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Sample records for ketorolac para analgesia

  1. Ketorolac

    MedlinePlus

    Ketorolac is used to relieve moderately severe pain, usually after surgery. Ketorolac is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. It works by stopping the body's production of a substance that causes pain, fever, ...

  2. Effects of ketorolac versus bupivacaine coadministration during patient-controlled hydromorphone epidural analgesia after thoracotomy procedures.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Bossard, R F; White, P F; Yeatts, R W

    1997-03-01

    We studied the comparative effects of ketorolac versus bupivacaine supplementation of hydromorphone (HM) patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) on the HM requirement, postoperative pain, and pulmonary function in 62 consenting patients after thoracotomy procedures. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of three different combinations of analgesic medications after the operation according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The treatment groups consisted of: Group 1 (n = 23): PCEA HM 3-mL (0.15 mg) bolus doses + saline 1 mL intravenously (IV) q6h, Group 2 (n = 20): PCEA HM (0.15 mg) in 0.125% bupivacaine 3-mL bolus doses + saline 1 mL IV q6h, and Group 3 (n = 19): PCEA HM 3-mL (0.15 mg) bolus doses + ketorolac 1 mL (30 mg) IV q6h. Epidural HM and supplemental analgesic requirements, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores, the incidence of nonincisional pain, and side effects were recorded at 24 and 48 h after surgery. Bedside pulmonary function tests were performed using a Puritan Bennett 100TM (Puritan-Bennett Corp., Wilmington, MA) spirometer before and 24 and 48 h after surgery. IV ketorolac supplementation of HM PCEA significantly reduced the incidence of nonincisional pain and the HM requirement over 48 h compared with the HM PCEA alone group (7% vs 26%; 3 +/- 1.6 mg vs 5.3 +/- 2.8 mg). Both ketorolac and bupivacaine supplementation of HM PCEA reduced the severity of pain on coughing and on movement compared with HM PCEA alone on postoperative day (POD) 1. Significant reductions in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced expiratory flow 25%-75% of the vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were noted on PODs 1 and 2 in all three treatment groups. The decrease in PEFR on PODs 1 and 2 was significantly less with ketorolac compared with bupivacaine supplementation. We conclude that ketorolac supplementation of HM PCEA reduces the incidence of nonincisional pain and HM requirement compared with HM PCEA

  3. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Nefopam versus Ketorolac Combined With Oxycodone in Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Boo-Young; Kwon, Jae-Young; Lee, Do-Won; Kim, Eunsoo; Kim, Tae-Kyun; Kim, Hae-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nefopam is a centrally-acting non-opioid analgesic, which has no effect on bleeding time and platelet aggregation. There has been no study about nefopam and oxycodone combination for postoperative analgesia. In this study, we present efficacy and side effects of nefopam/oxycodone compared with ketorolac/oxycodone in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic surgery. Methods: 120 patients undergoing gynecologic surgery were divided randomly into two groups: Nefopam group treated with oxycodone 1 mg and nefopam 1 mg bolus; and Ketorolac group treated with oxycodone 1 mg and ketorolac 1.5 mg bolus. After the operation, a blinded observer assessed the pain with a numeric rating scale (NRS), infused PCA dose and sedation score at 1, 4, 24, and 48 h, nausea, vomiting, headache, shivering, pruritus and delirium at 6, 24 and 48 h, and satisfaction at 48 h after the operation. Results: Nefopam group showed less nausea than Ketorolac group within 6 h after the operation. There were no significant differences in demographic data and other complications between both groups. At 48 h after operation, satisfaction and the infused PCA volumes of Nefopam group (34.0± 19.7 ml) showed no significant differences compared to Ketorolac group (30.7± 18.4 ml, P-value= 0.46). Conclusion: Nefopam showed a similar efficacy and lower incidence of nausea within 6 h after the operation to that of ketorolac in PCA. Nefopam may be a useful analgesic drug for the opioid-based PCA after gynecologic surgery. Further evaluation of accurate equivalent dose of nefopam as well as pharmacokinetics of bolus administration is required. PMID:26283884

  4. Effect of coadministration of caffeine and either adenosine agonists or cyclic nucleotides on ketorolac analgesia.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Bañuelos, P; Castañeda-Hernández, G; López-Muñoz, F J; Granados-Soto, V

    1999-07-21

    Caffeine potentiation of ketorolac-induced antinociception in the pain-induced functional impairment model in rats was assessed. Caffeine alone was ineffective, but increased the effect of ketorolac without affecting its pharmacokinetics. Intra-articular administration of adenosine and N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist), but not 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680, an adenosine A2A receptor agonist), significantly increased ketorolac antinociception. This effect was not local, as contralateral administration was also effective. Ipsilateral and contralateral administration of adenosine and CHA also increased antinociception by ketorolac-caffeine. Intra-articular 8-Bromo-adenosine cyclic 3',5'-hydrogen phosphate sodium or 8-Bromo-guanosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate sodium (cGMP) given ipsilaterally or contralaterally did not affect ketorolac-induced antinociception. Nevertheless, ipsilateral, but not contralateral, administration of 8-Br-cGMP significantly increased antinociception by ketorolac-caffeine, suggesting a local effect. The results suggest that caffeine potentiation of ketorolac antinociception is mediated, at least partially, by a local increase in cGMP and rule out the participation of adenosine receptor blockade.

  5. Ketorolac Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... if you have or have ever had ulcers, holes, or bleeding in your stomach or intestine, or ...

  6. Ketorolac Ophthalmic

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling and redness (inflammation) that can occur after cataract surgery. Ketorolac is in a class of medications ... eyes four times a day. For inflammation after cataract surgery, one drop is usually instilled in the ...

  7. Ketorolac Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Ketorolac may cause an increased ...

  8. Enantiomer-specific ketorolac pharmacokinetics in young women, including pregnancy and postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Kulo, Aida; Smits, Anne; Maleškić, Sanita; van de Velde, Marc; van Calsteren, Kristel; de Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Deprest, Jan; Allegaert, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Racemic ketorolac clearance (CL) is significantly higher at delivery, but S-ketorolac disposition determines the analgesic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pregnancy and postpartum period on enantiomer-specific (S and R) intravenous (IV) ketorolac pharmacokinetics (PKs). Data in women shortly following cesarean delivery (n=39) were pooled with data in a subgroup of these women that was reevaluated in the later postpartum period (postpartum group, n=8/39) and with eight healthy female volunteers. All women received single IV bolus of 30 mg ketorolac tromethamine. Five plasma samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours and plasma concentrations were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Enantiomer-specific PKs were calculated using PKSolver. Unpaired analysis showed that distribution volume at steady state (Vss, L/kg) for S- and R-ketorolac was significantly higher in women shortly following cesarean delivery (n=31) compared to postpartum group (n=8) or to healthy female volunteers (n=8). CL, CL to body weight, and CL to body surface area (CL/BSA) for S- and R-ketorolac were also significantly higher in women following delivery. In addition, S/R-ketorolac CL/BSA ratio was significantly higher at delivery. Paired PK analysis in eight women shortly following delivery and in postpartum group showed the same pattern. Finally, the simultaneous increase in CL and Vss resulted in similar estimates for elimination half-life in both unpaired and paired analysis. In conclusion, pregnancy affects S-, R-, and S/R-ketorolac disposition. This is of clinical relevance since S-ketorolac (analgesia) CL is even more increased compared to R-ketorolac CL, and S/R-ketorolac CL ratio is higher following delivery compared to postpartum period or to healthy female volunteers. PMID:27968707

  9. Enantiomer-specific ketorolac pharmacokinetics in young women, including pregnancy and postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Kulo, Aida; Smits, Anne; Maleškić, Sanita; Van de Velde, Marc; Van Calsteren, Kristel; De Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Deprest, Jan; Allegaert, Karel

    2017-02-21

    Racemic ketorolac clearance (CL) is significantly higher at delivery, but S-ketorolac disposition determines the analgesic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pregnancy and postpartum period on enantiomer-specific (S and R) intravenous (IV) ketorolac pharmacokinetics (PKs). Data in women shortly following cesarean delivery (n=39) were pooled with data in a subgroup of these women that was reevaluated in the later postpartum period (postpartum group, n=8/39) and with eight healthy female volunteers. All women received single IV bolus of 30 mg ketorolac tromethamine. Five plasma samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours and plasma concentrations were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Enantiomer-specific PKs were calculated using PKSolver. Unpaired analysis showed that distribution volume at steady state (Vss, L/kg) for S- and R-ketorolac was significantly higher in women shortly following cesarean delivery (n=31) compared to postpartum group (n=8) or to healthy female volunteers (n=8). CL, CL to body weight, and CL to body surface area (CL/BSA) for S- and R-ketorolac were also significantly higher in women following delivery. In addition, S/R-ketorolac CL/BSA ratio was significantly higher at delivery. Paired PK analysis in eight women shortly following delivery and in postpartum group showed the same pattern. Finally, the simultaneous increase in CL and Vss resulted in similar estimates for elimination half-life in both unpaired and paired analysis. In conclusion, pregnancy affects S-, R-, and S/R-ketorolac disposition. This is of clinical relevance since S-ketorolac (analgesia) CL is even more increased compared to R-ketorolac CL, and S/R-ketorolac CL ratio is higher following delivery compared to postpartum period or to healthy female volunteers.

  10. Cost effectiveness analysis of intravenous ketorolac and morphine for treating pain after limb injury: double blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rainer, Timothy H; Jacobs, Philip; Ng, Y C; Cheung, N K; Tam, Michael; Lam, Peggo K W; Wong, Robert; Cocks, Robert A

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the cost effectiveness of intravenous ketorolac compared with intravenous morphine in relieving pain after blunt limb injury in an accident and emergency department. Design Double blind, randomised, controlled study and cost consequences analysis. Setting Emergency department of a university hospital in the New Territories of Hong Kong. Participants 148 adult patients with painful isolated limb injuries (limb injuries without other injuries). Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was a cost consequences analysis comparing the use of ketorolac with morphine; secondary outcome measures were pain relief at rest and with limb movement, adverse events, patients' satisfaction, and time spent in the emergency department. Results No difference was found in the median time taken to achieve pain relief at rest between the group receiving ketorolac and the group receiving morphine, but with movement the median reduction in pain score in the ketorolac group was 1.09 per hour (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 2.02) compared with 0.87 (0.84 to 1.06) in the morphine group (P=0.003). The odds of experiencing adverse events was 144.2 (41.5 to 501.6) times more likely with morphine than with ketorolac. The median time from the initial delivery of analgesia to the participant leaving the department was 20 (4.0 to 39.0) minutes shorter in the ketorolac group than in the morphine group (P=0.02). The mean cost per person was $HK44 (£4; $5.6) in the ketorolac group and $HK229 in the morphine group (P<0.0001). The median score for patients' satisfaction was 6.0 for ketorolac and 5.0 for morphine (P<0.0001). Conclusion Intravenous ketorolac is a more cost effective analgesic than intravenous morphine in the management of isolated limb injury in an emergency department in Hong Kong, and its use may be considered as the dominant strategy. PMID:11082083

  11. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after third molar surgery: A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario-Alberto; Martinez-Rider, Ricardo; Perez-Urizar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia is considered an alternative for treating the postsurgical pain of third molar removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after a mandibular third molar surgery. Material and Methods A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups using a series of random numbers: Group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg plus intramuscular placebo (1 mL saline solution); or Group B, oral placebo (similar tablet to oral ketorolac) plus intramuscular tramadol 50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution. These treatments were given 30 min before the surgery. We evaluated the time of first analgesic rescue medication, pain intensity, total analgesic consumption and adverse effects. Results Patients taking oral ketorolac had longer time of analgesic covering and less postoperative pain when compared with patients receiving intramuscular tramadol. Conclusions According to the VAS and AUC results, this study suggests that 10 mg of oral ketorolac had superior analgesic effect than 50 mg of tramadol when administered before a mandibular third molar surgery. Key words:Ketorolac, tramadol, third molar surgery, pain, preemptive analgesia. PMID:27475688

  12. Pharmacokinetics of oral ketorolac in the rat.

    PubMed

    Granados-Soto, V; Flores-Murrieta, F J

    1995-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, a potent analgesic agent used for relief of moderate to severe pain, has been studied in rats who received oral doses of 1, 3.2 or 5.6 mg/kg of ketorolac tromethamine. Blood samples were obtained at selected times during 24 h after medication, and ketorolac concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. After administration of ketorolac, blood concentrations increased rapidly reaching a dose-dependent maximal concentration in about 20 min. Then, concentrations decayed with a half-life of about 6 h. A linear increase in Cmax and AUC as a function of the dose was observed, and not statistically significant difference was observed in AUC/dose or Cmax/dose between doses, indicating that pharmacokinetics of ketorolac is linear in the range of doses studied.

  13. Patterns of Ketorolac dosing by emergency physicians

    PubMed Central

    Soleyman-Zomalan, Emil; Motov, Sergey; Likourezos, Antonios; Cohen, Victor; Pushkar, Illya; Fromm, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ketorolac tromethamine is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) that is widely used in the emergency department (ED) for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. Ketorolac, like other NSAIDs, exhibits an analgesic ceiling effect and previous research suggests that 10 mg is possibly the ceiling dose. Do the patterns of ketorolac dosing by emergency physicians follow its analgesic ceiling dose? METHODS: This was a single center retrospective, descriptive study to characterize patterns of ketorolac administration in ED patients. Data for all patients who received ketorolac during the ten year study period from January 1, 2003 to January 1, 2013 were collected from the electronic medical record of an urban community ED with an annual volume of 116 935 patients. RESULTS: There were 49 605 ketorolac administrations during the study period; 38 687 (78%) were given intravenously, 9 916 (20%) intramuscularly, and 1 002 (2%) orally. Through the intravenous route, 5 288 (13.7%) were 15 mg, 32 715 (84.6%) were 30 mg, 15 (0.03%) were 60 mg, and 669 (1.7%) were other varying doses. Through the intramuscular route, 102 (1.0%) were 15 mg, 4 916 (49.6%) were 30 mg, 4 553 (45.9%) were 60 mg, and 345 (3.5%) were other varying doses. The most common diagnoses at discharge were renal colic (21%), low back pain (17%) and abdominal pain (11%). CONCLUSION: The data show that ketorolac was prescribed above its ceiling dose of 10 mg in 97% of patients who received intravenous doses and in 96% of patients receiving intramuscular doses. PMID:28123620

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Preemptive Analgesic Effect of Injected Intramuscular Diclofenac and Ketorolac after Third Molar Surgery- A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Deepthi; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Analgesia pre-emptively administered effect-ively aid in management of pain. Pre-emptive analgesia is anti-nociceptive treatment which prevents altered central sensitization of afferent inputs. Aim To compare and evaluate the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of preoperatively administered ketorolac and diclofenac for controlling postoperative pain after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients with symmetrically impacted third molars were divided into two groups, 30mg intramuscular injection of ketorolac and 75 mg diclofenac sodium were used in the respective groups. The visual analogue scale was used to assess post operative pain for three days and the patients were also evaluated for the number of rescue analgesia. Results The data was statistically evaluated with paired t- test. The maximum time taken for pain perception for Group A Ketoralac was 5.48 hrs and Group B Diclofenac sodium was 4.9 hrs and p=0.235 which was not significant. The mean number of tablets taken by the patients in the first three post operative days was 3.24 in Group A i.e., Ketorolac and 4.04 in Group B i.e., Diclofenac sodium. The values were compared using the paired t test. The p value = 0.004, which was significant. Conclusion Ketoralac showed better pre-emptive analgesic effect for post-operative pain management after third molar extraction. The immediate post-operative pain free period provided by both ketorolac and diclofenac by intramuscular route was same. PMID:27504398

  15. Acid and base degraded products of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Salaris, Margherita; Nieddu, Maria; Rubattu, Nicola; Testa, Cecilia; Luongo, Elvira; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2010-06-05

    The stability of ketorolac tromethamine was investigated in acid (0.5M HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.5M NaOH), using the same procedure reported by Devarajan et al. [2]. The acid and base degradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  16. Comparative evaluation of pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of intramuscular ketorolac versus tramadol following third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashwin V; Arun Kumar, K V; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Rajesh Kumar, B P

    2013-06-01

    Pre-emptive analgesia aims at preventing the central nervous system from reaching a hyper-excitable state known as central sensitization, in which it responds excessively to afferent inputs. The clinical implication would be more effective pain management, thereby reducing post-operative pain and analgesic requirements. This study aimed at investigating the existence of pre-emptive analgesia and to compare the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of im ketorolac [NSAID] versus tramadol [SYNTHETIC OPIOD] for post-operative pain management following third molar surgery. Fifty patients under the age group of 16-25 years with asymptomatic, symmetrically impacted mandibular third molars were equally divided into 2 groups and underwent third molar surgery under local anesthesia. Ketorolac 30 mg and tramadol 50 mg were used in the study group, while sodium chloride 0.9 % was used in the control group. Study parameters included pain intensity scores for 12 post-operative hours, time to 1st rescue analgesia, total number of analgesics consumed during the 5 post-operative days and patients' self assessment of efficacy of the surgery with regardsto no pain. Statistically, the data are presented as the mean values with their standard deviations and a 95 % confidence interval [p is significant, if p < 0.05] for the mean are applicable. Incidences of adverse events like pain on injection of the study drug, local reactions, nausea and vomiting were noted. Patients in the study group significantly performed better than the control group in terms of all the parameters; while among the study group, ketorolac fared better than tramadol. All the drug related complications were mild and did not require any intervention. Pre-operative ketorolac or tramadol in comparison to placebo resulted in a significantly better post-operative pain management. However as against tramadol, ketorolac is a better choice as a pre-emptive analgesic agent for the post-operative pain management following

  17. Evaluation of analgesic efficacy of bromfenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.09% versus ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solution 0.5% following LASEK or Epi-LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Jing; Wong, Sze H; Givergis, Roshan; Chynn, Emil W

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of bromfenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.09% compared with ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solution 0.5% in laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) or epithelial keratomileusis (epi-LASEK), sometimes referred to as epi-LASIK. Methods Eighty eyes (from 40 patients, 18 men and 22 women) undergoing bilateral simultaneous LASEK or epi-LASEK were randomized to receive ketorolac in one eye and bromfenac in the other. Mean age was 33.13 ± 9.34 years. One drop of bromfenac or ketorolac was instilled in each eye 15 minutes and one minute prior to surgery, and two and four hours following surgery. Patients were instructed to instill the medications on-label each day through postoperative day 4. The subjects completed pain and visual blurriness assessments from day of surgery to postoperative day 4. Uncorrected visual acuity was tested on postoperative days 1 and 6. Results For each of the five days, pain scores for bromfenac-treated eyes were significantly less than that for ketorolac-treated eyes (P < 0.01). Of the 40 patients, 32 (80%) said bromfenac provided better postoperative analgesia than ketorolac. There was no statistically significant difference in visual blurriness scores between the two groups (P > 0.1). Uncorrected visual acuity did not vary significantly between the treatment groups (P > 0.1). No serious adverse events were noted. Conclusion Bromfenac is subjectively superior to ketorolac in reducing postoperative pain following LASEK or epi-LASEK. The subjects tolerated the drugs well with no serious adverse outcomes and no difference in uncorrected visual acuity. PMID:22034570

  18. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  19. Obstetric Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Thistlewood, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article deals with current knowledge about labour pain; the effects of labour pain on the parturient, the fetus, and uterine activity; the benefits and risks of the various labour-pain options; and the parturient's right to exercise informed choice of analgesia options. PMID:21253234

  20. A Clinical Evaluation of the Analgesic Efficacy of Preoperative Administration of Ketorolac and Dexamethasone Following Surgical Removal of Third Molars

    PubMed Central

    Claseman, Timothy S.; Foley, William L.; Davis, Richard D.; Morrison, John W.; Palmore, Carroll A.; Murchison, David F.

    1998-01-01

    significant differences detected were found between the control group and the experimental groups; no significant differences were found at any point among any of the experimental groups. The relationship between the number of doses of narcotic medication taken postoperatively, and the preoperative intravenous regimen was assessed with a Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was found among groups with respect to the need for postoperative pain medication (P > 0.05). Postoperative analgesia following third molar surgery was enhanced in the first 10 hr with the preoperative administration of ketorolac. The addition of dexamethasone did not improve the analgesic effect. PMID:19598716

  1. Effects of Acute Administration of Ketorolac on Mammalian Vestibular Sensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP. PMID:23562034

  2. Effects of acute administration of ketorolac on mammalian vestibular sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP.

