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Sample records for ketorolac para analgesia

  1. Ketorolac

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Ketorolac may cause kidney failure. ...

  2. A Comparative Efficacy of Propacetamol and Ketorolac in Postoperative Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Ji Hun; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyoung Gon; Cho, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketorolac has been used as a postoperative analgesia in combination with opioids. However, the use of ketorolac may produce serious side effects in vulnerable patients. Propacetamol is known to induce fewer side effects than ketorolac because it mainly affects the central nervous system. We compared the analgesic effects and patient satisfaction levels of each drug when combined with fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods The patients were divided into two groups, each with n = 46. The patients in each group were given 60 mg of ketorolac or 2 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl) for 10 minutes. The patients were then given 180 mg of ketorolac or 8 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl and ramosetron) through PCA. We assessed the visual analogue pain scale (VAS) at the time point immediately before administration (baseline) and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes, and 24 hours after administration. Also, the side effects of each regimen and each patient's degree of satisfaction were assessed. Results There was a significant decline in the VAS score in both groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the VAS scores between the groups at each time point. Satisfaction scores between the groups showed no significant difference. Conclusions The efficacy of propacetamol is comparable to that of ketorolac in postoperative PCA with fentanyl. PMID:26175881

  3. Comparison of intramuscular ketorolac tromethamine and morphine sulfate for analgesia of pain after major surgery.

    PubMed

    Yee, J P; Koshiver, J E; Allbon, C; Brown, C R

    1986-01-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine is a new injectable nonnarcotic analgesic. In a parallel, double-blind study, the analgesic efficacies of single intramuscular doses of ketorolac 10, 30 and 90 mg were compared with those of morphine sulfate 6 and 12 mg. Two hundred forty-one patients were categorized according to type of surgical procedure and severity of pain. Pain intensity and pain relief were assessed for 6 hours by scoring standard verbal and visual analog scales. Patients receiving ketorolac 10, 30 or 90 mg or morphine (MS) 12 mg all had significantly better pain relief in almost all measurements performed than those receiving MS 6 mg (p less than 0.05). Ketorolac 10 and 30 mg were as effective as morphine 12 mg during the entire 6-hour observation period, and ketorolac 90 mg was more effective than morphine 12 mg during the entire 6 hours. Patients with pain related to major surgery (e.g., cholecystectomy and abdominal hysterectomy) were better able to distinguish analgesic potency of morphine than those having less traumatic procedures (e.g., tendon and ligament repairs).

  4. Ketorolac, an injectable nonnarcotic analgesic.

    PubMed

    Litvak, K M; McEvoy, G K

    1990-12-01

    Clinical studies of the injectable nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAIA) ketorolac tromethamine are reviewed, and the chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and adverse effects of ketorolac are described. Ketorolac exhibits anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activity. Although the exact mechanisms of action have not been determined, its effects appear to be associated principally with the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. After oral, i.m., or i.v. administration, ketorolac and its metabolites are excreted mainly in urine. Ketorolac tromethamine has been used for the symptomatic relief of moderate to severe postoperative pain, including that associated with abdominal, gynecologic, oral, orthopedic, or urologic surgery. Ketorolac has also been used for the relief of acute renal colic, pain associated with trauma, and visceral pain associated with cancer. When administered i.m., ketorolac produced analgesia comparable to that of i.m. doses of meperidine, pentazocine, or morphine. The most common adverse effects associated with short-term administration are nervous system and gastrointestinal effects; these are usually mild and occur in about 39% of patients. Unlike opiate analgesics, ketorolac does not appear to cause tolerance or physical dependence in patients receiving long-term therapy. Ketorolac tromethamine has been administered concomitantly with morphine or meperidine without apparent adverse interaction. For short-term pain management, an initial i.m. ketorolac tromethamine loading dose of 30 or 60 mg is recommended. Ketorolac tromethamine appears to be as effective as morphine or meperidine for short-term management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. It lacks the respiratory depressant effects of opiate analgesics but shares the toxic potentials of other NSAIAs.

  5. Epidural hematoma after thoracic epidural analgesia in a patient treated with ketorolac, mefenamic acid, and naftazone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Kim, Seok-Kon; Kim, Juri

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male undergoing thoracotomy and bleeding control received a preoperative thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred and urgent magnetic resonance imaging showed massive anterior epidural hematoma. During laminectomy and decompression, platelet dysfunction was diagnosed and preoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs medications were supposed to the cause of platelet dysfunction. After infusion of ten units of platelet concentrate, coagulopathy was improved. We should be more careful to drugs with antiplatelet effect when using regional analgesia. PMID:24729848

  6. Ketorolac Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... if you have or have ever had ulcers, holes, or bleeding in your stomach or intestine, or ...

  7. Ketorolac Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Ketorolac may cause an increased ...

  8. Perioperative ketorolac tromethamine and postoperative hemorrhage in cases of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Blauth, J; Fornadley, J A

    1995-06-01

    The charts of 258 patients undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy between June 1991 and June 1993 were reviewed. One hundred sixty-nine of these patients received ketorolac tromethamine during the perioperative period as a nonnarcotic alternative for postoperative pain management. The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage among patients who received ketorolac tromethamine was 10.1%, compared to 2.2% in those patients who received narcotic analgesia only. The average time to adequate oral intake and discharge was evaluated. Ketorolac appeared to moderately decrease the time to adequate oral intake. The use of ketorolac did not significantly alter the time to discharge. The increased incidence of postoperative hemorrhage in patients receiving ketorolac should be considered before this medication is used in the perioperative period. The risk/benefit ratio of ketorolac use as a postoperative analgesic may be better demonstrated in a prospective study.

  9. Ketorolac: a new parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Lassen, K; Epstein-Stiles, M; Olsson, G L

    1992-08-01

    Providing adequate pain control with minimal side effects in inpatient and ambulatory settings is a continuous challenge to the PACU nurse. Ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol, Syntex, Palo Alto, CA) is a new parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) approved for use in the United States. Ketorolac is useful in the management of short term, moderate to severe postoperative pain. It is used by itself or as an adjunct to traditional opioid analgesics. Ketorolac, like other NSAIDs, has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. Unlike morphine or meperidine, ketorolac does not bind to opioid receptors and is not a centrally acting agent. Administered intramuscularly, peak plasma levels are reached in 45 to 50 minutes. It is administered as a 30- or 60-mg intramuscular (IM) loading dose followed by 15- or 30-mg doses IM every 6 hours, with a maximum first-day dose of 150 mg and 120 mg on subsequent days up to a recommended maximum of 5 days. The lower dose range is recommended for elderly patients, patients weighing less than 50 kg, and patients with impaired kidney function. Initial studies show that use of ketorolac decreases the overall amount of opioid analgesia needed for postoperative pain control. To date, reported occurrence of side effects is low. A case study presents a healthy ambulatory surgical patient admitted for inguinal hernia repair using epidural anesthesia. Use of ketorolac has shown initial favorable results. More research is needed to further define its role and side effects in postoperative pain management.

  10. The Effect of Preoperative Ketorolac on WBC Response and Pain in Laparoscopic Surgery for Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Surgical stress causes changes in the composition of white blood cells (WBCs). Ketorolac is believed to have analgesic effects and to reduce the stress response and may therefore improve postoperative outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preoperative ketorolac on the WBC subsets in patients who had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis. Fifty patients who had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the ketorolac group (n = 25) received ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg before the induction of anesthesia, and the control group (n = 25) received saline. White cell count, differential, and pathology studies were done immediately after surgery, on postoperative day 1, and on postoperative day 3. We compared the baseline values within and between the two groups. We also assessed postoperative pain and side effects. The time that elapsed before the first patient request for analgesia, total meperidine dose and VAS (Visual Analog Scale) for postoperative pain were significantly lower in the ketorolac group than in the control group. Compared to the pre- surgical values, there was an increase in total WBC count and percentage of neutrophils, but a decrease in percentages of lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and leucocytes. Total WBC count, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils and leucocytes showed significant differences between the two groups. The incidences of postoperative side effects, such as nausea, dizziness, headache, and shoulder pain were not different between the groups. Preoperative ketorolac reduced postoperative pain and influenced the WBC response in laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis. PMID:16385658

  11. The efficacy of ketorolac as an adjunct to the Bier block for controlling postoperative pain following nontraumatic hand and wrist surgery.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jesse J; Villecco, Dante J; Dehner, Bryan K; Burkard, Joseph F; Osborne, Lisa A; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2008-10-01

    Research indicates that using a combination of ketorolac and lidocaine in the administration of a Bier block results in significant postoperative analgesia and decreased inflammation; however, the optimal dose of ketorolac to coadminister with the local anesthetic has not been established. This study was performed to determine if a 20-mg dose of ketorolac is effective in providing prolonged postoperative analgesia without adverse effects. A total of 55 patients (29 lidocaine-ketorolac, 26 lidocaine-placebo) were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Pain was measured using a 0 to 10 visual analogue scale and analysis of postoperative analgesic requirements. Incidence of bruising and postoperative analgesic satisfaction scores were determined 48 hours following discharge. No difference in demographic variables, adverse effect profiles, or satisfaction scores was noted between groups. Visual analogue scale scores were increased in the placebo group in the hospital but not following discharge to home. There was also a prolonged time to postoperative analgesic requests in the ketorolac group compared with the placebo group following discharge to home, achieving statistical significance for the time to second analgesic request (P = .012). Based on the results of this study we recommend that 20 mg ketorolac be considered in intravenous regional anesthesia.

  12. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after third molar surgery: A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario-Alberto; Martinez-Rider, Ricardo; Perez-Urizar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia is considered an alternative for treating the postsurgical pain of third molar removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after a mandibular third molar surgery. Material and Methods A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups using a series of random numbers: Group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg plus intramuscular placebo (1 mL saline solution); or Group B, oral placebo (similar tablet to oral ketorolac) plus intramuscular tramadol 50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution. These treatments were given 30 min before the surgery. We evaluated the time of first analgesic rescue medication, pain intensity, total analgesic consumption and adverse effects. Results Patients taking oral ketorolac had longer time of analgesic covering and less postoperative pain when compared with patients receiving intramuscular tramadol. Conclusions According to the VAS and AUC results, this study suggests that 10 mg of oral ketorolac had superior analgesic effect than 50 mg of tramadol when administered before a mandibular third molar surgery. Key words:Ketorolac, tramadol, third molar surgery, pain, preemptive analgesia. PMID:27475688

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Preemptive Analgesic Effect of Injected Intramuscular Diclofenac and Ketorolac after Third Molar Surgery- A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Deepthi; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Analgesia pre-emptively administered effect-ively aid in management of pain. Pre-emptive analgesia is anti-nociceptive treatment which prevents altered central sensitization of afferent inputs. Aim To compare and evaluate the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of preoperatively administered ketorolac and diclofenac for controlling postoperative pain after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients with symmetrically impacted third molars were divided into two groups, 30mg intramuscular injection of ketorolac and 75 mg diclofenac sodium were used in the respective groups. The visual analogue scale was used to assess post operative pain for three days and the patients were also evaluated for the number of rescue analgesia. Results The data was statistically evaluated with paired t- test. The maximum time taken for pain perception for Group A Ketoralac was 5.48 hrs and Group B Diclofenac sodium was 4.9 hrs and p=0.235 which was not significant. The mean number of tablets taken by the patients in the first three post operative days was 3.24 in Group A i.e., Ketorolac and 4.04 in Group B i.e., Diclofenac sodium. The values were compared using the paired t test. The p value = 0.004, which was significant. Conclusion Ketoralac showed better pre-emptive analgesic effect for post-operative pain management after third molar extraction. The immediate post-operative pain free period provided by both ketorolac and diclofenac by intramuscular route was same. PMID:27504398

  14. Ketorolac: a parenteral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Resman-Targoff, B H

    1990-11-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine is a pyrrolo-pyrrole nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with potent analgesic effects when administered intramuscularly for the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac is well absorbed and has a rapid onset of action. Maximum plasma concentrations are achieved in 45-50 minutes and peak analgesic effects in about one to two hours following intramuscular injection. Ketorolac is more than 99 percent bound to plasma proteins and has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 0.11-0.25 L/kg. About 91 percent of a dose is excreted in urine, mostly as inactive metabolites, and approximately 6 percent is eliminated in feces. The elimination half-life, approximately four to six hours, increases in elderly patients and those with renal impairment. Its analgesic effectiveness was similar or superior to that of morphine, meperidine, or pentazocine in single-dose studies of patients with postoperative pain or renal colic and greater than that of placebo in patients with chronic cancer pain. The adverse effects are generally mild to moderate, self-limiting, and similar to those seen with other prostaglandin inhibitors. Ketorolac has a reversible inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. It can cause dose-related gastric ulcerations, even when administered parenterally. Ketorolac is a promising parenteral alternative to oral NSAIDs and a nonnarcotic alternative to opioid analgesics. Additional multiple-dose studies are needed to more clearly define its place in therapy.

  15. Use of ketorolac in renal colic.

    PubMed

    Di Trolio, R N; Sing, R F; Bates, G M

    1999-11-01

    Intravenously administered ketorolac tromethamine provided complete pain relief to a 54-year-old man with right-sided testicular pain and nausea and vomiting. The patient had a ureteral calculus documented by computed tomography. This patient's pain initially failed to respond to intravenously administered hydromorphone hydrochloride. Subsequently, he was admitted to the hospital and had operative removal of his ureteral calculus and placement of a ureteral stent. Based on their findings and review of the literature, the authors recommend that intravenous ketorolac be used as the first-line treatment for acute renal colic in patients in whom the medication is not contraindicated.

  16. NSAID nephrotoxicity revisited: acute renal failure due to parenteral ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Perazella, M A; Buller, G K

    1993-12-01

    The success of ketorolac as a nonnarcotic analgesic is likely to propagate its widespread use to control moderate to severe postoperative pain. Indeed, of the patients treated with ketorolac and described in the medical literature, nearly 90% had had a major surgical procedure. Since any such procedure may be associated with significant third-spacing of the fluid and result in renal hypoperfusion, care must be taken in administering ketorolac. Close attention to urine output and parameters of renal function must be maintained. Moreover, postoperative ketorolac therapy should be avoided in patients who have conditions that predispose to NSAID nephrotoxicity (as in our Case 1). Likewise, in nonsurgical patients the same degree of caution should be used with ketorolac as with any oral NSAID. Finally, since ketorolac is excreted almost entirely by the kidney, either elderly patients or patients with underlying renal insufficiency must have an adjustment of the dosing interval, or this medication should be avoided in such patients altogether.

  17. [Use of analgesia and sedation in dental implantology in patients with concomitant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sitkin, S I; Davydova, O B; Kostin, I O; Gasparian, A L

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants surgery in patients with hypertension increases the risk of vascular complications. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of analgesia and sedation on blood pressure and postoperative pain in dental implantology. In 76 patients with hypertension implant surgery was performed under local anesthesia only (40 patients) or under local anesthesia with propofol sedation and pre-emptive analgesia with ketorolac (36 patients). Intraoperative systolic blood pressure in the second group was 20% less than in the first group while the intensity of pain in the postoperative period in the second group was three times less than in the first one. Propofol sedation in dental implantology provides hemodynamic stability in patients with concomitant hypertension and preemptive analgesia with ketorolac allows minimizing postoperative pain.

  18. Evaluation of analgesic efficacy of bromfenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.09% versus ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solution 0.5% following LASEK or Epi-LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Jing; Wong, Sze H; Givergis, Roshan; Chynn, Emil W

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of bromfenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.09% compared with ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solution 0.5% in laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) or epithelial keratomileusis (epi-LASEK), sometimes referred to as epi-LASIK. Methods Eighty eyes (from 40 patients, 18 men and 22 women) undergoing bilateral simultaneous LASEK or epi-LASEK were randomized to receive ketorolac in one eye and bromfenac in the other. Mean age was 33.13 ± 9.34 years. One drop of bromfenac or ketorolac was instilled in each eye 15 minutes and one minute prior to surgery, and two and four hours following surgery. Patients were instructed to instill the medications on-label each day through postoperative day 4. The subjects completed pain and visual blurriness assessments from day of surgery to postoperative day 4. Uncorrected visual acuity was tested on postoperative days 1 and 6. Results For each of the five days, pain scores for bromfenac-treated eyes were significantly less than that for ketorolac-treated eyes (P < 0.01). Of the 40 patients, 32 (80%) said bromfenac provided better postoperative analgesia than ketorolac. There was no statistically significant difference in visual blurriness scores between the two groups (P > 0.1). Uncorrected visual acuity did not vary significantly between the treatment groups (P > 0.1). No serious adverse events were noted. Conclusion Bromfenac is subjectively superior to ketorolac in reducing postoperative pain following LASEK or epi-LASEK. The subjects tolerated the drugs well with no serious adverse outcomes and no difference in uncorrected visual acuity. PMID:22034570

  19. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  20. [Perioperative analgesia in adults : The concept of balanced analgesia.].

    PubMed

    Jage, J

    1993-09-01

    systemic analgesics (opioids in low dosages) with nonsteroidal analgesics (e.g. diclofenac or ketorolac) and the combination of regional analgesic procedures with opioids have been shown to be very effective. The peripheral action of morphine offers new options in pain therapy. Different regional analgesic techniques and continuous infusions of local analgesics are described. The synergistic action of low dosages of local anaesthetics (bupivacaine 0.006%) with low dosages of fentanyl 0.0001-0.0002% are of interest for the treatment of obstetric pain and for pain in opioid-tolerant patients. Investigations performed by the author of this review have shown that epidural infusion of highly diluted mixtures of bupivacaine/fentanyl is highly effective in the analgesic treatment of patients undergoing prostatectomy, providing excellent physical mobilization. The potential dangers of drug combinations and contraindications are also discussed. The concept of using balanced analgesia to induce additive or synergistic effects following the administration of analgesic drugs requires further clinical studies. PMID:18415399

  1. Obstetric Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Thistlewood, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article deals with current knowledge about labour pain; the effects of labour pain on the parturient, the fetus, and uterine activity; the benefits and risks of the various labour-pain options; and the parturient's right to exercise informed choice of analgesia options. PMID:21253234

  2. Impact of ester promoieties on transdermal delivery of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Yin-Ku; Chang, Shu-Hao; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-03-01

    Different types of ketorolac ester prodrugs incorporating tert-butyl (KT), benzyl (KB), heptyl (KH), and diketorolac heptyl (DKH) promoieties were synthesized for the comparison of percutaneous penetration. The prodrugs were characterized according to their melting point, capacity factor, lipophilicity, solubility in 30% ethanol/buffer, enzymatic hydrolysis, in vitro skin permeation, hair follicle accumulation, and in vivo skin tolerance. Interactions between the prodrugs and esterases were predicted by molecular docking. Both equimolar suspensions and saturated solutions in 30% ethanol/pH 7.4 buffer were employed as the applied dose. All of the prodrugs exhibited a lower melting point than ketorolac. The lipophilicity increased in the following order: ketorolac < KT < KB < KH < DKH. The prodrugs were rapidly hydrolyzed to the parent drug in esterase medium, skin homogenate, and plasma, with KT and KB exhibiting higher degradation rates. KT exhibited the highest skin permeation, followed by KB. The flux of KT and KB exceeded that of ketorolac by 2.5-fold and twofold, respectively. KH and DKH did not improve ketorolac permeation but exhibited a sustained release behavior. KT and KH revealed selective absorption into follicles and a threefold greater follicular uptake compared with ketorolac. KB, KH, and DKH slightly but significantly increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) after consecutive administration for 7 days, whereas ketorolac and KT exhibited no influence on TEWL. According to the experimental results, it can be concluded that an optimal balance between lipophilicity and aqueous solubility is important in the design of a successful prodrug. The acceptable skin tolerance for safe application is also an important consideration. PMID:24481782

  3. Impact of ester promoieties on transdermal delivery of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Yin-Ku; Chang, Shu-Hao; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-03-01

    Different types of ketorolac ester prodrugs incorporating tert-butyl (KT), benzyl (KB), heptyl (KH), and diketorolac heptyl (DKH) promoieties were synthesized for the comparison of percutaneous penetration. The prodrugs were characterized according to their melting point, capacity factor, lipophilicity, solubility in 30% ethanol/buffer, enzymatic hydrolysis, in vitro skin permeation, hair follicle accumulation, and in vivo skin tolerance. Interactions between the prodrugs and esterases were predicted by molecular docking. Both equimolar suspensions and saturated solutions in 30% ethanol/pH 7.4 buffer were employed as the applied dose. All of the prodrugs exhibited a lower melting point than ketorolac. The lipophilicity increased in the following order: ketorolac < KT < KB < KH < DKH. The prodrugs were rapidly hydrolyzed to the parent drug in esterase medium, skin homogenate, and plasma, with KT and KB exhibiting higher degradation rates. KT exhibited the highest skin permeation, followed by KB. The flux of KT and KB exceeded that of ketorolac by 2.5-fold and twofold, respectively. KH and DKH did not improve ketorolac permeation but exhibited a sustained release behavior. KT and KH revealed selective absorption into follicles and a threefold greater follicular uptake compared with ketorolac. KB, KH, and DKH slightly but significantly increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) after consecutive administration for 7 days, whereas ketorolac and KT exhibited no influence on TEWL. According to the experimental results, it can be concluded that an optimal balance between lipophilicity and aqueous solubility is important in the design of a successful prodrug. The acceptable skin tolerance for safe application is also an important consideration.

  4. Psychomotor effects of ketorolac in comparison with buprenorphine and diclofenac.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, F C; Gough, K J; Nicoll, R A; Dow, R J

    1989-04-01

    1. Ketorolac is an investigational non-opioid analgesic. Buprenorphine, an opioid compound and diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, are analgesics used in clinical practise. 2. The psychomotor effects of ketorolac (30 mg), buprenorphine (0.3 mg), diclofenac (50 mg) and placebo all administered i.m., were examined in 12 healthy male volunteers (age 19-38 years), up to 8 h post-dose. 3. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) was measured up to 24 h post-dose, providing an indication of local tissue damage following injection. 4. Buprenorphine caused significant psychomotor impairment in seven out of eight psychomotor tests. The effects consistently peaked 4 h post-dose and were still apparent in many cases 8 h post-dose. These psychomotor effects were supported by marked symptoms in all volunteers. 5. Ketorolac and diclofenac had no clinically significant effects on psychomotor tests and only minimal symptoms were reported. 6. Diclofenac caused a marked increased in CPK (mean Cmax 298 iu l-1) compared with ketorolac (mean Cmax 70 iu l-1) and buprenorphine (mean Cmax 68 iu l-1). 7. These results suggest that ketorolac and diclofenac are suitable for administration following day case surgery. PMID:2785813

  5. [Reduction of omalgia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: clinical randomized trial ketorolac vs ketorolac and acetazolamide].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Balderas, Lorena; Franco-López, Francisco; Flores-Álvarez, Efrén; López-Rodríguez, Jorge Luis; Vázquez-García, José Antonio; Barba-Valadez, Claudia Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: la colecistectomía laparoscópica es el patrón de referencia del tratamiento de la colelitiasis sintomática. El 63% de los pacientes operados sufre dolor postquirúrgico referido al hombro (omalgia), circunstancia que limita el tratamiento ambulatorio. Objetivo: evaluar la utilidad de la acetazolamida asociada con ketorolaco para disminuir la omalgia consecutiva al tratamiento de mínima invasión. Material y métodos: ensayo clínico, aleatorizado, doble ciego realizado en pacientes a quienes se efectuó colecistectomía laparoscópica para evaluar la reducción de la omalgia postoperatoria y comparar el efecto de ketorolaco y ketorolaco más acetazolamida. En cada grupo se estudiaron 31 pacientes. El grupo de estudio recibió 250 mg de acetazolamida antes de la inducción anestésica, y 30 mg de ketorolaco en el postoperatorio inmediato. El grupo control recibió una tableta de placebo antes de la inducción anestésica, y 30 mg de ketorolaco en el postoperatorio inmediato. La omalgia se evaluó con la escala visual análoga. Las variables estudiadas incluyeron: edad, sexo, flujo de dióxido de carbono, presión intrabdominal, tiempo quirúrgico, cirugía electiva o urgente, omalgia, intensidad del dolor evaluada con la escala visual análoga y analgesia de rescate. Resultados: los grupos estudiados fueron homogéneos, el análisis estadístico no mostró diferencias en las variables estudiadas. En el grupo de estudio la omalgia coexistió en 9.67% de los pacientes y en el grupo control en 58.06% (p < 0.001). Conclusión: la administración por vía oral de 250 mg de acetazolamida y 30 mg de ketorolaco redujo significativamente la omalgia en los pacientes a quienes se realizó colecistectomía laparoscópica.

  6. Post-operative intravenous patient-controlled analgesic efficacy of morphine with ketorolac versus nefopam after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery: a randomized non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji-Uk; Cheon, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Yoon-Mi; Ri, Hyun-Su; Baik, Seong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a non-opioid non-steroidal centrally acting analgesic. This study was conducted to assess the analgesic efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using nefopam alone, compared with a combination of morphine and ketorolac, after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Methods Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received IV-PCA. Group A (n = 30) received IV-PCA with a combination of morphine 60 mg and ketorolac 180 mg, while group B (n = 30) received nefopam 200 mg (basal rate 1 ml/h, bolus 1 ml, and lockout time 15 min for both). The primary outcome evaluated was analgesic efficacy using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Other evaluated outcomes included the incidence rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), patient satisfaction of pain control, percentage of patients requiring additional opioids, and incidence rate of postoperative adverse effects. Results Group B was not inferior to group A in relation to the VAS in the post-anesthesia care unit, and at 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery (mean difference [95% confidence interval], 0.50 [–0.43 to 1.43], -0.30 [-1.25 to 0.65], -0.05 [-0.65 to 0.55], and 0.10 [-0.55 to 0.75], respectively). The incidence rate of nausea was lower in group B than in group A at 12 and 24 h after surgery (P = 0.004 and P = 0.017, respectively). There were no significant differences in the other outcomes between groups. Conclusions IV-PCA using nefopam alone has a non-inferior analgesic efficacy and produces a lower incidence of PONV in comparison with IV-PCA using a combination of morphine and ketorolac after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:27066208

  7. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  8. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to manage the postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; An, Sang-Bum; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Lim, Young-Jin; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2011-01-01

    Background This randomized controlled study evaluated the efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with fentanyl and ketorolac for neurosurgical patients, and compared the effectiveness of IV-PCA with intermittent analgesics injection. Methods The patients undergoing craniotomy were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients of group P (n = 53) received fentanyl (0.2 µg/kg/hr) and ketorolac (0.3 mg/kg/hr) via IV-PCA, and those of group N (n = 53) received intermittent fentanyl or ketorolac injection as needed. Pain was evaluated using a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) at postoperative 1, 4, and 24 hr. The amount of infused analgesic drugs, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and the incidence of nausea and miosis were measured at the same time points. Results Although VAS of pain (VASp) was comparable at postoperative 1 hr (P = 0.168) between the two groups, the group P had significantly lower VASp at postoperative 4 hr (P = 0.007) and 24 hr (P = 0.017). In group P, less analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 1 hr, and more analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 24 hr. There were no differences between two groups with respect to nausea, GCS, systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. IV-PCA did not further incur respiratory depression or miosis. Conclusions IV-PCA with fentanyl and ketorolac after craniotomy is more effective analgesic technique, without adverse events, than the intermittent administration of analgesics. PMID:21359078

  9. Ketorolac therapy for the prevention of acute pseudophakic cystoid macular edema: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, T; Cordero-Coma, M; Gallagher, M J

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of ketorolac vs control for prevention of acute pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (CME). The following databases were searched: Medline (1950–June 11, 2011), The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2011), and the TRIP Database (up to 11 June 2011), using no language or other limits. Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were included that consisted of patients with acute pseudophakic cystoid macular edema, those comparing ketorolac with control, and those having at least a minimum follow-up of 28 days. In the four RCTs evaluating ketorolac vs control, treatment with ketorolac significantly reduced the risk of CME development at the end of treatment (∼4 weeks) compared to control (P=0.008; 95% confidence interval (0.03–0.58)). When analyzed individually, each individual study was statistically nonsignificant in its findings with the exception of one study. When the pooled relative risk was calculated, the large sample size of this systematic review led to overall statistical significance, which is attributable to the review's large sample size and not to the individual studies themselves. In this systematic review of four RCTs, two of which compared ketorolac with no treatment and two of which evaluated ketorolac vs placebo drops, treatment with ketorolac significantly reduced the risk of developing CME at the end of ∼4 weeks of treatment compared with controls. These results, however, should be interpreted with caution considering the paucity of large randomized clinical trials in the literature. PMID:22094296

  10. Efficacy and safety of single doses of intramuscular ketorolac tromethamine compared with meperidine for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Stanski, D R; Cherry, C; Bradley, R; Sarnquist, F H; Yee, J P

    1990-01-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine, a potent nonnarcotic prostaglandin synthetase-inhibiting analgesic, was compared with meperidine for relief of moderate to severe postoperative pain. In a double-blind, randomized study, 125 patients received single intramuscular doses of ketorolac 30 or 90 mg or meperidine 50 or 100 mg. The degree of pain and pain relief were quantified verbally and with visual analog scales at baseline and 30 minutes, then hourly for 6 hours. Ketorolac 30 and 90 mg were significantly superior to meperidine 50 mg in six of nine efficacy measures. The onset of and peak analgesic effect of both doses of ketorolac and of meperidine were equivalent. Compared with both doses of meperidine, the two doses of ketorolac exhibited significantly longer duration of analgesic effect, as measured by the percentage of patients who terminated the study because of inadequate pain relief. The frequency of side effects was not significantly different between the drugs. The prolonged efficacy of intramuscular ketorolac combined with the reduced risk of respiratory depression suggest an important use of this drug for the relief of postoperative pain.

  11. Use of Ketorolac Is Associated with Decreased Pneumonia Following Rib Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yifan; Young, Jason B.; Schermer, Carol R.; Utter, Garth H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac in reducing pulmonary morbidity following rib fractures remains largely unknown. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study spanning January, 2003 to June, 2011, comparing pneumonia within 30 days and potential adverse effects of ketorolac among all patients with rib fractures who received ketorolac within four days post-injury to a random sample of those who did not. Results Among 202 patients who received ketorolac and 417 who did not, ketorolac use was associated with decreased pneumonia [odds ratio 0.14 (95% confidence interval 0.04–0.46)] and increased ventilator- and intensive care unit-free days [1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1–2.5) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.3–3.0) days, respectively] within 30 days. The rates of acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and fracture non-union were not different. Conclusions Early administration of ketorolac to patients with rib fractures is associated with a decreased likelihood of pneumonia, without apparent risks. PMID:24112670

  12. Levobupivacaine for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Makhni, Reena; Sethi, Savinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combined spinal-epidural analgesia has become the preferred technique for labor analgesia as it combines the benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of epidural catheter. Study was carried out with the primary aim to compare levobupivacaine and ropivacaine with fentanyl in terms of onset and duration of sensory block and to know maternal and fetal outcome. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 primipara of the American Society of Anesthesiologists health status Class I and II with singleton pregnancy in active stage of labor were randomly allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A received 3 mg intrathecal levobupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of levobupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 30 μg whereas Group B received 4 mg intrathecal ropivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% with fentanyl 30 μg. Patients were monitored for sensory and motor block characteristics, hemodynamics, maternal and fetal outcome, side effects, and complications. These characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and “unpaired t-test.” Results: Onset of analgesia was rapid in Group A (4.72 ± 0.54 min) as compared to Group B (5.58 ± 0.49 min). Duration of analgesia was also prolonged in Group A (117.00 ± 11.86 min) as compared to Group B (90.17 ± 8.85 min). Patients remained hemodynamically stable and side effects, and complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Levobupivacaine with fentanyl leads to early onset and prolonged duration of analgesia as compared to ropivacaine with fentanyl during labor analgesia. PMID:27746539

  13. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  14. Economic assessment of ketorolac versus narcotic analgesics in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Trotter, J P; Reinhart, S P; Katz, R M; Glazier, H S

    1993-01-01

    The medical records for 174 patients who underwent cholecystectomy (n = 52) or hip/knee replacement (n = 122) at four community-based medical centers were retrospectively reviewed to determine if using a nonnarcotic alternative to morphine sulfate and/or meperidine as a primary postoperative analgesic could reduce resource costs per patient. Two cohorts were constructed: 87 patients received either morphine sulfate or meperidine as the primary postoperative analgesic, and 87 patients received ketorolac. Ketorolac patients undergoing cholecystectomy were associated with lower per case costs in inpatient care (length of stay), direct nursing labor, PRN (as required) procedures, and medications relating to emesis and to gastrointestinal distress. Higher per case costs were recorded for the primary analgesic (study drug) and for supplemental pain medications. In contrast to substantial differences in the acquisition cost of ketorolac versus morphine sulfate/meperidine, the ketorolac cholecystectomy group was associated with lower overall resource costs per patient. In joint replacement procedures, however, the ketorolac group was associated with higher overall resource costs per patient, attributable primarily to a slightly higher postoperative length of stay.

  15. Ketorolac tromethamine as compared with morphine sulfate for treatment of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, D A; Fragen, R J; Kinzer, M; Pemberton, D

    1987-05-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine, a nonnarcotic, prostaglandin synthesis-inhibiting analgesic, was compared with morphine sulfate for relief of moderate to severe postoperative pain. The 155 patient participants received single intramuscular doses of either ketorolac, 10, 30, or 90 mg, or morphine, 6 or 12 mg, administered in a double-blind, randomized fashion. Pain scores (verbal and visual analog) were recorded at baseline and assessed at 30 minutes and then hourly to 6 hours. Pain relief was rated at the same times. Ketorolac, 90 and 30 mg, was rated significantly better than morphine, 6 mg, at each assessment interval after 1 hour. Ketorolac, 90 and 30 mg, was rated similarly to morphine, 12 mg, for the first 3 hours and better than morphine, 12 mg, 4 hours after injection. There were no serious side effects reported. The only side effect reported in more than 3% of patients was 8% somnolence with morphine. This study shows ketorolac to be a safe and effective analgesic for relief of postoperative pain.

  16. Isobolographic Analysis of the Interaction Between Tapentadol and Ketorolac in a Mouse Model of Visceral Pain.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Morales, Juan R; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel H; Adriana Soto-Castro, Tely; Alonso-Castro, Ángel J; Castañeda-Santana, Demian I; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this experimental assay was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in the acetic acid-induced writhing model in mice. Tapentadol (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) or ketorolac (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) were administered 15 min before the acetic acid administration. The ED50 values of the individual drugs were determined and different proportions (tapentadol-ketorolac in 1:1, 3:1, and 1:3) were assayed in combination in the writhing test. Isobolographic analysis and the interaction index demonstrated an antinociceptive synergistic interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in all combination. Thus, the experimental ED50 values were lower when compared with their theoretical ED50 values. These data suggest that the tapentadol-ketorolac combination produces an antinociceptive synergistic interaction in the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. Drug Dev Res 77 : 187-191, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27169518

  17. Isobolographic Analysis of the Interaction Between Tapentadol and Ketorolac in a Mouse Model of Visceral Pain.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Morales, Juan R; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel H; Adriana Soto-Castro, Tely; Alonso-Castro, Ángel J; Castañeda-Santana, Demian I; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this experimental assay was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in the acetic acid-induced writhing model in mice. Tapentadol (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) or ketorolac (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) were administered 15 min before the acetic acid administration. The ED50 values of the individual drugs were determined and different proportions (tapentadol-ketorolac in 1:1, 3:1, and 1:3) were assayed in combination in the writhing test. Isobolographic analysis and the interaction index demonstrated an antinociceptive synergistic interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in all combination. Thus, the experimental ED50 values were lower when compared with their theoretical ED50 values. These data suggest that the tapentadol-ketorolac combination produces an antinociceptive synergistic interaction in the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. Drug Dev Res 77 : 187-191, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  20. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clonidine is an effective adjuvant to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. We studied the effect of clonidine as an adjuvant in wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia. Aim: To evaluate the role of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Settings and Study Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II posted for abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allotted to two groups. Group A received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 3 μg/kg clonidine while Group B received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. A standard general anesthesia technique was used in all the patients. Postoperative analgesia was provided with injection ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg intravenous infusion and tramadol being the rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain score, duration of effective analgesia before the first rescue analgesic, percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic at different time intervals, and total number of rescue analgesic doses in 24 h were compared between the groups. Statistical Analysis: Difference between the bivariate samples in independent groups with Mann–Whitney U-test. For categorical data, Chi-square test was used. Results: Clonidine group has better pain score, longer duration of effective analgesia, lower percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic, and less number of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 h. Conclusion: We conclude that Clonidine 3 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to bupivacaine for wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia following total abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:27746524

  1. Ketorolac as a preoperative nonnarcotic analgesic to enhance anesthesia and postanesthesia recovery.

    PubMed

    Barton, C R; Elliott, C

    1992-09-01

    The benefits of using ketorolac as a preoperative intramuscular (IM) non-narcotic analgesic are described and illustrated by the presentation of two case reports. Case Summary--Patient 1: A 53-year-old female who had experienced refractory nausea and vomiting after six previous exposures to anesthesia presented for outpatient ureteroscopy and dilatation of strictures. Instead of using an opiate narcotic, ketorolac 60 mg IM was given 1 hour before induction as the analgesic portion of anesthesia. Case Summary--Patient 2: A 65-year-old male with mild chronic obstructive lung disease presented for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). To avoid the respiratory depression associated with opioid narcotics, ketorolac 60 mg IM was given as an analgesic 1 hour before the ESWL procedure.

  2. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016.

  3. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016. PMID:25899151

  4. Ketorolac for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Lynn L.; Ward, Kristy K.; Mody, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intramuscular ketorolac compared to placebo saline injection for pain control with intrauterine device (IUD) placement. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients received ketorolac 30mg or placebo saline intramuscular injection 30 minutes prior to IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement on a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 2.0cm difference (α=0.05) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included pain with study drug injection, speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and at 5 and 15 minutes after IUD placement. Results A total of 67 women participated in the study, 33 in the ketorolac arm and 34 in the placebo arm. There were no differences in baseline demographics including age, BMI, and race. There were no differences in median pain scores for IUD placement in the placebo versus ketorolac groups (5.2cm vs 3.6cm, p=0.99). There was a decrease in median pain scores at 5 minutes (2.2cm vs 0.3cm, p=<0.001) and 15 minutes (1.6cm vs 0.1cm, p=<0.001) after IUD placement but no difference for all other time points. Nulliparous participants (n=16, 8 per arm) had a decrease in pain scores with IUD placement (8.1cm vs 5.4cm, p=0.02). In this study, 22% of participants in the placebo group and 18% in the ketorolac group reported injection pain was as painful as IUD placement. Conclusions Ketorolac does not reduce pain with IUD placement but does reduce pain at 5 and 15 minutes after placement. PMID:26241253

  5. Comparison of Ketorolac Tromethamine and Prednisolone Acetate in Preventing Surgically Induced Miosis during Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Yusuf M; Krdoghli, Najwa F; Ahmad, Aksam J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of topical prednisolone acetate 1% and topical ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% in the maintenance of pupillary mydriasis during cataract surgery. Methods Fifty patients were enrolled in this prospective, partially masked and randomised study. They were assigned to receive topical treatment with either prednisolone acetate (n = 25) or ketorolac tromethamine (n = 25), starting 24 hours before cataract extraction (either routine extracapsular cataract extraction or phacoemulsification). One drop of the study medication was instilled every 6 hours for a total of 4 drops. No epinephrine was used in the intraoperative irrigation solution. Pupil diameter was measured three different times during surgery. To ensure participant safety, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, intraocular pressure, adverse events and visual acuity were also monitored. Results The mean pupil diameter change from the time of the pre-incision until after cortical irrigation and aspiration and lens implantation was significantly less with ketorolac than with prednisolone (P = 0.003). Consequently, mean pupil diameter after cortical irrigation and aspiration and lens implantation was significantly greater with ketorolac than with prednisolone (P <0.0001). No significant differences between groups were observed in the pupil diameter before the first incision (P = 0.244), nor after administration of a miotic agent (P = 0.505). Safety variables were comparable and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion Ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% and prednisolone acetate 1% solutions were equally well tolerated without related adverse events, but ketorolac was better in preventing surgically induced miosis. PMID:21509082

  6. The Effect of Perioperative Ketorolac on the Clinical Failure Rate of Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Nielson, Jason H.; Zurakowski, David; Micheli, Lyle J.; Curtis, Christine; Murray, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been recent interest in the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications on musculoskeletal healing. No studies have yet addressed the effect of these medications on meniscal healing. Hypothesis: The administration of ketorolac in the perioperative period will result in higher rates of meniscal repair clinical failure. Study design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent meniscal repair at our institution between August 1998 and July 2001. Three patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 107 (mean age, 15.9 ± 4.4 years) had a minimum 5-year follow-up (mean follow-up, 5.5 years). Thirty-two patients (30%) received ketorolac perioperatively. The primary outcome measure was reoperation for continued symptoms of meniscal pathology. Asymptomatic patients were evaluated by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form, Short Form–36 (SF-36) Health Survey, and Knee Outcome Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS). Results: Kaplan-Meier survivorship revealed no difference in reoperation rates with and without the administration of perioperative ketorolac (P = .95). There was an overall failure rate of 35% (37/107 patients), with a 34% failure rate in patients receiving ketorolac (11/32 patients). Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that age, duration of symptoms, meniscal tear type, fixation technique, concurrent anterior cruciate ligament repair, and ketorolac usage did not have an impact on the rate of failure (P > .05 for all; ketorolac use, P > .50). Female sex (P = .04) and medial location (P = .01) were predictive of an increased risk for reoperation. Conclusion: Failure of meniscal repair was not altered with the administration of perioperative ketorolac. Further work studying the effects of longer term anti-inflammatory use after meniscal repair is necessary before stating that this class of medications has no effect on meniscal healing. Clinical

  7. [Postoperative epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Donato, S; Malisano, A M; Dogareschi, T; Chiarandini, P; Spasiano, A; Pasetto, A

    1995-01-01

    Epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is one of the most effective methods for postoperative pain control. In critical patients it seems to improve outcome as well as pain control. This technique works better when started in the intraoperative time. Epidural analgesia is safe on surgical wards if nursing staff is trained in managing epidural catheters and in early detection and treatment of major and minor side effects. Nursing staff cooperates with the Acute Pain Service doctors and nurses who are on call on a 24 hour basis. Many perspective and retrospective studies showed a very low incidence of major side effects with epidurals. So we can consider it safe and effective even if we consider its invasiveness.

  8. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  9. R-Ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, S Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion, and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high-throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches, we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor, distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip) and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum-dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small-molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In summary, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as a direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiologic responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA-approved drug, racemic ketorolac, that can be used in humans.

  10. The Effects of Paracetamol, Ketorolac, and Paracetamol Plus Morphine on Pain Control after Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Yeul; Lee, Eun Ha; Han, Kyu Cheol; Ko, Young Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of ketorolac, paracetamol, and paracetamol plus morphine on pain relief after thyroidectomy. Methods Eighty patients were randomly allocated to one of the 4 groups: normal saline (group C), ketorolac 30 mg (group K), paracetamol 1 g (group P), and paracetamol 700 mg plus morphine 3 mg (group PM). Each regimen was administered intravenously (IV) 30 min. before the end of surgery. If pain was not relieved, patients received an IV bolus of pethidine hydrochloride 25 mg. Pain intensity using a visual analogue scale (VAS) was recorded at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hr after the end of surgery. Results VAS at 0.5 and 1 hr after the end of surgery were significantly lower in group K, group P, and group PM than in group C (P < 0.05). The number of patients receiving pethidine hydrochloride at 0.5 and 1 hr after the end of surgery was significantly lower in group K, group P, and group PM than in group C (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference among the groups in the incidences of adverse events associated with study medications and patient satisfaction (P > 0.05). Conclusions Paracetamol 1 g IV possesses a similar analgesic efficacy to ketorolac 30 mg IV after thyroidectomy. Paracetamol may represent an alternative to ketorolac for pain prevention after mildly to moderately painful surgery in situations where the use of NSAIDs is unsuitable. PMID:20556214

  11. Perioperative effects of oral ketorolac and acetaminophen in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy.

    PubMed

    Watcha, M F; Ramirez-Ruiz, M; White, P F; Jones, M B; Lagueruela, R G; Terkonda, R P

    1992-09-01

    Prophylactic administration of analgesics before surgery can decrease the intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and decrease pain during the early postoperative period. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 90 healthy ASA physical status I or II children undergoing bilateral myringotomy, we compared the postoperative analgesic effects of oral acetaminophen and ketorolac, when administered 30 min before induction of anaesthesia. Patients were randomized to receive saline (0.1 ml.kg-1), acetaminophen (10 mg.kg-1) or ketorolac (1 mg.kg-1) diluted in cherry syrup to a total volume of 5 ml. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with halothane and nitrous oxide via a face mask. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer using an objective pain scale. The three study groups were similar with respect to demographic data, duration of anaesthesia and surgery, induction behaviour, oxygen saturation, incidence of postoperative emesis and, recovery times. The ketorolac group had lower postoperative pain scores and required less frequent analgesic therapy in the early postoperative period compared with the acetaminophen and placebo groups. In contrast, there were no differences in pain scores or analgesic requirements between the acetaminophen and the placebo groups. We conclude that the preoperative administration of oral ketorolac, but not acetaminophen, provided better postoperative pain control than placebo in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy. PMID:1394752

  12. Impact of ketorolac administration around ovarian stimulation on in vivo and in vitro fertilization and subsequent embryo development.

    PubMed

    Jee, Byung Chul; Youm, Hye Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Jee Hyun; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2013-05-01

    We performed this study to investigate the effect of ketorolac (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) administration around ovarian stimulation on in vivo and in vitro fertilization process. Sixty-four female mice (ICR) were injected with ketorolac (0, 7.5, 15 and 30 µg/d) for 3 d starting from the day of eCG treatment. In experiment 1, 41 mice were triggered by hCG and then mated; two-cell embryos were obtained and in vitro development up to blastocyst was observed. In experiment 2, 23 mice were triggered by hCG and mature oocytes were collected; in vitro fertilization rate and subsequent embryo development up to blastocyst was recorded. In experiment 1, the blastocyst-forming rates per in vivo fertilized two-cell embryo showed an inverse relationship with a dosage of ketorolac (97.6%, 64.2%, 35.4% and 25.9%). In experiment 2, degenerated oocytes were frequently observed in a dose-dependent manner (4.3%, 22.9%, 22.4% and 75.0%). Lower fertilization rates were noted in all the three ketorolac-treating groups; blastocyst-forming rate was significantly lower in 30-µg-treating group when compared with the control group. Administration of ketorolac around ovarian stimulation significantly affects the development of in vivo fertilized embryo in a dose-dependent manner. High-dose ketorolac could result in a poor oocyte quality and decreased embryo developmental competence.

  13. Lipid Nanocapsule-Based Gels for Enhancement of Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Soltanzadeh, Sindokht

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports show ineffective transdermal delivery of ketorolac by nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). The aim of the present work was enhancement of transdermal delivery of ketorolac by another colloidal carriers, lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). LNCs were prepared by emulsification with phase transition method and mixed in a Carbomer 934P gel base with oleic acid or propylene glycol as penetration enhancers. Permeation studies were performed by Franz diffusion cell using excised rat abdominal skin. Aerosil-induced rat paw edema model was used to investigate the in vivo performance. LNCs containing polyethylene glycol hydroxyl stearate, lecithin in Labrafac as the oily phase, and dilution of the primary emulsion with 3.5-fold volume of cold water produced the optimized nanoparticles. The 1% Carbomer gel base containing 10% oleic acid loaded with nanoparticles enhanced and prolonged the anti-inflammatory effects of this drug to more than 12 h in Aerosil-induced rat paw edema model. PMID:22175029

  14. Failure of intrathecal ketorolac to reduce remifentanil-induced postinfusion hyperalgesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Eisenach, James C; Tong, Chuanyao; Curry, Regina S

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, acute exposure to opioids results in transient antinociception followed by longer lasting hypersensitivity to tactile or thermal stimuli, a phenomenon termed opioid-induced hyperalgesia. This hypersensitivity can be blocked or reversed by intrathecally administered cyclooxygenase inhibitors, including ketorolac, suggesting a role for spinal prostaglandins. In surgical patients, the dose of intraoperative opioid, particularly the short-acting drug, remifentanil, is directly related to increased pain and opioid requirements for many hours postoperatively. In addition, experimentally induced tactile hypersensitivity in humans is exaggerated after cessation of remifentanil infusions. The degree of this experimental opioid-induced hyperalgesia is reduced by systemic treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, and investigators have speculated that this reduction reflects the actions in the central nervous system, most likely in the spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, we measured cerebrospinal fluid prostaglandin E2 concentrations during and after remifentanil infusion in 30 volunteers. These volunteers received intrathecal ketorolac or saline in a random, blinded manner during intravenous remifentanil infusion after generation of hypersensitivity by topical capsaicin. Remifentanil reduced pain to noxious heat stimuli and reduced areas of capsaicin-induced hypersensitivity similarly in those receiving intrathecal ketorolac or saline. The primary outcome measure, area of capsaicin-induced hypersensitivity after stopping remifentanil, showed a similar increase in those receiving ketorolac as in those receiving saline. Cerebrospinal fluid prostaglandin E2 concentrations did not increase during postinfusion hyperalgesia compared with those during infusion, and they were not increased during infusion compared with those in historical controls. These data fail to support the hypothesis that acute opioid-induced hyperalgesia reflects spinal cyclooxygenase activation

  15. Tramadol versus ketorolac in the treatment of postoperative pain following maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Shankariah, Manjunath; Mishra, Madan; Kamath, Rajay A D

    2012-09-01

    Pain plagues daily activity and hence its management would require alleviation at both the mental and physical planes, thus, bringing about comfort. It includes delivering analgesics in parenteral or oral form, or patches depending on the intensity and availability. Best analgesic regimens are ones that offer broad coverage, easy to administer, safe and economical. A drug seemingly appropriate to treat moderate to severe pain would be Tramadol hydrochloride, a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic with lower opiate-like dependence than Morphine. Ketorolac, a pyrrolo-pyrrole derivative, possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity would also appear equally suitable. Fifty adult ASA grade I and II patients undergoing surgery under GA in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, were included. Ketorolac (30 mg IM) for 25 patients and Tramadol (100 mg IM) for 25 patients were administered at the time of skin closure and repeated after 8 and 16 h from the conclusion of surgery. Pain, using the VAS at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 24th post-operative hour, was assessed and compared using χ(2)-test. Vitals were monitored and adverse events were looked for. Though both the drugs resulted in significant decrease in pain intensity from the 2nd to 24th post-operative hour, Tramadol always resulted in better pain control than Ketorolac at every post-operative hour (P < 0.050). To conclude, intramuscular Tramadol seemed useful in controlling pain following surgery, with better levels of tolerance than intramuscular Ketorolac. However, both the drugs produced mild side effects but did not appear to influence the outcome. PMID:23997475

  16. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available.

