body as a center for energy metabolism, the importance of its glycogen content remains unclear. Here, we show that glycogen metabolism is regulated in a tissue-specific manner under starvation conditions in the fruit fly Drosophila The mobilization of fat body glycogen in larvae is independent of Adipokinetic hormone (Akh, the glucagon homolog) but is regulated by sugar availability in a tissue-autonomous manner. Fat body glycogen plays a crucial role in the maintenance of circulating sugars, including trehalose, under fasting conditions. These results demonstrate the importance of fat body glycogen as a metabolic safeguard in Drosophila . © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The control of fatty acid metabolism in liver cells from fed and starved sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, M A; Donaldson, I A; Pogson, C I

    1983-01-01

    Isolated liver cells prepared from starved sheep converted palmitate into ketone bodies at twice the rate seen with cells from fed animals. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation only in liver cells from fed sheep, and completely abolished the difference between fed and starved animals in palmitate oxidation. The rates of palmitate oxidation to CO2 and of octanoate oxidation to ketone bodies and CO2 were not affected by starvation or carnitine. Neither starvation nor carnitine altered the ratio of 3-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate or the rate of esterification of [1-14C]palmitate. Propionate, lactate, pyruvate and fructose inhibited ketogenesis from palmitate in cells from fed sheep. Starvation or the addition of carnitine decreased the antiketogenic effectiveness of gluconeogenic precursors. Propionate was the most potent inhibitor of ketogenesis, 0.8 mM producing 50% inhibition. Propionate, lactate, fructose and glycerol increased palmitate esterification under all conditions examined. Lactate, pyruvate and fructose stimulated oxidation of palmitate and octanoate to CO2. Starvation and the addition of gluconeogenic precursors stimulated apparent palmitate utilization by cells. Propionate, lactate and pyruvate decreased cellular long-chain acylcarnitine concentrations. Propionate decreased cell contents of CoA and acyl-CoA. It is suggested that propionate may control hepatic ketogenesis by acting at some point in the beta-oxidation sequence. The results are discussed in relation to the differences in the regulation of hepatic fatty acid metabolism between sheep and rats. PMID:6615480

  19. Whole-body metabolism varies across the estrous cycle in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Parker, G C; McKee, M E; Bishop, C; Coscina, D V

    2001-10-01

    Food intake in rats and other mammals is lowest at estrus and highest at diestrus. While much is known about the effects of different estrous phases on energy intake, as well as some of the metabolic effects the associated hormones exert, little has been reported about changes in whole-body metabolism that accompany those phases. This study investigates how energy expenditure (EE) and respiratory quotient (RQ) vary in intact female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) tested mid-light cycle over 2 h on days associated with estrus vs. diestrus. Rats showed small but reliable decreases in body weight on days associated with estrus, but not diestrus. EE was significantly increased by approximately 21% on the day associated with estrus compared to diestrus. At the same time, RQ was significantly decreased by approximately 7% on the day associated with estrus, indicating a relative shift to fat over carbohydrate as the energy substrate to support energetic needs. Future investigations of ingestive processes can integrate the present findings to investigate how gender differences in feeding and metabolism contribute to regulatory behaviors.

  20. Versatile Alkylation of (Hetero)Aryl Iodides with Ketones via β-C(sp3)-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ru-Yi; Liu, Luo-Yan; Park, Han Seul; Hong, Kai; Wu, Yongwei; Senanayake, Chris H; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-11-15

    We report Pd(II)-catalyzed β-C(sp 3 )-H (hetero)arylation of a variety of ketones using a commercially available 2,2-dimethyl aminooxyacetic acid auxiliary. Facile installation and removal of the auxiliary as well as its superior scope for both ketones and (hetero)aryl iodides overcome the significant limitations of the previously reported β-C(sp 3 )-H arylation of ketones. The ready availability of ketones renders this reaction a broadly useful method for alkyl-(hetero)aryl coupling involving both primary and secondary alkyls.

  1. Photochemical Production of Aldehydes and Ketones from Petroleum Films on Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, M. A.; Rebet, K.; Monin, L.; Bastian, G.

    2016-02-01

    While numerous reports have demonstrated that sunlight results in oxygenation of petroleum in environmental systems, few details are available regarding the specific mechanisms of these reactions. Previous studies have not been able to identify specific chemicals formed when oil is subjected to photochemical transformation. In this study, we have utilized several petroleum samples to investigate the formation of aldehyde and ketone photoproducts. These samples included oil from the MC252 well (source of the Deepwater Horizon spill), surrogate oil provided by BP to represent the MC252 oil, and residual fuel oil (NIST 2717a). Thin films of oil ( 100 μm) were placed over water and irradiated with a solar simulator for the equivalent of 1.5-12 days. After irradiation, the water was carefully separated from the oil and derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, a selective derivatization agent for aldehydes and ketones. The derivatized material was then analyzed by HPLC. Additional analysis by electrospray MS was also performed, and absorbance and fluorescence spectra of the underivatized aqueous phase were recorded. For all oils, exposure to sunlight resulted in release of aldehydes and ketones to the aqueous phase. The amount of released photoproducts was proportional to the length of solar exposure, but no production was seen for dark controls. Despite some similarities, the pattern of product formation varied from oil to oil. Addition of dispersant (Corexit 9500a or 9527a) resulted in larger amounts of aldehydes and ketones detected in the aqueous phase after solar irradiation of the oil. Electrospray mass spectrometry was utilized in an attempt to provide structural information about the aldehydes and ketones formed. Results of this study demonstrate that aldehydes and ketones are important photoproducts resulting from solar irradiation of oil on water. These products will affect the transport and bioavailability of oil spilled in aquatic systems.

  2. Whole-body CO2 production as an index of the metabolic response to sepsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole-body carbon dioxide (CO2) production (RaCO2) is an index of substrate oxidation and energy expenditure; therefore, it may provide information about the metabolic response to sepsis. Using stable isotope techniques, we determined RaCO2 and its relationship to protein and glucose metabolism in m...

  3. Regional body fat distribution and metabolic profile in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Piché, Marie-Eve; Lapointe, Annie; Weisnagel, S John; Corneau, Louise; Nadeau, André; Bergeron, Jean; Lemieux, Simone

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how body fat distribution variables were associated with metabolic parameters in a sample of 113 postmenopausal women not receiving hormone therapy (56.9 +/- 4.4 years, 28.4 +/- 5.1 kg/m(2)). Body fat distribution variables (visceral adipose tissue [AT], subcutaneous AT, and total midthigh AT) were measured using computed tomography; body fat mass was assessed by hydrostatic weighing; insulin sensitivity was determined with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations were measured by a 75-g oral glucose load; and (high-sensitivity) C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was measured using a highly sensitive assay. After controlling for fat mass, visceral AT was positively associated with plasma triglyceride, hs-CRP, FPG, and 2hPG, and negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and insulin sensitivity. Total midthigh AT was negatively associated with apolipoprotein B, FPG, and 2hPG, and positively associated with insulin sensitivity. Stepwise multiple regression analyses including abdominal visceral AT, subcutaneous AT and total midthigh AT as independent variables showed that abdominal visceral AT best predicted the variance in plasma triglyceride, HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein peak particle size, hs-CRP, FPG, 2hPG, and insulin sensitivity. Abdominal subcutaneous AT was a significant predictor of only insulin sensitivity, whereas total midthigh AT predicted HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein peak particle size, and apolipoprotein B. These multivariate analyses also indicated that total midthigh AT was favorably related to these outcomes, whereas abdominal visceral AT and subcutaneous AT were unfavorably related. These results confirmed that abdominal visceral fat is a critical correlate of metabolic parameters in postmenopausal women. In addition, a higher proportion of AT located in the total midthigh depot is associated with a favorable

  4. Intraspecific scaling in frog calls: the interplay of temperature, body size and metabolic condition.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Lucia; Arim, Matías; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Understanding physiological and environmental determinants of strategies of reproductive allocation is a pivotal aim in biology. Because of their high metabolic cost, properties of sexual acoustic signals may correlate with body size, temperature, and an individual's energetic state. A quantitative theory of acoustic communication, based on the metabolic scaling with temperature and mass, was recently proposed, adding to the well-reported empirical patterns. It provides quantitative predictions for frequencies, call rate, and durations. Here, we analysed the mass, temperature, and body condition scaling of spectral and temporal attributes of the advertisement call of the treefrog Hypsiboas pulchellus. Mass dependence of call frequency followed metabolic expectations (f~M (-0.25), where f is frequency and M is mass) although non-metabolic allometry could also account for the observed pattern. Temporal variables scaled inversely with mass contradicting metabolic expectations (d~M (0.25), where d is duration), supporting instead empirical patterns reported to date. Temperature was positively associated with call rate and negatively with temporal variables, which is congruent with metabolic predictions. We found no significant association between temperature and frequencies, adding to the bulk of empirical evidence. Finally, a result of particular relevance was that body condition consistently determined call characteristics, in interaction with temperature or mass. Our intraspecific study highlights that even if proximate determinants of call variability are rather well understood, the mechanisms through which they operate are proving to be more complex than previously thought. The determinants of call characteristics emerge as a key topic of research in behavioural and physiological biology, with several clear points under debate which need to be analysed on theoretical and empirical grounds.

  5. Migrant Asian Indians in New Zealand; prediction of metabolic syndrome using body weights and measures.

    PubMed

    Jowitt, Ljiljana M; Lu, Louise Weiwei; Rush, Elaine C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study of Asian Indian migrants in New Zealand was to determine cut-off points for body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist-to-height ratio that best discriminate for increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One hundred and seventy-five (90F, 85M) Asian Indian volunteers (aged >50 y) were recruited from urban Auckland, New Zealand. Body weight, height and waist and hip circumferences were measured using standard techniques. Waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body mass index were derived. Total and percent body fat by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and fasting glucose, insulin and lipids were measured. Three measures of metabolic risk were determined: the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, the McAuley score for insulin sensitivity and metabolic syndrome by International Diabetes Federation criteria. Body mass index, percent body fat and anthropometric measurements of central adiposity generally did not perform well as indicators of metabolic risk in this high risk population of Asian Indian migrants. Our data support the use of lower ethnic specific body mass index and waist circumference for Asian Indian women and men. The discriminatory power of waist-to-height ratio was similar to that of body mass index. Hence, waist-to-height ratio could be used as a simple screening tool. A recommendation, of a waist-to- height ratio of less than 0.5 that would underpin the simple public health message of "your waist circumference should be less than half your height".

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma redirects to ketolysis for progression under nutrition deprivation stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De; Li, Tingting; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Long; Yan, Ronghui; Li, Kui; Xing, Songge; Wu, Gongwei; Hu, Lan; Jia, Weidong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Dang, Chi V; Song, Libing; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Huafeng

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are known for their capacity to rewire metabolic pathways to support survival and proliferation under various stress conditions. Ketone bodies, though produced in the liver, are not consumed in normal adult liver cells. We find here that ketone catabolism or ketolysis is re-activated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells under nutrition deprivation conditions. Mechanistically, 3-oxoacid CoA-transferase 1 (OXCT1), a rate-limiting ketolytic enzyme whose expression is suppressed in normal adult liver tissues, is re-induced by serum starvation-triggered mTORC2-AKT-SP1 signaling in HCC cells. Moreover, we observe that enhanced ketolysis in HCC is critical for repression of AMPK activation and protects HCC cells from excessive autophagy, thereby enhancing tumor growth. Importantly, analysis of clinical HCC samples reveals that increased OXCT1 expression predicts higher patient mortality. Taken together, we uncover here a novel metabolic adaptation by which nutrition-deprived HCC cells employ ketone bodies for energy supply and cancer progression. PMID:27644987

  7. Cerebral metabolism of amino acids and glucose in fed and fasted sheep.

    PubMed

    Pell, J M; Bergman, E N

    1983-03-01

    Net cerebral uptake from or release into whole blood of oxygen, carbon dioxide, glucose, amino acids, lactate, pyruvate, ketone bodies, and acetate was estimated in fed, 3-day-fasted, and 6-day-fasted sheep. The respiratory quotient was similar in all three groups of sheep (approximately 0.95). Glucose uptake (35 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) was maintained during fasting, and about 94% of the cerebral oxygen consumption could have been accounted for by glucose oxidation in all sheep. A cerebral uptake of the branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) and proline also was observed with a concomitant production of glutamine and asparagine. The brains of fed and 3-day-fasted sheep were in nitrogen balance, but a small net release of nitrogen occurred in 6-day-fasted sheep (2 mumol N. min-1 X 100 g-1). A small amount of pyruvate was always released (1.4 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) into the blood, whereas lactate was released (6 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) only in 6-day-fasted sheep. Ketone body and acetate utilization always was negligible when compared with that for glucose. The total cerebral nonglucose carbon release found for 6-day-fasted sheep was equivalent to 23% of the glucose carbon taken up, although only 8% could have been derived directly from glucose. Thus, metabolism by the ovine brain seems resistant to prolonged periods of hypoglycemia with only small adaptations occurring after a 6-day fast.

  8. Regulation of metabolism and body fat mass by leptin.

    PubMed

    Baile, C A; Della-Fera, M A; Martin, R J

    2000-01-01

    The relative stability of body weight over the long term and under a variety of environmental conditions that alter short-term energy intake and expenditure provides strong evidence for the regulation of body energy content. The lipostatic theory of energy balance regulation proposed 40 years ago that circulating factors, generated in proportion to body fat stores, acted as signals to the brain, eliciting changes in energy intake and expenditure. The discovery of leptin and its receptors has now provided a molecular basis for this theory. Leptin functions as much more than an adipocyte-derived signal of lipid stores, however. Although suppression of food intake is an important centrally mediated effect of leptin, considerable evidence indicates that leptin also functions both directly and indirectly, via the brain, to orchestrate complex metabolic changes in a number of organs and tissues, altering nutrient flux to favor energy expenditure over energy storage.

  9. Early Decline in Glucose Transport and Metabolism Precedes Shift to Ketogenic System in Female Aging and Alzheimer's Mouse Brain: Implication for Bioenergetic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R.; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3–15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6–9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  10. Early decline in glucose transport and metabolism precedes shift to ketogenic system in female aging and Alzheimer's mouse brain: implication for bioenergetic intervention.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3-15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6-9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  11. High-performance liquid chromatography determination of ketone bodies in human plasma by precolumn derivatization with p-nitrobenzene diazonium fluoroborate.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Susumu; Shinohara, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Saori; Kubota, Ai; Inamura, Katsushi; Watanabe, Gen; Hirayama, Satoshi; Miida, Takashi; Ohta, Shin

    2009-01-01

    We developed and validated a sensitive and convenient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the specific determination of ketone bodies (acetoacetate and D-3-hydroxybutyrate) in human plasma. p-Nitrobenzene diazonium fluoroborate (diazo reagent) was used as a precolumn derivatization agent, and 3-(2-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid was used as an internal standard. After the reaction, excess diazo reagent and plasma proteins were removed by passing through a solid-phase cartridge (C(18)). The derivatives retained on the cartridge were eluted with methanol, introduced into the HPLC system, and then detected with UV at 380 nm. A calibration curve for acetoacetate standard solution with a 20-microl injection volume showed good linearity in the range of 1 to 400 microM with a 0.9997 correlation coefficient. For the determination of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, it was converted to acetoacetate before reaction with the diazo reagent by an enzymatic coupling method using D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase. A calibration curve for D-3-hydroxybutyrate standard solution also showed good linearity in the range of 1.5 to 2000 microM with a 0.9988 correlation coefficient. Analytical recoveries of acetoacetate and D-3-hydroxybutyrate in human plasma were satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to samples from diabetic patients, and results were consistent with those obtained using the thio-NAD enzymatic cycling method used in clinical laboratories.

  12. Methodology for in situ protection of aldehydes and ketones using trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and phosphines: selective alkylation and reduction of ketones, esters, amides, and nitriles.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Kenzo; Minami, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Watanabe, Kei; Fujioka, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    A methodology for selective transformations of ketones, esters, Weinreb amides, and nitriles in the presence of aldehydes has been developed. The use of a combination of PPh(3)-trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMSOTf) promotes selective transformation of aldehydes to their corresponding, temporarily protected, O,P-acetal type phosphonium salts. Because, hydrolytic work-up following ensuing reactions of other carbonyl moieties in the substrates liberates the aldehyde moiety, a sequence involving aldehyde protection, transformation of other carbonyl groups, and deprotection can be accomplished in a one-pot manner. Furthermore, the use of PEt(3) instead of PPh(3) enables ketones to be converted in situ to their corresponding O,P-ketal type phosphonium salts and, consequently, selective transformations of esters, Weinreb amides, and nitriles in the presence of ketones can be performed. This methodology is applicable to various dicarbonyl compounds, including substrates that possess heteroaromatic skeletons and hydroxyl protecting groups.

  13. Ru (III) Catalyzed Oxidation of Aliphatic Ketones by N-Bromosuccinimide in Aqueous Acetic Acid: A Kinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Giridhar Reddy, P.; Ramesh, K.; Shylaja, S.; Rajanna, K. C.; Kandlikar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics of Ru (III) catalyzed oxidation of aliphatic ketones such as acetone, ethyl methyl ketone, diethyl ketone, iso-butylmethyl ketone by N-bromosuccinimide in the presence of Hg(II) acetate have been studied in aqueous acid medium. The order of [N-bromosuccinimide] was found to be zero both in catalyzed as well as uncatalyzed reactions. However, the order of [ketone] changed from unity to a fractional one in the presence of Ru (III). On the basis of kinetic features, the probable mechanisms are discussed and individual rate parameters evaluated. PMID:22654610

  14. Modular decomposition of metabolic reaction networks based on flux analysis and pathway projection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeongah; Si, Yaguang; Nolan, Ryan; Lee, Kyongbum

    2007-09-15

    The rational decomposition of biochemical networks into sub-structures has emerged as a useful approach to study the design of these complex systems. A biochemical network is characterized by an inhomogeneous connectivity distribution, which gives rise to several organizational features, including modularity. To what extent the connectivity-based modules reflect the functional organization of the network remains to be further explored. In this work, we examine the influence of physiological perturbations on the modular organization of cellular metabolism. Modules were characterized for two model systems, liver and adipocyte primary metabolism, by applying an algorithm for top-down partition of directed graphs with non-uniform edge weights. The weights were set by the engagement of the corresponding reactions as expressed by the flux distribution. For the base case of the fasted rat liver, three modules were found, carrying out the following biochemical transformations: ketone body production, glucose synthesis and transamination. This basic organization was further modified when different flux distributions were applied that describe the liver's metabolic response to whole body inflammation. For the fully mature adipocyte, only a single module was observed, integrating all of the major pathways needed for lipid storage. Weaker levels of integration between the pathways were found for the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. Our results underscore the inhomogeneous distribution of both connectivity and connection strengths, and suggest that global activity data such as the flux distribution can be used to study the organizational flexibility of cellular metabolism. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. The Association between Breakfast Skipping and Body Weight, Nutrient Intake, and Metabolic Measures among Participants with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijuan; Cordeiro, Lorraine S.; Liu, Jinghua; Ma, Yunsheng

    2017-01-01

    The effect of skipping breakfast on health, especially in adults, remains a controversial topic. A secondary data analysis was conducted to examine associations between breakfast eating patterns and weight loss, nutrient intake, and metabolic parameters among participants with metabolic syndrome (MetS) (n = 240). Three randomly selected 24-h dietary recalls were collected from each participant at baseline and at the one-year visit. Skipped breakfast was seen in 32.9% at baseline and in 17.4% at the one-year visit, respectively. At baseline, after adjustment for demographics and physical activity, participants who ate breakfast had a higher thiamin, niacin, and folate intake than did breakfast skippers (p < 0.05); other selected parameters including body weight, dietary quality scores, nutrient intake, and metabolic parameters showed no significant differences between the two groups (p ≥ 0.05). From baseline to one year, after adjustment for covariates, mean fat intake increased by 2.7% (95% confidence intervals (CI): −1.0, 6.5%) of total energy in breakfast skippers in comparison to the 1.2% decrease observed in breakfast eaters (95% CI: −3.4, 1.1%) (p = 0.02). Mean changes in other selected parameters showed no significant differences between breakfast skippers and eaters (p > 0.05). This study did not support the hypothesis that skipping breakfast has impact on body weight, nutrient intakes, and selected metabolic measures in participants with MetS. PMID:28420112

  16. Metabolic rate measurements comparing supine with upright upper-body exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Loftin, Karin C.; Beene, Donya; Freeman-Perez, Sondra; Hnatt, Linda

    1993-01-01

    The ground-based study that tested the hypothesis that metabolic rates during supine and upright upper-body exercises are similar (mean value of 200 kcal/h) is presented. Six subjects each performed supine or upright exercise at three exercise stations, a hand-cycle ergometer, a rope-pull device, and a torque wrench. After a baseline measurement of the metabolic rate at rest, the metabolic rate was measured twice at each exercise station. The mean metabolic rates (kcal/h) during supine (n = 6) and upright control (n = 4) exercise stations were not significantly different except for the rope-pull station, 153.5 +/- 16.6 (supine) as compared to 247.0 +/- 21.7 (upright), p is less than 0.05. This difference may be due in part to an increased mechanical efficiency of supine exercises (15.0 +/- 0.7 percent) as compared to that of upright exercises (11.0 +/- 1.08 percent), p is less than 0.05. The net energy input was significantly smaller for the supine rope-pull exercise (64 +/- 18) as compared to upright (176 +/- 20). The relationship between best-rest exercises, metabolic rates, and the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) should be examined to determine the true risk of DCS in spaceflight extravehicular activities.

  17. Effects of a nonnutritive sweetener on body adiposity and energy metabolism in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Mitsutomi, Kimihiko; Masaki, Takayuki; Shimasaki, Takanobu; Gotoh, Koro; Chiba, Seiichi; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) have been studied in terms of their potential roles in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders. Several studies have suggested that NNSs have several specific effects on metabolism such as reduced postprandial hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. However, the detailed effects of NNSs on body adiposity and energy metabolism have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of an NNS on energy metabolism in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). DIO mice were divided into NNS-administered (4% NNS in drinking water), sucrose-administered (33% sucrose in drinking water), and control (normal water) groups. After supplementation for 4 weeks, metabolic parameters, including uncoupling protein (UCP) levels and energy expenditure, were assessed. Sucrose supplementation increased hyperglycemia, body adiposity, and body weight compared to the NNS-administered and control groups (P<0.05 for each). In addition, NNS supplementation decreased hyperglycemia compared to the sucrose-administered group (P<0.05). Interestingly, NNS supplementation increased body adiposity, which was accompanied by hyperinsulinemia, compared to controls (P<0.05 for each). NNS also increased leptin levels in white adipose tissue and triglyceride levels in tissues compared to controls (P<0.05 for each). Notably, compared to controls, NNS supplementation decreased the UCP1 level in brown adipose tissue and decreased O2 consumption in the dark phase. NNSs may be good sugar substitutes for people with hyperglycemia, but appear to influence energy metabolism in DIO mice. © 2013.