  3. [Reduction of omalgia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: clinical randomized trial ketorolac vs ketorolac and acetazolamide].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Balderas, Lorena; Franco-López, Francisco; Flores-Álvarez, Efrén; López-Rodríguez, Jorge Luis; Vázquez-García, José Antonio; Barba-Valadez, Claudia Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: la colecistectomía laparoscópica es el patrón de referencia del tratamiento de la colelitiasis sintomática. El 63% de los pacientes operados sufre dolor postquirúrgico referido al hombro (omalgia), circunstancia que limita el tratamiento ambulatorio. Objetivo: evaluar la utilidad de la acetazolamida asociada con ketorolaco para disminuir la omalgia consecutiva al tratamiento de mínima invasión. Material y métodos: ensayo clínico, aleatorizado, doble ciego realizado en pacientes a quienes se efectuó colecistectomía laparoscópica para evaluar la reducción de la omalgia postoperatoria y comparar el efecto de ketorolaco y ketorolaco más acetazolamida. En cada grupo se estudiaron 31 pacientes. El grupo de estudio recibió 250 mg de acetazolamida antes de la inducción anestésica, y 30 mg de ketorolaco en el postoperatorio inmediato. El grupo control recibió una tableta de placebo antes de la inducción anestésica, y 30 mg de ketorolaco en el postoperatorio inmediato. La omalgia se evaluó con la escala visual análoga. Las variables estudiadas incluyeron: edad, sexo, flujo de dióxido de carbono, presión intrabdominal, tiempo quirúrgico, cirugía electiva o urgente, omalgia, intensidad del dolor evaluada con la escala visual análoga y analgesia de rescate. Resultados: los grupos estudiados fueron homogéneos, el análisis estadístico no mostró diferencias en las variables estudiadas. En el grupo de estudio la omalgia coexistió en 9.67% de los pacientes y en el grupo control en 58.06% (p < 0.001). Conclusión: la administración por vía oral de 250 mg de acetazolamida y 30 mg de ketorolaco redujo significativamente la omalgia en los pacientes a quienes se realizó colecistectomía laparoscópica.

  4. Tissue adhesive to treat 2-site corneal melting associated with topical ketorolac use.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Alexandre S; Rapuano, Christopher J; Tabas, Janine G

    2003-02-01

    We report a case of a 78-year-old man presenting with 2 discrete areas of sterile corneal melting associated with chronic use of topical ketorolac after uneventful clear corneal phacoemulsification. He was treated successfully with tissue adhesive application. Patients receiving chronic topical ketorolac treatment, especially those with ocular surface abnormalities, can present with severe complications such as corneal melting.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of ketorolac tromethamine in horses after intravenous, intramuscular, and oral single-dose administration.

    PubMed

    Bianco, A W; Constable, P D; Cooper, B R; Taylor, S D

    2016-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an integral component of equine analgesia, yet currently available NSAIDs are both limited in their analgesic efficacy and have adverse effects. The NSAID ketorolac tromethamine (KT) is widely used in humans as a potent morphine-sparing analgesic drug but has not been fully evaluated in horses. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of KT in horses after intravenous (i.v.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral (p.o.) administration. Nine healthy adult horses received a single 0.5-mg/kg dose of KT via each route of administration. Plasma was collected up to 48 h postadministration and analyzed for KT concentration using HPLC/MS/MS. Noncompartmental analysis of i.v. dosage indicated a mean plasma clearance of 8.4 (mL/min)/kg and an estimated mean volume of distribution at steady-state of 0.77 L/kg. Noncompartmental analysis of i.v., i.m., and p.o. dosages indicated mean residence times of 2.0, 2.6, and 7.1 h, respectively. The drug was rapidly absorbed after i.m. and p.o. administration, and mean bioavailability was 71% and 57% for i.m. and p.o. administration, respectively. Adverse effects were not observed after i.v., i.m., and p.o. administration. More studies are needed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of KT in horses.

  6. The Ablation or Reduction of Intraoperative Tourniquet Pain with Preoperative Administration of IV Ketorolac Tromethamine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    from the same cause. 1. Depth of anesthesia between individuals varies depending upon their response to and metabolism of anesthetic agents . 2. The...review of the nervous system. Insight as to why pharmacological agents used in general anesthesia alter this noxious response is also important...peripherally-acting agent would be. Ketorolac tromethamine is a peripherally- acting drug capable of inhibiting prostaglandins. In contrast to ketorolac

  7. Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered DDX3 inhibitor to treat oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sabindra K.; Routray, Samapika; Veeramachaneni, Ganesh Kumar; Dash, Rupesh; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-01-01

    DDX3 belongs to DEAD box RNA helicase family and is involved in the progression of several types of cancer. In this work, we employed a High Throughput Virtual screening approach to identify bioactive compounds against DDX3 from ZINC natural database. Ketorolac salt was selected based on its binding free energy less than or equals to −5 Kcal/mol with reference to existing synthetic DDX3 inhibitors and strong hydrogen bond interactions as similar to crystallized DDX3 protein (2I4I). The anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac salt against DDX3 was tested using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. This compound significantly down regulated the expression of DDX3 in human OSCC line (H357) and the half maximal growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Ketorolac salt in H357 cell line is 2.6 µM. Ketorolac salt also inhibited the ATP hydrolysis by directly interacting with DDX3. More importantly, we observed decreased number of neoplastic tongue lesions and reduced lesion severity in Ketorolac salt treated groups in a carcinogen induced tongue tumor mouse model. Taken together, our result demonstrates that Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered bioactive compound against DDX3 and this compound can be used as an ideal drug candidate to treat DDX3 associated oral cancer. PMID:25918862

  8. A comparison of ketorolac with flunixin, butorphanol, and oxymorphone in controlling postoperative pain in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mathews, K A; Paley, D M; Foster, R A; Valliant, A E; Young, S S

    1996-09-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, was compared with flunixin and butorphanol for its analgesic efficacy and potential side effects after laparotomy or shoulder arthrotomy in dogs. Sixty-four dogs were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol 0.4 mg/kg body weight (BW) (n = 21), flunixin 1.0 mg/kg BW (n = 21), or ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg BW (n = 22), in a double blind fashion. The analgesic efficacy was rated from 1 to 4 (1 = inadequate, 4 = excellent) for each dog. The average scores after laparotomy were ketorolac, 3.4; flunixin, 2.7; and butorphanol, 1.6. After shoulder arthrotomy, the average scores were ketorolac, 3.5; flunixin, 3.0; and butorphanol, 1.4 (5/11 dogs). As butorphanol was unable to control pain after shoulder arthrotomy, oxymorphone, 0.05 mg/kg BW, replaced butorphanol in a subsequent group of dogs and had a score of 2.0 (6/11 dogs). Serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine were significantly elevated above baseline at 24 hours postoperatively in dogs receiving flunixin. One dog in each group developed melena or hematochezia. One dog receiving ketorolac had histological evidence of gastric ulceration. We concluded that ketorolac is a good analgesic for postoperative pain in dogs.

  9. Advances in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cynthia A

    2010-01-01

    The pain of childbirth is arguably the most severe pain most women will endure in their lifetimes. The pain of the early first stage of labor arises from dilation of the lower uterine segment and cervix. Pain from the late first stage and second stage of labor arises from descent of the fetus in the birth canal, resulting in distension and tearing of tissues in the vagina and perineum. An array of regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic, and nonpharmacologic techniques are currently used for labor analgesia. Nonpharmacologic methods are commonly used, but the effectiveness of these techniques generally lacks rigorous scientific study. Continuous labor support has been shown to decrease the use of pharmacologic analgesia and shorten labor. Intradermal water injections decrease back labor pain. Neuraxial labor analgesia (most commonly epidural or combined spinal-epidural) is the most effective method of pain relief during childbirth, and the only method that provides complete analgesia without maternal or fetal sedation. Current techniques commonly combine a low dose of local anesthetic (bupivacaine or ropivacaine) with a lipid soluble opioid (fentanyl or sufentanil). Neuraxial analgesia does not increase the rate of cesarean delivery compared to systemic opioid analgesia; however, dense neuraxial analgesia may increase the risk of instrumental vaginal delivery. PMID:21072284

  10. Local Infiltration Analgesia reduces pain and hospital stay after primary TKA: randomized controlled double blind trial.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Wani, Ajaz Majeed; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative analgesia following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with the use of parenteral opioids or epidural analgesia can be associated with important side effects. Good perioperative analgesia facilitates faster rehabilitation, improves patient satisfaction, and may reduce the hospital stay. We investigated the analgesic effect of a locally injected mixture of drugs, in a double blinded RCT in 80 primary TKA. They were randomized either to receive a periarticular mixture of drugs containing bupivacaine, ketorolac, morphine, and adrenalline or to receive normal saline. Visual analog scores (VAS) for pain (at rest and during activity) and for patient satisfaction and range of motion were recorded postoperatively. The patients who had received the periarticular injection used significantly less the Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) after the surgery as compared to the control group. In addition, they had lower VAS for pain during rest and activity and higher visual analog scores for patient satisfaction 72 hours postoperatively. No major complication related to the drugs was observed. Intraoperative periarticular injection with multimodal drugs following TKA can significantly reduce the postoperative pain and hence the requirements for PCA and hospital stay, with no apparent risks.

  11. Obstetric analgesia - update 2016.

    PubMed

    Heesen, Michael; Klimek, Markus

    2016-07-07

    Neuraxial labor analgesia can be initiated via combined spinal-epidural (CSE) or stand-alone epidural. Pros and cons of these techniques are outlined in this review. In recent years computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia (CI-PCEA) and programed intermittent epidural boluses (PIEB) have been developed, adding to continuous infusion and PCEA for the maintenance of neuraxial analgesia. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) and fever can occur secondary to labor epidural that both have clinical relevance for the care givers. Insights into the mechanism of epidural fever and treatment strategies for PDPH are outlined. Due to the increase in obesity the specific considerations for this patient group are discussed. New data have been presented for remifentanil, an ultra-shortly acting opioid, that is used in obstetric analgesia. Without breaking new data, the use of nitrous oxide especially by midwives has a kind of renaissance, and this will be discussed, too.

  12. Effect of ketorolac on the prevention of emergence agitation in children after sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deokkyu; Doo, A Ram; Lim, Hyungsun; Son, Ji-Seon; Lee, Jun-Rae; Han, Young-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ketorolac on the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children recovering from sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Eighty-five children aged 3 to 7 years were randomly assigned to the control group or the ketorolac group (1 mg/kg ketorolac). The children were evaluated by the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale and a four-point agitation scale. Results The median agitation scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. The overall incidence of emergence agitation was similar in the two groups (41% in the control group vs. 32% in the ketorolac group, P = 0.526). The number of children who received rescue drugs for treatment of emergence agitation was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions The administration of 1 mg/kg of ketorolac is not effective in decreasing the incidence and severity of emergence agitation in children aged 3 to 7 years after sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:23560190

  13. Ketorolac versus Magnesium Sulfate in Migraine Headache Pain Management; a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Delavar Kasmaei, Hossein; Amiri, Marzieh; Negida, Ahmed; Hajimollarabi, Samaneh; Mahdavi, Nastaransadat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a common cause of emergency department (ED) visits. To date, there is no recommended drug of choice for pain management of these patients. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of ketorolac and magnesium sulfate in this regard. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed on all 18 - 60 year-old patients, visiting two different EDs with complaint of moderate to severe migraine headache. Patients were treated with 30 mg ketorolac in one hospital and 1 gram magnesium sulfate in the other. Pain scores were assessed on arrival, 1 and 2 hours after drugs administration and quality of pain management was compared between two groups using SPSS 22. Results: 70 patients with the mean age of 36.4 ± 11.4 years were enrolled (51.4% male). The two groups were similar regarding baseline characteristics (p > 0.05). The improvement in pain score in magnesium sulfate group was greater than Ketorolac group after both one hour (6 vs 3; p < 0.001) and two hours (7 vs 5; p < 0.001). Conclusion: It seems that both ketorolac and magnesium sulfate are significantly effective in pain control of patients with migraine headache presenting to the emergency department. Magnesium sulfate was superior to ketorolac both one and two hours after drug administration. PMID:28286809

  14. Levobupivacaine for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Makhni, Reena; Sethi, Savinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combined spinal-epidural analgesia has become the preferred technique for labor analgesia as it combines the benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of epidural catheter. Study was carried out with the primary aim to compare levobupivacaine and ropivacaine with fentanyl in terms of onset and duration of sensory block and to know maternal and fetal outcome. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 primipara of the American Society of Anesthesiologists health status Class I and II with singleton pregnancy in active stage of labor were randomly allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A received 3 mg intrathecal levobupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of levobupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 30 μg whereas Group B received 4 mg intrathecal ropivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% with fentanyl 30 μg. Patients were monitored for sensory and motor block characteristics, hemodynamics, maternal and fetal outcome, side effects, and complications. These characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and “unpaired t-test.” Results: Onset of analgesia was rapid in Group A (4.72 ± 0.54 min) as compared to Group B (5.58 ± 0.49 min). Duration of analgesia was also prolonged in Group A (117.00 ± 11.86 min) as compared to Group B (90.17 ± 8.85 min). Patients remained hemodynamically stable and side effects, and complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Levobupivacaine with fentanyl leads to early onset and prolonged duration of analgesia as compared to ropivacaine with fentanyl during labor analgesia. PMID:27746539

  15. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016.

  16. [Placebo analgesia and sleep].

    PubMed

    Chouchou, F; Lavigne, G-J

    2014-10-01

    The placebo response is a psychobiological phenomenon for clinical benefits following the administration of an inert substance whatever its form. This phenomenon can be attributed to a wide range of neurobiological processes, such as expectations of relief, the Pavlovian conditioning and learning, emotional regulation, and reward mechanisms, which are themselves under the influence of processes that take place during sleep. The study of placebo analgesia in healthy from a placebo conditioning associated with analgesic suggestions has highlighted a relationship between sleep, expectations of relief and placebo analgesia: when the induction is persuasive before sleep, expectations of relief modulate placebo response the next morning and paradoxical sleep correlates negatively with both expectations and the placebo response. When the analgesic experience before sleep is less persuasive, expectations of relief are still present but no longer interact with placebo analgesia while paradoxical sleep no longer correlates with the analgesic placebo response. Sleep-processes especially during paradoxical sleep seem to influence the relationship between expectations of relief and placebo analgesia. In this review, we describe the relationship between sleep and placebo analgesia, the mechanisms involved in the placebo response (e.g., conditioning, learning, memory, reward) and their potential link with sleep that could make it a special time for the building placebo response.

  17. Ketorolac-associated renal morbidity: risk factors in cardiac surgical infants.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Brady S; Cabrera, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to identify the risk factors for acute kidney injury in infants who have received ketorolac after a cardiac surgical procedure by identifying patients with a > or = 50% increase in serum creatinine from baseline and matching them by age with three controls that had < 50% increase in serum creatinine. Significant differences in primary surgical procedure, baseline serum creatinine, and concomitant aspirin use were noted. We conclude that the concomitant use of aspirin with ketorolac is associated with increased renal morbidity in young post-cardiac surgical infants.

  18. [Management of ureteric colic with ketorolac and nifedipin vs. ketorolac and tamsulosin in the emergency room].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro J; Rocha-Rocha, Valeria M; Solís-Mendoza, Hugo A; Romero-Figueroa, María S; Etchegaray-Morales, Ivet; Alvarado-Ortega, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: el cólico renoureteral es la manifestación más común de la litiasis. Se trata de la presencia de cálculos en las papilas renales que frecuentemente migran hacia el uréter, ocasionando un cólico renoureteral, caracterizado por un dolor intenso en la región lumbar o en sus flancos. Se buscó comparar el uso del ketorolaco y nifedipino frente a ketorolaco y tamsulosina para el manejo del dolor ocasionado por litiasis en el tercio inferior del uréter. Métodos: estudio longitudinal en 150 pacientes mayores de 21 años con litiasis en tercio inferior del uréter. Al 50% se le administró ketorolaco y nifedipino y al otro 50% ketorolaco y tamsulosina. Se utilizó la escala numérica de dolor (END) al ingreso, a las 4 y a las 12 horas. La estadística fue descriptiva e inferencial (U de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon, chi cuadrada y regresión de Poisson). Resultados: la edad promedio fue 38.17 años y 54.7% de los pacientes fueron hombres. Inicialmente la END tuvo una media de 9.69, de 7.42 a las 4 horas y de 2.05 a las 12 horas. En la medición inicial del dolor no hubo diferencias significativas entre ambos grupos (p > 0.005); 4 y 12 horas después el dolor disminuyó más en los pacientes manejados con ketorolaco y nifedipino: p = 0.0041 y p = 0.000, respectivamente. No hubo complicaciones ni efectos secundarios en ambos tratamientos. Conclusión: la mancuerna ketorolaco y nifedipino es más efectiva que la del ketorolaco y la tamsulosina para el manejo del dolor del cólico renoureteral inferior durante las primeras 12 horas de tratamiento.

  19. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clonidine is an effective adjuvant to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. We studied the effect of clonidine as an adjuvant in wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia. Aim: To evaluate the role of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Settings and Study Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II posted for abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allotted to two groups. Group A received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 3 μg/kg clonidine while Group B received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. A standard general anesthesia technique was used in all the patients. Postoperative analgesia was provided with injection ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg intravenous infusion and tramadol being the rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain score, duration of effective analgesia before the first rescue analgesic, percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic at different time intervals, and total number of rescue analgesic doses in 24 h were compared between the groups. Statistical Analysis: Difference between the bivariate samples in independent groups with Mann–Whitney U-test. For categorical data, Chi-square test was used. Results: Clonidine group has better pain score, longer duration of effective analgesia, lower percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic, and less number of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 h. Conclusion: We conclude that Clonidine 3 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to bupivacaine for wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia following total abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:27746524

  20. [Hemoperitoneum from rupture of liver subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy attributed to ketorolac. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Guercio, G; Sandonato, L; Cintorino, D; Ricotta, C; Diana, G

    2008-01-01

    Ketorolac is one of the most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to control postoperative pain. However, peri- and postoperative administration of ketorolac is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as described in the literature. Notwithstanding this event is not frequent, it can expose the patient to serious complications that should be quickly recognised and effectively treated. We present a report about a female patient with cholelithiasis who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. After the operation, the patient had a haemorrhage that we attributed to surgery in a first time and then to administration of ketorolac.

  1. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  2. Procedural sedation analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades.Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED) usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation) is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:20668560

  3. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Plasma prostaglandin E2 concentrations after single dose administration of ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol) in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Pasloske, K; Burger, J; Conlon, P

    1998-01-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol) is a relatively new, potent, non-narcotic analgesic with cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity and has been associated with gastric and renal toxicity in people and dogs. The objectives of this study were to establish whether endogenous PGE2 exists in the plasma of healthy dogs and to determine if, and to what magnitude, ketorolac alters PGE2 plasma concentrations after administration. Enzyme immunoassay measurement of a stable PGE2 derivative, bicyclo PGE2, showed that after i.v. administration of 0.5 mg/kg ketorolac tromethamine, 1 and 24 h plasma samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less PGE2 than did plasma samples collected from dogs before the drug treatment. After p.o. administration, 1 h plasma samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less PGE2 than did pretreatment samples, and the 24 h post-drug administration samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less plasma PGE2 than the 96 h plasma samples. The results of this study suggest that a clinically effective single i.v. or p.o. dose of ketorolac tromethamine to healthy dogs causes a significant but reversible decrease in endogenous PGE2 production which may partially explain the drug's low therapeutic index. PMID:9684056

  5. Effect of Intravenous Ketorolac on Postoperative Pain in Mandibular Fracture Surgery; A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharian, Hamid Reza; Ilkhani pak, Homa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenous ketorolac on early postoperative pain in patients with mandibular fractures, who underwent surgical repair. Methods: This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in Shahid Rajaei Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during a 1-year period from 2015 to 2016. We included a total number of 50 patients with traumatic mandibular fractures who underwent surgical repair. Patients with obvious contraindications to ketorolac such as asthma, renal dysfunction, peptic ulceration, bleeding disorders, cardiovascular disease, mental retardation, or allergy to ketorolac or NSAIDS, were excluded. The patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous ketorolac (30 mg) at the end of operation in post anesthesia care unit immediately upon the onset of pain (n=25), or intravenous distilled water as placebo (n=25). Postoperative monitoring included non-invasive arterial blood pressure, ECG, and peripheral oxygen saturation. The postoperative pain was evaluated by a nurse using visual analog scale (VAS) (0–100 mm) pain score 4 hours after surgery and was compared between the two study groups. Results: Overall we included 50 patients (25 per group) in the current study. The baseline characteristics including age, gender, weight, operation duration, anesthesia duration and type of surgical procedure were comparable between two study groups. Those who received placebo had significantly higher requirements for analgesic use compared to ketorolac group (72% vs. 28%; p=0.002). Ketorolac significantly reduced the pain intensity 30-min after the operation (p<0.001). There were no significant side effects associated with ketorolac. Conclusion: Intravenous single-dose ketorolac is a safe and effective analgesic agent for the short-term management of mild to moderate acute postoperative pain in mandibular fracture surgery and can be used as an alternative to opioids. PMID:28246618

  6. Labour analgesia: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sunil T

    2010-09-01

    Advances in the field of labour analgesia have tread a long journey from the days of ether and chloroform in 1847 to the present day practice of comprehensive programme of labour pain management using evidence-based medicine. Newer advances include introduction of newer techniques like combined spinal epidurals, low-dose epidurals facilitating ambulation, pharmacological advances like introduction of remifentanil for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, introduction of newer local anaesthetics and adjuvants like ropivacaine, levobupivacaine, sufentanil, clonidine and neostigmine, use of inhalational agents like sevoflourane for patient-controlled inhalational analgesia using special vaporizers, all have revolutionized the practice of pain management in labouring parturients. Technological advances like use of ultrasound to localize epidural space in difficult cases minimizes failed epidurals and introduction of novel drug delivery modalities like patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps and computer-integrated drug delivery pumps have improved the overall maternal satisfaction rate and have enabled us to customize a suitable analgesic regimen for each parturient. Recent randomized controlled trials and Cochrane studies have concluded that the association of epidurals with increased caesarean section and long-term backache remains only a myth. Studies have also shown that the newer, low-dose regimes do not have a statistically significant impact on the duration of labour and breast feeding and also that these reduce the instrumental delivery rates thus improving maternal and foetal safety. Advances in medical technology like use of ultrasound for localizing epidural space have helped the clinicians to minimize the failure rates, and many novel drug delivery modalities like PCEA and computer-integrated PCEA have contributed to the overall maternal satisfaction and safety.