  17. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  18. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  19. [Paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Garutti, I; Olmedilla, L

    2004-10-01

    Managing postoperative pain from thoracotomy is one of the greatest challenges anesthesiologists face in daily practice. Proper management is assumed to improve the patient's prognosis. The thoracic paravertebral block, following its rediscovery, is being used with increasing frequency and success for both surgery and recovery from thoracotomy, challenging the supremacy of thoracic epidural analgesia, which to date has been considered the gold standard. We describe the history, anatomy, techniques and complications of the thoracic paravertebral block and review published randomized controlled trials comparing the thoracic paravertebral block to placebo and to epidural analgesia. In view of published evidence, it seems that the thoracic paravertebral block may replace the thoracic epidural technique as the gold standard for providing analgesia for patients undergoing thoracotomy.

  20. [Influence of simulated microgravity on the threshold of pain sensitivity in humans with single dose of ketorolac].

    PubMed

    Baranov, M V; Kovalev, A S; Perfilov, D F; Chernogorov, R V; Repenkova, L G

    2015-01-01

    The data supporting the influence of simulated microgravity effects on pain sensitivity were obtained in the series of experiments involving human. In conditions of antiorthostatic hypokinesia (ANOH) and immersion revealed no reduction in pain sensitivity in the morning, which is typical for normal conditions. Ketorolac has no effect on pain sensitivity, when determining the pain threshold (PT) by method of thermoalgometry. However, the conditions of simulated microgravity substantially alter the pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, increasing the rate of absorption of the drug and reduce its relative bioavailability and retention time in the blood plasma. This may require changes in pain therapy schemes in space flight. PMID:26571803

  1. Comparison of the effects of acetaminophen to ketorolac when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Myoung Jin; Cheong, Soon Ho; Shin, Chee Mahn; Kim, Young Jae; Choe, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Moo; Lim, Se Hun; Kim, Young Hwan; Cho, Kwang Rae; Lee, Sang Eun

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was done to evaluate the effect on pain relief when acetaminophen was added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Methods Sixty patients undergoing hand or forearm surgery received IVRA were assigned to three groups: Group C received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20), Group P received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with intravenous acetaminophen 300 mg to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20) and Group K received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline plus ketorolac 10 mg made up to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20). Sensory block onset time, tourniquet pain onset time, which was defined as the time from tourniquet application to fentanyl administration for relieving tourniquet pain and amount of analgesic consumption during surgery were recorded. Following deflation of tourniquet sensory recovery time, postoperative pain and quantity of analgesic uses in post-anesthesia care unit were assessed. Results Sensory block onset time was shorter in Group P compared to Group C (P < 0.05). Tourniquet pain onset time was delayed in Group P when compared with group C (P < 0.05). Postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were reduced in Group P and Group K compared to Group C (P < 0.001). Conclusions The addition of acetaminophen to lidocaine for IVRA shortens the onset time of sensory block and delays tourniquet pain onset time, but not with ketorolac. Both acetaminophen and ketorolac reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. PMID:20508792

  2. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  3. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  4. Development, characterization, and evaluation of ketorolac tromethamine-loaded biodegradable microspheres as a depot system for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vivek Ranjan; Trehan, Aman

    2008-08-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine, a potent nonnarcotic analgesic agent and 800 times more potent than aspirin, is indicated for the short-term management of moderate to such severe painful states as post operative pain, acute musculoskeletal pain, and dental pain. It Given every 6 hr intramuscularly in patients for acute pain, to avoid frequent dosing and patient inconvenience Ketorolac from ethamine was found suitable for parenteral depot system by biodegradable microspheres for the present study. Ketorolac tromethamine-loaded microspheres were prepared by o/w emulsion solvent evaporation technique using different polymers viz. polycaprolactone, poly-dl-lactide (Resomer) and poly lactic acid (PLA). To tailor the release profile of drug for several days, blends of Resomer and PLA were prepared with polycaprolactone in different ratios. Higher encapsulation efficiency was obtained with microspheres made with pure Resomer. Surface topography was studied by scanning electron microscopy, which showed spherical shape of microspheres. Residual solvent analysis was carried out to determine the residual amount of dichloromethane in microspheres and the content was found within permissible limits. Differential scanning calorimetric studies also were carried out to study any drug polymer interactions. We concluded that with careful selection of different polymers and their combinations, we can tailor the release of ketorolac tromethamine for long periods.

  5. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Continuous Intravenous Ketorolac vs Placebo for Adjuvant Pain Control After Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grimsby, Gwen M.; Conley, Sarah P.; Trentman, Terrence L.; Castle, Erik P.; Andrews, Paul E.; Mihalik, Laurie A.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel, continuous intravenous infusion of ketorolac, a powerful nonopioid analgesic, for postoperative pain control. Patients and Methods A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a continuous infusion of ketorolac tromethamine in 1 L of normal saline vs placebo was performed in 135 patients aged 18 to 75 years after laparoscopic donor nephrectomy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy completed from October 7, 2008, through July 21, 2010. Primary study end points were the 24-hour differences in visual analog pain scores and total narcotic consumption, whereas secondary end points were differences in urine output, serum creatinine level, and hemoglobin level. Results The study was stopped after randomization of 135 patients (68 in the ketorolac group and 67 in the placebo group) when interim analysis indicated that the difference in mean pain scores between the 2 groups (difference, 0.6) was smaller than the 1-point threshold set forth in the power calculations. No statistically significant change was noted in hemoglobin levels from preoperative to postoperative values (P=.13) or in postoperative serum creatinine levels (P=.13). Conclusion Although continuous infusion of ketorolac produced only a modest decrease in the use of narcotics, it appears to offer a safe therapeutic option for nonnarcotic pain control. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00765128 and NCT00765232 PMID:23058854

  6. Comparative study of intravenous Tramadol versus Ketorolac for preventing postoperative pain after third molar surgery--a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gopalraju, Prathibha; Lalitha, Ramanujapuram Manikarnike; Prasad, Kavitha; Ranganath, Krishnappa

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this comparative, prospective, randomized, controlled study was to evaluate two different regimens of analgesics: a preoperative intravenous dose of either Tramadol or Ketorolac given 10 min prior to surgery to assess their impact on clinical recovery after third molar surgery. Forty patients requiring surgical extraction of unilateral impacted mandibular third molars similar in position were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups based on permuting the numbers. Patients in Group 1 and Group 2 were administered either Tramadol 50 mg or Ketorolac 30 mg, intravenously, 10 min prior to surgery. The difference in postoperative pain was assessed by four primary points: pain intensity as measured by a 10 mm visual analogue scale hourly for 12 h, median time to rescue analgesics, number of analgesics consumed and patient's overall 5-point global assessment scale. Throughout the 12 h investigation period, patients treated with Ketorolac reported significantly lower pain intensity scores, significantly longer time to rescue analgesics (Acetaminophen 500 mg) and less intake of postoperative analgesics. In Group 2, 40% of the patient had good overall assessment as compared to Group 1 where only 25% of patients had good overall assessment. The current study shows that pre-emptive use of Inj. Ketorolac 30 mg intravenously can reduce the severity of the postoperative sequelae of asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molar surgery.

  7. Prophylactic postoperative ketorolac improves outcomes in diabetic patients assigned for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsawy, Moataz F; Badawi, Nermine; Khairy, Hany A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prophylactic role of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in reducing the incidence of central macular edema (CME) in diabetic eyes post-cataract surgery. Patients and methods This study included 86 eyes (70 patients) with high risk characteristics for the development of CME after cataract surgery. All patients underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Patients were divided into two equal groups (n = 43 [eyes]): a control group given topical dexamethasone 0.1%, four times/day for 12 weeks postoperatively and a study group given topical ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% twice daily in addition to topical dexamethasone 0.1% four times daily for 12 weeks. Patients were examined at 3, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively for evaluation of CME development. The main study outcome was the change in the retinal fovea thickness measured with ocular coherence topography. Results Ten eyes developed CME (11.6%); eight eyes in the control group and only two eyes in the study group. Mean retinal fovea thickness was significantly higher in the control group compared to the study group. Moreover, eyes of the control group developed CME significantly earlier than those of the study group. Conclusion Prophylactic postoperative ketorolac 0.4% may have a role in reducing the frequency and severity of CME in diabetic eyes post-cataract surgery. PMID:23836953

  8. Pharmacologic synergism of ocular ketorolac and systemic caffeine citrate in rat oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Jacob V.; Cai, Charles L.; Ahmad, Taimur; Bronshtein, Vadim; Sadeh, Jonathan; Valencia, Gloria B.; Lazzaro, Douglas R.; Beharry, Kay D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Caffeine or ketorolac decrease the risk of retinopathy of prematurity and may act synergistically to improve beneficial effect. Combination of caffeine (Caff) and ketorolac (Keto) to prevent oxygen-induced retinopathy was studied. Methods: Newborn rats exposed to room air (RA) or intermittent hypoxia (IH) consisting of 12% O2 during hyperoxia (50% O2) from birth (P0) had single daily IP injections of Caff from P0-P13 or saline; and/or ocular Keto (Acuvail, 0.45% ophthalmic solution) administered subcutaneously over the eyes from P5-P7. Pups were studied at P14 or placed in RA for recovery from IH (IHR) until P21. Eyes were examined for neovascularization, histopathology, growth factors, and VEGF-signaling genes. Results: Severe retinal damage noted during IHR in the untreated groups evidenced by hemorrhage, neovascularization, and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) pathologies were prevented with Keto/Caff treatment. Keto and/or Caff treatment in IH also promoted retinal neural development evidenced by eye opening (92%, P < 0.001 vs. 31% in the placebo-treated IH group). No corneal pathologies were noted with Keto. Conclusion. Caff or Keto given individually reduced retinal neovascularization, but the two drugs given together prevented severe OIR. PMID:27438224

  9. A comparison of oxycodone and fentanyl in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Seol; Yoo, Sie Hyeon; Chung, Jin Hun; Chung, Ji-Won; Seo, Yonghan; Chung, Ho-Soon; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Gong, Hyung Youn; Lee, Hyun-Young; Mun, Seong-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Background We planned to compare the effect of intravenous oxycodone and fentanyl on post-operative pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods We examined 60 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 30, Group O) or fentanyl (n = 30, Group F). The patients received 10 mg oxycodone/100 µg fentanyl with ketorolac 30 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 h postoperatively. Results The accumulated oxycodone consumption was less than fentanyl during 8, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. Numeric rating score of Group O showed significantly lower than that of Group F during 30 min, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h postoperatively. The incidences of adverse reactions were similar in the two groups, though the incidence of nausea was higher in the Group O during the 24 and 48 h postoperative period. Conclusions Oxycodone IV-PCA was more advantageous than fentanyl IV-PCA for laparoscopic hysterectomy in view of accumulated oxycodone consumption, pain control and cost beneficial effect. However, patient satisfaction was not good in the group O compared to group F. PMID:26045929

  10. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  11. Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Ware, R J

    1975-11-01

    Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine (Marcain) was employed as the anaesthetic technique in a series of 50 cases undergoing a variety of surgical procedures on the upper limb. A short pilot study was undertaken to determine the optimal dosage and concentration of bupivacaine. This was found to be 1-5 mg/kg in 0-2% concentration and proved suitable for all patients regardless of age or physical condition. The use of bupivacaine produced highly successful results in 98% of cases. Onset of analgesia was very rapid (3-5 minutes) and profound muscular relaxation occurred in approximately half of the cases. The degree of muscle relaxation was, however, always adequate for the successful reduction of fractures. Only one patient exhibited an adverse reaction to the dose of bupivacaine used and this was limited to a brief period of slight drowsiness. The results of this series suggest that bupivacaine may provide advantages over previously used local analgesic agents for intravenous regional analgesia and that it may be the agent of choice for this useful technique.

  12. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Pascal H; Stamer, Ulrike M; Landau, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism) seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone) is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration. PMID:23226064

  13. A review of the use of ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% in the treatment of post-surgical inflammation following cataract and refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Helga P; Fernández de Castro, Luis E; Vroman, David T; Solomon, Kerry D

    2007-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% ophthalmic solution, a recent reformulation containing 20% less active ingredient that the original formulation, is indicated for the reduction of ocular pain and burning/stinging following corneal refractive surgery. Clinical studies have shown ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% to be as effective as ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% to control inflammation after cataract surgery including prevention of cystoid macular edema (CME). Its efficacy to inhibit miosis during cataract surgery as well as its role in the treatment of dry eye has been reported. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% in the treatment of post-surgical inflammation following cataract and refractive surgery. PMID:19668513

  14. Comparison of Preoperative Topical Dexamethasone Phosphate Versus Ketorolac Tromethamine in Maintaining Intraoperative Mydriasis During Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hans Raj; Sharma, Rajni; Singh, Amrita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intraoperative miosis is one of the many challenges which a surgeon can face during cataract surgery. It may lead to impaired view and difficulty in delivering the nucleus. Also, it increases the chances of more serious intraoperative and postoperative complications. Therefore, maintaining adequate pupillary dilatation is of utmost importance during cataract surgery. Aim To study the efficacy of topical dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) and topical ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%) in maintaining pupillary dilatation during cataract surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 200 patients were studied. These were randomly divided into two groups of 100 each. Group1 was given topical dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) and Group 2, topical ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%). Medications were started 1-day before surgery in the form of one drop to be instilled every 6 hours. Pupillary diameter was measured in the horizontal meridian; 4 readings were taken - before making the incision, after nucleus delivery, following cortical clean-up and after Intraocular Lens (IOL) implantation. Results The two drugs showed no statistically significant difference in pupillary diameter at the commencement of surgery (p=0.435). The difference between the two drugs was statistically significant, for the mean pupillary diameter which changed from the start of surgery to after cortical clean-up. At this stage, ketorolac group showed a tendency towards larger mean pupillary diameter than dexamethasone group (6.70 ± 0.85mm and 6.32 ± 0.84mm, respectively, p=0.002). Again, ketorolac group patients had larger pupillary diameter after IOL implantation than dexamethasone group patients (the mean was 6.16± 0.97mm and 5.75 ± 0.73mm, respectively, p=0.001). Conclusion Both ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%) and dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) are effective in maintaining adequate mydriasis during cataract surgery, but the comparative analysis of the two drugs concludes that, ketorolac is definitely a

  15. Optimization of In-vitro Permeation Pattern of Ketorolac Tromethamine Transdermal Patches

    PubMed Central

    Kumar De, Pintu; Mallick, Subrata; Mukherjee, Biswajit; Sengupta, Sagar; Pattnaik, Satyanarayan; Chakraborty, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop a suitable transdermal matrix patch of ketorolac tromethamine with different proportions of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and ethyl cellulose (EC) using a D-optimal mixture design. The prepared transdermal patches were subjected to different physicochemical evaluation. The surfacet opography of the patches was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The drug-polymer interaction studies were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) technique. A correlation between in-vitro drug-release and in-vitro skin permeation was established and the criterion of desirability was employed to optimize the formulation. The results of the physicochemical characterization and in-vitro permeation of the prepared patches were promising to formulate transdermal patches with PVP/EC combinations. PMID:24250343

  16. Analgesia in thoracic surgery: review.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, G; Aceto, P; Gualtieri, E; Congedo, E

    2009-06-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is one of the most severe types of postoperative pain. It can last up to 2 months and can become chronic in 30% of patients. Pain relief after thoracic surgery is of particular significance, not only for ethical considerations but also for reduction of postoperative pulmonary and cardiac complications. Because of the difficulty in pain control, many approaches have been suggested, but a multimodal therapeutic strategy that provides a central or peripheral block associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and adjuvant drugs is now the cornerstone of treatment, offering the possibility of reducing opioid requirements and side effects. Thoracic epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is regarded as the gold standard treatment for post-thoracotomy pain management because it results in early extubation, better ventilatory mechanisms and gas exchange, decreased incidence of atelectasis, pneumonia and chronic postoperative pain. When epidural analgesia is contraindicated or cannot be performed, other regional techniques of analgesia can be used. An alternative method of providing adequate pain relief is a thoracic paravertebral block: continuous paravertebral infusion of local anesthetic via a catheter placed percutaneously or under direct vision during thoracotomy. This is effective in controlling postoperative pain and in preserving pulmonary function. Other techniques, such as intercostal and interpleural blocks, are rarely utilized, whereas a single shot of intrathecal injection of a hydrophilic opioid, such as morphine, appears to be effective. Cryoanalgesia, which is successful in the immediate postoperative period, has been abandoned for its brief duration and increased incidence of chronic pain. PMID:18953284

  17. Ion channels in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Tamara; Simon, Sidney A; Islas, Leon D

    2010-01-01

    Several recent techniques have allowed us to pinpoint the receptors responsible for the detection of nociceptive stimuli. Among these receptors, ion channels play a fundamental role in the recognition and transduction of stimuli that can cause pain. During the last decade, compelling evidence has been gathered on the role of the TRPV1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. Activation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons results in the release of neuropeptides and transmitters, leading to the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas, where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation will also evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal, or chemical stimuli. For these reasons, and because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 is now considered a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. Using the TRPV1 channel as an example, here we describe some basic biophysical approaches used to study the properties of ion channels involved in pain and in analgesia.

  18. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention.

  19. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention. PMID:677506

  20. Ketorolac Ophthalmic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  1. Ocular Penetration and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Ketorolac 0.45% and Bromfenac 0.09% Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Danielle; Villanueva, Linda; Nguyen, Cathy; Patel, Milan; Borbridge, Lisa; Attar, Mayssa; Schiffman, Rhett M.; Hollander, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Anti-inflammatory activity of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is mediated by suppression of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes. This study compared ocular penetration and inflammation suppression of topical ketorolac 0.45% and bromfenac 0.09% ophthalmic solutions in a rabbit model. Methods At hour 0, 36 rabbits received ketorolac 0.45%, bromfenac 0.09%, or an artificial tear 3 times once every 20 min. Half of the rabbits in each group then received intravenous injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–dextran at hour 1, and the other half at hour 10. Aqueous and iris-ciliary body (ICB) samples were collected in the former group at hour 2 (peak) and in the latter group at hour 11 (trough) An additional group of 6 animals received only FITC-dextran, and samples were collected 1 h later. Peak and trough nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug concentrations were compared with previously determined half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for COX isoenzymes. Results Peak and trough aqueous and ICB concentrations of ketorolac were at least 7-fold or greater than those of bromfenac. At peak levels, both ketorolac 0.45% and bromfenac 0.09% significantly inhibited LPS-induced aqueous prostaglandin E2 and FITC-dextran elevation (P < 0.01). At trough, both study drugs significantly inhibited LPS-induced aqueous prostaglandin E2 elevation (P < 0.05), but only ketorolac 0.45% significantly reduced LPS-induced aqueous FITC-dextran elevation (P < 0.01). Aqueous and ICB ketorolac concentrations exceeded its IC50 for COX-1 and COX-2 at peak and trough. Aqueous and ICB bromfenac levels exceeded its IC50 for COX-2 at peak and trough, but not for COX-1 at trough aqueous levels and peak and trough ICB levels. Conclusions Both ketorolac 0.45% and bromfenac 0.09% effectively suppressed inflammation at peak. At trough, only ketorolac 0.45% effectively suppressed inflammation as measured by FITC

  2. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized comparison of pre and postoperative administration of ketorolac and tramadol for dental extraction pain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Hitesh; Khan, Farhan Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of single-dose oral ketorolac and tramadol administered pre and postoperatively for dental extraction pain. Materials and Methods: 74 patients undergoing third molar extraction (impacted or other causes) were recruited into the study, over a period of 1 year. The patients were divided into six groups and they were given ketorolac (20 mg), tramadol (100 mg), or placebo either preoperatively or postoperatively (half an hour before or half an hour after the procedure). Placebo was glucose powder filled in empty capsule. Pain assessment was done using a modified Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at 30 min, 2, 4, and 6 h after the procedure. A record of whether rescue analgesic (ibuprofen 400 mg) was taken during the 6 h study period, along with the time it was taken, was made. Record of any adverse effects experienced by the patient was also kept. Maximum pain scores for each of the six study groups, over the 6 h study period, were noted. Results: Ketorolac and tramadol were significantly better than placebo in relieving molar tooth extraction pain. Postoperative administration of tramadol was found to be more efficacious than preoperative administration in relieving the pain, whereas the preoperative administration of ketorolac was better than its postoperative administration. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that tramadol is equally effective to ketorolac in relieving pain in the first 6 h after molar extraction and therefore can be tried in patients who are intolerant to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22557747

  3. No evidence of a clinically important effect of adding local infusion analgesia administrated through a catheter in pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using opioids is associated with troublesome side effects such as nausea and dizziness, and epidural analgesic means delayed mobilization. Thus, local infiltration analgesia (LIA) during surgery prolonged with local infusion analgesia (LINFA) into the soft tissue in the hip region through a catheter in the first postoperative days has gained major interest in THA fast-track settings within a short period of time. LIA at the time of surgery is a validated treatment. We investigated the additional effect of giving postoperative LINFA after THA in patients already having LIA during surgery. Patients and methods 60 consecutive patients undergoing non-cemented THA were randomized into two groups in a double-blind and controlled study. During surgery, all patients received standardized pain treatment with LIA. Postoperatively, they were treated either with a solution of Ropivacain, Ketorolac, and Adrenaline (LINFA group) or placebo (placebo group) administered through a catheter to the hip 10 and 22 h after surgery. Pain score, opioid consumption, and length of stay (LOS) were evaluated. Results After adjustment for multiple testing, there was no statistically significant postoperative difference between the LINFA group and the placebo group regarding pain and tiredness. We found some evidence of a short-term effect on nausea and vomiting. Opioid consumption and length of stay were similar in the two groups. Interpretation We found some evidence of a short-term effect of LINFA on nausea and vomiting, but no evidence of an effect on postoperative pain and tiredness. Thus, LINFA cannot be recommended as a standard pain treatment in patients with THA. PMID:21619503

  4. Treatment with paracetamol, ketorolac or etoricoxib did not hinder alveolar bone healing: a histometric study in rats

    PubMed Central

    FRACON, Ricardo Nogueira; TEÓFILO, Juliana Mazzonetto; MORIS, Izabela Cristina; LAMANO, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Prostaglandins control osteoblastic and osteoclastic function under physiological or pathological conditions and are important modulators of the bone healing process. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and consequently prostaglandins synthesis. Experimental and clinical evidence has indicated a risk for reparative bone formation related to the use of non-selective (COX-1 and COX-2) and COX-2 selective NSAIDs. Ketorolac is a non-selective NSAID which, at low doses, has a preferential COX-1 inhibitory effect and etoricoxib is a new selective COX-2 inhibitor. Although literature data have suggested that ketorolac can interfere negatively with long bone fracture healing, there seems to be no study associating etoricoxib with reparative bone formation. Paracetamol/acetaminophen, one of the first choices for pain control in clinical dentistry, has been considered a weak anti-inflammatory drug, although supposedly capable of inhibiting COX-2 activity in inflammatory sites. Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether paracetamol, ketorolac and etoricoxib can hinder alveolar bone formation, taking the filling of rat extraction socket with newly formed bone as experimental model. Material and methods The degree of new bone formation inside the alveolar socket was estimated two weeks after tooth extraction by a differential point-counting method, using an optical microscopy with a digital camera for image capture and histometry software. Differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA after confirming a normal distribution of sample data. Results and conclusions Histometric results confirmed that none of the tested drugs had a detrimental effect in the volume fraction of bone trabeculae formed inside the alveolar socket. PMID:21308296

  5. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  6. Post-thoracotomy analgesia and perioperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Sandler, A N

    1999-05-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is the most severe form of pain after surgery and is continuously exacerbated by ventilatory function. Due to the multiplicity of nociceptive inputs from the chest wall, thoracic viscera, diaphragm and postoperative chest tubes, postoperative pain may be difficult to control with single modalities. The aim is excellent analgesia with function i.e. normal ventilation and rapid mobilisation. A variety of agents and techniques have been shown to be effective analgesics with varying degrees of functional success. These include systemic opioids, NSAIDS and ketamine, regional analgesia (including epidural, spinal, paravetebral, intercostal and intrapleural techniques) and cryoanalgesia. The most popular and probably most effective technique at the present time is thoracic epidural analgesia using a combination of different local anesthetic agents and opioids. There are few data indicating any influence on outcome of different postthoracotomy analgesic techniques. Improvement in outcome requires a co-ordinated approach from all caregivers using the best possible analgesic techniques. PMID:10389403

  7. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in sedation-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Berger, M; Brandstetter, A; Chowanetz, E; Gasser, G; Mossig, H; Schmidt, P

    1988-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of combined sedation and analgesia during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using the Dornier lithotriptor HM III. We used a combination of a benzodiazepin derivatives with an opioid. We tested the dosage of drugs needed in relation to the length of treatment, the size of the stone and the overall energy output of the lithotriptor. In addition, continuous records were made of the patient's blood pressure and the oxygen saturation in the blood, with and without oxygen insufflation. Our results show that sedation combined with analgesia is a reasonable and useable alternative to general or regional anaesthesia for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

  8. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. PMID:25454374

  9. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  10. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  11. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  12. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  13. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  14. Formulation and in Vitro, ex Vivo and in Vivo Evaluation of Elastic Liposomes for Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Guadalupe; Piñón, Elizabeth; Mendoza, Luis; Mendoza, Néstor; Quintanar, David; Ganem, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to formulate ketorolac tromethamine-loaded elastic liposomes and evaluate their in vitro drug release and their ex vivo and in vivo transdermal delivery. Ketorolac tromethamine (KT), which is a potent analgesic, was formulated in elastic liposomes using Tween 80 as an edge activator. The elastic vesicles were prepared by film hydration after optimizing the sonication time and number of extrusions. The vesicles exhibited an entrapment efficiency of 73 ± 11%, vesicle size of 127.8 ± 3.4 nm and a zeta potential of −12 mV. In vitro drug release was analyzed from liposomes and an aqueous solution, using Franz diffusion cells and a cellophane dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da. Ex vivo permeation of KT across pig ear skin was studied using a Franz diffusion cell, with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 32 °C as receptor solution. An in vivo drug permeation study was conducted on healthy human volunteers using a tape-stripping technique. The in vitro results showed (i) a delayed release when KT was included in elastic liposomes, compared to an aqueous solution of the drug; (ii) a flux of 0.278 μg/cm2h and a lag time of about 10 h for ex vivo permeation studies, which may indicate that KT remains in the skin (with the possibility of exerting a local effect) before reaching the receptor medium; (iii) a good correlation between the total amount permeated, the penetration distance (both determined by tape stripping) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measured during the in vivo permeation studies. Elastic liposomes have the potential to transport the drug through the skin, keep their size and drug charge, and release the drug into deep skin layers. Therefore, elastic liposomes hold promise for the effective topical delivery of KT. PMID:24309316

  15. Formulation and in Vitro, ex Vivo and in Vivo Evaluation of Elastic Liposomes for Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine.

    PubMed

    Nava, Guadalupe; Piñón, Elizabeth; Mendoza, Luis; Mendoza, Néstor; Quintanar, David; Ganem, Adriana

    2011-12-15

    The objective of the current study was to formulate ketorolac tromethamine-loaded elastic liposomes and evaluate their in vitro drug release and their ex vivo and in vivo transdermal delivery. Ketorolac tromethamine (KT), which is a potent analgesic, was formulated in elastic liposomes using Tween 80 as an edge activator. The elastic vesicles were prepared by film hydration after optimizing the sonication time and number of extrusions. The vesicles exhibited an entrapment efficiency of 73 ± 11%, vesicle size of 127.8 ± 3.4 nm and a zeta potential of -12 mV. In vitro drug release was analyzed from liposomes and an aqueous solution, using Franz diffusion cells and a cellophane dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da. Ex vivo permeation of KT across pig ear skin was studied using a Franz diffusion cell, with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 32 °C as receptor solution. An in vivo drug permeation study was conducted on healthy human volunteers using a tape-stripping technique. The in vitro results showed (i) a delayed release when KT was included in elastic liposomes, compared to an aqueous solution of the drug; (ii) a flux of 0.278 mg/cm2h and a lag time of about 10 h for ex vivo permeation studies, which may indicate that KT remains in the skin (with the possibility of exerting a local effect) before reaching the receptor medium; (iii) a good correlation between the total amount permeated, the penetration distance (both determined by tape stripping) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measured during the in vivo permeation studies. Elastic liposomes have the potential to transport the drug through the skin, keep their size and drug charge, and release the drug into deep skin layers. Therefore, elastic liposomes hold promise for the effective topical delivery of KT.

  16. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  17. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  18. Somatosympathetic reflex and acupuncture-related analgesia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Shin; Tsai, Yuan-Feen

    2009-11-30

    Both acute and chronic pains correspond to nociceptive substances (NSs), which are naturally produced and metabolized by the organism experiencing the pains. The accumulation of NSs in regional tissues triggers a series of pathophysiological reactions and initiates certain threats to the health and the quality of human life. Pharmacological intervention is the most popular treatment for pain relief, which is achieved by either reducing the production of NSs or blocking the transmission of nociceptive signals through the nervous system, but no drug has been developed for the elimination of NSs. Therefore, improving blood circulation to eliminate NSs in painful tissues is an alternative strategy for pain relief. Acupuncture has been proved to be effective for the treatment of certain kinds of pain, but the mechanisms therein remain unclear. The effectiveness of acupuncture analgesia is also variable owing to the uncertainty surrounding the mechanism and the poor standardization of the technique. There is some evidence that acupuncture may induce pain relief by changing the regional blood flow through somatosympathetic reflex (SSR). Therefore, when exploring the mechanisms of SSR in detail, it is helpful to clarify the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and to develop a more standardized and effective protocol for acupuncture analgesia. Increasing evidence has suggested that both sympathetic activity and stimulation-induced SSR are differentially controlled in an organ-specific and activity-dependent manner. Vasomotor outflow, which involves the regulation of impaired regional blood circulation, is also differentially controlled in response to specific somatic stimulation. Therefore, we vigorously review the relations between SSR and acupuncture-related analgesia so that we can develop a targeted pain therapy where in certain areas of the body undergo site-specific somatic stimulation, which in turn, can adjust the impaired regional blood circulation. PMID:20359125

  19. Using visual prompts to aid analgesia prescribing.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Analgesia prescribing is fundamental to a patient's journey, affecting length of stay and patient experience. Laminated prompts are used throughout the NHS Foundation Trust to aid doctors prescribing. A baseline questionnaire was carried out to gather doctors' prescribing habits and current ability to convert opioids to their morphine equivalent. Ninety three percent of doctors said they were moderately to extremely confident when prescribing analgesia. However, when asked to carry out a simple opioid conversion only 14% answered correctly. Eighty three percent of doctors said they were prescribing laxatives alongside opioids frequently (57%) or almost all the time (25%). When actual rates were sampled only 14% of patients were prescribed a concurrent laxative. Laminated pain management guideline cards were created and distributed to doctors at sign in for weekly teaching. Doctor interviews were carried out to see if they were in possession of a prompt card and a simple opioid conversion question was asked. If they did not have a prompt card at the time of interview they were issued with one after answering the conversion question. Rates of concurrent laxative prescribing were collected from the electronic prescribing record of patients on the acute medical unit. Posters were displayed in doctors' offices and drug rooms. Laxative prescribing rates were re-collected and compared with the survey responses. Distribution of laminated prompts increased accuracy of opioid conversion by 86%. Error rates fell as prompt prevalence increased until there was 100% prevalence and 0% error. Concurrent prescribing of laxatives increased to 50% after posters were displayed around the acute medical unit. Doctors reported they were confident when prescribing analgesia. They reported that they often prescribed concurrent medications, however this did not relate to actual prescribing practices. Visual prompts improved doctors analgesia conversion knowledge and prescribing practices

  20. Analgesia accompanying food consumption requires ingestion of hedonic foods

    PubMed Central

    Foo, H.; Mason, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Animals eat rather than react to moderate pain. Here, we examined the behavioral, hedonic, and neural requirements for ingestion analgesia in ad libitum fed rats. Noxious heat-evoked withdrawals were similarly suppressed during self-initiated chocolate-eating and ingestion of intraorally infused water, sucrose, or saccharin, demonstrating that ingestion analgesia does not require feeding motivation, self-initiated food procurement, sucrose or calories. Rather, food hedonics is important since neither salt ingestion nor quinine rejection elicited analgesia. During quinine-induced nausea and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced illness, conditions when chocolate-eating was presumably less pleasurable, analgesia accompanying chocolate consumption was attenuated. Yet, analgesia during water ingestion was preserved in LPS-injected rats who showed enhanced palatability for water within this context. The dependence of ingestion analgesia on the positive hedonics of an ingestate was confirmed in rats with a conditioned taste aversion to sucrose: after paired exposure to sucrose and LPS, rats no longer showed analgesia during sucrose ingestion but continued to show analgesia during chocolate consumption. Eating pauses tended to occur less often and for shorter durations in the presence of ingestion analgesia than in its absence. Therefore, we propose that ingestion analgesia functions to defend eating from ending. Muscimol inactivation of the medullary raphe magnus (RM) blocked the analgesia normally observed during water ingestion, showing the involvement of brainstem endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms in ingestion analgesia. Brainstem-mediated defense of the consumption of palatable foods may explain, at least in part, why overeating tasty foods is so irresistible even in the face of opposing cognitive and motivational forces. PMID:19828818

  1. [Labor analgesia in the US and Japan].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Hisayo O

    2007-09-01

    Obstetric anesthesia has made significant progress over the last 50 years. It is one of the major subspecialties in anesthesia in US. Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP) was founded in 1968. According to its SCORE project on the practice of obstetric anesthesia, 82.4% of all parturients received some form of anesthesia for cesarean section or labor analgesia. Epidural analgesia was the most common form of labor analgesia (65%), followed by CSEA. This high percentage of anesthesia care for parturients mandates the presence of obstetric anesthesiologists at labor and delivery suites in major hospitals in US. The Japanese Society of Obstetrics and Anesthesia, formerly "Mutsu-bunben Kenkyukai", now called "Bunben to Masui Kenkyukai", was founded in Japan at about the same time as SOAP. Despite its long history, obstetric anesthesia is yet to be a major subspecialty in Japan. It is encouraging, however, that the number of attendants in obstetric anesthesia sessions in JSA seems increasing. SOAP has played an important role in the education and progress of obstetric anesthesia in US. I hope that the joint symposium of SOAP, Bunben to Masui Kenkyukai, and JSA at 39th SOAP annual meeting will facilitate the progress of obstetric anesthesia in Japan.

  2. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research. PMID:21709312

  3. Postoperative pain relief by demand analgesia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Brugmans, J

    1980-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief is only apparently an easy task. A brief survey of literature investigating the discomfort experienced in the postoperative phase is all but encouraging. One can identify four basic problems in obtaining adequate results by delivery of analgesic drugs: a) the biological variability among individual patients, b) the unpredictable uptake of the drug administered intramuscularly, c) the time lag involved between request by the patient and the subsequent administration of a single dose and d) the lack of knowledge about the nature of the discomfort and its remedies. An alternative strategy introducing "On-Demand" analgesia administering prescribed doses at the right moment is presented and analysed a) as an operant conditioning process implementing a particular reinforcement schedule (behavioural sciences), as well as b) a negative feedback control loop that entrust the central judgement to the patient (system theory). Both approaches give insight into the results: the technique copes with biological variability; anticipating pain induced by fear disappears; the feedback strategy works well and patients adapt to a wide range in prescriptions; intermittent administration makes more efficient use of the analgesic; an optimal result is demonstrated in studies comparing on-demand analgesia with the normal IM-regime and epidural analgesia; continuity in pain relief can be obtained in routine clinical practice.

  4. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research.

  5. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated. PMID:26678391

  6. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  7. Patient-controlled oral analgesia versus nurse-controlled parenteral analgesia after caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, A; Dehon, A; Nagot, N; Macioce, V; Nogue, E; Morau, E

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of early patient-controlled oral analgesia compared with parenteral analgesia in a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial of women undergoing elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia. Seventy-seven women received multimodal paracetamol, ketoprofen and morphine analgesia. The woman having patient-controlled oral analgesia were administered four pillboxes on the postnatal ward containing tablets and instructions for self-medication, the first at 7 h after the spinal injection and then three more at 12-hourly intervals. Pain at rest and on movement was evaluated using an 11-point verbal rating scale at 2 h and then at 6-hourly intervals for 48 h. The pre-defined non-inferiority limit for the difference in mean pain scores (patient-controlled oral analgesia minus parenteral) was one. The one-sided 95% CI of the difference in mean pain scores was significantly lower than one at all time-points at rest and on movement, demonstrating non-inferiority of patient-controlled oral analgesia. More women used morphine in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (22 (58%)) than in the parenteral group (9 (23%); p = 0.002). The median (IQR [range]) number of morphine doses in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group was 2 (1-3 [1-7]) compared with 1 (1-1 [1-2]); p = 0.006) in the parenteral group. Minor drug errors or omissions were identified in five (13%) women receiving patient-controlled oral analgesia. Pruritus was more frequent in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (14 (37%) vs 6 (15%) respectively; p = 0.03), but no differences were noted for other adverse events and maternal satisfaction. After elective caesarean section, early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management, and can be one of the steps of an enhanced recovery process. PMID:26931110

  8. Characterization of forced degradation products of ketorolac tromethamine using LC/ESI/Q/TOF/MS/MS and in silico toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Raju, B; Borkar, Roshan M; Namdev, Deepak; Gananadhamu, S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Srinivas, R

    2014-05-01

    Ketorolac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was subjected to forced degradation studies as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. A simple, rapid, precise, and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/Q/TOF/MS/MS) method has been developed for the identification and structural characterization of stressed degradation products of ketorolac. The drug was found to degrade in hydrolytic (acidic, basic, and neutral), photolytic (acidic, basic, and neutral solution), and thermal conditions, whereas the solid form of the drug was found to be stable under photolytic conditions. The method has shown adequate separation of ketorolac tromethamine and its degradation products on a Grace Smart C-18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) column using 20 mM ammonium formate (pH = 3.2): acetonitrile as a mobile phase in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. A total of nine degradation products were identified and characterized by LC/ESI/MS/MS. The most probable mechanisms for the formation of degradation products have been proposed on the basis of a comparison of the fragmentation of the [M + H](+) ions of ketorolac and its degradation products. In silico toxicity of the drug and degradation products was investigated by using topkat and derek softwares. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and robustness as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines.

  9. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  10. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  11. Placebo analgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Luana; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-07-01

    Although it has long been known that psychosocial factors play a crucial role in placebo responses, no attempt has been made to understand if social observation shapes the placebo analgesic effect. To address this question, we compared placebo analgesia induced through social observation (Group 1) with first-hand experience via a typical conditioning procedure (Group 2) and verbal suggestion alone (Group 3). In Group 1, subjects underwent painful stimuli and placebo treatment after they had observed a demonstrator (actually a simulator) showing analgesic effect when the painful stimuli were paired to a green light. In Group 2, subjects were conditioned according to previous studies, whereby a green light was associated to the surreptitious reduction of stimulus intensity, so as to make them believe that the treatment worked. In Group 3, subjects received painful stimuli and were verbally instructed to expect a benefit from a green light. Pain perception was assessed by means of a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0=no pain to 10=maximum imaginable pain. Empathy trait and heart rate were also measured. We found that observing the beneficial effects in the demonstrator induced substantial placebo analgesic responses, which were positively correlated with empathy scores. Moreover, observational social learning produced placebo responses that were similar to those induced by directly experiencing the benefit through the conditioning procedure, whereas verbal suggestions alone produced significantly smaller effects. These findings show that placebo analgesia is finely tuned by social observation and suggest that different forms of learning take part in the placebo phenomenon. PMID:19278785

  12. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  13. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia. PMID:26126071

  14. Novel stereoselective high-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin and ketorolac enantiomers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Al-Taweel, Shorog M; Alshehri, Mona M; Alzoman, Nourah Z

    2014-10-01

    A novel method was developed for the simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUA) and ketorolac tromethamine (KET) enantiomers in plasma samples. Since GUA probably increases the absorption of coadministered drugs (e.g., KET), it would be extremely important to monitor KET plasma levels for the purpose of dose adjustment with a subsequent decrease in the side effects. Enantiomeric resolution was achieved on a polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase, amylose-2, as a chiral selector under the normal phase (NP) mode and using ornidazole (ORN) as internal standard. This innovative method has the advantage of the ease and reliability of sample preparation for plasma samples. Sample clean-up was based on simply using methanol for protein precipitation followed by direct extraction of drug residues using ethanol. Both GUA and KET enantiomers were separated using an isocratic mobile phase composed of hexane/isopropanol/trifluoroacetic acid, 85:15:0.05 v/v/v. Peak area ratios were linear over the range 0.05-20 µg/mL for the four enantiomers S (+) GUA, R (-) GUA, R (+) KET, and S (-) KET. The method was fully validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of system suitability, specificity, accuracy, precision, robustness, and solution stability. Finally, this procedure was innovative to apply the rationale of developing a chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of drug isomers in clinical samples. PMID:25043279

  15. Novel stereoselective high-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin and ketorolac enantiomers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Al-Taweel, Shorog M; Alshehri, Mona M; Alzoman, Nourah Z

    2014-10-01

    A novel method was developed for the simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUA) and ketorolac tromethamine (KET) enantiomers in plasma samples. Since GUA probably increases the absorption of coadministered drugs (e.g., KET), it would be extremely important to monitor KET plasma levels for the purpose of dose adjustment with a subsequent decrease in the side effects. Enantiomeric resolution was achieved on a polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase, amylose-2, as a chiral selector under the normal phase (NP) mode and using ornidazole (ORN) as internal standard. This innovative method has the advantage of the ease and reliability of sample preparation for plasma samples. Sample clean-up was based on simply using methanol for protein precipitation followed by direct extraction of drug residues using ethanol. Both GUA and KET enantiomers were separated using an isocratic mobile phase composed of hexane/isopropanol/trifluoroacetic acid, 85:15:0.05 v/v/v. Peak area ratios were linear over the range 0.05-20 µg/mL for the four enantiomers S (+) GUA, R (-) GUA, R (+) KET, and S (-) KET. The method was fully validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of system suitability, specificity, accuracy, precision, robustness, and solution stability. Finally, this procedure was innovative to apply the rationale of developing a chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of drug isomers in clinical samples.

  16. Analytical and semi-preparative enantioresolution of (RS)-ketorolac from pharmaceutical formulation and in human plasma by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Lal, Manohar; Bhushan, Ravi

    2016-10-01

    An efficient, simple, validated, analytical and semi-preparative HPLC method has been developed for direct enantioresolution of (RS)-Ketorolac (Ket) using monochloro-methylated derivatives of cellulose and amylose, i.e. cellulose (tris-3-chloro-4-methylphenylcarbamate) and amylose (tris-5-chloro-2-methylphenylcarbamate) as chiral stationary phases (CSPs) with photo diode array detection at 320 nm. Enantioresolution was carried out in samples of human plasma spiked with (RS)-Ket under normal and reversed-phase elution modes with suitable mobile phase compositions. The effect of nature of alcohols (MeOH, EtOH, PrOH and n-BuOH) and other solvents (MeCN and MeOH) as organic modifiers in the mobile phase was investigated on the separation performance of two CSPs in terms of retention and separation of enantiomers. The best resolution was observed on cellulose-based CSP using EtOH, while using 2-PrOH (15%) and amylose-based CSP obtained the highest retention. Under reversed-phase elution mode the best enantioseparation was observed using 30% MeCN with ammonium formate buffer. The elution order of enantiomers was ascertained by determining specific rotations. The limit of detection and quantitation values were 5 and 15.5 ng/mL for each enantiomer of (RS)-Ket, respectively. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26988799

  17. Stereoselective and substrate-dependent inhibition of hepatic mitochondria beta-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, and ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Browne, G S; Nelson, C; Nguyen, T; Ellis, B A; Day, R O; Williams, K M

    1999-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause a range of adverse effects, some of which have been associated with perturbances of lipid metabolic pathways. Previous data demonstrating stereoselective formation of the CoA thioester of R-ibuprofen in particular were suggestive of possible stereoselective effects on lipid metabolism. Our aim was to characterise the relative stereoselectivity of the effects of ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, and ketorolac (0.01-1.0 mM) on both the beta-oxidation of palmitate and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatic mitochondria as a means of dissecting prostaglandin related from non-prostaglandin-related events. Beta-oxidation was inhibited stereoselectively by R-ibuprofen (P = 0.015), non-stereoselectively by R- and S-flurbiprofen (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively), and was essentially unaffected by either enantiomer of ketorolac. At 0.25 mM, inhibition by R-ibuprofen and both flurbiprofen enantiomers was partially reversed by increasing CoA concentrations (0-200 microM). Mitochondrial respiration was moderately inhibited by both enantiomers of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen (P < 0.01), but only by high concentrations (> or = 1 mM) of the enantiomers of ketorolac (P < 0.01). Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation measured as stimulation of State 4 respiration contributed to these effects. The data support interactions involving both stereoselective CoA-dependent and non-CoA-dependent mechanisms. The plasma drug concentrations required to achieve these effects are not likely to be attained in the majority of patients, although these concentrations are achievable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contribute to the well-known spectrum of adverse effects in this organ. Some patients do experience systemic adverse events which may be mediated by these mechanisms.

  18. The Effects of Two Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Bromfenac 0.1% and Ketorolac 0.45%, on Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Won; Chung, Byung Hoon; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the additive effects of two types of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), bromfenac 0.1% or ketorolac 0.45%, relative to topical steroid alone in cataract surgery. Materials and Methods A total 91 subjects scheduled to undergo cataract operation were randomized into three groups: Group 1, pre/postoperative bromfenac 0.1%; Group 2, pre/postoperative preservative-free ketorolac 0.45%; and Group 3, postoperative steroid only, as a control. Outcome measures included intraoperative change in pupil size, postoperative anterior chamber inflammation control, change in macular thickness and volume, and ocular surface status after operation. Results Both NSAID groups had smaller intraoperative pupil diameter changes compared to the control group (p<0.05). There was significantly less ocular inflammation 1 week and 1 month postoperatively in both NSAID groups than the control group. The changes in central foveal subfield thickness measured before the operation and at postoperative 1 month were 4.30±4.25, 4.87±6.03, and 12.47±12.24 µm in groups 1 to 3, respectively. In the control group, macular thickness and volume increased more in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), compared to those without DM. In contrast, in both NSAID groups, NSAIDs significantly reduced macular changes in subgroups of patients with or without DM. Although three ocular surface parameters were worse in group 1 than in group 2, these differences were not significant. Conclusion Adding preoperative and postoperative bromfenac 0.1% or ketorolac 0.45% to topical steroid can reduce intraoperative miosis, postoperative inflammation, and macular changes more effectively than postoperative steroid alone. PMID:26446653

  19. An epidural analgesia program: balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H F; Calio, M M

    1990-09-01

    An alternative to parenteral narcotic management is the administration of analgesics into the epidural space. The recognition and prevention of complications or side effects of epidural analgesia are prime concerns in planning nursing care for these patients.

  20. Postoperative epidural opioid analgesia: what are the choices?

    PubMed

    de Leon-Casasola, O A; Lema, M J

    1996-10-01

    The administration of hydrophilic opioids via a continuous infusion results in selective spinal analgesia with a low incidence of side effects. Lipophilic opioids may also be associated with spinal effects. However, the doses required to produce postoperative analgesia also produce plasma concentrations within the MEAC. Thus, in clinical practice it may not be possible to limit epidural doses of lipophilic opioids to those associated with spinal analgesia. Regardless of the mechanism of action, epidural administration of lipophilic opioids may offer no clinical advantages over the IV route. Notwithstanding, epidural administration of small doses of lipophilic opioids in combination with local anesthetics may offer significant clinical advantages over systemic administration of opioids alone. Dose-ranging studies will be necessary to determine the ideal concentrations of opioids and local anesthetics, as well as the ratios of the two drugs to obtain optimal analgesia with minimal incidence of side effects.

  1. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  2. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively. PMID:27121239

  3. Analgesia following thoracotomy: a survey of Australian practice.

    PubMed

    Cook, T M; Riley, R H

    1997-10-01

    This survey examines pain management after thoracotomy in Australian hospitals. Questionnaires were sent to senior thoracic anaesthetists at 27 hospitals (16 public and 11 private) with thoracic surgical units. Twenty-six anaesthetists replied and 24 responses were included in the analyses. Seventy-two percent of respondents were from hospitals with acute pain services (APS), and in 94% of these hospitals patients are reportedly visited by the APS. The most frequently used analgesic modalities are epidural analgesia, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA), and nurse-controlled intravenous opioid infusions. Over half of the anaesthetists reported using local anaesthetic intercostal nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or paracetamol. Combinations of analgesic techniques were cited frequently. Respondents reported that cryoanalgesia, interpleural blockade, paravertebral blockade, subarachnoid infusions, ketamine, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are used infrequently. Anaesthetists from public hospitals reported using epidural analgesia, IVPCA and NSAIDs more frequently than those from private hospitals. When epidural analgesia is used, most respondents place the catheter in the mid-thoracic region (91%), use a regimen of opioids plus local anaesthetic (96%), use a constant infusion technique (100%), and continue analgesia for up to three days (83%). Over half of the respondents reported that post-thoracotomy patients are nursed in a high-dependency area. Seventy-nine percent of respondents selected epidural analgesia as the best available analgesia technique, whereas 21% consider IVPCA to be the best. Only 75% of respondents reported that the type of analgesia they consider best is also the type which they use most frequently. PMID:9352765

  4. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia during SWL.

    PubMed

    Uyar, M; Uyar, M; Uğur, G; Bílge, S; Ozyar, B; Ozyurt, C

    1996-10-01

    Sixty unpremedicated outpatients undergoing elective extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) using a Dornier MPL 9000 lithotripter were randomly assigned to receive either propofol-alfentanil (PA group; N = 30) or midazolam-alfentanil (MA group; N = 30) by a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device for sedation and analgesia. Although pain intensity scores were lower after 20 minutes and sedation was more pronounced in the MA group, both drug regimens produced satisfactory sedation and analgesia and allowed the maximum number of shockwaves to be given. Alfentanil consumption was less in the MA group (P < 0.05). Both groups were hemodynamically stable. The patients in the MA group had slower ventilation rates, lower oxygen saturation, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide levels. Use of MA was associated with more episodes of oxygen desaturation to < 90% (30% vs. 11%; P < 0.05). One patient in the PA group and three patients in the MA group developed bradypnea (< 10 breaths/min). Patient satisfaction was very high with the two sedative-analgesic techniques. Propofol and midazolam, when given in combination with alfentanil using a PCA pump, may provide safe, effective analgesia and sedation during lithotripsy. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia may provide optimal conditions for SWL of urinary tract stones and is a useful alternative to other forms of anesthesia and analgesia.