  18. Quantitative analysis of drug effects at the whole-body level: a case study for glucose metabolism in malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Snoep, Jacky L; Green, Kathleen; Eicher, Johann; Palm, Daniel C; Penkler, Gerald; du Toit, Francois; Walters, Nicolas; Burger, Robert; Westerhoff, Hans V; van Niekerk, David D

    2015-12-01

    We propose a hierarchical modelling approach to construct models for disease states at the whole-body level. Such models can simulate effects of drug-induced inhibition of reaction steps on the whole-body physiology. We illustrate the approach for glucose metabolism in malaria patients, by merging two detailed kinetic models for glucose metabolism in the parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the human red blood cell with a coarse-grained model for whole-body glucose metabolism. In addition we use a genome-scale metabolic model for the parasite to predict amino acid production profiles by the malaria parasite that can be used as a complex biomarker. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. Detrimental and protective fat: body fat distribution and its relation to metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andrea; Magnuson, Aaron; Foster, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is linked to numerous comorbidities that include, but are not limited to, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. Current evidence suggests, however, obesity itself is not an exclusive predictor of metabolic dysregulation but rather adipose tissue distribution. Obesity-related adverse health consequences occur predominately in individuals with upper body fat accumulation, the detrimental distribution, commonly associated with visceral obesity. Increased lower body subcutaneous adipose tissue, however, is associated with a reduced risk of obesity-induced metabolic dysregulation and even enhanced insulin sensitivity, thus, storage in this region is considered protective. The proposed mechanisms that causally relate the differential outcomes of adipose tissue distribution are often attributed to location and/or adipocyte regulation. Visceral adipose tissue effluent to the portal vein drains into the liver where hepatocytes are directly exposed to its metabolites and secretory products, whereas the subcutaneous adipose tissue drains systemically. Adipose depots are also inherently different in numerous ways such as adipokine release, immunity response and regulation, lipid turnover, rate of cell growth and death, and response to stress and sex hormones. Proximal extrinsic factors also play a role in the differential drive between adipose tissue depots. This review focuses on the deleterious mechanisms postulated to drive the differential metabolic response between central and lower body adipose tissue distribution.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (generic) (P-11-338). 721.10417 Section 721.10417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Lipid Metabolism during Infection and Endotoxemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    containing 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids almost exclusively) have been used in certain therapeutic diets . In contrast to the long-chain triglycerides...increased utilization of ketone bodies. The major substrates for hepatic ketogenesis are long-chain fatty acids. The term ’ ketogenic capacity’ refers to the...bodies is influenced not only by substrate availability and enzyme activities, but also more directly by the dis- posal of acetyl-CoA through ketogenic

  4. Unlocking the chemotherapeutic potential of beta-aminovinyl ketones and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Hatem M; Bagley, Mark C

    2009-07-01

    The role of beta-aminovinyl ketones as synthetic intermediates has been well categorised, but recent developments have shown an interesting array of applications and new chemotherapeutic potential, both in the preparation of biologically active heterocycles and as pharmacophores in their own right.Medicinal chemists are accustomed to using the products of Knoevenagel-type condensations as auxiliaries for the synthesis of N-containing heteroaromatic compounds. One such example of these chemical building blocks are beta-aminovinyl ketones-valuable synthetic intermediates that have been used in the preparation of pyridines, pyrimidines, pyrazoles, and many other heterocyclic motifs. This review highlights their recent use in the synthesis of biologically active targets as part of drug discovery programmes and in natural product synthesis. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that the enaminone motif may serve as a therapeutic pharmacophore in its own right. This review highlights the range of biological responses that beta-aminovinyl ketones elicit, including as antitumour, antibacterial, and anticonvulsant agents. Thus, with a broad spectrum of biological properties and as versatile chemical intermediates, it is clear that beta-aminovinyl ketones offer great potential in the search for new chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Effects of iron-containing minerals on hydrothermal reactions of ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2018-02-01

    Hydrothermal organic transformations occurring in geochemical processes are influenced by the surrounding environments including rocks and minerals. This work is focused on the effects of five common minerals on reactions of a model ketone substrate, dibenzylketone (DBK), in an experimental hydrothermal system. Ketones play a central role in many hydrothermal organic functional group transformations, such as those converting hydrocarbons to oxygenated compounds; however, how these minerals control the hydrothermal chemistry of ketones is poorly understood. Under the hydrothermal conditions of 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 168 h, we observed that, while quartz (SiO2) and corundum (Al2O3) had no detectable effect on the hydrothermal reactions of DBK, iron-containing minerals, such as hematite (Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4), and troilite (synthetic FeS), accelerated the reaction of DBK by up to an order of magnitude. We observed that fragmentation products, such as toluene and bibenzyl, dominated in the presence of hematite or magnetite, while use of troilite gave primarily the reduction products, e.g., 1, 3-diphenyl-propane and 1, 3-diphenyl-2-propanol. The roles of the three iron minerals in these transformations were further explored by (1) control experiments with various mineral surface areas, (2) measuring H2 in hydrothermal solutions, and (3) determining hydrogen balance among the organic products. These results suggest the reactions catalyzed by iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) are promoted mainly by the mineral surfaces, whereas the sulfide mineral (troilite) facilitated the reduction of ketone in the reaction solution. Therefore, this work not only provides a useful chemical approach to study and uncover complicated hydrothermal organic-mineral interactions, but also fosters a mechanistic understanding of ketone reactions in the deep carbon cycle.

  6. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N

    2014-08-12

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)-dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level.

  7. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  8. Detection of Ketones by a Novel Technology: Dipolar Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Qiangling; Zhou, Wenzhao; Zou, Xue; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-05-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has played an important role in the field of real-time monitoring of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its advantages such as low limit of detection (LOD) and fast time response. Recently, a new technology of proton extraction reaction mass spectrometry (PER-MS) with negative ions OH- as the reagent ions has also been presented, which can be applied to the detection of VOCs and even inorganic compounds. In this work, we combined the functions of PTR-MS and PER-MS in one instrument, thereby developing a novel technology called dipolar proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS). The selection of PTR-MS mode and PER-MS mode was achieved in DP-PTR-MS using only water vapor in the ion source and switching the polarity. In this experiment, ketones (denoted by M) were selected as analytes. The ketone (molecular weight denoted by m) was ionized as protonated ketone [M + H]+ [mass-to-charge ratio ( m/z) m + 1] in PTR-MS mode and deprotonated ketone [M - H]- ( m/z m - 1) in PER-MS mode. By comparing the m/z value of the product ions in the two modes, the molecular weight of the ketone can be positively identified as m. Results showed that whether it is a single ketone sample or a mixed sample of eight kinds of ketones, the molecular weights can be detected with DP-PTR-MS. The newly developed DP-PTR-MS not only maintains the original advantages of PTR-MS and PER-MS in sensitive and rapid detection of ketones, but also can estimate molecular weight of ketones.

  9. The acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body metabolic flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Joo, J; Cox, C C; Kindred, E D; Lashinger, L M; Young, M E; Bray, M S

    2016-09-01

    Both circadian disruption and timing of feeding have important roles in the development of metabolic disease. Despite growing acceptance that the timing of food consumption has long-term impact on metabolic homeostasis, little is known regarding the immediate influence on whole body metabolism, or the mechanisms involved. We aimed to examine the acute effects of time-of-day-dependent high fat feeding on whole body substrate metabolism and metabolic plasticity, and to determine the potential contribution of the adipocyte circadian clock. Mice were fed a regimen of 4-h meal at the beginning and end of the dark (waking) cycle, separated by 4 h of fasting. Daily experimental conditions consisted of either an early very high fat or high fat (EVHF or EHF, 60 or 45% kcals from fat, respectively) or late (LVHF or LHF) meal, paired with a low fat (LF, 10% kcals from fat) meal. Metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were assessed. To determine the role of the adipocyte circadian clock, an aP2-CLOCK mutant (ACM) mouse model was used. Mice in the EVHF or EHF groups showed a 13.2 or 8.84 higher percentage of caloric intake from fat and had a 0.013 or 0.026 lower daily average respiratory exchange ratio, respectively, compared with mice eating the opposite feeding regime. Changes in glucose tolerance, body fat composition and weight were not significant at the end of the 9-day restricted feeding period. ACM mice did not exhibit different metabolic responses to the feeding regimes compared with wild-type littermates. Circadian clock disruption did not influence the short-term response to timed feeding. Both the total fat composition of diet and the timing of fat intake may differentially mediate the effect of timed feeding on substrate metabolism, but may not induce acute changes in metabolic flexibility.

  10. Sea urchins in a high-CO2 world: partitioned effects of body size, ocean warming and acidification on metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Carey, Nicholas; Harianto, Januar; Byrne, Maria

    2016-04-15

    Body size and temperature are the major factors explaining metabolic rate, and the additional factor of pH is a major driver at the biochemical level. These three factors have frequently been found to interact, complicating the formulation of broad models predicting metabolic rates and hence ecological functioning. In this first study of the effects of warming and ocean acidification, and their potential interaction, on metabolic rate across a broad range in body size (two to three orders of magnitude difference in body mass), we addressed the impact of climate change on the sea urchin ITALIC! Heliocidaris erythrogrammain context with climate projections for southeast Australia, an ocean warming hotspot. Urchins were gradually introduced to two temperatures (18 and 23°C) and two pH levels (7.5 and 8.0), at which they were maintained for 2 months. Identical experimental trials separated by several weeks validated the fact that a new physiological steady state had been reached, otherwise known as acclimation. The relationship between body size, temperature and acidification on the metabolic rate of ITALIC! H. erythrogrammawas strikingly stable. Both stressors caused increases in metabolic rate: 20% for temperature and 19% for pH. Combined effects were additive: a 44% increase in metabolism. Body size had a highly stable relationship with metabolic rate regardless of temperature or pH. None of these diverse drivers of metabolism interacted or modulated the effects of the others, highlighting the partitioned nature of how each influences metabolic rate, and the importance of achieving a full acclimation state. Despite these increases in energetic demand there was very limited capacity for compensatory modulating of feeding rate; food consumption increased only in the very smallest specimens, and only in response to temperature, and not pH. Our data show that warming, acidification and body size all substantially affect metabolism and are highly consistent and

  11. Effects of intermittent fasting and chronic swimming exercise on body composition and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ruan Carlos Macedo de; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Ferraz, Alex Soares Marreiros; da Silva, Tiago Eugênio Oliveira; Marocolo, Moacir

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent fasting protocol (IFP) has been suggested as a strategy to change body metabolism and improve health. The effects of IFP seem to be similar to aerobic exercise, having a hormetic adaptation according to intensity and frequency. However, the effects of combining both interventions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IFP with and without endurance-exercise training on body composition, food behavior, and lipid metabolism. Twenty-week-old Wistar rats were kept under an inverted circadian cycle of 12 h with water ad libitum and assigned to 4 different groups: control group (ad libitum feeding and sedentary), exercise group (ad libitum feeding and endurance training), intermittent fasting group (IF; intermittent fasting and sedentary), and intermittent fasting and exercise group (IFEX; intermittent fasting and endurance training). After 6 weeks, the body weight of IF and IFEX animals decreased without changes in food consumption. Yet, the body composition between the 2 groups was different, with the IFEX animals containing higher total protein and lower total fat content than the IF animals. The IFEX group also showed increases in total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased intramuscular lipid content. The amount of brown adipose tissue was higher in IF and IFEX groups; however, the IFEX group showed higher expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 in this tissue, indicating a greater thermogenesis. The IFP combined with endurance training is an efficient method for decreasing body mass and altering fat metabolism, without inflicting losses in protein content.

  12. Exogenous Ketone Supplements Reduce Anxiety-Related Behavior in Sprague-Dawley and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Csilla; Kovács, Zsolt; Juhasz, Gabor; Murdun, Cem; Goldhagen, Craig R.; Koutnik, Andrew P.; Poff, Angela M.; Kesl, Shannon L.; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional ketosis has been proven effective for seizure disorders and other neurological disorders. The focus of this study was to determine the effects of ketone supplementation on anxiety-related behavior in Sprague-Dawley (SPD) and Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. We tested exogenous ketone supplements added to food and fed chronically for 83 days in SPD rats and administered sub-chronically for 7 days in both rat models by daily intragastric gavage bolus followed by assessment of anxiety measures on elevated plus maze (EPM). The groups included standard diet (SD) or SD + ketone supplementation. Low-dose ketone ester (LKE; 1,3-butanediol-acetoacetate diester, ~10 g/kg/day, LKE), high dose ketone ester (HKE; ~25 g/kg/day, HKE), beta-hydroxybutyrate-mineral salt (βHB-S; ~25 g/kg/day, KS) and βHB-S + medium chain triglyceride (MCT; ~25 g/kg/day, KSMCT) were used as ketone supplementation for chronic administration. To extend our results, exogenous ketone supplements were also tested sub-chronically on SPD rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 5 g/kg/day) and on WAG/Rij rats (KE, KS and KSMCT; 2.5 g/kg/day). At the end of treatments behavioral data collection was conducted manually by a blinded observer and with a video-tracking system, after which blood βHB and glucose levels were measured. Ketone supplementation reduced anxiety on EPM as measured by less entries to closed arms (sub-chronic KE and KS: SPD rats and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats), more time spent in open arms (sub-chronic KE: SPD and KSMCT: WAG/Rij rats; chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), more distance traveled in open arms (chronic KS and KSMCT: SPD rats) and by delayed latency to entrance to closed arms (chronic KSMCT: SPD rats), when compared to control. Our data indicates that chronic and sub-chronic ketone supplementation not only elevated blood βHB levels in both animal models, but reduced anxiety-related behavior. We conclude that ketone supplementation may represent a promising anxiolytic strategy through a

  13. Emission of volatile aldehydes and ketones from wood pellets under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Arshadi, Mehrdad; Geladi, Paul; Gref, Rolf; Fjällström, Pär

    2009-11-01

    Different qualities of biofuel pellets were made from pine and spruce sawdust according to an industrial experimental design. The fatty/resin acid compositions were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for both newly produced pellets and those after 2 and 4 weeks of storage. The aldehydes/ketones compositions were determined by high performance liquid chromatography at 0, 2, and 4 weeks. The designs were analyzed for the response variables: total fatty/resin acids and total aldehydes/ketones. The design showed a strong correlation between the pine fraction in the pellets and the fatty/resin acid content but the influence decreased over storage time. The amount of fatty/resin acids decreased approximately 40% during 4 weeks. The influence of drying temperature on the aldehyde/ketone emission of fresh pellets was also shown. The amounts of emitted aldehydes/ketones generally decreased by 45% during storage as a consequence of fatty/resin acid oxidation. The matrices of individual concentrations were subjected to multivariate data analysis. This showed clustering of the different experimental runs and demonstrated the important mechanism of fatty/resin acid conversion.

  14. Field validation of the dnph method for aldehydes and ketones. Final report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Workman, G.S.; Steger, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    A stationary source emission test method for selected aldehydes and ketones has been validated. The method employs a sampling train with impingers containing 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to derivatize the analytes. The resulting hydrazones are recovered and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Nine analytes were studied; the method was validated for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, acetophenone and isophorone. Acrolein, menthyl ethyl ketone, menthyl isobutyl ketone, and quinone did not meet the validation criteria. The study employed the validation techniques described in EPA method 301, which uses train spiking to determine bias, and collocated sampling trains to determine precision. The studies were carriedmore » out at a plywood veneer dryer and a polyester manufacturing plant.« less

  15. [Metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids and its value for a human body].

    PubMed

    Lyzohub, V H; Zaval's'ka, T V; Horna, O O; Pliskevych, D A; Savchenko, O V

    2010-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of metabolism of polynonsaturated fat acids in a human body as antiatherogenous which prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, hypertension), as well as oncological diseases, a peptic ulcer of the stomach and duodenum.

  16. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acidsmore » (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.« less

  17. 40 CFR 63.61 - Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from the list of hazardous air pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from... Designations, Source Category List § 63.61 Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from the list of hazardous air pollutants. The substance methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, 2-Butanone) (CAS Number 78-93-3) is deleted from the list...

  18. 40 CFR 63.61 - Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from the list of hazardous air pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from... Designations, Source Category List § 63.61 Deletion of methyl ethyl ketone from the list of hazardous air pollutants. The substance methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, 2-Butanone) (CAS Number 78-93-3) is deleted from the list...

  19. Detraining increases body fat and weight and decreases VO2peak and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Ormsbee, Michael J; Arciero, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Competitive collegiate swimmers commonly take a month off from swim training after their last major competition. This abrupt cessation of intense physical training has not been well studied and may lead to physiopsychological decline. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of swim detraining (DT) on body composition, aerobic fitness, resting metabolism, mood state, and blood lipids in collegiate swimmers. Eight healthy endurance-trained swimmers (V(O2)peak, 46.7 ± 10.8 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 2 identical test days, 1 in the trained (TR) state and 1 in the detrained (~5 weeks) state (DT). Body composition and circumferences, maximal oxygen consumption (V(O2)peak), resting metabolism (RMR), blood lipids, and mood state were measured. After DT, body weight (TR, 68.9 ± 9.7 vs. DT, 69.8 ± 9.8 kg; p = 0.03), fat mass (TR, 14.7 ± 7.6 vs. DT, 16.5 ± 7.4 kg; p = 0.001), and waist circumference (TR, 72.7 ± 3.1 vs. DT, 73.8 ± 3.6 cm; p = 0.03) increased, whereas V(O2)peak (TR, 46.7 ± 10.8 vs. DT, 43.1 ± 10.3 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1); p = 0.02) and RMR (TR, 1.34 ± 0.2 vs. DT, 1.25 ± 0.17 kcal · min(-1); p = 0.008) decreased, and plasma triglycerides showed a trend to increase (p = 0.065). Our data suggest that DT after a competitive collegiate swim season adversely affects body composition, fitness, and metabolism. Athletes and coaches need to be aware of the negative consequences of detraining from swimming, and plan off-season training schedules accordingly to allow for adequate rest/recovery and prevent overuse injuries. It's equally important to mitigate the negative effects on body composition, aerobic fitness and metabolism so performance may continue to improve over the long term.

  20. Elucidating the influence of praziquantel nanosuspensions on the in vivo metabolism of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana Damacena; Arrúa, Eva Carolina; Pereira, Dayanne Amaral; Fraga, Carolina Miguel; Costa, Tatiane Luiza da; Hemphill, Andrew; Salomon, Claudio Javier; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop nanosuspensions of praziquantel (PZQ) and to evaluate their influence on the energetic metabolism of cysticerci inoculated in BALB/c mice. We analyzed metabolic alterations of glycolytic pathways and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the parasite. The nanosuspensions were prepared by precipitation and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poloxamer 188 (P188) and poloxamer 407 (P407) were used as stabilizers. Nanosuspension prepared with PVA had a particle size of 100nm, while P188- and P407-based nanosuspensions had particle sizes of 74nm and 285nm, respectively. The zeta potential was -8.1, -8.6, and -13.2 for the formulations stabilized with PVA, P188 and P407, respectively. Treatments of T. crassiceps cysticerci-infected mice resulted in an increase in glycolysis organic acids, and enhanced the partial reversion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the urea cycle and the production of ketonic bodies in the parasites when compared to the groups treated with conventional PZQ. These data suggest that PZQ nanosuspensions greatly modified the energetic metabolism of cysticerci in vivo. Moreover, the remarkable metabolic alterations produced by the stabilizers indicate that further studies on nanoformulations are required to find potentially suitable nanomedicines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoredox activation for the direct β-arylation of ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Pirnot, Michael T; Rankic, Danica A; Martin, David B C; MacMillan, David W C

    2013-03-29

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis.

  2. Solvation of Esters and Ketones in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Imanishi, Masayoshi; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-04

    Vibrational Raman spectra for the C═O stretching modes of three esters with different functional groups (methyl, a single phenyl, and two phenyl groups) were measured in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The results were compared with Raman spectra for three ketones involving the same functional groups, measured at the same thermodynamic states in scCO2. The peak frequencies of the Raman spectra of these six solute molecules were analyzed by decomposition into the attractive and repulsive energy components, based on the perturbed hard-sphere theory. For all solute molecules, the attractive energy is greater than the repulsive energy. In particular, a significant difference in the attractive energies of the ester-CO2 and ketone-CO2 systems was observed when the methyl group is attached to the ester or ketone. This difference was significantly reduced in the solute systems with a single phenyl group and was completely absent in those with two phenyl groups. The optimized structures among the solutes and CO2 molecules based on quantum chemical calculations indicate that greater attractive energy is obtained for a system where the oxygen atom of the ester is solvated by CO2 molecules.

  3. KETONES INHIBIT MITOCHONDRIAL PRODUCTION OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES PRODUCTION FOLLOWING GLUTAMATE EXCITOTOXICITY BY INCREASING NADH OXIDATION

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Marwan; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Davis, Laurie; Kim, Do Young; Rho, Jong M.

    2007-01-01

    Dietary protocols that increase serum levels of ketones, such as calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet, offer robust protection against a multitude of acute and chronic neurological diseases. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Previous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet may reduce free radical levels in the brain. Thus, one possibility is that ketones may mediate neuroprotection through antioxidant activity. In the present study, we examined the effects of the ketones β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate on acutely dissociated rat neocortical neurons subjected to glutamate excitotoxicity using cellular electrophysiological and single-cell fluorescence imaging techniques. Further, we explored the effects of ketones on acutely isolated mitochondria exposed to high levels of calcium. A combination of β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (1 mM each) decreased neuronal death and prevented changes in neuronal membrane properties induced by 10 μM glutamate. Ketones also significantly decreased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and the associated excitotoxic changes by increasing NADH oxidation in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, but did not affect levels of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione. In conclusion, we demonstrate that ketones reduce glutamate-induced free radical formation by increasing the NAD+/NADH ratio and enhancing mitochondrial respiration in neocortical neurons. This mechanism may, in part, contribute to the neuroprotective activity of ketones by restoring normal bioenergetic function in the face of oxidative stress. PMID:17240074

  4. Hepatic growth hormone and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in body growth, steatosis and metabolic liver cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kristina M.; Themanns, Madeleine; Friedbichler, Katrin; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Esterbauer, Harald; Tuckermann, Jan P.; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the control of processes that are essential for the maintenance of vital body functions including energy supply and growth control. GH and GCs have been well characterized to regulate systemic energy homeostasis, particular during certain conditions of physical stress. However, dysfunctional signaling in both pathways is linked to various metabolic disorders associated with aberrant carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In liver, GH-dependent activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 controls a variety of physiologic functions within hepatocytes. Similarly, GCs, through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), influence many important liver functions such as gluconeogenesis. Studies in hepatic Stat5 or GR knockout mice have revealed that they similarly control liver function on their target gene level and indeed, the GR functions often as a cofactor of STAT5 for GH-induced genes. Gene sets, which require physical STAT5–GR interaction, include those controlling body growth and maturation. More recently, it has become evident that impairment of GH-STAT5 signaling in different experimental models correlates with metabolic liver disease, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While GH-activated STAT5 has a protective role in chronic liver disease, experimental disruption of GC-GR signaling rather seems to ameliorate metabolic disorders under metabolic challenge. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about hepatic GH-STAT5 and GC-GR signaling in body growth, metabolism, and protection from fatty liver disease and HCC development. PMID:22564914

  5. Effects of chronic forced circadian desynchronization on body weight and metabolism in male mice.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Leandro P; Alzamendi, Ana; Giovambattista, Andrés; Chiesa, Juan J; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic functions are synchronized by the circadian clock setting daily patterns of food intake, nutrient delivery, and behavioral activity. Here, we study the impact of chronic jet-lag (CJL) on metabolism, and test manipulations aimed to overcome potential alterations. We recorded weight gain in C57Bl/6 mice under chronic 6 h advances or delays of the light-dark cycle every 2 days (ChrA and ChrD, respectively). We have previously reported ChrA, but not ChrD, to induce forced desynchronization of locomotor activity rhythms in mice (Casiraghi et al. 2012). Body weight was rapidly increased under ChrA, with animals tripling the mean weight gain observed in controls by day 10, and doubling it by day 30 (6% vs. 2%, and 15% vs. 7%, respectively). Significant increases in retroperitoneal and epidydimal adipose tissue masses (172% and 61%, respectively), adipocytes size (28%), and circulating triglycerides (39%) were also detected. Daily patterns of food and water intake were abolished under ChrA In contrast, ChrD had no effect on body weight. Wheel-running, housing of animals in groups, and restriction of food availability to hours of darkness prevented abnormal increase in body weight under ChrA Our findings suggest that the observed alterations under ChrA may arise either from a direct effect of circadian disruption on metabolism, from desynchronization between feeding and metabolic rhythms, or both. Direction of shifts, timing of feeding episodes, and other reinforcing signals deeply affect the outcome of metabolic function under CJL Such features should be taken into account in further studies of shift working schedules in humans. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. Metabolic rate and body size are linked with perception of temporal information☆

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kevin; McNally, Luke; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Cooper, Natalie; Jackson, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Body size and metabolic rate both fundamentally constrain how species interact with their environment, and hence ultimately affect their niche. While many mechanisms leading to these constraints have been explored, their effects on the resolution at which temporal information is perceived have been largely overlooked. The visual system acts as a gateway to the dynamic environment and the relative resolution at which organisms are able to acquire and process visual information is likely to restrict their ability to interact with events around them. As both smaller size and higher metabolic rates should facilitate rapid behavioural responses, we hypothesized that these traits would favour perception of temporal change over finer timescales. Using critical flicker fusion frequency, the lowest frequency of flashing at which a flickering light source is perceived as constant, as a measure of the maximum rate of temporal information processing in the visual system, we carried out a phylogenetic comparative analysis of a wide range of vertebrates that supported this hypothesis. Our results have implications for the evolution of signalling systems and predator–prey interactions, and, combined with the strong influence that both body mass and metabolism have on a species' ecological niche, suggest that time perception may constitute an important and overlooked dimension of niche differentiation. PMID:24109147

  7. Synthesis of α-Halo-α,α-Difluoromethyl Ketones by a Trifluoroacetate Release/Halogenation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    John, Jinu P.; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Three series of α-halo-α,α-difluoromethyl ketones are prepared from highly α-fluorinated gem-diols by exploiting the facile release of trifluoroacetate, followed by immediate trapping of the liberated α,α-difluoroenolate with an electrophilic chlorine, bromine, or iodine source. The products are typically isolated in good yields, even in the case of sensitive, α-iodo-α,α-difluoromethyl ketones. Also, we demonstrate that an α-iodo-α,α-difluoromethyl ketone will participate in a copper-promoted reaction to forge a new carbon–carbon bond. PMID:21995668

  8. Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, Bret H; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; Harris, Tamara B; Katsiaras, Andreas; Kritchevsky, Steven B; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Nevitt, Michael; Holvoet, Paul; Newman, Anne B

    2005-04-11

    The metabolic syndrome is a disorder that includes dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension and is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We determined whether patterns of regional fat deposition are associated with metabolic syndrome in older adults. A cross-sectional study was performed that included a random, population-based, volunteer sample of Medicare-eligible adults within the general communities of Pittsburgh, Pa, and Memphis, Tenn. The subjects consisted of 3035 men and women aged 70 to 79 years, of whom 41.7% were black. Metabolic syndrome was defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, including serum triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, glucose level, blood pressure, and waist circumference. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, intermuscular, and subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was measured by computed tomography. Visceral adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in men who were of normal weight (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 1.6-2.9), overweight (1.8, 1.5-2.1), and obese (1.2, 1.0-1.5), and in women who were of normal weight (3.3, 2.4-4.6), overweight (2.4, 2.0-3.0), and obese (1.7, 1.4-2.1), adjusting for race. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome only in normal-weight men (1.3, 1.1-1.7). Intermuscular adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in normal-weight (2.3, 1.6-3.5) and overweight (1.2, 1.1-1.4) men. In contrast, subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in obese men (0.9, 0.8-1.0) and women (0.9, 0.9-1.0). In addition to general obesity, the distribution of body fat is independently associated with the metabolic syndrome in older men and women, particularly among those of normal body weight.