  7. Impact of ketorolac administration around ovarian stimulation on in vivo and in vitro fertilization and subsequent embryo development.

    PubMed

    Jee, Byung Chul; Youm, Hye Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Jee Hyun; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2013-05-01

    We performed this study to investigate the effect of ketorolac (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) administration around ovarian stimulation on in vivo and in vitro fertilization process. Sixty-four female mice (ICR) were injected with ketorolac (0, 7.5, 15 and 30 µg/d) for 3 d starting from the day of eCG treatment. In experiment 1, 41 mice were triggered by hCG and then mated; two-cell embryos were obtained and in vitro development up to blastocyst was observed. In experiment 2, 23 mice were triggered by hCG and mature oocytes were collected; in vitro fertilization rate and subsequent embryo development up to blastocyst was recorded. In experiment 1, the blastocyst-forming rates per in vivo fertilized two-cell embryo showed an inverse relationship with a dosage of ketorolac (97.6%, 64.2%, 35.4% and 25.9%). In experiment 2, degenerated oocytes were frequently observed in a dose-dependent manner (4.3%, 22.9%, 22.4% and 75.0%). Lower fertilization rates were noted in all the three ketorolac-treating groups; blastocyst-forming rate was significantly lower in 30-µg-treating group when compared with the control group. Administration of ketorolac around ovarian stimulation significantly affects the development of in vivo fertilized embryo in a dose-dependent manner. High-dose ketorolac could result in a poor oocyte quality and decreased embryo developmental competence.

  8. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  9. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam Farid; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi; Mostafa, Manal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5%) and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration. PMID:22412775

  10. Lipid Nanocapsule-Based Gels for Enhancement of Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Soltanzadeh, Sindokht

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports show ineffective transdermal delivery of ketorolac by nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). The aim of the present work was enhancement of transdermal delivery of ketorolac by another colloidal carriers, lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). LNCs were prepared by emulsification with phase transition method and mixed in a Carbomer 934P gel base with oleic acid or propylene glycol as penetration enhancers. Permeation studies were performed by Franz diffusion cell using excised rat abdominal skin. Aerosil-induced rat paw edema model was used to investigate the in vivo performance. LNCs containing polyethylene glycol hydroxyl stearate, lecithin in Labrafac as the oily phase, and dilution of the primary emulsion with 3.5-fold volume of cold water produced the optimized nanoparticles. The 1% Carbomer gel base containing 10% oleic acid loaded with nanoparticles enhanced and prolonged the anti-inflammatory effects of this drug to more than 12 h in Aerosil-induced rat paw edema model. PMID:22175029

  11. Paracetamol and ketorolac pharmacokinetics and metabolism at delivery and during postpartum.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; van Calsteren, K; Hendrickx, S; Kelchtermans, J; Smits, A; Kulo, A; van de Velde, M

    2012-01-01

    During pregnancy, changes in renal elimination, body composition and metabolic activity occur. Since these important alterations in physiology also affect drug disposition, pregnancy warrants a focused approach. Despite these differences, even commonly administered drugs have not undergone pharmacokinetic evaluation in pregnant women or at delivery. This is also true for analgesics routinely administered by anesthesiologists during pregnancy or at delivery, like intravenous (i.v.) paracetamol or ketorolac. We report on our observations on i.v. paracetamol and ketorolac disposition following cesarean delivery to illustrate the feasibility of such focused studies and the impact of pregnancy on drug disposition. The clinical relevance of these observations are subsequently discussed, and some future research directions are suggested.

  12. Determination of ketorolac in blood and plasma samples by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Flores-Murrieta, F J; Granados-Soto, V; Hong, E

    1994-10-01

    A new method for determination of ketorolac in blood or plasma samples by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography has been developed. The method includes a double extraction with diethyl ether and detection by absorbance at 313 nm. Quantitation was performed by height ratios of ketorolac and the internal standard (sodium tolmetin). Detection limit of the method was 3 ng/ml using 1 ml of plasma and 10 ng/ml using 0.2 ml of blood. The method is linear in the range of concentrations typically obtained after therapeutic doses of the drug, has the advantages of using low volume of body fluid and the internal standard used is commercially available. Those characteristics allow us to conclude that this method is suitable for pharmacokinetic or drug monitoring studies.

  13. Ketorolac Tromethamine Spray Prevents Postendotracheal-Intubation-Induced Sore Throat after General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H. L.; Tsai, S. C.; Tsay, P. K.; Lin, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postoperative sore throat is one of the major complaints of general anesthesia in the postanesthesia care unit. This prospective study investigated the preventive effect of ketorolac tromethamine spray in postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat after general anesthesia. Methods. Surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were recruited from a medical center. Patients were randomly assigned to group K (treated with 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray) or group D (treated with distilled water spray). Before intubation, each endotracheal tube was sprayed with the appropriate solution by physicians over the 20 cm length of the cuff. Each group comprised 95 patients fitting the inclusion and exclusion criteria for whom complete data sets were collected. The intensity of the sore throat was measured at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after surgery, and data were compared. Results. The two groups had similar characteristics. Postoperative sore throat was significantly less frequent in group K than in group D (p < 0.001) and the pain intensity was significantly lower in group K than in group D at each time point (all p < 0.001). Conclusions. This study demonstrated that preanesthesia 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray could effectively decrease postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat in patients undergoing general anesthesia. PMID:28025646

  14. Exploring Opioid-Sparing Multimodal Analgesia Options in Trauma: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mary; Montgomery, Robert; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Challenges with opioids (e.g., adverse events, misuse and abuse with long-term administration) have led to a renewed emphasis on opioid-sparing multimodal management of trauma pain. To assess the extent to which currently available evidence supports the efficacy and safety of various nonopioid analgesics and techniques to manage trauma pain, a literature search of recently published references was performed. Additional citations were included on the basis of authors' knowledge of the literature. Effective options for opioid-sparing analgesics include oral and intravenous (IV) acetaminophen; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available via multiple routes; and anticonvulsants, which are especially effective for neuropathic pain associated with trauma. Intravenous routes (e.g., IV acetaminophen, IV ketorolac) may be associated with a faster onset of action than oral routes. Additional adjuvants for the treatment of trauma pain are muscle relaxants and alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. Ketamine and regional techniques play an important role in multimodal therapy but require medical and nursing support. Nonpharmacologic treatments (e.g., cryotherapy, distraction techniques, breathing and relaxation, acupuncture) supplement pharmacologic analgesics and can be safe and easy to implement. In conclusion, opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia addresses concerns associated with high doses of opioids, and many pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options are available to implement this strategy. Nurses play key roles in comprehensive patient assessment; administration of patient-focused, opioid-sparing, multimodal analgesia in trauma; and monitoring for safety concerns. PMID:27828892

  15. [Postoperative analgesia and dexamethasone].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Micol, J A; Hernández, J; del Pino, A

    1989-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, prospective study was carried out in 100 patients who had undergone some type of surgical treatment in order to evaluate the degree of pain and relief of pain, the degree of achieved analgesia according to the opinion of the observer and consumption of analgesic agents. The evaluation was carried out on seven occasions during the first 12 hours of the postoperative period. Patients received dexamethasone (4 mg before or after the operation or 8 mg after the operation), 6-methylprednisolone (16 mg at the end of the operation) or nothing (control group). Regardless of type, dose or timing of administration of the drugs, all patients receiving corticosteroids presented less pain, more relief of pain (expressed by themselves or in opinion of the observer) and needed lower doses of analgesics during the studied time.

  16. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  17. Efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastrointestinal laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhen; Wang, Kaiguo; Wang, Baosheng; Zhou, Naibao; Li, Hao; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been suggested that oxycodone is effective in relieving acute postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone (O) versus fentanyl (F), and the adequate potency ratio of oxycodone and fentanyl in patients with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastric laparotomy. Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized, controlled study, 60 patients undergoing elective gastric laparotomy were allocated to receive either oxycodone or fentanyl for postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (potency ratio 60:1). The patients received ketorolac 60 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 hours postsurgery. Pain severity, side effects and respiration rate were recorded 30 minutes, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the surgery. Cumulative opioid requirements and patient satisfaction were also measured. Results: The median consumption more than 48 hours after operation of oxycodone was 50 mg (range: 40.0–62.4 mg) and fentanyl was 0.8 mg (range: 0.6–1.1 mg), and the percentage of patients requiring rescue medication was not statistically significant. Numeric rating scores at rest and upon movement were significantly lower in group O than in F (P < 0.05). Whereas the incidences of adverse events were similar between the groups (33.3% vs 27.6%, P = 0.64), a significant higher sedation scores were found in patients given fentanyl at 30 minutes after the surgery (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Oxycodone was comparable to fentanyl in the relief of postoperative pain following gastric laparotomy. Oxycodone not only provides better postoperative pain relief and less sedation, but also there was a tendency toward more side effects with oxycodone. PMID:27684835

  18. Patient considerations in cataract surgery - the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria(®)) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients' quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  19. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  20. Pharmacologic synergism of ocular ketorolac and systemic caffeine citrate in rat oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Jacob V.; Cai, Charles L.; Ahmad, Taimur; Bronshtein, Vadim; Sadeh, Jonathan; Valencia, Gloria B.; Lazzaro, Douglas R.; Beharry, Kay D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Caffeine or ketorolac decrease the risk of retinopathy of prematurity and may act synergistically to improve beneficial effect. Combination of caffeine (Caff) and ketorolac (Keto) to prevent oxygen-induced retinopathy was studied. Methods: Newborn rats exposed to room air (RA) or intermittent hypoxia (IH) consisting of 12% O2 during hyperoxia (50% O2) from birth (P0) had single daily IP injections of Caff from P0-P13 or saline; and/or ocular Keto (Acuvail, 0.45% ophthalmic solution) administered subcutaneously over the eyes from P5-P7. Pups were studied at P14 or placed in RA for recovery from IH (IHR) until P21. Eyes were examined for neovascularization, histopathology, growth factors, and VEGF-signaling genes. Results: Severe retinal damage noted during IHR in the untreated groups evidenced by hemorrhage, neovascularization, and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) pathologies were prevented with Keto/Caff treatment. Keto and/or Caff treatment in IH also promoted retinal neural development evidenced by eye opening (92%, P < 0.001 vs. 31% in the placebo-treated IH group). No corneal pathologies were noted with Keto. Conclusion. Caff or Keto given individually reduced retinal neovascularization, but the two drugs given together prevented severe OIR. PMID:27438224

  1. Low doses of tizanidine synergize the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of ketorolac or naproxen while reducing of side effects.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Camacho, Selene I; Déciga Campos, Myrna; Beltrán-Villalobos, Karla; Castro-Vidal, Dalia A; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa M; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco J

    2017-03-14

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether tizanidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, is able to increase the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of naproxen and ketorolac with a low incidence of gastric injury and spontaneous activity in rats. The anti-inflammatory effect was assayed in a carrageenan test, and oral administration of tizanidine (ED40 =0.94±0.2mg/kg), naproxen (ED40=3.18±0.4mg/kg), and ketorolac (ED40=16.4±1.9mg/kg) showed a dose-dependent effect on inflammation. The anti-nociceptive effect was assayed in the formalin test, and administration of tizanidine (ED40=0.39±0.06mg/kg, p.o.), naproxen (ED40=33.9±3.9mg/kg, p.o.) or ketorolac (ED40=6.49±1mg/kg, p.o.) each showed a dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effect. The effects of combinations of tizanidine/naproxen and tizanidine/ketorolac were determined considering their ED40 at a rate of 1:1. Additionally, the tizanidine/naproxen and tizanidine/ketorolac combinations showed anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects. The tizanidine/ketorolac combination was more potent than tizanidine/naproxen, in both inflammatory (interaction index=0.03 tizanidine/ketorolac and 0.07 tizanidine/naproxen) and nociceptive (interaction index=0.005 tizanidine/ketorolac and 0.01 tizanidine/naproxen) processes. In both cases, tizanidine improved naproxen and ketorolac gastrointestinal tolerability by 50%. Furthermore, co-administration of tizanidine with naproxen or ketorolac did not modify the spontaneous activity in the same way as individual tizanidine administration. Considering that tizanidine increases the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of naproxen or ketorolac, with an increase in gastric tolerability, tizanidine could provide therapeutic advantages in the clinical treatment of inflammation and pain.

  2. Effect of benzalkonium chloride/EDTA on the ocular bioavailability of ketorolac tromethamine following ocular instillation to normal and de-epithelialized corneas of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Madhu, C; Rix, P J; Shackleton, M J; Nguyen, T G; Tang-Liu, D D

    1996-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of benzalkonium chloride/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (BAK/EDTA) on the ocular bioavailability (Focular) of ketorolac tromethamine after ocular instillation to normal and de-epithelialized corneas of rabbits both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro Focular of the formulations was measured in flow-through perfusion chambers. For in vivo studies, a 35 microL dose of 0.5% ketorolac tromethamine with or without BAK/EDTA was instilled into rabbit eyes with intact or de-epithelialized corneas. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h postdose, rabbits were euthanized, and the corneas and aqueous humor were collected from both eyes. The ketorolac concentrations from both in vivo and in vitro samples were quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro study results indicated that BAK/EDTA statistically significantly increased the Focular of ketorolac through de-epithelialized corneas but not through intact corneas. The in vivo study results showed that BAK/EDTA had no effect on the Focular of ketorolac in rabbits with intact corneas, based on the values of the area under the aqueous humor concentration versus time curves (AUC0-6h) of ketorolac. As expected, de-epithelialization of the corneas produced a faster and greater ocular absorption of ketorolac as evidenced by the smaller Tmax and larger AUC values compared to those for the intact corneas in vivo. However, BAK/EDTA decreased the ocular absorption of ketorolac in rabbits with de-epithelialized corneas. The half-lives (t 1/2) of ketorolac in corneal tissue and aqueous humor were longer in rabbits with intact corneas than those in rabbits with de-epithelialized corneas. In conclusion, the in vivo Focular of ketorolac was not altered by BAK/EDTA in rabbits with intact corneas, but it was decreased by BAK/EDTA in rabbits with de-epithelialized corneas. Therefore, the formulation with ketorolac alone may be better as a post-operative ocular analgesic.

  3. Methoxyflurane analgesia for burns dressings

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Kathleen J.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for analgesia for burns dressings are discussed. Methoxyflurane has proved satisfactory in a clinical trial, and can be administered by one of two types of vaporizer. The possibility of nephrotoxicity due to methoxyflurane has not been eliminated. PMID:5024149

  4. Physiologically activated phase transition systems for improved ocular retention of ketorolac tromethamine.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Sunil; Vhora, Imran; Desai, Jagruti; Thakkar, Sneha; Thakkar, Hetal

    2012-03-01

    In present investigation, novel physiologically activated phase transition systems for Ketorolac Tromethamine was developed. In-situ gelling systems: pH sensitive gel using carbopol 980 and HPMC K100LV, ion sensitive gel using gallan gum and temperature sensitive gel using Poloxamer 407 and Poloxamer 188 were developed. The drug content, content uniformity, pH, optical transmittance, rheological property, bioadhesive strength, in-vitro drug release, ocular irritation and stability study were evaluated. Characterization revealed that gels were conforming to all criteria required for ocular delivery in terms of stability on sterilization, long residence time, non-irritability and sustained drug release without affecting vision. Thus, In-situ gels can be a promising alternative to the prevalent market formulations.

  5. Oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan Seol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Park, Su Yeon; Ryu, Aeli; Chun, Hea Rim; Chung, Ho Soon; Kang, Kyou Sik; Chung, Jin Hun; Jung, Kyung Taek; Mun, Seong Taek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Oxycodone, a semisynthetic thebaine derivative opioid, is widely used for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and side effects of oxycodone and fentanyl in the management of postoperative pain by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) in patients who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH). Methods: The 127 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 64, group O) or fentanyl group (n = 63, group F). Patients received 7.5 mg oxycodone or 100 μg fentanyl with 30-mg ketorolac at the end of anesthesia followed by IV-PCA (potency ratio 75:1) for 48 hours postoperatively. A blinded observer assessed postoperative pain based on the numerical rating scale (NRS), infused PCA dose, patient satisfaction, sedation level, and side effects. Results: Accumulated IV-PCA consumption in group O was less (63.5 ± 23.9 mL) than in group F (85.3 ± 2.41 mL) during the first 48 hours postoperatively (P = 0.012). The NRS score of group O was significantly lower than that of group F at 4 and 8 hours postoperatively (P < .001); however, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness, and drowsiness was significantly higher in group O than in group F. Patient satisfaction was lower in group O than in group F during the 48 hours after surgery (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Oxycodone IV-PCA (potency ratio 1:75) provided superior analgesia to fentanyl IV-PCA after LSH; however, the higher incidence of side effects, including PONV, dizziness, and drowsiness, suggests that the doses used in this study were not equipotent. PMID:28272250

  6. A review of perioperative anesthesia and analgesia for infants: updates and trends to watch

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Jimenez, Nathalia; Lynn, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of opioid and non-opioid analgesics in neonates and infants. The unique physiology of this population differs from that of adults and impacts drug handling. Morphine and remifentanil are described as examples of older versus recently developed opiates to compare and contrast pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in infants. Exploration of genetics affecting both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of opiates is an area of active research, as is the investigation of a new class of mu-opiate-binding agents which seem selective for analgesic pathways while having less activity in pathways linked to side effects. The kinetics of acetaminophen and of ketorolac as examples of parenteral non-steroidal analgesics in infants are also discussed. The growth in regional anesthesia for peri-operative analgesia in infants can fill an important role minimizing intra-operative anesthetic exposure to opioids and transitioning to post-operative care. Use of multi-modal techniques is recommended to decrease undesirable opiate-related side effects in this vulnerable population. PMID:28232869

  7. Single periarticular local infiltration analgesia reduces opiate consumption until 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Niemeläinen, Mika; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Aho, Antti J; Moilanen, Teemu; Eskelinen, Antti

    2014-01-01

    Background — Randomized trials evaluating efficacy of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) have been published but many of these lack standardized analgesics. There is a paucity of reports on the effects of LIA on functional capability and quality of life. Methods — 56 patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were randomized into 2 groups in this placebo-controlled study with 12-month follow-up. In the LIA group, a mixture of levobupivacaine (150 mg), ketorolac (30 mg), and adrenaline (0.5 mg) was infiltrated periarticularly. In the placebo group, infiltration contained saline. 4 different patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were used for evaluation of functional outcome and quality of life. Results — During the first 48 hours postoperatively, patients in the LIA group used less oxycodone than patients in the placebo group in both cumulative and time-interval follow-up. The effect was most significant during the first 6 postoperative hours. The PROMs were similar between the groups during the 1-year follow-up. Interpretation — Single periarticular infiltration reduced the amount of oxycodone used and enabled adequate pain management in conjunction with standardized peroral medication without adverse effects. No clinically marked effects on the functional outcome after TKA were detected. PMID:25238439

  8. A review of perioperative anesthesia and analgesia for infants: updates and trends to watch.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Jimenez, Nathalia; Lynn, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of opioid and non-opioid analgesics in neonates and infants. The unique physiology of this population differs from that of adults and impacts drug handling. Morphine and remifentanil are described as examples of older versus recently developed opiates to compare and contrast pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in infants. Exploration of genetics affecting both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of opiates is an area of active research, as is the investigation of a new class of mu-opiate-binding agents which seem selective for analgesic pathways while having less activity in pathways linked to side effects. The kinetics of acetaminophen and of ketorolac as examples of parenteral non-steroidal analgesics in infants are also discussed. The growth in regional anesthesia for peri-operative analgesia in infants can fill an important role minimizing intra-operative anesthetic exposure to opioids and transitioning to post-operative care. Use of multi-modal techniques is recommended to decrease undesirable opiate-related side effects in this vulnerable population.