  5. Is epidural analgesia necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy?

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ibe, Takashi; Atsumi, Jun; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Takeyoshi, Isumi

    2010-10-01

    Most studies have shown that thoracic epidural analgesia reduces postoperative pain, but it carries potential risks. Recently, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery has become an established technique that causes minimal postoperative pain. This report shows that thoracic epidural analgesia is not always necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. From January to December 2007, 30 consecutive patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy were examined retrospectively. We analyzed the necessity for routine thoracic epidural analgesia. The continuous subcutaneous analgesia catheter for morphine (2 mg in 48 h) was removed from 15 patients on postoperative day 1, and from the other 15 on day 2. We administered loxoprofen sodium hydrate, diclofenac sodium suppository, pentazocine hydrochloride, and mexiletine hydrochloride for postoperative analgesia, as needed. The mean pain score was no more than 1.0. The maximum score was 3.0 on day 0, and 2.0 on day 14; subsequently, no pain score exceeded 2.0. The postoperative hospital stay was 8.7 ± 0.8 days. All patients made uneventful postoperative recoveries. There is no need for thoracic epidural analgesia after every video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy because our patients recovered with no serious complication. Less invasive surgical approaches should require simpler postoperative pain management. PMID:20947601

  6. Iontophoretic transport kinetics of ketorolac in vitro and in vivo: demonstrating local enhanced topical drug delivery to muscle.

    PubMed

    Gratieri, Taís; Pujol-Bello, Ester; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; de Souza, Joel G; Lopez, Renata F V; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery kinetics of ketorolac (KT), a highly potent NSAID and peripherally-acting analgesic that is currently indicated to treat moderate to severe acute pain. It was envisaged that, depending on the amounts delivered, transdermal iontophoretic administration might have two distinct therapeutic applications: (i) more effective and faster local therapy with shorter onset times (e.g. to treat trauma-related pain/inflammation in muscle) or (ii) a non-parenteral, gastrointestinal tract sparing approach for systemic pain relief. The first part of the study investigated the effect of experimental conditions on KT iontophoresis using porcine and human skin in vitro. These results demonstrated that KT electrotransport was linearly dependent on current density - from 0.1875 to 0.5mA/cm(2) - (r(2)>0.99) and drug concentration - from 5 to 20mg/ml (r(2)>0.99). Iontophoretic permeation of KT from a 2% hydroxymethyl cellulose gel was comparable to that from an aqueous solution with equivalent drug loading (584.59±114.67 and 462.05±66.56μg/cm(2), respectively). Cumulative permeation (462.05±66.56 and 416.28±95.71μg/cm(2)) and steady state flux (106.72±11.70 and 94.28±15.47μg/cm(2)h), across porcine and human skin, were statistically equivalent confirming the validity of the model. Based on the results in vitro, it was decided to focus on topical rather than systemic applications of KT iontophoresis in vivo. Subsequent experiments, in male Wistar rats, investigated the local enhancement of KT delivery to muscle by iontophoresis. Drug biodistribution was assessed in skin, in the biceps femoris muscle beneath the site of iontophoresis ('treated muscle'; TM), in the contralateral muscle ('non-treated muscle'; NTM) and in plasma (P). Passive topical delivery and oral administration served as negative and positive controls, respectively. Iontophoretic administration for 30min was superior to passive topical

  7. Microspheres and tablet in capsule system: A novel chronotherapeutic system of ketorolac tromethamine for site and time specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Priya; Kumari, Neeraj; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a novel delivery system of ketorolac tromethamine (KT) for dual pulse release based on microspheres and tablet in capsule system (MATICS) as a treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis. The design consisted of an impermeable hard gelatin capsule body, in which a core tablet was (second pulse) placed in the bottom and sealed with a hydrogel plug (HP2). The body was locked with enteric coated cap filled with KT microspheres (first pulse). The microspheres for first pulse were selected by screening the formulations (M1-M6), and M1 with least particle size of 96.38 ± 0.05 μm, highest drug loading of 25.10% ± 0.28% and maximum CDR of 89.32% ± 0.21% was adjudged as the best formulation. The HP2 tablet was selected based on its capability for maintaining a lag period of 6 h. The selection criterion of the second pulse (core tablet: T3) was its disintegration time of 4.02 ± 0.53 min and CDR of 99.10% ± 0.32% in 30 min. All the optimized formulations were assembled in accordance with the proposed design to form pulsatile MATICS and evaluated for in vitro release. MATICS displayed delayed sustained CDR of 80.15% in 8 h from the first pulse (microspheres) after a lag time of 2 h, followed by 97.05% KT release from second pulse (core tablet) in simulated colonic fluid within 10 h. Conclusively, in vitro pulsatile release was a rational combination of delayed sustained and immediate release of KT that has the potential to combat the pain at night and morning stiffness. Incorporation of two pulses in one system offers a reduction in dose frequency and better pain management.

  8. Microspheres and tablet in capsule system: A novel chronotherapeutic system of ketorolac tromethamine for site and time specific delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Priya; Kumari, Neeraj; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a novel delivery system of ketorolac tromethamine (KT) for dual pulse release based on microspheres and tablet in capsule system (MATICS) as a treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis. The design consisted of an impermeable hard gelatin capsule body, in which a core tablet was (second pulse) placed in the bottom and sealed with a hydrogel plug (HP2). The body was locked with enteric coated cap filled with KT microspheres (first pulse). The microspheres for first pulse were selected by screening the formulations (M1–M6), and M1 with least particle size of 96.38 ± 0.05 μm, highest drug loading of 25.10% ± 0.28% and maximum CDR of 89.32% ± 0.21% was adjudged as the best formulation. The HP2 tablet was selected based on its capability for maintaining a lag period of 6 h. The selection criterion of the second pulse (core tablet: T3) was its disintegration time of 4.02 ± 0.53 min and CDR of 99.10% ± 0.32% in 30 min. All the optimized formulations were assembled in accordance with the proposed design to form pulsatile MATICS and evaluated for in vitro release. MATICS displayed delayed sustained CDR of 80.15% in 8 h from the first pulse (microspheres) after a lag time of 2 h, followed by 97.05% KT release from second pulse (core tablet) in simulated colonic fluid within 10 h. Conclusively, in vitro pulsatile release was a rational combination of delayed sustained and immediate release of KT that has the potential to combat the pain at night and morning stiffness. Incorporation of two pulses in one system offers a reduction in dose frequency and better pain management. PMID:26258058

  9. Validated Stability-indicating Reverse-phase Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography Method for Simultaneous Determination of Sodium Methylparaben, Sodium Propylparaben and Ketorolac Tromethamine in Topical Dosage Forms

    PubMed Central

    Roy, C.; Chakrabarty, J.; Modi, P. B.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive, fast, and stability-indicating isocratic reverse-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for quantitative simultaneous determination of sodium methylparaben, sodium propylparaben and ketorolac tromethamine in topical dosage forms. Separation of all peaks was achieved by using acquity ethylene bridged hybrid C18 (50×2.1 mm, 1.7 μ) as stationary phase, mobile phase used was triethylamine buffer (pH 2.5):tetrahydrofuran:methanol (665:35:300, v/v/v) with isocratic mode at a flow rate of 0.40 ml/min. All component were detected at 252 nm with 10 min run time. The described method was found to be linear in the concentration range of 248-744 μg/ml for ketorolac tromethamine, 20.8-62.4 μg/ml for sodium methylparaben and 2.38-7.13 μg/ml for sodium propylparaben with correlation coefficients more than 0.999. Method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, solution stability, filter equivalency, and robustness as per International Conference on Harmonization guideline. Formulation was exposed to the stress conditions of peroxide, acid, base, thermal, and photolytic degradation and proven all components were well separated in the presence of degradants. PMID:24019569

  10. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth. PMID:21519396

  11. The mysterious persistence of hypnotic analgesia.

    PubMed

    Barber, J

    1998-01-01

    Hypnotic treatment of pain has a long history and, among hypnotic phenomena, pain relief is a relatively commonplace focus for intervention, yet we lack a conceptual explanation for this treatment. Hilgard's neodissociation theory accounts for the phenomenon of acute hypnotic analgesia, but not of persistent pain relief. Perhaps the enduring effect of hypnotic treatment can be explained at either of two levels: a neurophysiological model or a learning model. This explanation leads to the further question: How does hypnotic treatment of recurring pain achieve enduring relief? Clinical experience suggests a two-component model. First, the clinician communicates specific ideas that strengthen the patient's ability to derive therapeutic support and to develop a sense of openness to the unexplored possibilities for pain relief within the security of nurturing therapeutic relationship. Second, the clinician employs posthypnotic suggestions that capitalize on the patient's particular pain experiences, which simultaneously ameliorate the pain experience, and which, in small, repetitive increments, tend to maintain persistent pain relief over increasing periods of time.

  12. Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia in children with cerebral palsy undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldgaard Pedersen, Line; Nikolajsen, Lone; Rahbek, Ole; Uldall Duch, Birgitte; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Treatment of postoperative pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a major challenge. We investigated the effect of epidural analgesia, high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and an approximated placebo control on early postoperative pain in children with CP who were undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction. Patients and methods — Between 2009 and 2014, we included 18 children with CP. The first part of the study was a randomized double-blind trial with allocation to either LIA or placebo for postoperative pain management, in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. In the second part of the study, the children were consecutively included for postoperative pain management with epidural analgesia in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. The primary outcome was postoperative pain 4 h postoperatively using 2 pain assessment tools (r-FLACC and VAS-OBS) ranging from 0 to 10. The secondary outcome was opioid consumption over the 21-h study period. Results — The mean level of pain 4 h postoperatively was lower in the epidural group (r-FLACC: 0.7; VAS-OBS: 0.6) than in both the LIA group (r-FLACC: 4.8, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 5.2, p = 0.02) and the placebo group (r-FLACC: 5.2, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 6.5, p < 0.001). Corrected for body weight, the mean opioid consumption was lower in the epidural group than in the LIA group and the placebo group (both p < 0.001). Interpretation — Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia for early postoperative pain management in children with cerebral palsy who undergo unilateral hip reconstruction. PMID:26541479

  13. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  14. Evaluation of intercostal cryoanalgesia versus conventional analgesia in postthoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Pastor, J; Morales, P; Cases, E; Cordero, P; Piqueras, A; Galán, G; París, F

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of cryoanalgesia in patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. A double-blind randomized and prospective study was performed in 100 patients undergoing thoracotomy. They were randomized into two groups: Group A, 55 patients, who had undergone an intercostal cryoanalgesia and group B, control, 45 patients treated only with pharmacological analgesia ad libitum. In both groups we assessed pain in the first 7 postsurgical days, the amount of analgesia required, electromyography of the intercostal muscles involved and recording of maximal static respiratory pressures. Postsurgical pain was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in group A. No patient in group A needed major analgesia and the amount of aminopyrines required was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those used in group B. Maximal static inspiratory pressure (PImax) showed no significant changes and no significant differences were found between the two groups. Maximal static expiratory pressure (PEmax) significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in the 1st and 2nd week and it was not related to the type of analgesia used. We advocate the use of cryoanalgesia since it significantly reduces pain as well as the doses of analgesia. PMID:8815972

  15. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  16. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  17. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  18. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; O’Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia. PMID:24043932

  19. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Mark; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-09-06

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia.

  20. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by subanesthetic doses of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L; Misra, A L

    1985-03-01

    Pentobarbital pretreatment reportedly either inhibits, enhances or has no effect on morphine analgesia. The effect of subanesthetic doses of sodium pentobarbital (8-12 mg kg-1, SC) delivered via a delivery system on analgesia of morphine (5 mg kg-1, SC or 1 mg kg-1, IV) acutely administered 45 min after the sodium pentobarbital pellet implantation was assessed using the warm water (55 degrees C)-induced tail-withdrawal reflex in male Wistar rats. Significant potentiation of morphine analgesia was observed in sodium pentobarbital as compared to the placebo-pelleted animals. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors were not involved in this potentiation, which was possibly due to the activation of the descending inhibitory control pathways of nociceptive spinal tail-withdrawal reflex by a combined interaction of two drugs at spinal and supraspinal sites of action, that mediate opiate antinociception. PMID:3991755

  1. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  2. [Current approaches to the analgesia of spontaneous child birth].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, M I; Geronimus, V Iu

    2007-01-01

    The authors have compared various modes of spontaneous labor. Prolonged epidural infusion of naropine in combination with fentanyl has been found to cause a less motor block and therefore it may be used in the late first-to-second period of labor. Adequate analgesia ensures a smooth course of the second labor period and promotes the reduction in its duration and the correction of central hemodynamic and hormonal homeostastic disorders. The administration of moradol provides adequate analgesia of the first labor period, prevention, and elimination of abnormal labor activity, without exerting a depressive effect on maternal and neonatal respiration, which makes it possible to consider this procedure as an alternative mode of labor pain relief if there are contraindications to epidural analgesia. PMID:18330019

  3. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics.

  4. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics. PMID:26852948

  5. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  6. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  7. Single-dose intrathecal analgesia to control labour pain

    PubMed Central

    Minty, R.G.; Kelly, Len; Minty, Alana; Hammett, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the safety and efficacy of single-dose spinal analgesia (intrathecal narcotics [ITN]) during labour. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched and the references of 2 systematic reviews and a meta-analysis were reviewed to find articles on obstetric analgesia and pain measurement. The 33 articles selected included 14 studies, 1 meta-analysis, and 2 systematic reviews, all providing level I evidence. MAIN MESSAGE The literature supports use of ITN as a safe and effective alternative to epidural anesthesia. The recent decrease in rates of episiotomies and use of forceps during deliveries means patients require less dense perineal anesthesia. The advantageof single-dose ITN is that fewer physicians and nurses are needed to administer it even though its safety and effectiveness are comparable with other analgesics. Use of ITN is associated with a shorter first stage of labour and more rapid cervical dilation. A combination of 2.5 mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 250 μg of morphine intrathecally usually provides a 4-hour window of acceptable analgesia for patients without complications not anticipating protracted labour. The evolution in dosing of ITN warrants a re-examination of its usefulness in modern obstetric practice. CONCLUSION Physicians practising modern obstetrics in rural and small urban centres might find single-dose ITN a useful alternative to parenteral or epidural analgesia for appropriately selected patients. PMID:17872679

  8. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  9. Overdose of opioid from patient-controlled analgesia pumps.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, W G; Knowles, P; Kaldas, R

    1992-07-01

    Two incidence have occurred in our hospital when a patient-controlled analgesia pump has accidentally delivered the whole contents of the syringe of diamorphine (60 mg) over a period of approximately 1 h. Electrical corruption of the pumps' program has been identified as the probable cause. All pumps of this type have been modified to prevent such occurrences.

  10. Horner syndrome during lumbar epidural analgesia for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Schachner, S M; Reynolds, A C

    1982-06-01

    Horner syndrome (ptosis, miosis, anhidrosis, and facial and conjunctival vasodilation) is a recognized complication of lumbar epidural analgesia for labor and delivery. Alone, it presents no significant risk to mother or fetus, as resolution is spontaneous and complete. Horner syndrome may, however, be associated with significant maternal hypotension and therefore should be an indication for close maternal and fetal monitoring to provide reassurance.

  11. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  12. Comparative study of the ocular efficacy and safety of diclofenac sodium (0.1%) ophthalmic solution with that of ketorolac tromethamine (0.5%) ophthalmic solution in patients with acute seasonal allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Dehar, Navdeep; Gupta, Anita; Singh, Gursatinder

    2012-01-01

    Background: Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) is the most common and most prevalent of allergic disorders which afflict the ocular surface. Of the several treatments available, ophthalmic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are generally very safe and tolerable. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the ocular efficacy and safety of diclofenac sodium (0.1%) ophthalmic solution with that of ketorolac tromethamine (0.5%) ophthalmic solution in patients with acute SAC. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with signs and symptoms of SAC were evaluated in an open, randomized, parallel group study. The principle symptoms (ocular itching, burning, discharge, photophobia) and signs (ocular inflammation, lid edema, chemosis, conjunctival mucous, keratitis) were evaluated. Study Design: Patients were randomized into two groups of 30 each. Patients in group A received one drop of diclofenac sodium 0.1% and patients in group B received ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% in both the eyes four times a day for fourteen days. Evaluations were performed at day 0, 3, 7 and 14 of the therapy. At each visit, the signs and symptoms were rated using a scale from 0-3 (mild-1, moderate-2 and severe-3). Results: Significant clinical and statistical reductions in signs and symptoms from baseline were observed in both groups. Diclofenac sodium 0.1% was superior to ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% in reducing ocular itching (P < 0.05) and ocular inflammation (P < 0.05), at the final examination. Conclusion: Diclofenac sodium showed statistically significant better results at day 3 and 7 compared to ketorolac. PMID:23776804

  13. Pleasure-related analgesia activates opioid-insensitive circuits.

    PubMed

    Kut, Elvan; Candia, Victor; von Overbeck, Jan; Pok, Judit; Fink, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd

    2011-03-16

    Recent findings suggest that pain and pleasure share common neurochemical circuits, and studies in animals and humans show that opioid-mediated descending pathways can inhibit or facilitate pain. We explored the role of endogenous opioid neurotransmission in pleasure-related analgesia. μ-Opioidergic activity was blocked with 0.2 mg/kg naloxone to assess its effects on hedonic responses to pleasant emotional pictures (International Affective Picture System) and its modulating effects on heat pain tolerance. Naloxone did not alter subjective and autonomous reactions to pleasure induction or overall mood of participants. In addition, pleasure-related increases in pain tolerance persisted after reversal of endogenous μ-opioidergic neurotransmission. Subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings increased after naloxone administration. These findings suggest that, in addition to opioid-sensitive circuits, mainly opioid-insensitive pain-modulating circuits are activated during pleasure-related analgesia. PMID:21411655

  14. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  15. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  16. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  17. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  18. Current Strategies in Anesthesia and Analgesia for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Calin Stefan; Weiser, Mitchell C; Levin, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with substantial postoperative pain that may impair mobility, reduce the ability to participate in rehabilitation, lead to chronic pain, and reduce patient satisfaction. Traditional general anesthesia with postoperative epidural and patient-controlled opioid analgesia is associated with an undesirable adverse-effect profile, including postoperative nausea and vomiting, hypotension, urinary retention, respiratory depression, delirium, and an increased infection rate. Multimodal anesthesia--incorporating elements of preemptive analgesia, neuraxial perioperative anesthesia, peripheral nerve blockade, periarticular injections, and multimodal oral opioid and nonopioid medications during the perioperative and postoperative periods--can provide superior pain control while minimizing opioid-related adverse effects, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing the risk of postoperative complications.

  19. Two opioid forms of stress analgesia: studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-03-12

    We have previously reported that stress analgesia sensitive to and insensitive to opiate antagonists can be differentially produced in rats by varying the severity or temporal pattern of inescapable footshock. In these studies, we give further evidence for the opioid and non-opioid bases of these paradigms of stress analgesia. We find that naloxone-sensitive analgesia demonstrates tolerance with repeated stress and cross-tolerance with morphine, whereas naloxone-insensitive analgesia demonstrates neither of these characteristics. Moreover, different forms of opioid, but not non-opioid, stress analgesia manifest cross-tolerance with each other. These data are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between two forms of opioid stress analgesia.

  20. Stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine: predominant role of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1987-01-01

    Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted subcutaneously in male Wistar rats potentiated the analgesia of morphine, levorphanol, methadone and buprenorphine as measured by the tail-withdrawal test. Potentiated opiate analgesia was abolished by naloxone and further enhanced by desipramine and phenoxybenzamine. Yohimbine, alpha-methyl p-tyrosine, haloperidol, zimelidine, methysergide, p-chlorophenylalanine produced no significant effect on potentiated opiate analgesia. Pseudo-cocaine (dextro-cocaine), which is several-fold less potent than cocaine as an inhibitor of noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake in the CNS, had no significant effect on opiate analgesia. Analgesia produced by low doses of baclofen, a GABA agonist, was also not potentiated by cocaine. This study suggests a predominant role for noradrenaline in the stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine. PMID:3822492

  1. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    PubMed

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  2. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  3. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  4. [Preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain after frontotemporal craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Honnma, Toshimi; Imaizumi, Toshio; Chiba, Masahiko; Niwa, Jun

    2002-02-01

    Two thirds of patients suffer from moderate to severe pain after frontotemporal craniotomy. We think neurosurgeons must try to reduce the postoperative pain, which may induce postoperative hypertension, restlessness, and pathological pains. To investigate how preemptive analgesia effects postoperative pain, we assessed the pain in 20 consecutive patients who underwent neck clipping for non-ruptured cerebral aneurysms of anterior circulation systems by frontotemporal craniotomies. Ten patients underwent preemptive analgesia with four procedures (preemptive group) as follows, 1) oral administration of long-acting non-steroid anti inflammatory drug (NSAID, ampiroxicam) two hours before the surgical operation, 2) nerve blockades of the supra-orbital nerve and the infra-orbital nerve by bupivacaine, 3) local anesthesia of the scalp along the marker of a skin incision by xylocaine, 4) local anesthesia by bupivacaine along a skin incision after the skin closure. Ten patients of the control group underwent only procedure No. 3. Visual analog pain score (VAS) for postoperative pain 6, 12, and 24 hours, and 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after operation and NSAID administration for the pain were evaluated. Patients of the preemptive group had significantly less postoperative pain during the whole post-surgery period and required less administration of NSAID than the control group. Preemptive analgesia procedures No. 1, 2 and 4 reduced the postoperative pain and the total administration of NSAID. Postoperative pain may be reduced after other types of brain surgery, with proper nerve blocks like procedure No. 2, procedures No. 1, 3 and 4. PMID:11857941

  5. Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q.; Messina, Troy C.

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50–75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  6. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  7. Body region shocked need not critically define the neurochemical basis of stress analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J T; Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-10

    Both opioid and non-opioid forms of stress-induced analgesia have been demonstrated in rats, although the conditions leading to their selective activation are still being investigated. We have shown that variations in shock intensity, duration or temporal pattern can determine whether opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia occurs. Others have suggested that body region shocked is the critical determinant, analgesia from front paw shock being opioid and that from hind paw shock non-opioid. We now report that either opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia can be evoked from either front or hind paws depending only on footshock intensity when duration and temporal pattern are held constant.

  8. Postoperative analgesia for day-case herniorrhaphy patients. A comparison of cryoanalgesia, paravertebral blockade and oral analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wood, G J; Lloyd, J W; Bullingham, R E; Britton, B J; Finch, D R

    1981-06-01

    Patients were admitted as day-cases for inguinal herniorrhaphy under epidural anaesthesia and chlormethiazole sedation. The patients were given oral analgesia, and in addition, some were given either a paravertebral block with a dextran/bupivacaine mixture or cryoanalgesia of the ilio-inguinal nerve for postoperative pain relief. These anaesthetic and analgesic techniques are discussed in relation to day-case herniorrhaphy. PMID:7270829

  9. Significance of neuronal cytochrome P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hough, Lindsay B; Nalwalk, Julia W; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-08-26

    Stressful environmental changes can suppress nociceptive transmission, a phenomenon known as "stress-induced analgesia". Depending on the stressor and the subject, opioid or non-opioid mechanisms are activated. Brain μ opioid receptors mediate analgesia evoked either by exogenous agents (e.g. morphine), or by the release of endogenous opioids following stressful procedures. Recent work with morphine and neuronal cytochrome P450 (P450)-deficient mice proposed a signal transduction role for P450 enzymes in µ analgesia. Since µ opioid receptors also mediate some forms of stress-induced analgesia, the present studies assessed the significance of brain P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia. Two widely-used models of opioid stress-induced analgesia (restraint and warm water swim) were studied in both sexes of wild-type control and P450-deficient (Null) mice. In control mice, both stressors evoked moderate analgesic responses which were blocked by pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, confirming the opioid nature of these responses. Consistent with literature, sex differences (control female>control male) were seen in swim-induced, but not restraint-induced, analgesia. Null mice showed differential responses to the two stress paradigms. As compared with control subjects, Null mice showed highly attenuated restraint-induced analgesia, showing a critical role for neuronal P450s in this response. However, warm water swim-induced analgesia was unchanged in Null vs. control mice. Additional control experiments confirmed the absence of morphine analgesia in Null mice. These results are the first to show that some forms of opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia require brain neuronal P450 activity.

  10. Involvement of calmodulin inhibition in analgesia induced with low doses of intrathecal trifluoperazine.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Irie, Tetsumi; Ghafghazi, Taghi; Hajhashemi, Valiollahe

    2002-02-01

    We examined which of the known properties of trifluoperazine, including calmodulin inhibition, are involved in its analgesic effect. Furthermore, we tried to find any possible interaction between opioidergic system and calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia. Intrathecal trifluoperazine (1, 10, 100 microg) showed a biphasic effect in the formalin test; i.e., analgesia at relatively low doses (1, 10 microg) and hyperalgesia at a high dose (100 microg). No analgesic effects were observed after intrathecal injection of sulpiride (1, 10, 100 microg), atropine (0.1, 1, 10 microg), phentolamine (0.1, 1, 10 microg) and brompheniramine (0.1, 1, 10 microg). Meanwhile, intrathecal calmidazolium (10, 50, 250 microg) induced a dose-dependent analgesia. Histamine (1 microg), physostigmine (1 microg), bromocriptine (1 microg) and norepinephrine (1 microg) did not affect trifluoperazine-induced analgesia. Calcium (20 microg) attenuated the antinociceptive effect of trifluoperazine and inhibited the analgesic effect of calmidazolium. Finally, naloxone (2 mg/kg) decreased trifluoperazine-induced antinociception but did not have any effects on calmidazolium-induced analgesia. We concluded that calmodulin inhibition may be involved in the analgesia produced by trifluoperazine. With increasing doses of trifluoperazine, the algesic effect seems to overcome the analgesic effect. It is also suggested that the opioidergic system does not interact with calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia even though this system has a possible role in trifluoperazine-induced analgesia.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  14. Subcutaneous L-tyrosine elicits cutaneous analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the ability of L-tyrosine to induce cutaneous analgesia and to investigate the interaction between L-tyrosine and the local anesthetic lidocaine. After subcutaneously injecting the rats with L-tyrosine and lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner, cutaneous analgesia (by blocking the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex-CTMR) was evaluated in response to the local pinprick. The drug-drug interaction was analyzed by using an isobolographic method. We showed that both L-tyrosine and lidocaine produced dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the rank of drug potency was lidocaine (5.09 [4.88-5.38] μmol)>L-tyrosine (39.1 [36.5-41.8] μmol) (P<0.05). At the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the duration of cutaneous analgesia caused by L-tyrosine lasted longer than that caused by lidocaine (P<0.01). Lidocaine co-administered with L-tyrosine exhibited an additive effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Our pre-clinical study demonstrated that L-tyrosine elicits the local/cutaneous analgesia, and the interaction between L-tyrosine and lidocaine is additive. L-tyrosine has a lower potency but much greater duration of cutaneous analgesia than lidocaine. Adding L-tyrosine to lidocaine preparations showed greater duration of cutaneous analgesia compared with lidocaine alone. PMID:26376025

  15. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  17. [Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in clinical practice: effects, technique, complications and suggestions during anticoagulant treatment].

    PubMed

    Passarani, S; Pedrazzini, G; Paino, R; Paleari, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of thoracic peridural analgesia (TEA) on the neuroendocrine response to surgery are well known, but, at the present this technique is not widely used especially in Italy. The aim of this paper is to give information and suggestions on thoracic epidural analgesia in thoracic and cardiac surgery, and to discuss how anticoagulant therapy may interfere on this technique.

  18. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  19. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design. PMID:25026214

  20. Comparison of epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brichon, P Y; Pison, C; Chaffanjon, P; Fayot, P; Buchberger, M; Néron, L; Bocca, A; Verdier, J; Sarrazin, R

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 120 patients undergoing elective thoracotomy for parenchymal disease. Patients were randomized into three groups: A (control group), B (epidural analgesia), C (freezing of intercostal nerves). Subjective pain relief was assessed on a linear visual analog scale. Analgesic requirements were evaluated during the 12 days following surgery, or until discharge if earlier. The vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were measured on the day before operation and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (POD). Subjective pain relief was significantly better in Group B in comparison with Group A (P < 0.05) or C (P < 0.05). Group C had the lowest score on the 11th and 12th POD but differences were not statistically significant. Requirements for intravenous analgesics were lower in Group B than in the control group (P < 0.05) during the first 3 POD, and in group C than in the control group the day of operation (P < 0.05). Oral analgesic requirements, when compared with controls, were lower in group B during the first 5 POD, and lower in group C on the 3rd and the 4th POD (P < 0.05). Cryoanalgesia led to a slight but not significant increase in VC and FEV1. Epidural analgesia led to a significant increase when compared with controls in FEV1 during the first 3 POD, and in FVC on the 7th POD (P < 0.05). It is concluded that epidural analgesia led to the best pain relief and restoration of pulmonary function after thoracotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811482

  1. Doubtful effect of continuous intraarticular analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Sundberg, Martin; Hansson, Ulrik; Malmvik, Johan; Flivik, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is well established for effective postoperative pain relief in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To prolong the effect of LIA, infusion pumps with local intraarticular analgesia can be used. We evaluated the effect of such an infusion pump for the first 48 h postoperatively regarding pain, knee function, length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and complications. Patients and methods 200 patients received peroperative LIA and a continuous intraarticular elastomeric infusion pump set at 2 mL/h. The patients were randomized either to ropivacaine (7.5 mg/mL) or to NaCl (9 mg/mL) in the pump. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain (0–100 mm), analgesic consumption, side effects of medicine, range of motion (ROM), leg-raising ability, LOS, and complications during the first 3 months were recorded. Results On the first postoperative day, the ropivacaine group had lower VAS pain (33 vs. 40 at 12 noon and 36 vs. 43 at 8 p.m.; p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively), but after that all recorded variables were similar between the groups. During the first 3 months, the ropivacaine group had a greater number of superficial and deep surgical wound infections (11 patients vs. 2 patients, p = 0.02). There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Continuous intraarticular analgesia (CIAA) with ropivacaine after TKA has no relevant clinical effect on VAS pain and does not affect LOS, analgesic consumption, ROM, or leg-raising ability. There may, however, be a higher risk of wound-healing complications including deep infections. PMID:25428755

  2. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  3. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.

  4. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  5. Regional anaesthesia and analgesia on the front line.

    PubMed

    Scott, D M

    2009-11-01

    Deployment to a combat zone with the military poses many challenges to the anaesthetist. One of these challenges is the safe, rapid and comfortable initial wound management and repatriation of wounded combat soldiers to their home country or tertiary treatment facility for definitive care and rehabilitation. The current conflict in Afghanistan is associated with injury patterns that differ from wars such as Vietnam or Korea. This report describes the experience of an Australian military anaesthetist and the value of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the care of the wounded combat soldier

  6. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  7. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance.

  8. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  9. Intravenous regional analgesia in a patient with Glanzmann thrombastenia.

    PubMed

    Goksu, Sitki; Gul, Rauf; Ozen, Onder; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Buyukbebeci, Orhan; Oner, Unsal

    2010-02-01

    Glanzmann thrombastenia (GT) is a rare condition of an inherited autosomal recessive gene characterized with bleeding tendency. The condition is rarely met in the OR. and therefore it is essential that anesthesiologist be cognizant of the risk involved and be prepared with all necessary precautionary measures. We present a GT case in a 27-year-old male with a mass in the anticubital region of right wrist that was successfully excised using the non-invasive intravenous regional analgesia (IVRA). The use of platelet transfusion and the recombinant factor VIIa, are stressed.

  10. Learning to cope with biting flies: rapid NMDA-mediated acquisition of conditioned analgesia.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E; Ossenkopp, K P

    1999-02-01

    A 30-min exposure to intact biting flies (stable flies) induced an opioid-mediated analgesia in fly-naive male deer mice, whereas exposure to either altered biting flies whose biting mouthparts were removed or nonbiting house flies had no significant effects. However, mice that were previously exposed to intact stable flies for 30 min exhibited significant analgesia when exposed 24-168 hr later to stable flies whose biting parts were removed, but not to nonbiting house flies. Administration of the specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist NPC 12626 to fly-naive mice before exposure to intact flies, although not significantly reducing the analgesic response, blocked the subsequent conditioned analgesia. Naloxone, which blocked the intact biting fly-induced analgesia, did not alter the acquisition of the conditioned analgesic response to the altered stable flies. This demonstrates an NMDA-mediated acquisition of conditioned analgesia to a natural aversive stimulus. PMID:10197912

  11. [Assessment of pain relief in patients receiving different variants of multimodal analgesia after major gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Timerbaev, V H; Smimova, O V; Genov, P G; Olejnikova, O N; Rebrova, O Yu

    2014-01-01

    The major gynecology surgery generally results in severe postoperative pain. Currently multimodal analgesia concept is widely used for the aim of postoperative pain relief optimization. According to this theory it is worth using the medication with different mechanism in order to increase analgesia qualify, decrease analgesic consumption and avoid adverse reaction. Unfortunately the surveys recently conducted have been pointed out the postoperative analgesia quality is still insufficient despite of using the concept mentioned above. One way to solve the problem is appearing in daily practice nefopam--centrally acting non-opioid analgesic that inhibits reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine and also mitigates glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this trial we tried to assess the postoperative daily used analgesia quality and potency of preemptive multimodal analgesia model consisted of nefopam, ketoprofen, paracetamol and morphine.

  12. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  13. [Failure of extension of epidural analgesia to anesthesia for emergency cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Gago, A; Guasch, E; Gutiérrez, C; Guiote, P; Gilsanz, F

    2009-01-01

    Epidural analgesia provides effective control of labor pain and allows emergency cesarean section to be performed without recourse to general anesthesia. This technique is subject to failure, however. We sought to determine the incidence of failure of extension of epidural analgesia for labor to epidural anesthesia for emergency cesarean section. We also analyzed possible risk factors for failure. A 2-month observational study was carried out in a tertiary-care university hospital in patients who had an epidural catheter inserted for labor analgesia and who later underwent emergency cesarean section. Epidural catheter failure was defined if additional analgesia was required during surgery or if general anesthesia was required. Data were gathered on possible risk factors, such as obesity, difficult epidural puncture, leakage of blood on insertion, history of cesarean delivery, need for rescue analgesia, and level of satisfaction with analgesia during dilation. In total, 134 emergency cesareans were performed in women carrying an epidural catheter. The catheter failed to administer the anesthetic in 18 patients (13.4%). General anesthesia was required in 9 cases (6.7%). Difficult insertion (more than 2 attempts) was associated with a higher failure rate (P=.064). The relative risk of epidural catheter failure was 2.86-fold higher when rescue analgesia was needed during delivery than in cases when no supplement was required (P=.021). Receiving adequate analgesia during labor seems to be a protective factor (80%) against anesthetic catheter failure during cesarean section (P=.01). We conclude that high demand for rescue analgesia and signs of inadequate analgesia during labor should warn of epidural catheter failure if extension to anesthesia becomes necessary for a cesarean delivery.

  14. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  15. Human models of pain for the prediction of clinical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions. However, efforts to improve both animal and human experimental model selection, on the basis of increased understanding of the underlying pathophysiological pain mechanisms, have been disappointing, with poor translation of results to clinical analgesia. We have developed an alternative approach to the selection of suitable pain models that can correctly predict drug efficacy in particular clinical settings. This is based on the analysis of successful or unsuccessful empirical prediction of clinical analgesia using experimental pain models. We analyzed statistically the distribution of published mutual agreements or disagreements between drug efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings. Significance limits were derived by random permutations of agreements. We found that a limited subset of pain models predicts a large number of clinically relevant pain settings, including efficacy against neuropathic pain for which novel analgesics are particularly needed. Thus, based on empirical evidence of agreement between drugs for their efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings, it is possible to identify pain models that reliably predict clinical analgesic drug efficacy in cost-effective experimental settings.

  16. Double-blind, randomized, double-dummy clinical trial comparing the efficacy of ketorolac trometamol and naproxen for acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Plapler, Pérola Grinberg; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron; Ecclissato, Christina da Cunha; Bocchi de Oliveira, Monalisa Fernanda; Amazonas, Roberto Bleuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common type of medication used in the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac trometamol (KT) is a nonnarcotic, peripherally acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic effects comparable to certain opioids. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of KT and naproxen (NA) in the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP) of moderate-to-severe intensity. Patients and methods In this 10-day, Phase III, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial, participants with acute LBP of moderate-to-severe intensity as determined through a visual analog scale (VAS) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive sublingual KT 10 mg three times daily or oral NA 250 mg three times daily. From the second to the fifth day of treatment, if patient had VAS >40 mm, increased dosage to four times per day was allowed. The primary end point was the reduction in LBP as measured by VAS. We also performed a post hoc superiority analysis. Results KT was not inferior to NA for the reduction in LBP over 5 days of use as measured by VAS scores (P=0.608 for equality of variance; P=0.321 for equality of means) and by the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (P=0.180 for equality of variance test; P=0.446 for equality of means) using 95% confidence intervals. The percentage of participants with improved pain relief 60 minutes after receiving the first dose was higher in the KT group (24.2%) than in the NA group (6.5%; P=0.049). The most common adverse effects were heartburn, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusion KT is not inferior in efficacy and delivers faster pain relief than NA. PMID:27382251

  17. Double-blind, randomized, double-dummy clinical trial comparing the efficacy of ketorolac trometamol and naproxen for acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Plapler, Pérola Grinberg; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron; Ecclissato, Christina da Cunha; Bocchi de Oliveira, Monalisa Fernanda; Amazonas, Roberto Bleuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common type of medication used in the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac trometamol (KT) is a nonnarcotic, peripherally acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic effects comparable to certain opioids. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of KT and naproxen (NA) in the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP) of moderate-to-severe intensity. Patients and methods In this 10-day, Phase III, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial, participants with acute LBP of moderate-to-severe intensity as determined through a visual analog scale (VAS) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive sublingual KT 10 mg three times daily or oral NA 250 mg three times daily. From the second to the fifth day of treatment, if patient had VAS >40 mm, increased dosage to four times per day was allowed. The primary end point was the reduction in LBP as measured by VAS. We also performed a post hoc superiority analysis. Results KT was not inferior to NA for the reduction in LBP over 5 days of use as measured by VAS scores (P=0.608 for equality of variance; P=0.321 for equality of means) and by the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (P=0.180 for equality of variance test; P=0.446 for equality of means) using 95% confidence intervals. The percentage of participants with improved pain relief 60 minutes after receiving the first dose was higher in the KT group (24.2%) than in the NA group (6.5%; P=0.049). The most common adverse effects were heartburn, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusion KT is not inferior in efficacy and delivers faster pain relief than NA. PMID:27382251

  18. Placebo-induced analgesia in an operant pain model in rats.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Todd A; Price, Donald D; Caudle, Robert M; Murphy, Niall P; Neubert, John K

    2012-10-01

    Analgesia is particularly susceptible to placebo responses. Recent studies in humans have provided important insights into the neurobiology underlying placebo-induced analgesia. However, human studies provide incomplete mechanistic explanations of placebo analgesia because of limited capacity to use cellular, molecular, and genetic manipulations. To address this shortcoming, this article describes the development of a rat model of conditioned analgesia in an operant pain assay. Specifically, rats were conditioned to associate a placebo manipulation with the analgesic effect of 1mg/kg morphine (subcutaneously) on facial thermal pain. We found that conditioned (placebo) responding bore 3 of the hallmarks of placebo-induced analgesia: (1) strong interanimal variability in the response, (2) suppression by the opiate antagonist naloxone (5mg/kg subcutaneously), and (3) a positive predictive relationship between the unconditioned analgesic effect and the conditioned (placebo) effect. Because of the operant nature of the assay and the use of only a mild noxious thermal stimulus, we suggest that these results provide evidence of placebo-induced analgesia in a preclinical model that utilizes an affective behavioral end point. This finding may provide opportunities for invasive preclinical studies allowing greater understanding of placebo-induced analgesia, thus paving the way for avenues to harness its benefits.

  19. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (p<0.01). Subcutaneous saline and clonidine (0.12μmol) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. The mixture of an ineffective-dose clonidine (0.12μmol) and a drug (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:26828301

  20. Duration of Analgesia Induced by Acupuncture-Like TENS on Experimental Heat Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Marilyne; Dupuis-Michaud, Cynthia; Pagé, Catherine; Popovic, Draga; Simard, Marie-Eve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture-like TENS (AL-TENS) is a treatment modality that can be used to temporarily reduce pain. However, there is no clear data in the literature regarding the specific duration of analgesia induced by AL-TENS. Objectives. To describe and quantify the duration and magnitude of AL-TENS analgesia on experimental heat pain in healthy subjects and verify if the duration or magnitude of analgesia induced by the AL-TENS was influenced by the duration of the application of the AL-TENS (15 versus 30 minutes). Methods. A repeated-measures, intrasubject randomized experimental design was used, where each participant was his/her own control. 22 healthy volunteers underwent heat pain stimulations with a contact thermode before (pretest) and after (posttest) AL-TENS application (15 and 30 minutes). Outcome measures included subjective pain during AL-TENS, duration, and magnitude of AL-TENS-induced analgesia. Results. Survival analysis showed that the median duration of AL-TENS analgesia was 10 minutes following the application of either 15 or 30 minutes of AL-TENS. The magnitude of analgesia following either application was comparable at all points in time (P values > 0.05) and ranged between −20% and −36% pain reduction. Conclusion. Only half of the participants still had heat-pain analgesia induced by the AL-TENS at 15 minutes postapplication. PMID:27335882

  1. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  2. The effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, M K; Cho, C H; Kim, Y C

    2004-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain and respiratory complications in patients undergoing thoracotomy. Ninety patients were prospectively randomised to epidural analgesia alone (n = 45) or epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia combined (n = 45). We monitored the use of rescue pain medication and changes in forced vital capacity and forced expired volume in 1 s, and recorded pain and opioid-related side-effects during the immediate postoperative period. The incidence of post-thoracotomy pain and numbness were also assessed up to the sixth month after surgery. Cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia was associated with earlier recovery in pulmonary function, less pain during movement and a lower daily requirement for rescue analgesia one week after surgery. However, the combination of cryoanalgesia and epidural analgesia failed to decrease the incidence of long-term pain and numbness. In view of its associated long-term morbidity, cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia is not recommended for patients undergoing thoracotomy. PMID:15479314

  3. Functional Network Architecture Predicts Psychologically Mediated Analgesia Related to Treatment in Chronic Knee Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2014-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use. PMID:24623770

  4. Postoperative analgesia after paediatric orchidopexy: evaluation of a bupivacaine-morphine mixture.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D; Wade, A; Mather, S J; Prys-Roberts, C

    1990-04-01

    The value of combining morphine with bupivacaine for caudal analgesia was investigated. Thirty children, undergoing orchidopexy, received a caudal block of 0.125% bupivacaine with or without morphine 0.05 mg kg-1. Analgesia, side-effects, ventilatory frequency and oxygen saturation (SaO2) were recorded after operation. None of the 15 patients receiving the bupivacaine-morphine mixture required post-operative opioids, whereas eight of 15 patients receiving bupivacaine alone needed additional opioid analgesia. The incidence of side effects after surgery was similar for the two groups and there was no detectable difference in ventilatory frequency or SaO2.

  5. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of stress analgesia: lack of cross-tolerance between stressors.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-31

    Qualitatively different analgesic responses can be evoked in rats by exposure to prolonged, intermittent or brief, continuous footshock stress. These two forms of stress analgesia appear to be mediated by opioid and nonopioid pain-inhibitory substrates, respectively. The present study confirms our previous observation that tolerance develops to only the opioid form of stress analgesia and shows that cross-tolerance does not occur between the opioid and nonopioid forms. These data provide further evidence that independent mechanisms underlie opioid and nonopioid stress analgesia.

  6. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labour progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties and the future.

    PubMed

    Grant, E N; Tao, W; Craig, M; McIntire, D; Leveno, K

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labour in the USA receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labour and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labour progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term 'epidural' has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labour progression.

  7. Postoperative analgesia after paediatric orchidopexy: evaluation of a bupivacaine-morphine mixture.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D; Wade, A; Mather, S J; Prys-Roberts, C

    1990-04-01

    The value of combining morphine with bupivacaine for caudal analgesia was investigated. Thirty children, undergoing orchidopexy, received a caudal block of 0.125% bupivacaine with or without morphine 0.05 mg kg-1. Analgesia, side-effects, ventilatory frequency and oxygen saturation (SaO2) were recorded after operation. None of the 15 patients receiving the bupivacaine-morphine mixture required post-operative opioids, whereas eight of 15 patients receiving bupivacaine alone needed additional opioid analgesia. The incidence of side effects after surgery was similar for the two groups and there was no detectable difference in ventilatory frequency or SaO2. PMID:1970738

  8. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  9. Reduced nocturnal morphine analgesia in mice following a geomagnetic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Ossenkopp, K P; Kavaliers, M; Hirst, M

    1983-10-10

    Latency to respond to an aversive thermal stimulus and the degree of analgesia induced by morphine were examined in mice injected with either isotonic saline or morphine sulfate (10 mg/kg) during midscotophase of a 12:12 h LD cycle. When mean response latencies were compared to the degree of geomagnetic disturbance (Ap index) present on test days, it was found that during the geomagnetic storm on December 17th, 1982, a significant reduction (P less than 0.01) in response latency was evident in both saline- and morphine-treated mice. The reduction in response latencies was greater, and lasted longer in the morphine-treated animals. It is suggested that the pineal gland may mediate this biomagnetic effect. PMID:6646507

  10. Glia: novel counter-regulators of opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Linda R; Hutchinson, Mark R; Johnston, Ian N; Maier, Steven F

    2005-12-01

    Development of analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain enhancement present serious difficulties for the use of opioids for pain control. Although neuronal mechanisms to account for these phenomena have been sought for many decades, their bases remain unresolved. Within the past four years, a novel non-neuronal candidate has been uncovered that opposes acute opioid analgesia and contributes to development of opioid tolerance and tolerance-associated pain enhancement. This novel candidate is spinal cord glia. Glia are important contributors to the creation of enhanced pain states via the release of neuroexcitatory substances. New data suggest that glia also release neuroexcitatory substances in response to morphine, thereby opposing its effects. Controlling glial activation could therefore increase the clinical utility of analgesic drugs. PMID:16246435

  11. Seeing the body: a new mechanism for acupuncture analgesia?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    The use of visual illusions to study how the brain gives rise to a representation of the body has produced surprising results, particularly in relation to modulation of pain. It seems likely that this research has relevance to how we understand acupuncture analgesia. Acupuncture supplies several different kinds of signal to the brain: touch in the preliminary examination for tender areas; needle stimulation, mainly of Aδ fibres; and sometimes visual input from the patient's sight of the needle insertion. In the light of recent research, all these are likely to modulate pain. There are implications here for clinical practice and for research. Acupuncture may be more effective if patients can see the needles being inserted. The use of non-penetrating stimuli to the skin or minimal needle insertion at non-acupuncture points as control procedures becomes more than ever open to question and this, in turn, has relevance for claims that acupuncture is indistinguishable from placebo.

  12. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain. PMID:27275042

  13. Diclofenac or paracetamol for analgesia in paediatric myringotomy outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tay, C L M; Tan, S

    2002-02-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind study compared the analgesic efficacy of oral diclofenac resinate 0.5 mg.kg(-1) with paracetamol 15 mg/kg(-1) for control of postoperative pain in paediatric patients for outpatient bilateral myringotomy and tube insertion. Paracetamol, the most commonly used oral analgesic for paediatric patients, was compared with a new palatable syrup formulation of diclofenac. Sixty-three ASA 1 orA SA 2 children aged one year and above were randomly assigned to receive diclofenac (Group A) or paracetamol (Group B). The study drug was given 30 to 60 minutes before induction of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with either inhalational sevoflurane or intravenous thiopentone. All subjects received intravenous fentanyl 1 microg/kg(-1) intraoperatively. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer using the CHEOPS score on eye-opening, and then at 10, 30 and 60 minutes. Children with a CHEOPS score > 7 received further fentanyl 1 microg x kg(-1). The number of cases requiring this "rescue" analgesia was recorded. Both groups were comparable in demographics, induction technique, duration of anaesthesia and time between premedication and induction of anaesthesia. Overall, CHEOPS scores were low for both groups at all times and did not differ between the groups at any time. Twenty per cent of the diclofenac group and 27% of the paracetamol group required rescue analgesia (not statistically significant). The efficacy of diclofenac 0.5 mg x kg(-1) and paracetamol 15 mg x kg(-1) as oral analgesic premedication for BMT was comparable in children receiving an anaesthetic which included intraoperative administration of fentanyl 1 microg x kg(-1). PMID:11939442

  14. Molecular architecture of endocannabinoid signaling at nociceptive synapses mediating analgesia.

    PubMed

    Nyilas, Rita; Gregg, Laura C; Mackie, Ken; Watanabe, Masahiko; Zimmer, Andreas; Hohmann, Andrea G; Katona, István

    2009-05-01

    Cannabinoid administration suppresses pain by acting at spinal, supraspinal and peripheral levels. Intrinsic analgesic pathways also exploit endocannabinoids; however, the underlying neurobiological substrates of endocannabinoid-mediated analgesia have remained largely unknown. Compelling evidence shows that, upon exposure to a painful environmental stressor, an endocannabinoid molecule called 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is mobilized in the lumbar spinal cord in temporal correlation with stress-induced antinociception. We therefore characterized the precise molecular architecture of 2-AG signaling and its involvement in nociception in the rodent spinal cord. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization revealed that dorsal horn neurons widely expressed the mRNA of diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DGL-alpha), the synthesizing enzyme of 2-AG. Peroxidase-based immunocytochemistry demonstrated high levels of DGL-alpha protein and CB(1) cannabinoid receptor, a receptor for 2-AG, in the superficial dorsal horn, at the first site of modulation of the ascending pain pathway. High-resolution electron microscopy uncovered postsynaptic localization of DGL-alpha at nociceptive synapses formed by primary afferents, and revealed presynaptic positioning of CB(1) on excitatory axon terminals. Furthermore, DGL-alpha in postsynaptic elements receiving nociceptive input was colocalized with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR(5)), whose activation induces 2-AG biosynthesis. Finally, intrathecal activation of mGluR(5) at the lumbar level evoked endocannabinoid-mediated stress-induced analgesia through the DGL-2-AG-CB(1) pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest a key role for 2-AG-mediated retrograde suppression of nociceptive transmission at the spinal level. The striking positioning of the molecular players of 2-AG synthesis and action at nociceptive excitatory synapses suggests that pharmacological manipulation of spinal 2-AG levels may be an efficacious way to regulate pain

  15. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  16. Evaluation of menstrual cycle effects on morphine and pentazocine analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Dasilva, MC; Shinal, RM; Glover, T; Williams, RS; Staud, R; Riley, JL; Fillingim, RB

    2011-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated menstrual cycle influences on basal pain perception, but direct evidence of menstrual cycle influences on analgesic responses has not been reported in humans. Our aim was to determine whether the magnitude of morphine and pentazocine analgesia varied across the menstrual cycle. Sixty-five healthy women, 35 taking oral contraceptives (OC) and 30 normally cycling (NOC), underwent experimental pain assessment both before and after intravenous administration morphine (0.08 mg/kg) or pentazocine (0.5 mg/kg) compared to saline placebo. Both active drug and placebo were administered once during the follicular phase and once during the luteal phase. Measures of heat, ischemic and pressure pain sensitivity were obtained before and after drug administration. Change scores in pain responses were computed to determine morphine and pentazocine analgesic responses, and medication side effects were recorded. The data were analyzed using mixed-model ANOVAs. NOC women showed slightly greater heat pain sensitivity in the follicular vs. luteal phase, while the reverse pattern emerged for OC women (p=0.046). Also, OC women showed lower pressure pain thresholds compared to NOC women (p < .05). Regarding analgesic responses, NOC women showed greater morphine analgesia for ischemic pain during the follicular vs. the luteal phase (p=0.004). Likewise, side effects for morphine were significantly higher in NOC women in the follicular phase than in the luteal phase (p=0.02). These findings suggest that sex hormones may influence opioid responses; however, the effects vary across medications and pain modalities and are likely to be modest in magnitude. PMID:21239109

  17. Comparison of general anesthesia and intravenous sedation-analgesia for SWL.

    PubMed

    Zommick, J; Leveillee, R; Zabbo, A; Colasanto, L; Barrette, D

    1996-12-01

    We compared general anesthesia and intravenous sedation-analgesia for SWL on a Dornier HM3 lithotripter with respect to treatment and anesthesia time, X-ray exposure, shockwaves administered, and efficacy. The case records of 49 patients receiving general anesthesia and 118 patients who underwent intravenous sedation-analgesia were examined. Follow-up plain abdominal radiographs were evaluated for residual stones. Treatments accomplished under intravenous sedation-analgesia required less anesthesia time and less SWL time. The amount of fluoroscopy time was increased. The success rate in treating patients with these two types of anesthesia was not significantly different. Intravenous sedation-analgesia is safe and effective for shockwave lithotripsy in the HM3 lithotripter. This technique facilitates more rapid outpatient treatment and has excellent patient tolerance.