  9. Occurrence, biological activity and metabolism of 6-shogaol.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xingran; Wang, Xiaoqi; Ji, Ruya; Liu, Lang; Qiao, Yening; Lou, Zaixiang; Ma, Chaoyang; Li, Shiming; Wang, Hongxin; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2018-03-01

    As one of the main bioactive compounds of dried ginger, 6-shogaol has been widely used to alleviate many ailments. It is also a major pungent flavor component, and its precursor prior to dehydration is 6-gingerol, which is reported to be responsible for the pungent flavor and biological activity of fresh ginger. Structurally, gingerols including 6-gingerol have a β-hydroxyl ketone moiety and is liable to dehydrate to generate an α,β-unsaturated ketone under heat and/or acidic conditions. The conjugation of the α,β-unsaturated ketone skeleton in the chemical structure of 6-shogaol explicates its higher potency and efficacy than 6-gingerol in terms of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiemetic and other bioactivities. Research on the health benefits of 6-shogaol has been conducted and results have been reported recently; however, scientific data are scattered due to a lack of systematic collection. In addition, action mechanisms of the preventive and/or therapeutic actions of 6-shogaol remain obscurely non-collective. Herein, we review the preparations, biological activity and mechanisms, and metabolism of 6-shogaol as well as the properties of 6-shogaol metabolites.

  10. Circulating omentin-1 might be associated with metabolic health status in different phenotypes of body size.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Shahab; Mirzaei, Khadijeh; Mohammadi, Chonur; Keshavarz, Seyed Ali; Maghbooli, Zhila

    2017-12-01

    Adipokines are mediators of body composition and are involved in obesity complications. This study aimed to assess the association of circulating omentin-1, vaspin, and RBP-4 with body composition indices and metabolic health status (MHS) in different phenotypes of body size. A total of 350 subjects were included in the current cross-sectional study. Body composition was measured using a body composition analyzer, and serum concentrations of omentin-1, vaspin, and RBP-4 were assessed by ELISA kits. Circulating omentin-1 was significantly (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.00-1.91, P = 0.01) and marginally (OR = 1.63, 95%CI: 1.00-1.75, P = 0.06) associated with MHS in the overweight and obese subjects, respectively. But no association was seen between omentin-1 and MHS in normal-weight subjects. Serum levels of vaspin and RBP-4 were not correlated with MHS. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation was observed between circulating omentin-1 and body mass index (BMI) as well as fat percentage (P = 0.02) in the MHS group. Serum vaspin concentrations were not related to body composition components in both groups. In addition, in the MHS group, circulating RBP-4 was positively correlated with fat percentage and fat mass (FM) (p < 0.0001) and was negatively correlated with fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water (TBW) (p < 0.0001). In contrast, in the metabolically unhealthy group, RBP-4 was negatively correlated with fat percentage, FM, and BMI (p < 0.0001) and was positively correlated with FFM and TBW (p < 0.0001). This study showed that circulating levels of omentin-1 are useful predictors of metabolic health status in overweight and obese people.

  11. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones Catalyzed by Rare-Earth Metals Complexed with Phenoxy Modified Chiral Prolinols.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Lu, Chengrong; Fei, Zenghui; Zhao, Bei; Yao, Yingming

    2018-06-01

    Enantioselective reduction of ketones and α,β-unsaturated ketones by pinacolborane (HBpin) has been well-established by using chiral rare-earth metal catalysts with phenoxy modified prolinols. A number of highly optically active alcohols were obtained from reduction of simple ketones catalyzed by ytterbium complex 1 [L 4 Yb(L 4 H)] (H 2 L 4 = ( S)-2- tert-butyl-6-((2-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)methyl)phenol). Moreover, α,β-unsaturated ketones were selectively reduced to a wide range of chiral allylic alcohols with excellent yields, high enantioselectivity, and complete chemoselectivity, catalyzed by a single component chiral ytterbium complex 2 [L 1 Yb(L 1 H)] (H 2 L 1 = ( S)-2,4-di- tert-butyl-6-((2-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)methyl)phenol).

  13. Lanthanum Tricyanide-Catalyzed Acyl Silane-Ketone Benzoin Additions and Kinetic Resolution of Resultant α-Silyloxyketones

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, James C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the full account of our efforts on the lanthanum tricyanide-catalyzed acyl silane-ketone benzoin reaction. The reaction exhibits a wide scope in both acyl silane (aryl, alkyl) and ketone (aryl-alkyl, alkyl-alkyl, aryl-aryl, alkenyl-alkyl, alkynyl-alkyl) coupling partners. The diastereoselectivity of the reaction has been examined in both cyclic and acyclic systems. Cyclohexanones give products arising from equatorial attack by the acyl silane. The diastereoselectivity of acyl silane addition to acyclic α-hydroxy ketones can be controlled by varying the protecting group to obtain either Felkin-Ahn or chelation control. The resultant α-silyloxyketone products can be resolved with selectivity factors from 10 to 15 by subjecting racemic ketone benzoin products to CBS reduction. PMID:20392127

  14. Lanthanum tricyanide-catalyzed acyl silane-ketone benzoin additions and kinetic resolution of resultant alpha-silyloxyketones.

    PubMed

    Tarr, James C; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-21

    We report the full account of our efforts on the lanthanum tricyanide-catalyzed acyl silane-ketone benzoin reaction. The reaction exhibits a wide scope in both acyl silane (aryl, alkyl) and ketone (aryl-alkyl, alkyl-alkyl, aryl-aryl, alkenyl-alkyl, alkynyl-alkyl) coupling partners. The diastereoselectivity of the reaction has been examined in both cyclic and acyclic systems. Cyclohexanones give products arising from equatorial attack by the acyl silane. The diastereoselectivity of acyl silane addition to acyclic alpha-hydroxy ketones can be controlled by varying the protecting group to obtain either Felkin-Ahn or chelation control. The resultant alpha-silyloxyketone products can be resolved with selectivity factors from 10 to 15 by subjecting racemic ketone benzoin products to CBS reduction.

  15. Associations between Body Composition Indices and Metabolic Disorders in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Dong, Sheng-Yong; Wang, Fei; Ma, Cong; Zhao, Xiao-Lan; Zeng, Qiang; Fei, Ao

    2018-01-01

    Background: Obesity induces dyslipidemia, hypertension, glucose intolerance, and inflammatory state, which results in atherogenic processes, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. We usually use body composition indices, such as body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BFP), waist circumference-height ratio (WHtR), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) to reflect the obesity. The aim of this large population-based cross-sectional study was to investigate the associations between body composition indices and metabolic parameters in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 12,018 Chinese adults were included. Body composition indices, such as BMI, BFP, WHtR, and WHR, and metabolic parameters, such as systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting blood glucose (FBG), 2 h postprandial blood glucose (2h PBG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting insulin (FINS), insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and white blood cell count (WBC), were measured and analyzed. All analyses were stratified by gender. Results: All body composition indices and metabolic parameters except 2h PBG differed significantly between males and females (all P < 0.001). BMI was positively associated with SBP, DBP, LDL-C, TC, TG, FBG, 2h PBG, HbA1c, FINS, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, and WBC, and inversely associated with HDL-C; similar relationships were identified between the metabolic parameters and BFP, WHtR, and WHR. In the multivariate analysis, the odds of impaired glucose regulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and increased hs-CRP were 1.36, 1.92, 3.44, and 1.27 times greater in the overweight group than those in the normal weight group, respectively, and 1.66, 3.26, 7.53, and 1.70 times greater in the obese group than those in the normal weight group, respectively. The odds of dyslipidemia and hs-CRP were 1

  16. Effects of aerobic exercise training on serum sex hormone binding globulin, body fat index, and metabolic syndrome factors in obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2012-12-01

    The percentage of obese postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome is rising, and physical factors associated with the metabolic syndrome prevalence or incidence are also rising, including high body mass index (BMI), visceral fat area (VFA), low plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, and low cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, we investigated the influence of aerobic exercise on SHBG, body fat index (BFI), and metabolic syndrome factors in obese postmenopausal Korean women. Thirty healthy postmenopausal, women aged 53.46 ± 2.4 years and with over 32% body fat, were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise group (EX; n=15) or to a "nonexercise" control (Con; n=15) group. The primary outcome measurements were serum SHBG, lipid profiles, insulin levels, and metabolic syndrome factors. Secondary outcome measurements were body composition, VFA, blood pressure (BP), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Posttraining body weight and BFI (P<0.05), total cholesterol, glucose, and insulin levels (P<0.01), BP, and HOMA-IR (P<0.001) decreased, whereas SHBG (P<0.001) and metabolic syndrome factors (P<0.01) improved in the exercise group but not in the control group. SHBG levels also showed a significant positive correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and significant negative correlations withglucose, diastolic blood pressure, fat mass, BMI, and percent body fat (P<0.05). Our findings indicate that aerobic exercise improves body composition, SHBG, insulin levels, and metabolic syndrome factors. These findings suggest that in obesepostmenopausal Korean women, 16 weeks of aerobic exercise is effective for preventing the metabolic syndrome caused by obesity.

  17. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  18. Momilactone B Inhibits Ketosis In Vitro by Regulating the ANGPTL3-LPL Pathway and Inhibiting HMGCS2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Young; S P, Nipin; Darvin, Pramod; Joung, Youn Hee; Byun, Hyo Joo; Do, Chang Hee; Park, Kyung Do; Park, Mi Na; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Yang, Young Mok

    2017-07-03

    Ketogenesis is the production of ketone bodies, which provide energy when the body lacks glucose. Under ketogenic conditions, the body switches from primarily carbohydrate to fat metabolism to maintain energy balance. However, accumulation of high levels of ketone bodies in the blood results in ketosis. Treating ketosis with natural substances is preferable, because they are unlikely to cause side-effects. Momilactone B is an active compound isolated from Korean rice. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that momilactone B could inhibit ketosis. We constructed an in vitro ketosis model by glucose starvation. We used this model to test the anti-ketosis effects of momilactone B. A primary target for treating ketosis is angiopoietin-like-3 (ANGPTL3), which modulates lipoprotein metabolism by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a multifunctional enzyme that breaks down stored fat to produce triglycerides. We showed that momilactone B could regulate the ANGPTL3-LPL pathway. However, a strong anti-ketosis candidate drug should also inhibit ketogenesis. Ketogenesis can be suppressed by inhibiting the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase-2 (HMGCS2), a mitochondrial enzyme that converts acetyl-CoA to ketone bodies. We found that momilactone B suppressed the expression of HMGCS2 through the increased expression of STAT5b. We also elucidated the relationship of STAT5b to ANGPTL3 and LPL expression.

  19. Differential ammonia metabolism in Aedes aegypti fat body and midgut tissues

    PubMed Central

    Scaraffia, Patricia Y.; Zhang, Quigfen; Thorson, Kelsey; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand at the tissue level how Aedes aegypti copes with toxic ammonia concentrations that result from the rapid metabolism of blood meal proteins, we investigated the incorporation of 15N from 15NH4Cl into amino acids using an in vitro tissue culture system. Fat body or midgut tissues from female mosquitoes were incubated in an Aedes saline solution supplemented with glucose and 15NH4Cl for 10–40 minutes. The media was then mixed with deuterium-labeled amino acids, dried and derivatized. The 15N-labeled and unlabeled amino acids in each sample were quantified by mass spectrometry techniques. The results demonstrate that both tissues efficiently incorporate ammonia into amino acids, however, the specific metabolic pathways are distinct. In the fat body, the 15N from 15NH4Cl is first incorporated into the amide side chain of Gln and then into the amino group of Gln, Glu, Ala and Pro. This process mainly occurs via the glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GltS) pathway. In contrast, 15N in midgut is first incorporated into the amino group of Glu and Ala, and then into the amide side chain of Gln. Interestingly, our data show that the GS/GltS pathway is not functional in the midgut. Instead, midgut cells detoxify ammonia by glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and GS. These data provide new insights into ammonia metabolism in A. aegypti mosquitoes. PMID:20206632

  20. Aqueous-Phase Acetic Acid Ketonization over Monoclinic Zirconia

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cai, Qiuxia; Lopez-Ruiz, Juan A.; Cooper, Alan R.

    The effect of aqueous phase on the acetic acid ketonization over monoclinic zirconia has been investigated using first-principles based density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To capture the aqueous phase chemistry over the solid zirconia catalyst surface, the aqueous phase is represented by 111 explicit water molecules with a liquid water density of 0.93 g/cm3 and the monoclinic zirconia is modeled by the most stable surface structure . The dynamic nature of aqueous phase/ interface was studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, indicating that nearly half of the surface Zr sites are occupied by either adsorbed water molecules or hydroxylmore » groups at 550 K. DFT calculations show that the adsorption process of acetic acid from the liquid water phase to the surface is nearly thermodynamically neutral with a Gibbs free energy of -2.3 kJ/mol although the adsorption strength of acetic acid on the surface in aqueous phase is much stronger than in vapor phase. Therefore it is expected that the adsorption of acetic acid will dramatically affects aqueous phase ketonization reactivity over the monoclinic zirconia catalyst. Using the same ketonization mechanism via the β-keto acid intermediate, we have compared acetic acid ketonization to acetone in both vapor and aqueous phases. Our DFT calculation results show although the rate-determining step of the β-keto acid formation via the C-C coupling is not pronouncedly affected, the presence of liquid water molecules will dramatically affect dehydrogenation and hydrogenation steps via proton transfer mechanism. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time and advanced catalyst characterization use was granted by a user proposal at the William R. Wiley

  1. Direct conversion of alcohols to α-chloro aldehydes and α-chloro ketones.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Studer, Armido

    2014-09-19

    Direct conversion of primary and secondary alcohols into the corresponding α-chloro aldehydes and α-chloro ketones using trichloroisocyanuric acid, serving both as stoichiometric oxidant and α-halogenating reagent, is reported. For primary alcohols, TEMPO has to be added as an oxidation catalyst, and for the transformation of secondary alcohols (TEMPO-free protocol), MeOH as an additive is essential to promote chlorination of the intermediary ketones.

  2. [Analysis of body composition and resting metabolic rate of 858 middle-aged and elderly people in urban area of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Yu, D N; Xian, T Z; Wang, L J; Cheng, B; Sun, M X; Guo, L X

    2018-05-10

    Objective: To understand the overweight rate and obesity rate in middle-aged and elderly people in urban area of Beijing, and analyze the changes of body composition and resting metabolic rate with age. Methods: From November 2014 to December 2015, body composition measurement and resting metabolic rate detection were conducted among 858 people aged 51 to 99 years, including 760 men, 98 women, who received physical examination at Beijing Hospital. Results: The overweight rate was 51.4 % , and the obesity rate was 16.9 % . The overweight rate was 26.5 % and the obesity rate was 14.3 % in women, significantly lower than those in men (54.6 % and 17.2 % ) ( P <0.001). The distribution of skeletal muscle volume, muscle index, body fat percentage, visceral fat area and resting metabolic rate in different age groups were different ( P <0.001). In the normal weight group, the skeletal muscle volume, muscle index and resting metabolic rate in age group ≥80 years decreased obviously ( P <0.05). At the same time, the body fat percentage and visceral fat area increased obviously ( P <0.05). However, the skeletal muscle volume, muscle index and resting metabolic rate of the overweight and obese groups began to decrease obviously in age group 70- years ( P <0.05), and the decrease in age group ≥80 years was more obvious. At the same time, body fat percentage and visceral fat area increased significantly in age group 70- years ( P <0.05). Conclusion: The overweight and obesity rates were high in the middle-aged and elderly people in the urban area of Beijing, and the rates were higher in men than in women. With the increase of age, the skeletal muscle volume, muscle index and resting metabolic rate gradually decreased, while the percentage of body fat and visceral fat area increased; Overweight and obese people had earlier changes in body composition and resting metabolic rate.

  3. Body composition in patients with classical homocystinuria: body mass relates to homocysteine and choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bandeira, Isabel Cristina; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Souza, Carolina Fischinger Moura; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Castro, Kamila; Tonon, Tássia; Nalin, Tatiéle; Imbard, Apolline; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2014-08-10

    Classical homocystinuria is a rare genetic disease caused by cystathionine β-synthase deficiency, resulting in homocysteine accumulation. Growing evidence suggests that reduced fat mass in patients with classical homocystinuria may be associated with alterations in choline and homocysteine pathways. This study aimed to evaluate the body composition of patients with classical homocystinuria, identifying changes in body fat percentage and correlating findings with biochemical markers of homocysteine and choline pathways, lipoprotein levels and bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores. Nine patients with classical homocystinuria were included in the study. Levels of homocysteine, methionine, cysteine, choline, betaine, dimethylglycine and ethanolamine were determined. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in patients and in 18 controls. Data on the last BMD measurement and lipoprotein profile were obtained from medical records. Of 9 patients, 4 (44%) had a low body fat percentage, but no statistically significant differences were found between patients and controls. Homocysteine and methionine levels were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI), while cysteine showed a positive correlation with BMI (p<0.05). There was a trend between total choline levels and body fat percentage (r=0.439, p=0.07). HDL cholesterol correlated with choline and ethanolamine levels (r=0.757, p=0.049; r=0.847, p=0.016, respectively), and total cholesterol also correlated with choline levels (r=0.775, p=0.041). There was no association between BMD T-scores and body composition. These results suggest that reduced fat mass is common in patients with classical homocystinuria, and that alterations in homocysteine and choline pathways affect body mass and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative performance assessment of point-of-care testing devices for measuring glucose and ketones at the patient bedside.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Kaczmarek, Ewa; Guerra, Elena; Mastrantonio, Fabrizio; Lucarelli, Fausto; Valgimigli, Francesco; Mosca, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing devices for monitoring glucose and ketones can play a key role in the management of dysglycemia in hospitalized diabetes patients. The accuracy of glucose devices can be influenced by biochemical changes that commonly occur in critically ill hospital patients and by the medication prescribed. Little is known about the influence of these factors on ketone POC measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the analytical performance of POC hospital whole-blood glucose and ketone meters and the extent of glucose interference factors on the design and accuracy of ketone results. StatStrip glucose/ketone, Optium FreeStyle glucose/ketone, and Accu-Chek Performa glucose were also assessed and results compared to a central laboratory reference method. The analytical evaluation was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocols for precision, linearity, method comparison, and interference. The interferences assessed included acetoacetate, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, galactose, maltose, uric acid, and sodium. The accuracies of both Optium ketone and glucose measurements were significantly influenced by varying levels of hematocrit and ascorbic acid. StatStrip ketone and glucose measurements were unaffected by the interferences tested with exception of ascorbic acid, which reduced the higher level ketone value. The accuracy of Accu-Chek glucose measurements was affected by hematocrit, by ascorbic acid, and significantly by galactose. The method correlation assessment indicated differences between the meters in compliance to ISO 15197 and CLSI 12-A3 performance criteria. Combined POC glucose/ketone methods are now available. The use of these devices in a hospital setting requires careful consideration with regard to the selection of instruments not sensitive to hematocrit variation and presence of interfering substances. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery.

  6. Palladium-catalyzed, pyrrolidine-mediated arylmethylation of ketones and aldehydes with coumarinyl(methyl) acetates.

    PubMed

    Cattopadhyay, Kalicharan; Recio, Antonio; Tunge, Jon A

    2012-09-14

    We report the palladium-catalyzed, pyrrolidine-mediated α-benzylation of enamines generated from aldehydes and ketones. The method allows for direct coupling of medicinally relevant coumarin moieties with aldehydes and ketones in good yield under mild conditions. The reaction is believed to proceed via a Pd-π-benzyl complex generated from (coumarinyl)methyl acetates.

  7. The effect of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Igor; Booth, Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA) is the energy expended on the physiological processes associated with meal digestion and is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the meal and the body weight (BW) and temperature of the organism. This study assessed the effects of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate (RMR) and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus. RMR and SDA were established at 3 temperatures (14, 20 and 26 degrees C). 5 size classes of mulloway ranging from 60 g to 1.14 kg were used to establish RMR with 3 of the 5 size classes (60, 120 and 240 g) used to establish SDA. The effect of body size on the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) varied significantly depending on the temperature; there was a greater relative increase in the mass-specific RMR for smaller mulloway with increasing temperature. No statistical differences were found between the mass exponent (b) values at each temperature when tested against H(0): b=0.8. The gross RMR of mulloway (mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) can be described as function of temperature (T; 14-26 degrees C) as: (0.0195T-0.0454)BW(g)(0.8) and the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) can be described as: (21.042T-74.867)BW(g)(-0.2). Both SDA duration and time to peak SDA were influenced by temperature and body weight; SDA duration occurred within 41-89 h and peak time occurred within 17-38 h of feeding. The effect of body size on peak metabolic rate varied significantly depending on temperature, generally increasing with temperature and decreasing with increasing body size. Peak gross oxygen consumption (MO(2): mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) scaled allometrically with BW. Temperature, but not body size, significantly affected SDA scope, although the difference was numerically small. There was a trend for MO(2) above RMR over the SDA period to increase with temperature; however, this was not statistically significant. The average proportion of energy expended over the SDA period

  8. Body composition, nutritional status, and endothelial function in physically active men without metabolic syndrome--a 25 year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pigłowska, Małgorzata; Kostka, Tomasz; Drygas, Wojciech; Jegier, Anna; Leszczyńska, Joanna; Bill-Bielecka, Mirosława; Kwaśniewska, Magdalena

    2016-04-27

    The purpose of this analysis was to investigate the relationship between body composition, metabolic parameters and endothelial function among physically active healthy middle-aged and older men. Out of 101 asymptomatic men prospectively tracked for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (mean observation period 25.1 years), 55 metabolically healthy individuals who maintained stable leisure time physical activity (LTPA) level throughout the observation and agreed to participate in the body composition assessment were recruited (mean age 60.3 ± 9.9 years). Body composition and raw bioelectrical parameters were measured with bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Microvascular endothelial function was evaluated by means of the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using Endo-PAT2000 system. Strong correlations were observed between lifetime physical activity (PA), aerobic fitness and most of analyzed body composition parameters. The strongest inverse correlation was found for fat mass (p < 0.01) while positive relationship for fat-free mass (p < 0.01), total body water (p < 0.05 for current aerobic capacity and p < 0.01 for historical PA), body cell mass (p < 0.001), muscle mass (p < 0.001), calcium and potassium (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 for current aerobic capacity and p < 0.001 and p < 0.01 for historical PA, respectively) and glycogen mass (p < 0.001). Among metabolic parameters, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and uric acid were significantly associated with most body composition indicators. Regarding endothelial function, a negative correlation was found for RHI and body mass (p < 0.05) while positive relationship for RHI and body cell mass (p < 0.05), calcium (p < 0.05) and potassium mass (p < 0.05). Impaired endothelial function was observed among 8 subjects. Among bioelectrical parameters, impedance (Z) and resistance (R) normalized for subjects' height were negatively related with body mass, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (p < 0.001); while reactance (Xc

  9. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt))

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni, Q-fly) is a major agricultural pest in eastern Australia. The deployment of male lures comprises an important component of several control and detection strategies for this pest. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroac...