  9. Postoperative Pain and Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia-Related Adverse Effects in Young and Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Jinae; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sumin; Han, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective analysis of 10,575 patients who used fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after surgery, we evaluated difference between young and elderly patients on their characteristic of adverse effects. We reviewed the data collected from the patients who were provided IV-PCA for pain control following elective surgery under either general or spinal anesthesia between September 2010 and March 2014. Postoperative pain, incidence of PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need of rescue analgesics and antiemetics for postoperative 48 hours were analyzed. Pain intensity (numerical rating scale [NRS]) at postoperative 6 to 12 hours (4.68 vs 4.58, P < 0.01) and incidence of nausea or vomiting (23.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in young patients, while incidence of PCA discontinuation (9.9% vs 11.5%, P < 0.01) and sedation (0.1% vs 0.7%, P < 0.001) was higher in elderly patients. Despite larger fentanyl dose used, a greater proportion of young patients required rescue analgesics (53.8% vs 47.9%, P < 0.001) while addition of ketorolac was effective in reducing postoperative pain. Despite lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), a larger proportion of elderly patients required rescue antiemetics (10.1% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) while addition of ramosetron was effective in reducing PONV. In conclusion, when fentanyl-based IV-PCA is used for postoperative pain control, a larger proportion of young patients may require rescue analgesics while elderly patients may require more rescue antiemetics. The addition of ketorolac or ramosetron to the PCA of young and elderly patients can be effective to prevent rescue analgesics or antiemetics use. PMID:26559296

  10. Paravertebral Block Plus Thoracic Wall Block versus Paravertebral Block Alone for Analgesia of Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nai-Liang; Yu, Ben-Long; Hung, Chen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Paravertebral block placement was the main anesthetic technique for modified radical mastectomy in our hospital until February 2014, when its combination with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature was initiated. We compared the analgesic effects of paravertebral blocks with or without blocks targeting the pectoral musculature for modified radical mastectomy. Methods We retrospectively collected data from a single surgeon and anesthesiologist from June 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015. Intraoperative sedatives and analgesic requirements, time to the first analgesic request, postoperative analgesic doses, patient satisfaction, and complications were compared. Results Fifty-four patients received a paravertebral block alone (PECS 0), and 46 received a paravertebral block combined with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature (PECS 1). The highest intraoperative effect–site concentration of propofol was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group than in the PECS 0 group [2.3 (1.5, 2.8) vs 2.5 (1.5, 4) μg/mL, p = 0.0014]. The intraoperative rescue analgesic dose was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group [0 (0, 25) vs 0 (0, 75) mg of ketamine, p = 0.0384]. Furthermore, the PECS 1 group had a significantly longer time to the first analgesic request [636.5 (15, 720) vs 182.5 (14, 720) min, p = 0.0001]. After further adjustment for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification, chronic pain history, incidence of a superficial cervical plexus block placement, and operation duration, blocks targeting the pectoral musculature were determined to be the only significant factor (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.23–0.58; p < 0.0001). Very few patients used potent analgesics including morphine and ketorolac; the cumulative use of morphine or ketorolac was similar in the study groups. However, the incidence of all analgesic use, namely morphine, ketorolac, acetaminophen, and celecoxib, was

  11. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo analgesic effects. Distinct psychological traits can modulate expectations of analgesia, which facilitate brain pain control mechanisms involved in pain reduction. Many studies have highlighted the importance and clinical relevance of these responses. Gaining deeper understanding of these pain modulatory mechanisms has important implications for personalizing patient pain management. PMID:25806903

  12. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    2017-03-24

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect.

  13. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  14. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  15. Solid dispersion of hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin and ketorolac: enhancement of in-vitro dissolution rates, improvement in anti-inflammatory activity and reduction in ulcerogenicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagarsenker, M S; Meshram, R N; Ramprakash, G

    2000-08-01

    Ketorolac, is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, with strong analgesic activity. It is practically insoluble in water and has been implicated in causing gastrointestinal ulceration. This study describes the formulation of solid dispersions of ketorolac using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPbeta-CyD) and beta-cyclodextin (beta-CyD) as carriers, to improve the aqueous solubility of the drug, thus enhancing its bioavailability. Also, reduction in ulcerogenicity was anticipated. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies indicated loss of crystalline nature of the drug, in the dispersions prepared with HPbeta-CyD. NMR studies revealed a strong interaction between drug and HPbeta-CyD. Solid dispersions of drug with beta-CyD retained the crystalline nature of the drug. All the solid dispersions showed a remarkable improvement in the rate and extent of dissolution of ketorolac. The kneaded dispersion with HPbeta-CyD prepared using a 1:1 alcohol-water mixture showed promise in reducing the ulcer-inducing effect of ketorolac in rats. Oral administration of this dispersion was found to inhibit carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats to a significantly greater extent compared with ketorolac or its trometamol salt. Though beta-CyD as a carrier for ketorolac gave faster release of the poorly soluble drug, HPbeta-CyD proved to be superior to beta-CyD, as a carrier in the kneaded dispersion prepared using 1:1 alcohol-water mixture. These results suggest that solid dispersions of ketorolac with HPbeta-CyD aid in faster dissolution and better bioavailability of the drug. The higher solubility of the drug in the presence of HPbeta-CyD also reduces local gastrointestinal side-effects of the drug.

  16. The Antinociceptive Effect of a Tapentadol-Ketorolac Combination in a Mouse Model of Trigeminal Pain is Mediated by Opioid Receptors and ATP-Sensitive K(+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Barreras-Espinoza, Israel; Soto-Zambrano, José Alberto; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Zapata-Morales, Ramón; Alonso-Castro, Ángel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A

    2017-02-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinoceptive interaction between the opioid analgesic, tapentadol, and the NSAID, ketorolac, in the mouse orofacial formalin test. Tapentadol or ketorolac were administered ip 15 min before orofacial formalin injection. The effect of the individual drugs was used to calculate their ED50 values and different proportions (tapentadol-ketorolac in 1:1, 3:1, and 1:3) were assayed in the orofacial test using isobolographic analysis and interaction index to evaluate the interaction between the drugs. The combination showed antinociceptive synergistic and additive effects in the first and second phase of the orofacial formalin test. Naloxone and glibenclamide were used to evaluate the possible mechanisms of action and both partially reversed the antinociception produced by the tapentadol-ketorolac combination. These data suggest that the mixture of tapentadol and ketorolac produces additive or synergistic interactions via opioid receptors and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the orofacial formalin-induced nociception model in mice. Drug Dev Res 78 : 63-70, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of the efficacy and patients’ tolerability of Nepafenac and Ketorolac in the treatment of ocular inflammation following cataract surgery: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Xia, Song; Wang, Erqian

    2017-01-01

    As a new ophthalmic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with prodrug structure, Nepafenac was supposed to have a better efficacy than conventional NSAIDs both in patients’ tolerability and ocular inflammation associated with cataract surgery. However, many current studies reached contradictory conclusions on the superiority of Nepafenac over Ketorolac. The objective of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and patients’ tolerability of Nepafenac and Ketorolac following cataract surgery. To clarify this, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Eleven articles were included in this study. The dataset consisted of 1165 patients, including 1175 cataract surgeries. Among them, 574 patients were in the Nepafenac group and 591 in the Ketorolac group. Our analysis indicated that these two drugs were equally effective in controlling post cataract surgery ocular inflammation, reducing macular edema, achieving a better visual ability and maintaining intraoperative mydriasis during cataract surgery. However, Nepafenac was more effective than Ketorolac in reducing the incidence of postoperative conjunctival hyperemia and ocular discomfort. This meta-analysis indicated that topical Nepafenac is superior to Ketorolac in patients’ tolerability following cataract surgery. However, these two drugs are equally desirable in the management of anterior chamber inflammation, visual rehabilitation and intraoperative mydriasis. Given the limitations in our study, more researches with larger sample sizes and focused on more specific indicators such as peak aqueous concentrations of drugs or PEG2 levels are required to reach a firmer conclusion. PMID:28253334

  18. [Methods of the use of ketorolac tromethamine in patients during the early postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, R N; Maiachkin, R B; Nikoda, V V; Rusina, O V; Broun, N K; Molochnikov, I O

    1997-01-01

    Analgesia with nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) becomes a pressing problem today. One such drug is ketorolak tromethamine (KT), characterized by expressed analgesic activity comparable with that of opioid analgesics morphine or promedol. Our purpose was to assess KT efficacy in analgesia performed by different methods, including analgesia controlled by the patient (ACP) after surgery. In medium severe and strong pain KT was used in group I (n = 60) "as needed" in a dose of 30 mg up to 3-4 times a day, in group 2 (n = 12) by the ACP method, in group 3 (n = 16) KT was incessantly infused in a daily dose of up to 120 mg, and in group 4 (n = 11) KT was injected 3-4 times a day in a dose of 30 mg in combination with morphine ACP. The results indicate a high efficacy of KT: 83% after a single injection. Combined use of KT and promedol decreased the dose by 40-50%. Side effects were observed in 15% of patients: most often it was a sense of fever and sweating (in 4% of patients), nausea and vomiting (in 2%), insomnia (in 2%). ACP and planned injections in a daily dose of 90-120 mg is the optimal method of analgesia in patients after extensive surgical interventions.

  19. Perioperative analgesia outcomes and strategies.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Mancuso, Kenneth F; Owen, Christopher Paul; Lissauer, Jonathan; Merritt, Christopher K; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-06-01

    Despite an appreciation for many unwanted physiological effects from inadequate pain postoperative relief, moderate to severe postoperative pain remains commonplace. Though treatment options have evolved in recent years, including improvement in medications, multimodal regimens, and regional anesthetic techniques, including ultrasound and continuous catheters, outcomes data indicate that many of these strategies are associated with varying degrees of morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on the importance of effective postoperative analgesia and both short- and long-term effects associated with inadequate management. A careful literature review of emphasizing treatment options and potential pathogenesis associated with these strategies is emphasized in this review.

  20. Controlled release of ketorolac through nanocomposite films of hydrogel and LDH nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi Ping; Gu, Zi; Cheng, Xiaoxi; Rasoul, Firas; Whittaker, Andrew K.; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2011-03-01

    A novel nanocomposite film for sustained release of anionic ophthalmic drugs through a double-control process has been examined in this study. The film, made as a drug-loaded contact lens, consists principally of a polymer hydrogel of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), in whose matrix MgAl-layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH) nanoparticles intercalated with the anionic drug are well dispersed. Such nanocomposite films (hydrogel-LDH-drug) contained 0.6-0.8 mg of MgAl-LDH and 0.08-0.09 mg of the ophthalmic drug (ketorolac) in 1.0 g of hydrogel. MgAl-drug-LDH nanoparticles were prepared with the hydrodynamic particle size of 40-200 nm. TEM images show that these nanoparticles are evenly dispersed in the hydrogel matrix. In vitro release tests of hydrogel-LDH-drug in pH 7.4 PBS solution at 32 °C indicate a sustained release profile of the loaded drug for 1 week. The drug release undergoes a rapid initial burst and then a monotonically decreasing rate up to 168 h. The initial burst release is determined by the film thickness and the polymerization conditions, but the following release rate is very similar, with the effective diffusion coefficient being nearly constant (3.0 × 10-12 m2/s). The drug release from the films is mechanistically attributed to anionic exchange and the subsequent diffusion in the hydrogel matrix.

  1. Enhanced electrochemical detection of ketorolac tromethamine at polypyrrole modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Padmanabhan; Senthil Kumar, Nagarajan; Renukadevi, Murugesan; Gopalan, Anantha Iyengar; Vasudevan, Thiyagarajan; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2007-04-01

    A glassy carbon electrode modified with a coating of polypyrrole (Ppy) exhibited an attractive performance for the detection and determination of a non-steroidal and non-narcotic analgesic compound, ketorolac tromethamine (KT). Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse and square wave voltammetry were used in a combined way to identify the electrochemical characteristics and to optimize the conditions for detection. For calibrating and estimating KT, square-wave voltammetry was mainly used. The drug shows a well-defined peak at -1.40 V vs. Ag/AgCl in the acetate buffer (pH 5.5). The existence of Ppy on the surface of the electrode gives higher electrochemical active sites at the electrode for the detection of KT and preconcentrate KT by adsorption. The square-wave stripping voltammetric response depends on the excitation signal and the accumulation time. The calibration curve is linear in the range 1 x 10(-11) to 1 x 10(-7) M with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-12) M. Applicability to serum samples was also demonstrated. A detection limit of 1.0 ng ml for serum was observed. Square-wave voltammetry shows superior performance over UV spectroscopy and other techniques.

  2. Ion channels in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Tamara; Simon, Sidney A; Islas, Leon D

    2010-01-01

    Several recent techniques have allowed us to pinpoint the receptors responsible for the detection of nociceptive stimuli. Among these receptors, ion channels play a fundamental role in the recognition and transduction of stimuli that can cause pain. During the last decade, compelling evidence has been gathered on the role of the TRPV1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. Activation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons results in the release of neuropeptides and transmitters, leading to the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas, where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation will also evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal, or chemical stimuli. For these reasons, and because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 is now considered a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. Using the TRPV1 channel as an example, here we describe some basic biophysical approaches used to study the properties of ion channels involved in pain and in analgesia.

  3. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Siu Tsin Au; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F.; Colloca, Luana

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electro-cutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both continuous and partial reinforcement produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger following continuous reinforcement. However, while the placebo analgesia established under continuous reinforcement extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under partial reinforcement did not. These findings indicate that partial reinforcement can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via continuous reinforcement. Partial reinforcement may, therefore, reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect. PMID:24602997

  4. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Au Yeung, Siu Tsin; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F; Colloca, Luana

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electrocutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both CRF and PRF produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger after CRF. However, although the placebo analgesia established under CRF extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under PRF did not. These findings indicate that PRF can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via CRF. PRF may therefore reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect.

  5. Monoaminergic mechanisms of stimulation-produced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Akil, H; Liebeskind, J C

    1975-08-29

    The roles played by the cerebral monoamines (dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin) in stimulation-produced analgesia (SPA) have been investigated in the rat employing the tail flick test. SPA was elicited through bipolar electrodes chronically implanted in the mesencephalic periaqeductal gray matter, an area previously shown to yield potent and reliable analgesic effects. Four approaches were used to alter transmission in monoamine pathways. (1) Depletion of monoamines by administration of tetrabenazine (TBZ), p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT), or disulfiram. (2) Replacement of depleted monoamine stores by appropiate precursors (5-HTP or L-DOPA) in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. (3) Potentiation of monoamine systems by administration of precursors to previously untreated animals or by administration of a dopamine receptor stimulator, apomorphine. (4) Blockade of catecholamine receptors by haloperidol or of dopamine receptors by pimozide. These four approaches yielded internally consistent results. Depletion of all 3 monoamines (TBZ) led to a powerful inhibition of SPA. Original levels of SPA were restored by injection of either 5-HTP or L-DOPA. Specific depletion of serotonin (PCPA) caused a reduction in SPA, whereas elevation of serotonin levels (5-HTP) caused an increase in SPA. Dopamine receptor blockade (pimozide) decreased SPA, whereas the precursor (L-DOPA) and a dopamine receptor stimulator (apomorphine) increased SPA. On the other hand, selective depletion of noradrenaline (disulfiram) caused an increase in SPA; and at a time when noradrenaline levels are depressed and dopamine levels are elevated (AMPT + L-DOPA), SPA was seen to be particularly enhanced. thus, dopamine and serotonin appear to facilitate SPA, whereas noradrenaline appears to inhibit it. When a general catecholamine receptor blocker (haloperidol) was employed, SPA was diminished, suggesting that the influence of dopamine in SPA is

  6. Treatment with paracetamol, ketorolac or etoricoxib did not hinder alveolar bone healing: a histometric study in rats

    PubMed Central

    FRACON, Ricardo Nogueira; TEÓFILO, Juliana Mazzonetto; MORIS, Izabela Cristina; LAMANO, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Prostaglandins control osteoblastic and osteoclastic function under physiological or pathological conditions and are important modulators of the bone healing process. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and consequently prostaglandins synthesis. Experimental and clinical evidence has indicated a risk for reparative bone formation related to the use of non-selective (COX-1 and COX-2) and COX-2 selective NSAIDs. Ketorolac is a non-selective NSAID which, at low doses, has a preferential COX-1 inhibitory effect and etoricoxib is a new selective COX-2 inhibitor. Although literature data have suggested that ketorolac can interfere negatively with long bone fracture healing, there seems to be no study associating etoricoxib with reparative bone formation. Paracetamol/acetaminophen, one of the first choices for pain control in clinical dentistry, has been considered a weak anti-inflammatory drug, although supposedly capable of inhibiting COX-2 activity in inflammatory sites. Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether paracetamol, ketorolac and etoricoxib can hinder alveolar bone formation, taking the filling of rat extraction socket with newly formed bone as experimental model. Material and methods The degree of new bone formation inside the alveolar socket was estimated two weeks after tooth extraction by a differential point-counting method, using an optical microscopy with a digital camera for image capture and histometry software. Differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA after confirming a normal distribution of sample data. Results and conclusions Histometric results confirmed that none of the tested drugs had a detrimental effect in the volume fraction of bone trabeculae formed inside the alveolar socket. PMID:21308296

  7. Nasal delivery of analgesic ketorolac tromethamine thermo- and ion-sensitive in situ hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Du, Lina; Chen, Xu; Ge, Pingju; Wang, Yu; Fu, Yangmu; Sun, Haiyan; Jiang, Qingwei; Jin, Yiguang

    2015-07-15

    Ketorolac tromethamine (KT) was potent to treat moderate to moderately severe pains. However, KT solutions for nasal delivery lost quickly from the nasal route. Thermo- and ion-sensitive in-situ hydrogels (ISGs) are appropriate for nasal drug delivery because the intranasal temperature maintains ∼37 °C and nasal fluids consist of plentiful cations. In this study, a novel nasal thermo- and ion-sensitive ISG of KT was prepared with thermo-sensitive poloxamer 407 (P407) and ion-sensitive deacetylated gellan gum (DGG). The optimal formulation of the KT ISG consisted of 3% (w/v) DGG and 18% (w/v) P407 and its viscosity was up to 7.63 Pas at 37 °C. Furthermore, penetration enhancers and bacterial inhibitors were added and their fractions in the ISG were optimized based on transmucosal efficiencies and toxicity on toad pili. Sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin of 2.5% (w/v) and chlorobutanol of 0.5% (w/v) were chosen as the penetration enhancer and the bacterial inhibitor, respectively. The Fick's diffusion and dissolution of KT could drive it continuous release from the dually sensitive ISG according to the in vitro investigation. Two methods, writhing frequencies induced by acetic acid and latency time of tails retracting from hot water, were used to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of the KT ISG on the mouse models. The writhing frequencies significantly decreased and the latency time of tail retracting was obviously prolonged (p<0.05) for the KT ISG compared to the control. The thermo- and ion-sensitive KT ISG had appropriate gelation temperature, sustained drug release, improved intranasal absorption, obvious pharmacodynamic effect, and negligible nasal ciliotoxicity. It is a promising intranasal analgesic formulation.

  8. Post-caesarean analgesia: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Kerai, Sukhyanti; Saxena, Kirti Nath; Taneja, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Adequate post-operative analgesia after caesarean section (CS) is vital as it impacts the distinct surgical recovery requirements of the parturient. Although newer analgesic modalities and drugs for post-caesarean analgesia have been introduced over the recent years, review of the literature suggests suggests that we are far from achieving the goals of optimum post-operative analgesia. We conducted a systematic review of recent advances in modalities for post-caesarean analgesia. After systematic search and quality assessment of studies, we included a total of 51 randomised controlled trials that evaluated the role of opioids, transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, wound infiltration/infusion, ketamine, gabapentin and ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block (II-IH NB) for post-caesarean analgesia. Administration of opioids still remains the gold standard for post-operative analgesia, but the associated troublesome side effects have led to the mandatory incorporation of non-opioid analgesics in post-CS analgesia regime. Among the non-opioid techniques, TAP block is the most investigated modality of the last decade. The analgesic efficacy of TAP block as a part of multimodal analgesia is established in post-CS cases where intrathecal morphine is not employed and in CS under general anaesthesia. Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-I inhibitors and intravenous paracetamol are found to be useful in post-operative analgesic regimen. The perioperative use of ketamine is found useful only in CS done under spinal anaesthesia; no benefit is seen where general anaesthesia is employed. Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, systemic gabapentin and II-IH NB need further trials to assess their efficacy.