  18. Maternal pyrexia associated with the use of epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Fusi, L; Steer, P J; Maresh, M J; Beard, R W

    1989-06-01

    To establish the effect of pain relief on maternal temperature during labour forty patients who went into spontaneous labour with a single fetus, had a normal temperature (less than 37.5 degrees C), and had no clinical evidence of infection were investigated prospectively. They were divided into two comparable groups--one receiving pethidine and the other epidural analgesia. Both groups had much the same temperatures at the beginning of labour and before any analgesic administration. The mean temperature in the pethidine group remained constant during labour, whereas in the epidural analgesia group it showed a significant rise after only 6 hours of labour. This rise was not related to any clinical evidence of infection. Patients receiving epidural analgesia during labour are at increased risk of developing pyrexia. This pyrexia may be the result of vascular and thermoregulatory modifications induced by epidural analgesia.

  19. Sympathetic activation triggers endogenous opioid release and analgesia within peripheral inflamed tissue.

    PubMed

    Binder, Waltraud; Mousa, Shaaban A; Sitte, Nicolle; Kaiser, Myriam; Stein, Christoph; Schäfer, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Stress induces analgesia by mechanisms within and outside the brain. Here we show that the sympathetic nervous system is an essential trigger of intrinsic opioid analgesia within peripheral injured tissue. Noradrenaline, injected directly into inflamed hind paws of male Wistar rats, produced dose-dependent antinociception, reversible by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-antagonists. alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors were demonstrated on beta-endorphin-containing immune cells and noradrenaline induced adrenergic receptor-specific release of beta-endorphin from immune cell suspensions. This antinociceptive effect of noradrenaline was reversed by micro - and delta-opioid antagonists as well as by anti-beta-endorphin. Stress-induced peripheral analgesia was abolished by chemical sympathectomy and by adrenergic antagonists. These findings indicate that sympathetic neuron-derived noradrenaline stimulates adrenergic receptors on inflammatory cells to release beta-endorphin, which induces analgesia via activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15245482

  20. Early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under regional analgesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Bassam; Palacios, Jean Luc; Lapasset, Lionel; Hattée, Bernard; Leroy, Frédéric

    2004-02-01

    Patients undergoing major knee surgery may experience postoperative pain, which could be exacerbated by early postoperative continuous passive motion or active mobilization. This pain may result in poor functional recovery. Use of regional analgesia techniques to achieve more consistent pain relief and to facilitate rapid rehabilitation can play an important role in optimizing postoperative outcome after anterior cruciate ligament repair (ACLR). This case study concerns a 20-year-old male soldier, otherwise healthy, who underwent ACLR. We inserted a catheter in the fascia iliaca compartment and performed postoperative analgesia with low-concentration ropivacaine by using an elastomeric pump. The patient started early rehabilitation under fascia iliaca compartment analgesia. We discuss the case and the influence of regional analgesia techniques on postoperative and clinical outcomes. PMID:14966725

  1. Failure of naloxone to reverse analgesia from transcutaneous electrical stimulation in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Abram, S E; Reynolds, A C; Cusick, J F

    1981-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of endogenous opiates in the mediation of analgesia produced by low intensity, high frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation in the presence of chronic pain, an attempt was made to reverse stimulation-induced analgesia with naloxone. Fifteen patients with chronic pain who were consistently relieved of pain by low intensity, high frequency transcutaneous stimulation were studied. During stimulation at 58 Hz, patients were given double-blind intravenous injections of either naloxone (0.4 or 1.2 mg) or saline. Subjective pain ratings were recorded before stimulation, after stimulation, and after naloxone and saline injections. No reversal of analgesia was seen after naloxone or saline. These results suggest that transcutaneous stimulation at low intensity and high frequency may provide analgesia that is not associated with release of endogenous opiates in patients with chronic pain.

  2. Excellent postoperative analgesia with the addition of hyaluronidase to lignocaine for subcostal TAP block used in conjunction with systemic analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark Zachary; O'Connor, Therese C

    2014-01-01

    Subcostal transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks provide good postoperative analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomies. We hypothesised that adding hyaluronidase may improve the efficacy of this technique by increasing spread of the local anaesthetic (LA). In this case, we performed a bilateral ultrasound-guided subcostal TAP block using lignocaine (40 mL 1%) with hyaluronidase (75 IU/mL) for postoperative analgesia following elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It was used in combination with intraoperative morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol. Regular paracetamol was administered postoperatively. We monitored serial serum lignocaine levels and recorded the patient's visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores postoperatively. We found that the patient experienced excellent analgesia throughout the postoperative period and that the serum lignocaine levels did not exceed the therapeutic range. PMID:24510699

  3. [Labor epidural analgesia for a woman with a pityriasis versicolor in the lumbar region].

    PubMed

    Dubar, G; Omarjee, M; Viguié, C; Barbarot, S; Mignon, A

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is usually contraindicated in case of infection at the site of needle insertion. Tinea versicolor is a benign superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by the proliferation of a skin commensal yeast of low pathogenicity. We report the case of a pregnant woman with a tinea versicolor in the lumbar region, who benefited from a labor epidural analgesia, realised with reinforced antiseptic measures. No neurological or infectious complication occurred.

  4. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects. PMID:23820004

  5. TRPM8 is the Principal Mediator of Menthol-induced Analgesia of Acute and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, while other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol and WS-12 induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively with diminished side effects. PMID:23820004

  6. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated.

  7. A Leptin-Mediated Central Mechanism in Analgesia-Enhanced Opioid Reward in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Grewo; Kim, Hyangin; McCabe, Michael F.; Chou, Chiu-Wen; Wang, Shuxing; Chen, Lucy L.; Marota, John J.A.; Blood, Anne; Breiter, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used in chronic pain management despite a potential risk of rewarding. However, it remains unclear whether opioid analgesia would enhance the opioid rewarding effect thereby contributing to opioid rewarding. Utilizing a rat paradigm of conditioned place preference (CPP) combined with ankle monoarthritis as a condition of persistent nociception, we showed that analgesia induced by either morphine or the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increased CPP scores in arthritic rats, suggesting that analgesia itself had a rewarding effect. However, arthritic rats exhibited a significantly higher CPP score in response to morphine than ibuprofen. Thus, the rewarding effect of morphine was enhanced in the presence of persistent nociception, producing a phenomenon of analgesia-enhanced opioid reward. At the cellular level, administration of morphine activated a cascade of leptin expression, glial activation, and dopamine receptor upregulation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), while administration of ibuprofen decreased glial activation with no effect on leptin expression in the NAc. Furthermore, the morphine rewarding effect was blocked in leptin deficient ob/ob mice or by neutralizing leptin or interleukin-1β in the NAc without diminishing morphine analgesia. The data indicate that systemic opioid can activate a leptin-mediated central mechanism in the NAc that led to the enhanced opioid rewarding effect. These findings provide evidence for an interaction between opioid analgesia and opioid rewarding, which may have implications in clinical opioid dose escalation in chronic pain management. PMID:25031415

  8. The TGR5 receptor mediates bile acid–induced itch and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Farzad; Kwon, Edwin; Poole, Daniel P.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Lyo, Victoria; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Cevikbas, Ferda; Steinhoff, Martin; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Vanner, Stephen J.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Corvera, Carlos U.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cholestatic disease exhibit pruritus and analgesia, but the mechanisms underlying these symptoms are unknown. We report that bile acids, which are elevated in the circulation and tissues during cholestasis, cause itch and analgesia by activating the GPCR TGR5. TGR5 was detected in peptidergic neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord that transmit itch and pain, and in dermal macrophages that contain opioids. Bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist induced hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and stimulated the release of the itch and analgesia transmitters gastrin-releasing peptide and leucine-enkephalin. Intradermal injection of bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist stimulated scratching behavior by gastrin-releasing peptide– and opioid-dependent mechanisms in mice. Scratching was attenuated in Tgr5-KO mice but exacerbated in Tgr5-Tg mice (overexpressing mouse TGR5), which exhibited spontaneous pruritus. Intraplantar and intrathecal injection of bile acids caused analgesia to mechanical stimulation of the paw by an opioid-dependent mechanism. Both peripheral and central mechanisms of analgesia were absent from Tgr5-KO mice. Thus, bile acids activate TGR5 on sensory nerves, stimulating the release of neuropeptides in the spinal cord that transmit itch and analgesia. These mechanisms could contribute to pruritus and painless jaundice that occur during cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:23524965

  9. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated. PMID:14740589

  10. Epidural analgesia for childbirth: effects of newer techniques on neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela

    2004-01-01

    New low-dose, local anesthetic-opioid combinations, combined spinal epidural analgesia, and new anesthetic drugs, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine, have modified the anesthetic practice in obstetric labor analgesia. These new analgesic techniques have less or no neonatal effects when compared with traditional epidural labor analgesia. They also have less effect on mode of delivery, which may in turn affect neonatal outcome. The use of very diluted or low concentrations of local anesthetic solutions may reduce their placental passage and thus the possible subtle neonatal effects. Small doses of epidural or spinal opioids alone or combined with low doses of local anesthetics does not affect the well-being of the neonate at birth. When considering the neonatal outcome, combined spinal epidural analgesia is as well tolerated as low-dose epidural analgesia. Transient fetal heart rate changes have been described immediately after the administration of intrathecal or epidural opioids. Maternal hypotension may also occur at the onset of epidural analgesia. Whether the occurrence of transient fetal heart rate changes or maternal hypotension immediately after the epidural block may influence the neonatal outcome at birth needs verification.

  11. Perioperative analgesic effects of intravenous paracetamol: Preemptive versus preventive analgesia in elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hossam Ibrahim Eldesuky Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cesarean section (CS) is the one of the most common surgical procedure in women. There is preoperative stress effect before the delivery of the baby as (intubation and skin incision). There is acute postoperative pain, which may be progressed to chronic pain. All these perioperative stress effects need for various approach of treatment, which including systemic and neuraxial analgesia. The different analgesia modalities may affect and impair early interaction between mother and infant. Preemptive intravenous (I.V.) paracetamol (before induction) may reduce stress response before the delivery of the baby, intraoperative opioids and postoperative pain. Objectives: The aim of this study to compare between the administration of I.V. paracetamol as: Preemptive analgesia (preoperative) and preventive analgesia (at the end of surgery) as regards of hemodynamic, pain control, duration of analgesia, cumulative doses of intraoperative opioids and their related side-effects and to compare between two different protocols of postoperative analgesia and their cumulative doses. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients undergoing elective CS were randomly enrolled in this study and divided into two groups of 30 patients each. Group I: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before induction of anesthesia. Group II: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before the end of surgery. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and peripheral oxygen saturation were recorded. Postoperative pain was assessed by visual analog score. Postoperative pethidine was given by two different protocols: group I: 0.5 mg/kg was divided into 0.25 mg/kg intramuscular and 0.25 mg/kg I.V. Group II was given pethidine 0.5 mg/kg I.V. Doses of intraoperative fentanyl, postoperative pethidine, duration of paracetamol analgesic time, time to next analgesia, and side-effects of opioid were noted and compared. Result: Preemptive group had hemodynamic stability

  12. Focused analgesia in waking and hypnosis: effects on pain, memory, and somatosensory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Cacace, Immacolata; Massicolle, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Somatosensory event-related potentials (SERPs) to painful electric standard stimuli under an odd-ball paradigm were analyzed in 12 high hypnotizable (HH), 12 medium hypnotizable (MH), and 12 low hypnotizable (LH) subjects during waking, hypnosis, and a cued eyes-open posthypnotic condition. In each of these conditions subjects were suggested to produce an obstructive imagery of stimulus perception as a treatment for pain reduction. A No-Analgesia treatment served as a control in waking and hypnosis conditions. The subjects were required to count the number of delivered target stimuli. HH subjects experienced significant pain and distress reductions during posthypnotic analgesia as compared to hypnotic analgesia and between these two analgesic conditions as compared to the two control conditions. Outside of hypnosis, these subjects remembered less pain and distress levels than they reported during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments. In contrast, for waking-analgesia treatment, HH subjects remembered similar pain and distress levels to those they reported concurrently with the stimulation. HH subjects, during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments, detected a smaller number of target stimuli and displayed a significant amplitude reduction of the midline frontal and central N140 and P200 SERP components. No significant SERP differences were observed for these subjects between treatments in waking condition and between hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesic treatments. For the MH and LH subjects no significant N140 and P200 amplitude changes were observed among analgesic conditions as compared to control conditions. These amplitude findings are seen as indicating that hypnotic analgesia can affect earlier and later stages of stimulus processing. PMID:18023535

  13. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVERTEBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: ELEPHANTS AND RHINO.

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Boothe, Matthew; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-03-01

    An online survey utilizing Survey Monkey linked through the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserve examined current practices in megavertebrate analgesia. Data collected included drugs administered, dosing regimens, ease of administration, efficacy, and adverse events. Fifty-nine facilities (38 housing elephants, 33 housing rhinoceroses) responded. All facilities administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with phenylbutazone (0.25-10 mg/kg) and flunixin meglumine (0.2-4 mg/kg) being most common. Efficacy was reported as "good" to "excellent" for these medications. Opioids were administered to elephants (11 of 38) and rhinoceroses (7 of 33), with tramadol (0.5-3.0 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.05-1.0 mg/kg) being most common. Tramadol efficacy scores were highly variable in both elephants and rhinoceroses. While drug choices were similar among institutions, substantial variability in dosing regimens and reported efficacy between and within facilities indicates the need for pharmacokinetic studies and standardized methods of analyzing response to treatment to establish dosing regimens and clinical trials to establish efficacy and safety.

  14. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVERTEBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: ELEPHANTS AND RHINO.

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Boothe, Matthew; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-03-01

    An online survey utilizing Survey Monkey linked through the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserve examined current practices in megavertebrate analgesia. Data collected included drugs administered, dosing regimens, ease of administration, efficacy, and adverse events. Fifty-nine facilities (38 housing elephants, 33 housing rhinoceroses) responded. All facilities administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with phenylbutazone (0.25-10 mg/kg) and flunixin meglumine (0.2-4 mg/kg) being most common. Efficacy was reported as "good" to "excellent" for these medications. Opioids were administered to elephants (11 of 38) and rhinoceroses (7 of 33), with tramadol (0.5-3.0 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.05-1.0 mg/kg) being most common. Tramadol efficacy scores were highly variable in both elephants and rhinoceroses. While drug choices were similar among institutions, substantial variability in dosing regimens and reported efficacy between and within facilities indicates the need for pharmacokinetic studies and standardized methods of analyzing response to treatment to establish dosing regimens and clinical trials to establish efficacy and safety. PMID:27010292

  15. Perioperative analgesia and the effects of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Abe, Andrew; Kaye, Alan David; Gritsenko, Karina; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Adam Marc

    2014-06-01

    With over 50,000 dietary supplements available, resurgence in consumer interest over the past few decades has resulted in an explosion of use of these agents worldwide. Disillusionment with current medications and belief in "natural medicines" has resulted in a multibillion dollar industry. Active ingredients in a number of herbs are being tested for therapeutic potential, and some are efficacious, so herbal medicines cannot be dismissed. The prevalence of herbology is further encouraged by a relatively relaxed policy of the FDA regarding these compounds, which they consider foods. As herbal products are included in the "supplement" category, there is no existing protocol for standardization of these products. There are numerous examples of herbals that can adversely affect patient recovery and outcomes in anesthesia. The prudent anesthesia provider will make sure to obtain correct information as to accurate herbal usage of each patient and attempt to discontinue these products two to three weeks prior to the delivery of an anesthetic. Postoperative analgesia, bleeding, and level of sedation can be negatively impacted related to herbal products and herbal-drug interactions. Over 90 herbal products are associated with bleeding and this can be a specific problem intraoperatively or when considering placement of a regional anesthetic for postoperative pain management. PMID:24993438

  16. Epidural analgesia for labour and delivery. Current evidence.

    PubMed

    Marucci, M; Fiore, T

    2004-09-01

    Currently, evidence-based medicine indicates that epidural analgesia (EA) labor is not associated with cesarean and instrumental delivery for dystocia. This evidence was obtained from clinical investigations of variability in clinical labor management. An optimized balance between anesthesiological and obstetric practice is vitally important for securing spontaneous delivery. The total dose of local anesthetic for EA may be associated with operative delivery when there is a lack of obstetric care standardization and co-interventions reducing unintended EA effects. Furthermore, combining local anesthetic low dose and opioid low dose may produce a new balance with obstetric management. Physiological and pharmacological knowledge together with recent clinical findings suggest that combined opioid-local anesthetic low dose EA causes minimal negative effects on labor progress and is effective and safe in terms of maternal and neonatal outcome. Internal communication between obstetricians and anesthesiologists is essential for optimizing EA labor management. Processes of health care quality management, such as medical audit and peer review, should be routinely practiced to reach this goal. PMID:15467496

  17. Meditative analgesia: the current state of the field.

    PubMed

    Grant, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Since the first demonstrations that mindfulness-based therapies could have a positive influence on chronic pain patients, numerous studies have been conducted with healthy individuals in an attempt to understand meditative analgesia. This review focuses explicitly on experimental pain studies of meditation and attempts to draw preliminary conclusions based on the work completed in this new field over the past 6 years. Dividing meditative practices into the broad categories of focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques allowed several patterns to emerge. The majority of evidence for FA practices suggests they are not particularly effective in reducing pain. OM, on the other hand, seems to influence both sensory and affective pain ratings depending on the tradition or on whether the practitioners were meditating. The neural pattern underlying pain modulation during OM suggests meditators actively focus on the noxious stimulation while inhibiting other mental processes, consistent with descriptions of mindfulness. A preliminary model is presented for explaining the influence of mindfulness practice on pain. Finally, the potential analgesic effect of the currently unexplored technique of compassion meditation is discussed. PMID:24673150

  18. Transversus Abdominis Plane Catheter Bolus Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Nikolajsen, Lone; Bendtsen, Thomas Fichtner; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been shown to reduce pain and opioid requirements after abdominal surgery. The aim of the present case series was to demonstrate the use of TAP catheter injections of bupivacaine after major abdominal surgery. Methods. Fifteen patients scheduled for open colonic resection surgery were included. After induction of anesthesia, bilateral TAP catheters were placed, and all patients received a bolus dose of 20 mL bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL with epinephrine 5 μg/mL through each catheter. Additional bolus doses were injected bilaterally 12, 24, and 36 hrs after the first injections. Supplemental pain treatment consisted of paracetamol, ibuprofen, and gabapentin. Intravenous morphine was used as rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain was rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10) at regular predefined intervals after surgery, and consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Results. The TAP catheters were placed without any technical difficulties. NRS scores were ≤3 at rest and ≤5 during cough at 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36 hrs after surgery. Cumulative consumption of intravenous morphine was 28 (23–48) mg (median, IQR) within the first 48 postoperative hours. Conclusion. TAP catheter bolus injections can be used to prolong analgesia after major abdominal surgery. PMID:22666242

  19. The effects of low-dose ketamine on the analgesia nociception index (ANI) measured with the novel PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Laurent; Ortner, Clemens M; Jelacic, Srdjan; Rivat, Cyril; Landau, Ruth; Richebé, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor assesses nociception effects on the autonomic nervous system by analyzing changes in heart rate variability (HRV). This non-invasive device analyses ECG signals and determines the analgesia nociception index (ANI), allowing for quantitative assessment of the analgesia/nociception balance in anesthetized patients. Ketamine, an analgesic adjuvant with sympathomimetic properties, has been shown to improve perioperative pain management. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether low-dose ketamine, due to its intrinsic effect on the sino-atrial node, affects HRV and, therefore, interferes with ANI measurements. This pilot study included 20 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomies. Anesthesia and analgesia were maintained with sevoflurane and fentanyl respectively, in a standardized manner. Five minutes after intubation, 0.5 μg kg(-1) of intravenous (i.v.) ketamine was administered. ANI, bispectral index (BIS), heart rate and blood pressure were recorded from the induction of anesthesia until 5 min after skin incision. There was not any significant decrease in mean (±SD) ANI values after intubation (2.11±20.11, p=0.35) or i.v. ketamine administration (1.31±15.26, p=0.28). The mean (±SD) reduction in ANI values after skin incision was statistically significant (13.65±15.44, p=0.01), which is consistent with increased nociception. A single i.v. bolus of 0.5 μg kg(-1) ketamine did not influence the ANI values of 20 women under standardized general anesthesia conditions and absent noxious stimulation. These results suggest that the ANI derived from the PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor is feasible under such clinical conditions.

  20. Dose ratio is important in maximizing naloxone enhancement of nalbuphine analgesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Gear, Robert W; Gordon, Newton C; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Heller, Philip H; Levine, Jon D

    2003-11-01

    The analgesic effect of kappa partial agonist opioids (i.e. nalbuphine, pentazocine and butorphanol) is significantly greater in women. Recent evidence suggests that this sexual dimorphism may result from a naloxone-sensitive anti-analgesic effect that is activated along with, and summates with, the analgesic effect of these agents, resulting in decreased analgesia or increased pain. For example, nalbuphine (5 mg) produces profound anti-analgesia (i.e. enhanced pain) in men, but addition of a low dose of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.4 mg, opioid antagonist) induces significant analgesia in men and enhances nalbuphine analgesia in women. To further delineate the dose-dependent relationship of nalbuphine and naloxone, we recently evaluated the effect of a lower dose of nalbuphine (2.5 mg) with and without naloxone (0.4 mg) on dental postoperative pain. In women, nalbuphine alone induced modest short duration analgesia, which was antagonized by the addition of naloxone. In men, this dose of nalbuphine alone did not produce analgesia or anti-analgesia, and naloxone did not alter the response to nalbuphine. Thus, it appeared that the 2.5 mg dose of nalbuphine was not sufficient to induce anti-analgesia while the 0.4 mg dose of naloxone was able to antagonize the analgesic effect of nalbuphine, at least in women. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that an important determinant of naloxone enhancement of nalbuphine analgesia is the dose ratio of nalbuphine to naloxone. Since a dose ratio of 12.5:1 (i.e. 5 mg nalbuphine:0.4 mg naloxone) resulted in analgesic enhancement, but a dose ratio of 6.25:1 (2.5 mg:0.4 mg) did not, we tested the same, lower, dose of nalbuphine (2.5 mg) in combination with a lower dose of naloxone (0.2 mg) to maintain the 12.5:1 dose ratio. This lower dose of naloxone significantly prolonged the analgesic effect of nalbuphine in both men and women, suggesting that the anti-analgesic effect of nalbuphine is present in both

  1. Effects of Flurbiprofen Axetil on Postoperative Analgesia and Cytokines in Peripheral Blood of Thoracotomy Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Beiping; Kong, Ming

    2015-06-01

    The objective is to study the effects of flurbiprofen axetil (FA) with fentanyl together in postoperative controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) on pain intensity, cytokine levels in peripheral blood and adverse reactions of thoracotomy patients. Fifty thoracotomy patients were divided into a FA and a control group, each with 25 cases. Postoperative analgesia was administered in the two groups using PCIA. The pressing times of analgesia pump, the visual analog scale (VAS) scores during resting and coughing at 2, 6, 24, 48, 72 h after surgery and the incidence of adverse drug reactions were recorded. Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-2, and TNF-α in peripheral blood were determined before the administration of FA (T0), and at 24 h (T1), 48 h (T2), 72 h (T3) after surgery. The analgesia pump pressing times in the FA group was less than that of the control group. The VAS scores during resting and coughing at 2, 6, 24, 48, 72 h after surgery, were statistically less than those of control group. The incidence rate of nausea and vomiting was insignificantly different between the two groups. Administration of FA together with PCIA in thoracotomy patients can improve postoperative analgesia.

  2. Effects of Multimodal Analgesia on the Success of Mouse Embryo Transfer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John M.; Austin, Jamie; Wilkerson, James; Carbone, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is promoted as the best practice pain management for invasive animal research procedures. Universal acceptance and incorporation of multimodal analgesia requires assessing potential effects on study outcome. The focus of this study was to assess effects on embryo survival after multimodal analgesia comprising an opioid and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) compared with opioid-only analgesia during embryo transfer procedures in transgenic mouse production. Mice were assigned to receive either carprofen (5 mg/kg) with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; CB) or vehicle with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; VB) in a prospective, double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial. Data were analyzed in surgical sets of 1 to 3 female mice receiving embryos chimeric for a shared targeted embryonic stem-cell clone and host blastocyst cells. A total of 99 surgical sets were analyzed, comprising 199 Crl:CD1 female mice and their 996 offspring. Neither yield (pups weaned per embryo implanted in the surgical set) nor birth rate (average number of pups weaned per dam in the set) differed significantly between the CB and VB conditions. Multimodal opioid–NSAID analgesia appears to have no significant positive or negative effect on the success of producing novel lines of transgenic mice by blastocyst transfer. PMID:21838973

  3. Post-ictal analgesia: involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Nora, J E; Herrero, C F; Tedeschi-Filho, W; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2001-01-12

    The neural mechanisms involved in post-ictal analgesia remain to be elucidated. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is used experimentally to induce seizure in animal subjects. This non-competitive antagonist blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 30 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naloxone (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg), methysergide (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and ketanserine (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. However, while naloxone antagonized analgesia 15 and 25 min post convulsions, the other drugs caused a blockade of the post-ictal analgesia in a relatively greater period of time. These results indicate that endogenous opioids, serotonin and acetylcholine may be involved in post-ictal analgesia.

  4. Analgesia Induced by Isolated Bovine Chromaffin Cells Implanted in Rat Spinal Cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Pappas, George D.; Pollard, Harvey B.

    1986-10-01

    Chromaffin cells synthesize and secrete several neuroactive substances, including catecholamines and opioid peptides, that, when injected into the spinal cord, induce analgesia. Moreover, the release of these substances from the cells can be stimulated by nicotine. Since chromaffin cells from one species have been shown to survive when transplanted to the central nervous system of another species, these cells are ideal candidates for transplantation to alter pain sensitivity. Bovine chromaffin cells were implanted into the subarachnoid space of the lumbar spinal region in adult rats. Pain sensitivity and response to nicotine stimulation was determined at various intervals following cell implantation. Low doses of nicotine were able to induce potent analgesia in implanted animals as early as one day following their introduction into the host spinal cord. This response could be elicited at least through the 4 months the animals were tested. The induction of analgesia by nicotine in implanted animals was dose related. This analgesia was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone and partially attenuated by the adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. These results suggest that the analgesia is due to the stimulated release of opioid peptides and catecholamines from the implanted bovine chromaffin cells and may provide a new therapeutic approach for the relief of pain.

  5. Baseline reward circuitry activity and trait reward responsiveness predict expression of opioid analgesia in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wanigasekera, Vishvarani; Lee, Michael C.; Rogers, Richard; Kong, Yazhuo; Leknes, Siri; Andersson, Jesper; Tracey, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Variability in opioid analgesia has been attributed to many factors. For example, genetic variability of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-encoding gene introduces variability in MOR function and endogenous opioid neurotransmission. Emerging evidence suggests that personality trait related to the experience of reward is linked to endogenous opioid neurotransmission. We hypothesized that opioid-induced behavioral analgesia would be predicted by the trait reward responsiveness (RWR) and the response of the brain reward circuitry to noxious stimuli at baseline before opioid administration. In healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging and the μ-opioid agonist remifentanil, we found that the magnitude of behavioral opioid analgesia is positively correlated with the trait RWR and predicted by the neuronal response to painful noxious stimuli before infusion in key structures of the reward circuitry, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and the ventral tegmental area. These findings highlight the role of the brain reward circuitry in the expression of behavioral opioid analgesia. We also show a positive correlation between behavioral opioid analgesia and opioid-induced suppression of neuronal responses to noxious stimuli in key structures of the descending pain modulatory system (amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostral–ventromedial medulla), as well as the hippocampus. Further, these activity changes were predicted by the preinfusion period neuronal response to noxious stimuli within the ventral tegmentum. These results support the notion of future imaging-based subject-stratification paradigms that can guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:23045652

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the lower limb and the effect of postoperative analgesia on diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mar, G J; Barrington, M J; McGuirk, B R

    2009-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome can cause significant disability if not treated early, but the diagnosis is challenging. This systematic review examines whether modern acute pain management techniques contribute to delayed diagnosis. A total of 28 case reports and case series were identified which referred to the influence of analgesic technique on the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, of which 23 discussed epidural analgesia. In 32 of 35 patients, classic signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome were present in the presence of epidural analgesia, including 18 patients with documented breakthrough pain. There were no randomized controlled trials or outcome-based comparative trials available to include in the review. Pain is often described as the cardinal symptom of compartment syndrome, but many authors consider it unreliable. Physical examination is also unreliable for diagnosis. There is no convincing evidence that patient-controlled analgesia opioids or regional analgesia delay the diagnosis of compartment syndrome provided patients are adequately monitored. Regardless of the type of analgesia used, a high index of clinical suspicion, ongoing assessment of patients, and compartment pressure measurement are essential for early diagnosis.

  7. The role of intercostal cryoanalgesia in post-thoracotomy analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sepsas, Evangelos; Misthos, Panagiotis; Anagnostopulu, Maria; Toparlaki, Olga; Voyagis, Gregorios; Kakaris, Stamatios

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Patients undergoing thoracotomy were studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia, combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA), against IVPCA alone during the four days following surgery. METHODS Fifty patients were randomized into two groups: an IVPCA group (n = 25) and an IVPCA-cryo group (n = 25). Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a verbal analogue scale at rest and during coughing. The intensity and the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain, numbness, epigastric distension and/or back pain, the analgesic requirements, as well as the blood gas values and respiratory function tests were evaluated up to the second postoperative (postop) month. Haemodynamic data and episodes of nausea and/or vomiting were recorded over the four postop days. RESULTS In the cryo group there was a statistically significant improvement in postop pain scores (P = 10–4), reduction in consumption of morphine (P = 10–4) and other analgesics (P = 10–4), optimization (less acidosis) of the pH values of blood gases (P < 0.015 over 72 hours postop and P < 0.03 on the first and second postop months), increase in systolic blood pressure (P < 0.05 over 96 hours postop), reduction in heart rate (P < 0.05 over 96 hours postop), increase in values of FEV1 (P < 0.02) and FVC (P < 0.05) at the first and second postop months, reduction in the incidence of nausea (0.05 < P < 0.1 over 18 hours postop), numbness, epigastric distension and back pain (P < 0.05 at days 5, 6, 7, 14, 30 and 60 following surgery). CONCLUSIONS We suggest that cryoanalgesia be considered as a simple, safe, inexpensive, long-term form of post-thoracotomy pain relief. Cryoanalgesia effectively restores FEV1 values at the second postop month. PMID:23424242

  8. Comparison of tapentadol with tramadol for analgesia after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srinivas Kalyanaraman; Mohan, Gokulakrishnan; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Theodore, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tapentadol is a relatively new analgesic. We decided to compare it with tramadol for their various effects after cardiac surgery. Setting: A study in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Sixty adults undergoing cardiac surgery were divided into 2 groups of 30 each by computerized random allotment (Group X = tapentadol 50 mg oral and Group Y = tramadol 100 mg oral). Informed Consent and Institutional Ethics Committee approval were obtained. The patients were given either drug X or drug Y after extubation in this single blinded study, wherein the data collectors and analyzers were blinded to the study. All patients received oral paracetamol qds and either drug X or drug Y tds. The pain score was noted on a Visual Analog Scale before each drug dose, 3 h later and on coughing. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure were recorded before the drug dose and 3 h later. Postoperative nausea or vomiting (PONV), temperature, and modified Glasgow Coma Scale readings were recorded. The above readings were obtained for 6 doses (up to 48 h after extubation). Statistics: t-test, Pearson Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and Mantel–Haenszel test were used for statistics. Results: Tapentadol group patients had significantly better analgesia 3 h after the drug and “on coughing” than tramadol group. The difference in their effects on blood creatinine levels, temperature, hemodynamics, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate were not clinically significant. Tapentadol produced lesser drowsiness and lesser vomiting than tramadol. Conclusions: Tapentadol, due to its norepinephrine reuptake inhibition properties, in addition to mu agonist, is a better analgesic than tramadol and has lesser PONV. PMID:26139740

  9. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  10. The opioid/nonopioid nature of stress-induced analgesia and learned helplessness.

    PubMed

    Maier, S F; Sherman, J E; Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to a variety of stressors produces a subsequent analgesic reaction. This stress-induced analgesia (SIA) is sometimes opioid in nature (reversed by opiate antagonists and cross-tolerant with morphine) and sometimes nonopioid. Both 30 min of intermittent footshock and 60-80 five-sec tailshocks have been shown to produce opioid SIA, whereas 3 min of continuous footshock and 5-40 tailshocks produce nonopioid SIA. We report that both of the opioid SIA procedures produce a learned helplessness effect as assessed by shuttlebox escape acquisition and an analgesia that is reinstatable 24 hr. later. The nonopioid procedures produce neither a learned helplessness effect nor a reinstatable analgesia. It is argued that these data implicate the learning of uncontrollability in the activation of opioid systems.

  11. Patient-controlled analgesia using remifentanil in the parturient with thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Pegrum, A; Stacey, R G

    1999-05-01

    Patient-controlled intravenous remifentanil was used to provide analgesia in labour for three thrombocytopaenic women. The most successful regimen comprised a patient-demand bolus of 0.5 microg x kg(-1) with a lockout period of 2-3 min, allowing for a successful demand with each contraction. There was an initial period during which the patient learned to anticipate the next contraction and to deliver a bolus about 30 s beforehand; subsequently the remifentanil provided excellent analgesia, with a range of consumption of 426-1050 microg x h(-1). Apart from one episode of maternal sedation and fetal heart rate decelerations resulting from an excessive demand bolus, mothers and neonates tolerated the remifentanil without sequelae. Owing to rapid metabolism by tissue esterase, the use of remifentanil allows adequate doses of opioid to be administered to the mother to achieve good analgesia, without its accumulation in the fetus.

  12. Peripheral injection of DNS-RFa, a FMRFa agonist, suppresses morphine-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Brussaard, A B; Kits, K S; Ter Maat, A; Mulder, A H; Schoffelmeer, A N

    1989-01-01

    The present results demonstrate an antagonistic effect of DNS-RFa on morphine-induced analgesia in rats. This confirms previous evidence presented by others on the effects of FMRFa-related peptides when applied centrally. Unlike these peptides, however, it is shown here that DNS-RFa is effective upon peripheral injection. The effects of DNS-RFa on morphine-induced analgesia were dose-dependent (ED50 = 0.5 mg/kg). DNS-RFa alone (5 mg/kg) did not affect the control level of nociception. Peripheral injection of FMRFa (5 mg/kg) did not affect morphine-induced analgesia. DNS-RFa defines the minimal configuration to activate neuronal FMRFa receptors in the pond snail. The present report suggests also that in vertebrates the Arg-Phe-NH2 sequence is essential and that DNS-RFa readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  14. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  15. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  16. Bupivacaine versus bupivacaine plus fentanyl for epidural analgesia: effect on maternal satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J D; Henderson, K; Bowden, M I; Lewis, M; Cooper, G M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare a combination of epidural fentanyl and bupivacaine with bupivacaine alone for epidural analgesia in labour and to evaluate factors in addition to analgesia that may influence maternal satisfaction. DESIGN--A prospective randomised pilot study. SETTING--Birmingham Maternity Hospital. SUBJECTS--85 primiparous women who requested epidural analgesia in labour and their babies. INTERVENTIONS--Group 1 mothers were treated with bupivacaine conventionally, group 2 mothers with bupivacaine and fentanyl in a more complex way designed to provide satisfactory analgesia but with less troublesome side effects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Overall maternal satisfaction, maternal perception of epidural analgesia and its side effects, and aspects of mothers' psychological states during labour, quantified using 100 mm visual linear analogue scales; the frequency of normal and operative deliveries; and measurements of neonatal wellbeing. RESULTS--Satisfaction was higher in group 2 mothers (median group difference +3 mm, 95% confidence interval +1 to +5, p = 0.012): this was associated with more normal deliveries (difference between proportions 0.23, 95% confidence interval +0.03 to +0.42); greater self control (median group difference -7 mm, -17 to -2, p = 0.003); and reduced unpleasantness of motor blockade (-10 mm, -19 to -5, p less than 0.001), sensory blockade (-5 mm, -11 to -2, p = 0.002) and shivering (-5 mm, -18 to 0, p = 0.046) at the expense of mild itching (0 mm, 0 to 0, p less than 0.001). Group 1 mothers found restricted movements more unpleasant (-1 mm, -11 to 0, p = 0.006) and were more sleepy (-4 mm, -20 to 0, p = 0.032). The addition of fentanyl to bupivacaine reduced the requirement for local anaesthetic (-33 mg, -55 to -15, p less than 0.001) without compromising analgesia. No adverse effects in neonates were attributed to the use of fentanyl. CONCLUSIONS--The already high maternal satisfaction from conventional epidural analgesia can be improved

  17. [PROPHYLAXIS OF POSTOPERATIVE HYPERALGESIA, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE ANALGESIA METHOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2016-03-01

    The investigation was conducted in 20 children, operated on for abdominal oncological diseases in a 2010-2015 yrs period, using various methods of analgesia. While application of a constant infusion of high doses of phentanyl--1-4 MKr/(kg x h) in perioperative period the occurrence of the opiate-induced hyperalgesia is possible with the accompanied morphological changes in intestinal wall; in anesthesia of a transverse abdominal muscle (a TAP-blockade) and combined spinal epidural analgesia such changes were not observed. PMID:27514091

  18. Role of brainstem serotonin in analgesia produced by low-intensity exercise on neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bobinski, Franciane; Ferreira, Tamara A A; Córdova, Marina M; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; da Cunha, Cláudio; Santo, Caroline C do Espírito; Poli, Anicleto; Pires, Rita G W; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Sluka, Kathleen A; Santos, Adair R S

    2015-12-01

    Physical exercise is a low-cost, safe, and efficient intervention for the reduction of neuropathic chronic pain in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms for how exercise reduces neuropathic pain are not yet well understood. Central monoaminergic systems play a critical role in endogenous analgesia leading us to hypothesize that the analgesic effect of low-intensity exercise occurs through activation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in descending inhibitory systems. To test this hypothesis, we induced peripheral nerve injury (PNI) by crushing the sciatic nerve. The exercise intervention consisted of low-intensity treadmill running for 2 weeks immediately after injury. Animals with PNI showed an increase in pain-like behaviors that were reduced by treadmill running. Reduction of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) synthesis using the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester prevented the analgesic effect of exercise. However, blockade catecholamine synthesis with the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine had no effect. In parallel, 2 weeks of exercise increased brainstem levels of the 5-HT and its metabolites (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), decreased expression of the serotonin transporter, and increased expression of 5-HT receptors (5HT-1B, 2A, 2C). Finally, PNI-induced increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta, in the brainstem, was reversed by 2 weeks of exercise. These findings provide new evidence indicating that low-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise suppresses pain-like behaviors in animals with neuropathic pain by enhancing brainstem 5-HT neurotransmission. These data provide a rationale for the analgesia produced by exercise to provide an alternative approach to the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

  19. Admixture of propofol and alfentanil. Use for intravenous sedation and analgesia during transvaginal oocyte retrieval.

    PubMed

    Sherry, E

    1992-06-01

    An admixture of propofol and alfentanil provides adequate sedation and analgesia during transvaginal oocyte retrieval in the absence of a paracervical block. In 100 patients the technique provided haemodynamic stability, sedation which was easily controlled, rapid recovery and universal patient acceptance.

  20. Ventral tegmental analgesia in two strains of rats: effects of amphetamine, naloxone and parachlorophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Moreau, J L; Cohen, E; Lieblich, I

    1984-05-21

    Pain sensitivity and analgesia induced by the stimulation of the ventral tegmentum (VT) were studied in 72 male rats of two lines, LC2-Hi and LC2-Lo, genetically selected for high and low rates of lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation, respectively. LC2-Lo rats were more sensitive to acute peripheral pain and developed a stronger analgesia than their LC2-Hi counterparts. In order to assess the pharmacological substrate of ventral tegmental stimulation-induced analgesia (VT-SIA), the effects of amphetamine (AMP, 21 animals), naloxone (NX, 24 animals) and parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 27 animals) injections were studied. VT-SIA was found to be clearly decreased by PCPA, slightly decreased by AMP and not significantly affected by NX. Ventral tegmental self-stimulation ( VTSS ) was increased by PCPA treatment. The comparison of VTSS and VT-SIA did not reveal any correlation between both phenomena. These data suggest that VT-SIA may be mediated by serotonin while catecholamines may have a modulatory role in this analgesia and that VTSS and VT-SIA seem to be governed by different neuronal systems.

  1. Lumbar epidural analgesia in labour: relation to fetal malposition and instrumental delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Hoult, I J; MacLennan, A H; Carrie, L E

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of instrumental delivery and malposition immediately before delivery was compared in patients who were given lumbar epidural analgesia and those who were not. Instrumental delivery was five times more common and a malposition of the fetal head was more than three times as common in the epidural group as in women who did not receive regional analgesia. Similar incidences were found even when the epidural was electively chosen before labour in the absence of medical indications. The instrumental delivery rate was affected by parity, the length of the second stage of labour, and the return of sensation by the second stage but not by other factors studied. The high incidence (20%) of malposition associated with epidural analgesia was not affected by any of the factors studied. The psychological and physical disadvantages of malposition and instrumental delivery have yet to be assessed. In the meantime, when there are no medical indications for epidural analgesia, the advantages of pain relief should be weighed against those of a normal spontaneous delivery. PMID:831964

  2. Postoperative urinary retention in a dog following morphine with bupivacaine epidural analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Herperger, L J

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention, overflow incontinence, and subsequent detrusor atony were observed following surgery in which a morphine with bupivacaine epidural injection was used for perioperative analgesia. The premise that the urinary retention may have been due to the effects of the morphine component of the epidural is discussed, along with other possible causes. PMID:9789679

  3. Sedation and analgesia for critically ill pediatric burn patients: the current state of practice.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Andrew; Preston, Robert J; Cochran, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current practice patterns and attitudes toward pediatric sedation and analgesia in United States (US) burn centers for critically ill patients. Survey-based questionnaire was sent to 119 Directors at US burn centers that care for pediatric patients. Forty-one surveys (34%) were analyzed. 48.8% of responding centers mandate pediatric consultation for pediatric burn patients based on factors such as age and burn size. The most common sedation and analgesic agents used were midazolam, fentanyl, morphine, ketamine, and diphenhydramine. Written sedation policies exist at 63.4% of centers. 90.2% of centers employ scoring systems to guide agent titration. 60.9% of respondents practice sedation holidays "always" or "usually." 90.2% of centers perceive the medications they routinely use are "always" or "often" efficacious in pediatric sedation and analgesia. 53.7% of respondents reported the presence of withdrawal signs and symptoms in their patient population. The lack of consensus guidelines for sedation and analgesia delivery to pediatric intensive care unit patients results in practice variation. The majority of centers perceive their sedation and analgesia strategies to be efficacious despite the heavy reliance on propofol and midazolam, both of which have questionable safety profiles in critically ill children.

  4. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sucena Pita, Murillo; Sato, Sandra; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; do Nascimento, Cássio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac), panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine), and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients' pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time. PMID:25874243

  5. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  6. Spinal cord distribution of sup 3 H-morphine after intrathecal administration: Relationship to analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Y.; Sinatra, R.S.; Kitahata, L.M.; Collins, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intrathecally administered {sup 3}H-morphine was examined by light microscopic autoradiography in rat spinal cord and temporal changes in silver grain localization were compared with results obtained from simultaneous measurements of analgesia. After tissue processing, radio-activity was found to have penetrated in superficial as well as in deeper layers (Rexed lamina V, VII, and X) of rat spinal cord within minutes after application. Silver grain density reached maximal values at 30 min in every region of cord studied. Radioactivity decreased rapidly between 30 min and 2 hr and then more slowly over the next 24 hr. In rats tested for responses to a thermal stimulus (tail flick test), intrathecal administration of morphine (5 and 15 micrograms) resulted in significant dose dependent analgesia that peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 5 hr (P less than 0.5). There was a close relationship between analgesia and spinal cord silver grain density during the first 4 hr of the study. It is postulated that the onset of spinal morphine analgesia depends on appearance of molecules at sites of action followed by the activation of anti-nociceptive mechanisms.

  7. Admixture of propofol and alfentanil. Use for intravenous sedation and analgesia during transvaginal oocyte retrieval.

    PubMed

    Sherry, E

    1992-06-01

    An admixture of propofol and alfentanil provides adequate sedation and analgesia during transvaginal oocyte retrieval in the absence of a paracervical block. In 100 patients the technique provided haemodynamic stability, sedation which was easily controlled, rapid recovery and universal patient acceptance. PMID:1616081

  8. A new animal model of placebo analgesia: involvement of the dopaminergic system in reward learning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Bombi; Park, Hi-Joon; Olausson, Håkan; Enck, Paul; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a new placebo analgesia animal model and investigated the role of the dopamine and opioid systems in placebo analgesia. Before and after the conditioning, we conducted a conditioned place preference (CPP) test to measure preferences for the cues (Rooms 1 and 2), and a hot plate test (HPT) to measure the pain responses to high level-pain after the cues. In addition, we quantified the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and c-Fos in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as a response to reward learning and pain response. We found an enhanced preference for the low level-pain paired cue and enhanced TH expression in the VTA of the Placebo and Placebo + Naloxone groups. Haloperidol, a dopamine antagonist, blocked these effects in the Placebo + Haloperidol group. An increased pain threshold to high-heat pain and reduced c-Fos expression in the ACC were observed in the Placebo group only. Haloperidol blocked the place preference effect, and naloxone and haloperidol blocked the placebo analgesia. Cue preference is mediated by reward learning via the dopamine system, whereas the expression of placebo analgesia is mediated by the dopamine and opioid systems. PMID:26602173

  9. Evidence for opioid and non-opioid forms of stimulation-produced analgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J T; Prieto, G J; Lee, A; Liebeskind, J C

    1982-07-15

    This study compares stimulation-produced analgesia (SPA) elicited from two different midline regions of the midbrain of the rat. Dorsal electrode placements were in the caudal periaqueductal gray matter; ventral placements lay within or subjacent to the dorsal raphe n. SPA thresholds were measured by the tail-flick method both during and immediately after the period of brain stimulation. Thresholds were consistently higher in the post-stimulation test. SPA from dorsal and ventral regions differed in the following ways: (1) Post-stimulation analgesia was significantly more difficult to obtain in ventral than in dorsal regions, whereas during-stimulation analgesia did not vary as a function of electrode location; (2) Although a continuous distribution of thresholds was seen for ventral placements, thresholds for dorsal placements tended to be either high or low on both during- and post-stimulation tests; (3) Naloxone (0.01--10 mg/kg) reliably elevated SPA thresholds for ventral but not dorsal stimulation placements. We conclude that different substrates of SPA lie in close proximity to one another in the medial midbrain of the rat. This portion of the midbrain appears to mediate both opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of analgesia. PMID:7104742

  10. Central administration of neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuate systemic morphine analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Quan; Jiang, Tian-nan; Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Wang, Rui

    2011-04-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to an opioid-modulating peptide family. NPFF has been reported to play important roles in the control of pain and analgesia through interactions with the opioid system. However, very few studies examined the effect of supraspinal NPFF system on analgesia induced by opiates administered at the peripheral level. In the present study, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPFF (1, 3 and 10 nmol) dose-dependently inhibited systemic morphine (0.12 mg, i.p.) analgesia in the mouse tail flick test. Similarly, i.c.v. administration of dNPA and NPVF, two agonists highly selective for NPFF(2) and NPFF(1) receptors, respectively, decreased analgesia induced by i.p. morphine in mice. Furthermore, these anti-opioid activities of NPFF and related peptides were blocked by pretreatment with the NPFF receptors selective antagonist RF9 (10 nmol, i.c.v.). These results demonstrate that activation of central NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors has the similar anti-opioid actions on the antinociceptive effect of systemic morphine.