  10. Thyroglobulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP Body Fluid ... Medscape Today from Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism [On-line information]. Available online at http://www. ...

  11. Organocatalytic C-H bond arylation of aldehydes to bis-heteroaryl ketones.

    PubMed

    Toh, Qiao Yan; McNally, Andrew; Vera, Silvia; Erdmann, Nico; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2013-03-13

    An organocatalytic aldehyde C-H bond arylation process for the synthesis of complex heteroaryl ketones has been developed. By exploiting the inherent electrophilicity of diaryliodonium salts, we have found that a commercial N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst promotes the union of heteroaryl aldehydes and these heteroaromatic electrophile equivalents in good yields. This straightforward catalytic protocol offers access to ketones bearing a diverse array of arene and heteroarene substituents that can subsequently be converted into molecules displaying structural motifs commonly found in medicinal agents.

  12. Grasshopper ketone 3-O-primveroside from Sinocrassula indica.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hai-Hui; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    A new megastigmane glycoside, grasshopper ketone 3-O-primveroside (1), was isolated from the methanolic extract of the whole herbs of Sinocrassula indica (Crassulaceae). Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral and chemical evidence.

  13. Effects of hypoglycaemia on neuronal metabolism in the adult brain: role of alternative substrates to glucose.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ana I

    2013-07-01

    Hypoglycaemia is characterized by decreased blood glucose levels and is associated with different pathologies (e.g. diabetes, inborn errors of metabolism). Depending on its severity, it might affect cognitive functions, including impaired judgment and decreased memory capacity, which have been linked to alterations of brain energy metabolism. Glucose is the major cerebral energy substrate in the adult brain and supports the complex metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, which are essential for synaptic activity. Therefore, hypoglycaemia disturbs cerebral metabolism and, consequently, neuronal function. Despite the high vulnerability of neurons to hypoglycaemia, important neurochemical changes enabling these cells to prolong their resistance to hypoglycaemia have been described. This review aims at providing an overview over the main metabolic effects of hypoglycaemia on neurons, covering in vitro and in vivo findings. Recent studies provided evidence that non-glucose substrates including pyruvate, glycogen, ketone bodies, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate, are metabolized by neurons in the absence of glucose and contribute to prolong neuronal function and delay ATP depletion during hypoglycaemia. One of the pathways likely implicated in the process is the pyruvate recycling pathway, which allows for the full oxidation of glutamate and glutamine. The operation of this pathway in neurons, particularly after hypoglycaemia, has been re-confirmed recently using metabolic modelling tools (i.e. Metabolic Flux Analysis), which allow for a detailed investigation of cellular metabolism in cultured cells. Overall, the knowledge summarized herein might be used for the development of potential therapies targeting neuronal protection in patients vulnerable to hypoglycaemic episodes.

  14. Asymmetric Direct 1,2-Addition of Aryl Grignard Reagents to Aryl Alkyl Ketones.

    PubMed

    Osakama, Kazuki; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-01-15

    The enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to ketones was promoted by a BINOL derivative bearing alkyl chains at the 3,3'-positions. This is the first asymmetric direct aryl Grignard addition to ketones reported to date. A variety of tertiary diaryl alcohols could be obtained in high yields and enantioselectivities without using any other metal source.

  15. Palladium-catalyzed, pyrrolidine-mediated arylmethylation of ketones and aldehydes with coumarinyl(methyl) acetates†

    PubMed Central

    Cattopadhyay, Kalicharan; Recio, Antonio; Tunge, Jon A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the palladium-catalyzed, pyrrolidine-mediated α-benzylation of enamines generated from aldehydes and ketones. The method allows for direct coupling of medicinally relevant coumarin moieties with aldehydes and ketones in good yield under mild conditions. The reaction is believed to proceed via a Pd-π-benzyl complex generated from (coumarinyl)methyl acetates. PMID:22832549

  16. Efficient Domino Hydroformylation/Benzoin Condensation: Highly Selective Synthesis of α-Hydroxy Ketones.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kaiwu; Sang, Rui; Soule, Jean-Francois; Bruneau, Christian; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-12-07

    An improved domino hydroformylation/benzoin condensation to give α-hydroxy ketones has been developed. Easily available olefins are smoothly converted into the corresponding α-hydroxy ketones in high yields with excellent regioselectivities. Key to success is the use of a specific catalytic system consisting of a rhodium/phosphine complex and the CO2 adduct of an N-heterocyclic carbene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fuel use and metabolic response to endurance exercise: a wind tunnel study of a long-distance migrant shorebird.

    PubMed

    Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Jenni, Lukas; Kvist, Anders; Lindström, Ake; Piersma, Theunis; Visser, G Henk

    2002-08-01

    This study examines fuel use and metabolism in a group of long-distance migrating birds, red knots Calidris canutus (Scolopacidae), flying under controlled conditions in a wind tunnel for up to 10 h. Data are compared with values for resting birds fasting for the same time. Plasma levels of free fatty acids, glycerol and uric acid were elevated during flight, irrespective of flight duration (1-10 h). Triglyceride levels, the estimated concentration of very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were lower during flight, while glucose levels did not change. In flying birds, plasma levels of uric acid and lipid catabolites were positively correlated with the residual variation in body mass loss, and lipid catabolites with energy expenditure (as measured using the doubly labelled water method), after removing the effect of initial body mass. The plasma metabolite levels indicate: (i) that the rates of catabolism of lipids from adipose tissue and of protein are higher during flight; (ii) that low ketone body concentrations probably facilitate fatty acid release from adipose tissue; (iii) that low triglyceride and VLDL levels do not indicate the use of an additional pathway of fatty acid delivery, as found in small birds; and (iv) that the relationships between energy expenditure, body mass loss and metabolic pattern suggest that a higher individual energy expenditure entails a higher rate of catabolism of both lipids and protein and not a shift in fuel substrate.

  18. Study of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthetic benzyl bromides, ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Al-Smadi, Mousa L; Khabour, Omar F; Shuaibu, Fatima A; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2016-01-01

    Several applications of chalcones and their derivatives encouraged researchers to increase their synthesis as an alternative for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial and fungal infections. In the present study, chalcone derivatives were synthesized through cross aldol condensation reaction between 4-( N , N -dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and multiarm aromatic ketones. The multiarm aromatic ketones were synthesized through nucleophilic substitution reaction between 4-hydroxy acetophenone and benzyl bromides. The benzyl bromides, multiarm aromatic ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives were evaluated for their activities against eleven clinical pathogenic Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and three pathogenic fungi by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the microbroth dilution technique. The results of the present study demonstrated that benzyl bromide derivatives have strong antibacterial and antifungal properties as compared to synthetic chalcone derivatives and ketones. Benzyl bromides (1a and 1c) showed high ester activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi but moderate activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, these compounds may be considered as good antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery. However, substituted ketones (2a-b) as well as chalcone derivatives (3a-c) showed no activity against all the tested strains except for ketone (2c), which showed moderate activity against Candida albicans .

  19. Study of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthetic benzyl bromides, ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Al-Smadi, Mousa L; Khabour, Omar F; Shuaibu, Fatima A; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2016-01-01

    Several applications of chalcones and their derivatives encouraged researchers to increase their synthesis as an alternative for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial and fungal infections. In the present study, chalcone derivatives were synthesized through cross aldol condensation reaction between 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and multiarm aromatic ketones. The multiarm aromatic ketones were synthesized through nucleophilic substitution reaction between 4-hydroxy acetophenone and benzyl bromides. The benzyl bromides, multiarm aromatic ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives were evaluated for their activities against eleven clinical pathogenic Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and three pathogenic fungi by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the microbroth dilution technique. The results of the present study demonstrated that benzyl bromide derivatives have strong antibacterial and antifungal properties as compared to synthetic chalcone derivatives and ketones. Benzyl bromides (1a and 1c) showed high ester activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi but moderate activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, these compounds may be considered as good antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery. However, substituted ketones (2a–b) as well as chalcone derivatives (3a–c) showed no activity against all the tested strains except for ketone (2c), which showed moderate activity against Candida albicans. PMID:27877017

  20. Cooperative catalysis by tertiary amino-thioureas: mechanism and basis for enantioselectivity of ketone cyanosilylation.

    PubMed

    Zuend, Stephan J; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2007-12-26

    The mechanism of the enantioselective cyanosilylation of ketones catalyzed by tertiary amino-thiourea derivatives was investigated using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The kinetic analysis is consistent with a cooperative mechanism in which both the thiourea and the tertiary amine of the catalyst are involved productively in the rate-limiting cyanide addition step. Density functional theory calculations were used to distinguish between mechanisms involving thiourea activation of ketone or of cyanide in the enantioselectivity-determining step. The strong correlation obtained between experimental and calculated ee's for a range of substrates and catalysts provides support for the most favorable calculated transition structures involving amine-bound HCN adding to thiourea-bound ketone. The calculations suggest that enantioselectivity arises from direct interactions between the ketone substrate and the amino-acid derived portion of the catalyst. On the basis of this insight, more enantioselective catalysts with broader substrate scope were prepared and evaluated experimentally.

  1. Relation of body weight and food consumption to metabolic rate of juvenile Japanese sea bass, Lateolabrax japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Xin-Hua

    2000-12-01

    The metabolic rate of Japanese sea bass, Lateolabrax japonicus (C & V), was estimated in laboratory at temperature 25.2±0.5°C. The fresh weight of the fish was 4.64 52.28 g (average of 17.81±0.33 g). The routine metabolism was related to body weight by the exponential equation: R r =14.966 W 0.74 ( r=0.934). The rate of feeding metabolism increased linearly with food consumption. Feeding metabolic rate was 1.8 2.4 times the routine metabolic rate.

  2. The Ketone Body, β-Hydroxybutyrate Stimulates the Autophagic Flux and Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Glucose Deprivation in Cortical Cultured Neurons.

    PubMed

    Camberos-Luna, Lucy; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Massieu, Lourdes

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the major energy substrate in brain, however, during ketogenesis induced by starvation or prolonged hypoglycemia, the ketone bodies (KB), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) can substitute for glucose. KB improve neuronal survival in diverse injury models, but the mechanisms by which KB prevent neuronal damage are still not well understood. In the present study we have investigated whether protection by the D isomer of BHB (D-BHB) against neuronal death induced by glucose deprivation (GD), is related to autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent degradation process activated during nutritional stress, which leads to the digestion of damaged proteins and organelles providing energy for cell survival. Results show that autophagy is activated in cortical cultured neurons during GD, as indicated by the increase in the levels of the lipidated form of the microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II), and the number of autophagic vesicles. At early phases of glucose reintroduction (GR), the levels of p62 declined suggesting that the degradation of the autophagolysosomal content takes place at this time. In cultures exposed to GD and GR in the presence of D-BHB, the levels of LC3-II and p62 rapidly declined and remained low during GR, suggesting that the KB stimulates the autophagic flux preventing autophagosome accumulation and improving neuronal survival.

  3. Changes in body composition and metabolic profile during interleukin 6 inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bruno; Dutheil, Fréderic; Giraud, Charlotte; Courteix, Daniel; Sapin, Vincent; Frayssac, Thomas; Mathieu, Sylvain; Malochet‐Guinamand, Sandrine; Soubrier, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by increased mortality associated with cardiometabolic disorders including dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and cachectic obesity. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and interleukin 6 receptor blocker licensed for the treatment of RA decrease inflammation and could thus improve cardiovascular risk, but their effects on body composition and metabolic profile need to be clarified. We investigated the effects of tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanized anti‐interleukin 6 receptor antibody, on body composition and metabolic profile in patients treated for RA. Methods Twenty‐one active RA patients treated with TCZ were included in a 1 year open follow‐up study. Waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure, lipid profile, fasting glucose, insulin, serum levels of adipokines and pancreatic/gastrointestinal hormones, and body composition (dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry) were measured at baseline and 6 and 12 months of treatment. At baseline, RA patients were compared with 21 non‐RA controls matched for age, sex, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome. Results Compared with controls, body composition was altered in RA with a decrease in total and appendicular lean mass, whereas fat composition was not modified. Among RA patients, 28.6% had a skeletal muscle mass index below the cut‐off point for sarcopaenia (4.8% of controls). After 1 year of treatment with TCZ, there was a significant weight gain without changes for fat mass. In contrast, an increase in lean mass was observed with a significant gain in appendicular lean mass and skeletal muscle mass index between 6 and 12 months. Distribution of the fat was modified with a decrease in trunk/peripheral fat ratio and an increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue. No changes for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and atherogenic index were observed. Conclusions Despite weight gain during treatment

  4. Impact of brown adipose tissue on body fatness and glucose metabolism in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M; Yoneshiro, T; Aita, S; Kameya, T; Sugie, H; Saito, M

    2014-06-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is involved in the regulation of whole-body energy expenditure and adiposity. Some clinical studies have reported an association between BAT and blood glucose in humans. To examine the impact of BAT on glucose metabolism, independent of that of body fatness, age and sex in healthy adult humans. Two hundred and sixty healthy volunteers (184 males and 76 females, 20-72 years old) underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography after 2 h of cold exposure to assess maximal BAT activity. Blood parameters including glucose, HbA1c and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were measured by conventional methods, and body fatness was estimated from body mass index (BMI), body fat mass and abdominal fat area. The impact of BAT on body fatness and blood parameters was determined by logistic regression with the use of univariate and multivariate models. Cold-activated BAT was detected in 125 (48%) out of 260 subjects. When compared with subjects without detectable BAT, those with detectable BAT were younger and showed lower adiposity-related parameters such as the BMI, body fat mass and abdominal fat area. Although blood parameters were within the normal range in the two subject groups, HbA1c, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in the BAT-positive group. Blood glucose also tended to be lower in the BAT-positive group. Logistic regression demonstrated that BAT, in addition to age and sex, was independently associated with BMI, body fat mass, and abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat areas. For blood parameters, multivariate analysis after adjustment for age, sex and body fatness revealed that BAT was a significantly independent determinant of glucose and HbA1c. BAT, independent of age, sex and body fatness, has a significant impact on glucose metabolism in adult healthy humans.

  5. Using solubility and Henry`s law constant data for ketones in water

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yaws, C.L.; Sheth, S.D.; Han, M.

    When a chemical spill occurs in water, the extent of chemical contamination is determined by the chemical`s solubility in the water. If contaminated water comes into contact with air, such as in a pond or a storage vessel, the contaminant`s emissions into the air can be determined based upon Henry`s law constant for that particular constituent. A high Henry`s law constant value translates into a greater emissions level. The engineering design and operation of strippers to remove contaminants from water require data for both water solubility and Henry`s law constant. A new correlation developed by researchers at Lamar University providesmore » reliable values down to very, very low concentrations for the solubility of ketones in water. The correlation is based on the boiling point temperature of the ketone and can be used for engineering studies involving health, safety and environmental considerations. Results for water solubility and Henry`s law constant are provided here for a wide variety of ketones. Representative values are about 249,000 parts per million (ppm) per weight (wt) for methyl ethyl ketone (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}O) and 360 ppm/wt for 5-nonanone (C{sub 9}H{sub 18}O).« less

  6. Thermodynamics of the living organisms. Allometric relationship between the total metabolic energy, chemical energy and body temperature in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2017-11-01

    The study present relationship between the total metabolic energy (ETME(c), J) derived as a function of body chemical energy (Gchem, J) and absolute temperature (Tb, K) in mammals: ETME(c) =Gchem (Tb/Tn). In formula the temperature Tn =2.73K appears normalization temperature. The calculated total metabolic energy ETME(c) differs negligible from the total metabolic energy ETME(J), received as a product between the basal metabolic rate (Pm, J/s) and the lifespan (Tls, s) of mammals: ETME = Pm×Tls. The physical nature and biological mean of the normalization temperature (Tn, K) is unclear. It is made the hypothesis that the kTn energy (where k= 1.3806×10-23 J/K -Boltzmann constant) presents energy of excitation states (modes) in biomolecules and body structures that could be in equilibrium with chemical energy accumulated in body. This means that the accumulated chemical energy allows trough all body molecules and structures to propagate excitations states with kTn energy with wavelength in the rage of width of biological membranes. The accumulated in biomolecules chemical energy maintains spread of the excited states through biomolecules without loss of energy.

  7. Sequential aldol condensation-transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions of aldehydes, methyl ketones, and arylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan-Xi; Xing, Chun-Hui; Israel, Matthew; Hu, Qiao-Sheng

    2011-04-15

    Sequential aldol condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones followed by transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions of arylboronic acids to form β-substituted ketones is described. By using the 1,1'-spirobiindane-7,7'-diol (SPINOL)-based phosphite, an asymmetric version of this type of sequential reaction, with up to 92% ee, was also realized. Our study provided an efficient method to access β-substituted ketones and might lead to the development of other sequential/tandem reactions with transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions as the key step. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Raspberry Ketone Protects Rats Fed High-Fat Diets Against Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Zhang, Fengqing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The protective effect of raspberry ketone against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was tested by using a high-fat diet-induced NASH model, and its mechanism was explored. Forty Sprague–Dawley rats with a 1:1 male to female ratio were randomly divided into five groups: the normal control (NC) group (n=8) fed normal diet for 8 weeks, the model control (MC) group (n=8) fed high-fat diet (82% standard diet, 8.3% yolk powder, 9.0% lard, 0.5% cholesterol, and 0.2% sodium taurocholate), and the raspberry ketone low-dose (0.5%) (RKL) group (n=8), the raspberry ketone middle-dose (1%) (RKM) group (n=8), and the raspberry ketone high-dose (2%) (RKH) group (n=8) fed high-fat diet for 4 weeks. After 8 weeks of experiment, all the rats were sacrificed, and blood lipid parameters (total cholesterol [TC], triglycerides [TG], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), liver function parameters (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]), leptin (LEP), free fatty acid (FFA), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), blood glucose (GLU), and insulin (INS) with calculated INS resistance index (IRI) and INS-sensitive index (ISI) were measured in rats. Therefore, we determined the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α activity in liver homogenate and the levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponection (APN), superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). The liver tissues of rats in each group were imaged by electron microscopy with hematoxylin–eosin as the staining agent. The levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST, ALP, GLU, INS, IRI, FFA, LEP, TNF-α, MDA, and hs-CRP of MC rats were significantly increased (P<.05, P<.01). Therefore, the levels of HDL-C, ISI, PPAR-α, LDLR, and APN were significantly decreased (P<.05, P<.01). Compared with the MC group, each parameter in the RKL, RKM, and

  9. Raspberry ketone protects rats fed high-fat diets against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Meng, Xianjun; Zhang, Fengqing

    2012-05-01

    The protective effect of raspberry ketone against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was tested by using a high-fat diet-induced NASH model, and its mechanism was explored. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats with a 1:1 male to female ratio were randomly divided into five groups: the normal control (NC) group (n=8) fed normal diet for 8 weeks, the model control (MC) group (n=8) fed high-fat diet (82% standard diet, 8.3% yolk powder, 9.0% lard, 0.5% cholesterol, and 0.2% sodium taurocholate), and the raspberry ketone low-dose (0.5%) (RKL) group (n=8), the raspberry ketone middle-dose (1%) (RKM) group (n=8), and the raspberry ketone high-dose (2%) (RKH) group (n=8) fed high-fat diet for 4 weeks. After 8 weeks of experiment, all the rats were sacrificed, and blood lipid parameters (total cholesterol [TC], triglycerides [TG], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), liver function parameters (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]), leptin (LEP), free fatty acid (FFA), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), blood glucose (GLU), and insulin (INS) with calculated INS resistance index (IRI) and INS-sensitive index (ISI) were measured in rats. Therefore, we determined the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α activity in liver homogenate and the levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponection (APN), superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). The liver tissues of rats in each group were imaged by electron microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin as the staining agent. The levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST, ALP, GLU, INS, IRI, FFA, LEP, TNF-α, MDA, and hs-CRP of MC rats were significantly increased (P<.05, P<.01). Therefore, the levels of HDL-C, ISI, PPAR-α, LDLR, and APN were significantly decreased (P<.05, P<.01). Compared with the MC group, each parameter in the RKL, RKM, and RKH groups was

  10. Blood Ketones: Measurement, Interpretation, Limitations, and Utility in the Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhatariya, Ketan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remains a common medical emergency. Over the last few years, new national guidelines have changed the focus in managing the condition from being glucose-centered to ketone-centered. With the advent of advancing technology and the increasing use of hand-held, point-of-care ketone meters, greater emphasis is placed on making treatment decisions based on these readings. Furthermore, recent warnings about euglycemic DKA occurring in people with diabetes using sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors urge clinicians to inform their patients of this condition and possible testing options. This review describes the reasons for a change in treating DKA, and outlines the benefits and limitations of using ketone readings, in particular highlighting the difference between urine and capillary readings. PMID:28278308

  11. Metabolism and ventilation in hypoxic rats: effect of body mass.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Matsuoka, T; Saiki, C; Naso, L

    1994-07-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were measured by the flow-through method, and ventilation (VE) by the barometric technique in post-weaning age rats of 50, 100, 250 and 400 g, (5 males and 5 females in each group), at ambient temperature congruent to 24 degrees C. In normoxia, VO2, VCO2 and VE decreased with the increase in body weight (BW), whether normalization was by BW or by BW minus the weights of fat and skeleton; VE/VO2 and rectal temperature remained constant. In hypoxia (10% inspired O2), VE VO2 increased in all groups, to 2-2.5 times the normoxic values, because of a significant increase in VE (hyperpnea) and decrease in VO2 (hypometabolism); arterial PCO2, measured in some 100 g and 400 g rats, dropped similarly. However, the hyperpnea was about twice as large, and metabolism and body temperature decreased significantly less, in the 400 g than in the 50 g rats. The cost (ml O2) of breathing, computed in the paralysed animal artificially ventilated, averaged approximately 0.7% (normoxia) and 2% of VO2 (hypoxia), with no systematic differences with BW. The results agree with the concept that the metabolic response to hypoxia can be an important determinant of the magnitude of the hyperpnea.

  12. Whole-Body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Wenger, Karl H.; Misra, Sudipta; Davis, Catherine L.; Pollock, Norman K.; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Ding, Kehong; Isales, Carlos M.; Hamrick, Mark W.; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Mattson, Mark P.; Cutler, Roy G.; Yu, Jack C.