  9. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  10. The effect of a single intravenous dose of metamizol 2 g, ketorolac 30 mg and propacetamol 1 g on haemodynamic parameters and postoperative pain after heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, C; Gómez, A; Martos, F; Rubio, M; Sarmiento, J; de la Cuesta, F S

    2000-02-01

    Although nonopiate analgesics may be particularly useful in the immediate postoperative period after major surgery, their use has been associated with haemodynamic adverse effects during postoperative pain treatment and in critically ill patients in intensive care. The effect of a single intravenous dose of metamizol (dipyrone) 2 g, ketorolac 30 mg and propacetamol 1 g on haemodynamic variables and pain control in the immediate postoperative period after heart surgery is compared. Seventy-two patients undergoing elective coronary and/or heart valve surgery, were included in a cohort study of 1-years duration (1998). After weaning from mechanical ventilation and extubation, haemodynamic variables and a 4-point verbal rating pain scale were asseseed at base-line and 60 min after the administration of a single doses of metamizol, ketorolac or propacetamol. The Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare changes produced by the study medications. A significant, but small, decrease in radial artery blood pressure was observed in all treatment groups which had little clinical relevance; no vasodilator effects were observed and ventricular function showed only minor changes: propacetamol decreased cardiac index by 10% and a 15% decrease in right ventricular work was also observed. Metamizol and ketorolac produced a 10% decrease in the left ventricular work index. Pain scores showed a statistically significant decrease in all treatment groups. The analgesic effects of metamizol, ketorolac and propacetamol were not associated with a clinically significant impairment in haemodynamic function when administered to haemodynamically stable patients.

  11. Hypno-analgesia and acupuncture analgesia: a neurophysiological reality?

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Brown, M; Stern, J; Sletten, I; Ulett, G

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hypnosis, acupuncture and analgesic drugs on the subjective experience of pain and on objective neurophysiological parameters were investigated. Pain was produced by brief electric stimuli on the wrist. Pain challengers were: hypnosis (induced by two different video tapes), acupuncture (at specific and unspecific loci, with and without electrical stimulation of the needles), morphine and ketamine. Evaluation of clinical parameters included the subjective experience of pain intensity, blood pressure, puls, temperature, psychosomatic symptoms and side effects. Neurophysiological parameters consisted of the quantitatively analyzed EEG and somatosensory evlked potential (SEP). Pain was significantly reduced by hypnosis, morphine and ketamine, but not during the control seesion. Of the four acupuncture techniques, only electro-acupuncture at specific loci significantly decreased pain. The EEG changes during hypnosis were dependent on the wording of the suggestion and were characterized by an increase of slow and a decrease of fast waves. Acupuncture induced just the opposite changes, which were most significant when needles were inserted at traditional specific sites and stimulated electrically. The evoked potential findings suggested that ketamine attenuates pain in the thalamo-cortical pathways, while hypnosis, acupuncture and morphine induce analgesia at the later CNS stage of stimulus processing. Finally some clinical-neurophysiological correlations were explored.

  12. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity), mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost effectiveness of remifentanil as

  13. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  14. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  15. Formulation and pharmacokinetics of colon-specific double-compression coated mini-tablets: Chronopharmaceutical delivery of ketorolac tromethamine.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The present study is designed and significantly planned to study the effect of double-compression coating on core mini-tablets to attain the chronopharmaceutical delivery of ketorolac tromethamine to colon. Double-compression coated tablets were prepared based on time-controlled hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M inner compression coat and pH-sensitive Eudragit S100 outer compression coat. From the in vitro drug release studies, F6 tablets was considered as the optimized formulation, which retarded the drug release in stomach and small intestine (3.51 ± 0.15% in 5h) and progressively released to colon (99.82 ± 0.69% in 24h). The release process followed supercase-II transport with zero order release kinetics. Similarity factor calculated from stability studies was found to be 84.73. From the pharmacokinetic evaluation, the immediate release core mini-tablets reached peak plasma concentration (Cmax of 4532.68 ± 28.14 ng/ml) at 2h Tmax and colon targeted tablets showed Cmax=3782.29 ± 17.83 ng/ml at 12h Tmax. The area under the curve and mean resident time of core mini-tablets were found to be 11,278.26 ± 132.67 ng-h/ml and 3.68 h respectively while 17,324.48 ± 56.32 ng-h/ml and 10.39 h for compression coated tablets. Hence the development of double-compression coated tablets is a promising way to gain the chronopharmaceutical delivery of ketorolac tromethamine to colon.

  16. Formulation and in Vitro, ex Vivo and in Vivo Evaluation of Elastic Liposomes for Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine.

    PubMed

    Nava, Guadalupe; Piñón, Elizabeth; Mendoza, Luis; Mendoza, Néstor; Quintanar, David; Ganem, Adriana

    2011-12-15

    The objective of the current study was to formulate ketorolac tromethamine-loaded elastic liposomes and evaluate their in vitro drug release and their ex vivo and in vivo transdermal delivery. Ketorolac tromethamine (KT), which is a potent analgesic, was formulated in elastic liposomes using Tween 80 as an edge activator. The elastic vesicles were prepared by film hydration after optimizing the sonication time and number of extrusions. The vesicles exhibited an entrapment efficiency of 73 ± 11%, vesicle size of 127.8 ± 3.4 nm and a zeta potential of -12 mV. In vitro drug release was analyzed from liposomes and an aqueous solution, using Franz diffusion cells and a cellophane dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da. Ex vivo permeation of KT across pig ear skin was studied using a Franz diffusion cell, with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 32 °C as receptor solution. An in vivo drug permeation study was conducted on healthy human volunteers using a tape-stripping technique. The in vitro results showed (i) a delayed release when KT was included in elastic liposomes, compared to an aqueous solution of the drug; (ii) a flux of 0.278 mg/cm2h and a lag time of about 10 h for ex vivo permeation studies, which may indicate that KT remains in the skin (with the possibility of exerting a local effect) before reaching the receptor medium; (iii) a good correlation between the total amount permeated, the penetration distance (both determined by tape stripping) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measured during the in vivo permeation studies. Elastic liposomes have the potential to transport the drug through the skin, keep their size and drug charge, and release the drug into deep skin layers. Therefore, elastic liposomes hold promise for the effective topical delivery of KT.

  17. Formulation and in Vitro, ex Vivo and in Vivo Evaluation of Elastic Liposomes for Transdermal Delivery of Ketorolac Tromethamine

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Guadalupe; Piñón, Elizabeth; Mendoza, Luis; Mendoza, Néstor; Quintanar, David; Ganem, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to formulate ketorolac tromethamine-loaded elastic liposomes and evaluate their in vitro drug release and their ex vivo and in vivo transdermal delivery. Ketorolac tromethamine (KT), which is a potent analgesic, was formulated in elastic liposomes using Tween 80 as an edge activator. The elastic vesicles were prepared by film hydration after optimizing the sonication time and number of extrusions. The vesicles exhibited an entrapment efficiency of 73 ± 11%, vesicle size of 127.8 ± 3.4 nm and a zeta potential of −12 mV. In vitro drug release was analyzed from liposomes and an aqueous solution, using Franz diffusion cells and a cellophane dialysis membrane with molecular weight cut-off of 8000 Da. Ex vivo permeation of KT across pig ear skin was studied using a Franz diffusion cell, with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 32 °C as receptor solution. An in vivo drug permeation study was conducted on healthy human volunteers using a tape-stripping technique. The in vitro results showed (i) a delayed release when KT was included in elastic liposomes, compared to an aqueous solution of the drug; (ii) a flux of 0.278 μg/cm2h and a lag time of about 10 h for ex vivo permeation studies, which may indicate that KT remains in the skin (with the possibility of exerting a local effect) before reaching the receptor medium; (iii) a good correlation between the total amount permeated, the penetration distance (both determined by tape stripping) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measured during the in vivo permeation studies. Elastic liposomes have the potential to transport the drug through the skin, keep their size and drug charge, and release the drug into deep skin layers. Therefore, elastic liposomes hold promise for the effective topical delivery of KT. PMID:24309316

  18. The effects of maternal labour analgesia on the fetus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2010-06-01

    Maternal labour pain and stress are associated with progressive fetal metabolic acidosis. Systemic opioid analgesia does little to mitigate this stress, but opioids readily cross the placenta and cause fetal-neonatal depression and impair breast feeding. Pethidine remains the most widely used, but alternatives, with the possible exception of remifentanil, have little more to offer. Inhalational analgesia using Entonox is more effective and, being rapidly exhaled by the newborn, is less likely to produce lasting depression. Neuraxial analgesia has maternal physiological and biochemical effects, some of which are potentially detrimental and some favourable to the fetus. Actual neonatal outcome, however, suggests that benefits outweigh detrimental influences. Meta-analysis demonstrates that Apgar score is better after epidural than systemic opioid analgesia, while neonatal acid-base balance is improved by epidural compared to systemic analgesia and even compared to no analgesia. Successful breast feeding is dependent on many factors, therefore randomized trials are required to elucidate the effect of labour analgesia.

  19. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  20. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p < 0.001). Main effects of noxious thermal stimulation were observed across several brain regions, including operculoinsular, primary somatosensory, and cingulate cortices, whereas hard task difficulty was represented in anterior insular, parietal, and prefrontal cortices. Permutation testing within the brainstem nuclei revealed the following: main effects of task in dorsal PAG and right LC; and main effect of temperature in RVM and a task × temperature interaction in right LC. Intrasubject regression revealed a distributed network of supratentorial brain regions and the RVM whose activity was linearly related to pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus

  1. Intrathecal injection of morphine for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baraka, A; Noueihid, R; Hajj, S

    1981-02-01

    Intrathecal injection of morphine was used to provide obstetric analgesia in 20 primiparous women in labor. When the cervix was at least 3 cm dilated, morphine, 1 or 2 mg, was injected intrathecally. In all parturients, labor pains were completely relieved after 15-60 min and analgesia lasted as long as eight to 11 hours. The analgesia was not associated with any alteration of pin-prick sensation or motor power, and there was no change in the arterial blood pressure or heart rate. All infants were delivered vaginally by use of episiotomy annd a low forceps, except two infants of mothers in the 2 mg of morphine group who needed cesarean section. During the second stage of labor, analgesia was supplemented by lidocaine, 2 per cent, using local perineal infiltration in 14 parturients and pudendal block in two parturients, and by epidural block in four parturients. Nineteen of the 20 newborns cried immediately at birth, and had Apgar scores o 7-9 at 1 min and 8-10 at 5 min. During the first 24 hours of life, the neurobehavioral responses of all newborns were scored as normal. Systemic maternal side effects such as somnolence, nausea, vomiting, and itching occurred in a high proportion of the parturients. However, in the majority of cases, these side effects were mild. Only two parturients of the 2 mg morphine group complained of marked somnolence, itching, and vomiting, which persisted post partum; these were effectively reversed by the specific antagonist naloxone. The analgesic effect of intrathecal morphine can be attributed to its action on the opiate receptors in the substantia gelatinosa of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, supraspinal effects of morphine cannot be excluded. The low lipid solubility of morphine can explain its slow onset and prolonged duration of action. Also, this will result in minimal systemic absorption of morphine, which protects the fetus and results in selective maternal analgesia.

  2. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  3. The effect of ketorolac and dexamethasone on the incidence of sore throat in women after thyroidectomy: a prospective double-blinded randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background We evaluated the effect of two drugs with anti-inflammatory action, dexamethasone and ketorolac, on reduction of postoperative sore throat (POST) after general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods One hundred and ninety-two female patients scheduled to undergo general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation for thyroidectomy were enrolled in this prospective study. Participants were randomly allocated to receive intravenous medication; placebo (Group C, n = 45), ketorolac 30 mg immediately before intubation (Group Kpre, n = 47), ketorolac 30 mg at the end of surgery (Group Kpost, n = 45) and dexamethasone 10 mg (Group D, n = 43). The incidence and severity of POST and hoarseness were evaluated at 1, 6 and 24 hours after surgery. Results Incidences and severities of POST at rest and during swallowing in first 6 hours after extubation were comparable among 4 groups. At 24 hours postextubation, the incidence (P = 0.002, 95% CI of proportion differences; 0.05–0.39) and severity (P = 0.008) of POST during swallowing were significantly lower in group D than in group C. Kpre and Kpost groups did not show a greater reduction in POST than group C, despite lower rescue analgesic requirement at 1 hour after extubation in group Kpre (P = 0.006; 95% CI of proportion differences; 0.07–0.38). No intergroup differences were observed in incidences of hoarseness or adverse events. Conclusions Intravenous administration of dexamethasone 10 mg, but not ketorolac, before induction of anesthesia reduces the incidence and severity of POST during swallowing at 24 hours after thyroidectomy. PMID:28184269

  4. Opioid Analgesia in P450 Gene Cluster Knockout Mice: A Search for Analgesia-Relevant Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Nalwalk, Julia W.; Ding, Xinxin; Scheer, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), which are well-known drug-metabolizing enzymes, are thought to play a signal transduction role in µ opioid analgesia and may serve as high-affinity 3H-cimetidine (3HCIM) binding sites in the brain. 3HCIM binding sites may also be related to opioid or nonopioid analgesia. However, of the more than 100 murine P450 enzymes, the specific isoform(s) responsible for either function have not been identified. Presently, three lines of constitutive P450 gene cluster knockout (KO) mice with full-length deletions of 14 Cyp2c, 9 Cyp2d, and 7 Cyp3a genes were studied for deficiencies in 3HCIM binding and for opioid analgesia. Liver and brain homogenates from all three genotypes showed normal 3HCIM binding values, indicating that gene products of Cyp2d, Cyp3a, and Cyp2c are not 3HCIM-binding proteins. Cyp2d KO and Cyp3a KO mice showed normal antinociceptive responses to a moderate systemic dose of morphine (20 mg/kg, s.c.), thereby excluding 16 P450 isoforms as mediators of opioid analgesia. In contrast, Cyp2c KO mice showed a 41% reduction in analgesic responses following systemically (s.c.) administered morphine. However, the significance of brain Cyp2c gene products in opioid analgesia is uncertain because little or no analgesic deficits were noted in Cyp2c KO mice following intracerebroventricular or intrathecalmorphine administration, respectively. These results show that the gene products of Cyp2d and Cyp3a do not contribute to µ opioid analgesia in the central nervous system. A possible role for Cyp2c gene products in opioid analgesia requires further consideration. PMID:26109562

  5. Relationship between obstetric analgesia and time of effective breast feeding.

    PubMed

    Crowell, M K; Hill, P D; Humenick, S S

    1994-01-01

    The Infant Breast-feeding Assessment Tool (IBFAT) was used to assess the time of effective breast feeding in 48 healthy term infants born to mothers having their first or second baby. Infants of mothers who received an analgesia (butorphanol or nalbuphine) in labor (n = 26) were compared with infants whose mothers did not receive any labor analgesia (n = 22). Timing of the administration of labor analgesia was also examined with infants whose mothers received no analgesia or analgesia within an hour of birth compared with infants whose mothers received analgesia more than one hour before birth. Infants of first-time breast-feeding mothers took longer to establish effective feeding compared with infants of second-time breast-feeding mothers. Male infants also took longer. Labor analgesia significantly affected mother-rated IBFAT scores when initiation time was considered. Infants who received analgesia within an hour of birth, or no analgesia, and who initiated breast feeding early, established effective feeding significantly earlier than infants with longer duration of analgesia and later initiation of breast feeding.

  6. Prehospital analgesia with nitrous oxide/oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    A pilot study of prehospital analgesia with 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen was undertaken in patients experiencing severe pain from various sources. Under the supervision of an ambulance attendant N2O/O2 was administered through a face mask held by the patient and connected to a portable regulator/tank unit. Two types of units were evaluated -- Entonox (with premixed N2O and O2) and Nitronox (with separate cylinders of N2O and O2, the gases being mixed at the time of administration). Of the 72 patients 69 obtained worthwhile analgesia (marked or partial relief of pain) during treatment in the field or in the ambulance. There were no serious side effects, and those that did occur reflected N2O's expected action (e.g., giddiness). N2O/O2 is thus considered a safe and effective analgesic, suitable for use by ambulance personnel. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:7306895

  7. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: an evidence-based narrative review.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, M; Carvalho, B

    2016-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.

  8. Anesthesia and analgesia in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Galatos, Apostolos D

    2011-03-01

    Physical or chemical restraint, with or without local anesthesia, has been extensively used to perform diagnostic or minor surgical procedures in small ruminants. However, anesthetic and analgesic techniques are required when specific diagnostic procedures and painful surgery are to be performed. Apart from improving animal welfare standards, anesthesia and analgesia are essential to make the procedures easier and improve both animal and personnel safety. This article provides an overview of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and techniques commonly used in sheep and goats.

  9. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  10. An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Meng, I D; Manning, B H; Martin, W J; Fields, H L

    1998-09-24

    Although many anecdotal reports indicate that marijuana and its active constituent, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), may reduce pain sensation, studies of humans have produced inconsistent results. In animal studies, the apparent pain-suppressing effects of delta-9-THC and other cannabinoid drugs are confounded by motor deficits. Here we show that a brainstem circuit that contributes to the pain-suppressing effects of morphine is also required for the analgesic effects of cannabinoids. Inactivation of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) prevents the analgesia but not the motor deficits produced by systemically administered cannabinoids. Furthermore, cannabinoids produce analgesia by modulating RVM neuronal activity in a manner similar to, but pharmacologically dissociable from, that of morphine. We also show that endogenous cannabinoids tonically regulate pain thresholds in part through the modulation of RVM neuronal activity. These results show that analgesia produced by cannabinoids and opioids involves similar brainstem circuitry and that cannabinoids are indeed centrally acting analgesics with a new mechanism of action.

  11. Offset analgesia is reduced in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at 2 anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. A total of 25 younger adults and 20 older adults completed 6 offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of 3 continuous phases: an initial 15-second painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5 seconds (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10 seconds (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0-100). Older adults demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, although the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon.

  12. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research.

  13. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  14. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated. PMID:26678391

  15. EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED ANALGESIA AFTER EXPOSURE TO SOME WAR GASES

    PubMed Central

    Auer, John

    1922-01-01

    Cats gassed with dimethylsulfate or chloropicrin in such concentration that death generally results within 4 days, usually exhibit a marked generalized analgesia, both superficial and deep. Gassed cats react with no obvious sign of pain to operative interferences, including laparotomy and gentle friction of the parietal-peritoneum. The analgesia develops within a few hours after gassing, and reaches its maximum in about 24 hours. With dimethylsulfate the analgesia may persist for 6 months; with chloropicrin practically normal sensitiveness has been observed 7 days after gassing. This analgesia is considered to be caused and maintained largely by a general, low grade, tissue aspbyxia which is chiefly of pulmonic origin. PMID:19868605

  16. Influence of adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms in baclofen induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, L; Rifo, J; Contreras, E

    1988-01-01

    1. Baclofen induced analgesia was confirmed by means of the mouse hot plate test. 2. Physostigmine significantly increased the response to baclofen whilst neostigmine was ineffective. Baclofen analgesia was reduced by atropine. 3. The response to baclofen was increased by the administration of tolazoline, propranolol and nadolol. In contrast, the analgesic response to morphine was attenuated by the antiadrenergic drugs phenoxybenzamine, tolazoline and nadolol.

  17. [PERIOPERATIVE ANALGESIA INFLUENCE ON MOTHER REHABILITATION PERIOD AFTER CESAREAN SECTION].

    PubMed

    Sedykh, S V

    2015-01-01

    Early breast-feeding is a standard of perinatal care currently. After cesarean section it can be possible in case of early mother activation (verticalization). Assessment of perioperative analgesia influence on activation timing was the aim of our research. We included 120 parturient women. It was proved, that local analgesia using in postoperative period promotes early mother verticaliration, and optimal breast-feeding starting.

  18. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  19. Anesthesia and analgesia for pectus excavatum surgery.

    PubMed

    Mavi, Jagroop; Moore, David L

    2014-03-01

    The technique of choice for surgical correction of pectus excavatum is the Nuss procedure, a minimally invasive technique in which rigid metal bars are placed transthoracically beneath the sternum and costal cartilages until permanent remodeling of the chest wall has occurred. Intraoperatively, anesthesia focuses on three areas: the potential for catastrophic blood loss caused by perforation of large capacitance vessels and the heart, the potential for malignant arrhythmias, and the consequences of bilateral iatrogenic pneumothoraces. Postoperatively, analgesia is institutionally dependent and controversial, based on usage and type of regional anesthesia. The necessity of multimodal analgesic techniques creates a common ground across different hospital systems.