  11. Sex-dependent components of the analgesia produced by athletic competition.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, W F; Bokat, C; Kass, L; Alboyadjian, A; Gracely, R H

    2001-02-01

    Competing in various athletic events (track meet, basketball game, or fencing match) can produce analgesia to cold pressor stimuli in male and female college athletes compared with baseline assessments. This competition-induced analgesia has been attributed to the stress associated with competition, which has components related to both physical exercise and the cognitive aspects of competing. This study evaluated the analgesic effect of exercise-related stress, and that caused by the cognitively stressful components of competing independent of exercise. Cold pressor pain ratings were assessed after competition in a track meet and after treadmill exercise or sedentary video game competition in both athletes and nonathletes. As expected, competing in athletics resulted in a decrease in cold pressor ratings in both male and female athletes. Independent of athletic status, treadmill running induced analgesia in women, but not in males, whereas sedentary video game competition produced analgesia in men, but not in women. These findings suggest that different components of the competitive athletic experience might be responsible for the analgesic effects in a sex-dependent manner.

  12. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  13. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  14. Changes in rapid eye movement sleep associated with placebo-induced expectations and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Laverdure-Dupont, Danièle; Rainville, Pierre; Montplaisir, Jacques; Lavigne, Gilles

    2009-09-23

    The experience of a sensory event is extensively shaped by past experience and expectations. Placebo analgesia, one of the most studied models of expectation-mediated effects, can be induced by suggestion of analgesia and conditioning. The present study examined the possibility that sleep might contribute to the consolidation of new expectations and consequently influence the generation of expectation-mediated placebo effects. Strong expectations of analgesia were generated before sleep by conditioning manipulations wherein the intensity of thermal pain stimulation was surreptitiously reduced after the application of a topical placebo cream. Expectations and placebo analgesic effects were measured the following morning and compared with those of a control daytime group without sleep. Although placebo effects were observed in both groups, correlation analysis suggests that the mediating effect of expectations on placebo responses was strongest in the overnight group. Moreover, after exposure to a convincing analgesia experience, the relative duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep decreased in subjects showing higher analgesic expectations and placebo responses the next morning. In a third group exposed to less consistent analgesic experiences before sleep, expectations reported in the morning were comparable with other groups. However, expectations were positively correlated with REM sleep and did not emerge as a significant mediator of the analgesic effect. Together, these findings show that sleep-related processes may influence the association between expectations and placebo analgesia and that REM sleep can predict placebo-induced expectations of pain relief. However, equivocal previous experience with treatments may significantly alter the relationship between relief expectation, REM sleep, and placebo effects.

  15. Efficacy of continuous epidural analgesia and the implications for patient care in the early postoperative phase.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1990-06-01

    Management of postoperative pain has been shown to be inadequately controlled, and, in fact, can have significant deleterious effects on a patient's early postoperative recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia has recently been used to control postoperative pain. This mode of analgesia controls postoperative pain without the delays inherent in the PRN administration of systemic narcotics. This was a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 53 thoracic and 81 abdominal surgery patients. The focus of the study was to identify the benefits and problems of continuous epidural analgesia for postoperative pain management and the implications for the nursing care of the patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: (1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; (2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill Pain Questionnaire; (3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; (4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; (5) occurrence of adverse effects; and (6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used (PRN) systemic administration of narcotics. With the exception of the report of back pain by patients receiving the normal saline epidural solution, complications did not occur in a significantly greater proportion when using the epidural route. Although some nursing care problems were identified, patients who received epidural analgesia were able to be cared for on general care units with no adverse effects reported. PMID:2285719

  16. Ictal analgesia in temporal lobe epilepsy - The mechanism of seizure-related burns.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Anna; Horváth, András; Rásonyi, György; Fabó, Dániel; Szabó, Géza; Sákovics, Anna; Kamondi, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Seizure-related injuries have major impact in the excess mortality and morbidity of epilepsy patients. Experimental data suggest that analgesia may develop during seizures contributing to the severity of seizure-related accidents, especially burns. We aimed to identify those seizure-types that may lead to burn-injuries by seizure-related analgesia. In our tertiary epilepsy centre, we asked 100 epilepsy patients having a history of seizure-related injury, to complete our burn-and-pain questionnaire. Fifty-one patients completed the survey; their epileptology data were collected and those with a seizure-related burn were interviewed. Forty-two out of the 51 patients (82%) had partial epilepsy and 9 (18%) had idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Twenty-six persons (51%) reported decreased pain perception during or after seizures in general. Twelve patients (23%) had suffered one or more seizure-related burn. Five of them fell onto a hot surface or fire accidentally, during generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Seven out of the 12 burnt patients (58%) grasped a hot object or reached into boiling fluid during complex partial seizures; without experiencing-, or reacting in response to pain. These patients had temporal lobe epilepsy, 5 of them had left temporal seizure onset. Our hypothesis based on the circumstantial analysis of our patients' burn-injuries; is that temporal lobe seizures may cause ictal/postictal analgesia. It may be caused by the seizure-related epileptic facilitation of the periaqueductal gray matter; the central pain-inhibiting structure of the brain. Seizure-related endogenous opioid-release my have a contributory role in inhibiting pain-perception. Ictal analgesia warrants better burn-prevention in temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Understanding the mechanism of ictal analgesia and specifying those seizures-types prone to cause it; may help indentifying human pain-inhibiting pathways.

  17. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I2 index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I2 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%). PMID:26061307

  18. Influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary function and complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Şen, Meral; Özol, Duygu; Bozer, Mikdat

    2009-12-01

    Pain and diaphragmatic dysfunction are the major reasons for postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery. Preoperative administration of analgesics helps to reduce and prevent pain. The objective of this study was first to research the rate of pulmonary complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and then analyze the influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary functions and complications. Seventy patients scheduled for elective LC were included in our double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective study. Randomly, 35 patients received 1 g etofenamate (group 1) and 35 patients 0.9% saline (group 2) intramuscularly 1 h before surgery. All patients underwent physical examination, chest radiography, lung function tests, and pulse oxygen saturation measurements 2 h before surgery and postoperatively on day 2. Atelectasis was graded as micro, focal, segmental, or lobar. With preemptive analgesia, the need for postoperative analgesia decreased significantly in group 1. In both groups mean spirometric values were reduced significantly after the operation, but the difference and proportional change according to preoperative recordings were found to be similar [29.5 vs. 31.3% reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC) and 32.9 vs. 33.5% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for groups 1 and 2, respectively]. There was an insignificant drop in oxygen saturation rates for both groups. The overall incidence of atelectasia was similar for group 1 and 2 (30.2 vs. 29.2%). Although the degree of atelectesia was found to be more severe in the placebo group, the difference was not statistically significant. We concluded that although preemptive analgesia decreased the need for postoperative analgesia, this had no effect on pulmonary functions and pulmonary complications. PMID:19117121

  19. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  20. [Postoperative analgesia with tramal in newborn children using the method of continuous intravenous infusion].

    PubMed

    Mikhel'son, V A; Zhirkova, Iu V; Beliaeva, I D; Stepanenko, S M; Manerova, A F; Butyleva, O Iu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of postoperative analgesia with tramal in the newborns. Analgesia with tramal (5% solution for injections, "Gruonental GmbH", Germany) was administered postoperatively in 20 newborn children. Thirteen children were operated for congenital malformations in the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, three children were operated for purulent-septic diseases and four children were operated for neoplasms. Hemodynamics indices, i.e. heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure, as well as SaO2, respiratory rate (RR), acid-base condition and behavioral reactions were assessed. Analgesia was implemented by the method of continuous intravenous infusion of tramal, 0.1-0.2 mg/kg.h combined with boluses, 1-2 mg/kg. The newborns were asleep for a major part of time during analgesia with tamal; the stable indices of hemodynamics, acid-base balance, glycemia and of the cortisol level were registered. Arterial hypertension, caused by several factors including the effect produced by tamal, was noted in 70% of children. Dose-dependent hypercapnia was registered in 80% of tests in children at unassisted respiration during the infusion of tamal, which is indicative of that tamal affects the respiratory center during the neonatal period and that it is necessary to monitor thoroughly the respiratory functions, i.e. RR, SatO2, pO2, pCO2, and to choose accurately a preparation dose. The continuous infusion of tamal ensures a sufficient analgesia after different operations and especially after medium-traumatic operations.

  1. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, M; Mogil, J S; Japón, M; Chan, E C; Allen, R G; Low, M J

    1996-01-01

    A physiological role for beta-endorphin in endogenous pain inhibition was investigated by targeted mutagenesis of the proopiomelanocortin gene in mouse embryonic stem cells. The tyrosine codon at position 179 of the proopiomelanocortin gene was converted to a premature translational stop codon. The resulting transgenic mice display no overt developmental or behavioral alterations and have a normally functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Homozygous transgenic mice with a selective deficiency of beta-endorphin exhibit normal analgesia in response to morphine, indicating the presence of functional mu-opiate receptors. However, these mice lack the opioid (naloxone reversible) analgesia induced by mild swim stress. Mutant mice also display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. These changes may reflect compensatory upregulation of alternative pain inhibitory mechanisms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8633004

  2. Leukocyte opioid receptors mediate analgesia via Ca(2+)-regulated release of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Celik, Melih Ö; Labuz, Dominika; Henning, Karen; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are the most powerful analgesics. As pain is driven by sensory transmission and opioid receptors couple to inhibitory G proteins, according to the classical concept, opioids alleviate pain by activating receptors on neurons and blocking the release of excitatory mediators (e.g., substance P). Here we show that analgesia can be mediated by opioid receptors in immune cells. We propose that activation of leukocyte opioid receptors leads to the secretion of opioid peptides Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin A (1-17), which subsequently act at local neuronal receptors, to relieve pain. In a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, exogenous agonists of δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors injected at the damaged nerve infiltrated by opioid peptide- and receptor-expressing leukocytes, produced analgesia, as assessed with von Frey filaments. The analgesia was attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of opioid peptides, and by leukocyte depletion. This decrease in analgesia was restored by the transfer of wild-type, but not opioid receptor-lacking leukocytes. Ex vivo, exogenous opioids triggered secretion of opioid peptides from wild-type immune cells isolated from damaged nerves, which was diminished by blockade of Gαi/o or Gβγ (but not Gαs) proteins, by chelator of intracellular (but not extracellular) Ca(2+), by blockers of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and was partially attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitor. Similarly, the leukocyte depletion-induced decrease in exogenous opioid analgesia was re-established by transfer of immune cells ex vivo pretreated with extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, but was unaltered by leukocytes pretreated with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator or blockers of Gαi/o and Gβγ proteins. Thus, both ex vivo opioid peptide release and in vivo analgesia were mediated by leukocyte opioid receptors coupled to the G

  3. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  4. Leukocyte opioid receptors mediate analgesia via Ca(2+)-regulated release of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Celik, Melih Ö; Labuz, Dominika; Henning, Karen; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are the most powerful analgesics. As pain is driven by sensory transmission and opioid receptors couple to inhibitory G proteins, according to the classical concept, opioids alleviate pain by activating receptors on neurons and blocking the release of excitatory mediators (e.g., substance P). Here we show that analgesia can be mediated by opioid receptors in immune cells. We propose that activation of leukocyte opioid receptors leads to the secretion of opioid peptides Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin A (1-17), which subsequently act at local neuronal receptors, to relieve pain. In a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, exogenous agonists of δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors injected at the damaged nerve infiltrated by opioid peptide- and receptor-expressing leukocytes, produced analgesia, as assessed with von Frey filaments. The analgesia was attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of opioid peptides, and by leukocyte depletion. This decrease in analgesia was restored by the transfer of wild-type, but not opioid receptor-lacking leukocytes. Ex vivo, exogenous opioids triggered secretion of opioid peptides from wild-type immune cells isolated from damaged nerves, which was diminished by blockade of Gαi/o or Gβγ (but not Gαs) proteins, by chelator of intracellular (but not extracellular) Ca(2+), by blockers of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and was partially attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitor. Similarly, the leukocyte depletion-induced decrease in exogenous opioid analgesia was re-established by transfer of immune cells ex vivo pretreated with extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, but was unaltered by leukocytes pretreated with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator or blockers of Gαi/o and Gβγ proteins. Thus, both ex vivo opioid peptide release and in vivo analgesia were mediated by leukocyte opioid receptors coupled to the G

  5. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of footshock-induced analgesia: role of the spinal dorsolateral funiculus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Watkins, L R; Mayer, D J; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-05-01

    Exposure to inescapable footshock causes either an opioid or non-opioid mediated analgesia in the rat depending on the temporal parameters of its administration. Lesions of the spinal dorsolateral funiculus significantly reduce both the opioid and non-opioid forms of this footshock-induced analgesia. Thus, these two neurochemically discrete pain-inhibitory systems appear to depend on the integrity of the same descending path, one known to be activated by morphine and by analgesic brain stimulation.

  6. Postoperative pain control using continuous i.m. bupivacaine infusion plus patient-controlled analgesia compared with epidural analgesia after major hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Lun-Hing, Edgar M; van Dam, Ronald M; Welsh, Fenella K S; Wells, John K G; John, Timothy G; Cresswell, Adrian B; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Rees, Myrddin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is debate concerning the best mode of delivery of analgesia following liver resection, with continuous i.m. infusion of bupivacaine (CIB) plus patient-controlled i.v. analgesia (PCA) suggested as an alternative to continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). This study compares these two modalities. Methods A total of 498 patients undergoing major hepatectomy between July 2004 and July 2011 were included. Group 1 received CIB + PCA (n = 429) and Group 2 received CEA (n = 69). Groups were analysed on baseline patient and surgical characteristics. Primary endpoints were pain severity scores and total opioid consumption. Secondary endpoints were pain management failures, need for rescue medication, postoperative (opioid-related) morbidity and hospital length of stay (LoS). Results In both groups pain was well controlled and >70% of patients had no or minimal pain on PoDs 1 and 2. The numbers of patients experiencing severe pain were similar in both groups: PoD 1 at rest: 0.3% in Group 1 and 0% in Group 2 (P = 1.000); PoD 1 on movement: 8% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.338); PoD 2 at rest: 0% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.126), and PoD 2 on movement: 5% in Group 1 and 5% in Group 2 (P = 1.000). Although the CIB + PCA group required more opioid rescue medication on PoD 0 (53% versus 22%; P < 0.001), they used less opioids on PoDs 0–3 (P ≤ 0.001), had lower morbidity (26% versus 39%; P = 0.018), and a shorter LoS (7 days versus 8 days; P = 0.005). Conclusions The combination of CIB + PCA provides pain control similar to that provided by CEA, but facilitates lower opioid consumption after major hepatectomy. It has the potential to replace epidural analgesia, thereby avoiding the occurrence of rare but serious complications. PMID:24151899

  7. The effects of preoperative oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Lerche, Phillip; Aarnes, Turi K.; Gardner, Heather L.; London, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, blinded, controlled clinical study compared the effects of pre-emptive oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on pain scores and analgesic requirement in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal. Thirty-six client-owned dogs presenting for cutaneous tumor removal were randomly assigned to receive carprofen, tramadol, or no treatment prior to surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Modified Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Score (MGCMPS), and algometry at enrollment, prior to premedication, at extubation, then hourly for the first 4 h, and every 4 h for 24 h. Dogs scoring ≥ 7 (MGCMPS), or having a VAS measurement ≥ 40 mm were given rescue analgesia. There were no significant differences in pain VAS, MGCMPS, or algometry. There were no differences in rescue analgesia requirement, or time to rescue analgesia among groups. Carprofen, tramadol, or no pre-emptive analgesia, combined with pre-operative hydromorphone and rescue analgesia, resulted in satisfactory analgesia in the 24-hour postoperative period. PMID:26246627

  8. A Bayesian Perspective on Sensory and Cognitive Integration in Pain Perception and Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Anchisi, Davide; Zanon, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a component of any response to a treatment (effective or inert), but we still ignore why it exists. We propose that placebo analgesia is a facet of pain perception, others being the modulating effects of emotions, cognition and past experience, and we suggest that a computational understanding of pain may provide a unifying explanation of these phenomena. Here we show how Bayesian decision theory can account for such features and we describe a model of pain that we tested against experimental data. Our model not only agrees with placebo analgesia, but also predicts that learning can affect pain perception in other unexpected ways, which experimental evidence supports. Finally, the model can also reflect the strategies used by pain perception, showing that modulation by disparate factors is intrinsic to the pain process. PMID:25664586

  9. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  10. The efficacy of preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain control: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Brunetto, Elisa; Dahmani, Eman; Forthoffer, Jola Janaqi; Kapoor, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of preemptive analgesia is to reduce postoperative pain, contributing to a more comfortable recovery period and reducing the need for narcotic pain control. The efficacy of preemptive analgesia remains controversial. This systematic review of the literature evaluated the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and gabapentin as preemptive oral analgesics for surgical patients. Included articles were limited to studies of adult patients that compared the difference in postoperative pain between control and treatment groups. Of 40 studies reviewed, 14 met the inclusion criteria, including two on NSAIDs, four on COX-2 inhibitors, and eight on gabapentin. Research was predominantly conducted outside the United States. Gabapentin and COX-2 inhibitors were found to be the most effective preemptive analgesics for postoperative pain control. As part of a collaborative team, perioperative nurses and certified RN anesthetists are responsible for ongoing pain assessment and management for preemptive analgesic interventions.

  11. Hypnotherapy as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia for the treatment of pain for burn debridement.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D R; Questad, K A; de Lateur, B J

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a hypnotherapeutic intervention for controlling pain in severely burned patients while they go through dressing changes and wound debridement. The technique is based on Barber's (1977) Rapid Induction Analgesia (RIA) and involves hypnotizing patients in their rooms and having their nurses provide posthypnotic cues for analgesia during wound cleaning. Five subjects who underwent hypnotherapy showed reductions on their pain rating scores (Visual Analogue Scale) relative to their own baselines and to the pain curves of a historical control group (N = 8) matched for initial pain rating scores. Although the lack of randomized assignment to experimental and control groups limited the validity of the results, the findings provide encouraging preliminary evidence that RIA offers an efficient and effective method for controlling severe pain from burns. PMID:2563925

  12. Sedation and Analgesia in Intensive Care: A Comparison of Fentanyl and Remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, F.; Celik, M.; Clark, P. M.; Macit, C.

    2011-01-01

    Optimal sedation and analgesia are of key importance in intensive care. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of sedoanalgesia and outcome parameters in regimens containing midazolam and either fentanyl or remifentanil. A prospective, randomized, open-label, controlled trial was carried out in the ICU unit of a large teaching hospital in Istanbul over a 9-month period. Thirty-four patients were randomly allocated to receive either a remifentanil-midazolam regimen (R group, n = 17) or a fentanyl-midazolam regimen (F group, n = 17). A strong correlation between Riker Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) and Ramsey Scale (RS) measurements was observed. Comparatively, remifentanil provided significantly more potent and rapid analgesia based on Behavioral-Physiological Scale (BPS) measurements and a statistically nonsignificantly shorter time to discharge. On the other hand, remifentanil also caused a significantly sharper fall in heart rate within the first six hours of treatment. PMID:22110929

  13. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy.

  14. [Administration of Perfalgan (paracetamol) for postoperative analgesia in obstetrics and gynaecology].

    PubMed

    Tablov, B; Popov, I; Tablov, V; Radev, R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the quality of postoperative analgesia by using of Perfalgan (injectable paracetamol)--alone or in combination with other analgesics for different operations in obstetric and gynecology. We have evaluated 60 women, divided into four groups each one of 15 according to the kind of surgical intervention: section cesarean, laparoscopy, laparohysterectomy or cystectomy. The effect of administered Perfalgan over postoperative pain was estimated by different objective and subjective parameters after standard general anesthesia. As a result of our study we consider that postoperative analgesia with Perfalgan is suitable enough after section cesarean and laparoscopy. As a component of multimodal analgesic combination it gives a good quality of postoperative pain relief in condition of laparohysterectomy or cystectomy. It is very important that this is without any adverse effects. PMID:16544723

  15. Analgesia, sedation, and neuromuscular blockade during targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Riker, Richard R; Gagnon, David J; May, Teresa; Seder, David B; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-12-01

    The approach to sedation, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade during targeted temperature management (TTM) remains largely unstudied, forcing clinicians to adapt previous research from other patient environments. During TTM, very little data guide drug selection, doses, and specific therapeutic goals. Sedation should be deep enough to prevent awareness during neuromuscular blockade, but titration is complex as metabolism and clearance are delayed for almost all drugs during hypothermia. Deeper sedation is associated with prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) and ventilator therapy, increased delirium and infection, and delayed wakening which can confound early critical neurological assessments, potentially resulting in erroneous prognostication and inappropriate withdrawal of life support. We review the potential therapeutic goals for sedation, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade during TTM; the adverse events associated with that treatment; data suggesting that TTM and organ dysfunction impair drug metabolism; and controversies and potential benefits of specific monitoring. We also highlight the areas needing better research to guide our therapy. PMID:26670815

  16. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  17. Morphine Analgesia Modification in Normotensive and Hypertensive Female Rats after Repeated Fluoxetine Administration.

    PubMed

    Kosiorek-Witek, Anna; Makulska-Nowak, Helena Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine through the use of fluoxetine the effect of administering a serotonin reuptake inhibitor over several days on the antinociceptive action of μ-morphine type opioid receptor agonist. Investigations were performed on rats of both sexes, both the WKY normotensive strains as well as on the SHR genetically conditioned hypertensive strains. Results showed that the efficacy of morphine analgesia is higher in the SHR strain compared to normotensive rats (WKY). Surprisingly, repeated administration of fluoxetine reduced morphine analgesia, with the weakening of opioid antinociceptive action comparable to the duration of serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration. It was also concluded that the antinociceptive action of morphine in female rats and the alteration of its efficacy as a result of fluoxetine premedication for several days depend on oestrus cycle phase. The highest sensitivity of female rats to morphine was reported in the dioestrus and oestrus phases; much lower values were reported for the metoestrus phase.

  18. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  19. Role of Esmolol in Perioperative Analgesia and Anesthesia: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Harless, Megan; Depp, Caleb; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2015-06-01

    Use of opioids to provide adequate perioperative analgesia often leads to respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia, with the potential to increase length of stay in the hospital. In an effort to reduce perioperative opioid administration yet provide appropriate pain relief, researchers began to study the use of esmolol beyond its well-known cardiovascular effects. Perioperative esmolol has been shown to reduce anesthetic requirements, decrease perioperative opioid use, decrease the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, lead to an earlier discharge, and increase patient satisfaction. This article provides a review of the literature on the use of esmolol as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia and anesthesia. PMID:26137757

  20. [Analgesia, sedation and delir – Treatment of patients in the neuro intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Jungk, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Analgesia and sedation of patients in the neuro intensive care unit, in particular in case of intracranial hypertension, remains a challenge even today. A goal for analgesia and sedation should be set for each individual patient (RASS -5 in case of intracranial hypertension) and should be re-evaluated repeatedly based on standardized scores (RASS plus EEG monitoring where appropriate, NCS). There are no sufficient evidence-based sedation algorithms in this patient cohort. Remifentanil, sufentanil and fentanyl have been proven safe and effective for continuous application; however, bolus application should be avoided. (S-)Ketamin can be considered safe when mechanical ventilation and sedation with GABA receptor agonists are applied. Propofol and benzodiazepines are equally safe and effective with shorter wake up times for propofol. The use of barbitarutes is restricted to intractable intracranial hypertension or status epilepicus. Evidence for alpha-2-adrenoceptoragonists and inhalative sedation is poor and requires further research.

  1. Co-incidental diagnosis of an extradural abscess while siting an extradural catheter for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M; McIndoe, A

    1998-06-01

    Extradural abscess is a rare but serious complication of the extradural route of administration of analgesic drugs. We report a case of spontaneous extradural abscess diagnosed during placement of an extradural catheter for analgesia after a negative diagnostic laparotomy. Magnetic resonance imaging is the usual diagnostic tool of choice. This, and subsequent surgery, confirmed the diagnosis suspected after drainage of pus through the Tuohy needle.

  2. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  3. Can intravenous patient-controlled analgesia be omitted in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Yeon; Park, Jun Seok; Park, Soo Yeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Yeo, Jinseok; Kim, Jong-Chan; Park, Sungsik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) is a popular method of postoperative analgesia, but many patients suffer from PCA-related complications. We hypothesized that PCA was not essential in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery by minimal invasive approach. Methods Between February 2013 and August 2013, 297 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer were included in this retrospective comparative study. The PCA group received conventional opioid-based PCA postoperatively, and the non-PCA group received intravenous anti-inflammatory drugs (Tramadol) as necessary. Patients reported their postoperative pain using a subjective visual analogue scale (VAS). The PCA-related adverse effects and frequency of rescue analgesia were evaluated, and the recovery rates were measured. Results Patients in the PCA group experienced less postoperative pain on days 4 and 5 after surgery than those in the non-PCA group (mean [SD] VAS: day 4, 6.2 [0.3] vs. 7.0 [0.3], P = 0.010; and day 5, 5.1 [0.2] vs. 5.5 [0.2], P = 0.030, respectively). Fewer patients in the non-PCA group required additional parenteral analgesia (41 of 93 patients vs. 53 of 75 patients, respectively), and none in the non-PCA group required rescue PCA postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly higher in the non-PCA group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The mean (range) length of hospital stay was shorter in the non-PCA group (7.9 [6-10] days vs. 8.7 [7-16] days, respectively, P = 0.03). Conclusion Our Results suggest that IV-PCA may not be necessary in selected patients those who underwent minimal invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:25692119

  4. Social isolation: effects on pain threshold and stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Puglisi-Allegra, S; Oliverio, A

    1983-10-01

    Individually housed DBA/2 mice showed higher pain thresholds than grouped mice. Stress-induced analgesia was evident in grouped but not in isolated mice. Since also morphine injections did not result in analgesic effects in isolated mice, it is suggested that social isolation results in an increased release of opioids which may produce a decreased sensitivity at the opiate receptor level. The role of endogenous opioids in relation to social isolation is discussed. PMID:6685878

  5. Intrathecal clonidine added to small-dose bupivacaine prolongs postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing transurethral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gecaj-Gashi, Agreta; Terziqi, Hasime; Pervorfi, Tune; Kryeziu, Arben

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective, double-blinded study was to investigate the effects of clonidine in co-administration with bupivacaine during spinal anesthesia, regarding the onset and regression of motor and sensory block, postoperative analgesia and possible side effects. Methods: We randomly selected 66 male patients (age 35 to 70), from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I–II; these patients were scheduled for transurethral surgical procedures. These patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 33 patients each: group B (bupivacaine) only received 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg intrathecally and group BC (bupivacaine + clonidine) received bupivacaine 7.5 mg and clonidine 25 μg intrathecally. We performed the spinal anesthesia at a level of L3–L4 with a 25-gauge needle. We assessed the sensory block with a pin-prick, the motor block using the Bromage scale, analgesia with the visual analog scale and sedation with the modified Wilson scale. We also recorded the hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Results: The groups were demographically similar. The mean time of achievement of motor block (Bromage 3) and sensory block at level T9 was significantly shorter in the BC group compared with B group (p = 0.002, p = 0.000, respeectively). The motor block regression time was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.237). The postoperative analgesia requirement was significantly longer in group BC compared with group B (p = 0.000). No neurological deficit, sedation or other significant adverse effects were recorded. Conclusion: The intrathecal application of clonidine in combination with bupivacaine improves the duration and quality of spinal anesthesia; it also provides longer duration of postoperative analgesia, without significant side effects. PMID:22396363

  6. Removal of Unusually Large Torpedo Sialolith from Wharton's Duct under Local Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Siddika, A; Ferdousi, A M; Zaman, S; Shahpor, N

    2016-07-01

    Submandibular salivary gland system is commonly affected with sialolith (calculus) and victim suffers painful acute symptoms. Sialoliths usually are of 1-15mm in size. Although rarely giant sialoliths are seen, a giant torpedo sialolith of about 41mm × 9mm within the submandibular salivary duct is reported which was removed intraorally under local analgesia. Post-operatively, within six weeks salivation through duct was evidenced showing the process of re-establishment of salivary function. PMID:27612906

  7. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  8. Co-incidental diagnosis of an extradural abscess while siting an extradural catheter for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M; McIndoe, A

    1998-06-01

    Extradural abscess is a rare but serious complication of the extradural route of administration of analgesic drugs. We report a case of spontaneous extradural abscess diagnosed during placement of an extradural catheter for analgesia after a negative diagnostic laparotomy. Magnetic resonance imaging is the usual diagnostic tool of choice. This, and subsequent surgery, confirmed the diagnosis suspected after drainage of pus through the Tuohy needle. PMID:9771321

  9. Footpad dermatitis and pain assessment in turkey poults using analgesia and objective gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weber Wyneken, C.; Sinclair, A.; Veldkamp, T.; Vinco, L. J.; Hocking, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationships between litter moisture, footpad dermatitis (FPD) and pain in medium-heavy turkey strains was studied by gait analysis in two medium-heavy with and without analgesia (betamethasone or bupivacaine).The relationship between FPD and litter moisture was linear above a breakpoint of 49% litter moisture, and there were no differences between the two breeds in susceptibility to FPD.Gait analysis showed higher impulse, single support time, stride time and stance time in breed A compared to breed B. Significant interactions between breed, litter and analgesic for impulse, single support time and stride time were associated with higher means for breed A given saline injection on wet litter.Data from betamethasone analgesia in Experiments 1 and 3 were combined for analysis. Peak vertical force was higher in saline- compared to betamethasone-treated birds. Compared to the wet (high FPD) litter treatments, birds on dry (low FPD) litter had greater speed and lower double support time and longer stride length. Turkeys kept on wet litter had a longer stride length compared to dry litter when given saline, whereas in betamethasone-treated birds the means were similar.There were no differences between birds with or without bupivacaine analgesia. Peak vertical force was higher in breed A than B and in birds with a low FPD compared to a high FPD score.It was concluded that breeds A and B did not differ in susceptibility to develop FPD when housed on wet litter but may have natural gait differences. Significant changes in gait parameters were associated with wet litter and with analgesic treatments. The results showed that FPD affected the gait of the turkeys and, combined with evidence of behavioural changes when given analgesia, suggest that footpad lesions are painful. PMID:26248222

  10. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    van der Knijff-van Dortmont, A L M J; Dirckx, M; Duvekot, J J; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Gonzalez Candel, A; van der Marel, C D; Scoones, G P; Adriaens, V F R; Dons-Sinke, I J J

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  11. Issues of consent for regional analgesia in labour: a survey of obstetric anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Black, J D B; Cyna, A M

    2006-04-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain consent and inform patients of material risks prior to administering regional analgesia in labour. We surveyed consultant members of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists with a special interest in obstetric anaesthesia, in order to identify and compare which risks of regional analgesia they report discussing with women prior to and during labour. We also asked about obstetric anaesthetists' beliefs about informed consent, the type of consent obtained and its documentation. Of 542 questionnaires distributed, 291 responses (54%) were suitable for analysis. The five most commonly discussed risks were post dural puncture headache, block failure, permanent neurological injury, temporary leg weakness and hypotension. Obstetric anaesthetists reported discussing a mean of 8.0 (SD 3.8) and 10 (SD 3.8) risks in the labour and antenatal settings respectively. Nearly 20% of respondents did not rank post dural puncture headache among their top five most important risks for discussion. Seventy percent of respondents indicated that they believe active labour inhibits a woman's ability to give 'fully informed consent'. Over 80% of respondents obtain verbal consent and 57 (20%) have no record of the consent or its discussion. Obstetric anaesthetists reported making a considerable effort to inform patients of risks prior to the provision of regional analgesia in labour. Verbal consent may be appropriate for labouring women, using standardized forms that serve as a reminder of the risks, and a record of the discussion. Consensus is required as to what are the levels of risk from regional analgesia in labour.

  12. Preemptive multimodal analgesia facilitates same-day discharge following robot-assisted hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine whether early hospital discharge following minimally invasive surgery can be achieved through the use of preemptive multimodal analgesia without compromising patient safety or comfort. Data were retrospectively collected for 150 patients who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign indications from 9 December 2009 to 6 October 2010 at Cox Health Systems (Springfield, MO, USA). One surgeon performed 100 consecutive cases with all patients receiving preemptive multimodal treatment with celecoxib and ropivacaine. These cases were compared with 50 patients treated with an opioid-based postoperative analgesia regimen by one of four other surgeons at the same center. Patient characteristics, perioperative outcomes, opioid requirement, and time to discharge were compared between groups. The patients in the multimodal group had significantly reduced opioid requirements intraoperatively (25.0 mg vs. 29.9 mg, P = 0.0077), postoperatively on the day of surgery (10.9 mg vs. 17.9 mg, P = 0.0030), and on the first postoperative day (3.1 mg vs. 15.3 mg, P = 0.0001). There were no differences in procedure time, transfusions, or readmission rates between groups. Time in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) was decreased in the multimodal group (72.0 min vs. 88.4 min, P < 0.0001), as was time to discharge from the hospital (8.5 h vs. 30.2 h, P < 0.0001). Age and body mass index were both significantly lower in the multimodal group; however, regression analyses demonstrated that analgesia regimen was the only parameter that predicted opioid requirement and time to discharge. Preemptive multimodal analgesia reduced the total dose of rescue opioids, facilitating same-day discharge without compromising patient comfort or safety. PMID:27628274

  13. [The characteristics of epidural analgesia during the removal of lumbar intervertebral disk hernias].

    PubMed

    Arestov, O G; Solenkova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu; Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A

    2000-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) was used in 29 patients undergoing surgical removal of lumbar discal hernia. Marcain EA with controlled medicinal sleep and non-assisted breathing allowed to perform the whole operation in 27 patients. EA may be ineffective in combination of sequestrated disk hernia with scarry adhesive process. The technique of the operation demands a single use of the anesthetic drug which is potent enough to make blockade throughout the operation up to the end. PMID:10738758

  14. Exposure to novel odors induces opioid-mediated analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Tepperman, F S

    1988-11-01

    Land snails, Cepaea nemoralis, that were exposed for 1-30 min to a novel odor of either peppermint extract or vegetable juice concentrate displayed an increase in the latency of their nociceptive response to an aversive thermal stimulus (40 degrees C, hot-plate). This "analgesic" response, which entailed the elevation of the fully extended foot in hydrated snails, was evident directly after exposure to the novel chemostimuli and lasted for 15-30 min. This novelty-induced analgesia was blocked by the exogenous opiate antagonist naloxone. Analgesia was not observed in snails that were exposed to the same olfactory cue 4 or 24 h later, but was evident when the alternate novel odor (peppermint or vegetable juice) was presented. However, a significant analgesia was displayed by snails that were reexposed to their initial olfactory stimulus after 48-72 h. These findings indicate that exposure to a novel olfactory stimulus can activate endogenous opioid systems and induce an analgesic response in mollusks. PMID:2849409

  15. Opposite effects of the same drug: reversal of topical analgesia by nocebo information.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per Matti; Zwarg, Maria Lorentze; Eilertsen, Hans-Ingvald Hage; Gorecka, Marta Maria; Bjørkedal, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that psychological factors such as learning, expectation, and emotions can affect pharmacological treatment and shape both favorable and adverse effects of drugs. This study investigated whether nocebo information provided during administration of an analgesic cream could reverse topical analgesia to hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we tested whether nocebo effects were mediated by negative emotional activation. A total of 142 healthy volunteers (73 women) were randomized into 6 groups. A topical analgesic cream (Emla) was administered together with suggestions of analgesia in 1 group, whereas another group received Emla with suggestions of hyperalgesia. Two other groups received a placebo cream together with the same information as the groups receiving Emla. A fifth group received Emla with no specific information about the effect, and the sixth group received no treatment but the same pain induction as the other groups. Heat pain stimulation (48°C) was administered during a pretest and 2 posttests. Pain was continuously recorded during stimulation, and measures of subjective stress and blood pressure were obtained before the pretest, after the application of cream, and after the posttests. The results revealed that pain was significantly lower in the group receiving Emla with positive information and highest in the groups receiving suggestions of hyperalgesia, regardless of whether Emla or the placebo was administered. Mediation analyses showed that stress and blood pressure mediated hyperalgesia after nocebo suggestions. These results suggest that nocebo information can reverse topical analgesia and that emotional factors can explain a significant proportion of variance in nocebo hyperalgesia.

  16. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 counteracts morphine-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Boban Blagaic, A; Turcic, P; Blagaic, V; Dubovecak, M; Jelovac, N; Zemba, M; Radic, B; Becejac, T; Stancic Rokotov, D; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    Previously, the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, (PL 14736, Pliva) has been shown to have several beneficial effects, it exert gastroprotective, anti-inflammatory actions, stimulates would healing and has therapeutic value in inflammatory bowel disease. The present study aimed to study the effect of naloxone and BPC 157 on morphine-induced antinociceptive action in hot plate test in the mouse. It was found that naloxone and BPC 157 counteracted the morphine (16 mg/kg s.c.) - analgesia. Naloxone (10 mg/kg s.c.) immediately antagonised the analgesic action and the reaction time returned to the basic values, the development of BPC 157-induced action (10 pg/kg, 10 ng/kg, 10 microg/kg i.p.) required 30 minutes. When haloperidol, a central dopamine-antagonist (1 mg/kg i.p.), enhanced morphine-analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted this enhancement and naloxone reestablished the basic values of pain reaction. BPC 157, naloxone, and haloperidol per se failed to exert analgesic action. In summary, interaction between dopamine-opioid systems was demonstrated in analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted the haloperidol-induced enhancement of the antinociceptive action of morphine, indicating that BPC acts mainly through the central dopaminergic system. PMID:20388962

  17. Efficacy of two doses of tramadol versus bupivacaine in perioperative caudal analgesia in adult hemorrhoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Hanan M.; Esmat, Ibrahim M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was conducted to evaluate the perioperative analgesic efficacy of the two doses of caudally administered tramadol versus bupivacaine in adult hemorrhoidectomy. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 patients, aged 20-50 years, undergoing hemorrhoidectomy were randomly scheduled to receive bupivacaine 0.25% in 20 ml (Group B; n = 30), tramadol 1 mg/kg in 20 ml (Group T1; n = 30), tramadol 2 mg/kg in 20 ml (Group T2; n = 30) through caudal route after induction of general anesthesia. Postoperative pain was assessed every hour until the visual analog scale was 6, which is 1st time for rescue analgesia. Postoperative sedation, hemodynamic changes, serum cortisol, and epinephrine levels and incidence of side effects were also evaluated. Results: Duration of analgesia was longer in Group T2 (20 [1.14] h] compared with the Group B (7 [1.2] h) or Group T1 (12 [0.75] h); all P < 0.001. There were no significant hemodynamic changes. There were not incidences of side effects. Conclusion: Caudal tramadol 2 mg/kg provided a longer duration of postoperative analgesia with rapid onset and no incidence of complications or adverse effects in adult hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:27051362

  18. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  19. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  20. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine in addition to fentanyl with bupivacaine given caudally

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Smaoui, Mohamed; Laabidi, Sofiene; Kolsi, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of clonidine in association with fentanyl as an additive to bupivacaine 0.25% given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. In the present prospective randomized double blind study, 40 children of ASA-I-II aged 1-5 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg and clonidine 1μg/kg (group I) or bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamic parameters, and side effects or complications. Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. Heart rate and blood pressure were not different in 2 groups. Significantly prolonged duration of post-operative analgesia was observed in group I (P<0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting and bradycardia were similar in both groups. The adjunction of clonidine to fentanyl as additives to bupivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children may provide better and longer analgesia after infraumblical surgical procedures.

  1. [Intramuscular ketamine analgesia in emergency patients. I. Clinico--pharmacokinetic study].

    PubMed

    Hirlinger, W K; Dick, W; Knoche, E

    1983-07-01

    Effective analgesia under conditions of emergency and disaster is still a problem which can be considered as unsolved. The i.m. administration of ketamine in subanaesthetic doses could be one step forward, particularly in regard to a possible application by paramedical personnel. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, we compared 2 groups of 6 patients each, who received either 0.5 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg ketamine respectively i.m. for p.o. pain relief after tonsillectomies. The analgesic efficacy, the levels of consciousness, the blood pressure values and the ketamine plasma levels demonstrated, that effective analgesia can be obtained within 10 min following either dose. The dosage of 1 mg/kg however was followed by a transient impairment of the levels of consciousness. The pharmacokinetic data may lead to the conclusion that analgesia starts above plasma levels of 100 ng/ml. Important side effects were not be observed in these few cases. A further study, which has almost been completed, will demonstrate whether the same results apply to emergency out-patients suffering from fractures, burns etc. PMID:6614421

  2. A meta-analysis of brain mechanisms of placebo analgesia: consistent findings and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Lauren Y; Wager, Tor D

    2014-01-01

    Placebo treatments reliably reduce pain in the clinic and in the lab. Because pain is a subjective experience, it has been difficult to determine whether placebo analgesia is clinically relevant. Neuroimaging studies of placebo analgesia provide objective evidence of placebo-induced changes in brain processing and allow researchers to isolate the mechanisms underlying placebo-based pain reduction. We conducted formal meta-analyses of 25 neuroimaging studies of placebo analgesia and expectancy-based pain modulation. Results revealed that placebo effects and expectations for reduced pain elicit reliable reductions in activation during noxious stimulation in regions often associated with pain processing, including the dorsal anterior cingulate, thalamus, and insula. In addition, we observed consistent reductions during painful stimulation in the amygdala and striatum, regions implicated widely in studies of affect and valuation. This suggests that placebo effects are strongest on brain regions traditionally associated with not only pain, but also emotion and value more generally. Other brain regions showed reliable increases in activation with expectations for reduced pain. These included the prefrontal cortex (including dorsolateral, ventromedial, and orbitofrontal cortices), the midbrain surrounding the periaqueductal gray, and the rostral anterior cingulate. We discuss implications of these findings as well as how future studies can expand our understanding of the precise functional contributions of the brain systems identified here.

  3. Linking pain and the body: neural correlates of visually induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Mancini, Flavia; Driver, Jon; Haggard, Patrick

    2012-02-22

    The visual context of seeing the body can reduce the experience of acute pain, producing a multisensory analgesia. Here we investigated the neural correlates of this "visually induced analgesia" using fMRI. We induced acute pain with an infrared laser while human participants looked either at their stimulated right hand or at another object. Behavioral results confirmed the expected analgesic effect of seeing the body, while fMRI results revealed an associated reduction of laser-induced activity in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and contralateral operculoinsular cortex during the visual context of seeing the body. We further identified two known cortical networks activated by sensory stimulation: (1) a set of brain areas consistently activated by painful stimuli (the so-called "pain matrix"), and (2) an extensive set of posterior brain areas activated by the visual perception of the body ("visual body network"). Connectivity analyses via psychophysiological interactions revealed that the visual context of seeing the body increased effective connectivity (i.e., functional coupling) between posterior parietal nodes of the visual body network and the purported pain matrix. Increased connectivity with these posterior parietal nodes was seen for several pain-related regions, including somatosensory area SII, anterior and posterior insula, and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings suggest that visually induced analgesia does not involve an overall reduction of the cortical response elicited by laser stimulation, but is consequent to the interplay between the brain's pain network and a posterior network for body perception, resulting in modulation of the experience of pain.

  4. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27532001

  5. Self-administered methoxyflurane for procedural analgesia: experience in a tertiary Australasian centre.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, A L; Jephcott, C G; Smithells, J R; Sleigh, J W

    2016-04-01

    Methoxyflurane, an agent formerly used as a volatile anaesthetic but that has strong analgesic properties, will soon become available again in the UK and Europe in the form of a small hand-held inhaler. We describe our experience in the use of inhaled methoxyflurane for procedural analgesia within a large tertiary hospital. In a small pilot crossover study of patients undergoing burns-dressing procedures, self-administered methoxyflurane inhalation was preferred to ketamine-midazolam patient-controlled analgesia by five of eight patients. Patient and proceduralist outcomes and satisfaction were recorded from a subsequent case series of 173 minor surgical and radiological procedures in 123 patients performed using inhaled methoxyflurane. The procedures included change of dressing, minor debridement, colonoscopy and incision-and-drainage of abscess. There was a 97% success rate of methoxyflurane analgesia to facilitate these procedures. Limitations of methoxyflurane include maximal daily and weekly doses, and uncertainty regarding its safety in patients with pre-existing renal disease.

  6. Placebo analgesia and its opioidergic regulation suggest that empathy for pain is grounded in self pain.

    PubMed

    Rütgen, Markus; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Silani, Giorgia; Riečanský, Igor; Hummer, Allan; Windischberger, Christian; Petrovic, Predrag; Lamm, Claus

    2015-10-13

    Empathy for pain activates brain areas partially overlapping with those underpinning the first-hand experience of pain. It remains unclear, however, whether such shared activations imply that pain empathy engages similar neural functions as first-hand pain experiences. To overcome the limitations of previous neuroimaging research, we pursued a conceptually novel approach: we used the phenomenon of placebo analgesia to experimentally reduce the first-hand experience of pain, and assessed whether this results in a concomitant reduction of empathy for pain. We first carried out a functional MRI experiment (n = 102) that yielded results in the expected direction: participants experiencing placebo analgesia also reported decreased empathy for pain, and this was associated with reduced engagement of anterior insular and midcingulate cortex: that is, areas previously associated with shared activations in pain and empathy for pain. In a second step, we used a psychopharmacological manipulation (n = 50) to determine whether these effects can be blocked via an opioid antagonist. The administration of the opioid antagonist naltrexone blocked placebo analgesia and also resulted in a corresponding "normalization" of empathy for pain. Taken together, these findings suggest that pain empathy may be associated with neural responses and neurotransmitter activity engaged during first-hand pain, and thus might indeed be grounded in our own pain experiences.

  7. Analgesia dose prescribing and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline: a general practice database linkage cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Doos, Lucy; Strauss, Vicky Y; Lambie, Mark; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to quantify the short-term effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and paracetamol analgesia dose prescribing on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline in the general practice population. Design A population-based longitudinal clinical data linkage cohort study. Setting Two large general practices in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Patients aged 40 years and over with ≥2 eGFR measurements spaced ≥90 days apart between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 were selected. Exposure Using WHO Defined Daily Dose standardised cumulative analgesia prescribing, patients were categorised into non-user, normal and high-dose groups. Outcome measure The primary outcome was defined as a >5 mL/min/1.73 m2/year eGFR decrease between the first and last eGFR. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, baseline chronic kidney disease (CKD) status, renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors and other analgesia prescribing. Results There were 4145 patients (mean age 66 years, 55% female) with an analgesia prescribing prevalence of 17.2% for NSAIDs, 39% for aspirin and 22% for paracetamol and stage 3–5 CKD prevalence was 16.1% (n=667). Normal or high-dose NSAID and paracetamol prescribing was not significantly associated with eGFR decline. High-dose aspirin prescribing was associated with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in patients with a baseline (first) eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2; OR=0.52 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.77). Conclusions NSAID, aspirin and paracetamol prescribing over 2 years did not significantly affect eGFR decline with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in high-dose aspirin users with well-preserved renal function. However, the long-term effects of analgesia use on eGFR decline remain to be determined. PMID:25138808

  8. Comparison Between the Use of Ropivacaine Alone and Ropivacaine With Sufentanil in Epidural Labor Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Xu, Shiqin; Qin, Xiang; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Shan-Wu; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhou

    2015-10-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of the sole local anesthetic ropivacaine with the combination of both local anesthetic ropivacaine and opioidergic analgesic sufentanil given epidurally on the labor pain control.After institutional review board approval and patient consent, a total of 500 nulliparas requesting epidural labor analgesia were enrolled and 481 eventually were randomized into 2 groups: a sole local anesthetic group (ropivacaine 0.125%) and a combination of local anesthetic and opioidergic analgesic group (0.125% ropivacaine + 0.3 μg/mL sufentanil). After the test dose, a 10-mL epidural analgesic solution was given in a single bolus, followed by intermittent bolus injection of 10 to 15 mL of the solution. The primary outcome was the analgesic efficacy measured using Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain. Other maternal and infant variables were evaluated as secondary outcomes.A total of 346 participants completed the study. The median NRS pain score during the 1st stage of labor was significantly lower in the combination group 2.2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.8-2.7) comparing to the sole local analgesic group 2.4 (IQR: 2.0-2.8) (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was observed in NRS pain score prior epidural analgesia and during the 2nd stage of labor. Patients in both groups rated same satisfaction of analgesia. Patients in the sole local analgesic group experienced fewer side effects than those in the combination group (37.7% vs 47.2%, P = 0.082). The individual analgesia-related cost in the sole local analgesic group was less ($5.7 ± 2.06) than that in the combination group ($9.76 ± 3.54) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of 1-minute Apgar ≤ 7 was lower in the sole local analgesic group 2 (1.2%) than the combination group 10 (5.5%) (P = 0.038). No difference was found between other secondary outcomes.The sole local anesthetic ropivacaine produces a comparable labor analgesic effect as the combination of

  9. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  10. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  11. Comparison of dexmedetomidine/fentanyl with midazolam/fentanyl combination for sedation and analgesia during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Li, S; Deng, F; Yao, Y; Qian, L

    2014-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that causes minimal respiratory depression compared with alternative drugs. This study investigated whether combined dexmedetomidine/fentanyl offered better sedation and analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl in dental surgery. Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral impacted tooth extraction were randomly assigned to receive either dexmedetomidine and fentanyl (D/F) or midazolam and fentanyl (M/F). Recorded variables were patient preoperative anxiety scores, vital signs, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAAS) scores after drug administration, surgeon and patient degree of satisfaction, and the duration of analgesia after surgery. The OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients administered D/F compared to those who received M/F. The duration of analgesia after the surgical procedure was significantly longer in patients who received D/F (5.3 h) than in those who received M/F (4.1 h; P=0.017). The number of surgeons satisfied with the level of sedation/analgesia provided by D/F was significantly higher than for M/F (P=0.001). Therefore, dexmedetomidine/fentanyl appears to provide better sedation, stable haemodynamics, surgeon satisfaction, and postoperative analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl during office-based unilateral impacted tooth extraction.