    2017-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has gained attention as a potential exercise mimetic, but direct comparisons with the metabolic effects of exercise are scarce. To determine whether WBV recapitulates the metabolic and osteogenic effects of physical activity, we exposed male wild-type (WT) and leptin receptor–deficient (db/db) mice to daily treadmill exercise (TE) or WBV for 3 months. Body weights were analyzed and compared with WT and db/db mice that remained sedentary. Glucose and insulin tolerance testing revealed comparable attenuation of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in db/db mice following TE or WBV. Both interventions reduced body weight in db/db mice and normalized muscle fiber diameter. TE or WBV also attenuated adipocyte hypertrophy in visceral adipose tissue and reduced hepatic lipid content in db/db mice. Although the effects of leptin receptor deficiency on cortical bone structure were not eliminated by either intervention, exercise and WBV increased circulating levels of osteocalcin in db/db mice. In the context of increased serum osteocalcin, the modest effects of TE and WBV on bone geometry, mineralization, and biomechanics may reflect subtle increases in osteoblast activity in multiple areas of the skeleton. Taken together, these observations indicate that WBV recapitulates the effects of exercise on metabolism in type 2 diabetes. PMID:28323991

  13. Ketones in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association; c1995–2017. DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones; [updated 2015 Mar 18; cited 2017 Mar 19]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: http://www. ... Testing: What You Need to Know; [cited 2017 Mar 19]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: http://www. ...

  14. Association between ratio indexes of body composition phenotypes and metabolic risk in Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Powell, M; Lara, J; Mocciaro, G; Prado, C M; Battezzati, A; Leone, A; Tagliabue, A; de Amicis, R; Vignati, L; Bertoli, S; Siervo, M

    2016-12-01

    The ratio between fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) has been used to discriminate individual differences in body composition and improve prediction of metabolic risk. Here, we evaluated whether the use of a visceral adipose tissue-to-fat-free mass index (VAT:FFMI) ratio was a better predictor of metabolic risk than a fat mass index to fat-free mass index (FMI:FFMI) ratio. This is a cross-sectional study including 3441 adult participants (age range 18-81; men/women: 977/2464). FM and FFM were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and VAT by ultrasonography. A continuous metabolic risk Z score and harmonised international criteria were used to define cumulative metabolic risk and metabolic syndrome (MetS), respectively. Multivariate logistic and linear regression models were used to test associations between body composition indexes and metabolic risk. In unadjusted models, VAT:FFMI was a better predictor of MetS (OR 8.03, 95%CI 6.69-9.65) compared to FMI:FFMI (OR 2.91, 95%CI 2.45-3.46). However, the strength of association of VAT:FFMI and FMI:FFMI became comparable when models were adjusted for age, gender, clinical and sociodemographic factors (OR 4.06, 95%CI 3.31-4.97; OR 4.25, 95%CI 3.42-5.27, respectively). A similar pattern was observed for the association of the two indexes with the metabolic risk Z score (VAT:FFMI: unadjusted b = 0.69 ± 0.03, adjusted b = 0.36 ± 0.03; FMI:FFMI: unadjusted b = 0.28 ± 0.028, adjusted b = 0.38 ± 0.02). Our results suggest that there is no real advantage in using either VAT:FFMI or FMI:FFMI ratios as a predictor of metabolic risk in adults. However, these results warrant confirmation in longitudinal studies. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Combined NMR and GC-MS analyses revealed dynamic metabolic changes associated with the carrageenan-induced rat pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Lei, Hehua; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2013-12-06

    Inflammation is closely associated with pathogenesis of various metabolic disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. To understand the systems responses to localized inflammation, we analyzed the dynamic metabolic changes in rat plasma and urine associated with the carrageenan-induced self-limiting pleurisy using NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with multivariate data analysis. Fatty acids in plasma were also analyzed using GC-FID/MS with the data from clinical chemistry and histopathology as complementary information. We found that in the acute phase of inflammation rats with pleurisy had significantly lower levels in serum albumin, fatty acids, and lipoproteins but higher globulin level and larger quantity of pleural exudate than controls. The carrageenan-induced inflammation was accompanied by significant metabolic alterations involving TCA cycle, glycolysis, biosyntheses of acute phase proteins, and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, ketone bodies, and choline in acute phase. The resolution process of pleurisy was heterogeneous, and two subgroups were observed for the inflammatory rats at day-6 post treatment with different metabolic features together with the quantity of pleural exudate and weights of thymus and spleen. The metabolic differences between these subgroups were reflected in the levels of albumin and acute-phase proteins, the degree of returning to normality for multiple metabolic pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, gut microbiota functions, and metabolisms of lipids, choline and vitamin B3. These findings provided some essential details for the dynamic metabolic changes associated with the carrageenan-induced self-limiting inflammation and demonstrated the combined NMR and GC-FID/MS analysis as a powerful approach for understanding biochemical aspects of inflammation.

  16. Body energy metabolism and oxidative stress in mice supplemented with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) associated to oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Flavia; Dalalio, Felipe; Teodoro, Bruno; Prado, Ieda; Curti, Carlos; Alberici, Luciane

    2014-10-01

    Some fatty acids may play an important role in regulating metabolism through PPARs activation. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to reduce body fat accumulation and increase body metabolism; this effect has been associated with up-regulation of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and PPARalfa activation. Oleic acid has shown beneficial effects on health, decreasing oxidative stress and improving clinical conditions related to obesity. Therefore, in this work, we addressed the effects of a oleic plus CLA-supplemented murine diet on body metabolism, mitochondrial energetics and oxidative stress in the liver, as well as on other associated morphological and functional parameters in C57BL/6 mice. The diet was supplemented with 2% CLA mixture (cis-9, trans-10 and trans-10, cis-12 isomers; 45% of each isomer) and/or 0.7% olive oil on alternating days (60 days) by gavage. The results showed that diet supplementation with CLA increases body metabolism and reduces lipid accumulation in adipose tissues. Groups that received oleic acid (oleic and CLA oleic) showed decreased levels of total cholesterol and cholesterol non-HDL, and increased levels of HDL-cholesterol. Livers of mice fed a diet supplemented with CLA showed high levels UCP2 mRNA, and the isolated hepatic mitochondria showed indications of UCP activity and increased ROS generation. Oleic acid partially reversed the lower lipid accumulation increasing PPARgamma content, reversed the higher ROS generation by liver mitochondria and improved liver oxidative status. These results indicate a beneficial and secure dose of CLA and oleic acid for diet supplementation in mice, which increases body metabolism inducing UCP2 overexpression/activity in liver while preserving the redox state of the liver. Therefore, diet supplementation with CLA associated to oleic acid may be regarded as a potential strategy for controlling obesity and oxidative stress. Supported by FAPESP. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  17. Effect of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on protein metabolism in whole body and in selected tissues.

    PubMed

    Holecek, M; Muthny, T; Kovarik, M; Sispera, L

    2009-01-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) is a leucine metabolite with protein anabolic effect. The aim of the study was to examine the role of exogenous HMB on leucine and protein metabolism in whole body and selected tissues. Rats were administered by HMB (0.1 g/kg b.w.) or by saline. The parameters of whole-body protein metabolism were evaluated 24 h later using L-[1-14C]leucine and L-[3,4,5-3H]phenylalanine. Changes in proteasome dependent proteolysis and protein synthesis were determined according the "chymotrypsin-like" enzyme activity and labeled leucine and phenylalanine incorporation into the protein. A decrease in leucine clearance and whole-body protein turnover (i.e., a decrease in whole-body proteolysis and protein synthesis) was observed in HMB treated rats. Proteasome-dependent proteolysis decreased significantly in skeletal muscle, changes in heart, liver, jejunum, colon, kidney, and spleen were insignificant. Decrease in protein synthesis was observed in the heart, colon, kidney, and spleen, while an increase was observed in the liver. There were no significant changes in leucine oxidation. We conclude that protein anabolic effect of HMB in skeletal muscle is related to inhibition of proteolysis in proteasome. Alterations in protein synthesis in visceral tissues may affect several important functions and the metabolic status of the whole body.

  18. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Methods: Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets f...

  19. [Power metabolism from neurons and a glia to the whole brain: norm, pathology and correction].

    PubMed

    Zil'berter, Iu I; Zil'berter, T M

    2012-01-01

    The review outlines current state of the thepretical, methodological and applies aspects of brain's energy homeostasis. Authors suggest reconsidering the exclusive role of glucose as an energy substrate (ES) at both neuronal and systemic levels discussing recent research data on qualitative composition of ES pool in the brain. The role of ES alternative to glucose, e.g., lactate and ketone bodies, is examined. The hypotheses of intracellular and astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttles are discussed along with the hypotheses of astrocyte-neuron shuttle of ketone bodies, the selfish brain theory and suppositions on homeostatic versus non-homeostatic ES supply chains. In conclusion, authors argue that exogenous native ES may be used for prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Tofogliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, attenuates body weight gain and fat accumulation in diabetic and obese animal models

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M; Takeda, M; Kito, A; Fukazawa, M; Yata, T; Yamamoto, M; Nagata, T; Fukuzawa, T; Yamane, M; Honda, K; Suzuki, Y; Kawabe, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Tofogliflozin, a highly selective inhibitor of sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), induces urinary glucose excretion (UGE), improves hyperglycemia and reduces body weight in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). The mechanisms of tofogliflozin on body weight reduction were investigated in detail with obese and diabetic animal models. Methods: Diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and KKAy mice (a mouse model of diabetes with obesity) were fed diets containing tofogliflozin. Body weight, body composition, biochemical parameters and metabolic parameters were evaluated. Results: In DIO rats tofogliflozin was administered for 9 weeks, UGE was induced and body weight gain was attenuated. Body fat mass decreased without significant change in bone mass or lean body mass. Food consumption (FC) increased without change in energy expenditure, and deduced total calorie balance (deduced total calorie balance=FC−UGE−energy expenditure) decreased. Respiratory quotient (RQ) and plasma triglyceride (TG) level decreased, and plasma total ketone body (TKB) level increased. Moreover, plasma leptin level, adipocyte cell size and proportion of CD68-positive cells in mesenteric adipose tissue decreased. In KKAy mice, tofogliflozin was administered for 3 or 5 weeks, plasma glucose level and body weight gain decreased together with a reduction in liver weight and TG content without a reduction in body water content. Combination therapy with tofogliflozin and pioglitazone suppressed pioglitazone-induced body weight gain and reduced glycated hemoglobin level more effectively than monotherapy with either pioglitazone or tofogliflozin alone. Conclusion: Body weight reduction with tofogliflozin is mainly due to calorie loss with increased UGE. In addition, tofogliflozin also induces a metabolic shift from carbohydrate oxidation to fatty acid oxidation, which may lead to prevention of fat accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and liver. Tofogliflozin may have the potential

  1. Bedside ketone determination in diabetic children with hyperglycemia and ketosis in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Ham, Melissa R; Okada, Pamela; White, Perrin C

    2004-03-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus marked by characteristic biochemical derangements. Diagnosis and management involve frequent evaluation of these biochemical parameters. Reliable bedside equivalents for these laboratory studies may help reduce the time to treatment and reduce costs. We evaluated the precision and bias of a bedside serum ketone meter in the acute care setting. Serum ketone results using the Precision Xtra glucometer/ketone meter (Abbott Laboratories, MediSense Products Inc., Bedford, MA, USA) correlated strongly with the Children's Medical Center of Dallas' laboratory values within the meter's value range. Meter ketone values steadily decreased during the treatment of DKA as pH and CO(2) levels increased and acidosis resolved. Therefore, the meter may be useful in monitoring therapy for DKA. This meter may also prove useful in identifying patients at risk for DKA in physicians' offices or at home.

  2. Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Associated Metabolic Perturbations in Haploinsufficient Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Nadia; Carneiro, Lionel; Favrod, Céline; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Dix, Laure; Pralong, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1 +/− mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1 +/− mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity (24.8% lower body weight after 16 weeks of HFD), as well as less insulin resistance and no hepatic steatosis as compared to littermate MCT1 +/+ mice used as controls. Body composition analysis revealed that reduced weight gain in MCT1 +/− mice was due to decreased fat accumulation (50.0% less after 9 months of HFD) notably in liver and white adipose tissue. This phenotype was associated with reduced food intake under HFD (12.3% less over 10 weeks) and decreased intestinal energy absorption (9.6% higher stool energy content). Indirect calorimetry measurements showed ∼ 15% increase in O2 consumption and CO2 production during the resting phase, without any changes in physical activity. Determination of plasma concentrations for various metabolites and hormones did not reveal significant changes in lactate and ketone bodies levels between the two genotypes, but both insulin and leptin levels, which were elevated in MCT1 +/+ mice when fed HFD, were reduced in MCT1 +/− mice under HFD. Interestingly, the enhancement in expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver of MCT1 +/+ mice under high fat diet was prevented in the liver of MCT1 +/− mice under the same diet, thus likely contributing to the observed phenotype. These findings uncover the critical role of MCT1 in the regulation of energy balance when animals are exposed to an obesogenic diet. PMID:24367518

  3. Aryl Ketone Synthesis via Tandem Orthoplatinated Triarylphosphite-Catalyzed Addition Reactions of Arylboronic Acids with Aldehydes Followed by Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yuan-Xi; Hu, Qiao-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Tandem orthoplatinated triarylphosphite-catalyzed addition reactions of arylboronic acids with aldehydes followed by oxidation to yield aryl ketones is described. 3-Pentanone was identified as a suitable oxidant for the tandem aryl ketone formation reaction. By using microwave energy, aryl ketones were obtained in high yields with the catalyst loading as low as 0.01%. PMID:20849092

  4. Highly enantioselective alpha-aminoxylation of aldehydes and ketones with a polymer-supported organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Font, Daniel; Bastero, Amaia; Sayalero, Sonia; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2007-05-10

    The first catalytic enantioselective alpha-aminoxylation of aldehydes and ketones using an insoluble, polymer-supported organocatalyst (1) derived from trans-4-hydroxyproline is reported (ee: 96-99%). Reaction rates in the aminoxylation of cyclic ketones with 1 are higher than those reported with l-proline. The insoluble nature of 1 simplifies workup conditions and allows catalyst recycling without an apparent decrease in enantioselectivity or yield.

  5. Metabolism, body size and life span: a case study in evolutionarily divergent populations of the garter snake (Thamnophis elegans).

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, Anne; Vleck, David

    2010-11-01

    We present a case study of metabolism, life history and aging in the western terrestrial garter snake (Thamnophis elegans). Early research in the field supported the rate-of-living hypothesis as an explanation of aging, which was based on an apparent negative relationship between mass-specific metabolic rate and lifespan in endotherms. This hypothesis in its original form has not withstood additional tests and comparisons between the two main lineages of endotherms-birds and mammals, but there is still much to be discovered of the causative links among rate of oxygen consumption, physiology and life history, particularly in ectothermic reptiles. We present data that show adult short-lived snakes, from naturally occurring ecotypes of garter snakes, have higher mass-specific resting metabolic rates at any given body mass (metabolic intensity) across a series of normal activity temperatures (15-32°C). The short-lived ecotype in this geographic region reaches a larger body size, and has life-history traits that place it at the fast end of a pace-of-life continuum (fast growth, early maturation, high reproductive output) relative to individuals of the small-bodied long-lived ecotype. The difference between ecotypes in metabolic intensity, even after acclimation to identical conditions, may reflect evolutionary divergence and genetic differences between ecotypes. The difference in metabolic intensity is not, however, present at birth, so an alternative is that developmental environment may permanently influence metabolic rate and life history. Such developmental canalization could lead to altered gene expression via environmental influences on the epigenome and result in altered metabolic trajectories in the snakes' natural habitats.

  6. A cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on diabetic metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Huang, Yanping; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Shouquan; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-26

    Breath acetone is a known biomarker for diabetes mellitus in breath analysis. In this work, a cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on clinical metabolic disorders of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was carried out. Breath acetone concentrations of 113 T2DM patients and 56 apparently healthy individuals were measured at a single time point. Concentrations varied from 0.22 to 9.41 ppmv (mean 1.75 ppmv) for T2DM, which were significantly higher than those for normal controls (ranged from 0.32 to 1.96 ppmv, mean 0.72 ppmv, p = 0.008). Observations in our work revealed that breath acetone concentrations elevated to different degrees, along with the abnormality of blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride and cholesterol. Breath acetone showed obviously positive correlations with blood ketone and urine ketone. Possible metabolic relations between breath acetone and diabetic disorders were also discussed. This work aimed at giving an overall assessment of breath acetone from the perspective of clinical parameters for type 2 diabetes.

  7. Metabolic and hormonal changes during aerobic exercise in distance runners.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pastor, V J; Ruiz, M; Diego-Acosta, A M; Avila, C; García, J C; Pérez, F; Guirado, F; Noguer, N

    1999-03-01

    A group of long-distance runners is studied in order to clarify aspects concerning neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating organic adaptation to maximum effort, with special interest in the function of the growth hormone in fat metabolism and the possible use of ketone bodies as an alternative source of energy. A test is designed on a treadmill with a gradient of 3% and progressive increases in speed of 2 Km/h every 10 min, starting at 6 Km/h, and continuing until exhaustion. Masks are worn to enable the breath by breath measurement of expired gases and the subjects are monitored electrocardiographically using V5. For blood sample collection an antecubital vein is catheterized with a system enabling the replacement of the blood volume extracted by means of perfusion with physiological saline solution, and the increasing concentration of hormones in the blood is evaluated. The results obtained, indicate that epinephrine as well as GH hormones increase significatively from 20 min of exercise in runners promoting changes from carbohydrates to lipids as fuels to carry out exercise. The concomitant variations in energy substrates support the former hypothesis of work. Moreover, the muscle could employ acetylCoA originating from acetoacetate as an alternative metabolic source of fuel during maximum effort.

  8. Metabolic signatures of insulin resistance in 7,098 young adults.

    PubMed

    Würtz, Peter; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J; Tukiainen, Taru; Kettunen, Johannes; Savolainen, Markku J; Tammelin, Tuija; Viikari, Jorma S; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Ripatti, Samuli; Raitakari, Olli T; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2012-06-01

    Metabolite associations with insulin resistance were studied in 7,098 young Finns (age 31 ± 3 years; 52% women) to elucidate underlying metabolic pathways. Insulin resistance was assessed by the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR) and circulating metabolites quantified by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in two population-based cohorts. Associations were analyzed using regression models adjusted for age, waist, and standard lipids. Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, gluconeogenesis intermediates, ketone bodies, and fatty acid composition and saturation were associated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.0005 for 20 metabolite measures). Leu, Ile, Val, and Tyr displayed sex- and obesity-dependent interactions, with associations being significant for women only if they were abdominally obese. Origins of fasting metabolite levels were studied with dietary and physical activity data. Here, protein energy intake was associated with Val, Phe, Tyr, and Gln but not insulin resistance index. We further tested if 12 genetic variants regulating the metabolites also contributed to insulin resistance. The genetic determinants of metabolite levels were not associated with HOMA-IR, with the exception of a variant in GCKR associated with 12 metabolites, including amino acids (P < 0.0005). Nonetheless, metabolic signatures extending beyond obesity and lipid abnormalities reflected the degree of insulin resistance evidenced in young, normoglycemic adults with sex-specific fingerprints.

  9. Syn/anti isomerization of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones in the determination of airborne unsymmetrical aldehydes and ketones using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivation.

    PubMed

    Binding, N; Müller, W; Witting, U

    1996-10-01

    Aldehydes and ketones readily react with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) to form the corresponding hydrazones. This reaction has been frequently used for the quantification of airborne carbonyl compounds. Since unsymmetrical aldehydes and ketones are known to form isomeric 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones (syn/ anti-isomers), the influence of isomerization on the practicability and accuracy of the 2,4-DNPH-method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid sorbent samplers has been studied with three ketones (methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isopropyl ketone (MIPK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)). With all three ketones the reaction with 2,4-DNPH resulted in mixtures of the isomeric hydrazones which were separated by HPLC and GC and identified by mass spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The isomers show similar chromatographic behaviour in HPLC as well as in GC, thus leading to problems in quantification and interpretation of chromatographic results.

  10. Nickel-catalyzed cycloadditions of unsaturated hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and ketones.

    PubMed

    Tekavec, Thomas N; Louie, Janis

    2008-04-04

    The nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition of unsaturated hydrocarbons and carbonyls is reported. Diynes and enynes were used as coupling partners. Carbonyl substrates include both aldehdyes and ketones. Reactions of diynes and aldehydes afforded the [3,3] electrocyclic ring-opened tautomers, rather than pyrans, in high yields. The cycloaddition reaction of enynes and aldehydes afforded two distinct products. A new carbon-carbon bond is formed, prior to a competitive beta-hydrogen elimination of a nickel alkoxide, between the carbonyl carbon and either one of the carbons of the olefin or the alkyne. The steric hindrance of the enyne greatly affected the chemoselectivity of the cycloaddition of enynes and aldehydes. In some cases, dihydropyran was also formed. The scope of the cycloaddition reaction was expanded to include the coupling of enynes and ketones. No beta-hydrogen elimination was observed in cycloaddition reaction of enynes and ketones. Instead, C-O bond-forming reductive elimination occurred exclusively to afford dihydropyrans in excellent yields. In all cases, complete chemoselectivity was observed; only dihydropyrans where the carbonyl carbon forms a carbon-carbon bond with a carbon of the olefin, rather than of the alkyne, were observed. All cycloaddition reactions occur at room temperature and employ nickel catalysts bearing the hindered 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (IPr) or its saturated analogue, 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazolin-2-ylidene (SIPr).

  11. Nickel-Catalyzed Cycloadditions of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons, Aldehydes, and Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Tekavec, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    The nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition of unsaturated hydrocarbons and carbonyls is reported. Diynes and enynes were used as coupling partners. Carbonyl substrates include both aldehdyes and ketones. Reactions of diynes and aldehydes afforded the [3, 3] electrocyclic ring-opened tautomers, rather than pyrans, in high yields. The cycloaddition reaction of enynes and aldehydes afforded two distinct products. A new carbon–carbon bond is formed, prior to a competitive β-hydrogen elimination of a nickel alkoxide, between the carbonyl carbon and either one of the carbons of the olefin or the alkyne. The steric hindrance of the enyne greatly affected the chemoselectivity of the cycloaddition of enynes and aldehydes. In some cases, dihydropyran was also formed. The scope of the cycloaddition reaction was expanded to include the coupling of enynes and ketones. No β-hydrogen elimination was observed in cycloaddition reaction of enynes and ketones. Instead, C–O bond-forming reductive elimination occurred exclusively to afford dihydropyrans in excellent yields. In all cases, complete chemoselectivity was observed; only dihydropyrans where the carbonyl carbon forms a carbon–carbon bond with a carbon of the olefin, rather than of the alkyne, were observed. All cycloaddition reactions occur at room temperature and employ nickel catalysts bearing the hindered 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (IPr) or its saturated analogue, 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazolin-2-ylidene (SIPr). PMID:18318544

  12. Effect of a transition diet on production performance and metabolism in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Peters, R R; Kohn, R A

    2007-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the change in blood metabolites over time, and to evaluate the effect of dietary energy concentration on ketone body accumulation in periparturient cows. Twenty-eight multiparous Holstein cows were listed in order of their anticipated due dates and assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups: with or without a transition diet. The control group received a nonlactating cow diet [1.54 Mcal/kg of net energy for lactation (NE(L)), 10.9% crude protein (CP), 53.1% neutral detergent fiber (NDF)] from 28 d before expected parturition, and a lactation diet (1.77 Mcal of NE(L)/kg, 16.8% CP, 29.9% NDF) after parturition. The treatment group received a transition diet (1.71 Mcal of NE(L)/kg, 16.8% CP, 35.2% NDF) from 17 d before parturition to 14 d after calving and was fed the same diets as cows in the control group during the third week of lactation. Blood from the coccygeal vein was sampled 3 times per week from 21 d before expected parturition to 21 d postpartum for analysis of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, acetone, and glycerol. There were no significant differences in dry matter intake, milk yield, milk components, body weight change, and body condition score change during the postcalving period. Plasma concentrations of different ketone bodies changed in parallel, stayed relatively constant precalving, peaked after parturition, and then decreased but remained high compared with concentrations late in gestation. Plasma concentrations of NEFA and glycerol changed in a pattern similar to those of the ketone bodies. Feeding a transition diet resulted in a greater area under the curve (AUC) for glucose in the last 17 d of gestation, but in no effect within the first 21 d in milk. Acetoacetate AUC was greater for treatment cows than for control cows across the first 21 d in milk. The AUC of NEFA and glycerol between d 15 and 21 postpartum were greater for treatment cows than for control

  13. Prolonged whole body immersion in cold water: hormonal and metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Deuster, P A; Ryan, C J; Doubt, T J

    1990-03-01

    To characterize metabolic and hormonal responses during prolonged whole body immersion, 16 divers wearing dry suits completed four immersions in 5 degrees C water during each of two 5-day air saturation dives at 6.1 meters of sea water. One immersion began in the AM (1000 h) and one began in the PM (2200 h) to evaluate diurnal variations. Venous blood samples were obtained before and after completion of each immersion. Cortisol and ACTH levels demonstrated diurnal variation, with larger increases occurring after PM immersions. A greater than three-fold postimmersion increase occurred in norepinephrine (NE). There were significant increases in triiodothyronine (T3) uptake and epinephrine, but no change in T3, thyroxine, thyrotrophic hormone, and dopamine. Postimmersion free fatty acid levels increased 409% from preimmersion levels; glucose levels declined, and lactate increased significantly. Only changes in NE correlated significantly with changes in rectal temperature. In summary, when subjects are immersed in cold water for prolonged periods, with a slow rate of body cooling afforded by thermal protection and intermittent exercise, hormonal and metabolic changes occur that are similar in direction and magnitude to short-duration unprotected exposures. Except for cortisol and ACTH, none of the other measured variables exhibited diurnal alterations.