  20. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  1. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  2. 1,2,3-Triazolyl ester of Ketorolac: A "Click Chemistry"-based highly potent PAK1-blocking cancer-killer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Takahashi, Hideaki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Shahinozzaman, M D; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2017-01-27

    An old anti-inflammatory/analgesic drug called Toradol is a racemic form of Ketorolac (50% R-form and 50% S-form) that blocks the oncogenic RAC-PAK1-COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) signaling, through the direct inhibition of RAC by the R-form and of COX-2 by the S-form, eventually down-regulating the production of prostaglandins. However, due to its COOH moiety which is clearly repulsive to negatively-charged phospholipid-based plasma membrane, its cell-permeability is rather poor (the IC50 against the growth of human cancer cells such as A549 is around 13 μM). In an attempt to boost its anti-cancer activity, hopefully by increasing its cell-permeability through abolishing the negative charge, yet keeping its water-solubility, here we synthesized a 1,2,3-triazolyl ester of Toradol through "Click Chemistry". The resultant water-soluble "azo" derivative called "15K" was found to be over 500 times more potent than Toradol with the IC50 around 24 nM against the PAK1-dependent growth of A549 cancer cells, inactivating PAK1 in cell culture with the apparent IC50 around 65 nM, and inhibiting COX-2 in vitro with the IC50 around 6 nM. Furthermore, the Click Chemistry boosts the anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac by 5000 times against the PAK1-independent growth of B16F10 melanoma cells. Using a multi-drug-resistant (MDR) cancer cell line (EMT6), we found that the esterization of Ketorolac boosts its cell-permeability by at least 10 folds. Thus, the Click Chemistry dramatically boosts the anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac, at least in three ways: increasing its cell-permeability, the anti-PAK1 activity of R-form and anti-COX-2 activity of S-form. The resultant "15K" is so far among the most potent PAK1-blockers, and therefore would be potentially useful for the therapy of many different PAK1-dependent diseases/disorders such as cancers.

  3. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  4. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  5. Microspheres and tablet in capsule system: A novel chronotherapeutic system of ketorolac tromethamine for site and time specific delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Priya; Kumari, Neeraj; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a novel delivery system of ketorolac tromethamine (KT) for dual pulse release based on microspheres and tablet in capsule system (MATICS) as a treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis. The design consisted of an impermeable hard gelatin capsule body, in which a core tablet was (second pulse) placed in the bottom and sealed with a hydrogel plug (HP2). The body was locked with enteric coated cap filled with KT microspheres (first pulse). The microspheres for first pulse were selected by screening the formulations (M1–M6), and M1 with least particle size of 96.38 ± 0.05 μm, highest drug loading of 25.10% ± 0.28% and maximum CDR of 89.32% ± 0.21% was adjudged as the best formulation. The HP2 tablet was selected based on its capability for maintaining a lag period of 6 h. The selection criterion of the second pulse (core tablet: T3) was its disintegration time of 4.02 ± 0.53 min and CDR of 99.10% ± 0.32% in 30 min. All the optimized formulations were assembled in accordance with the proposed design to form pulsatile MATICS and evaluated for in vitro release. MATICS displayed delayed sustained CDR of 80.15% in 8 h from the first pulse (microspheres) after a lag time of 2 h, followed by 97.05% KT release from second pulse (core tablet) in simulated colonic fluid within 10 h. Conclusively, in vitro pulsatile release was a rational combination of delayed sustained and immediate release of KT that has the potential to combat the pain at night and morning stiffness. Incorporation of two pulses in one system offers a reduction in dose frequency and better pain management. PMID:26258058

  6. Intracortical modulation, and not spinal inhibition, mediates placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, M; Lee, M C H; Valentini, E; Iannetti, G D

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of spinal responses to noxious stimulation has been detected using spinal fMRI during placebo analgesia, which is therefore increasingly considered a phenomenon caused by descending inhibition of spinal activity. However, spinal fMRI is technically challenging and prone to false-positive results. Here we recorded laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) during placebo analgesia in humans. LEPs allow neural activity to be measured directly and with high enough temporal resolution to capture the sequence of cortical areas activated by nociceptive stimuli. If placebo analgesia is mediated by inhibition at spinal level, this would result in a general suppression of LEPs rather than in a selective reduction of their late components. LEPs and subjective pain ratings were obtained in two groups of healthy volunteers - one was conditioned for placebo analgesia while the other served as unconditioned control. Laser stimuli at three suprathreshold energies were delivered to the right hand dorsum. Placebo analgesia was associated with a significant reduction of the amplitude of the late P2 component. In contrast, the early N1 component, reflecting the arrival of the nociceptive input to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), was only affected by stimulus energy. This selective suppression of late LEPs indicates that placebo analgesia is mediated by direct intracortical modulation rather than inhibition of the nociceptive input at spinal level. The observed cortical modulation occurs after the responses elicited by the nociceptive stimulus in the SI, suggesting that higher order sensory processes are modulated during placebo analgesia.

  7. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  8. Analgesia and chemical restraint for the emergent veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Doris H

    2008-11-01

    Frequently, analgesics are withheld in the emergent patient based on common misconceptions. Concerns expressed are that analgesics "mask" physiologic indicators of patient deterioration or that potential toxicity and adverse reactions associated with drug administration outweigh the benefits gained. Appropriate selection of drugs and doses as described in this article allow the veterinarian to achieve analgesia, in addition to sedation or restraint when needed, without unwarranted fears. Guidelines are provided for typical situations encountered in trauma patients to provide a safe starting point for providing analgesia. Caution required in these cases is also discussed, with emphasis on individualization of the approach to analgesia and chemical restraint.

  9. [Jacuzzi-immersion for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Eldor, J; Burstein, M; Dudakova, I; Stark, M

    1992-12-15

    The effect of immersion in a jacuzzi in relieving labor pains, and on cervical dilatation was examined in 40 parturients. They were immersed in the jacuzzi during labor for an average of 25.5 minutes. Labor pains decreased during immersion by 2.59 degrees (scale of 0-10) compared with an average increase in labor pains of 0.25 degrees in 40 control women who were not immersed (p < 0.01). The cervical opening increased during immersion by an average of 1.5 cm in the test group, compared with 0.3 cm in the controls (p < 0.01). Immersion in a jacuzzi during labor is apparently associated with analgesia and accelerated cervical dilatation.

  10. Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin) for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J R; Meyer-Witting, M

    1992-05-01

    Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin, diacetyl morphine) 2.5 mg in isotonic saline 2.5 ml was given to 13 patients in labour through a 26 gauge Quincke needle. Three patients were given epidural bupivacaine at a mean of 295 min after injection of diamorphine and a further 2 used 50% nitrous oxide during the second stage of labour. Eight patients needed no additional analgesia for labour although 1 received a pudendal nerve block for forceps delivery. No neonatal complications attributable to diamorphine were observed. There was a high incidence of post partum headache (6/13 cases). The use of a Sprotte needle and a fine spinal catheter might overcome the limitations of spinal headache and limited duration of action respectively.

  11. Use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Holdcroft, A

    1992-11-01

    A questionnaire on the use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia was completed by 87 obstetric anaesthetists: 71% of consultants in teaching hospitals were prepared to use adrenaline mixed with local anaesthetics compared with 33% of consultants in district hospitals; they had a similar duration of obstetric anaesthetic experience. Test doses containing adrenaline were not commonly used in labour, but were more often used prior to elective Caesarean section. Adrenaline was used with either lignocaine or bupivacaine; few consultants used both solutions. Contraindications to the use of adrenaline in the nonuser group were in decreasing order of rank: neurological damage, pregnancy-induced hypertension, stenotic valvular heart disease, sickle cell disease or trait of fetal distress. Overall, the contraindications related to the systemic absorption of adrenaline were most common.

  12. The closed co-axial analgesia system.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Jørgensen, S; Oxhøj, H; Arnsbo, P

    1980-10-01

    A twin-tube system for nitrous oxide analgesia in dental surgeries is described. The system is a non-polluting modification of the Mapleson A system, employing the principle of co-axial tubing introduced by Bain & Spoerel (1972). Active, continuous and calibrated gas removal takes place via the co-axial tubing by means of an ejector flowmeter. Investigation of the dynamic pressure excursions occurring at the nose-piece are fully compatible with normal breathing. Gas contamination of the dental environment can be reduced by at least 90%. The system described is safe and easy to handle. It is made of light-weight material and is adaptable to the equipment available. No rebreathing takes place when using a fresh gas inflow of 150 ml/kg body weight/min.

  13. [Pethidine or nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia?].

    PubMed

    Mitterschiffthaler, G; Huter, O

    1991-05-01

    Because of the risk of ventilatory depression, agonistic and partially agonistic/antagonistic opiates are well suited for providing pain relief in obstetrics. We compared two groups of 20 women each with pregnancy on term who received equipotent doses of nalbuphin (0.1 mg/kg) and pethidin (0.8 mg/kg) intramuscularly. We found a significantly longer (6h) and better analgesic effect in the nalbuphin group but also a significantly more pronounced sedation. Other side effects were fewer in this last-named group. There were no differences in the behaviour of the babies between both groups. We consider that because of the "ceiling effect" of ventilatory depression, nalbuphin may allow better analgesia without the risk of ventilatory depression of both mother and newborn.

  14. The Role of Multimodal Analgesia in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark F; Kreitz, Tyler; Schroeder, Gregory; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2017-04-01

    Optimal postoperative pain control allows for faster recovery, reduced complications, and improved patient satisfaction. Historically, pain management after spine surgery relied heavily on opioid medications. Multimodal regimens were developed to reduce opioid consumption and associated adverse effects. Multimodal approaches used in orthopaedic surgery of the lower extremity, especially joint arthroplasty, have been well described and studies have shown reduced opioid consumption, improved pain and function, and decreased length of stay. A growing body of evidence supports multimodal analgesia in spine surgery. Methods include the use of preemptive analgesia, NSAIDs, the neuromodulatory agents gabapentin and pregabalin, acetaminophen, and extended-action local anesthesia. The development of a standard approach to multimodal analgesia in spine surgery requires extensive assessment of the literature. Because a substantial number of spine surgeries are performed annually, a standardized approach to multimodal analgesia may provide considerable benefits, particularly in the context of the increased emphasis on accountability within the healthcare system.

  15. The use of obstetric analgesia in Sweden 1983-1986.

    PubMed

    Gerdin, E; Cnattingius, S

    1990-09-01

    The use of obstetric analgesia was investigated in a Swedish population-based prospective study of 335,207 births, which represents almost all women who had vaginal deliveries in Sweden between 1983 and 1986. Lumbar epidural analgesia (EDA) was used in 16%, paracervical block (PCB) in 12%, pethidine or morphine in 49% and pudendal block in 62%. All four types of analgesia were much more commonly used by nulliparae than multiparae. Variables such as maternal age, smoking, nationality, relationship with the infant's father and gestational age had only moderate influence on the rates of different types of analgesia. EDA and PCB were more frequently used in larger than in smaller hospitals and in the daytime than at night. No such differences were found for pethidine or morphine, or pudendal block, which were administered routinely by midwives.

  16. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  17. Stability of piritramide in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) solutions.

    PubMed

    Remane, D; Scriba, G; Meissner, W; Hartmann, M

    2009-06-01

    For patient controlled analgesia, syringes with solutions of 1.5 mg/ml piritramide in 0.9% aqueous sodium chloride are used. The physical and chemical stability for dilutions of the commercially available preparation of piritramide is limited up to 72 hours by the manufacturer. Since application duration for patient-controlled analgesia can exceed that limited time, stability was investigated by HPLC. Our results show that these solutions are chemically stable over a time period of 60 days.

  18. Obstetric analgesia and fetal aortic blood flow during labour.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, A; Bernow, J; Marsál, K

    1987-04-01

    Fetal aortic blood flow was studied in 50 women during labour, using a method combining real-time ultrasonography and a pulsed Doppler technique. Eleven women had no analgesia, 24 women received 75-100 mg pethidine intramuscularly, 12 epidural analgesia with 0.25% bupivacaine and three paracervical block with 0.125% bupivacaine. Fetal aortic blood flow increased during labour from 200 to 245 ml/min/kg in the group without analgesia (P less than 0.05) and from 211 to 236 ml/min/kg in the group with epidural analgesia (P less than 0.05) but decreased insignificantly from 216 to 204 ml/min/kg after pethidine. After paracervical block the aortic blood flow fell in two out of three fetuses. Not only is epidural analgesia the most effective means of pain relief during labour, it is also the type of obstetric analgesia that interferes least with the physiological response to labour in terms of its effect on the fetal blood flow.

  19. [Locally administered ropivacaine vs. standard analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Chavarría-Pérez, Teresa; Cabrera-Leal, Carlos Fernando; Ramírez-Vargas, Susana; Reynada, José Luis; Arce-Salinas, César Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: se desconoce qué modalidad analgésica brinda mejores resultados después de una colecistectomía laparoscópica. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en valuar la eficacia analgésica de la ropivacaína usada localmente contra la dipirona por vía intravenosa en colecistectomía laparoscópica. Métodos: ensayo clínico al azar, de no inferioridad, en 50 pacientes con colecistectomía laparoscópica para comparar el uso de ropivacaína al 0.75 % infiltrada en el lugar de inserción de los trócares y en la fosa vesicular frente a dipirona por vía intravenosa. El desenlace primario fue dolor evaluado mediante escala visual análoga (EVA) en las primeras 24 horas. Resultados: el promedio de las EVA de dolor al término de la cirugía fue de 3.8 frente a 3.56 en el grupo de ropivacaína o de dipirona, mientras que a las 6, 12 y 24 horas fueron 2.64 frente a 2.6, 1.92 frente a 1.88 y 1.28 frente a 1.2, respectivamente. No hubo efectos adversos en ningún grupo y la necesidad de rescates analgésicos con tramadol fue similar entre ambos grupos. Conclusiones: la ropivacaína al 0.75 % infiltrada en el lugar de inserción de los trócares y la fosa vesicular muestra una analgesia similar a la dipirona por vía intravenosa en las primeras 24 horas después de una colecistectomía laparoscópica, sin efectos adversos.

  20. Development and Validation of Chemometric-Assisted Spectrophotometric Methods for Simultaneous Determination of Phenylephrine Hydrochloride and Ketorolac Tromethamine in Binary Combinations.

    PubMed

    Elfatatry, Hamed M; Mabrouk, Mokhtar M; Hammad, Sherin F; Mansour, Fotouh R; Kamal, Amira H; Alahmad, Shoeb

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes new spectrophotometric methods for the simultaneous determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine in their synthetic mixtures. The applied chemometric techniques are multivariate methods including classical least squares, principal component regression, and partial least squares. In these techniques, the concentration data matrix was prepared by using the synthetic mixtures containing these drugs dissolved in distilled water. The absorbance data matrix corresponding to the concentration data was obtained by measuring the absorbances at 16 wavelengths in the range 244-274 nm at 2 nm intervals in the zero-order spectra. The spectrophotometric procedures do not require any separation steps. The accuracy, precision, and linearity ranges of the methods have been determined, and analyzing synthetic mixtures containing the studied drugs has validated them. The developed methods were successfully applied to the synthetic mixtures and the results were compared to those obtained by a reported HPLC method.

  1. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  2. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth.

  3. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  4. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  5. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  6. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  7. Sedation and analgesia for the pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Grabinsky, Andreas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    The number of children requiring sedation and analgesia for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures has increased substantially in the last decade. Both anesthesiologist and non-anesthesiologists are involved in varying settings outside the operating room to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia. Procedural sedation has become standard of care and its primary aim is managing acute anxiety, pain, and control of movement during painful or unpleasant procedures. There is enough evidence to suggest that poorly controlled acute pain causes suffering, worse outcome, as well as debilitating chronic pain syndromes that are often refractory to available treatment options. This article will provide strategies to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia for pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23181210

  8. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics.

  9. Sedation and Analgesia in the Performance of Interventional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Interventional procedures can produce pain, anxiety, and physical and mental distress. Analgesia and sedation in the interventional radiology suite are given routinely during interventional procedures and allow a safe, comfortable, and technically successful procedure to be performed. Appropriate sedation decreases patient movement, patient anxiety, pain perception, and is crucial to successfully perform percutaneous interventions. A thorough understanding of the preoperative patient assessment, intraprocedural monitoring, pharmacologic characteristics of medications, postoperative care, and treatment of complications is required for the practicing interventionalist. Complications related to sedation and analgesia can occur secondary to preexisting medical conditions, incorrect drug administration, and/or inadequate patient monitoring.1,2 PMID:22550378

  10. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  11. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  12. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  13. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  14. Bayesian prediction of placebo analgesia in an instrumental learning model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2017-01-01

    Placebo analgesia can be primarily explained by the Pavlovian conditioning paradigm in which a passively applied cue becomes associated with less pain. In contrast, instrumental conditioning employs an active paradigm that might be more similar to clinical settings. In the present study, an instrumental conditioning paradigm involving a modified trust game in a simulated clinical situation was used to induce placebo analgesia. Additionally, Bayesian modeling was applied to predict the placebo responses of individuals based on their choices. Twenty-four participants engaged in a medical trust game in which decisions to receive treatment from either a doctor (more effective with high cost) or a pharmacy (less effective with low cost) were made after receiving a reference pain stimulus. In the conditioning session, the participants received lower levels of pain following both choices, while high pain stimuli were administered in the test session even after making the decision. The choice-dependent pain in the conditioning session was modulated in terms of both intensity and uncertainty. Participants reported significantly less pain when they chose the doctor or the pharmacy for treatment compared to the control trials. The predicted pain ratings based on Bayesian modeling showed significant correlations with the actual reports from participants for both of the choice categories. The instrumental conditioning paradigm allowed for the active choice of optional cues and was able to induce the placebo analgesia effect. Additionally, Bayesian modeling successfully predicted pain ratings in a simulated clinical situation that fits well with placebo analgesia induced by instrumental conditioning. PMID:28225816

  15. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  16. Focused local anesthesia and analgesia for head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Herlich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Facility in the use of head and neck regional blocks will provide excellent perioperative analgesia and patient satisfaction. The scope of ambulatory surgical care for head and neck surgery will undoubtedly increase as expertize in these blocks expand in the face of strict criteria for patient selection. Supplemental sedation will be more precise with the intended result of less hangover and nausea and vomiting.

  17. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  18. [Obstetric analgesia using nitralgin inhalation and lumbal peridural anesthesia (a model for obstetric analgesia)].

    PubMed

    Hardonyi, A; Sándor, C; Barkai, L; Koltai, M

    1990-06-10

    Authors report the systems of anesthesia used at their ward for delivery in the last eight years. Nitralgin inhalation is used since 1981, lumbar peridural anesthesia is used since 1983. Of 13,458 deliveries in case of 3893 parturiants Nitralgin analgesia was used, while LEDA was used for 2300 parturients. By means of Nitralgin inhalation system it could be assured in the delivery room to apply the pain relief gas mixture (Nitralgin) simultaneously for several parturients. With direction of anesthesiologists employed for the ward the LEDA was attained by gynecologists knowing the use and application of general anesthesia. Thus the continuous application of both procedures can be ensured in 24 hours a day. In our study the frequency of vacuum extraction (0.26 p. c.) and that of Cesarean section (12.81 p. c.) did not increase. With application of these methods it could be achieved that 60 p. c. of vaginal deliveries are performed with anesthesia. Authors propose their system for wider application since in the same ward more and more parturients can be applied anesthesia for pain relief at vaginal delivery.

  19. A review of postoperative analgesia for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gloria S; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2016-11-01

    An online database search with subsequent article review was performed in order to review the various analgesic modalities for breast cancer surgery. Of 514 abstracts, 284 full-length manuscripts were reviewed. The effect of pharmacologic interventions is varied (NSAIDS, opioids, anticonvulsants, ketamine, lidocaine). Likewise, data from high-quality randomized, controlled studies on wound infiltration (including liposome encapsulated) and infusion of local anesthetic are minimal and conflicting. Conversely, abundant evidence demonstrates paravertebral blocks and thoracic epidural infusions provide effective analgesia and minimize opioid requirements, while decreasing opioid-related side effects in the immediate postoperative period. Other techniques with promising - but extremely limited - data include cervical epidural infusion, brachial plexus, interfascial plane and interpleural blocks. In conclusion, procedural interventions involving regional blocks are more conclusively effective than pharmacologic modalities in providing analgesia to patients following surgery for breast cancer.

  20. Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns.

    PubMed

    Blass, E M; Watt, L B

    1999-12-01

    This experiment had three goals: 1. To identify the basis of sucking-induced analgesia in healthy, term, newborn humans undergoing the painful, routine, procedure of heel lance and blood collection. 2. To evaluate how taste-induced and sucking-induced analgesias combine to combat pain. 3. To determine whether facial grimacing was an accurate index of diminished pain, or whether it was linked to tissue trauma. We report that: 1. Sucking an unflavored pacifier was analgesic when and only when suck rate exceeded 30 sucks/min. 2. The combination of sucrose and nonnutritive sucking was remarkably analgesic; we saw no behavioral indication in nine of the ten infants that the heel lance had even occurred. 3. Grimacing was reduced to almost naught by procedures that essentially eliminated crying and markedly reduced heart rate during the blood harvesting procedure.

  1. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  2. Patient-controlled analgesia after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Sarah

    Patient-controlled analgesia is a method of pain control that allows the patient to self-administer opioid medication as and when it is needed. Pain is a personal experience and one pain-relieving intervention may not be effective for all patients. This article reviews the literature on patient-controlled analgesia, particularly with reference to patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Pain policies and education programmes need to be proactive in addressing staff and patient gaps in knowledge and misconceptions about pain assessment and management. Nurses need to appreciate the nature and importance of research in promoting a more critical approach to patient care and the development of quality nursing practice.