  12. Comparison between two doses of dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine for caudal analgesia in paediatric infraumbilical surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshi Karuppiah, Niveditha Padma; Shetty, Sumalatha R; Patla, Krishna Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block (CB) with adjuvants is routinely used in children for anaesthesia. We evaluated the efficacy of the α2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine at two different doses as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in CB. Methods: This study was conducted on ninety children. Control group BD0 received 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg, whereas, the study groups BD1 and BD2 received 1 μg/kg and 2 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, respectively, with 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg as a single shot CB. Adequacy of the block, haemodynamic changes, duration of analgesia and side effects were compared. Analysis of Variance was used for between-group comparisons of numerical variables. Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used for quantitative data. Results: The demography was comparable. Anal sphincter 5 min after administration of the CB was relaxed in 89.3%, 82.1% and 75% of cases in BD0, BD1 and BD2 groups, respectively. The sphincter was relaxed at the end of surgery in all the cases. Comparable haemodynamics was noted with significantly prolonged duration of analgesia in the groups BD1 (964.2 ± 309 min) and BD2 (1152.6 ± 380.4 min) compared to control (444.6 ± 179.4 min). While no complications were encountered in groups BD0 and BD1, bradycardia was observed in four cases of BD2 group with accompanied hypotension in one of them. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine improves the quality of CB, provides good operating conditions and increases the duration of post-operative analgesia. We conclude that 1 μg/kg is as effective as 2 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine and with a better safety profile. PMID:27330203

  13. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  14. Caudal ropivacaine and bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Surhan Ozer; Isil, Canan Tulay; Sahin, Sevtap Hekimoglu; Paksoy, Inci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic efficacy of ropivacaine 0.175% and bupivacaine 0.175% injected caudally into infants for lower abdominal surgery. Methods: Eighty infants, aged 3-12 months, ASA I-II scheduled to undergo lower abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to one of the two groups: Group R received 1ml.kg-1 0.175% ropivacaine and Group B received 1ml.kg-1 0.175% bupivacaine via caudal route. Postoperative analgesia, sedation and motor block were evaluated with modified objective pain scale, three-point scale and modified Bromage scale respectively. Postoperative measurements including mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), pain (OPS), sedation and motor block score were recorded for four hours in the postoperative recovery room. Parents were contacted by telephone after 24 hours to question duration of analgesia and side effects. Results: No significant differences were found among the groups in demographic data, MAP, HR, OPS and sedation scores during four hours postoperatively. The duration of analgesia was 527.5±150.62 minutes in Group R, 692.77±139.01 minutes in Group B (p=0.004). Twelve (30%) patients in Group R, 16 (40%) patients in groupB needed rescue analgesics (p=0.348). Rescue analgesics were administered (1 time/2 times) (9/3) (22.5/7.5%) in Group R and 16/0 (40/0%) in Group B, where no statistically significant difference was determined between the groups (p=0.071). Motor blockade was observed in 7 (17.5%) patients in Group R, and 8 (20%) patients in Group B (p=0.774). Conclusion: This study indicated, that a concentration of 0.175% ropivacaine and 0.175% bupivacaine administered to the infants via caudal route both provided effective and similar postoperative pain relief in infants, who underwent lower abdominal surgery. PMID:26430427

  15. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate on Post-Operative Analgesia During Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffaripour, Sina; Eghbal, Hossein; Rahimi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-operative pain control is an important concern for both patients and physicians. Magnesium is being used as an adjuvant for anesthesia and analgesia during and after various surgeries. We aimed to investigate the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-operative analgesia after laminectomy. Methods Materials: In this randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 40 adult patients aged 18-60 with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)  Class I-II who were candidates for elective laminectomy. The patients were randomly assigned in two control groups and were similarly anesthetized. In the case group, after the induction of anesthesia, a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg) was administered within five to 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/hr up to the end of the surgery; while, the patients in the control group received the same volume of saline. After the surgery, all patients received a patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) pump containing morphine. The first time of using PCA, the amount of consumed morphine during the first 24 hours, and pain score were recorded at 6,12,18 and 24 hours in the post-operative period. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the amount of morphine consumed in 24 hours after the surgery (P value =0.23), the first time of using of PCA pump (P value =0.79) and pain intensity (P value=0.52). Conclusion: The infusion of Magnesium Sulfate during laminectomy had no effect on patients’ pain and opioid requirement during the first 24 hours after the surgery. PMID:27433405

  16. Effect of multisensory stimulation on analgesia in term neonates: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, Carlo Valerio; Bagnoli, Franco; Perrone, Serafina; Nenci, Anna; Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Fusi, Mara; Ceccarelli, Simona; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2002-04-01

    Many attempts have been made to obtain safe and effective analgesia in newborns. Oral glucose-water has been found to have analgesic properties in neonates. We investigated whether other sensory stimulation added to oral glucose provided more effective analgesia than oral glucose alone. In a randomized prospective double-blind trial, we studied 120 term newborns during heel prick. The babies were divided randomly into six groups of 20, and each group was treated with a different procedure during heel prick: A) control; B) 1 mL 33% oral glucose given 2 min before the heel prick; C) sucking; D) 1 mL 33% oral glucose plus sucking; E) multisensory stimulation including 1 mL 33% oral glucose (sensorial saturation); F) multisensory stimulation without oral glucose. Sensorial saturation consisted in massage, voice, eye contact, and perfume smelling during heel prick. Each heel prick was filmed and assigned a point score according to the Douleur Aiguë du Nouveau-né (DAN) neonatal acute pain scale. Camera recording began 30 s before the heel prick, so it was impossible for the scorers to distinguish procedure A (control) from B (glucose given 2 min before), C (sucking water) from D (sucking glucose), and E (multisensory stimulation and glucose) from F (multisensory stimulation and water) from the video. Procedure E (multisensory stimulation and glucose) was found to be the most effective procedure, and the analgesia was even more effective than that produced by procedure D (sucking glucose). We conclude that sensorial saturation is an effective analgesic technique that potentiates the analgesic effect of oral sugar. It can be used for minor painful procedures on newborns.

  17. Comparison of epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia for post-thoracotomy pain control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Yang, Ba-Xian; Wang, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Epidural analgesia is regarded as the gold method for controlling post-thoracotomy pain. Intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia can also produce satisfactory analgesic effects, but is suspected to increase the incidence of chronic pain. However, randomized controlled trials comparing these two methods for post-thoracotomy acute pain analgesic effects and chronic pain incidents have not been conducted previously. We studied 107 adult patients, allocated randomly to thoracic epidural bupivacaine and morphine or intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia. Acute pain scores and opioid-related side effects were evaluated for three postoperative days. Chronic pain information, including the incidence, severity, and allodynia-like pain, was acquired on the first, third, sixth and twelfth months postoperatively. There was no significant difference on numeral rating scales (NRS) at rest or on motion between the two groups during the three postoperative days. The patient satisfaction results were also similar between the groups. The side effects, especially mild pruritus, were reported more often in the epidural group. Both groups showed high incidence of chronic pain (42.1-72.1%), and no significance between the groups. The incidence of allodynia-like pain reported in cryo group was higher than that in Epidural group on any postoperative month, with significance on the sixth and the twelfth months postoperatively (P<0.05). More patients rated their chronic pain intensity on moderate and severe in cryo group and interfered with daily life (P<0.05). Both thoracic epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia showed satisfactory analgesia for post-thoracotomy acute pain. The incidence of post-thoracotomy chronic pain is high. Cryoanalgesia may be a factor that increases the incidence of neuropathic pain. PMID:17870625

  18. [Anesthesia and analgesia in addicts: basis for establishing a standard operating procedure].

    PubMed

    Jage, J; Heid, F

    2006-06-01

    Addicts have an exaggerated organic and psychological comorbidity and in cases of major operations or polytrauma they are classified as high-risk patients. Additional perioperative problems are a higher analgetics requirement, craving, physical and/or psychological withdrawal symptoms, hyperalgesia and tolerance. However, the clinical expression depends on the substance abused. For a better understanding of the necessary perioperative measures, it is helpful to classify the substances into central nervous system depressors (e.g. heroin, alcohol, sedatives, hypnotics), stimulants (e.g. cocaine, amphetamines, designer drugs) and other psychotropic substances (e.g. cannabis, hallucinogens, inhalants). The perioperative therapy should not be a therapy for the addiction, as this is senseless. On the contrary, the characteristics of this chronic disease must be accepted. Anesthesia and analgesia must be generously stress protective and sufficiently analgesically effective. Equally important perioperative treatment principles are stabilization of physical dependence by substitution with methadone (for heroin addicts) or benzodiazepines/clonidine (for alcohol, sedatives and hypnotics addiction), avoidance of stress and craving, thorough intraoperative and postoperative stress relief by using regional techniques or systematically higher than normal dosages of anesthetics and opioids, strict avoidance of inadequate dosage of analgetics, postoperative optimization of regional or systemic analgesia by non-opioids and coanalgetics and consideration of the complex physical and psychological characteristics and comorbidities. Even in cases of abstinence (clean) an inadequate dosage must be avoided as this, and not an adequate pain therapy sometimes even with strong opioids, can potentially activate addiction. A protracted abstinence syndrome after withdrawal of opioids can lead to increased response to administered opioids (e.g. analgesia, side-effects). PMID:16775729

  19. Role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in an experimental model of epilepsy-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2004-10-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The neurotransmission in the postictal period has been the focus of many studies, and there is evidence suggesting antinociceptive mechanisms following tonic-clonic seizures in both animals and men. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of acetylcholine in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). Analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in eight albino Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increases in tail-flick latencies (TFLs) at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of atropine (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated by peripheral administration of mecamylamine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor blocker, at the same doses (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) used for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. The recruitment of the muscarinic receptor was made 10 min postconvulsions and in subsequent periods of postictal analgesia, whereas the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor was implicated only after 30 min postseizures. The cholinergic antagonists caused a minimal reduction in body temperature, but did not impair baseline TFL, spontaneous exploration or motor coordination in the rotarod test at the maximal dose of 4 mg/kg. These results indicate that acetylcholine may be involved as a neurotransmitter in postictal analgesia.

  20. Functional brain interactions that serve cognitive-affective processing during pain and placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Craggs, Jason G; Price, Donald D; Verne, G Nicholas; Perlstein, William M; Robinson, Michael M

    2007-12-01

    Pain requires the integration of sensory, cognitive, and affective information. The use of placebo is a common methodological ploy in many fields, including pain. Neuroimaging studies of pain and placebo analgesia (PA) have yet to identify a mechanism of action. Because PA must result from higher order processes, it is likely influenced by cognitive and affective dimensions of the pain experience. A network of brain regions involved in these processes includes the anterior and posterior insula (A-Ins, P-Ins), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (DACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and the supplementary motor area (SMA). We used connectivity analyses to investigate the underlying mechanisms associated with Placebo analgesia in a group of chronic pain patients. Structural equation models (SEM) of fMRI data evaluated the inter-regional connectivity of these regions across three conditions: (1) initial Baseline (B1), (2) placebo (PA), and (3) Placebo Match (PM). SEM results of B1 data in the left hemisphere confirmed hypothesized regional relationships. However, inter-regional relationships were dynamic and the network models varied across hemispheres and conditions. Deviations from the B1 model in the PA and PM conditions correspond to our manipulation of expectation for pain. The dynamic changes in inter-regional influence across conditions are interpreted in the context of a self-reinforcing feedback loop involved in the induction and maintenance of PA. Although it is likely that placebo analgesia results partly from afferent inhibition of a nociceptive signal, the mechanisms likely involve the interaction of a cognitive-affective network with input from both hemispheres. PMID:17904390

  1. Oral self-administration of buprenorphine in the diet for analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Molina-Cimadevila, M J; Segura, S; Merino, C; Ruiz-Reig, N; Andrés, B; de Madaria, E

    2014-04-23

    Postsurgical oral self-administration of analgesics in rodents is an interesting technique of providing analgesia, avoiding the negative effects of manipulation. Several strategies, using gelatin or nutella, have already been described. However, rodents require some habituation period to reach a good intake because of their neophobic behavior. The current study aimed to explore whether buprenorphine when mixed with an extruded diet offers a potential treatment option in the pain management of mice using a triple approach: by measuring the spontaneous intake in healthy animals; by using the hot-plate test; and finally by assessing the drug's ability to provide postoperative analgesia in a surgical intervention of moderate severity (intra-utero electroporation). Mice consumed during 20 hours, similar amounts of extruded diet alone, mixed with glucosaline, and mixed with buprenorphine (0.03 mg per pellet) or meloxicam (0.25 mg per pellet) both of which were diluted in glucosaline, showing that no neophobia was associated with these administrations. Relative increase from baseline latency (% maximal possible effect) in the hot-plate test at 20 h of administration was significantly higher for oral buprenorphine in diet 0.03 mg/pellet, and diet 0.15 mg/pellet, compared with placebo and no differences were found between those oral administrations and subcutaneous buprenorphine 0.1 mg/kg measured 3 h later. The treatment was also effective in attenuating the reductions in food consumption and body weight that occur after surgery. These data suggest that providing buprenorphine with the diet is a feasible and effective way of self-administration of analgesia in mice and does not cause neophobia and may easily contribute to the refinement of surgical procedures. PMID:24759572

  2. Effects of sweetening agents on morphine-induced analgesia in mice by formalin test.

    PubMed

    Nikfar, S; Abdollahi, M; Etemad, F; Sharifzadeh, M

    1997-10-01

    1. There is evidence that sweet-tasting substances such as sucrose and saccharin can interact with endogenous opioid systems. Further evidence showed that feeding mice different concentrations of sucrose and saccharin alter the latency in the tail-flick test. 2. In the current study, the effects of a 12-day regimen of different sweetening agents [sucrose (32%), saccharin (0.08%) and aspartame (0.16%)] on morphine-induced analgesia with the formalin test were investigated. 3. Male albino mice (20-27 g) were used for the experiments. Animals were given 12 days to adapt to dietary conditions. Animals were first given saline or morphine subcutaneously (1.5, 3.0, 6.0, or 9.0 mg/kg) 30 min before the observation period. The recording of the early phase started immediately and lasted for 10 min. The recording of the late response started 20 min after formalin injection and lasted for 10 min. Statistical analysis was performed by using analysis of variance followed by Newman-Keuls test, and P < or = 0.05 was considered significant. 4. Sucrose and aspartame increased morphine analgesia in the early phase, but saccharin had no effect on the early phase. On the other hand, saccharin and sucrose decreased the effect of morphine in the late phase, but aspartame increased the effect of morphine-induced analgesia. 5. In conclusion, the present data provide further evidence for an important role for dietary variables in determining the effects of exogenous opioids on pain sensitivity.

  3. [New opioids for general anaesthesia and in- and out-hospital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dabrowska-Wójciak, Iwona; Piotrowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, three new opioids of the piperidine family have been introduced to anaesthesia clinical practice: sufentanil, alfentanil and remifentanil. Alfentanil is a derivative of fentanyl, with quicker onset than that of fentanyl and with shorter duration and more intense vagomimetic properties than those of fentanyl and sufentanil. It may cause less intense respiratory depression than equianalgesic doses of fentanyl. Clinical trials indicate that alfentanil can be used effectively as an analgesic, as an analgesic supplement to anaesthesia, and as the major component of a general anaesthetic. Its short duration of effect makes it attractive as an analgesic supplement for short ambulatory surgical procedures. Sufentanil is a more potent and more lipophilic analgesic than fentanyl. It would appear to maintain haemodynamic stability during surgery better than other opioids. Epidural sufentanil produces a rapid onset and good quality of analgesia. In addition, low doses administered intravenously via a PCA pump seem to have a potential role for analgesia during labour. Remifentanil is an opioid analgesic that is rapidly metabolized by non-specific blood and tissue esterases. According to its unique pharmacokinetic profile, remifentanil-based anaesthesia combines high-dosage opioid analgesia intraoperatively with a rapid and predictable postoperative awakening, even after long procedures. Its vagomimetic properties are especially pronounced in small children, the elderly and hypovolaemic patients, and in these groups atropine should be always given before remifentanil administration. Remifentanil also minimises the adrenergic response to endotracheal intubation. Three mju agonist-antagonists have been used for pain treatment: nalbuphine, butorphanol and buprenorphine. They can be used in ambulatory settings. Nalbuphine can be used parenterally. It reverses morphine-induced respiratory depression while maintaining adequate analgesic effect. Buprenorphine

  4. [Acute analgesia: implementation of a dedicated protocol in an emergency department].

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Majd; Villar, Adolfo; Luthy, Christophe; Sarasin, François

    2014-06-25

    Acute pain relief is an ongoing challenge for both nurses and emergency physicians. Its management remains suboptimal or delayed, despite the existence of valid recommendations. The complexity of the emergency department and the diversity of encountered situations justify a tailored approach, taking into account the patient's clinical characteristics and needs. Such an approach must, under safety conditions assign sufficient autonomy to care providers in order to achieve pain relief. The benefits of an optimal analgesia are numerous. They include a greater patient satisfaction, a reduced length of stay, and a rapid return to mobility. This article highlights the key elements of acute pain management in the emergency department of the Geneva University Hospitals.

  5. Comparative evaluation of different doses of intrathecal neostigmine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vandana; Mohindra, B. K.; Sodhi, Gurdip Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy and safety of intrathecal neostigmine at dose of 50 μg and 150 μg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: 75 patients of either sex, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II in the age group of 30-65 years scheduled to undergo lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries were allocated randomly into 3 groups of 25 each. Spinal anesthesia was administered in Group I (control group) with 12.5 mg (2.5 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, in Group II (50 μg group) with 12.5 mg (2.5 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 50 μg (0.1 ml) of neostigmine methylsulphate and in Group III (150 μg group) with 12.5 mg (2.5 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 150 μg (0.3 ml) of neostigmine methylsulphate. Hemodynamic parameters, onset and level of sensory block were recorded. Postoperative analgesic assessment was made in terms of total Visual Analogue Scale-Pain (VAS-P) scores in 24 hrs, duration of analgesia (time to requirement of first analgesic) and total number of rescue analgesic (diclofenac sodium 75 mg intramuscularly) consumption in 24 hours. Side effects were recorded. Results: The total VAS-P score in group I was 23.12 ± 3.21, which was higher than the VAS-P score in group II (18.4 ± 2.92) and group III (16.24 ± 1.85). The total duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in neostigmine groups (224.40 ± 23.28 min in group I, 367.60 ± 42.15 min in group II and 625.60 ± 87.70 min in group III). In group I, the patients required 2.48 ± 0.51 number of analgesics in 24 hours, which was much higher than required in group II (1.92 ± 0.64) and group III (1.32 ± 0.47). The incidence of nausea and vomiting was more with 150 μg neostigmine group compared to 50 μg neostigmine. Conclusions: The administration of intrathecal neostigmine in dose of 50 μg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine produces hemodynamically stable

  6. [Analgesia in labor with continuous--drip venous perfusion of ketamine].

    PubMed

    Bertoletti, P L; Ciucci, N

    1981-04-01

    A personal opinion on the way analgesia should be piloted in labour is expressed and reference is made to personal results with continuous venous drip perfusion of ketamin with a SIC P77 infusional pump in 110 cases. The data from the series are described and particular attention is given to the behaviour of the drug with respect to uterine dynamics and the incidence of instrumental intervention. Stress is laid on the considerable benefits offered by the method, including reduction of the labour period and good maternal and foetal tolerance.

  7. Review article: Intrapartum neuraxial analgesia and breastfeeding outcomes: limitations of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Ashley L

    2013-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the relationship between intrapartum neuraxial analgesia, particularly epidural fentanyl, and breastfeeding, substantial study design limitations have precluded the current literature from furnishing strong, clinically significant conclusions. Lack of randomized controlled trials, nonstandardization of breastfeeding evaluations across studies, and failure to control for confounding variables all pose significant problems. Further research is needed to elucidate the specific relationship between neuraxial opioids and breastfeeding and, if there are significant associations, whether these drugs act directly on neonatal brain tissue to attenuate exhibition of breastfeeding behaviors. In this review, I will detail the deficiencies of the current literature and make recommendations for future research. PMID:23302971

  8. Xylazine, ketamine and their combination for lumbar epidural analgesia in water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Pratap, K; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Singh, G R; Pathak, R

    2006-10-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of xylazine individually (0.05 mg/kg), ketamine individually (2.5 mg/kg), and a combination of xylazine and ketamine (0.05 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg) after lumbar epidural administration in water buffalo calves. Fifteen non-descript, male water buffalo calves of 6-8 months of age weighing between 55 and 75 kg were randomly placed in three groups (groups A, B and C). The agents were administered at the first lumbar epidural space. Clinico-physiological parameters, such as analgesia, ataxia, sedation, salivation, heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were studied. Other haematological and biochemical parameters monitored were haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total leukocyte count, plasma glucose, cortisol, protein albumin, globulin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alanineamino transferase (ALT), sodium, potassium and chloride. The onset of analgesia (mean +/- SEM) was faster in group C (3.2 +/- 0.20 min) compared with that of group B (4.6 +/- 0.22 min) and group A (34.0 +/- 1.86 min). Analgesia of the thorax, flank, inguinal region, hind limbs, perineum and tail was complete in group C, but mild to moderate in groups A and B. Ataxia was severe in group C and mild in groups A and B. Mild to deep sedation was produced by groups A and C animals. Group B animals failed to produce sedation. Longer duration and greater depth of analgesia was produced in animals of group C. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature decreased in groups A and C. The haematological parameters decreased in all the groups. The biochemical parameters like glucose, cortisol, BUN, creatinine, and ALT increased in all the animals. However, total proteins and albumin decreased in the three groups. The plasma electrolytes sodium, potassium and chloride did not show any significant change. The results of this study indicated a possible synergistic analgesic interaction between epidurally administered xylazine and ketamine, without

  9. Comparison between caudal bupivacaine and bupivacaine with ketamine for postoperative analgesia in children: A prospective randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Depinder; Anand, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy of caudal bupivacaine plus ketamine on postoperative pain in children. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of caudal block with mixture of bupivacaine and ketamine to bupivacaine alone for postoperative analgesia in pediatric patients undergoing infraumbilical surgery. Settings and Design: A prospective randomized study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Statistical Analysis: Data were collected; mean value and standard deviation were computed for age, weight, duration of surgery, and duration of analgesia. Then, the mean values of the two groups were compared using ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II pediatric patients of either sex, aged 1–10 years, undergoing herniotomy, orchidopexy, and urethroplasty were randomly allocated to receive one of the two analgesic regimens. Group A (30 patients) received caudal bupivacaine 0.25% in a dose of 1 ml/kg, and Group B received caudal block with 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg and preservative-free ketamine 0.5 mg/kg; duration of analgesia was recorded by objective pain scale to equate pain and discomfort in young children with changes in standardized behavioral and physiological parameters. Results: Mean duration of analgesia in Group A was 5.63 ± 0.98 h while the mean duration of analgesia in Group B was 10.18 ± 2.24 h with P < 0.001. There were no differences between groups in the incidence of motor block and side effects. Conclusion: On the basis of results derived from this study, it is concluded that addition of ketamine 0.5 mg/kg to caudal bupivacaine 0.25% in a dose of 1 ml/kg significantly prolonged the postoperative analgesia compared with administration of caudal bupivacaine 0.25% in a dose of 1 ml/kg alone. PMID:27746538

  10. Efficacy of epidural analgesia for pain management of critically ill patients and the implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1991-11-01

    Management of pain for critically ill patients has been shown to be inadequately controlled and can have serious deleterious effects on a patient's recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia can be used to control pain in critical care patients. This mode of analgesia administration provides pain relief without the delays inherent in the as-needed administration of analgesics. Fifteen critical care unit patients were part of a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 43 thoracic and 66 abdominal surgery patients. The purpose of the study was to identify the benefits and problems associated with continuous epidural analgesia administration and the implications for the nursing care of critically ill patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: 1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; 2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill pain questionnaire; 3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; 4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; 5) occurrence of adverse effects, and 6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used as-needed systemic administration of narcotics. Although some nursing care problems were identified, continuous epidural analgesia can be used for pain relief in critical care patients, if the analgesia is administered by accurate reliable infusion systems and carefully monitored by nursing staff who are knowledgeable about the pharmacologic considerations of epidural analgesic agents and the management of patient care. PMID:1954060

  11. Simplifying prehospital analgesia. Why certain medications should or should not be used for pain management in the field.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Bryan; Braude, Darren; Dailey, Michael W; Myers, Jeff; Richards, Mike; Wesley, Keith

    2005-07-01

    Prehospital analgesia can be safely provided with only three agents: fentanyl, morphine and the mixed-gas nitrous oxide/oxygen. Of these three, fentanyl is by far the best agent for general EMS analgesic therapy by paramedics. However, to initiate prehospital analgesia earlier in the EMS response time frame, EMT's should administer nitrous oxide/oxygen. This protocol can easily be added to the EMT education program or through a continuing education session. All of the other agents discussed have absolutely no role in modern prehospital care. PMID:16027666

  12. A prospective, randomized comparison of interpleural and paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Sabanathan, S; Mearns, A J; Shah, R D; Goulden, C

    1995-10-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized comparison of the superficially similar techniques of interpleural and paravertebral (extrapleural) analgesia in 53 patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. Local anaesthetic placed anterior to the superior costotransverse ligament and posterior to the parietal pleura produces a paravertebral block and instilled between the parietal and visceral pleurae produces an interpleural block. Patients received preoperative and postoperative continuous bupivacaine paravertebral blocks in group 1 and interpleural blocks in group 2. Premedication comprised diclofenac and morphine, and after operation all patients had regular diclofenac and patient-controlled morphine (PCM). Analgesia was assessed by visual analogue pain scores (VAS), PCM requirements, ratio of preoperative to postoperative spirometric values (PFT), rates of postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM) and hospital stay, all recorded by blinded observers. Eight patients were withdrawn and data from 45 patients were analysed. Patient characteristics, surgery, VAS scores and PCM use were similar in both groups. PFT were significantly better (P = 0.03-0.0001) in group 1, and PORM was lower and hospital stay approximately 1 day less in this group. Five patients in group 2 became temporarily confused, probably because of bupivacaine toxicity (P = 0.02). We conclude that bupivacaine deposited paravertebrally produced greater preservation of lung function and fewer side effects than bupivacaine administered interpleurally. PMID:7488477

  13. Factors influencing the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia: an observational multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Piotr; Andersen, Hege; Nordbø, Arve; Kongsgaard, Ulf E

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia (EDA) is used widely for postoperative pain treatment. However, studies have reported a failure rate of EDA of up to 30%. We aimed to evaluate the quality of postoperative EDA in patients undergoing a laparotomy in five Norwegian hospitals. Methods This was a multicenter observational study in patients undergoing a laparotomy with epidural-based postoperative analgesia. Data were registered at three time points. Technical aspects, infusion rates, pain intensity, assessment procedures, side effects, and satisfaction of patients and health personnel were recorded. The use of other pain medications and coanalgesics was registered. Results Three hundred and seventeen patients were included. Pain control at rest was satisfactory in 89% of patients at 24 hours and in 91% at 48 hours. Pain control when coughing was satisfactory in 62% at 24 hours and in 59% at 48 hours. The spread of hypoesthesia was consistent for each individual patient but varied between patients. The hypoesthetic area was not associated with pain intensity, and the precision of the EDA insertion point was not associated with the pain score. Few side effects were reported. EDA was regarded as effective and functioning well by 64% of health personnel. Conclusion EDA was an effective method for postoperative pain relief at rest but did not give sufficient pain relief during mobilization. The use of cold stimulation to assess the spread of EDA had limited value as a clinical indicator of the efficacy of postoperative pain control. Validated tools for the control of EDA quality are needed. PMID:25206312

  14. Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for analgesia during biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Genz, A; Fache, J S; Ong, M; Coldman, A J; Burhenne, H J

    1991-10-01

    The effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in controlling pain during biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (BESWL) was assessed in 100 patients with symptomatic gallbladder calculi. Patients were divided into four groups: TENS electrodes were placed on the back at cutaneous anesthesia sites and on the right leg and the gallbladder acupuncture site in groups A and B. Electrodes were "turned on" only in group A. In groups C and D, electrodes were placed only on the back at cutaneous dermatomes. Electrodes were "turned on" in group C only. The TENS unit was stimulated at the pulse rate of 60 to 100 microseconds and frequency of 80 to 125 Hz. Lithotripsy was performed with the Lithostar Plus overhead module. The differences in the amount of analgesic used and the pain experiences by the patients in all groups were not statistically significant. The proportion of patients requiring intravenous analgesia in each group was also not significantly different (72%, 80%, 68%, 76% in groups A to D, respectively). Thus, TENS did not help in reducing the amount of intravenous analgesia required or the average pain perceived by the patient during lithotripsy treatment.

  15. Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the neonate: a review of current evidences.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2014-10-01

    The role of single shot spinal anesthesia has been established in ex-premature infants at risk of apnea. However, use of epidural anesthesia in neonates is on the rise. In this systematic analysis, we have reviewed the current evidence on the safety and efficacy of the use of single shot and continuous epidural anesthesia/analgesia in neonates. Current clinical practice is guided by evidence based mostly on non-randomized studies, prospective/retrospective case series and surveys. Single shot caudal blockade as a sole technique has been used in neonates mainly for inguinal hernia repair and circumcision. Use of continuous epidural anesthesia through the caudal route or caudo-thoracic advancement of the catheter for major thoracic and abdominal surgery offers good perioperative analgesia. Other observed benefits are early extubation, attenuation of stress response, early return of bowel function and reduction of general anesthesia-related postoperative complications. However, risk of procedure-related and drug-related complications to the developing neural structure remains a serious concern.

  16. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeffrey; Ayad, Sabry; Gonzales, Jeffrey J; Mehta, Jaideep; Boublik, Jan; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by administration of a local anesthetic in close proximity, TAP infiltration involves administration and spread of local anesthetic within an anatomical plane of the surgical site. PMID:26677342

  17. The cognitive modulation of pain: hypnosis- and placebo-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Kupers, Ron; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth; Laureys, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, there is compelling evidence that there is a poor relationship between the incoming sensory input and the resulting pain sensation. Signals coming from the peripheral nervous system undergo a complex modulation by cognitive, affective, and motivational processes when they enter the central nervous system. Placebo- and hypnosis-induced analgesia form two extreme examples of how cognitive processes may influence the pain sensation. With the advent of modern brain imaging techniques, researchers have started to disentangle the brain mechanisms involved in these forms of cognitive modulation of pain. These studies have shown that the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices form important structures in a descending pathway that modulates incoming sensory input, likely via activation of the endogenous pain modulatory structures in the midbrain periaqueductal gray. Although little is known about the receptor systems involved in hypnosis-induced analgesia, studies of the placebo response suggest that the opiodergic and dopaminergic systems play an important role in the mediation of the placebo response. PMID:16186029

  18. Effects of stress and. beta. -funal trexamine pretreatment on morphine analgesia and opioid binding in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.U.; Andrews, J.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Holtzman, S.G.

    1987-12-28

    This study was essentially an in vivo protection experiment designed to test further the hypothesis that stress induces release of endogenous opiods which then act at opioid receptors. Rats that were either subjected to restraint stress for 1 yr or unstressed were injected ICV with either saline or 2.5 ..mu..g of ..beta..-funaltrexamine (..beta..-FNA), an irreversible opioid antagonist that alkylates the mu-opioid receptor. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested unstressed for morphine analgesia or were sacrificed and opioid binding in brain was determined. (/sup 3/H)D-Ala/sup 2/NMePhe/sup 4/-Gly/sup 5/(ol)enkephalin (DAGO) served as a specific ligand for mu-opioid receptors, and (/sup 3/H)-bremazocine as a general ligand for all opioid receptors. Rats injected with saline while stressed were significantly less sensitive to the analgesic action of morphine 24 hr later than were their unstressed counterparts. ..beta..-FNA pretreatment attenuated morphine analgesia in an insurmountable manner. Animals pretreated with ..beta..-FNA while stressed were significantly more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine than were animals that received ..beta..-FNA while unstressed. ..beta..-FNA caused small and similar decreases in (/sup 3/H)-DAGO binding in brain of both stressed and unstressed animals. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Opioid neurotransmission in the post-ictal analgesia: involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Freitas, R L; Savoldi, M; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Kishi, R; Weltson, A; Resende, G C

    2001-06-01

    Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux, was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significative increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), for at least 120 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naltrexone (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated with peripheral administration of naloxonazine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), a mu(1)-opioid blocker, in the same doses used for non-specific antagonist. These results indicate that endogenous opioids may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia. The involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor was also considered.

  20. A prospective study of parents' compliance with their child's prescribed analgesia following tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Paul; Amin, Mohamed; Colreavy, Michael P

    2013-03-01

    We conducted a prospective study to assess how well parents ensured that their children received their prescribed analgesia following tonsillectomy. Our study was based on 69 cases of tonsillectomy that were carried out at our tertiary pediatric care center. Postoperatively, all patients were prescribed paracetamol (acetaminophen) on the basis of their weight; the standard pediatric dosage of this agent at the time of our study was 60 mg/kg/day. The parents were telephoned 2 weeks postoperatively to assess their compliance with this regimen. Of the original 69 patients who had been recruited, 66 completed the study-35 girls and 31 boys, aged 2 to 15 years (mean: 7.0; median 5.5). According to the parents, only 15 children (22.7%) received our recommended 60-mg/kg/day dosage and were thus determined to be fully compliant. Overall, parents reported a wide variation in the amount of drug administered, ranging from 12.5 to 111.0 mg/kg/day (mean: 44.8), indicating that parents often underdose their children. We recommend that more emphasis be placed on weight-directed, parent-provided analgesia during the post-tonsillectomy period. PMID:23532650

  1. No tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia in presence of opioid expression in inflamed synovia.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, C; Pflüger, M; Yassouridis, A; Hoelzl, J; Lehrberger, K; Welte, C; Hassan, A H

    1996-01-01

    Pain treatment with centrally acting opiates is limited by tolerance. Tolerance is a decreasing effect of a drug with prolonged administration of that drug or of a related (e.g., endogenous) compound acting at the same receptor. This is often associated with a downregulation of receptors. In peripheral inflamed tissue, both locally expressed opioid peptides and morphine can produce powerful analgesia mediated by similar populations of opioid receptors. We hypothesized that the chronic presence of endogenous opioids in inflamed joints might convey downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors and tolerance to the analgesic effects of intraarticular morphine. We assessed these effects after arthroscopic surgery in patients with and without histologically verified synovial cellular infiltration, and we examined synovial opioid peptides and opioid receptors by immunocytochemistry and autoradiography, respectively. We found that, despite an abundance of opioid-containing cells in pronounced synovitis, morphine is at least as effective as in patients without such cellular infiltrations, and there is no major downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors. Thus, opioids expressed in inflamed tissue do not produce tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia. Tolerance may be less pronounced for peripherally than for centrally acting opioids, which provides a promising perspective for the treatment of chronic pain in arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:8698872

  2. Coagulation status using thromboelastography in patients receiving warfarin prophylaxis and epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hepner, David L; Concepcion, Mercedes; Bhavani-Shankar, Kodali

    2002-09-01

    To determine the coagulation status of patients receiving postoperative warfarin and epidural analgesia using thromboelastography (TEG(R)).Prospective, observational, clinical study.Orthopedic postoperative division at a university hospital.52 ASA physical status II and III patients undergoing knee arthroplasty and receiving prophylactic warfarin and epidural analgesia.Patients' preoperative and postoperative coagulation status was determined by TEG(R). Daily TEG(R) parameters were obtained until the epidural catheter was removed. TEG(R) parameters include reaction time (R-time or time until the first significant levels of detectable clot formation), K-time (clot firmness), maximum amplitude (MA-clot strength), alpha angle (clot development), and coagulation index (overall coagulation). In addition, daily international normalized ratios (INRs) were obtained as per our routine practice. On the day of catheter removal reaction time was significantly increased compared with preoperative values (p < 0.0001), but it remained within normal ranges. There was no change in the coagulation index. However, INR was abnormal and significantly increased (INR = 1.48+/-0.3; p < 0.0001), compared with preoperative values, on the day when the epidural catheter was removed. When the epidural catheters are removed, overall coagulation status, as measured by TEG(R), and despite an elevated INR (mean INR <1.5), remained within normal limits in patients receiving low-dose warfarin prophylaxis.

  3. Pain perception and EEG dynamics: does hypnotizability account for the efficacy of the suggestions of analgesia?

    PubMed

    Madeo, Dario; Castellani, Eleonora; Mocenni, Chiara; Santarcangelo, Enrica Laura

    2015-06-01

    We report novel findings concerning the role of hypnotizability, suggestions of analgesia and the activity of the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation System (BIS/BAS) in the modulation of the subjective experience of pain and of the associated EEG dynamics. The EEG of high (highs) and low hypnotizable participants (lows) who completed the BIS/BAS questionnaire was recorded during basal conditions, tonic nociceptive stimulation without (PAIN) and with suggestions for analgesia (AN). Participants scored the perceived pain intensity at the end of PAIN and AN. The EEG midline dynamics was characterized by indices indicating the signal predictability (Determinism) and complexity (Entropy) obtained through the Recurrence Quantification Analysis. The reduced pain intensity reported by highs during AN was partially accounted for by the activity of the Behavioral Activation System. The decreased midline cortical Determinism observed during nociceptive stimulation in both groups independently of suggestions remained significantly reduced only in lows after controlling for the activity of the Behavioral Activation System. Finally, controlling for the activity of the Behavioral Inhibition System abolished stimulation, suggestions and hypnotizability-related differences. Results indicate that the BIS/BAS activity may be more important than hypnotizability itself in pain modulation and in the associated EEG dynamics. PMID:25837836

  4. Evaluation of a Sustained-Release Formulation of Buprenorphine for Analgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Patricia L; Liang, Haixiang; Crichlow, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Preventing and minimizing pain in laboratory animals is a basic tenet of biomedical research and is warranted for ethical, legal, and scientific reasons. Postoperative analgesia is an important facet of pain management. A sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine was tested in rats for analgesic efficacy and plasma concentration over a 72-h time period. Rats were injected subcutaneously with either 1.2 mg/kg sustained-release formulation (Bup-SR), 0.2 mL/kg buprenorphine HCl (Bup-HCl), or an equivalent volume of sustained-release vehicle and tested in a thermal nociception model or a surgical postoperative pain model. In both models, Bup-SR showed evidence of providing analgesia for 2 to 3 d. Thermal latency response in rats that received the sustained-release formulation increased 28.4% and 15.6% compared with baseline values on days 1 and 2, respectively. Rats with a unicortical tibial defect and treated with Bup-SR showed similar willingness to bear weight on the hindlimbs as did negative-control animals (no surgery), demonstrated by counting vertical raises; rats treated with Bup-HCl had significantly fewer vertical raises than did control rats for 5 d after surgery. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine remained over 1 ng/mL for 72 h after a single dose of Bup-SR. Taken together, the results indicate that this formulation of buprenorphine may be a viable option for treating postsurgical pain in laboratory rats. PMID:21439213

  5. Activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling attenuates morphine analgesia: involvement of Gi protein.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dawei; Bu, Huilian; Guo, Genhua; Shu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Guan, Xuehai; Yang, Hui; Tian, Xuebi; Xiang, Hongbing; Gao, Feng

    2014-08-01

    Morphine is a potent agonist of μ-opioid receptor and is widely used to relieve severe pain, including cancer pain. Some chemokines, for example, CX3CL1 and CCL2, participate in the regulation of opioid santinociception. In our previous study, we found overexpression of chemokine CXCL10/CXCR3 in spinal cord participated in the development of cancer-induced bone pain, so we supposed that CXCL10 may have influence in morphine analgesia in cancer pain relief. In this study, we found that a single dose of morphine could transiently increase the expression of CXCL10 in spinal cord. Blocking the function of CXCL10 enhanced morphine antinociception in cancer-induced bone pain rats. However, overexpression of CXCL10 induced acute algesia and decreased the analgesic effect of morphine in normal mice. The algesic effect of CXCL10 was blocked by inhibition of CXCR3 and Gi protein. These results suggested that CXCL10 in spinal cord serves as a novel negative regulator of morphine analgesia and provided evidence that activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 in spinal cord may attenuate antinociceptive potency of morphine in cancer pain relief.

  6. Attitudes of Swiss veterinarians towards pain and analgesia in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Perret-Gentil, F; Doherr, M G; Spadavecchia, C; Levionnois, O L

    2014-03-01

    A survey was performed to evaluate the use of perioperative analgesia in dogs and cats by veterinary practitioners. Questions were grouped in seven sections recording personal data, education in veterinary analgesia, general ideology regarding treatment of perioperative pain, personal experience, assessment, and use of main analgesics to treat perioperative pain. A total of 258 received forms were analyzed. Based on 5 questions, 88 % showed excellent motivation to use perioperative pain therapy. The main reason declared for the use of analgesics was to relieve the patient from pain (64.1 %). Most veterinarians reported to routinely administer analgesics before (71 - 96 %) or after (2 - 23 %) surgery. The most used analgesics were non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (carprofen, meloxicam) and opioids (butorphanol, buprenorphine). Animals were routinely evaluated for pain after recovery. Only 43.8 % of veterinarians declared to use loco-regional anaesthesia. Swiss veterinarians appear to recognize well the need for perioperative pain treatment. However, weakness was shown in evaluating pain severity, distinguishing between opioid classes, and using loco-regional anaesthesia. PMID:24568804

  7. Attitudes of Swiss veterinarians towards pain and analgesia in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Perret-Gentil, F; Doherr, M G; Spadavecchia, C; Levionnois, O L

    2014-03-01

    A survey was performed to evaluate the use of perioperative analgesia in dogs and cats by veterinary practitioners. Questions were grouped in seven sections recording personal data, education in veterinary analgesia, general ideology regarding treatment of perioperative pain, personal experience, assessment, and use of main analgesics to treat perioperative pain. A total of 258 received forms were analyzed. Based on 5 questions, 88 % showed excellent motivation to use perioperative pain therapy. The main reason declared for the use of analgesics was to relieve the patient from pain (64.1 %). Most veterinarians reported to routinely administer analgesics before (71 - 96 %) or after (2 - 23 %) surgery. The most used analgesics were non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (carprofen, meloxicam) and opioids (butorphanol, buprenorphine). Animals were routinely evaluated for pain after recovery. Only 43.8 % of veterinarians declared to use loco-regional anaesthesia. Swiss veterinarians appear to recognize well the need for perioperative pain treatment. However, weakness was shown in evaluating pain severity, distinguishing between opioid classes, and using loco-regional anaesthesia.

  8. Syrup formulations for post-tonsillectomy analgesia: a double-blind study comparing ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo.

    PubMed

    Parker, D A; Gibbin, K P; Noyelle, R M

    1986-09-01

    Post-tonsillectomy analgesia from ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo is compared in a double-blind study. The results are reported showing ibuprofen to have greater therapeutic benefit than placebo whereas aspirin did not. Methods of providing pain relief after tonsillectomy and the relative clinical merits of ibuprofen and aspirin are discussed. PMID:3531373

  9. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  10. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Maitreyi Gajanan; Sardesai, Shalini Pravin; Ghodki, Poonam Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a fascial plane block providing post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing surgery with infra-umbilical incisions. We evaluated analgesic efficacy of TAP block with ropivacaine for 24 h after caesarean section through a Pfannenstiel incision. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were randomised to undergo TAP block with ropivacaine (n = 30) versus control group (n = 30) with normal saline, in addition to standard analgesia with intravenous paracetamol and tramadol. At the end of the surgery, ultrasound-guided TAP plane block was given bilaterally using ropivacaine or normal saline (15 ml on either side). Each patient was assessed post-operatively by a blinded investigator at regular intervals up to 24 h for visual analogue score (VAS) and requirement of analgesia. SPSS version 18.0 software was used. Demographic data were analysed using Student's t-test and the other parameters using paired t-test. Results: TAP block with ropivacaine compared with normal saline reduced post-operative VAS at 24 h (P = 0.004918). Time for rescue analgesia in the study group was prolonged from 4.1 to 9.53 h (P = 0.01631). Mean requirement of tramadol in the first 24 h was reduced in the study group. Conclusion: US guided TAP block after caesarean section reduces the analgesic requirement in the first 24 h. PMID:27141108

  11. Combined morphine-bupivacaine caudals for reconstructive penile surgery in children: systemic absorption of morphine and postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D; Hobbs, A J; Prys-Roberts, C

    1991-02-01

    We wished to determine if the addition of a small dose of morphine (0.05 mg.kg-1) to a caudal solution of 0.25% bupivacaine could extend the duration of analgesia after major reconstructive penile surgery and also to measure the systemic absorption of morphine after caudal injection. Thirty children undergoing reconstructive penile surgery received a caudal injection of 0.25% bupivacaine 0.75 ml.kg-1 with or without morphine 0.05 mg.kg-1. All patients awoke pain-free, but eight of the fifteen patients receiving bupivacaine alone required supplementary injections of opioid postoperatively, whereas none of the patients receiving the bupivacaine-morphine mixture required additional opioids. The incidence of side-effects was similar for the two groups. Morphine was absorbed rapidly after caudal injection to reach a peak plasma level of 21.2 (+/- 4.8) ng.ml-1 at ten minutes and then fell to 10.1 (+/- 3.8) ng.ml-1 at one hour and 4.1 (+/- 2.6) ng.ml-1 at three hours. These levels are low compared with plasma levels associated with systemic analgesia. We conclude that the extended duration of analgesia from morphine 0.05 mg/kg given caudally is due at least in part to specific spinal analgesia. PMID:2012289

  12. Effects of hypnosis on regional cerebral blood flow during ischemic pain with and without suggested hypnotic analgesia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H J; Gur, R C; Skolnick, B; Gur, R E; Benson, D M

    1993-11-01

    Using 133Xe regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging, two male groups having high and low hypnotic susceptibility were compared in waking and after hypnotic induction, while at rest and while experiencing ischemic pain to both arms under two conditions: attend to pain and suggested analgesia. Differences between low and highly-hypnotizable persons were observed during all hypnosis conditions: only highly-hypnotizable persons showed a significant increase in overall CBF, suggesting that hypnosis requires cognitive effort. As anticipated, ischemic pain produced CBF increases in the somatosensory region. Of major theoretical interest is a highly-significant bilateral CBF activation of the orbito-frontal cortex in the highly-hypnotizable group only during hypnotic analgesia. During hypnotic analgesia, highly-hypnotizable persons showed CBF increase over the somatosensory cortex, while low-hypnotizable persons showed decreases. Research is supportive of a neuropsychophysiological model of hypnosis (Crawford, 1991; Crawford and Gruzelier, 1992) and suggests that hypnotic analgesia involves the supervisory, attentional control system of the far-frontal cortex in a topographically specific inhibitory feedback circuit that cooperates in the regulation of thalamocortical activities. PMID:8166843

  13. Evaluation of Efficacy of Epidural Clonidine with 0.5% Bupivacaine for Postoperative Analgesia for Orthopaedic Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saravanan; Ganesan, Ilango

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of epidural clonidine in intra and postoperative analgesia, the level of sedation caused by clonidine and monitor its side effects. Materials and Methods Forty patients of ASA1 & ASA2 scheduled for lower limb orthopaediac surgeries were chosen for the study. Study group received 50μg of clonidine diluted to 1ml along with first dose of epidural injection and Control group received 1ml of normal saline along with first dose of epidural. Intra and postoperative vitals, verbal pain rating scale (VRS), sedation score and number of rescue anlgesics required postoperatively were noted. Patients received rescue analgesic when VRS was 1. Results Addition of clonidine to bupivacaine definitely improves the quality of analgesia by reducing the overall pain score, prolonging the duration of the time of first rescue analgesia and causing reduction of total analgesic consumption in the postoperative period without any hemodynamic instability. Sedation may be beneficial during the intraoperative period. Conclusion Epidural clonidine produces long lasting, good quality analgesia with good level of sedation and with minimal side effects. PMID:26500983

  14. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local dorsal cutaneous noxious pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epinephrine as additive for propranolol as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we tested the effect of co-administration of epinephrine with propranolol on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Bupivacaine, a long-lasting local anesthetic, was used as control. Subcutaneous propranolol and bupivacaine elicited a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [2.05 (1.95-2.21) μmol/kg]>propranolol [9.21 (9.08-9.42) μmol/kg] (P<0.01 for each comparison). Subcutaneous epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. Mixtures of epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) with drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, intensified and prolonged drug action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of combined drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) exhibited no cutaneous analgesia. We concluded that propranolol was less potent but produced a similar duration of action when compared to bupivacaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine enhanced the potency and extended the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:24973696

  15. A D2-like receptor family agonist produces analgesia in mechanonociception but not in thermonociception at the spinal cord level in rats.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; Coffeen, Ulises; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Contreras, Bernardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Mercado, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The administration of dopaminergic drugs produces analgesia in individuals experiencing different types of pain. Analgesia induced by these drugs at the spinal cord level is mediated by D2-like agonists, which specifically inhibit the detection of nociceptive stimuli by sensory afferents. The extent of the analgesia provided by spinal dopamine agonists remains controversial, and the cellular mechanism of this analgesic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of quinpirole, a D2-like agonist, based on two nociceptive tests and at various doses that were selected to specifically activate dopamine receptors. We found that intrathecal quinpirole administration produces analgesia of mechanical but not thermal nociception and that the analgesic effect of quinpirole is reversed by a mix of D2, D3, and D4 receptor-specific antagonists, suggesting that the activation of all D2-like receptors is involved in the analgesia produced by intrathecal quinpirole. The differential effect on thermal and mechanical nociception was also tested upon the activation of μ-opioid receptors. As reported previously, low doses of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO produced analgesia of only thermonociception. This evidence shows that a D2-like receptor agonist administered at the spinal cord level produces analgesia specific to mechanonociception but not thermonociception.