  14. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones and Imines Catalyzed by (CN-Box)Re(V)-Oxo Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nolin, Kristine A.; Ahn, Richard W.; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    The development and application of chiral, non-racemic Re(V)-oxo complexes to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones is described. In addition to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones, we report the application of these complexes to (1) a tandem Meyer-Schuster rearrangement/reduction to access enantioenriched allylic alcohols and (2) the enantioselective reduction of imines. PMID:20623567

  15. Effects of Insecticidal Ketones Present in Mint Plants on GABAA Receptor from Mammalian Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela Eugenia; Marin, Leticia Delgado; García, Daniel Asmed

    2017-01-01

    Background: The genus Mentha, an important member of the Lamiaceae family, is represented by many species commonly known as mint. The insecticidal activity of Mentha oil and its main components has been tested and established against various insects/pests. Among these, the ketone monoterpenes that are most common in different Mentha species demonstrated insect toxicity, with pulegone being the most active, followed by carvone and menthone. Considering that the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) is one of the main insecticide targets on neurons, and that pulegone would modulate the insect GABA system, it may be expected that the insecticidal properties of Mentha ketones are mediated by their interaction with this receptor. Objective: In order to discern the pharmacological actions of these products when used as insecticides on mammalian organisms, we evaluated the pharmacologic activity of ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, on native GABAA-R from rats. Materials and Methods: Determination of ketones effects on allosterically enhanced benzodiazepine binding, using primary cultures of cortical neurons, which express functional receptors and MTT assay to evaluate their cell toxicity. Results: Our results seem to indicate that ketone components of Mentha, with proven repellent or insecticide activity, were able to behave as GABAA-R negative allosteric modulators in murine cells and consequently could exhibit convulsant activity in mammalians. Only pulegone at the highest assayed concentration (2 mM) showed a significant reduction in cell viability after exposure for 24 hr. Conclusion: The present results strongly suggest that the ketone components of Mentha are able to exhibit convulsant activity in mammalian organisms, but functional assays and in vivo experiments would be necessary to corroborate this proposed action. SUMMARY The pharmacological activity of insecticide ketones, commonly present in Mentha plants, was evaluated on native GABAA receptor from mammalian

  16. Concurrent and aerobic exercise training promote similar benefits in body composition and metabolic profiles in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Paula Alves; Chen, Kong Y; Lira, Fabio Santos; Saraiva, Bruna Thamyres Cicotti; Antunes, Barbara Moura Mello; Campos, Eduardo Zapaterra; Freitas, Ismael Forte

    2015-11-26

    The prevalence of obesity in pediatric population is increasing at an accelerated rate in many countries, and has become a major public health concern. Physical activity, particularly exercise training, remains to be a cornerstone of pediatric obesity interventions. The purpose of our current randomized intervention trial was to compare the effects of two types of training matched for training volume, aerobic and concurrent, on body composition and metabolic profile in obese adolescents. Thus the aim of the study was compare the effects of two types of training matched for training volume, aerobic and concurrent, on body composition and metabolic profile in obese adolescents. 32 obese adolescents participated in two randomized training groups, concurrent or aerobic, for 20 weeks (50 mins x 3 per week, supervised), and were compared to a 16-subject control group. We measured the percentage body fat (%BF, primary outcome), fat-free mass, percentage of android fat by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and others metabolic profiles at baseline and after interventions, and compared them between groups using the Intent-to-treat design. In 20 weeks, both exercise training groups significantly reduced %BF by 2.9-3.6% as compare to no change in the control group (p = 0.042). There were also positive changes in lipid levels in exercise groups. No noticeable changes were found between aerobic and concurrent training groups. The benefits of exercise in reducing body fat and metabolic risk profiles can be achieved by performing either type of training in obese adolescents. RBR-4HN597.

  17. Ultraviolet-induced surface grafting of octafluoropentyl methacrylate on polyether ether ketone for inducing antibiofilm properties.

    PubMed

    Amdjadi, Parisa; Nojehdehian, Hanieh; Najafi, Farhood; Ghasemi, Amir; Seifi, Massoud; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Fahimipour, Farahnaz; Tayebi, Lobat

    2017-07-01

    Since octafluoropentyl methacrylate is an antifouling polymer, surface modification of polyether ether ketone with octafluoropentyl methacrylate is a practical approach to obtaining anti-biofilm biocompatible devices. In the current study, the surface treatment of polyether ether ketone by the use of ultraviolet irradiation, so as to graft (octafluoropentyl methacrylate) polymer chains, was initially implemented and then investigated. The Fourier-transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra corroborated the appearance of new signals associated with the fluoroacrylate group. Thermogravimetric curves indicated enhanced asymmetry in the polymer structure due to the introduction of the said new groups. Measuring the peak area in differential scanning calorimetry experiments also showed additional bond formation. Static water contact angle measurements indicated a change in wettability to the more hydrophobic surface. The polyether ether ketone-octafluoropentyl methacrylate surface greatly reduced the protein adsorption. This efficient method can modulate and tune the surface properties of polyether ether ketone according to specific applications.

  18. Human forearm metabolism during progressive starvation.

    PubMed

    Owen, O E; Reichard, G A

    1971-07-01

    Forearm muscle metabolism was studied in eight obese subjects after an overnight, 3 and 24 day fast. Arterio-deep-venous differences of oxygen, carbon dioxide, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, free fatty acids, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate with simultaneous forearm blood flow were measured. Rates of metabolite utilization and production were thus estimated. Oxygen consumption and lactate and pyruvate production remained relatively constant at each fasting period. Glucose, initially the major substrate consumed, showed decreased consumption after 3 and 24 days of fasting. Acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate consumption after an overnight fast was low. At 3 days of fasting with increased arterial concentrations of acetoactate and beta-hydroxybutyrate, consumption of these substrates rose dramatically. At 24 days of fasting, despite further elevation of arterial levels of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate, the utilization of acetoacetate did not increase further and if anything decreased, while five out of eight subjects released beta-hydroxybutyrate across the forearm. Acetoacetate was preferentially extracted over beta-hydroxybutyrate. At 24 days of starvation, free fatty acids were the principal fuels extracted by forearm muscle; at this time there was a decreased glucose and also ketone-body consumption by skeletal muscle.

  19. No effect of adjunctive, repeated dose intranasal insulin treatment on body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Li, Xue; Liu, Emily; Copeland, Paul; Freudenreich, Oliver; Goff, Donald C.; Henderson, David C.; Song, Xueqin; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effect of adjunctive intranasal insulin therapy on body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia. Method Each subject had a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and had been on stable dose of antipsychotic agent for at least one month. In an 8-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, subjects received either intranasal insulin (40IU 4 times per day) or placebo. The whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess body composition. Lipid particles were assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. All assessments were conducted at baseline, and repeated at week 8. Results A total number of 39 subjects completed the study (18 in the insulin group, 21 in the placebo group). There were no significant differences between the two groups in week 8 changes for body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, as well as various measures of lipid particles (p′s > 0.100). The DXA assessment showed no significant differences between the two groups in week 8 changes for fat mass, lean mass or total mass (p's > 0.100). Conclusion In the present study, adjunctive therapy of intranasal insulin did not seem to improve body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia. The implications for future studies were discussed. PMID:23434504

  20. Toxicological effects of cinnabar in rats by NMR-based metabolic profiling of urine and serum

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wei Lai; Liao Peiqiu; Wu Huifeng

    2008-03-15

    Cinnabar, an important traditional Chinese mineral medicine, has been widely used as a Chinese patent medicine ingredient for sedative therapy. However, the pharmaceutical and toxicological effects of cinnabar, especially in the whole organism, were subjected to few investigations. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach has been applied to investigate the toxicological effects of cinnabar after intragastrical administration (dosed at 0.5, 2 and 5 g/kg body weight) on male Wistar rats. Liver and kidney histopathology examinations and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. The {sup 1}H NMR spectra were analyzed using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time-more » and dose-dependent biochemical variations induced by cinnabar. The metabolic signature of urinalysis from cinnabar-treated animals exhibited an increase in the levels of creatinine, acetate, acetoacetate, taurine, hippurate and phenylacetylglycine, together with a decrease in the levels of trimethyl-N-oxide, dimethylglycine and Kreb's cycle intermediates (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate). The metabolomics analyses of serum showed elevated concentrations of ketone bodies (3-D-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate), branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine), choline and creatine as well as decreased glucose, lipids and lipoproteins from cinnabar-treated animals. These findings indicated cinnabar induced disturbance in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microflora environment as well as slight injury in liver and kidney, which might indirectly result from cinnabar induced oxidative stress. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabolomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine.« less

  1. Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation and Hydrogen Production in the Ketonization of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Lina M; Renz, Michael; Corma, Avelino

    2016-09-08

    Aldehydes possess relatively high chemical energy, which is the driving force for disproportionation reactions such as Cannizzaro and Tishchenko reactions. Generally, this energy is wasted if aldehydes are transformed into carboxylic acids with a sacrificial oxidant. Here, we describe a cascade reaction in which the surplus energy of the transformation is liberated as molecular hydrogen for the oxidation of heptanal to heptanoic acid by water, and the carboxylic acid is transformed into potentially industrially relevant symmetrical ketones by ketonic decarboxylation. The cascade reaction is catalyzed by monoclinic zirconium oxide (m-ZrO2 ). The reaction mechanism has been studied through cross-coupling experiments between different aldehydes and acids, and the final symmetrical ketones are formed by a reaction pathway that involves the previously formed carboxylic acids. Isotopic studies indicate that the carboxylic acid can be formed by a hydride shift from the adsorbed aldehyde on the metal oxide surface in the absence of noble metals. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Sequential Aldol Condensation – Transition Metal-Catalyzed Addition Reactions of Aldehydes, Methyl Ketones and Arylboronic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yuan-Xi; Xing, Chun-Hui; Israel, Matthew; Hu, Qiao-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Sequential aldol condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones followed by transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions of arylboronic acids to form β-substituted ketones is described. By using the 1,1′-spirobiindane-7,7′-diol (SPINOL)-based phosphite, an asymmetric version of this type of sequential reaction, with up to 92% ee, was also realized. Our study provided an efficient method to access β-substituted ketones and might lead to the development of other sequential/tandem reactions with transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions as the key step. PMID:21417359

  3. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5▿

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane → 2-propanol → acetone → methyl acetate → acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  4. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  5. Effects of metabolic modifiers such as carnitines, coenzyme Q10, and PUFAs against different forms of neurotoxic insults: metabolic inhibitors, MPTP, and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew

    2005-08-01

    , L-C, together with its acetyl ester, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), also participates in the control of the mitochondrial acyl-CoA/CoA ratio, peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, and production of ketone bodies. A deficiency of carnitine is known to have major deleterious effects on the CNS. We have examined L-C and its acetylated derivative, ALC, as potential neuroprotective compounds using various known metabolic inhibitors, as well as against drugs of abuse such as methamphetamine.

  6. The effects of a low-fat, plant-based dietary intervention on body weight, metabolism, and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Scialli, Anthony R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lanou, Amy J; Glass, Jolie

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of a low-fat, plant-based diet on body weight, metabolism, and insulin sensitivity, while controlling for exercise in free-living individuals. In an outpatient setting, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to a low-fat, vegan diet or a control diet based on National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, without energy intake limits, and were asked to maintain exercise unchanged. Dietary intake, body weight and composition, resting metabolic rate, thermic effect of food, and insulin sensitivity were measured at baseline and 14 weeks. Mean +/- standard deviation intervention-group body weight decreased 5.8 +/- 3.2 kg, compared with 3.8 +/- 2.8 kg in the control group (P = .012). In a regression model of predictors of weight change, including diet group and changes in energy intake, thermic effect of food, resting metabolic rate, and reported energy expenditure, significant effects were found for diet group (P < .05), thermic effect of food (P < .05), and resting metabolic rate (P < .001). An index of insulin sensitivity increased from 4.6 +/- 2.9 to 5.7 +/- 3.9 (P = .017) in the intervention group, but the difference between groups was not significant (P = .17). Adoption of a low-fat, vegan diet was associated with significant weight loss in overweight postmenopausal women, despite the absence of prescribed limits on portion size or energy intake.

  7. Bidirectional communication between the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and the microbiome tunes host metabolism.

    PubMed

    Korecka, Agata; Dona, Anthony; Lahiri, Shawon; Tett, Adrian James; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Braniste, Viorica; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Reichardt, Nicole; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Rafter, Joseph; Narbad, Arjan; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-induced transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is known for its capacity to tune adaptive immunity and xenobiotic metabolism-biological properties subject to regulation by the indigenous microbiome. The objective of this study was to probe the postulated microbiome-AhR crosstalk and whether such an axis could influence metabolic homeostasis of the host. Utilising a systems-biology approach combining in-depth 1 H-NMR-based metabonomics (plasma, liver and skeletal muscle) with microbiome profiling (small intestine, colon and faeces) of AhR knockout (AhR -/- ) and wild-type (AhR +/+ ) mice, we assessed AhR function in host metabolism. Microbiome metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids were found to regulate AhR and its target genes in liver and intestine. The AhR signalling pathway, in turn, was able to influence microbiome composition in the small intestine as evident from microbiota profiling of the AhR +/+ and AhR -/- mice fed with diet enriched with a specific AhR ligand or diet depleted of any known AhR ligands. The AhR -/- mice also displayed increased levels of corticosterol and alanine in serum. In addition, activation of gluconeogenic genes in the AhR -/- mice was indicative of on-going metabolic stress. Reduced levels of ketone bodies and reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism in the liver further underscored this observation. Interestingly, exposing AhR -/- mice to a high-fat diet showed resilience to glucose intolerance. Our data suggest the existence of a bidirectional AhR-microbiome axis, which influences host metabolic pathways.

  8. Raspberry ketone in food supplements--High intake, few toxicity data--A cause for safety concern?

    PubMed

    Bredsdorff, Lea; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Hallas-Møller, Torben; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2015-10-01

    Raspberry ketone (4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone) is marketed on the Internet as a food supplement. The recommended intake is between 100 and 1400 mg per day. The substance is naturally occurring in raspberries (up to 4.3 mg/kg) and is used as a flavouring substance. Toxicological studies on raspberry ketone are limited to acute and subchronic studies in rats. When the lowest recommended daily dose of raspberry ketone (100 mg) as a food supplement is consumed, it is 56 times the established threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) of 1800 μg/day for Class 1 substances. The margin of safety (MOS) based on a NOAEL of 280 mg/kg bw/day for lower weight gain in rats is 165 at 100 mg and 12 at 1400 mg. The recommended doses are a concern taking into account the TTC and MOS. Investigations of raspberry ketone in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models indicated potential cardiotoxic effects and potential effects on reproduction/development. Taking into account the high intake via supplements, the compound's toxic potential should be clarified with further experimental studies. In UK the pure compound is regarded as novel food requiring authorisation prior to marketing but raspberry ketone is not withdrawn from Internet sites from this country. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lower critical temperature and cold-induced thermogenesis of lean and overweight humans are inversely related to body mass and basal metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Kimberly J; Boon, Mariëtte R; Doornink, Fleur; Jazet, Ingrid M; Rensen, Patrick C N; Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    It is colloquially stated that body size plays a role in the human response to cold, but the magnitude and details of this interaction are unclear. To explore the inherent influence of body size on cold-exposed metabolism, we investigated the relation between body composition and resting metabolic rate in humans at thermoneutrality and during cooling within the nonshivering thermogenesis range. Body composition and resting energy expenditure were measured in 20 lean and 20 overweight men at thermoneutrality and during individualized cold exposure. Metabolic rates as a function of ambient temperature were investigated considering the variability in body mass and composition. We observed an inverse relationship between body size and the lower critical temperature (LCT), i.e. the threshold where thermoneutrality ends and cold activates thermogenesis. LCT was higher in lean than overweight subjects (22.1 ± 0.6 vs 19.5 ± 0.5°C, p < 0.001). Below LCT, minimum conductance was identical between lean and overweight (100 ± 4 vs 97 ± 3kcal/°C/day respectively, p = 0.45). Overweight individuals had higher basal metabolic rate (BMR) explained mostly by the higher lean mass, and lower cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT) per degree of cold exposure. Below thermoneutrality, energy expenditure did not scale to lean body mass. Overweight subjects had lower heat loss per body surface area (44.7 ± 1.3 vs 54.7 ± 2.3kcal/°C/m 2 /day, p < 0.001). We conclude that larger body sizes possessed reduced LCT as explained by higher BMR related to more lean mass rather than a change in whole-body conductance. Thus, larger individuals with higher lean mass need to be exposed to colder temperatures to activate CIT, not because of increased insulation, but because of a higher basal heat generation. Our study suggests that the distinct effects of body size and composition on energy expenditure should be taken in account when exploring the metabolism of humans exposed to cold. Copyright © 2017

  10. Association of regular walking and body mass index on metabolic syndrome among an elderly Korean population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soonyoung; Kim, Dong-Il

    2018-06-01

    Aging is associated with increased body fat and lower lean body mass, which leads to increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. This study aimed to investigate the association of regular participation in walking and body mass index (BMI) with metabolic syndrome and its 5 criteria in elderly Koreans. A total of 3554 (male = 1581, female = 1973) elderly subjects (age ≥ 65 years), who participated in the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V) were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Participation in walking activity, BMI, metabolic syndrome and its 5 criteria; waist circumference (WC), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting glucose (FG) levels, triglyceride (TG) levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) levels, were measured. Subjects were categorized into four groups based on the duration and regularity of their walks and BMI. In the regular walking (≥30 min of continuous walking a day, on ≥5 days a week) and normal weight (BMI < 23 kg/m 2 ) group, WC, SBP, DBP, FG, and TG levels were significantly lower, and HDL-C levels were significantly higher, compared to the non-regular walking and overweight (BMI ≥ 23 kg/m 2 ) group. Furthermore, the odds of metabolic syndrome was 4.36 times higher (Odds ratio [OR]: 4.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.37-5.63) in the non-regular walking and overweight group than that of the regular walking and normal weight group after controlling for the influence of age, sex, and smoking status. Moreover, The BMI (β = 0.328, R 2  = 0.152) were more contributing factors than Regular walking (β = -0.011) for metabolic syndrome. In conclusions, regular participation in walking activity and implementing weight control may reduce the incidence rate of metabolic syndrome in elderly Koreans, with weight management serving as the greater influences of the two. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier

  11. Whole-body vibration to prevent intensive care unit-acquired weakness: safety, feasibility, and metabolic response.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Tobias; Haas, Kurt; Wolf, Stefan; Mai, Knut; Spies, Claudia; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Wernecke, Klaus-D; Spranger, Joachim; Weber-Carstens, Steffen

    2017-01-09

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired weakness in critically ill patients is a common and significant complication affecting the course of critical illness. Whole-body vibration is known to be effective muscle training and may be an option in diminishing weakness and muscle wasting. Especially, patients who are immobilized and not available for active physiotherapy may benefit. Until now whole-body vibration was not investigated in mechanically ventilated ICU patients. We investigated the safety, feasibility, and metabolic response of whole-body vibration in critically ill patients. We investigated 19 mechanically ventilated, immobilized ICU patients. Passive range of motion was performed prior to whole-body vibration therapy held in the supine position for 15 minutes. Continuous monitoring of vital signs, hemodynamics, and energy metabolism, as well as intermittent blood sampling, took place from the start of baseline measurements up to 1 hour post intervention. We performed comparative longitudinal analysis of the phases before, during, and after intervention. Vital signs and hemodynamic parameters remained stable with only minor changes resulting from the intervention. No application had to be interrupted. We did not observe any adverse event. Whole-body vibration did not significantly and/or clinically change vital signs and hemodynamics. A significant increase in energy expenditure during whole-body vibration could be observed. In our study the application of whole-body vibration was safe and feasible. The technique leads to increased energy expenditure. This may offer the chance to treat patients in the ICU with whole-body vibration. Further investigations should focus on the efficacy of whole-body vibration in the prevention of ICU-acquired weakness. Applicability and Safety of Vibration Therapy in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01286610 . Registered 28 January 2011.

  12. ANALYSIS OF ALDEHYDES AND KETONES IN THE GAS PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and testing of a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-acetonitrile (DNPH-ACN) method for the analysis of aldehydes and ketones in ambient air are described. A discussion of interferences, preparation of calibration standards, analytical testing, fluorescence methods and car...

  13. The Metabolic Phenotype in Obesity: Fat Mass, Body Fat Distribution, and Adipose Tissue Function.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H

    2017-01-01

    The current obesity epidemic poses a major public health issue since obesity predisposes towards several chronic diseases. BMI and total adiposity are positively correlated with cardiometabolic disease risk at the population level. However, body fat distribution and an impaired adipose tissue function, rather than total fat mass, better predict insulin resistance and related complications at the individual level. Adipose tissue dysfunction is determined by an impaired adipose tissue expandability, adipocyte hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, and local inflammation. Recent human studies suggest that adipose tissue oxygenation may be a key factor herein. A subgroup of obese individuals - the 'metabolically healthy obese' (MHO) - have a better adipose tissue function, less ectopic fat storage, and are more insulin sensitive than obese metabolically unhealthy persons, emphasizing the central role of adipose tissue function in metabolic health. However, controversy has surrounded the idea that metabolically healthy obesity may be considered really healthy since MHO individuals are at increased (cardio)metabolic disease risk and may have a lower quality of life than normal weight subjects due to other comorbidities. Detailed metabolic phenotyping of obese persons will be invaluable in understanding the pathophysiology of metabolic disturbances, and is needed to identify high-risk individuals or subgroups, thereby paving the way for optimization of prevention and treatment strategies to combat cardiometabolic diseases. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  14. Anthropometry and Body Composition of Preterm Neonates in the Light of Metabolic Programming.

    PubMed

    Parlapani, Elisavet; Agakidis, Charalampos; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais

    2018-01-01

    The improved survival of preterm infants has led to increased interest regarding their health as adults. In the context of metabolic programming, the connection between perinatal and early postnatal nutrition and growth with health in later life has brought to the fore the role of catch-up growth during the first months of preterm infants' lives and its association with body fat and obesity in childhood or puberty. A state-of-the art review was conducted in order to assess the way catch-up is evaluated, in terms of timing and rate. Adequate growth is of major importance for neurodevelopment; however, it may compete with adiposity or metabolic health. Studies based on body composition assessment have given conflicting results as regards the effect of early versus late and rapid versus slow catch-up growth on later health, mainly attributed to the lack of established criteria and definitions. Given that adequate early nutrition is crucial for the neurodevelopment of preterm infants, further studies are needed on the role of catch-up growth in long-term outcome, using generally accepted qualitative and quantitative criteria.