  3. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  4. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  5. Epidural analgesia during labour - maternal understanding and experience - informed consent.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, K; Chin, D; Drew, A

    2015-01-01

    Women obtain information on epidural analgesia from various sources. For epidural for pain relief in labour this is provided by the anaesthetist as part of the consenting process. There is much discussion about the inadequacy of this consenting process; we report on women's knowledge, experience and recall of this process at a regional hospital with a 24-h epidural service. Fifty-four women were interviewed within 72 h of a vaginal birth. 91% of the women had acquired information from friends, relatives and antenatal classes. Lack of recall of benefits of epidural analgesia accounted for 26 (38%) and 25 (26%) of the responses, respectively. Similarly in terms of amount of pain relief they could expect, 13 (21%) could not remember and 13 (21%) thought that it may not work. We suggest use of varying methods of disseminating information and wider utilisation of anaesthetists in the antenatal educational programmes.

  6. Neuraxial analgesia: a review of its effects on the outcome and duration of labor

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Labor pain is one of the most challenging experiences encountered by females during their lives. Neuraxial analgesia is the mainstay analgesic for intrapartum pain relief. However, despite the increasing use and undeniable advantages of neuraxial analgesia for labor, there have been concerns regarding undesirable effects on the progression of labor and outcomes. Recent evidence indicates that neuraxial analgesia does not increase the rate of Cesarean sections, although it may be associated with a prolonged second stage of labor and an increased rate of instrumental vaginal delivery. Even when neuraxial analgesia is administered early in the course of labor, it is not associated with an increased rate of Cesarean section or instrumental vaginal delivery, nor does it prolong the labor duration. These data may help physicians correct misconceptions regarding the adverse effects of neuraxial analgesia on labor outcome, as well as encourage the administration of neuraxial analgesia in response to requests for pain relief. PMID:24363839

  7. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  8. [Levobupivacaine in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia. Where is its place?].

    PubMed

    Bremerich, D H; Zwissler, B

    2004-07-01

    Levobupivacaine, the S-enantiomer of racemic bupivacaine, will be available in Germany in mid-2004. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that, compared to bupivacaine, levobupivacaine has equal local anaesthetic potency with reduced potential for cardiac and CNS toxicity. This review introduces the new long-acting amide local anaesthetic levobupivacaine to the reader and evaluates its place in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia compared to bupivacaine and ropivacaine.

  9. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  10. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Vivian P.; Zegers, Marie P.A.; Koppen, Hille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy. PMID:25802500

  11. Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q.; Messina, Troy C.

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50–75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  12. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  13. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  14. Obstetric analgesia and immunoreactive endorphin peptides in maternal plasma during labor.

    PubMed

    Riss, P A; Bieglmayer, C

    1984-01-01

    We studied the effect of obstetric analgesia on maternal plasma levels of immunoreactive endorphin peptides (ir-EP) during labor and the postpartum period in three groups of parturients: group I (n = 22) had no analgesia, group II (n = 20) received pethidine intramuscularly, and group III (n = 10) had continuous epidural analgesia. Initial levels of ir-EP were similar in all three groups. Patients without any medication and patients on pethidine showed a significant rise in ir-EP in late labor and at delivery. Epidural analgesia was characterized by constant levels of ir-EP during labor and an insignificant rise at delivery.

  15. Effect of single dose pretreatment analgesia with three different analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Priyank; Agarwal, Manish; Chourasia, Hemant Ramesh; Singh, Mahesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the aims of root canal treatment is to prevent or eliminate pain. Postoperative endodontic pain control continues to be a significant challenge. Aim: To compare and evaluate the effect of single oral dose of 100 mg of tapentadol, 400 mg of etodolac, or 10 mg of ketorolac as a pretreatment analgesic for the prevention and control of postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The incidence of side effects was recorded as secondary outcome. Materials and Methods: Sixty emergency patients with moderate to severe pain, diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were randomly allocated (1:1:1) to any of the three groups; tapentadol, etodolac, or ketorolac. Medications were administered 30 min before beginning of the endodontic treatment. Patients recorded pain intensity on 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) after treatment, for upto 24 h. Results: At 24 h, mean ±standard deviation (SD) of VAS scores (in cm) for tapentadol, etodolac, and ketorolac were 0.89 ± 0.83, 2.68 ± 2.29, and 0.42 ± 0.69, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) test showed significant difference among the three groups (P = 0.001). Mann-Whitney test showed significantly lower VAS scores in tapentadol and ketorolac than etodolac group (P = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Single oral dose of 10 mg of ketorolac and 100mg of tapentadol as a pretreatment analgesic significantly reduced postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis when compared to 400 mg of etodolac. PMID:25506136

  16. Double-blind, randomized, double-dummy clinical trial comparing the efficacy of ketorolac trometamol and naproxen for acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Plapler, Pérola Grinberg; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron; Ecclissato, Christina da Cunha; Bocchi de Oliveira, Monalisa Fernanda; Amazonas, Roberto Bleuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common type of medication used in the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac trometamol (KT) is a nonnarcotic, peripherally acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic effects comparable to certain opioids. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of KT and naproxen (NA) in the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP) of moderate-to-severe intensity. Patients and methods In this 10-day, Phase III, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial, participants with acute LBP of moderate-to-severe intensity as determined through a visual analog scale (VAS) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive sublingual KT 10 mg three times daily or oral NA 250 mg three times daily. From the second to the fifth day of treatment, if patient had VAS >40 mm, increased dosage to four times per day was allowed. The primary end point was the reduction in LBP as measured by VAS. We also performed a post hoc superiority analysis. Results KT was not inferior to NA for the reduction in LBP over 5 days of use as measured by VAS scores (P=0.608 for equality of variance; P=0.321 for equality of means) and by the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (P=0.180 for equality of variance test; P=0.446 for equality of means) using 95% confidence intervals. The percentage of participants with improved pain relief 60 minutes after receiving the first dose was higher in the KT group (24.2%) than in the NA group (6.5%; P=0.049). The most common adverse effects were heartburn, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusion KT is not inferior in efficacy and delivers faster pain relief than NA. PMID:27382251

  17. Trends in pain relief in labour: implications for obstetric analgesia service in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O

    2005-09-01

    Labour and delivery result in severe pain for most women. Attention to comfort and analgesia for women in labour is important for physiological reasons and out of compassion. A review of common methods of pain relief of labour was done. Inhalation method as well as intravenous administration of opioids for pain relief in labour is fast giving way to lumbar epidural analgesia. The use of local anaesthetic in labour offers superior pain relief, is effective and safe. The inhalation and parenteral routes seem reserved for patients with contraindication to insertion of epidural. The administration of high volume dilute concentration of local anaesthetic plus lipid soluble opioids, with some level of patient's control, appears to be the current trend in the management of labour pains. There is a body of evidence indicating that Nigerian women may want pain relief in labour. However, there is no organised labour analgesia service in Nigeria. An organised obstetric analgesia service can be developed within the limits of available manpower and technology in an emerging country like Nigeria. This article therefore, focuses on trends in obstetric analgesia and its implications on the development of organised obstetric analgesia services in Nigeria. Key words: obstetric analgesia, obstetric analgesia service, Nigeria.

  18. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  3. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  4. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  5. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  6. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  7. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  8. [medullar adhesive arachnoiditis: a late complication after obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ploteau, S; de Kersaint-Gilly, A; Boog, G

    2004-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman, G3P3, was progressively affected by spastic paraparesis with loss of sensitivity and urinary incontinence due to medullar adhesive arachnoiditis occurring five months after an epidural analgesia for repeat cesarean section. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a voluminous subarachnoid cyst and a septated syringomyelic cavitation attributed to metabisulfite, the preservative of epinephrine and to multiple lidocaine injections through the catheter in the postoperative period. Despite two decompressive neurosurgical operations, the neurological state of the patient continues to worsen.

  9. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  10. [Obstetric analgesia in patients with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome].

    PubMed

    Felten, M L; Mercier, F J; Bonnet, V; Benhamou, D

    2001-11-01

    We report three cases of delivery in two parturients with a Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. These patients have a rare hereditary disorder that results in three main features: haemangiomas, varicose veins, bone and soft tissue hypertrophy. In the absence of angiographic magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord and of perispinal tissues, arteriovenous malformations of the central nervous system could not been ruled out. Intravenous sufentanil and pudendal block were used for labour analgesia and vaginal delivery respectively; general anaesthesia was used for uterine revision and for caesarean section.

  11. Ultrasound and its evolution in perioperative regional anesthesia and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Edward R; Marshall, Zwade J; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-03-01

    Perioperative regional anesthetic and analgesic techniques have evolved considerably over the past four decades. Perhaps, the most impressive development in recent years has been the rapid adoption and widespread utilization of ultrasound (US) guidance to perform targeted delivery of local anesthetics and catheters in a consistent manner for postoperative pain control. This article briefly reviews the history of US in regional anesthesia and perioperative analgesia, the evidence basis for this practice, the clinical application of novel techniques and imaging modalities, and possible future technology and research directions.

  12. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  13. [3 cases of sedation and analgesia using propofol and remifentanil for labor].

    PubMed

    Fontao Rodríguez, F E

    2003-10-01

    Three women in labor for whom epidural analgesia was contraindicated--2 with sepsis (pylonephritis and chorioamnionitis) and 1 with sacral agenesia--were provided intravenous analgesia with propofol (0.4-1.2 mg/kg/h) and remifentanil (0.033-0.1 microgram/kg/min plus boluses of 20 micrograms controlled by the patient) with oxygen supplementation. Heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, maternal oxygen saturation and fetal heart rate were monitored. Maternal satisfaction, quality of analgesia, maternal side effects (sedation, depression, breathing, muscle rigidity, nausea, and vomiting) and fetal side effects (heart rate variability and Apgar score) were evaluated. We conclude that in cases where epidural analgesia is contraindicated, intravenous perfusion of low doses of propofol and remifentanil can provide a valid alternative for analgesia during labor.

  14. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  15. Significance of Neuronal Cytochrome P450 Activity in Opioid-Mediated Stress-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Lindsay B.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Stressful environmental changes can suppress nociceptive transmission, a phenomenon known as “stress-induced analgesia”. Depending on the stressor and the subject, opioid or non-opioid mechanisms are activated. Brain μ opioid receptors mediate analgesia evoked either by exogenous agents (e.g. morphine), or by the release of endogenous opioids following stressful procedures. Recent work with morphine and neuronal cytochrome P450 (P450)-deficient mice proposed a signal transduction role for P450 enzymes in μ analgesia. Since μ opioid receptors also mediate some forms of stress-induced analgesia, the present studies assessed the significance of brain P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia. Two widely-used models of opioid stress-induced analgesia (restraint and warm water swim) were studied in both sexes of wild-type control and P450-deficient (Null) mice. In control mice, both stressors evoked moderate analgesic responses which were blocked by pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, confirming the opioid nature of these responses. Consistent with literature, sex differences (control female > control male) were seen in swim-induced, but not restraint-induced, analgesia. Null mice showed differential responses to the two stress paradigms. As compared with control subjects, Null mice showed highly attenuated restraint-induced analgesia, showing a critical role for neuronal P450s in this response. However, warm water swim-induced analgesia was unchanged in Null vs. control mice. Additional control experiments confirmed the absence of morphine analgesia in Null mice. These results are the first to show that some forms of opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia require brain neuronal P450 activity. PMID:25020125

  16. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  17. Update on epidural analgesia during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Priscu, V

    1993-05-01

    Properly administered epidural analgesia provides adequate pain relief during labor and delivery, shortens the first stage of labor, avoids adverse effects of narcotics, hypnotics, or inhalation drugs and it could be used as anesthesia in case a cesarean section is required. Epidural analgesia should be provided to all patients who need and ask for it with an exception of contraindications such as coagulation disorders, suspected infection or gross anatomic abnormality. The technique must be carried out with care if serious life-threatening complications, such as intravenous or intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, are to be avoided. The aim of many recent investigations has been to reduce the total dose of local anesthetic used. Supplementation of an opioid (mainly fentanyl) and introduction of the patient controlled epidural pump may not only serve this goal, but also reduce the demands on the time of obstetric anesthetists. We conclude that properly and skillfully administered epidural is the best form of pain relief during labor and delivery and we hope that more mothers could enjoy its benefits.

  18. BDNF parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway in morphine-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Maysa; Pawlowski, Sophie Anne; Barthas, Florent; Yalcin, Ipek; Kaufling, Jennifer; Dardente, Hugues; Zachariou, Venetia; Dileone, Ralph Joseph; Barrot, Michel; Veinante, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    In addition to its neurotrophic role, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in a wide array of functions, including anxiety and pain. The central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) contains a high concentration of BDNF in terminals, originating from the pontine parabrachial nucleus. Since the spino-parabrachio-amygdaloid neural pathway is known to convey nociceptive information, we hypothesized a possible involvement of BDNF in supraspinal pain-related processes. To test this hypothesis, we generated localized deletion of BDNF in the parabrachial nucleus using local bilateral injections of adeno-associated viruses in adult floxed-BDNF mice. Basal thresholds of thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were not altered by BDNF loss and no behavioural deficit was noticed in anxiety and motor tests. However, BDNF-deleted animals displayed a major decrease in the analgesic effect of morphine. In addition, intra-CeA injections of the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc in control mice also decreased morphine-induced analgesia. Finally, the number of c-Fos immunoreactive nuclei after acute morphine injection was decreased by 45% in the extended amygdala of BDNF-deleted animals. The absence of BDNF in the parabrachial nucleus thus altered the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway. Overall, our study provides evidence that BDNF produced in the parabrachial nucleus modulates the functions of the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway in opiate analgesia.

  19. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVEREBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: GIRAFFE AND HIPPOPOTAMUS.

    PubMed

    Boothe, Matthew; Kottwitz, Jack; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Results of an online survey posted on the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserv examined the patterns of analgesic medication and pain management modalities used for captive giraffe and hippopotami. Compiled data included signalment, drugs administered, dosing regimens, subjective efficacy scores, ease of administration, and adverse events. Nineteen institutions exhibiting hippopotami ( Hippopotamus amphibious ) and pygmy hippopotami (Choeropsis liberiensis) and 45 exhibiting giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis spp.) responded. Phenylbutazone was the most-commonly administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), followed by flunixin meglumine, but doses varied widely. Eight institutions reported adverse events from NSAID administration. Tramadol was the most-commonly administered opioid followed by butorphanol. Only one adverse event was reported for opioids. Twenty-three of 45 institutions exhibiting giraffe utilized alternative analgesia methods including gabapentin, glucosamine-chondroitin, local anesthetics, and low level laser therapy. Six of 19 institutions exhibiting hippopotami administered omega 3-6 fatty acids, gabapentin, glucosamine-chondroitin, and α-2 adrenergics to provide analgesia. While all reporting zoological institutions administered similar drugs, there was substantial variation and diversity in both dosing regimens and frequencies, indicating the need for both preclinical and clinical studies supporting dosing regimens.

  20. Human models of pain for the prediction of clinical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions. However, efforts to improve both animal and human experimental model selection, on the basis of increased understanding of the underlying pathophysiological pain mechanisms, have been disappointing, with poor translation of results to clinical analgesia. We have developed an alternative approach to the selection of suitable pain models that can correctly predict drug efficacy in particular clinical settings. This is based on the analysis of successful or unsuccessful empirical prediction of clinical analgesia using experimental pain models. We analyzed statistically the distribution of published mutual agreements or disagreements between drug efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings. Significance limits were derived by random permutations of agreements. We found that a limited subset of pain models predicts a large number of clinically relevant pain settings, including efficacy against neuropathic pain for which novel analgesics are particularly needed. Thus, based on empirical evidence of agreement between drugs for their efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings, it is possible to identify pain models that reliably predict clinical analgesic drug efficacy in cost-effective experimental settings.

  1. A pervasive mechanism for analgesia: activation of GIRK2 channels.

    PubMed

    Blednov, Y A; Stoffel, M; Alva, H; Harris, R A

    2003-01-07

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) provide a common link between numerous neurotransmitter receptors and the regulation of synaptic transmission. We asked whether GIRKs specify a single behavioral action that is produced by drugs acting on the diverse receptors coupled with GIRKs. By using GIRK2-null mutant mice, we found marked reduction or complete elimination of the antinociceptive (hot plate test) effects of ethanol, oxotremorine, nicotine, baclofen, clonidine, and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212. However, ketamine analgesia remained intact. For most drugs, there was a sex difference in antinociceptive action, and the impact of deletion of the GIRK2 channel was less in female mice. The deletion of the GIRK2 channel blocks the opioid-dependent component of stress-induced analgesia (SIA), whereas nonopioid SIA was not changed. We propose that opioid, alpha adrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic, gamma-aminobutyric acid-B, and cannabinoid receptors are coupled with postsynaptic GIRK2 channels in vivo. Furthermore, this pathway accounts for essentially all of the antinociceptive effects in males, although females appear to recruit additional signal transduction mechanisms for some analgesic drugs.

  2. Obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Chi, Claudia; Lee, Christine A; England, Adrian; Hingorani, Jaishree; Paintsil, James; Kadir, Rezan A

    2009-06-01

    A retrospective review was carried out on the methods of obstetric analgesia/anesthesia used in 80 pregnancies amongst 63 women with inherited bleeding disorders (19 factor XI deficiency, 16 carriers of haemophilia, 15 von Willebrand disease, seven platelet function disorders, four factor VII deficiency, one factor VII and XI deficiency and one factor X deficiency). In 72 pregnancies, the woman was seen antenatally in a multidisciplinary clinic to discuss and plan pain relief options. Regional block was performed for 41 pregnancies. The mothers were known to have a bleeding disorder in 35 of these pregnancies. Prophylactic cover was given in 10 pregnancies prior to the insertion of regional block but not required in the remaining 25 pregnancies because the coagulation defects had spontaneously normalised at term. There were six reported adverse effects from regional block similar to that found in the general population: inadequate anesthesia/analgesia (2), bloody tap (2), hypotension and a possible dural puncture which was treated conservatively. There were no reports of long-term complications. The findings show that it is possible to offer women with inherited bleeding disorders the option of regional block provided their coagulation defects have normalised, either spontaneously during pregnancy or following adequate haemostatic cover.

  3. Morphine and hydromorphone epidural analgesia. A prospective, randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Chaplan, S R; Duncan, S R; Brodsky, J B; Brose, W G

    1992-12-01

    Because evidence from uncontrolled, unblinded studies suggested fewer side effects from epidural hydromorphone than from epidural morphine, we employed a randomized, blinded study design to compare the side effects of lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone in 55 adult, non-obstetric patients undergoing major surgical procedures. A bolus dose of epidural study drug was given at least 1 h prior to the conclusion of surgery, followed by a continuous infusion of the same drug for two postoperative days. Infusions were titrated to patient comfort. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, VAS sedation scores, and subjective ratings of nausea and pruritus were assessed twice daily. The two treatments provided equivalent analgesia. Sedation scores and prevalence of nausea did not differ significantly between groups. Prevalence of pruritus, however, differed significantly on postoperative day 1, with moderate to severe pruritus reported by 44.4% of patients in the morphine group versus 11.5% in the hydromorphone group (P < .01). On post-operative day 2, reports of pruritus by patients receiving morphine remained higher than those among the hydromorphone-treated subjects, although this difference was no longer statistically significant (32% vs. 16.7%, P = .18). We conclude that lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone afford comparable analgesia, but the occurrence of moderate to severe pruritus on the first postoperative day is reduced by the use of hydromorphone.

  4. Opioid-independent mechanisms supporting offset analgesia and temporal sharpening of nociceptive information.

    PubMed

    Martucci, K T; Eisenach, J C; Tong, C; Coghill, R C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed after administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and after intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real-time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1 to 10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered after naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or after the termination of remifentanil infusion. Because thermal hyperalgesia was observed after both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone, and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia, which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals.

  5. Placebo-induced analgesia in an operant pain model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Todd A.; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert; Murphy, Niall P.; Neubert, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Analgesia is particularly susceptible to placebo responses. Recent studies in humans have provided important insights into the neurobiology underlying placebo-induced analgesia. However, human studies provide incomplete mechanistic explanations of placebo analgesia because of limited capacity to use cellular, molecular, and genetic manipulations. To address this shortcoming, we describe here the development of a rat model of conditioned analgesia in an operant pain assay. Specifically, rats were conditioned to associate a placebo manipulation with the analgesic effect of 1 mg/kg morphine (s.c.) on facial thermal pain. We found that conditioned (placebo) responding bore three of the hallmarks of placebo-induced analgesia: (1) strong inter-animal variability in the response, (2) suppression by the opiate antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.), and (3) a positive predictive relationship between the unconditioned analgesic effect and the conditioned (placebo) effect. Due to the operant nature of the assay and the use of only a mild noxious thermal stimulus, we suggest these results provide evidence of placebo-induced analgesia in a preclinical model that utilizes an affective behavioral endpoint. This finding may provide opportunities for invasive preclinical studies allowing greater understanding of placebo-induced analgesia, thus paving the way for avenues to harness its benefits. PMID:22871471

  6. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (p<0.01). Subcutaneous saline and clonidine (0.12μmol) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. The mixture of an ineffective-dose clonidine (0.12μmol) and a drug (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia.