  16. A D2-like receptor family agonist produces analgesia in mechanonociception but not in thermonociception at the spinal cord level in rats.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; Coffeen, Ulises; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Contreras, Bernardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Mercado, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The administration of dopaminergic drugs produces analgesia in individuals experiencing different types of pain. Analgesia induced by these drugs at the spinal cord level is mediated by D2-like agonists, which specifically inhibit the detection of nociceptive stimuli by sensory afferents. The extent of the analgesia provided by spinal dopamine agonists remains controversial, and the cellular mechanism of this analgesic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of quinpirole, a D2-like agonist, based on two nociceptive tests and at various doses that were selected to specifically activate dopamine receptors. We found that intrathecal quinpirole administration produces analgesia of mechanical but not thermal nociception and that the analgesic effect of quinpirole is reversed by a mix of D2, D3, and D4 receptor-specific antagonists, suggesting that the activation of all D2-like receptors is involved in the analgesia produced by intrathecal quinpirole. The differential effect on thermal and mechanical nociception was also tested upon the activation of μ-opioid receptors. As reported previously, low doses of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO produced analgesia of only thermonociception. This evidence shows that a D2-like receptor agonist administered at the spinal cord level produces analgesia specific to mechanonociception but not thermonociception. PMID:26303304

  17. L-Acetylcarnitine induces analgesia by selectively up-regulating mGlu2 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiechio, S; Caricasole, A; Barletta, E; Storto, M; Catania, M V; Copani, A; Vertechy, M; Nicolai, R; Calvani, M; Melchiorri, D; Nicoletti, F

    2002-05-01

    L-Acetylcarnitine (LAC, 100 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug commonly used for the treatment of painful neuropathies, substantially reduced mechanical allodynia in rats subjected to monolateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve and also attenuated acute thermal pain in intact rats. In both cases, induction of analgesia required repeated injections of LAC, suggesting that the drug induces plastic changes within the nociceptive pathway. In both CCI- and sham-operated rats, a 24-day treatment with LAC increased the expression of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors 2 and 3 in the lumbar segment of the spinal cord, without changing the expression of mGlu1a or -5 receptors. A similar up-regulation of mGlu2/3 receptors was detected in the dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglia of intact rats treated with LAC for 5-7 days, a time sufficient for the induction of thermal analgesia. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LAC treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 immunoreactivity in the inner part of lamina II and in laminae III and IV of the spinal cord. An increased mGlu2/3 receptor expression was also observed in the cerebral cortex but not in the hippocampus or cerebellum of LAC-treated animals. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with Northern blot analysis showed that repeated LAC injections selectively induced mGlu2 mRNA in the dorsal horns and cerebral cortex (but not in the hippocampus). mGlu3 mRNA levels did not change in any brain region of LAC-treated animals. To examine whether the selective up-regulation of mGlu2 receptors had any role in LAC-induced analgesia, we have used the novel compound LY 341495, which is a potent and systemically active mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist. LAC-induced analgesia was largely reduced 45 to 75 min after a single injection of LY 341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in both CCI rats tested for mechanical allodynia and intact rats tested for thermal pain. We conclude that LAC produces analgesia against chronic pain produced not

  18. Addition of transversus abdominis plane block to patient controlled analgesia for laparoscopic high anterior resection improves analgesia, reduces opioid requirement and expedites recovery of bowel function

    PubMed Central

    Ris, F; Findlay, JM; Hompes, R; Rashid, A; Warwick, J; Cunningham, C; Jones, O; Crabtree, N

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Opioid sparing in postoperative pain management appears key in colorectal enhanced recovery. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks offer such an effect. This study aimed to quantify this effect on pain, opioid use and recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic high anterior resection. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data on 68 patients. Patients received an epidural (n=24), intravenous morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA, n=22) or TAP blocks plus PCA (n=22) determined by anaesthetist preference. Outcome measures were numerical pain scores (0–3), cumulative intravenous morphine dose and time to recovery of bowel function (passage of flatus or stool). Results There were no differences in patient characteristics, complications or extraction site. The TAP block group had lower pain scores (0.7 vs 1.36, p<0.001) and morphine requirements (8mg vs 15mg, p=0.01) than the group receiving PCA alone at 12 hours and 24 hours. Earlier passage of flatus (2.0 vs 2.7 vs 3.4 days, p=0.002), stool (3.1 vs 4.1 vs 5.5 days, p=0.04) and earlier discharge (4 vs 5 vs 6 days, p=0.02) were also seen. Conclusions Use of TAP blocks was found to reduce pain and morphine use compared with PCA, expedite recovery of bowel function compared with PCA and epidural, and expedite hospital discharge compared with epidural. PMID:25350178

  19. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I² index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I² 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%).

  20. Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml), an μ-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P = 0.0440; IGFBP-1, P = 0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1β, P = 0.0218; TNF-α, P = 0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and

  1. [Congenital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Accornero, N; Bini, G; Cruccu, G

    1980-01-01

    The case of a 12 years old boy with a congenital anaesthesia covering all cutaneous and visceral districts is reported. There were no other neurological abnormalities apart a light mental retardation and loss of axon reflex after intradermal injection of hystamine. Notwithstanding this last finding a diagnosis of congenital indifference to pain was made. The differential diagnosis between indifference and insensitivity to pain is discussed. PMID:6162189

  2. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases.

  3. Procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency room of a field hospital after the Nepal earthquake.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Giora; Ilan, Uri; Mendlovic, Joseph; Bader, Tarif; Shavit, Itai

    2016-10-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) should be a priority in the emergency care of injured children. This humanistic approach is particularly important in paediatric victims of disaster, because these patients are prone to psychological distress secondary to the traumatic event. Following the Nepal earthquake, an Israeli field hospital (IFH) was deployed in Kathmandu. We report our experience with PSA in the emergency room (ER) of the IFH. 22 children underwent surgery in the operating room and 10 underwent PSA in the ER by paediatric emergency physicians: 6 had wound debridement, 2 had fracture reduction and 2 had laceration repair. All the procedures were successfully completed in the ER and no patient required intubation or admission to the intensive care unit due to an adverse event. The present study is the first report of the practice of paediatric PSA by non-anaesthesiologists in a field hospital.

  4. Humane terminal extubation reconsidered: the role for preemptive analgesia and sedation.

    PubMed

    Billings, J Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Patient comfort is not assured by common practices for terminal extubation. Treatment guidelines suggest minimizing dosage of opioids and sedatives. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that clinicians are limited in their ability to recognize distress in such patients and tend to undermedicate patients in distress. Yet suffering of any significant degree should be unacceptable. For painful procedures, such as surgery, the analogous practice of postponing anesthesia until the patient evidences discomfort would never be tolerated. Waiting for signs of suffering before initiating excellent analgesia and sedation inexorably subjects patients to distress. Therefore, when death is inevitable and imminent after extubation, suffering should be anticipated, concerns about respiratory depression dismissed, and vigorous preemptive deep sedation or anesthesia provided.

  5. Alarm pheromone induces stress analgesia via an opioid system in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Núñez, J; Almeida, L; Balderrama, N; Giurfa, M

    1997-12-31

    Changes of the stinging response threshold of Apis mellifera scutellata were measured on foragers fixed on a holder and stimulated with an electric shock as a noxious stimulus. The threshold of responsiveness to the noxious stimulus increased when bees were previously stimulated with isopentyl acetate, which is a main component of the alarm pheromone of the sting chamber. This effect is antagonised by previous injection of naloxone-hydrochloride (Endo Laboratories Inc.). Results suggest that in the honeybee an endogenous opioid system activated by isopentyl acetate is responsible for modulation of perception for nociceptive stimuli. The resulting stress-induced analgesia in the defender bee would reduce its probability of withdrawal thus increasing its efficiency against enemies. PMID:9402618

  6. Thoracic epidural analgesia to control malignant pain until viability in a pregnant patient

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Gibson, Mary Elizabeth; Amaro-Driedger, David; Hussain, Mahammad N

    2016-01-01

    Management of nonobstetric pain in the pregnant patient presents unique challenges related to transplacental fetal exposure to opioids and the subsequent risk of neonatal withdrawal syndrome. We present the case of a pregnant patient suffering from the pain of a progressively enlarging thoracoabdominal sarcoma. Epidural analgesia (using local anesthetics with minimal opioid) was utilized over a span of weeks to manage oncologic pain, limiting fetal opioid exposure and culminating in the birth of a healthy infant. While nonobstetric abdominal pain during pregnancy is not that uncommon, neoplastic abdominal pain does appear to be rare. Combined local anesthetic and opioid continuous epidural infusion should be considered a viable option in the pain management approach to obstetric patients with nonobstetric pain associated with malignancy. PMID:27358573

  7. Labor analgesia for the parturient with lumbar tattoos: what does an obstetrician need to know?

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2006-08-01

    Tattoos-ancient forms of permanent body ornamentation (body art) have today become popular fashion accessories worldwide. More than 50% of all tattoos are being done on women. In the recent years body tattooing in unconventional sites (e.g. lumbar and/or sacral area, lower abdomen, breast, and buttocks) has gained increasing popularity among young women (including in pregnancy). Although, the potential hazards of regional anesthesia in patients with lumbar tattoos remain controversial it may seem prudent to avoid a hollow needle insertion (possible tissue entrapment in its bore as the needle passes to the deeper structures) through a tattoo for neuraxial blocks. This author is not aware of any other review articles in English literature discussing implications, and complications of labor analgesia in parturients presenting with lumbar tattoos.

  8. Improved obstetric outcomes using hypnotic analgesia and skill mastery combined with childbirth education.

    PubMed

    Harmon, T M; Hynan, M T; Tyre, T E

    1990-10-01

    The benefits of hypnotic analgesia as an adjunct to childbirth education were studied in 60 nulliparous women. Subjects were divided into high and low hypnotic susceptibility groups before receiving 6 sessions of childbirth education and skill mastery using an ischemic pain task. Half of the Ss in each group received a hypnotic induction at the beginning of each session; the remaining control Ss received relaxation and breathing exercises typically used in childbirth education. Both hypnotic Ss and highly susceptible Ss reported reduced pain. Hypnotically prepared births had shorter Stage 1 labors, less medication, higher Apgar scores, and more frequent spontaneous deliveries than control Ss' births. Highly susceptible, hypnotically treated women had lower depression scores after birth than women in the other 3 groups. We propose that repeated skill mastery facilitated the effectiveness of hypnosis in our study. PMID:2254498

  9. US -endorphin-(1-27) is a naturally occurring antagonist to etorphine-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, P.; Li, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    The potent opioid peptide US -endorphin is found in the brain and pituitary with two related fragments, US -endorphin-(1-27) and US -endorphin-(1-26). The fragments, retain substantial opioid-receptor binding activity but are virtually inactive analgesically. US -Endorphin-(1-27) inhibits US -endorphin-induced and etorphine-induced analgesia when coinjected intracerebroventricularly into mice. Antagonism by competition at the same site(s) is suggested from parallel shifts of the dose-response curves of etorphine or US -endorphin in the presence of US -endorphin-(1-27). Its potency is 4-5 times greater than that of the opiate antagonist naloxone. US -Endorphin-(1-26) does not antagonize the antinociceptive action of etorphine or US -endorphin in doses up to 500 pmol per animal.

  10. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  11. Procedural sedation and analgesia in children undergoing digestive endoscopic procedures - paediatrician or anaesthesiologist?

    PubMed

    Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita; Ignyś, Iwona; Grześkowiak, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Marzena; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures of the gastrointestinal tract were successfully introduced into paediatric practice in the 1970s. Recent expansive development has become useful for improvement of both diagnosis and treatment in many children with gastrointestinal diseases. Most of these procedures are performed under procedural sedation (PSA) knowing anatomical, physiological and psychological differences and requiring good experience from the paediatrician and anaesthesiologist. These principles help to provide the procedure safely and minimise adverse events, which are greater the smaller the child is. Procedural sedation and analgesia in healthy children can be performed by a paediatrician, but children with congenital defects and serious coexisting diseases (ASA ≥ III) and also during the usage of anaesthetics (e.g. propofol), should be managed by an anaesthesiologist.

  12. Procedural sedation and analgesia in children undergoing digestive endoscopic procedures – paediatrician or anaesthesiologist?

    PubMed Central

    Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita; Ignyś, Iwona; Grześkowiak, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Marzena; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures of the gastrointestinal tract were successfully introduced into paediatric practice in the 1970s. Recent expansive development has become useful for improvement of both diagnosis and treatment in many children with gastrointestinal diseases. Most of these procedures are performed under procedural sedation (PSA) knowing anatomical, physiological and psychological differences and requiring good experience from the paediatrician and anaesthesiologist. These principles help to provide the procedure safely and minimise adverse events, which are greater the smaller the child is. Procedural sedation and analgesia in healthy children can be performed by a paediatrician, but children with congenital defects and serious coexisting diseases (ASA ≥ III) and also during the usage of anaesthetics (e.g. propofol), should be managed by an anaesthesiologist. PMID:25061486

  13. Heart-rate control during pain and suggestions of analgesia without deliberate induction of hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Carli, Giancarlo; Migliorini, Silvia; Fontani, Giuliano; Varanini, Maurizio; Balocchi, Rita

    2008-07-01

    Heart rate and heart-rate variability (HRV) were studied through a set of different methods in high (highs) and low hypnotizable subjects (lows) not receiving any deliberate hypnotic induction in basal conditions (simple relaxation) and during nociceptive-pressor stimulation with and without suggestions of analgesia. ANOVA did not reveal any difference between highs and lows for heart rate and for the HRV indexes extracted from the series of the interbeat intervals (RR) of the ECG in the frequency (spectral analysis) and time domain (standard deviation, Poincare plot) in both basal and stimulation conditions. Factors possibly accounting for the results and likely responsible for an underestimation of group differences are discussed. PMID:18569137

  14. The 2015 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Labor Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W

    2016-05-01

    Every year the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review the literature pertinent to obstetric anesthesiology published the previous calendar year. This individual selects the most notable contributions, creates a syllabus of the articles, and then presents his/her overview in an annual lecture named in honor of the late Gerard W. Ostheimer, a pioneering obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital. This article reviews the literature published in 2014 focusing on the themes of labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. Its contents were presented as the Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, May 16, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The syllabus is available as Supplemental Digital Content (http://links.lww.com/AA/B397).

  15. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  16. The 2015 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Labor Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W

    2016-05-01

    Every year the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review the literature pertinent to obstetric anesthesiology published the previous calendar year. This individual selects the most notable contributions, creates a syllabus of the articles, and then presents his/her overview in an annual lecture named in honor of the late Gerard W. Ostheimer, a pioneering obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital. This article reviews the literature published in 2014 focusing on the themes of labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. Its contents were presented as the Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, May 16, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The syllabus is available as Supplemental Digital Content (http://links.lww.com/AA/B397). PMID:27101497

  17. Use of Neurofeedback to Enhance Response to Hypnotic Analgesia in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Gianas, Ann; George, Holly R; Sherlin, Leslie H; Kraft, George H; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-01-01

    This proof of principle study examined the potential benefits of EEG neurofeedback for increasing responsiveness to self-hypnosis training for chronic pain management. The study comprised 20 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) who received 5 sessions of self-hypnosis training--1 face-to-face session and 4 prerecorded sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to have the prerecorded sessions preceded by either (a) EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) training to increase left anterior theta power (NF-HYP) or (b) a relaxation control condition (RLX-HYP). Eighteen participants completed all treatment sessions and assessments. NF-HYP participants reported greater reductions in pain than RLX-HYP participants. The findings provide support for the potential treatment-enhancing effects of neurofeedback on hypnotic analgesia and also suggest that effective hypnosis treatment can be provided very efficiently. PMID:26599991

  18. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  19. Differences Between Patient and Provider Perceptions of Informed Decision Making About Epidural Analgesia Use During Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist between patient and provider perceptions regarding the decision-making process around use of epidural analgesia during childbirth. The dyadic patient–provider Decisional Conflict Scale was modified to measure first-time mother (n = 35) and maternity care provider (n = 52) perceptions. Providers perceived a greater degree of informed decision making than patients (84.97 vs. 79.41, p = .04) and were more likely to recall they upheld patients’ rights to make informed choices than patients were to perceive their rights had been upheld (85.95 vs. 71.73, p < .01). This incongruity highlights the need to align legal principles with practice to create mutual agreement between stakeholder perceptions of informed decision making. PMID:24839385

  20. Labor analgesia for the parturient with lumbar tattoos: what does an obstetrician need to know?

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2006-08-01

    Tattoos-ancient forms of permanent body ornamentation (body art) have today become popular fashion accessories worldwide. More than 50% of all tattoos are being done on women. In the recent years body tattooing in unconventional sites (e.g. lumbar and/or sacral area, lower abdomen, breast, and buttocks) has gained increasing popularity among young women (including in pregnancy). Although, the potential hazards of regional anesthesia in patients with lumbar tattoos remain controversial it may seem prudent to avoid a hollow needle insertion (possible tissue entrapment in its bore as the needle passes to the deeper structures) through a tattoo for neuraxial blocks. This author is not aware of any other review articles in English literature discussing implications, and complications of labor analgesia in parturients presenting with lumbar tattoos. PMID:16491369

  1. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects.

  2. Local Anesthetic Peripheral Nerve Block Adjuvants for Prolongation of Analgesia: A Systematic Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Kirksey, Meghan A.; Haskins, Stephen C.; Cheng, Jennifer; Liu, Spencer S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of peripheral nerve blocks for anesthesia and postoperative analgesia has increased significantly in recent years. Adjuvants are frequently added to local anesthetics to prolong analgesia following peripheral nerve blockade. Numerous randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have examined the pros and cons of the use of various individual adjuvants. Objectives To systematically review adjuvant-related randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses and provide clinical recommendations for the use of adjuvants in peripheral nerve blocks. Methods Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that were published between 1990 and 2014 were included in the initial bibliographic search, which was conducted using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. Only studies that were published in English and listed block analgesic duration as an outcome were included. Trials that had already been published in the identified meta-analyses and included adjuvants not in widespread use and published without an Investigational New Drug application or equivalent status were excluded. Results Sixty one novel clinical trials and meta-analyses were identified and included in this review. The clinical trials reported analgesic duration data for the following adjuvants: buprenorphine (6), morphine (6), fentanyl (10), epinephrine (3), clonidine (7), dexmedetomidine (7), dexamethasone (7), tramadol (8), and magnesium (4). Studies of perineural buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, dexmedetomidine, and magnesium most consistently demonstrated prolongation of peripheral nerve blocks. Conclusions Buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, magnesium, and dexmedetomidine are promising agents for use in prolongation of local anesthetic peripheral nerve blocks, and further studies of safety and efficacy are merited. However, caution is recommended with use of any perineural adjuvant, as none have Food and Drug Administration approval, and

  3. Effects of intravenous analgesia with combined dezocine and butorphanol on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, B X; Zong, J; Tang, J C; Sun, D P; Hui, X; Li, R Q; Zhang, J L; Ji, Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the analgesic effects of the combination of dezocine and butorphanol on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients. Forty elderly patients undergoing upper abdominal surgeries or thoracotomies with general anesthesia were randomly divided into the dezocine and butorphanol group or the butorphanol group (20 patients per group). A visual analog scale was used to evaluate analgesia and the degree of malignant vomiting. The Ramsay scoring method was used to evaluate sedation. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate cognitive function. Forty-eight hours after the operation, the pain score of the dezocine and butorphanol group (means ± SD, 1.75 ± 0.44) was lower than that of the butorphanol group (2.25 ± 0.79; P < 0.05), and the nausea and vomiting score of the dezocine and butorphanol group (0) was lower than that of the butorphanol group (0.70 ± 1.30; P < 0.05). Six hours after the operation, the sedative score of the butorphanol group (3.75 ± 0.79) was higher than that of the dezocine and butorphanol group (2.15 ± 0.75; P < 0.05). Compared to 1 day before the operation, the MMSE scores of both groups decreased 6 h after the operation, and the MMSE score of the butorphanol group (15.00 ± 2.00) was lower than that of the dezocine and butorphanol group (20.95 ± 1.54; P < 0.05). Dezocine and butorphanol analgesia had transient effects on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients, and the effect of the combination was superior than butorphanol only. PMID:26125754

  4. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea.

    PubMed

    Cerritelli, Serena; Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, p<0.001; n = 8). All effects of NTSPOMC activation were blocked by systemic naloxone (opioid antagonist) but not by SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control.

  5. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, p<0.001; n = 8). All effects of NTSPOMC activation were blocked by systemic naloxone (opioid antagonist) but not by SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control. PMID:27077912

  6. Contrasting effects of acute vs. chronic tricyclic antidepressant treatment on central morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Kellstein, D E; Malseed, R T; Goldstein, F J

    1984-12-01

    Antinociception following central opioid microinjection in rats was assessed weekly via a tail-flick procedure during chronic tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) treatment. (1) Daily TCA: Subcutaneous injections of desipramine (DMI), 30 mg/kg, chlorimipramine (CMI), 10 mg/kg, or saline, 1 ml/kg, were given daily for 22 days. Morphine sulfate (M), 5 micrograms, was microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) at 7 day intervals. On day 1, DMI or CMI enhanced M analgesia whereas saline did not. Augmentation of M disappeared by days 8 and 15 for CMI and DMI, respectively, and was replaced by attenuation which was still observed on day 22 for both TCAs. L-Tryptophan (LT), 100 mg/kg, i.p., on days 15 and 22 temporarily restored TCA enhancement of M. Fourteen days after cessation of all daily TCA treatments, enhancement of M by CMI was similar to that observed on day 1, whereas recovery of DMI-induced facilitation was incomplete. (2) Weekly TCA: Weekly treatment with DMI, CMI, or saline in the same doses as above had similar effects. M analgesia was enhanced by the TCAs but not saline on day 1; this facilitation was absent by day 15. Attenuation of M by DMI or CMI was evident on day 22; 2 weeks after cessation of all weekly TCA treatments, complete recovery of TCA-induced augmentation was observed. Loss of M facilitation during chronic daily or weekly TCA administration may be related to reduction of central opioid and/or 5-HT2 receptors. PMID:6097858

  7. [Patient-controlled intravenous versus epidural analgesia after major joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Peng, W L; Wu, G J; Sun, W Z; Fan, S Z; Chen, T L; Huang, F Y

    1992-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy, side effects, and satisfaction of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous and epidural morphine for postoperative pain were evaluated in this study. Twenty patients undergoing major joint replacement surgery were randomly allocated to intravenous PCA (IPCA) group or epidural PCA (EPCA) group. All patients had a standardized balanced anesthesia, and an epidural catheter was introduced after the operation in EPCA group. Postoperative pain relief was evaluated with verbal pain scale. The result showed that pain intensity and pain relief were similar in either group without significant difference (p greater than 0.05). Morphine consumption in IPCA group was 1.72 +/- 0.30 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 1.14 +/- 0.44 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. In EPCA group, relatively low doses of morphine were used, i.e., 0.20 +/- 0.07 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 0.17 +/- 0.07 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. Both groups showed an "incomplete" but satisfactory analgesia with relatively low doses of morphine. The "equianalgesic dose ratio" of IPCA to EPCA with morphine was approximately 8.5:1. Sedation was minimal in both groups. No respiratory depression developed in all patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most prominent side effects which might limit the usefulness of PCA. The incidence was 5 out of 10 patients in IPCA group and 4 out of 10 patients in EPCA group, despite under the treatment of droperidol (15 micrograms/kg, iv, prn) for most of the patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Çiğdem; Çakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-01-01

    Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P < 0.001). Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn’t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients’ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended. PMID

  9. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Saim Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  10. Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Analgesia Following Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy*

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Troitsa, Anton; Kirshon, Mark; Alfici, Ricardo; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that preoperative (pre-op) ultrasound (US)-guided posterior transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) and US-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block (ILI+IHG) will produce a comparable analgesia after Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in adult men. The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve will be blocked separately. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 166 adult men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a pre-op TAP group, a pre-op ILI+IHG group, and a control group. An intraoperative block of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve was performed in all patients in all three groups, followed by postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. The pain intensity and morphine consumption immediately after surgery and during the 24 hours after surgery were compared between the groups. Results A total of 149 patients completed the study protocol. The intensity of pain immediately after surgery and morphine consumption were similar in the two “block” groups; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the control group. During the 24 hours after surgery, morphine consumption in the ILI+IHG group decreased compared with the TAP group, as well as in each “block” group versus the control group. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all evaluated parameters were similar. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided ILI+IHG provided better pain control than US-guided posterior TAP following the Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in men during 24 hours after surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01429480.) PMID:27487311

  11. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg) was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI), and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS) but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10) factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception. PMID:26426693

  12. Comparison between IV Paracetamol and Tramadol for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to use safer drug with minimal side effects for postoperative analgesia are growing day by day for surgeries of shorter duration or which may require day care only, search for ideal agent has been a never ending process. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods This study was done at Department of Anaesthesiology, Era’s Medical College, Lucknow, India. Sixty ASA-I or II patients between 18-55 years of age, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 each. Group A received IV infusion of paracetamol 1g in 100 ml solution, while Group B received IV infusion of Tramadol 100 mg in 100 ml NS at 0 (first complain of pain postoperatively), 6, 12 and 18 hours respectively. Pain intensity was measured by a 10 point Visual Analogue Scale (0→no pain and 10→worst imaginable pain) VAS at T(0)→just before analgesic administration, at 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours thereafter, in addition to HR, SBP, DBP. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, Student t-test and p-values <0.05 was considered significant. Results During postoperative follow-up intervals, paracetamol showed significantly lower VAS scores as compared to tramadol at 1.5 hour, 3 hour, 6 hour, 12 hour and 24 hour follow up intervals. One patient in tramadol group had nausea postoperatively (p>0.05). No adverse effect attributable to paracetamol was noticed. Conclusion Intravenous Paracetamol can be advocated as an effective and safe analgesic agent for postoperative pain relief. PMID:27656532

  13. Long-Term Stability of Tramadol and Ketamine Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfeng; Qin, Wengang; Chen, Fuchao; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Subanesthetic doses of ketamine as an adjuvant to tramadol in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain have been shown to improve the quality of analgesia. However, there are no such commercially available drug mixtures, and the stability of the combination has rarely been assessed. Material/Methods Admixtures were assessed for periods of up to 14 days at 4°C and 25°C. Three different mixtures of tramadol and ketamine (tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 0.5 mg/mL, tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 1.0 mg/mL, and tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 2.0 mg/mL) were prepared in polyolefin bags by combining these 2 drugs with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline [NS]). The chemical stability of the admixtures was evaluated by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and by measurement of pH values. Solution appearance and color were assessed by observing the samples against black and white backgrounds. Solutions were considered stable if they maintained 90% of the initial concentration of each drug. Results The percentages of initial concentration of tramadol and ketamine in the various solutions remained above 98% when stored at 4°C or 25°C over the testing period. No changes in color or turbidity were observed in any of the prepared solutions. Throughout this period, pH values remained stable. Conclusions The results indicate that the drug mixtures of tramadol with ketamine in NS for PCA delivery systems were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C or 25°C. PMID:26306476

  14. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  15. Effects of a Hypnotic Induction and an Unpleasantness-Focused Analgesia Suggestion on Pain Catastrophizing to an Experimental Heat Stimulus: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tomonori; Nakae, Aya; Sasaki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with greater levels of pain. While many studies support the efficacy of hypnosis for pain, the effect on pain catastrophizing remains unclear. The present study evaluated the effect of hypnosis on pain catastrophizing using experimental heat stimulation. Twenty-two pain patients engaged in 3 conditions: baseline (no suggestion), hypnotic induction, and hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion. Participants with higher baseline pain showed a significant reduction in rumination following hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion and significant reductions in pain due to both the hypnotic induction alone and the hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion. The findings suggest that unpleasantness-focused hypnotic analgesia reduces pain via its effect on the rumination component of pain catastrophizing. PMID:27585727

  16. Liposome Bupivacaine for Postsurgical Analgesia in Adult Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Colectomy: Results from Prospective Phase IV Sequential Cohort Studies Assessing Health Economic Outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Candiotti, Keith A.; Sands, Laurence R.; Lee, Edward; Bergese, Sergio D.; Harzman, Alan E.; Marcet, Jorge; Kumar, Anjali S.; Haas, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid-based postsurgical analgesia exposes patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy to elevated risk for gastrointestinal motility problems and other opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs). The purpose of our research was to investigate postsurgical outcomes, including opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and ORAE risk associated with a multimodal analgesia regimen, employing a single administration of liposome bupivacaine as well as other analgesics that act by different mechanisms. Methods We analyzed combined results from 6 Phase IV, prospective, single-center studies in which patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy received opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or multimodal analgesia incorporating intraoperative administration of liposome bupivacaine. As-needed rescue therapy was available to all patients. Primary outcome measures were postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and hospitalization costs. Secondary measures included time to first rescue opioid use, patient satisfaction with analgesia (assessed using a 5-point Likert scale), and ORAEs. Results Eighty-two patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy and did not meet intraoperative exclusion criteria (PCA n = 56; multimodal analgesia n = 26). Compared with the PCA group, the multimodal analgesia group had significantly lower mean total postsurgical opioid consumption (96 vs 32 mg, respectively; P < 0.0001) and shorter median postsurgical hospital length of stay (3.0 vs 4.0 days; P = 0.0019). Geometric mean costs were $11,234 and $13,018 in the multimodal analgesia and PCA groups, respectively (P = 0.2612). Median time to first rescue opioid use was longer in the multimodal analgesia group versus PCA group (1.1 hours vs 0.6 hours, respectively; P=0.0003). ORAEs were experienced by 41% of patients receiving intravenous opioid PCA and 8% of patients receiving multimodal analgesia (P = 0.0019). Study limitations included use of an open

  17. Efficacy and Effects of Parenteral Pethidine or Meptazinol and Regional Analgesia for Pain Relief during Delivery. A Comparative Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J.; Jank, A.; Amara, S.; Stepan, P. D. H.; Kaisers, U.; Hoehne, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripartum anesthesia may consist of parenteral opioids and/or regional analgesia. There is only limited data in the literature comparing both methods in daily obstetric practice. This observational study investigated the opioids pethidine and meptazinol as well as regional analgesics with regard to their administration, efficacy, side effects and subjective maternal satisfaction with therapy. The rates of secondary regional analgesia administration after administration of the respective opioid served as a means of evaluating treatment. Methods: This study collected data on pain management during vaginal delivery in a German university hospital over a twelve month period. Severity of pain was measured intrapartum using a numerical rating scale. Maternal, neonatal and delivery-related data were obtained postpartum from the clinical records and from the mothers using a questionnaire. Results: The study is based on data obtained from 449 deliveries. Pain relief achieved by the administration of pethidine and meptazinol was similarly low; maternal satisfaction with the respective therapy was high. Meptazinol was usually administered intravenously (83 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), repeatedly (27 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) and closer to the birth (1.9 ± 2.7 h vs. 2.6 ± 2.8 h; p < 0.05) compared to pethidine. Secondary regional analgesia was more common after the administration of pethidine (16 % vs. 8 %; p < 0.05). Regional analgesia resulted in greater pain relief compared to opioid therapy (78 % vs. 24 % after 30 min; p < 0.001) and was associated with longer times to delivery (7.6 ± 2.5 h vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 h; p < 0.001) and higher levels of maternal satisfaction with therapy (6.1 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 1.6 on a 7-point scale; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In daily clinical practice, meptazinol can be adapted more readily to changes during birth and requires less secondary analgesia. Regional neuraxial

  18. Efficacy and Effects of Parenteral Pethidine or Meptazinol and Regional Analgesia for Pain Relief during Delivery. A Comparative Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J.; Jank, A.; Amara, S.; Stepan, P. D. H.; Kaisers, U.; Hoehne, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripartum anesthesia may consist of parenteral opioids and/or regional analgesia. There is only limited data in the literature comparing both methods in daily obstetric practice. This observational study investigated the opioids pethidine and meptazinol as well as regional analgesics with regard to their administration, efficacy, side effects and subjective maternal satisfaction with therapy. The rates of secondary regional analgesia administration after administration of the respective opioid served as a means of evaluating treatment. Methods: This study collected data on pain management during vaginal delivery in a German university hospital over a twelve month period. Severity of pain was measured intrapartum using a numerical rating scale. Maternal, neonatal and delivery-related data were obtained postpartum from the clinical records and from the mothers using a questionnaire. Results: The study is based on data obtained from 449 deliveries. Pain relief achieved by the administration of pethidine and meptazinol was similarly low; maternal satisfaction with the respective therapy was high. Meptazinol was usually administered intravenously (83 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), repeatedly (27 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) and closer to the birth (1.9 ± 2.7 h vs. 2.6 ± 2.8 h; p < 0.05) compared to pethidine. Secondary regional analgesia was more common after the administration of pethidine (16 % vs. 8 %; p < 0.05). Regional analgesia resulted in greater pain relief compared to opioid therapy (78 % vs. 24 % after 30 min; p < 0.001) and was associated with longer times to delivery (7.6 ± 2.5 h vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 h; p < 0.001) and higher levels of maternal satisfaction with therapy (6.1 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 1.6 on a 7-point scale; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In daily clinical practice, meptazinol can be adapted more readily to changes during birth and requires less secondary analgesia. Regional neuraxial

  19. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  20. Sex differences in opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate mediated non-opioid biting fly exposure induced analgesia in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E

    1998-08-01

    There is evidence for sex differences in responses to noxious stimuli and in the expression and mediation of analgesia. In particular, results of investigations with swim stress and the more ethologically appropriate stress of predator odor exposure have suggested sex differences in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system involvement in the mediation of analgesia. Whether or not this sex difference generalizes to other environmental stressors is, however, not clear. Biting flies are a natural aversive stimuli commonly encountered by wild and domestic animals and humans. The present study examined the opioid and non-opioid mediated nociceptive (50 degrees C hot plate) responses of reproductive male and female deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, exposed to biting fly attack. A 30 min exposure to biting flies (stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) elicited a naloxone sensitive, opioid-mediated analgesia that was of a greater magnitude in males than in female deer mice. In contrast, a 5 min exposure to biting flies elicited a 'on-opioid' analgesia that was of similar magnitude in both sexes and insensitive to both naloxone and the specific kappa opiate antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In male mice this non-opioid analgesia was antagonised by the competitive NMDA antagonist, NPC 1262, while in reproductive females the biting fly-induced analgesia was insensitive to NPC 12626. These results show that there are sex differences in NMDA involvement in the mediation of the non-opioid analgesia arising from brief exposure to the stress of biting fly attack. These data from a common, natural environmental challenge support the presence of basic sex difference in NMDA involvement in the mediation of stress-induced analgesia. PMID:9766834

  1. Sex differences in opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate mediated non-opioid biting fly exposure induced analgesia in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E

    1998-08-01

    There is evidence for sex differences in responses to noxious stimuli and in the expression and mediation of analgesia. In particular, results of investigations with swim stress and the more ethologically appropriate stress of predator odor exposure have suggested sex differences in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system involvement in the mediation of analgesia. Whether or not this sex difference generalizes to other environmental stressors is, however, not clear. Biting flies are a natural aversive stimuli commonly encountered by wild and domestic animals and humans. The present study examined the opioid and non-opioid mediated nociceptive (50 degrees C hot plate) responses of reproductive male and female deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, exposed to biting fly attack. A 30 min exposure to biting flies (stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) elicited a naloxone sensitive, opioid-mediated analgesia that was of a greater magnitude in males than in female deer mice. In contrast, a 5 min exposure to biting flies elicited a 'on-opioid' analgesia that was of similar magnitude in both sexes and insensitive to both naloxone and the specific kappa opiate antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In male mice this non-opioid analgesia was antagonised by the competitive NMDA antagonist, NPC 1262, while in reproductive females the biting fly-induced analgesia was insensitive to NPC 12626. These results show that there are sex differences in NMDA involvement in the mediation of the non-opioid analgesia arising from brief exposure to the stress of biting fly attack. These data from a common, natural environmental challenge support the presence of basic sex difference in NMDA involvement in the mediation of stress-induced analgesia.

  2. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program.

  3. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies.

    PubMed

    Borzellino, Giuseppe; Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier; Krastinova, Evguenia; Dyevre, Valérie; Genna, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06-2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  4. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  5. Development of the fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) for patient-controlled analgesia of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Minkowitz, Harold S; Danesi, Hassan; Ding, Li; Jones, James B

    2015-09-01

    The fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) is a needle-free, patient-activated drug delivery system used for patient-controlled analgesia in adult hospitalized patients with postoperative pain. The system design has been updated to a separated system consisting of a Controller and a Drug Unit, and has had regulatory submissions in USA and Europe in 2014. Fentanyl ITS has been shown to be therapeutically equivalent to morphine intravenous (iv.) patient-controlled analgesia. One of the advantages of fentanyl ITS is that patients have better mobility as there is no need for an iv. pump, iv. lines and pole. The introduction of the updated fentanyl ITS will add a versatile tool to the postoperative pain management armamentarium.

  6. BEST-PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR FIELD-BASED SURGERY AND ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING WILDLIFE. I. ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Fiorello, Christine V; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Field anesthesia is often necessary for both invasive and noninvasive procedures on wild animals. We describe basic principles of safe anesthetic delivery, monitoring, and recovery for application in procedures involving free-ranging wildlife. For invasive procedures, the potential for immediate and lasting pain must be addressed and appropriate analgesia provided. In situations where the minimum standard of safe anesthesia and effective analgesia cannot be provided, the investigator and approving bodies should rigorously evaluate the risk to the patient against the value of the data obtained. This document is intended to serve as a resource for Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, biologists, veterinarians, and other researchers planning projects that involve free-ranging wildlife in field conditions. PMID:26845296

  7. [Application of multimodal anesthesia/analgesia in complex of anesthesiological support of reconstructive operations, performed on the lower extremity arteries].

    PubMed

    Homon, M L

    2014-09-01

    Anesthesiological support of 47 patients, while performing reconstructive operations on the lower extremities arteries in presence of the third level of operative risk (according to ASA), was analyzed; of them in 24 - a spinal anesthesia was applied, in 23 - a reduced spino-epidural anesthesia. Application of a spino-epidural anesthesia/analgesia with reduction of the dose of a spinal component and usage of analgesia instead of anesthesia secures lesser intraoperative oscillations of hemodynamic indices in comparison with such while performing spinal anesthesia, as well as better antinociceptive protection, is also characterized by small toxic impact on the patient, demands application of a sedative and the infusion therapy of lesser volume. While performing a potentially complex and durable reconstructive operations on the lower extremities arteries a wide application of the method depicted is recommended.

  8. Regional anesthesia or patient-controlled analgesia and compartment syndrome in orthopedic surgical procedures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Elizabeth BS; Maleki, Ana Hosseinzadeh; Jahromi, Leila; Hermecz, Brittany Nelson; Nelson, Lauren E; Vetter, Imelda L; Evenhuis, Spencer; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on the use of regional anesthesia (RA) and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was conducted in patients who require orthopedic extremity procedures to determine whether either analgesic technique contributes to a delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome (CS). A total of 34 relevant articles (28 case reports and six research articles) were identified. Of all case report articles published after 2009, the majority (75%) concluded that RA does not put the patient at an increased risk of a delayed diagnosis of CS. Of these, only two relevant prospective research studies focusing on RA or PCA and their relationship to CS were identified. Neither study resulted in any cases of CS. However, both had relatively small sample sizes. Given the lack of evidence identified in this systematic review, prospective studies or large-scale retrospective data reviews are needed to more strongly advocate the use of one modality of analgesia over the other in this patient population. PMID:27785097

  9. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  10. BEST-PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR FIELD-BASED SURGERY AND ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING WILDLIFE. I. ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Fiorello, Christine V; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Field anesthesia is often necessary for both invasive and noninvasive procedures on wild animals. We describe basic principles of safe anesthetic delivery, monitoring, and recovery for application in procedures involving free-ranging wildlife. For invasive procedures, the potential for immediate and lasting pain must be addressed and appropriate analgesia provided. In situations where the minimum standard of safe anesthesia and effective analgesia cannot be provided, the investigator and approving bodies should rigorously evaluate the risk to the patient against the value of the data obtained. This document is intended to serve as a resource for Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, biologists, veterinarians, and other researchers planning projects that involve free-ranging wildlife in field conditions.

  11. Patient and Provider Perceptions of Decision Making About Use of Epidural Analgesia During Childbirth: A Thematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the nature of differences in perceptions of decision making between patients and providers about use of epidural analgesia during labor. Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns in written survey responses from 14 patients, 13 labor nurses, and 7 obstetrician–gynecologists. Results revealed patients attempted to place themselves in an informed role in decision making and sought respect for their decisions. Some providers demonstrated paternalism and a tendency to steer patients in the direction of their own preferences. Nurses observed various pressures on decision making, reinforcing the importance of patients being supported to make an informed choice. Differences in perceptions suggest need for improvement in communication and shared decision-making practices related to epidural analgesia use in labor. PMID:25364218

  12. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  13. Carprofen provides better post-operative analgesia than tramadol in dogs after enucleation: A randomized, masked clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Cherlene; Bentley, Ellison; Hetzel, Scott; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare analgesia provided by carprofen or tramadol in dogs after enucleation. Design Randomized, masked trial Animals Forty-three dogs Procedures Client-owned dogs admitted for routine enucleation were randomly assigned to receive either carprofen or tramadol orally 2 hours prior to surgery and 12 hours after the first dose. Dogs were scored for pain at baseline, and postoperatively at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 30 hours after extubation. Dogs received identical premedication and inhalation anesthesia regimens, including premedication with hydromorphone. If the total pain score was ≥9, if there was a score ≥ 3 in any one category, or if the visual analog scale score (VAS) was ≥35 combined with a palpation score of >0, rescue analgesia (hydromorphone) was administered and treatment failure was recorded. Characteristics between groups were compared with a Student’s t-test and Fisher’s exact test. The incidence of rescue was compared between groups using a log rank test. Pain scores and VAS scores between groups were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Results There was no difference in age (p=0.493), gender (p=0.366) or baseline pain scores (p=0.288) between groups. Significantly more dogs receiving tramadol required rescue analgesia (6/21) compared to dogs receiving carprofen (1/22; p=0.035). Pain and VAS scores decreased linearly over time (p=0.038, p<0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in pain (p=0.915) or VAS scores (p=0.372) between groups at any time point (dogs were excluded from analysis after rescue). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This study suggests that carprofen, with opioid premedication, provides more effective post-operative analgesia than tramadol in dogs undergoing enucleation. PMID:25459482

  14. Comparison of caudal tramadol versus caudal fentanyl with bupivacaine for prolongation of postoperative analgesia in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, NM; Engineer, SR; Jansari, DB; Patel, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block is a common technique for pediatric analgesia for infraumblical surgeries. Because of the short duration of analgesia with bupivacaine alone various additive have been used to prolong the action of bupivacaine. The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic effect of tramadol or fentanyl added to bupivacaine for infraumblical surgeries in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind controlled trial. After written informed consent from parents, 100 patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I-II, in the age group of 1-12 years, of either sex undergoing infraumblical surgery under general anesthesia were divided into two groups. Group BT received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with tramadol 2 mg/kg in normal saline and Group BF received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/kg in normal saline with maximum volume of 12 ml in both groups. All patients were assessed intraoperatively for hemodynamic changes, the requirement of sevoflurane concentration, as well as postoperatively for pain by using FLACC (F = Face, L = Leg, A = Activity, C = Cry, C = Consolability), pain score and for sedation by using four point sedation score. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 10–18 h in Group BT while in Group BF it was 7-11 h. The postoperatively period up to 1½ h, Group BF had higher sedation score up to two as compared to that below one on Group BT. Conclusion: Caudal tramadol significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia as compared to caudal fentanyl without any side effects. PMID:27051365

  15. Evaluation of caudal dexamethasone with ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia in paediatric herniotomies: A randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Santosh; Dogra, Neelam; Dogra, Jaideep; Jain, Priyanka; Ola, Sandeep Kumar; Ratre, Brajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal analgesia is one of the most popular regional blocks in paediatric patients undergoing infra-umbilical surgeries but with the drawback of short duration of action after single shot local anaesthetic injection. We evaluated whether caudal dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg as an adjuvant to the ropivacaine improved analgesic efficacy after paediatric herniotomies. Methods: Totally 128 patients of 1–5 years age group, American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I and II undergoing elective inguinal herniotomy were randomly allocated to two groups in double-blind manner. Group A received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine caudally and Group B received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine, in which 0.1 mg/kg dexamethasone was added for caudal analgesia. Post operative pain by faces, legs, activity, cry and consolability tool score, rescue analgesic requirement and adverse effects were noted for 24 h. Results: Results were statistically analysed using Student's t-test. Pain scores measured at 1, 2, 4, and 6 h post-operative, were lower in Group B as compared to Group A. Mean duration of analgesia in Group A was 248.4 ± 54.1 min and in Group B was 478.046 ± 104.57 min with P = 0.001. Rescue analgesic requirement was more in Group A as compared to Group B. Adverse effects after surgery were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: Caudal dexamethasone added to ropivacaine is a good alternative to prolong post-operative analgesia with less pain score compared to caudal ropivacaine alone. PMID:26962252

  16. Effect of adding tetracaine to bupivacaine on duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks for ambulatory shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Linda T.; Lowry, Benjamin P.; Culp, William C.; Kitchings, Olen E.; Meyer, Tricia A.; McAllister, Russell K.; Roberson, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine prolonged the duration of postoperative analgesia of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade for patients undergoing ambulatory shoulder surgery. We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical study at an ambulatory surgery center utilizing ultrasound- and nerve stimulation-guided supraclavicular nerve blockade for postoperative analgesia. The control group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL preservative-free saline. The study group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL of 1% tetracaine. Patients documented their visual analog scale scores and intake of pain medications for 3 days. Primary outcomes included time of first postoperative pain, time of first postoperative pain pill, and time of return of motor and sensory function. Secondary outcomes included pain score and pain medication intake trends and adverse events secondary to the nerve block. A total of 84 patients completed the study, 42 patients in each group. The study group was statistically significantly older than the control group (mean age, 54 vs 48 years; P = 0.04). The mean duration of analgesia was 16.6 ± 8.3 h for the control group and 17.1 ± 7.3 h for the study group (P = 0.69). No outcomes were statistically different. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in duration of postoperative analgesia with the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade. No differences were identified in postoperative pain medications, pain scores, or complications. PMID:26130874

  17. Context-Dependent Links between Song Production and Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Male European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Stevenson, Sharon A.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms that ensure appropriate vocal behaviors within specific social contexts. Male songbirds produce spontaneous (undirected) songs as well as female-directed courtship songs. Opioid neuropeptide activity in specific brain regions is rewarding, at least in mammals, and past studies suggest that the opioid met-enkephalin in such areas is more tightly linked to undirected than female-directed song. Recent data using a song-associated place preference paradigm further suggest that production of undirected but not directed song is tightly linked to intrinsic reward. Opioids have analgesic properties. Therefore, if production of undirected song is closely linked to opioid-mediated reward, the production of undirected but not directed song should be associated with analgesia. Consistent with this prediction, in male starlings we identified a positive correlation between analgesia (decreased reactivity to a hot water bath) and undirected song (in non-breeding season condition males in affiliative flocks) but not female-directed song (in breeding season condition males presented with females). When breeding condition males were divided according to social status, a negative correlation was found in subordinate males (i.e. males that failed to acquire a nest box). These data are consistent with the hypotheses 1) that the production of undirected song is facilitated or maintained by opioids (and/or other neuromodulators that also induce analgesia) and 2) that production of female-directed song is not linked in the same way to release of the same neuromodulators. Results also demonstrate a link between analgesia and song in subordinate individuals lacking a nesting territory within the breeding season. Overall, the findings indicate that distinct neural mechanisms regulate communication in different social contexts and support the working hypothesis that undirected but not directed song is tightly linked to opioid release. PMID:23056422

  18. Context-dependent links between song production and opioid-mediated analgesia in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A; Riters, Lauren V

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms that ensure appropriate vocal behaviors within specific social contexts. Male songbirds produce spontaneous (undirected) songs as well as female-directed courtship songs. Opioid neuropeptide activity in specific brain regions is rewarding, at least in mammals, and past studies suggest that the opioid met-enkephalin in such areas is more tightly linked to undirected than female-directed song. Recent data using a song-associated place preference paradigm further suggest that production of undirected but not directed song is tightly linked to intrinsic reward. Opioids have analgesic properties. Therefore, if production of undirected song is closely linked to opioid-mediated reward, the production of undirected but not directed song should be associated with analgesia. Consistent with this prediction, in male starlings we identified a positive correlation between analgesia (decreased reactivity to a hot water bath) and undirected song (in non-breeding season condition males in affiliative flocks) but not female-directed song (in breeding season condition males presented with females). When breeding condition males were divided according to social status, a negative correlation was found in subordinate males (i.e. males that failed to acquire a nest box). These data are consistent with the hypotheses 1) that the production of undirected song is facilitated or maintained by opioids (and/or other neuromodulators that also induce analgesia) and 2) that production of female-directed song is not linked in the same way to release of the same neuromodulators. Results also demonstrate a link between analgesia and song in subordinate individuals lacking a nesting territory within the breeding season. Overall, the findings indicate that distinct neural mechanisms regulate communication in different social contexts and support the working hypothesis that undirected but not directed song is tightly linked to opioid release. PMID:23056422

  19. Effects of xylazine, lignocaine and their combination for lumber epidural analgesia in water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Pratap, K; Amarpal; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Singh, G R

    2005-09-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of xylazine alone (0.05 mg/kg), lignocaine alone (2.0 mg/kg) and a combination of xylazine and lignocaine (0.05 mg/kg and 2.0 mg/kg, respectively) after lumbar epidural administration in water buffalo calves. Fifteen nondescript, male water buffalo calves of 6-8 months of age and weighing between 55 and 75 kg were randomly placed in 3 groups (A, B and C). The agents were administered at the 1st lumbar epidural space. Clinico-physiological parameters such as analgesia, ataxia, sedation, salivation, heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were studied. Other haematological and biochemical parameters monitored were haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total leukocyte count, plasma glucose, cortisol, protein albumin, globulin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ALT, sodium, potassium and chloride. The onset of analgesia was faster in group C (3.0 +/- 0.44 min) compared with that of group B (4.4 +/- 0.40 min) and group A (34.0 +/- 1.86 min). Analgesia of the thorax, flank, inguinal region, hind limbs, perineum and tail was complete in group C, but mild to moderate in groups A and B. Ataxia was severe in groups B and C and mild in group A. Mild to deep sedation were produced by groups A and C animals. Longer duration and greater depth of analgesia was produced in animals in group C. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature decreased in groups A and C. The haematological parameters decreased in all the groups. The biochemical parameters like glucose, cortisol, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ALT increased in all the animals. However, total proteins and albumin decreased in the 3 groups. The plasma electrolytes sodium, potassium and chloride did not show any significant change. The results of this study indicated a possible additive analgesic interaction between epidurally administered xylazine and lignocaine, without causing any marked systemic effects in water buffalo calves.

  20. Topically applied mesoridazine exhibits the strongest cutaneous analgesia and minimized skin disruption among tricyclic antidepressants: The skin absorption assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chang, Chia-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2016-08-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are found to have an analgesic action for relieving cutaneous pain associated with neuropathies. The aim of this study was to assess cutaneous absorption and analgesia of topically applied TCAs. Percutaneous delivery was investigated using nude mouse and pig skin models at both infinite and saturated doses. We evaluated the cutaneous analgesia in nude mice using the pinprick scores. Among five antidepressants tested in the in vitro experiment, mesoridazine, promazine and doxepin showed a superior total absorption percentage. The drug with the lowest total absorption percentage was found to be fluphenazine (<7%) either at an infinite dose or at saturated solubility. The follicular pathway was important for mesoridazine and promazine delivery. Mesoridazine showed stronger skin analgesia than the other TCAs although the in vivo skin absorption of mesoridazine (0.34nmol/mg) was less than that of promazine (0.80nmol/mg) and doxepin (0.74nmol/mg). Mesoridazine had a prolonged duration of pain relief (165min) compared to promazine (83min) and doxepin (17min). The skin irritation test demonstrated an evident barrier function deterioration and cutaneous erythema by promazine and doxepin treatment, whereas mesoridazine caused no obvious adverse effect by topical application for up to 7days. PMID:27260201

  1. Reduction of empathy for pain by placebo analgesia suggests functional equivalence of empathy and first-hand emotion experience.