  15. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling: From ketone and diamine to pyrazine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kun; Huang, Zhiliang; Qi, Xiaotian; Li, Yingzi; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Chao; Yi, Hong; Meng, Lingkui; Bunel, Emilio E.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative C–H/N–H coupling between simple ketones and diamines was developed toward the synthesis of a variety of pyrazines. Various substituted ketones were compatible for this transformation. Preliminary mechanistic investigations indicated that radical species were involved. X-ray absorption fine structure experiments elucidated that the Cu(II) species 5 coordinated by two N atoms at a distance of 2.04 Å and two O atoms at a shorter distance of 1.98 Å was a reactive one for this aerobic oxidative coupling reaction. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the intramolecular coupling of cationic radicals was favorable in this transformation. PMID:26601302

  16. A Green Approach for Allylations of Aldehydes and Ketones: Combining Allylborate, Mechanochemistry and Lanthanide Catalyst.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Viviane P; Oliveira, Cristiane K; de Souza, Thiago M; Menezes, Paulo H; Alves, Severino; Longo, Ricardo L; Malvestiti, Ivani

    2016-11-16

    Secondary and tertiary alcohols synthesized via allylation of aldehydes and ketones are important compounds in bioactive natural products and industry, including pharmaceuticals. Development of a mechanochemical method using potassium allyltrifluoroborate salt and water, to successfully perform the allylation of aromatic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds is reported for the first time. By controlling the grinding parameters, the methodology can be selective, namely, very efficient for aldehydes and ineffective for ketones, but by employing lanthanide catalysts, the reactions with ketones can become practically quantitative. The catalyzed reactions can also be performed under mild aqueous stirring conditions. Considering the allylation agent and its by-products, aqueous media, energy efficiency and use of catalyst, the methodology meets most of the green chemistry principles.

  17. Metabolic expenditures of lunge feeding rorquals across scale: implications for the evolution of filter feeding and the limits to maximum body size.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Jean; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Shadwick, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Bulk-filter feeding is an energetically efficient strategy for resource acquisition and assimilation, and facilitates the maintenance of extreme body size as exemplified by baleen whales (Mysticeti) and multiple lineages of bony and cartilaginous fishes. Among mysticetes, rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) exhibit an intermittent ram filter feeding mode, lunge feeding, which requires the abandonment of body-streamlining in favor of a high-drag, mouth-open configuration aimed at engulfing a very large amount of prey-laden water. Particularly while lunge feeding on krill (the most widespread prey preference among rorquals), the effort required during engulfment involve short bouts of high-intensity muscle activity that demand high metabolic output. We used computational modeling together with morphological and kinematic data on humpback (Megaptera noveaangliae), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) whales to estimate engulfment power output in comparison with standard metrics of metabolic rate. The simulations reveal that engulfment metabolism increases across the full body size of the larger rorqual species to nearly 50 times the basal metabolic rate of terrestrial mammals of the same body mass. Moreover, they suggest that the metabolism of the largest body sizes runs with significant oxygen deficits during mouth opening, namely, 20% over maximum VO2 at the size of the largest blue whales, thus requiring significant contributions from anaerobic catabolism during a lunge and significant recovery after a lunge. Our analyses show that engulfment metabolism is also significantly lower for smaller adults, typically one-tenth to one-half VO2|max. These results not only point to a physiological limit on maximum body size in this lineage, but also have major implications for the ontogeny of extant rorquals as well as the evolutionary pathways used by ancestral toothed whales to transition from hunting individual prey

  18. Metabolic Expenditures of Lunge Feeding Rorquals Across Scale: Implications for the Evolution of Filter Feeding and the Limits to Maximum Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Jean; Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Shadwick, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk-filter feeding is an energetically efficient strategy for resource acquisition and assimilation, and facilitates the maintenance of extreme body size as exemplified by baleen whales (Mysticeti) and multiple lineages of bony and cartilaginous fishes. Among mysticetes, rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) exhibit an intermittent ram filter feeding mode, lunge feeding, which requires the abandonment of body-streamlining in favor of a high-drag, mouth-open configuration aimed at engulfing a very large amount of prey-laden water. Particularly while lunge feeding on krill (the most widespread prey preference among rorquals), the effort required during engulfment involve short bouts of high-intensity muscle activity that demand high metabolic output. We used computational modeling together with morphological and kinematic data on humpback (Megaptera noveaangliae), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) whales to estimate engulfment power output in comparison with standard metrics of metabolic rate. The simulations reveal that engulfment metabolism increases across the full body size of the larger rorqual species to nearly 50 times the basal metabolic rate of terrestrial mammals of the same body mass. Moreover, they suggest that the metabolism of the largest body sizes runs with significant oxygen deficits during mouth opening, namely, 20% over maximum at the size of the largest blue whales, thus requiring significant contributions from anaerobic catabolism during a lunge and significant recovery after a lunge. Our analyses show that engulfment metabolism is also significantly lower for smaller adults, typically one-tenth to one-half . These results not only point to a physiological limit on maximum body size in this lineage, but also have major implications for the ontogeny of extant rorquals as well as the evolutionary pathways used by ancestral toothed whales to transition from hunting individual prey items to

  19. Process for conversion of levulinic acid to ketones

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dagle, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.

    A method for generating desired platform chemicals from feedstocks such as cellulosic biomass feedstocks containing levulinic acid by decarboxylating a feed stock comprising levulinic acid to generate ketones. This is done by passing a feed stock comprising levulinic acid in a gas phase over a non-precious metal catalyst on a neutral support.

  20. Photochemical studies on aromatic γ,δ-epoxy ketones: efficient synthesis of benzocyclobutanones and indanones.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yutian; Yang, Chao; Gui, Weijun; Liu, Yang; Xia, Wujiong

    2012-04-11

    Irradiation of terminal aromatic γ,δ-epoxy ketones with a 450 W UV lamp led to Norrish type II cyclization/semi-pinacol rearrangement cascade reaction which formed the benzocyclobutanones containing a full-carbon quaternary center, whereas irradiation of substituted aromatic γ,δ-epoxy ketones led to the indanones through a photochemical epoxy rearrangement and 1,5-biradicals cyclization tandem reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Sources and concentrations of aldehydes and ketones in indoor environments in the UK

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Crump, D.R.; Gardiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    Individual aldehydes and ketones can be separated, identified and quantitatively estimated by trapping the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatives and analysis by HPLC. Appropriate methods and detection limits are reported. Many sources of formaldehyde have been identified by this means and some are found to emit other aldehydes and ketones. The application of this method to determine the concentration of these compounds in the atmospheres of buildings is described and the results compared with those obtained using chromotropic acid or MBTH.

  2. One-pot synthesis of β-acetamido ketones using boric acid at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products.

  3. A nickel catalyst for the addition of organoboronate esters to ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Jean; Itami, Kenichiro

    2009-10-01

    A Ni(cod)(2)/IPr catalyst promotes the intermolecular 1,2-addition of arylboronate esters to unactivated aldehydes and ketones. Diaryl, alkyl aryl, and dialkyl ketones show good reactivity under mild reaction conditions (< or = 80 degrees C, nonpolar solvents, no strong base or acid additives). A dramatic ligand effect favors either carbonyl addition (IPr) or C-OR cross-coupling (PCy(3)) with aryl ether substrates. A Ni(0)/Ni(II) catalytic cycle initiated by the oxidative cyclization of the carbonyl substrate is proposed.

  4. Microencapsulated conjugated linoleic acid associated with hypocaloric diet reduces body fat in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Roberta F; Uehara, Sofia K; Rosa, Glorimar

    2012-01-01

    Background Animal studies have suggested beneficial effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in reducing body fat mass and improvement in the serum lipid profile and glycemia. However, these effects are controversial in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of microencapsulated CLA supplementation on body composition, body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome. Methods This study was a placebo-controlled and randomized clinical trial. Fourteen women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome received light strawberry jam enriched or not with microencapsulated CLA (3 g/day) as a mixture of 38.57% cis-9, trans-11, and 39.76% trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers associated with a hypocaloric diet for 90 days. The subjects were monitored to assess variables associated with the metabolic syndrome, in addition to assessing adherence with the intervention. Results There were no significant effects of microencapsulated CLA on the lipid profile or blood pressure. Mean plasma insulin concentrations were significantly lower in women supplemented with microencapsulated CLA (Δ T90 – T0 = −12.87 ± 4.26 μU/mL, P = 0.02). Microencapsulated CLA supplementation did not alter the waist circumference, but there was a reduction in body fat mass detected after 30 days (Δ = −2.68% ± 0.82%, P = 0.02), which was maintained until the 90-day intervention period (Δ = −3.32% ± 1.41%, P = 0.02) in the microencapsulated CLA group. The placebo group showed this effect only after 90 days (Δ = −1.97% ± 0.60%, P = 0.02), but had a reduced waist circumference (Δ T90 – T0 = −4.25 ± 1.31 cm, P = 0.03). Conclusion Supplementation with mixed-isomer microencapsulated CLA may have a favorable effect on glycemic control and body fat mass loss at an earlier time in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome, although there were no effects on lipid profile and blood pressure. PMID:23271912

  5. Microencapsulated conjugated linoleic acid associated with hypocaloric diet reduces body fat in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Roberta F; Uehara, Sofia K; Rosa, Glorimar

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies have suggested beneficial effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in reducing body fat mass and improvement in the serum lipid profile and glycemia. However, these effects are controversial in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of microencapsulated CLA supplementation on body composition, body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome. This study was a placebo-controlled and randomized clinical trial. Fourteen women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome received light strawberry jam enriched or not with microencapsulated CLA (3 g/day) as a mixture of 38.57% cis-9, trans-11, and 39.76% trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers associated with a hypocaloric diet for 90 days. The subjects were monitored to assess variables associated with the metabolic syndrome, in addition to assessing adherence with the intervention. There were no significant effects of microencapsulated CLA on the lipid profile or blood pressure. Mean plasma insulin concentrations were significantly lower in women supplemented with microencapsulated CLA (Δ T₉₀ - T₀ = -12.87 ± 4.26 μU/mL, P = 0.02). Microencapsulated CLA supplementation did not alter the waist circumference, but there was a reduction in body fat mass detected after 30 days (Δ = -2.68% ± 0.82%, P = 0.02), which was maintained until the 90-day intervention period (Δ = -3.32% ± 1.41%, P = 0.02) in the microencapsulated CLA group. The placebo group showed this effect only after 90 days (Δ = -1.97% ± 0.60%, P = 0.02), but had a reduced waist circumference (Δ T₉₀ - T₀ = -4.25 ± 1.31 cm, P = 0.03). Supplementation with mixed-isomer microencapsulated CLA may have a favorable effect on glycemic control and body fat mass loss at an earlier time in sedentary women with metabolic syndrome, although there were no effects on lipid profile and blood pressure.

  6. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Ari, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil) by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A 1 receptors (A 1 Rs) influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A 1 Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A 1 R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days) applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day) alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg). Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day). After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A 1 R inhibition modified (decreased) the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A 1 Rs, may modulate the

  7. Metabolic and hemodynamic effects of sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors on cardio-renal protection in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    The specific sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2 inhibitors) inhibit glucose reabsorption in proximal renal tubular cells, and both fasting and postprandial glucose significantly decrease because of urinary glucose loss. As a result, pancreatic β-cell function and peripheral insulin action significantly improve with relief from glucose toxicity. Furthermore, whole-body energy metabolism changes to relative glucose deficiency and triggers increased lipolysis in fat cells, and fatty acid oxidation and then ketone body production in the liver during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors. In addition, SGLT2 inhibitors have profound hemodynamic effects including diuresis, dehydration, weight loss and lowering blood pressure. The most recent findings on SGLT2 inhibitors come from results of the Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcomes and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes trial. SGLT2 inhibitors exert extremely unique and cardio-renal protection through metabolic and hemodynamic effects, with long-term durability on the reduction of blood glucose, bodyweight and blood pressure. Although a site of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is highly specific to inhibit renal glucose reabsorption, whole-body energy metabolism, and hemodynamic and renal functions are profoundly modulated during the treatment of SGLT2 inhibitors. Previous studies suggest multifactorial clinical benefits and safety concerns of SGLT2 inhibitors. Although ambivalent clinical results of this drug are still under active discussion, the present review summarizes promising recent evidence on the cardio-renal and metabolic benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Effects of abuse pattern of gestational toluene exposure on metabolism, feeding and body composition.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Patricia A; Fata, Ellen; Bowen, Scott E; Jen, K-L Catherine; Coscina, Donald V

    2008-03-18

    Inhalant abuse during pregnancy lowers birth weight and impedes early development. These studies explored the effects of brief, repeated, prenatal toluene exposures in pregnant female rats on body weight, metabolic rate, body composition, and food intake in their offspring. Rats were exposed to 0, 8000, 12,000, or 16,000 ppm of toluene twice daily for 15 min from gestational days 8 to 20. The effects of such exposures on post-weaning litter weights, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide output, and body fat content were determined in 2 cohorts (n=23, n=24) of offspring. Food intakes and weight changes in response to 3 different diets (regular chow, purified diet, purified high fat diet) were examined in another cohort (n=24) from postnatal days 72 to 116. Litter weights showed a significant linear decrease as a function of toluene dose. Offspring exposed to the 16,000 ppm toluene dose displayed statistically lower energy expenditures than control rats. Male rats exposed to 8000 or 16,000 ppm toluene had significantly greater percentage of body fat as well as total body fat than the other groups. Toluene also significantly suppressed weight gain over the time chow was consumed compared to the 0 ppm control group. Finally there were trends for a main effect of toluene dose on food intake during chow and during high fat diet consumption, with rats in the 12,000 ppm group consuming more than the 0 ppm group on both diets. These data suggest that, in addition to other previously documented abnormalities in neurological development and behavior, the physiological regulation of metabolism and body composition in males as well as food intake and weight gain in both sexes may be altered by prenatal exposure to toluene.

  9. Highly stereoselective three-component reactions of phenylselenomagnesium bromide, acetylenic sulfones, and saturated aldehydes/ketones or alpha,beta-unsaturated enals or enones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Xie, Meihua

    2002-12-13

    beta-Phenylseleno-alpha-tolylsulfonyl-substituted alkenes were synthesized via the three-component conjugate-nucleophilic addition of acetylenic sulfones, phenylselenomagnesium bromide, and carbonyl compounds, such as aldehydes, aliphatic ketones, or alpha,beta-unsaturated enals or enones. The reaction is highly regio- and stereoselective with moderate to good yields. Functionalized allylic alcohols were obtained in the case of aldehydes and aliphatic ketones. In the case of alpha,beta-unsaturated enones, functionalized allylic alcohols or functionalized gamma,delta-unsaturated ketones were obtained, depending on the structures of the ketones.

  10. Metal-free trifluoromethylation of aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yupu; Si, Tuda; Yang, Ming-Hsiu; Altman, Ryan A

    2014-08-01

    The ability to convert simple and common substrates into fluoroalkyl derivatives under mild conditions remains an important goal for medicinal and agricultural chemists. One representative example of a desirable transformation involves the conversion of aromatic and heteroaromatic ketones and aldehydes into aryl and heteroaryl β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes. The traditional approach for this net transformation involves stoichiometric metals and/or multistep reaction sequences that consume excessive time, material, and labor resources while providing low yields of products. To complement these traditional strategies, we report a one-pot metal-free decarboxylative procedure for accessing β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes from readily available ketones and aldehydes. This method features several benefits, including ease of operation, readily available reagents, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group compatibility, and scalability.

  11. Metal-Free Trifluoromethylation of Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Aldehydes and Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to convert simple and common substrates into fluoroalkyl derivatives under mild conditions remains an important goal for medicinal and agricultural chemists. One representative example of a desirable transformation involves the conversion of aromatic and heteroaromatic ketones and aldehydes into aryl and heteroaryl β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes. The traditional approach for this net transformation involves stoichiometric metals and/or multistep reaction sequences that consume excessive time, material, and labor resources while providing low yields of products. To complement these traditional strategies, we report a one-pot metal-free decarboxylative procedure for accessing β,β,β-trifluoroethylarenes and -heteroarenes from readily available ketones and aldehydes. This method features several benefits, including ease of operation, readily available reagents, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group compatibility, and scalability. PMID:25001876

  12. Asian Americans have greater prevalence of metabolic syndrome despite lower body mass index.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, L P; Wong, E C; Shin, J J; Fortmann, S P; Lauderdale, D S

    2011-03-01

    To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome for Asian Americans and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs), given that existing evidence shows racial/ethnic heterogeneity exists in how BMI predicts metabolic syndrome. Electronic health records of 43,507 primary care patients aged 35 years and older with self-identified race/ethnicity of interest (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese or NHW) were analyzed in a mixed-payer, outpatient-focused health-care organization in the San Francisco Bay Area. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is significantly higher in Asians compared with NHWs for every BMI category. For women at the mean age of 55 and BMI of 25  kg  m(-2), the predicted prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 12% for NHW women compared with 30% for Asians; similarly for men, the predicted prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 22% for NHWs compared with 43% of Asians. Compared with NHW women and men with a BMI of 25  kg  m(-2), comparable prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed at BMI of 19.6  kg  m(-2) for Asian women and 19.9  kg  m(-2) for Asian men. A similar pattern was observed in disaggregated Asian subgroups. In spite of the lower BMI values and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity than NHWs, Asian Americans have higher rates of metabolic syndrome over the range of BMI. Our results indicate that BMI ranges for defining overweight/obesity in Asian populations should be lower than for NHWs.

  13. Aliphatic C-C Bond Cleavage in α-Hydroxy Ketones by a Dioxygen-Derived Nucleophilic Iron-Oxygen Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shrabanti; Rahaman, Rubina; Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan K

    2017-03-17

    A nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, formed in situ in the reaction between an iron(II)-benzilate complex and O 2 , oxidatively cleaves the aliphatic C-C bonds of α-hydroxy ketones. In the cleavage reaction, α-hydroxy ketones without any α-C-H bond afford a 1:1 mixture of carboxylic acid and ketone. Isotope labeling studies established that one of the oxygen atoms from dioxygen is incorporated into the carboxylic acid product. Furthermore, the iron(II) complex cleaves an aliphatic C-C bond of 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone affording androstenedione and acetic acid. The O 2 -dependent aliphatic C-C bond cleavage of α-hydroxy ketones containing no α-C-H bond bears similarity to the lyase activity of the heme enzyme, cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Oxidative impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation involves activation of protein phosphatase 2A and is prevented by ketone bodies.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Marwan; Rho, Jong M

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies have shown that ketone bodies (KB) exert antioxidant effects in experimental models of neurological disease. In the present study, we explored the effects of the KB acetoacetate (ACA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) on impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in rats by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) using electrophysiological, fluorescence imaging, and enzyme assay techniques. We found that: 1) a combination of ACA and BHB (1 mM each) prevented impairment of LTP by H(2)O(2) (200 microM); 2) KB significantly lowered intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS)--measured with the fluorescent indicator carboxy-H(2)DCFDA (carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate)--in CA1 pyramidal neurons exposed to H(2)O(2); 3) the effect of KB on LTP was replicated by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor fostriecin; 4) KB prevented impairment of LTP by the PP2A activator C(6) ceramide; 5) fostriecin did not prevent the increase in ROS levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons exposed to H(2)O(2), and C(6) ceramide did not increase ROS levels; 6) PP2A activity was enhanced by both H(2)O(2) and rotenone (a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases endogenous superoxide production); and 7) KB inhibited PP2A activity in protein extracts from brain tissue treated with either H(2)O(2) or ceramide. We propose that oxidative impairment of hippocampal LTP is associated with PP2A activation, and that KB prevent this impairment in part by inducing PP2A inhibition through an antioxidant mechanism.

  15. One-Pot Synthesis of β-Acetamido Ketones Using Boric Acid at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products. PMID:22666168

  16. Zinc-catalyzed allenylations of aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Fandrick, Daniel R; Saha, Jaideep; Fandrick, Keith R; Sanyal, Sanjit; Ogikubo, Junichi; Lee, Heewon; Roschangar, Frank; Song, Jinhua J; Senanayake, Chris H

    2011-10-21

    The general zinc-catalyzed allenylation of aldehydes and ketones with an allenyl boronate is presented. Preliminary mechanistic studies support a kinetically controlled process wherein, after a site-selective B/Zn exchange to generate a propargyl zinc intermediate, the addition to the electrophile effectively competes with propargyl-allenyl zinc equilibration. The utility of the methodology was demonstrated by application to a rhodium-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Introduction of an Aliphatic Ketone into Recombinant Proteins in a Bacterial Strain that Overexpresses an Editing-Impaired Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi; Wang, Pin; Van Deventer, James A.; Link, A. James; Tirrell, David A.

    2011-01-01

    A leucine analog containing a ketone has been incorporated into proteins in E. coli. Only E. coli strains overexpressing an editing-deficient leucyl-tRNA synthetase were capable of synthesizing proteins with the aliphatic ketone amino acid. Modification of ketone-containing proteins under mild conditions has been demonstrated. PMID:19670197

  18. OXYGEN 18 EXCHANGE REACTIONS OF ALDEHYDES AND KETONES

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Byrn, Marianne; Calvin, Melvin

    1965-12-01

    Using infra-red spectroscopy, the equilibrium exchange times have been determined for a series of ketones, aromatic aldehydes, and {beta}-ketoesters reacting with oxygen 18 enriched water. These exchange times have been evaluated in terms of steric and electronic considerations, and applied to a discussion of the exchange times of chlorophylls a and b and chlorophyll derivatives.

  19. Whole-body pre-cooling does not alter human muscle metabolism during sub-maximal exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Booth, J; Wilsmore, B R; Macdonald, A D; Zeyl, A; Mcghee, S; Calvert, D; Marino, F E; Storlien, L H; Taylor, N A

    2001-06-01

    Muscle metabolism was investigated in seven men during two 35 min cycling trials at 60% peak oxygen uptake, at 35 degrees C and 50% relative humidity. On one occasion, exercise was preceded by whole-body cooling achieved by immersion in water during a reduction in temperature from 29 to 24 degrees C, and, for the other trial, by immersion in water at a thermoneutral temperature (control, 34.8 degrees C). Pre-cooling did not alter oxygen uptake during exercise (P > 0.05), whilst the change in cardiac frequency and body mass both tended to be lower following pre-cooling (0.05 < P < 0.10). When averaged over the exercise period, muscle and oesophageal temperatures after pre-cooling were reduced by 1.5 and 0.6 degrees C respectively, compared with control (P < 0.05). Pre-cooling had a limited effect on muscle metabolism, with no differences between the two conditions in muscle glycogen, triglyceride, adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate, creatine or lactate contents at rest, or following exercise. These data indicate that whole-body pre-cooling does not alter muscle metabolism during submaximal exercise in the heat. It is more likely that thermoregulatory and cardiovascular strain are reduced, through lower muscle and core temperatures.

  20. Enantioselective synthesis of chiral oxazolines from unactivated ketones and isocyanoacetate esters by synergistic silver/organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pardo, Pablo; Blay, Gonzalo; Muñoz, M Carmen; Pedro, José R; Sanz-Marco, Amparo; Vila, Carlos

    2018-03-15

    A multicatalytic approach that combines a bifunctional Brønsted base-squaramide organocatalyst and Ag + as Lewis acid has been applied in the reaction of unactivated ketones with tert-butyl isocyanoacetate to give chiral oxazolines bearing a quaternary stereocenter. The formal [3+2] cycloaddition provided high yields of the corresponding cis-oxazolines with good diastereoselectivity and excellent enantioselectivity, being applied to aryl-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl ketones.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Thermogenesis and Its Role in Whole Body Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Jose Luis; Reis, Felipe C. G.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes has become a major epidemic across the globe. Controlling obesity has been a challenge since this would require either increased physical activity or reduced caloric intake; both are difficult to enforce. There has been renewed interest in exploiting pathways such as uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-mediated uncoupling in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue to increase energy expenditure to control weight gain. However, relying on UCP1-based thermogenesis alone may not be sufficient to control obesity in humans. On the other hand, skeletal muscle is the largest organ and a major contributor to basal metabolic rate and increasing energy expenditure in muscle through nonshivering thermogenic mechanisms, which can substantially affect whole body metabolism and weight gain. In this review we will describe the role of Sarcolipin-mediated uncoupling of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA) as a potential mechanism for increased energy expenditure both during cold and diet-induced thermogenesis. PMID:29086530

  2. Metabolic profiling of body fluids and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Jäger, Christian; Galozzi, Sara; Barkovits, Katalin; Marcus, Katrin; Mollenhauer, Brit; Hiller, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Metabolome analyses of body fluids are challenging due pre-analytical variations, such as pre-processing delay and temperature, and constant dynamical changes of biochemical processes within the samples. Therefore, proper sample handling starting from the time of collection up to the analysis is crucial to obtain high quality samples and reproducible results. A metabolomics analysis is divided into 4 main steps: 1) Sample collection, 2) Metabolite extraction, 3) Data acquisition and 4) Data analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolic analysis for biological matrices, especially body fluids. This protocol can be applied on blood serum/plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of humans and other vertebrates. It covers sample collection, sample pre-processing, metabolite extraction, GC-MS measurement and guidelines for the subsequent data analysis. Advantages of this protocol include: •Robust and reproducible metabolomics results, taking into account pre-analytical variations that may occur during the sampling process•Small sample volume required•Rapid and cost-effective processing of biological samples•Logistic regression based determination of biomarker signatures for in-depth data analysis.

  3. Citrulline Supplementation Induces Changes in Body Composition and Limits Age-Related Metabolic Changes in Healthy Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Moinard, Christophe; Le Plenier, Servane; Noirez, Philippe; Morio, Béatrice; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Kharchi, Caroline; Ferry, Arnaud; Neveux, Nathalie; Cynober, Luc; Raynaud-Simon, Agathe

    2015-07-01

    Aging is associated with profound metabolic disturbances, and citrulline may be of use to limit them. The aim of this work was to evaluate the long-term effect of citrulline supplementation on metabolism in healthy aged rats. Twenty-month-old male rats were randomly assigned to be fed (ad libitum) for 12 wk with either a citrulline-enriched diet (1 g ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅  d(-1)) or a standard diet [rendered isonitrogenous by addition of nonessential amino acids (NEAAs)]. Motor activity and muscle strength were measured, body composition was assessed, and muscle metabolism (protein structure, mitochondrial exploration, and transductional factors) and lipid metabolism (lipoprotein composition and sensitivity to oxidative stress) were explored. Compared with the NEAA-treated group, citrulline supplementation was associated with lower mortality (0% vs. 20%; P = 0.05), 9% higher lean body mass (P < 0.05), and 13% lower fat mass (P < 0.05). Compared with the NEAA-treated group, citrulline-treated rats had greater muscle mass (+14-48% depending on type of muscle; P < 0.05 for tibialis, gastrocnemius, and plantaris). Susceptibility to oxidation of lipoproteins, as measured by the maximal concentration of 7-ketocholesterol after copper-induced VLDL and LDL oxidation, was lower in citrulline-treated rats than in NEAA-treated rats (187 ± 8 μmol/L vs. 243 ± 7 μmol/L; P = 0.0005). Citrulline treatment in male aged rats favorably modulates body composition and protects against lipid oxidation and, thus, emerges as an interesting candidate to help prevent the aging process. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Body composition and metabolic changes during a 520-day mission simulation to Mars.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F; Macchi, C; Eberini, I; Masini, M A; Botta, M; Vassilieva, G; Nichiporuk, I; Monici, M; Santucci, D; Celotti, F; Magni, P; Ruscica, M

    2018-03-12

    The "Mars-500 project" allowed to evaluate the changes in psychological/physiological adaptation over a prolonged confinement, in order to gather information for future missions. Here, we evaluated the impact of confinement and isolation on body composition, glucose metabolism/insulin resistance and adipokine levels. The "Mars-500 project" consisted of 520 consecutive days of confinement from June 3, 2010 to Nov 4, 2011. The crew was composed of six male subjects (three Russians, two Europeans, and one Chinese) with a median age of 31 years (range 27-38 years). During the 520-day confinement, total body mass and BMI progressively decreased, reaching a significant difference at the end (417 days) of the observation period (- 9.2 and - 5.5%, respectively). Fat mass remained unchanged. A progressive and significant increase of fasting plasma glucose was observed between 249 and 417 days (+ 10/+ 17% vs baseline), with a further increase at the end of confinement (up to + 30%). Median plasma insulin showed a non-significant early increment (60 days; + 86%). Total adiponectin halved (- 47%) 60 days after hatch closure, remaining at this nadir (- 51%) level for a further 60 days. High molecular weight adiponectin remained significantly lower from 60 to 168 days. Based on these data, countermeasures may be envisioned to balance the potentially harmful effects of prolonged confinement, including a better exercise program, with accurate monitoring of (1) the individual activity and (2) the relationship between body composition and metabolic derangement.

  5. Silica gel promotes reductions of aldehydes and ketones by N-heterocyclic carbene boranes.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tsuyoshi; Curran, Dennis P

    2012-09-07

    N-Heterocyclic carbene boranes (NHC-boranes) such as 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidine trihydridoborane (diMe-Imd-BH(3)) serve as practical hydride donors for the reduction of aldehydes and ketones in the presence of silica gel. Primary and secondary alcohols are formed in good yields under ambient conditions. Aldehydes are selectively reduced in the presence of ketones. One, two, or even all three of the boron hydrides can be transferred. The process is attractive because all the components are stable and easy to handle and because both the reaction and isolation procedures are convenient.

  6. Cs₂CO₃-Initiated Trifluoro-Methylation of Chalcones and Ketones for Practical Synthesis of Trifluoromethylated Tertiary Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cheng; Bai, Xing-Feng; Lv, Ji-Yuan; Cui, Yu-Ming; Cao, Jian; Zheng, Zhan-Jiang; Xu, Li-Wen

    2017-05-18

    It was found that 1,2-trifluoromethylation reactions of ketones, enones, and aldehydes were easily accomplished using the Prakash reagent in the presence of catalytic amounts of cesium carbonate, which represents an experimentally convenient, atom-economic process for this anionic trifluoromethylation of non-enolisable aldehydes and ketones.

  7. Following healthy pregnancy by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiling of human urine.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Sílvia O; Barros, António S; Goodfellow, Brian J; Duarte, Iola F; Carreira, Isabel M; Galhano, Eulália; Pita, Cristina; Almeida, Maria do Céu; Gil, Ana M

    2013-02-01

    In this work, untargeted NMR metabonomics was employed to evaluate the effects of pregnancy on the metabolite composition of maternal urine, thus establishing a control excretory trajectory for healthy pregnancies. Urine was collected for independent groups of healthy nonpregnant and pregnant women (in first, second, third trimesters) and multivariate analysis performed on the corresponding NMR spectra. Models were validated through Monte Carlo Cross Validation and permutation tests and metabolite correlations measured through Statistical Total Correlation Spectroscopy. The levels of 21 metabolites were found to change significantly throughout pregnancy, with variations observed for the first time to our knowledge for choline, creatinine, 4-deoxyerythronic acid, 4-deoxythreonic acid, furoylglycine, guanidoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and lactate. Results confirmed increased aminoaciduria across pregnancy and suggested (a) a particular involvement of isoleucine and threonine in lipid oxidation/ketone body synthesis, (b) a relation of excreted choline, taurine, and guanidoacetate to methionine metabolism and urea cycle regulation, and (c) a possible relationship of furoylglycine and creatinine to pregnancy, based on a tandem study of nonfasting confounding effects. Results demonstrate the usefulness of untargeted metabonomics in finding biomarker metabolic signatures for healthy pregnancies, against which disease-related deviations may be confronted in future studies, as a base for improved diagnostics and prediction.

  8. Selective hydrosilylation of alkynes and ketones: contrasting reactivity between cationic 3-iminophosphine palladium and nickel complexes.

    PubMed

    Tafazolian, Hosein; Yoxtheimer, Robert; Thakuri, Rajendr S; Schmidt, Joseph A R

    2017-04-19

    The catalytic hydrosilylation of alkynes and ketones has been explored utilizing palladium- and nickel(allyl) complexes supported by 3-iminophosphine ligands. Palladium and nickel demonstrated distinctly different reactivity profiles, with palladium proving very effective for the hydrosilylation of electron-deficient alkynes, while nickel excelled with ketones and internal alkynes. Additionally, in many cases, regioselective hydrosilylation was observed.

  9. Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Associations of Overall and Central Body Fatness with Circulating Hormones and Metabolic Factors in US Men.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David S; Rohrmann, Sabine; Peskoe, Sarah B; Joshu, Corinne E; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Selvin, Elizabeth; Dobs, Adrian S; Kanarek, Norma; Canfield, Steven; Nelson, William G; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in the associations of body fatness with hormones and metabolic factors remain poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether the associations of overall and central body fatness with circulating sex steroid hormones and metabolic factors differ by race/ethnicity. Data from 1,243 non-Hispanic white (NHW), non-Hispanic black (NHB) and Mexican-American (MA) adult men in the third national health and nutrition examination survey (NHANES III) were analyzed. Waist circumference (central body fatness) was measured during the physical examination. Percent body fat (overall body fatness) was calculated from bioelectrical impedance. Associations were estimated by using weighted linear regression models to adjust the two measures of body fatness for each other. Waist circumference, but not percent body fat was inversely associated with total testosterone and SHBG in all three racial/ethnic groups after their mutual adjustment (all P < 0.0001). Percent body fat (P = 0.02), but not waist circumference was positively associated with total estradiol in NHB men; no association was present in NHW and MA men (P-interaction = 0.04). Waist circumference, but not body fat was strongly positively associated with fasting insulin (all P < 0.0001) and inversely associated with HDL cholesterol (all P ≤ 0.003) in all three racial/ethnic groups. Both percent body fat and waist circumference were positively associated with leptin (all P < 0.0001) in all three racial/ethnic groups. There was no strong evidence in the associations of sex hormones and metabolic factors with body fatness in different racial/ethnic groups. These findings should be further explored in prospective studies to determine their relevance in racial/ethnic disparities of chronic diseases.

  10. Two-carbon homologation of aldehydes and ketones to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Petroski, Richard J; Vermillion, Karl; Cossé, Allard A

    2011-06-17

    Phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes or ketones to unbranched- or methyl-branched α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a protected aldehyde group instead of the usual ester group. A homologation cycle entailed condensation of the reagent with the starting aldehyde, followed by removal of the dimethylhydrazone protective group with a biphasic mixture of 1 M HCl and petroleum ether. This robust two-step process worked with a variety of aldehydes and ketones. Overall isolated yields of unsaturated aldehyde products ranged from 71% to 86% after the condensation and deprotection steps.

  11. A novel microreactor approach for analysis of ketones and aldehydes in breath.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-An; Li, Mingxiao; Biswas, Souvik; Nantz, Michael H; Higashi, Richard M

    2011-11-21

    We report a fabricated microreactor with thousands of micropillars in channels. Each micropillar surface is chemically functionalized to selectively preconcentrate gaseous ketones and aldehydes of exhaled breath and to enhance ultra-trace, rapid analysis by direct-infusion Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). The micropillar reactive coating contains the quaternary ammonium aminooxy salt 2-(aminooxy)ethyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium iodide (ATM) for capturing trace carbonyl VOCs by means of an oximation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of this approach for detection of C(1) to C(12) aldehydes and ketones in exhaled breath, but the approach is applicable to any gaseous sample.

  12. π-Expanded α,β-unsaturated ketones: synthesis, optical properties, and two-photon-induced polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Rashid; Bourquard, Florent; Balčiūnas, Evaldas; Smoleń, Sabina; Gray, David; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Farsari, Maria; Gryko, Daniel T

    2015-02-23

    A library of π-expanded α,β-unsaturated ketones was designed and synthesized. They were prepared by a combination of Wittig reaction, Sonogashira reaction, and aldol condensation. It was further demonstrated that the double aldol condensation can be performed effectively for highly polarized styrene- and diphenylacetylene-derived aldehydes. The strategic placement of two dialkylamino groups at the periphery of D-π-A-π-D molecules resulted in dyes with excellent solubility. These ketones absorb light in the region 400-550 nm. Many of them display strong solvatochromism so that the emission ranges from 530-580 nm in toluene to the near-IR region in benzonitrile. Ketones based on cyclobutanone as central moieties display very high fluorescence quantum yields in nonpolar solvents, which decrease drastically in polar media. Photophysical studies of these new functional dyes revealed that they possess an enhanced two-photon absorption cross section when compared with simpler ketone derivatives. Due to strong polarization of the resulting dyes, values of two-photon absorption cross sections on the level of 200-300 GM at 800 nm were achieved, and thanks to that as well as the presence of the keto group, these new two-photon initiators display excellent performance so that the operating region is 5-75 mW in some cases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Simeon I; Blau, Jenny E; Rother, Kristina I

    2015-08-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients.

  14. A multi-tissue type genome-scale metabolic network for analysis of whole-body systems physiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions provide a biologically meaningful mechanistic basis for the genotype-phenotype relationship. The global human metabolic network, termed Recon 1, has recently been reconstructed allowing the systems analysis of human metabolic physiology and pathology. Utilizing high-throughput data, Recon 1 has recently been tailored to different cells and tissues, including the liver, kidney, brain, and alveolar macrophage. These models have shown utility in the study of systems medicine. However, no integrated analysis between human tissues has been done. Results To describe tissue-specific functions, Recon 1 was tailored to describe metabolism in three human cells: adipocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes. These cell-specific networks were manually curated and validated based on known cellular metabolic functions. To study intercellular interactions, a novel multi-tissue type modeling approach was developed to integrate the metabolic functions for the three cell types, and subsequently used to simulate known integrated metabolic cycles. In addition, the multi-tissue model was used to study diabetes: a pathology with systemic properties. High-throughput data was integrated with the network to determine differential metabolic activity between obese and type II obese gastric bypass patients in a whole-body context. Conclusion The multi-tissue type modeling approach presented provides a platform to study integrated metabolic states. As more cell and tissue-specific models are released, it is critical to develop a framework in which to study their interdependencies. PMID:22041191

  15. Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Pete J; Kirk, Tom; Ashmore, Tom; Willerton, Kristof; Evans, Rhys; Smith, Alan; Murray, Andrew J; Stubbs, Brianna; West, James; McLure, Stewart W; King, M Todd; Dodd, Michael S; Holloway, Cameron; Neubauer, Stefan; Drawer, Scott; Veech, Richard L; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-08-09

    Ketosis, the metabolic response to energy crisis, is a mechanism to sustain life by altering oxidative fuel selection. Often overlooked for its metabolic potential, ketosis is poorly understood outside of starvation or diabetic crisis. Thus, we studied the biochemical advantages of ketosis in humans using a ketone ester-based form of nutrition without the unwanted milieu of endogenous ketone body production by caloric or carbohydrate restriction. In five separate studies of 39 high-performance athletes, we show how this unique metabolic state improves physical endurance by altering fuel competition for oxidative respiration. Ketosis decreased muscle glycolysis and plasma lactate concentrations, while providing an alternative substrate for oxidative phosphorylation. Ketosis increased intramuscular triacylglycerol oxidation during exercise, even in the presence of normal muscle glycogen, co-ingested carbohydrate and elevated insulin. These findings may hold clues to greater human potential and a better understanding of fuel metabolism in health and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Nested Case-Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J; Abubakar, Mustapha; Jenab, Mazda; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Racine, Antoine; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena A; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E N; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Siersema, Peter D; Peeters, Petra H; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika; Palmqvist, Richard; Nyström, Hanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Freisling, Heinz; Kong, So Yeon; Tsilidis, Kostas; Muller, David C; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI) measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1) metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), (2) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men]) were used (instead of BMI) to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a p-value of <0.05 was considered

  17. A rational approach to predict and modulate stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; Gasparrini, Francesco; La Torre, Francesco; Pierini, Marco; Siani, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    An effective strategy to assess and modulate the stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones (C alpha SKs) is presented. The tendency of C alpha SKs to retain or change their configuration in water is analyzed as a function of thermodynamic proton-release attitude of alpha asymmetric atoms inside the structures by linear Brønsted correlations. A molecular modeling procedure was developed to analyze and suggest chemical modifications of C alpha SKs in view to obtain the desired grade of stereochemical stability. The approach was employed to predict the tendency to enantiomerize in water of two ketones (1 and 2) endowed with inhibitory activity against monoamine oxidases (MAOs) and the results were confirmed by experimental kinetics measurements performed in organic medium. As a demonstration of practical potentialities of the approach, four new structures, conceived as simple chemical modifications of 1 and 2, were designed to improve/reduce the stereostability grade of the starting anti-MAO ketones. The possibility to extend easily the procedure to other classes of C-H acids appears of interest.

  18. A Conserved Role for Syndecan Family Members in the Regulation of Whole-Body Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Maria; Klimentidis, Yann C.; Casazza, Krista; Moses Chambers, Michelle; Cho, Ruth; Harbison, Susan T.; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Zhang, Shaoyan; Leips, Jeff; Fernandez, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Syndecans are a family of type-I transmembrane proteins that are involved in cell-matrix adhesion, migration, neuronal development, and inflammation. Previous quantitative genetic studies pinpointed Drosophila Syndecan (dSdc) as a positional candidate gene affecting variation in fat storage between two Drosophila melanogaster strains. Here, we first used quantitative complementation tests with dSdc mutants to confirm that natural variation in this gene affects variability in Drosophila fat storage. Next, we examined the effects of a viable dSdc mutant on Drosophila whole-body energy metabolism and associated traits. We observed that young flies homozygous for the dSdc mutation had reduced fat storage and slept longer than homozygous wild-type flies. They also displayed significantly reduced metabolic rate, lower expression of spargel (the Drosophila homologue of PGC-1), and reduced mitochondrial respiration. Compared to control flies, dSdc mutants had lower expression of brain insulin-like peptides, were less fecund, more sensitive to starvation, and had reduced life span. Finally, we tested for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human SDC4 gene and variation in body composition, metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and sleep traits in a cohort of healthy early pubertal children. We found that SNP rs4599 was significantly associated with resting energy expenditure (P = 0.001 after Bonferroni correction) and nominally associated with fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01) and sleep duration (P = 0.044). On average, children homozygous for the minor allele had lower levels of glucose, higher resting energy expenditure, and slept shorter than children homozygous for the common allele. We also observed that SNP rs1981429 was nominally associated with lean tissue mass (P = 0.035) and intra-abdominal fat (P = 0.049), and SNP rs2267871 with insulin sensitivity (P = 0.037). Collectively, our results in Drosophila and humans

  19. A conserved role for syndecan family members in the regulation of whole-body energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Maria; Klimentidis, Yann C; Casazza, Krista; Chambers, Michelle Moses; Cho, Ruth; Harbison, Susan T; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Zhang, Shaoyan; Leips, Jeff; Fernandez, Jose R

    2010-06-23

    Syndecans are a family of type-I transmembrane proteins that are involved in cell-matrix adhesion, migration, neuronal development, and inflammation. Previous quantitative genetic studies pinpointed Drosophila Syndecan (dSdc) as a positional candidate gene affecting variation in fat storage between two Drosophila melanogaster strains. Here, we first used quantitative complementation tests with dSdc mutants to confirm that natural variation in this gene affects variability in Drosophila fat storage. Next, we examined the effects of a viable dSdc mutant on Drosophila whole-body energy metabolism and associated traits. We observed that young flies homozygous for the dSdc mutation had reduced fat storage and slept longer than homozygous wild-type flies. They also displayed significantly reduced metabolic rate, lower expression of spargel (the Drosophila homologue of PGC-1), and reduced mitochondrial respiration. Compared to control flies, dSdc mutants had lower expression of brain insulin-like peptides, were less fecund, more sensitive to starvation, and had reduced life span. Finally, we tested for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human SDC4 gene and variation in body composition, metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and sleep traits in a cohort of healthy early pubertal children. We found that SNP rs4599 was significantly associated with resting energy expenditure (P = 0.001 after Bonferroni correction) and nominally associated with fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01) and sleep duration (P = 0.044). On average, children homozygous for the minor allele had lower levels of glucose, higher resting energy expenditure, and slept shorter than children homozygous for the common allele. We also observed that SNP rs1981429 was nominally associated with lean tissue mass (P = 0.035) and intra-abdominal fat (P = 0.049), and SNP rs2267871 with insulin sensitivity (P = 0.037). Collectively, our results in Drosophila and humans argue that syndecan family

  20. Metabolic Profiles and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Cordyceps bassiana Fruiting Bodies According to Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seok-Young; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Seong Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic profiles of Cordyceps bassiana according to fruiting body developmental stage were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to detect 62 metabolites, including 48 metabolites from 70% methanol extracts and 14 metabolites from 100% n-hexane extracts. These metabolites were classified as alcohols, amino acids, organic acids, phosphoric acids, purine nucleosides and bases, sugars, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, or fatty amides. Significant changes in metabolite levels were found according to developmental stage. Relative levels of amino acids, purine nucleosides, and sugars were higher in development stage 3 than in the other stages. Among the amino acids, valine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, which are associated with ABC transporters and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, also showed higher levels in stage 3 samples. The free radical scavenging activities, which were significantly higher in stage 3 than in the other stages, showed a positive correlation with purine nucleoside metabolites such as adenosine, guanosine, and inosine. These results not only show metabolic profiles, but also suggest the metabolic pathways associated with fruiting body development stages in cultivated C. bassiana. PMID:24058459

  1. The lateral hypothalamic area revisited: neuroanatomy, body weight regulation, neuroendocrinology and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Bellinger, L L

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews findings that have accumulated since the original description of the syndrome that follows destruction of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). These data comprise the areas of neuroanatomy, body weight regulation, neuroendocrinology, neurochemistry, and intermediary metabolism. Neurons in the LHA are the largest in the hypothalamus, and are topographically well organized. The LHA belongs to the parasympathetic area of the hypothalamus, and connects with all major parts of the brain and the major hypothalamic nuclei. Rats with LHA lesions regulate their body weight set point in a primary manner and not because of destruction of a "feeding center". The lower body weight is not due to finickiness. In the early stages of the syndrome, catabolism and running activity are enhanced, and so is the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) as shown by increased norepinephrine excretion that normalizes one mo later. The LHA plays a role in the feedback control of body weight regulation different from ventromedial (VMN) and dorsomedial (DMN). Tissue preparations from the LHA promote glucose utilization and insulin release. Although it does not belong to the classical hypothysiotropic area of the hypothalamus, the LHA does affect neuroendocrine secretions. No plasma data on growth hormone are available following electrolytic lesions LHA but electrical stimulation fails to elicit GH secretion. Nevertheless, antiserum raised against the 1-37 fragment of human GHRF stains numerous perikarya in the dorsolateral LHA. The plasma circadian corticosterone rhythm is disrupted in LHA lesioned rats, but this is unlikely due to destruction of intrinsic oscillators. Stimulation studies show a profound role of the LHA in glucose metabolism (glycolysis, glycogenesis, gluconeogenesis), this mechanism being cholinergic. Its role in lipolysis appears not to be critical. In general, stimulation of the VMN elicits opposite effects. Lesion studies in rats show altered

  2. Percentage body fat ranges associated with metabolic syndrome risk: results based on the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shankuan; Wang, ZiMian; Shen, Wei; Heymsfield, Steven B; Heshka, Stanley

    2003-08-01

    Increasing attention has focused on the association between body fatness and related metabolic risk factors. The quantitative link between percentage body fat (%BF) and the risk of metabolic syndrome is unknown. The objectives were to determine the risk [odds ratios (ORs)] of metabolic syndrome based on %BF in black and white men and women in the United States and to provide corresponding ranges of %BF associated with a risk equivalent to body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). The subjects were participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and were divided into those with and without the metabolic syndrome. OR equations were derived from logistic regression models for %BF and BMI, with the 25th percentile in the study population as the reference. Ranges were developed by associating %BF with the equivalent risk of metabolic syndrome based on established BMI cutoffs. Four sets (men, women, black, and white) of OR curves were generated for %BF and for BMI by using data from 8259 adults. The ORs for metabolic syndrome were lower in blacks than in whites at any given %BF or BMI. The developed cutoffs for %BF differed between men and women but showed only small race and age effects. A simplified set of sex-specific %BF ranges for the risk of metabolic syndrome were developed. The risk of metabolic syndrome can be established from measured %BF by using either the developed OR curves or %BF thresholds at traditional BMI cutoffs. This information should prove useful in both clinical and research settings.

  3. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.