    PubMed

    Rütgen, Markus; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Riečanský, Igor; Lamm, Claus

    2015-06-10

    Previous research in social neuroscience has consistently shown that empathy for pain recruits brain areas that are also activated during the first-hand experience of pain. This has been interpreted as evidence that empathy relies upon neural processes similar to those underpinning the first-hand experience of emotions. However, whether such overlapping neural activations imply that equivalent neural functions are engaged by empathy and direct emotion experiences remains to be demonstrated. We induced placebo analgesia, a phenomenon specifically modulating the first-hand experience of pain, to test whether this also reduces empathy for pain. Subjective and neural measures of pain and empathy for pain were collected using self-report and event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants underwent painful electrical stimulation or witnessed that another person was undergoing such stimulation. Self-report showed decreased empathy during placebo analgesia, and this was mirrored by reduced amplitudes of the pain-related P2, an ERP component indexing neural computations related to the affective-motivational component of pain. Moreover, these effects were specific for pain, as self-report and ERP measures of control conditions unrelated to pain were not affected by placebo analgesia. Together, the present results suggest that empathy seems to rely on neural processes that are (partially) functionally equivalent to those engaged by first-hand emotion experiences. Moreover, they imply that analgesics may have the unwanted side effect of reducing empathic resonance and concern for others. PMID:26063925

  2. Intravenous non-opioid analgesia for peri- and postoperative pain management: a scientific review of intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wonuk; Nguyen, Kimngan Pham

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a predictable consequence following operations, but the management of postoperative pain is another challenge for anesthesiologists and inappropriately controlled pain may lead to unwanted outcomes in the postoperative period. Opioids are indeed still at the mainstream of postoperative pain control, but solely using only opioids for postoperative pain management may be connected with risks of complications and adverse effects. As a consequence, the concept of multimodal analgesia has been proposed and is recommended whenever possible. Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used analgesic and antipyretic drug for its good tolerance and high safety profiles. The introduction of intravenous form of acetaminophen has led to a wider flexibility of its use during peri- and postoperative periods, allowing the early initiation of multimodal analgesia. Many studies have revealed the efficacy, safety and opioid sparing effects of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous ibuprofen has also shown to be well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant opioid sparing effects during the postoperative period. However, the number of randomized controlled trials confirming the efficacy and safety is small and should be used in caution in certain group of patients. Intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen are important options for multimodal postoperative analgesia, improving pain and patient satisfaction. PMID:25664148

  3. A Triple-Option Analgesia Plan for Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-04.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Kotwal, Russ S; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Edgar, Erin P; O'Connor, Kevin C; Montgomery, Harold R; Shackelford, Stacy A; Gandy, John V; Wedmore, Ian S; Timby, Jeffrey W; Gross, Kirby R; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Although the majority of potentially preventable fatalities among U.S. combat forces serving in Afghanistan and Iraq have died from hemorrhagic shock, the majority of U.S. medics carry morphine autoinjectors for prehospital battlefield analgesia. Morphine given intramuscularly has a delayed onset of action and, like all opioids, may worsen hemorrhagic shock. Additionally, on a recent assessment of prehospital care in Afghanistan, combat medical personnel noted that Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) battlefield analgesia recommendations need to be simplified--there are too many options and not enough clear guidance on which medication to use in specific situations. They also reported that ketamine is presently being used as a battlefield analgesic by some medics in theater with good results. This report proposes that battlefield analgesia be achieved using one or more of three options: (1) the meloxicam and Tylenol in the TCCC Combat Pill Pack for casualties with relatively minor pain who are still able to function as effective combatants; (2) oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) for casualties who have moderate to severe pain, but who are not in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress and are not at significant risk for developing either condition; or (3) ketamine for casualties who have moderate to severe pain but who are in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress or are at significant risk for developing either condition. Ketamine may also be used to increase analgesic effect for casualties who have previously been given opioids (morphine or fentanyl.).

  4. Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade. A prospective, randomised pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Liu, Spencer S.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Rade, Matthew C.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    In a randomised controlled pragmatic trial we investigated whether local infiltration analgesia would result in earlier readiness for discharge from hospital after total knee replacement (TKR) than patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) plus femoral nerve block. A total of 45 patients with a mean age of 65 years (49 to 81) received a local infiltration with a peri-articular injection of bupivacaine, morphine, and methylprednisolone, as well as adjuvant analgesics. In 45 PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients with a mean age of 67 years (50 to 84), analgesia included a bupivacaine nerve block, bupivacaine/hydromorphone PCEA, and adjuvant analgesics. The mean time until ready for discharge was 3.2 days (1 to 14) in the local infiltration group and 3.2 days (1.8 to 7.0) in the PCEA+femoral nerve blockade group. The mean pain scores for patients receiving local infiltration were higher when walking (p = 0.0084), but there were no statistically significant differences at rest. The mean opioid consumption was higher in those receiving local infiltration. The choice between these two analgesic pathways should not be made on the basis of time to discharge after surgery. Most secondary outcomes were similar, but PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients had lower pain scores when walking and during continuous passive movement. If PCEA+femoral nerve blockade is not readily available, local infiltration provides similar length of stay and similar pain scores at rest following TKR. PMID:23632672

  5. [The effects of application of rectal naproxen on postoperative analgesia, sedation and morphine use in heart surgery operations].

    PubMed

    Kayacan, T; Güzelmeriç, F; Oğuş, H; Yaltirik, R; Barutçuoğlu, O; Erentuğ, V; Koçak, T

    2004-04-01

    In this study, effects and side effects of application of rectal naproxen, combined with patient controlled intravenous morphine analgesia, were investigated in the elective coronary bypass operations for postoperative pain control, sedation and opioid use. Following the ethical committee approval and individual patient self consent, 40 patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery were included in the study. A double blind study was performed by administering rectal naproxen to group N (n = 20) and placebo to group P (n = 20), at the end of the operation. Doses were repeated at the 12th hour postoperatively. Patient controlled intravenous morphine analgesia was performed to all patients for postoperative 24 hours. Postoperative pain and sedation levels were assessed, the side effects were noted. There was no difference between two groups with respect to their demographic features duration of surgery, extubation time and side effects (p > 0.05). With respect to group P, decrease in opioid use, better sedation and decrease in pain scores during both resting and coughing was seen in group N (p < 0.05). In conclusion, analgesia applied by addition of rectal naproxen to opioids achieved better pain management in selected patients after cardiac surgery.

  6. Reduction of empathy for pain by placebo analgesia suggests functional equivalence of empathy and first-hand emotion experience.

    PubMed

    Rütgen, Markus; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Riečanský, Igor; Lamm, Claus

    2015-06-10

    Previous research in social neuroscience has consistently shown that empathy for pain recruits brain areas that are also activated during the first-hand experience of pain. This has been interpreted as evidence that empathy relies upon neural processes similar to those underpinning the first-hand experience of emotions. However, whether such overlapping neural activations imply that equivalent neural functions are engaged by empathy and direct emotion experiences remains to be demonstrated. We induced placebo analgesia, a phenomenon specifically modulating the first-hand experience of pain, to test whether this also reduces empathy for pain. Subjective and neural measures of pain and empathy for pain were collected using self-report and event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants underwent painful electrical stimulation or witnessed that another person was undergoing such stimulation. Self-report showed decreased empathy during placebo analgesia, and this was mirrored by reduced amplitudes of the pain-related P2, an ERP component indexing neural computations related to the affective-motivational component of pain. Moreover, these effects were specific for pain, as self-report and ERP measures of control conditions unrelated to pain were not affected by placebo analgesia. Together, the present results suggest that empathy seems to rely on neural processes that are (partially) functionally equivalent to those engaged by first-hand emotion experiences. Moreover, they imply that analgesics may have the unwanted side effect of reducing empathic resonance and concern for others.

  7. A Triple-Option Analgesia Plan for Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-04.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Kotwal, Russ S; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Edgar, Erin P; O'Connor, Kevin C; Montgomery, Harold R; Shackelford, Stacy A; Gandy, John V; Wedmore, Ian S; Timby, Jeffrey W; Gross, Kirby R; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Although the majority of potentially preventable fatalities among U.S. combat forces serving in Afghanistan and Iraq have died from hemorrhagic shock, the majority of U.S. medics carry morphine autoinjectors for prehospital battlefield analgesia. Morphine given intramuscularly has a delayed onset of action and, like all opioids, may worsen hemorrhagic shock. Additionally, on a recent assessment of prehospital care in Afghanistan, combat medical personnel noted that Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) battlefield analgesia recommendations need to be simplified--there are too many options and not enough clear guidance on which medication to use in specific situations. They also reported that ketamine is presently being used as a battlefield analgesic by some medics in theater with good results. This report proposes that battlefield analgesia be achieved using one or more of three options: (1) the meloxicam and Tylenol in the TCCC Combat Pill Pack for casualties with relatively minor pain who are still able to function as effective combatants; (2) oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) for casualties who have moderate to severe pain, but who are not in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress and are not at significant risk for developing either condition; or (3) ketamine for casualties who have moderate to severe pain but who are in hemorrhagic shock or respiratory distress or are at significant risk for developing either condition. Ketamine may also be used to increase analgesic effect for casualties who have previously been given opioids (morphine or fentanyl.). PMID:24604434

  8. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Rajagopalan; Abhinaya, Ranganathan Jothi; Sakthivel, Ayyanar; Sivarajan, Govindarajan

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block) is a novel procedure to provide postoperative analgesia following inguinal hernia surgery. The utilization of ultrasound has greatly augmented the success rate of this block and additionally avoiding complications. The aim of our study was to gauge the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided TAP block in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair. Materials and methods Sixty patients scheduled for elective inguinal hernia repair were selected for the study. At the end of the surgical procedure, they were randomly divided into two groups. Ultrasound-guided TAP block was performed with 20 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% (group A) or normal saline (group B). Visual analog scale (VAS) scores were used to assess pain. Paracetamol was given if VAS > 3 and tramadol was used when VAS > 6. Patients were monitored for VAS scores and total analgesic consumption for the 24-hour period. Results The TAP block with ropivacaine (group A) reduced VAS scores at 4, 6, and 12 hours. There was no distinction in VAS scores at 0, 2, and 24 hours between the two groups. The duration of analgesia for TAP block with ropivacaine lasted for 390 minutes. Total analgesics consumption was also significantly reduced in group A than group B. No complication was reported to TAP block in both the groups. Conclusion The ultrasound-guided TAP block provides good postoperative analgesia, reduces analgesic requirements, and provides good VAS scores with fewer complications following inguinal hernia surgery. PMID:26848274

  9. Thoracic Paravertebral Block, Multimodal Analgesia, and Monitored Anesthesia Care for Breast Cancer Surgery in Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare idiopathic neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons and characterized by spasticity, muscle weakness, and bulbar involvement. It can sometimes mimic early stage of more common and fatal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Surgical patients with a history of neurodegenerative disorders, including PLS, may be at increased risk for general anesthesia related ventilatory depression and postoperative respiratory complications, abnormal response to muscle relaxants, and sensitivity to opioids, sedatives, and local anesthetics. We present a case of a patient with PLS and recent diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent a simple mastectomy surgery uneventfully under an ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block, multimodal analgesia, and monitored anesthesia care. Patient reported minimal to no pain or discomfort in the postoperative period and received no opioids for pain management before being discharged home. In patients with PLS, thoracic paravertebral block and multimodal analgesia can provide reliable anesthesia and effective analgesia for breast surgery with avoidance of potential risks associated with general anesthesia, muscle paralysis, and opioid use. PMID:27200193

  10. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  11. Efficacy of Pregabalin as Premedication for Post-Operative Analgesia in Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Geetha Chamanhalli; Vig, Saurabh; Bevanaguddaiah, Yatish; Anadaswamy, Tejesh C

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin, a structural analogue of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), is shown to be effective in treatment of several types of neuropathic pain, incisional injury, and inflammatory injury. Objectives The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two doses (75 mg or 150 mg) of pregabalin with the administration of a placebo for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. Patients and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 135 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. The patients were divided in three groups of 45 patients each: group 0, placebo; group 1, 75 mg pregabalin; and group 2, 150 mg pregabalin; each treatment of which was administered one hour before surgery. The Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) was used for pre-operative assessment and the visual analog scale (VAS) was used to determine pain at rest and for cough on the first post-operative day. The time for the requirement of rescue analgesics on the first post-operative day was also assessed. Results The RSS scores were significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the controls (P < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores for pain both at rest and on cough were significantly reduced in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Rescue analgesic consumption decreased significantly in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). The time at which rescue analgesia was administered (first dose) was 4.45 hours in group 0, 10.86 hours in group 1, and 16.82 hours in group 2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Pregabalin administered as premedication provided significant postoperative pain relief and decreased the requirement of other parenteral analgesics. Pregabalin doses of 150 mg had a better analgesic profile, but the advantages of their use may be limited by side effects such as dizziness. Thus, it is concluded that pregabalin doses of 75 mg may be the optimal pre-emptive dose. PMID:27642577

  12. Effect of Dexmedetomidine Alone for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia After Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuqin; Liu, Wenjuan; Xu, Zan; Wang, Fumei; Zhang, Chuanfeng; Wang, Baosheng; Wang, Kaiguo; Yu, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gynecological laparoscopic surgery is minimally invasive compared with open surgical approaches, but postoperative pain is generally undermanaged. Pain management strategies related to the procedure-specific efficacy are needed. Many studies have shown that dexmedetomidine (DEX) has opioid-sparing properties. It is not clear whether DEX used alone for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) could reduce postoperative pain after an invasive procedure. We hypothesized that DEX alone would reduce postoperative pain in women patients undergoing an elective gynecological laparoscopic procedure. This CONSORT-prospective randomized controlled clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of DEX alone for intravenous PCA after gynecological laparoscopic operation. Forty women patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy were enrolled into the study at Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute and randomly allocated into two groups (n = 20 each). In the DEX group (group D), the intravenous PCA protocol was DEX 0.25 μg/kg/h diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. In the fentanyl group (group F), the PCA protocol was fentanyl 20 μg/kg diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. The primary outcome was the mean pain score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at 6 hours after the operation. The secondary outcomes included the Ramsay sedation score, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), satisfaction with pain control, and time to recovery of gastrointestinal function. There were no significant differences in the patients’ characteristics and intraoperative measurements (P > 0.05). No patients received rescue analgesic. The mean VAS scores at 6 hours post-operatively were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). The incidence of PONV was less in group D than in group F (P < 0.05). The Ramsay sedation scores were not significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Satisfaction with pain control was

  13. Effect of preemptive analgesia with parecoxib sodium in patients undergoing radical resection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Zhongkai; Xia, Kunpeng; Shao, Changzhong; Guo, Shengdong; Wang, Shenggang; Li, Kezhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effect of preemptive analgesia with parecoxib sodium in patients undergoing radical resection of lung cancer. Methods: 115 cases of lung cancer patients with American society of anesthesiologists class (ASA) grade I~II who received selective operation were randomly divided into the research group and the control group. The research group patients were given preoperative parecoxib sodium 40 mg plus postoperative normal saline 2 ml, while the control group patients were treated with preoperative normal saline 2 ml plus postoperative parecoxib sodium 40 mg. The pain condition at postoperative 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), and emergence agitation was tested by agitation score. Results: Finally there were 56 cases and 57 cases can be used for evaluation in the research group and control group. The VAS scores after 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h in the research group and control group were [2.23±0.45, 2.35±0.48, 2.51±0.51, 2.41±0.45, 2.28±0.42, 2.16±0.39, 2.11±0.40] and [3.80±0.62, 4.01±0.64, 4.31±0.67, 4.10±0.64, 3.65±0.70, 3.12±0.66, 2.46±0.53], respectively. The research group were obviously lower than the control group, the difference were statistically significant (P<0.05). The rate of agitation was 24.44% (11/56) in the research group, significantly lower than the control group of 59.65% (34/57) (P<0.05). Conclusion: Preemptive analgesia with parecoxib sodium can obviously relieve acute pain using in patients undergoing radical resection of lung cancer, and is helpful to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation. PMID:26550379

  14. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo conditioning, (3) sham mindfulness meditation, or (4) book-listening control intervention. We assessed intervention efficacy using psychophysical evaluation of experimental pain and functional neuroimaging. Importantly, all cognitive manipulations (i.e., mindfulness meditation, placebo conditioning, sham mindfulness meditation) significantly attenuated pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to rest and the control condition (p < 0.05). Mindfulness meditation reduced pain intensity (p = 0.032) and pain unpleasantness (p < 0.001) ratings more than placebo analgesia. Mindfulness meditation also reduced pain intensity (p = 0.030) and pain unpleasantness (p = 0.043) ratings more than sham mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness-meditation-related pain relief was associated with greater activation in brain regions associated with the cognitive modulation of pain, including the orbitofrontal, subgenual anterior cingulate, and anterior insular cortex. In contrast, placebo analgesia was associated with activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation of sensory processing regions (secondary somatosensory cortex). Sham mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia was not correlated with significant neural activity, but rather by greater reductions in respiration rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that mindfulness-related pain relief is mechanistically distinct from placebo analgesia. The elucidation of this distinction confirms the existence of multiple

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Clonidine as an Adjuvant to Bupivacaine for Caudal Analgesia in Paediatric Infra-Umbilical Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Priolkar, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caudal analgesia, has gained popularity in paediatric intraoperative and postoperative pain management, more so with the use of adjuvants to prolong its duration, each of them having various results. Clonidine, an alpha2-adrenergic agonist is being used for its analgesic effects in various doses with 0.25% Bupivacaine. Aim The study was conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy, haemodynamic safety and side effects of 1 μg/kg Clonidine added to 1 ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine solution for caudal analgesia. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled study was carried out in 60 children of ASA Physical Status I, aged 1-10 years, scheduled for infraumbilical operations in a tertiary care centre. They were randomly assigned for caudal analgesia, to either group B: 1ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine solution or group BC: 1ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine and preservative free Clonidine 1μ/kg. All were premedicated with midazolam 0.75 mg/kg orally 30 minutes prior to induction of anaesthesia. Heart rate (HR), Mean Arterial blood Pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were monitored. General anaesthesia was induced with thiopentone (1.25%) 5mg/kg and inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. Postoperative pain, sedation and motor block was assessed by the various scores and patients were monitored for adverse effects. Results The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 3 times longer in group BC. Group B received significantly more doses of rescue analgesic than group BC (p-value of 0.004). There was no significant bradycardia, hypotension, sedation or urinary retention in either of the groups. There was no residual motor blockade at 6 hours. Incidence of vomiting was similar in both the groups. Conclusion Caudal Clonidine in the dose of 1 μg/kg in children is a satisfactory and efficacious adjuvant to caudal Bupivacaine for producing prolonged postoperative analgesia with minimum side effects. PMID:27790555

  16. Physiological stress reactivity and empathy following social exclusion: a test of the defensive emotional analgesia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bass, Ellyn Charlotte; Stednitz, Sarah Josephine; Simonson, Kevin; Shen, Tori; Gahtan, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of social exclusion elicit social pain responses. The current study examined the ability of social exclusion to activate physiological stress responses and adaptively modulate affect and empathy consistent with "defensive emotional analgesia." Measures of affect and empathy, and saliva samples for cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA) analysis, were collected before and after subjects participated in a computer game ("Cyberball") designed to manipulate feelings of social exclusion. Contrary to our hypotheses, social exclusion was associated with a reduction in cortisol, and social inclusion with an increase in cortisol. Both Cyberball groups showed increases in sAA and decreases in both positive and negative affect, with the greatest drop in affect occurring after social exclusion. Empathy did not differ between the social exclusion and inclusion groups and was not correlated with cortisol or sAA levels. These results support the presence of a defensive response to social exclusion in which central stress pathways controlling cortisol release are inhibited. Cortisol and sAA were shown to have distinct patterns of responses to psychological stress, with sAA responding more rapidly. Related methodological concerns for the use of these physiological stress markers and of Cyberball in social neuroscience research are discussed.

  17. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Immersive Virtual Reality Analgesia during Physical Therapy for Pediatric Burn Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Yuko S.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Blough, David K.; Patterson, David R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R.

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6–19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist’s direction for one to five days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects’ perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27–44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect (“fun”) during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. PMID:20692769

  18. Onset of Analgesia and Efficacy of Ibuprofen Sodium in Postsurgical Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brain, Patrick; Leyva, Rina; Doyle, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: A novel, immediate-release tablet formulation of ibuprofen (IBU) sodium dihydrate, Advil Film Coated Tablets (IBUNa), has been developed that is absorbed faster than standard IBU tablets. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy and onset of analgesia of this new formulation with standard IBU tablets after a single dose. Materials and Methods: Patients (N=316) with at least moderate baseline postsurgical dental pain were randomized to 400 mg IBUNa, Advil (IBUAdv), Motrin (IBUMot), or placebo. Primary endpoints were time-weighted sum of pain relief (PR) and pain intensity differences over 8 hours (SPRID 0-8) and time to onset of meaningful pain relief (TMPR) measured by the double-stopwatch method. Results: SPRID 0-8 was significantly greater for IBUNa and the other active treatments versus placebo (P<0.001). IBUNa had a significantly earlier TMPR versus placebo, pooled IBUAdv/IBUMot, and IBUMot (P<0.001 for all), and a marginally faster TMPR (P=0.075) versus IBUAdv. Results for secondary endpoints were similar. Adverse events were comparable across treatment groups, with gastrointestinal disorders being most frequently reported. Most adverse events were mild or moderate. Discussion: This novel formulation of IBUNa provided superior overall PR compared with placebo and more rapid onset of analgesic effect compared with standard IBU tablets. Rapid PR is important in the treatment of acute pain, including dental pain, and this IBUNa formulation represents a new treatment option for rapid PR. PMID:25119511

  19. Acetaminophen for analgesia following pyloromyotomy: does the route of administration make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Arvid; Thung, Arlyne; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background During the perioperative care of infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, an opioid-sparing technique is often advocated due to concerns such as postoperative hypoventilation and apnea. Although the rectal administration of acetaminophen is commonly employed, an intravenous (IV) preparation is also currently available, but only limited data are available regarding IV acetaminophen use for infants undergoing pyloromyotomy. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of IV and rectal acetaminophen for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Methods A retrospective review of the use of IV and rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the perioperative need for supplemental analgesic agents, postoperative pain scores, tracheal extubation time, time in the postanesthesia care unit, time to oral feeding, and time to hospital discharge. Results The study cohort included 68 patients, of whom 34 patients received IV acetaminophen and 34 received rectal acetaminophen. All patients also received local infiltration of the surgical site with 0.25% bupivacaine. No intraoperative opioids were administered. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative pain scores, need for supplemental analgesic agents, time in the postanesthesia care unit, or time in the hospital. There was no difference in the number of children who tolerated oral feeds on the day of surgery or in postoperative complications. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that there is no clinical difference or advantage with the use of IV versus rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27022299

  20. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies. PMID:27141977

  1. Patient-controlled inhalational analgesia in prehospital care: a study of side-effects and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R D; Paris, P M; Stoy, W A; Cannon, G

    1983-11-01

    A clinical trial of a 50:50 mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen for pain relief was carried out to determine the feasibility of its use in a field setting and the side-effects produced by this sedative/analgesic. The gas mixture was delivered from a single-tank system using a demand-valve apparatus which was triggered by the patient's inspiratory effort. This "patient-controlled" sedation/analgesia was provided to 1243 patients over a period of 18 months. Of the 1201 patients evaluated, 20.6% reported minor side-effects consisting of nausea or vomiting (5.7%), dizziness or lightheadedness (10.3%), excitement (3.7%), and numbness (0.3%). Ninety-one (7.6%) patients became drowsy or fell into a light sleep but all were readily aroused by verbal command. All retained the ability to cough or swallow on command. No consistent or clinically adverse changes were found in BP or pulse rates. The trial supports the concept that this agent is a promising sedative/analgesic for the relief of mild to moderate pain and anxiety. Because of its safety, it is particularly suited to use in prehospital emergency care.

  2. Placebo analgesia and reward processing: Integrating genetics, personality, and intrinsic brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rongjun; Gollub, Randy L; Vangel, Mark; Kaptchuk, Ted; Smoller, Jordan W.; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Our expectations about an event can strongly shape our subjective evaluation and actual experience of events. This ability, applied to the modulation of pain, has the potential to affect therapeutic analgesia substantially and constitutes a foundation for non-pharmacological pain relief. A typical example of such modulation is the placebo effect. Studies indicate that placebo may be regarded as a reward, and brain activity in the reward system is involved in this modulation process. In the present study, we combined resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) measures, genotype at a functional COMT polymorphism (Val158Met), and personality measures in a model to predict the magnitude of placebo conditioning effect indicated by subjective pain rating reduction to calibrated noxious stimuli. We found that the regional homogeneity (ReHo), an index of local neural coherence, in the ventral striatum, was significantly associated with conditioning effects on pain rating changes. We also found that the number of Met alleles at the COMT polymorphism was linearly correlated to the suppression of pain. In a fitted regression model, we found the ReHo in the ventral striatum, COMT genotype, and Openness scores accounted for 59% of the variance in the change in pain ratings. The model was further tested using a separate data set from the same study. Our findings demonstrate the potential of combining resting state connectivity, genetic information and personality to predict placebo effect. PMID:24578196

  3. Inhibition of peripheral nociceptors by aminoglycosides produces analgesia in inflammatory pain models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Francisco; Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; López, Omar; Vega, Rosario; Coffeen, Ulises; Contreras, Bernardo; Soto, Enrique; Pellicer, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) modulate nociceptors and ionic channels expressed in sensory neurons. The AG applied in situ could be useful to alleviate hyperalgesia in animal models of inflammatory pain. We tested streptomycin (ST) and neomycin (NEO) as analgesic agents applied in situ in rat paw inflammation caused by formalin or carrageenan administration. The action of ST and NEO on the action potential discharge produced by acidic stimuli in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons was also studied in current-clamp recordings. In the formalin test, ST and NEO significantly reduced the nociceptive behaviour. ST reduced the N-(4-methyl-2-quinazolinyl)-guanidine (GMQ)-induced nociceptive behaviour, and NEO diminished the hyperalgesia to thermonociception and mechanonociception produced by CAR. In the current-clamp experiments, ST and NEO reduced the generation of action potentials when an acidic solution was applied. We conclude that ST and NEO produce analgesia to inflammatory pain, an effect that is due in part to the inhibition of ASIC activation in sensory neurons.

  4. Effect of Cryoanalgesia Combined with Intravenous Continuous Analgesia in Thoracotomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Mi Sook; Hahm, Tae Soo; Cho, Hyun Sung; Cho, Chung Hwan; Song, Jae Gyok

    2004-01-01

    Fifty patients undergoing thoracotomy was studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia (IVCA). Patients were randomized into two groups: IVCA group and IVCA-cryo group. Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale at rest (VAS-R) and during movement (VAS-M). Analgesic requirements were evaluated over the 7 days following surgery. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured before operation, on the 2nd and 7th postoperative days (POD). We interviewed patients by telephone to evaluate the prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain. However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAc-ryo group. The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCA-cryo group, respectively. Our study showed that cryoanalgesia combined with IVCA effectively restore respiratory function on 7th POD, but that it was not effective at reducing the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain. PMID:14966345

  5. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Following Vertical Gastroplasty: a Comparison with Intramuscular Narcotics.

    PubMed

    Kyzer; Ramadan; Gersch; Chaimoff

    1995-02-01

    BACKGROUND: patient-controlled analgesia PCA is a rapidly spreading approach to the management of post-operative pain. The suitability of this method for the morbidly obese patient undergoing bariatric surgery has not yet been determined. METHODS: in the present study we randomly compared two groups of patients undergoing silastic ring vertical gastroplasty. One group received PCA (12 patients) and the other (11 patients) received intermittent doses of pethidine intramuscularly. RESULTS: the cumulative morphine use during the first post-operative day was 52.71 +/- 1.83 mg by the PCA group and an equivalent of 24.55 +/- 3.42 mg morphine by the IM pethidine group (p = 0.0002). The analgesic and sedative effects by the PCA were found to be superior. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of side-effects or complications, except a higher, unexplained incidence of wound infection in the PCA group. CONCLUSION: use of PCA in patients undergoing bariatric surgery has obvious advantages and appears to be a safe procedure. PMID:10733789

  6. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  7. Effect of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia in thoracotomy patients.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Mi Sook; Yang, Mikyung; Hahm, Tae Soo; Cho, Hyun Sung; Cho, Chung Hwan; Song, Jae Gyok

    2004-02-01

    Fifty patients undergoing thoracotomy was studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia (IVCA). Patients were randomized into two groups: IVCA group and IVCA-cryo group. Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale at rest (VAS-R) and during movement (VAS-M). Analgesic requirements were evaluated over the 7 days following surgery. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured before operation, on the 2nd and 7th postoperative days (POD). We interviewed patients by telephone to evaluate the prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain. However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAcryo group. The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCAcryo group, respectively. Our study showed that cryoanalgesia combined with IVCA effectively restore respiratory function on 7th POD, but that it was not effective at reducing the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain. PMID:14966345

  8. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine or fentanyl with ropivacaine given caudally

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Usha; Prabhakar, T; Malhotra, Kiran

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of clonidine and fentanyl as an additive to ropivacaine given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. Materials and Methods: In the present double blind study, 90 children of ASA-I-II aged 3-8 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either ropivacaine 0.25% 1 ml/kg + clonidine 2 μg/kg (group I) or ropivacaine 0.25% 1 μl/kg + fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamics, and side effects/complications. Results: Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. The analgesic properties and hemodynamics were also comparable in both groups (P > 0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting bradycardia were significantly less in group I than group II (P < 0.05) ensuing more patient comfort. Conclusions: The analgesic properties of clonidine and fentanyl as additives to ropivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children are comparable but clonidine offers a more favorable side effect profile. The use of clonidine as additive to ropivacaine in caudal epidural is superior choice to fentanyl because of lack of unwanted side effects and increased patient comfort. PMID:21772681

  9. ACTH-like peptides increase pain sensitivity and antagonize opiate analgesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the pituitary and of ACTH in pain sensitivity was investigated in the rat. Pain sensitivity was assessed by measuring paw-lick and jump latencies in response to being placed on a grid at 55 C. Hypophysectomy reduced pain sensitivity, and this effect was reversed by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of the opiate antagonist naloxone. Similarly, the analgesia produced by a dose of morphine was antagonized by the administration of ACTH or alpha-MSH. The peripheral injection of ACTH or alpha-MSH in normal rats did not increase pain sensitivity. However, ACTH administered ICV increased pain sensivity within 10 min. The results indicate that the pituitary is the source of an endogenous opiate antagonist and hyperalgesic factor and that this factor is ACTH or an ACTH-like peptide. This activity resides in the N-terminal portion of the ACTH molecule since ACTH sub 4-10 is not active in this respect, nor does this activity require a free N-terminal serine since alpha-MSH appears to be almost as potent as the ACTH sub 1-24 peptide. It is concluded that ACTH-like peptides of pituitary origin act as endogenous hyperalgesic and opiate antagonistic factors.

  10. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  11. Continuous intercostal analgesia with 0.5% bupivacaine after thoracotomy: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Deneuville, M; Bisserier, A; Regnard, J F; Chevalier, M; Levasseur, P; Hervé, P

    1993-02-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of 0.5% bupivacaine (360 mg/day) as a continuous infusion through an indwelling intercostal catheter inserted intraoperatively in the management of pain after thoracotomy. Eighty-six patients were randomized into three groups: group 1 = intercostal bupivacaine, group 2 = intercostal saline solution, and group 3 = fixed-schedule intramuscular buprenorphine. Supplementary buprenorphine was given as required. Pain and pulmonary function were assessed throughout the first 5 days after operation. Pain score was lower in group 1 than in group 2 for the first 8 hours after operation (p < 0.02). During the first 3 postoperative days, mean postoperative pain scores of 5 or more were recorded in 9% of group 1 patients versus 40% of group 2 patients (p < 0.05) and 13% of group 3 patients (not significant). Total doses of buprenorphine were lower in groups 1 and 2 than in group 3 (p < 0.001). No between-group differences in pulmonary function were observed. Respiratory complications occurred in no patients in groups 1 and 3 versus 5 in group 2 (p < 0.05). Continuous intercostal bupivacaine provided similar early pain control as compared with fixed-schedule narcotics but induced better analgesia with fewer complications than on-demand narcotics alone (group 2). PMID:8431046

  12. Inhibition of peripheral nociceptors by aminoglycosides produces analgesia in inflammatory pain models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Francisco; Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; López, Omar; Vega, Rosario; Coffeen, Ulises; Contreras, Bernardo; Soto, Enrique; Pellicer, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) modulate nociceptors and ionic channels expressed in sensory neurons. The AG applied in situ could be useful to alleviate hyperalgesia in animal models of inflammatory pain. We tested streptomycin (ST) and neomycin (NEO) as analgesic agents applied in situ in rat paw inflammation caused by formalin or carrageenan administration. The action of ST and NEO on the action potential discharge produced by acidic stimuli in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons was also studied in current-clamp recordings. In the formalin test, ST and NEO significantly reduced the nociceptive behaviour. ST reduced the N-(4-methyl-2-quinazolinyl)-guanidine (GMQ)-induced nociceptive behaviour, and NEO diminished the hyperalgesia to thermonociception and mechanonociception produced by CAR. In the current-clamp experiments, ST and NEO reduced the generation of action potentials when an acidic solution was applied. We conclude that ST and NEO produce analgesia to inflammatory pain, an effect that is due in part to the inhibition of ASIC activation in sensory neurons. PMID:25028102

  13. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  14. Consent for labour epidural analgesia: an observational study in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Trumble, J; Lee, J; Slater, P M; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2015-05-01

    There is a wide range of practice amongst obstetric anaesthetists when obtaining consent for women requesting labour epidural analgesia. This is the first prospective observational study recording the number and types of risks mentioned and whether the risk was quantified. Statements of benefits and alternatives to the procedure were also noted. Fourteen anaesthetists, each consulting a single patient, were recorded during the process of obtaining consent and inserting the epidural. The most commonly mentioned risks (median 7) were headache/dural puncture, failure/difficulty with insertion, nerve damage, bleeding/haematoma and infection/epidural abscess. There was no difference between consultants and trainees, although consultants showed greater variance. It was uncommon for anaesthetists to state a benefit (21%) or mention an alternative option (21%), but there was usually a quantitative statement of risk (71%). Data showed a deviation from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guidelines and these findings may encourage anaesthetists to reflect on their own practice and guide future research.

  15. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  16. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-05-04

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies.

  17. Morphine for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia May Inhibit Delirium Tremens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia-Ta; Liao, Wen-Wei; Huang, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholism is common among trauma patients and often lacks the appropriate monitoring. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), including delirium tremens (DT), can be associated with significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, appropriate acute pain management may protect against delirium; the administration of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV - PCA) may not only alleviate pain, but also reduce the incidence of post-operative delirium. IV-PCA is widely used today; however, little attention has been paid to its influence on the development of AWS or DT post-surgery. Here we present a case in which the administration of IV-PCA may have delayed the onset of DT that interfered with postoperative care and the initiation of psychiatric consultation. The literature was reviewed to determine the potential mechanisms behind the effects of IV-PCA on the onset of AWS or DT. IV-PCA may delay the onset of DT. It is imperative to take into consideration trauma patients’ psychiatric history including answers to questions on alcoholism, so that when an IV-PCA is administered and then discontinued, adequate interventions to prevent further morbidity associated with AWS and DT can be initiated in sufficient time. PMID:26512587

  18. Comparison of lidocaine and compression for velvet antler analgesia in wapiti

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Murray R.; Caulkett, Nigel A.; Wilson, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    This research compared ring block lidocaine anesthesia (L) and compression (C) for velvet antler removal in elk. Thirty-two wapiti were given 1 mg/kg body weight of zuclopenthixol acetate. The next day, they were restrained in a hydraulic chute and given either a compression device or a lidocaine ring block on the antler pedicle. Behavioral and physiological responses to treatment application and antler removal were recorded, and blood was collected for cortisol analysis. During application of L and C, increases in mean heart rate and systolic arterial blood pressure were greater in the C treatment group (P < 0.05, and P = 0.05, respectively). When antler was removed, more behavioral responses occurred in the C treatment group (P = 0.02) and its median behavior score was higher (P = 0.03). Mean heart rates increased for both treatment groups when antlers were removed (P < 0.01). It was concluded that application of C may be painful, and that C was not as effective as L for analgesia for velvet antler removal. PMID:12497964

  19. Co-administration of memantine with epinephrine produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of epinephrine as adjuvant for memantine or lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we evaluated the effects of adding epinephrine to memantine or lidocaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Lidocaine, a known local anesthetic, was used as control. We found that epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine produced a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On a 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potencies were epinephrine [0.012 (0.006-0.020)μmol]>memantine [4.010 (3.311-4.988)μmol]>lidocaine [6.177 (5.333-7.218)μmol] (P<0.05 for each comparison). Mixtures of epinephrine (2.7nmol or 13.7nmol) with drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, enhanced the potency and prolonged the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of co-administration of drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (13.7nmol) produced no cutaneous analgesia (data not shown). Epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine were shown to have local anesthetic effects as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine increased the duration and potency of memantine and lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. PMID:24861513

  20. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    PubMed

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. PMID:27091515

  1. Co-administration of memantine with epinephrine produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of epinephrine as adjuvant for memantine or lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we evaluated the effects of adding epinephrine to memantine or lidocaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Lidocaine, a known local anesthetic, was used as control. We found that epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine produced a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On a 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potencies were epinephrine [0.012 (0.006-0.020)μmol]>memantine [4.010 (3.311-4.988)μmol]>lidocaine [6.177 (5.333-7.218)μmol] (P<0.05 for each comparison). Mixtures of epinephrine (2.7nmol or 13.7nmol) with drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, enhanced the potency and prolonged the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of co-administration of drugs (memantine or lidocaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (13.7nmol) produced no cutaneous analgesia (data not shown). Epinephrine, memantine, and lidocaine were shown to have local anesthetic effects as infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine increased the duration and potency of memantine and lidocaine as an infiltrative anesthetic.

  2. Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia or Multimodal Pain Regimen with Periarticular Injection After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jules-Elysee, Kethy M.; Goon, Amanda K.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Ranawat, Chitranjan S.; Lin, Yi; Kahn, Richard L.; Bhagat, Devan D.; Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Ma, Yan; Reid, Shane C.; Curren, Jodie; YaDeau, Jacques T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty remains in question. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with use of a multimodal pain regimen including periarticular injection (PAI). We hypothesized that PAI would lead to earlier readiness for discharge, decreased opioid consumption, and lower pain scores. Methods: Forty-one patients received PAI, and forty-three patients received PCEA. Preoperatively, both groups were administered dexamethasone (6 mg, orally). The PAI group received a clonidine patch and sustained-release oxycodone (10 mg), while the PCEA group had placebo. Both groups received combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and used an epidural pain pump postoperatively; the PAI group had normal saline solution, while the PCEA group had bupivacaine and hydromorphone. The primary outcome, readiness for discharge, required the discontinuation of the epidural, a pain score of <4 (numeric rating scale) without parenteral narcotics, normal eating, minimal nausea, urination without a catheter, a dry surgical wound, no acute medical problems, and the ability to independently transfer and walk 12.2 m (40 ft). Results: The mean time to readiness for discharge (and standard deviation) was 2.4 ± 0.7 days (PAI) compared with 2.3 ± 0.8 days (PCEA) (p = 0.86). The mean length of stay was 3.0 ± 0.8 days (PAI) compared with 3.1 ± 0.7 days (PCEA) (p = 0.46). A significant mean difference in pain score of 0.74 with ambulation (p = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 1.31) and 0.80 during physical therapy (p = 0.03; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.51) favored the PCEA group. The mean opioid consumption (oral morphine equivalents in milligrams) was significantly higher in the PAI group on postoperative day 0 (43 ± 21 compared with 28 ± 23; p = 0.002) and postoperative days 0 through 2 (136 ± 59 compared with 90 ± 79; p = 0.004). Opioid-Related Symptom

  3. Continuous Local Infiltration Analgesia for Pain Control After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Zhi-Hu; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Li, Feng-Bo; Li, Yan-Jun; Meng, Xin-Min; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate to severe pain. As more research is conducted on the use of continuous local infiltration analgesia (CLIA) to manage pain after a TKA, it is necessary to reassess the efficacy and safety of the TKA method. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of CLIA versus placebo after a TKA. In January 2015, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in the Medline, Embase, PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane Controlled Trials Register), Web of Science, Google database, and Chinese Wanfang databases. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement criteria. The primary endpoint was the visual analog scale score after a TKA with rest or mobilization at 24, 48, and 72 hours, which represents the effect of pain control after TKA. The complications of infection, nausea, and whether it prolonged wound drainage were also compiled to assess the safety of CLIA. RevMan 5.30 software was used for the meta-analysis. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity across studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. Ten studies involving 735 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed that continuous infusion analgesia provided better pain control with rest at 24 hours (mean difference [MD] −12.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] −16.63 to 8.45), and with mobilization at 24 hours (MD −18.27, 95% CI −27.52 to 9.02) and 48 hours (MD −14.19, 95% CI −21.46 to 6.93). There was no significant difference with respect to the visual analog scale score at 48 hours (MD −6.15, 95% CI −13.51 to 1.22, P = 0.10) and 72 hours (MD −3.63, 95% CI −10.43 to 3.16, P = 0.29) with rest and at 72 hours with mobilization (MD −4.25, 95% CI

  4. Postoperative epidural analgesia for patients undergoing pectus excavatum corrective surgery: a 10-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Asad; Tse, Andrew; Paul, James E; Fitzgerald, Peter; Teh, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Managing postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive pectus excavatum repair (Nuss procedure) is challenging but essential in facilitating ambulation and minimizing the length of stay. Although multiple epidural regimens with varying opioids are presently used for pain management, there is currently no clinical consensus regarding which epidural regimen provides the best analgesia outcomes with the fewest side effects. This 10-year retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the quality of analgesia and the incidence of side effects associated with the three most common epidural regimens used at a tertiary care children’s hospital, in patients undergoing the Nuss procedure. Methods Seventy-two pediatric patients were identified as having been treated with one of three epidural regimens for postoperative pain management following the Nuss procedure: Group A (n=12) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 5 µg/mL fentanyl, Group B (n=21) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 10 µg/mL hydromorphone, and Group C (n=39) received 0.1% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL hydromorphone. Our primary outcome was maximal daily pain scores (numerical rating scale 0–10), with an analytical focus on postoperative day 1 scores. The primary outcome was analyzed using linear regression. The secondary outcomes included the length of stay, side-effect profiles as reflected by the number of treatments for nausea and pruritus, pain scores according to epidural site insertion, occurrence of breakthrough pain, and presence of severe pain throughout their hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were analyzed using linear or logistic regression adjusted for pain scores at baseline. The criterion for statistical significance was set a priori at alpha =0.05. Results Group A had significantly higher day-1 pain scores (score 5.42/10) than Group B (4.52/10; P=0.030) and Group C (4.49/10; P=0.015) after adjusting for baseline pain and age. No significant difference in maximum daily

  5. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Place avoidance learning and stress-induced analgesia in the attacked mouse: role of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, B; Frischknecht, H R

    1989-07-01

    In this study, mechanisms of pain inhibition (tail-flick test) and memory (place avoidance paradigm) were investigated in attacked, DBA/2 and C57BL/6, mice. During training, exposure of test animals to 10 or 30 bites by an aggressive, isolated ICR mouse situated in the dark half of a bright/dark conditioning box induced a significantly higher social conflict analgesia in DBA than in C57 mice. Naltrexone (0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg) reduced this response in DBA mice that received 30, but not 10, bites and was ineffective in C57 mice. This points to different, opioid versus naltrexone-insensitive nonopioid, analgesic mechanisms. During place choice testing in the same box 24 h later, DBA mice that had received 30, but not 10, bites showed a significant, naltrexone-reversible, avoidance of the attack place. No place avoidance learning was observed in C57 mice. The data provided unequivocal evidence that place avoidance learning was a result of associative conditioning, in that neither pairing nor social conflict per se significantly changed the preference for the dark side seen in experimentally naive DBA mice. Antagonism of place avoidance conditioning was observed regardless of whether testing was carried out in the drugged or undrugged state, excluding possible state-dependent effects as an explanation for the naltrexone-induced impairment. Individual correlational analysis in saline-injected, attacked DBA mice revealed a negative relationship between the analgesic state immediately after training and the avoidance of attack place during testing. In summary, the results suggest strain-dependent analgesic and learning mechanisms and indicate that endogenous opioids released in attacked DBA mice support pain inhibition and modulate the memorization of attack place by their analgesic effects, as well as by mechanisms independent of pain inhibitory systems.

  7. Comparing Two Different Doses of Intravenous Midazolam in Pediatric Sedation and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Barzegari, Hassan; Masoumi, Kambiz; Motamed, Hassan; Zohrevandi, Behzad; Zeynadini Meymand, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Midazolam has turned into a common drug for pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia. However, there is not much data regarding its proper dose and potential side effects in the Iranian children population. Therefore, the present study was done to compare 2 doses of IV midazolam in this regard. Methods: The present clinical trial was performed to compare 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg doses of IV midazolam in induction of sedation for head trauma infant patients in need of brain computed tomography (CT) scan. Conscious infants under 2 years old, with stable hemodynamics were included. Onset and duration of action as well as probable side effects were compared between the two groups using SPSS version 22. Results: 110 infants with the mean age of 14.0 ± 5.9 months (range: 4 - 24) and mean weight of 9.7 ± 2 kg (range: 5 - 15) were randomly allocated to one of the 2 study groups (54.6% female). Success rate in 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg groups were 38.2% (21 patients) and 60% (33 patients), respectively (p = 0.018). Overall, 56 (50.9%) patients did not reach proper sedation and were sedated receiving ketamine (22 patients) or another dose of midazolam (34 patients, mean additional dose needed was 2.1 ± 1.1 mg). Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrated the higher success rate and longer duration of action for 0.3 mg/kg midazolam compared to 0.1 mg/kg. The groups were equal regarding onset of action, effect on vital signs and probable side effects. PMID:27800539

  8. Sucrose-induced analgesia during early life modulates adulthood learning and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Nuseir, Khawla Q; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alabwaini, Jehad; Khabour, Omar F; Kassab, Manal I

    2015-06-01

    This study is aimed at examining the long-term effects of chronic pain during early life (postnatal day 0 to 8weeks), and intervention using sucrose, on cognitive functions during adulthood in rats. Pain was induced in rat pups via needle pricks of the paws. Sucrose solution or paracetamol was administered for analgesia before the paw prick. Control groups include tactile stimulation to account for handling and touching the paws, and sucrose alone was used. All treatments were started on day one of birth and continued for 8weeks. At the end of the treatments, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM), as well as pain threshold via foot-withdrawal response to a hot plate apparatus. Additionally, the hippocampus was dissected, and blood was collected. Levels of neurotrophins (BDNF, IGF-1 and NT-3) and endorphins were assessed using ELISA. The results show that chronic noxious stimulation resulted in comparable foot-withdrawal latency between noxious and tactile groups. On the other hand, pretreatment with sucrose or paracetamol increased pain threshold significantly both in naive rats and noxiously stimulated rats (P<0.05). Chronic pain during early life impaired short-term memory, and sucrose treatment prevented such impairment (P<0.05). Sucrose significantly increased serum levels of endorphin and enkephalin. Chronic pain decreased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus and this decrease was prevented by sucrose and paracetamol treatments. Hippocampal levels of NT-3 and IGF-1 were not affected by any treatment. In conclusion, chronic pain induction during early life induced short memory impairment, and pretreatment with sucrose prevented this impairment via mechanisms that seem to involve BDNF. As evident in the results, sucrose, whether alone or in the presence of pre-noxious stimulation, increases pain threshold in such circumstances; most likely via a mechanism that involves an increase in endogenous

  9. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  10. Laser acupuncture and analgesia: preliminary evidence for a transient and opioid-mediated effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Peter

    2006-02-01

    Acupuncture is frequently used to treat pain. Although human pain quantification is difficult and often subjective, in rodent models the tail-flick test provides a well-established and objective assessment of analgesia. This test measures the time taken before a rat withdraws its tail from a heat source. Needle and electroacupuncture at the acupuncture point Spleen-6, located at the tibia's posterior margin above the medial malleolus, has been found to increase tail-flick time in rats. The aim of the current study was to determine if laser acupuncture had a similar effect. A 550 μm diameter optic fiber was used to irradiate Spleen-6 for 2 minutes (690 nm, 130 mW) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, control experiments were performed in which rats were subjected to sham treatment (restraint but no irradiation) or irradiation of an non-acupuncture point (the tail's dorsal surface, 1cm from the base) using the same laser parameters. The baseline tail-flick time was measured and 15 minutes later the laser acupuncture or the control protocols were performed and tail-flick time re-measured 10 minutes after treatment. Additional experiments were done in which the opioid-blocker naloxone (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) was administered one hour before laser acupuncture. Tailflick time increased after laser acupuncture (P = 0.0002), but returned to baseline values one hour later. In contrast, no increase was found after either sham treatment or tail irradiation. Pretreatment with naloxone attenuated the increase in tail-flick time. In summary, laser acupuncture exerts a transient analgesic effect which may act via an opioid-mediated mechanism.

  11. Initial experience with ketamine-based analgesia in patients undergoing robotic radical cystectomy and diversion

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsohn, Kenneth; Davis, Tanya D.; El-Arabi, Ahmad M.; Tlachac, Jonathan; Langenstroer, Peter; O’Connor, R. Corey; Guralnick, Michael L.; See, William A.; Schlosser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We instituted a ketamine-predominant analgesic regimen in the peri- and postoperative periods to limit the effects of narcotic analgesia on bowel function in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. The primary end points of interest were time to return of bowel function, time to discharge, and efficacy of the analgesic regimen. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy (RARC) with urinary diversion by a single surgeon at our institution from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. Patients receiving the opioid-minimizing ketamine protocol were compared to a cohort of patients undergoing RARC with an opioid-predominant analgesic regimen. Results: In total, 15 patients (Group A) were included in the ketamine-predominant regimen and 25 patients (Group B) in the opioid-predominant control group. Three patients (19%) in Group A discontinued the protocol due to ketamine side effects. The mean time to bowel movement and length of stay in Group A versus Group B was 3 versus 6 days (p < 0.001), and 4 versus 8 days, respectively (p < 0.001). Group A patients received an average of 13.0 mg of morphine versus 97.5 mg in Group B (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients who received our ketamine pain control regimen had a shorter time to return of bowel function and length of hospitalization after RARC. Our study has its limitations as a retrospective, single surgeon, single institution study and the non-randomization of patients. Notwithstanding these limitations, this study was not designed to show inferiority of one approach, but instead to show that our protocol is safe and efficacious, warranting further study in a prospective fashion. PMID:26225179

  12. Comparative clinical study of gabapentin and pregabalin for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rajshree; Tripathi, Manoj; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in central sensitization by gabapentinoids that include gabapentin and pregabalin may reduce acute postoperative pain. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative analgesic benefit and efficacy in patients administered with oral gabapentin or pregabalin as premedication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized, prospective, and comparative study. Materials and Methods: In this study, recruited patients were randomly allocated in three groups. Groups A, B, and C received 2 capsules of B complex, 3 capsules of 300 mg gabapentin each, and 2 capsules of 75 mg pregabalin, respectively, each in 30 patients of each group, 1 h before induction of anesthesia. Postoperative efficacy among th