  7. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  8. Opioid-Independent Mechanisms Supporting Offset Analgesia and Temporal Sharpening of Nociceptive Information

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, K. T.; Eisenach, J. C.; Tong, C.; Coghill, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed following administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and following intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1–10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered following naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or following the termination of remifentanil infusion. Since thermal hyperalgesia was observed following both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals. PMID:22503222

  9. Functional network architecture predicts psychologically mediated analgesia related to treatment in chronic knee pain patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Javeria Ali; Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Gollub, Randy L

    2014-03-12

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use.

  10. [Efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema].

    PubMed

    Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la fotocoagulación reduce la incidencia de pérdida visual en diabéticos con edema macular focal, aunque puede inducirla durante 6 semanas; la mejoría visual después del tratamiento es excepcional. El ketorolaco tópico puede limitar la inflamación causada por la fotocoagulación, y mejorar el desenlace visual. Objetivo: determinar la eficacia del ketorolaco tópico en la mejoría de la función visual después de la fotocoagulación, en diabéticos con edema macular focal. Material y métodos: estudio experimental, comparativo, prospectivo, longitudinal efectuado en diabéticos con edema macular focal, asignados al azar a dos grupos de tratamiento tópico durante 3 semanas después de la fotocoagulación (A: ketorolaco, B: placebo). En cada grupo se comparó la agudeza visual antes y después del tratamiento (t pareada) y entre grupos la proporción de ojos con mejoría visual (χ(2)). La evaluación se repitió con estratificación por agudeza visual inicial (≥ 0.5, < 0.5). Resultados: se analizaron 105 ojos; en el grupo A (n= 46) el promedio de agudeza visual cambió de 0.50 a 0.58 (p= 0.003), en el B (n= 59) de 0.55 a 0.55 (p= 0.83); el promedio del cambio porcentual fue 22.3% en el grupo A y 3.5% en el B (p= 0.03). Hubo mejoría visual en 25 ojos del grupo A (54.3%) y 19 del B (32.2%, p= 0.019, RR 1.65); la diferencia persistió cuando la agudeza visual inicial era ≥ 0.5 (10 [40%], grupo A, 5 [14.7%], grupo B, p= 0.02, RR 2.72). Conclusiones: el ketorolaco fue más eficaz que el placebo para mejorar la agudeza visual en pacientes diabéticos con edema macular focal.

  11. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor and delivery: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Sandro; Favilli, Alessandro; Acanfora, Marta M; Bini, Vittorio; Giorgini, Carla; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Two groups of women have been retrospectively compared: 155 women who received analgesia and 1355 women who delivered without analgesia. The duration of the first stage, second stage, and total duration of labor was longer in epidural group, however epidural analgesia was not demonstrated as an independent risk factor for a prolonged labor. The variable most influencing the total duration of labor and the duration of the first stage was nulliparity; the variables most influencing the duration of the second stage were the older age, a reduced body mass index, a high newborn weight and nulliparity.

  12. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  13. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  14. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  15. Acral mutilation and analgesia in 13 French spaniels.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Manon; de Jaham, Caroline; Page, Nadia; Sauve, Frederic; Helie, Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Acral mutilation and analgesia (AMA) is reported in 13 French spaniels in Canada. This newly recognized disorder shares striking similarities in clinical features and biopsy findings to the other acral mutilation syndromes or hereditary sensory neuropathies reported in German short-haired pointer dogs, English pointer dogs and English springer spaniels. Clinical signs are first noted between 3.5 and 12 months of age. Affected dogs lick, bite and severely self-mutilate their distal extremities resulting in ulcers with secondary bacterial infection. Auto-amputation of claws, digits and footpads occurs in severe cases. Single or multiple feet can be affected. Affected dogs walked on their severely mutilated feet without evidence of pain, lameness, or ataxia. The majority of the dogs were euthanized within days to months of diagnosis.

  16. Postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine for brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Tetsuo; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: On a pharmacologic basis, levobupivacaine is expected to last longer than ropivacaine. However, most reports of these anesthetics for brachial plexus block do not suggest a difference in analgesic effect. The aim of this study is to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for treating ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block. Methods: A total of 62 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery procedures were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive levobupivacaine (group L, N = 31) or ropivacaine (group R, N = 31). The duration of analgesia, offset time of motor block, need for rescue analgesics, and sleep disturbance on the night of surgery were recorded. Pain score was recorded on the day of surgery, and on postoperative days 1 and 2. Results: There was no difference in the time interval until the first request for pain medication comparing the two groups (group L: 15.6 [11.4, 16.8] hours; group R: 12.5 [9.4, 16.0] hours, P = 0.32). There was no difference in the duration of motor block (group L: 12.2 [7.6, 14.4] hours; group R: 9.4 [7.9, 13.2] hours, P = 0.44), pain score (P = 0.92), need for rescue analgesics (group L: 55%; group R: 65%, P = 0.6), or rate of sleep disturbance (group L: 61%, group R: 58%, P = 1.0) on comparing the two groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for brachial plexus block. PMID:28328862

  17. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia: interactions between nalbuphine and hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Parker, R K; Holtmann, B; White, P F

    1997-04-01

    Epidural opioid analgesia can offer advantages over intravenous administration, however, opioid-related side effects are common after epidural administration. We studied the effect of adding nalbuphine (NB), an opioid agonist-antagonist, to hydromorphone (HM) for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in 78 healthy women after elective cesarean delivery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The control group received preservative-free HM (Dilaudid) alone, 0.075 mg/mL, while the three study groups received HM, 0.075 mg/mL, containing preservative-free NB (Nubain) 0.02, 0.04, or 0.08 mg/mL. Intraoperatively, all patients received epidural bupivacaine 0.5%. Postoperatively, a patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) device was connected to the epidural catheter and programmed to deliver a 3-mL loading dose of the analgesic solution. Subsequently, patients could self-administer 2 mL bolus doses on demand with a 30-min lockout interval. Patients were encouraged to ambulate approximately 8 h after surgery, and PCEA therapy was discontinued when a clear liquid diet was tolerated. Visual analog scale scores were used to assess pain at 8-h intervals while using PCEA therapy. Although the overall incidences of nausea (19%-35%) and pruritus (32%-62%) were similar in all four groups, the addition of NB decreased the need for bladder catheterization. The highest NB concentration resulted in increased PCA demands during the 32-h study period. In conclusion, the combination of HM 0.075 mg/mL and NB 0.04 mg/mL resulted in lower nausea scores and a decreased incidence of urinary retention compared with HM alone, without increasing the opioid analgesic requirement.

  18. [Maternal behavior toward her newborn infant. Potential modification by peridural analgesia or childbirth preparation].

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Grenom, A; Pierre, F; Soutoul, J H; Fabre-Nys, C; Krebhiel, D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of sophrology and epidural analgesia on early relationship between the mother and her child were studied on a simple of 190 deliveries. The mothers were observed during and just after delivery. Mothers who had been separated from their child before the end of the observation were excluded from the study. The patients had the choice between epidural analgesia or prenatal care with sophrology. Participation to prenatal courses has statistically a positive effect on the relation between the mother and her child (p less than 0.01). Instead, epidural analgesia and posture have very limited effect on this factor. However, a trend to more interaction is found in multipari and patients who didn't choose epidural analgesia.

  19. [Eutopic parturition: psychoprophylaxis or extradural analgesia. Influence on the endocrine response].

    PubMed

    Carrasco, M S; Iglesias, J; Freire, J; Martín, M L; Marín Santana, A; Cobo, I; García Rendón, A

    1989-01-01

    Prolactin, ACTH, cortisol and HGH levels have been studied on 30 pregnant women in three different periods: during the labour, at the delivery and 24 hours later. They were divided into 3 groups depending on the analgesia: I) no analgesia (n = 10); II) psychoprophylaxis (n = 10), and III) extradural analgesia (n = 10). Prolactin levels increased during delivery and 24 hours later. A significant increase of ACTH levels (p less than 0.01) was observed during the delivery in the 3 groups even though they were under hasal values 24 hours later. Cortisol increased 38% (p less than 0.01) and 52% (p less than 0.02) in II and III groups, respectively during the delivery. No difference was found with HGH. Our results suggest that endocrine response modified by labour and delivery doesn't change with different analgesia techniques.

  20. Continuous postoperative analgesia via quadratus lumborum block - an alternative to transversus abdominis plane block.

    PubMed

    Visoiu, Mihaela; Yakovleva, Nataliya

    2013-10-01

    Different transversus abdominis plane blocks techniques cause variations in postoperative analgesia characteristics. We report the use of unilateral quadratus lumborum catheter for analgesia following colostomy closure. The catheter was placed under direct ultrasound visualization and had good outcomes: low pain scores and minimal use of rescue analgesic medication. No complications were reported in this pediatric patient. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this regional anesthesia technique.

  1. Ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Goswami, Jyotsna; Patro, Viplab

    2015-02-01

    Quadratus lumborum block is a recently introduced variation of transversus abdominis plane block. In this report, we describe the use of ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a 7-year-old child scheduled to undergo radical nephrectomy (left-sided) for Wilms tumor. The result was excellent postoperative analgesia and minimal requirement for rescue analgesics. The modification described may allow easier placement of a catheter for continuous infusion of local anesthetic.

  2. Comparative evaluation of ropivacaine and ropivacaine with dexamethasone in supraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Palaria, Urmila; Sinha, Ajay K.; Punera, D. C.; Pandey, Vijita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixing of various adjuvants has been tried with local anesthetics in an attempt to prolong anesthesia from peripheral nerve blocks but have met with inconclusive success. More recent studies indicate that 8 mg dexamethasone added to perineural local anesthetic injections augment the duration of peripheral nerve block analgesia. Aims: Evaluating the hypothesis that adding dexamethasone to ropivacaine significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus block compared with ropivacaine alone. Patients and Methods: It was a randomized, prospective, and double-blind clinical trial. Eighty patients of ASA I and II of either sex, aged 16-60 years, undergoing elective upper limb surgeries were equally divided into two groups and given supraclavicular nerve block. Group R patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with distilled water (2 ml)-control group whereas Group D patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 8 mg dexamethasone (2 ml)-study group. The primary outcome was measured as duration of analgesia that was defined as the interval between the onset of sensory block and the first request for analgesia by the patient. The secondary outcome included maximum visual analogue scale (VAS), total analgesia consumption, surgeon satisfaction, and side effects. Results: Group R patients required first rescue analgesia earlier (557 ± 58.99 min) than those of Group D patients (1179.4 ± 108.60 min), which was found statistically significant in Group D (P < 0.000). The total dose of rescue analgesia was higher in Group R as compared to Group D, which was statistically significant (P < 0.00). Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone (8 mg) to ropivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus approach significantly and safely prolongs motor blockade and postoperative analgesia (sensory) that lasted much longer than that produced by local anesthetic alone. PMID:25886227

  3. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Angela M.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Shofer, Frances S.; Holena, Daniel N.; Abbuhl, Stephanie B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal or back pain. Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error. Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5), the majority (76%) had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%), compared to the 65–79 years group (n=2,080; 8%) and to the <65 years group (n=21,950; 89%), was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%), black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%), and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6). Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001) and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001). Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001). After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14–20%). Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. PMID:21691471

  4. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects.

  5. Differences in postoperative opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia versus intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus intramuscular injection (IMI) in the early postoperative period after open abdominal surgery. A retrospective audit of 115 patients elicited demographic and clinical data. No significant differences were found between the demographic variables of the PCA and IMI groups. There was a significant difference in the mean opioid dose used during the first 3 postoperative days (p < .01). Mean opioid consumption was 136.89 mg for the PCA group and 50.79 mg for the IMI group. Although there was a reduction in the amount of opioid consumed over the first 3 postoperative days, the PCA group consistently consumed more opioid analgesia compared with the IMI group. Furthermore, there was a disproportionate reduction in opioid consumption between the two groups from Day 1 (r = .34; p < .01) to Day 3 (r = .14; p = .14). This study shows that the amount of analgesia consumed during the postoperative period by patients who had abdominal surgery varied markedly depending on the mode of analgesia (PCA or IMI). The difference in analgesic consumption was also found to increase throughout the 3-day postoperative period. This divergence in the amount of opioid consumption between patients who were prescribed PCA and patients who were prescribed IM analgesia heightens the need for vigilance in assessment and management of pain during the early postoperative period, particularly in patients prescribed IM analgesia on an "as-needed" basis.

  6. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia. A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed. Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery. Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect. PMID:27902584

  7. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia.A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed.Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery.Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect.

  8. The TGR5 receptor mediates bile acid–induced itch and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Farzad; Kwon, Edwin; Poole, Daniel P.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Lyo, Victoria; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Cevikbas, Ferda; Steinhoff, Martin; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Vanner, Stephen J.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Corvera, Carlos U.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cholestatic disease exhibit pruritus and analgesia, but the mechanisms underlying these symptoms are unknown. We report that bile acids, which are elevated in the circulation and tissues during cholestasis, cause itch and analgesia by activating the GPCR TGR5. TGR5 was detected in peptidergic neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord that transmit itch and pain, and in dermal macrophages that contain opioids. Bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist induced hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and stimulated the release of the itch and analgesia transmitters gastrin-releasing peptide and leucine-enkephalin. Intradermal injection of bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist stimulated scratching behavior by gastrin-releasing peptide– and opioid-dependent mechanisms in mice. Scratching was attenuated in Tgr5-KO mice but exacerbated in Tgr5-Tg mice (overexpressing mouse TGR5), which exhibited spontaneous pruritus. Intraplantar and intrathecal injection of bile acids caused analgesia to mechanical stimulation of the paw by an opioid-dependent mechanism. Both peripheral and central mechanisms of analgesia were absent from Tgr5-KO mice. Thus, bile acids activate TGR5 on sensory nerves, stimulating the release of neuropeptides in the spinal cord that transmit itch and analgesia. These mechanisms could contribute to pruritus and painless jaundice that occur during cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:23524965

  9. Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Obstetrics: A Case Report of Caesarean Section with Subarachnoid Anaesthesia after Remifentanil Intravenous Analgesia for Labour

    PubMed Central

    Valente, A.; Frassanito, L.; Natale, L.; Draisci, G.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial techniques of anaesthesia and analgesia are the current choice in obstetrics for efficacy and general low risk of major complications. Concern exists about neuraxial anaesthesia in patients with occult neural tube defects, regarding both labour analgesia and anaesthesia for Caesarean section. Recently, remifentanil infusion has been proposed as an analgesic technique alternative to lumbar epidural, especially when epidural analgesia appears to be contraindicated. Here, we discuss the case of a pregnant woman attending at our institution with occult, symptomatic spinal dysraphism who requested labour analgesia. She was selected for remifentanil intravenous infusion for labour pain and then underwent urgent operative delivery with spinal anaesthesia with no complications. PMID:22844625

  10. Topical versus caudal ketamine/bupivacaine combination for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Hala Saad; Moeen, Seham Mohamed; Moeen, Ahmed Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies claim that caudal administration of ketamine causes effective postoperative analgesia. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effectiveness of ketamine after caudal or topical administration in pediatric patients undergoing inguinal herniotomy. Patients and Methods: This randomized, comparative, double-blind study included eighty children (aged 6 months to 6 years) received either 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine/ketamine 0.5 mg/kg for caudal analgesia (caudal group) or 0.3 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine/ketamine 0.5 mg/kg sprayed by the surgeon around the spermatic cord and upon the ilioinguinal nerve before wound closure for topical analgesia (topical group). The duration of postoperative analgesia, pain scores, rescue analgesic consumption, sedation score, hemodynamic monitoring, and side-effects were evaluated 48 h postoperative. Results: Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of analgesia free time demonstrated a significant advantage of topical ketamine (TK) group over caudal ketamine (CK) group. The duration of postoperative analgesia was longer in TK group than in CK group (28.74 ± 2.88 vs. 21.43 ± 5.01 h, P = 0.000). Fewer children asked for oral analgesics in the topical group (24 of 36, 66.7%) than in the caudal one (28 of 32, 87.5%; P < 0.01). Postoperative pain scores at the 6th till 48th h were lower in topical group with comparable analgesic consumption between two groups. In the caudal group, four subjects suffered from retention of urine: Two presented with a residual motor block and two had photophobia. Conclusion: Wound instillation of bupivacaine/ketamine is a simple, noninvasive, and effective technique that could be a safe alternative to CK for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair. PMID:28217052

  11. Differential effects of experimental central sensitization on the time-course and magnitude of offset analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Yelle, Marc D; Coghill, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    Pain perception is temporally altered during states of chronic pain and acute central sensitization; however, the mechanisms contributing to temporal processing of nociceptive information remain poorly understood. Offset analgesia is a phenomenon that reflects the presence of temporal contrast mechanisms for nociceptive information and can provide an end point to study temporal aspects of pain processing. In order to investigate whether offset analgesia is disrupted during sensitized states, 23 healthy volunteers provided real-time continuous visual analogue scale responses to noxious heat stimuli that evoke offset analgesia. Responses to these stimuli were evaluated during capsaicin-heat sensitization (45°C stimulus, capsaicin cream 0.1%) and heat-only sensitization (40°C stimulus, placebo cream). Capsaicin-heat sensitization produced significantly larger regions of secondary mechanical allodynia compared to heat-only sensitization. Although areas of mechanical allodynia were positively related to individual differences in heat pain sensitivity, this relationship was altered at later time points after capsaicin-heat sensitization. Heat hyperalgesia was observed in the secondary region following both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization. Increased latencies to maximal offset analgesia and prolonged aftersensations were observed only in the primary regions directly treated by capsaicin-heat or heat alone. However, contrary to the hypothesis that offset analgesia would be reduced following capsaicin-heat sensitization, the magnitude of offset analgesia remained remarkably intact after both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization in zones of both primary and secondary mechanical allodynia. These data indicate that offset analgesia is a robust phenomenon and engages mechanisms that interact minimally with those supporting acute central sensitization.

  12. Combined spinal epidural (CSE) analgesia: technique, management, and outcome of 300 mothers.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Baxandall, M L; Srikantharajah, I D; Edge, G; Kadim, M Y; Morgan, B M

    1994-04-01

    Epidural analgesia in labour is commonly associated with some degree of lower limb weakness often severe enough to be described as paralysis by the mother. We aimed to produce rapid reliable analgesia with no motor block throughout labour. We report a pilot survey of 300 consecutive women requesting regional analgesia in labour who received a combined spinal epidural blockade (CSE). The initial dose was given into the subarachnoid space and analgesia maintained via an epidural catheter. A subarachnoid injection of 2.5 mg bupivacaine and 25 mug fentanyl was successfully given in 268 women (89.3%). Completely pain-free contractions within 3 min of this injection occurred in 195 women (65%) and in all 300 within 20 min and there was no associated motor block in 291 (97%). 141 women chose to stand, walk or sit in a rocking chair at some time during labour. Only 38 women (12.6%) were immobile during the first stage of labour. Analgesia was maintained via the epidural catheter with bolus doses of 10-15 ml of 0.1% bupivacaine and 0.0002% fentanyl. The mean bupivacaine requirement was 9.5 mg/h throughout the entire duration of analgesia. The incidence of post lumbar puncture headache was 2.3%. Transient hypotension occurred in 24 women (8%) and was treated with 6 mg intravenous boluses of ephedrine. Complete satisfaction with analgesia and mobility was reported 12-24 h post partum by 95% of mothers. The use of this analgesic technique caused no alteration in obstetric management or post partum care of the women.

  13. Clonidine combined with sufentanil and bupivacaine with adrenaline for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Le Polain, B; De Kock, M; Scholtes, J L; Van Lierde, M

    1993-11-01

    Clonidine produces analgesia via a non-opioid mechanism and it may be used as an interesting adjuvant to local anaesthetics and opioids in obstetric analgesia. To examine the effects of the addition of clonidine to bolus injections of bupivacaine, adrenaline and sufentanil, we enrolled 50 women receiving extradural analgesia for vaginal delivery into a double-blind study. They were allocated randomly to two groups: group A received a 10-ml extradural solution of bupivacaine 12.5 mg combined with adrenaline 25 micrograms and sufentanil 10 micrograms; group B received the same solution with clonidine 30 micrograms. Each patient was allowed two subsequent injections of the chosen solution. Subsequently, if still in the first stage of labour, analgesia was augmented with additional 10-ml injections of bupivacaine 12.5 mg with adrenaline 25 micrograms, without sufentanil or clonidine. The latter solution was used for perineal analgesia in group A; clonidine 30 micrograms was added in group B. During the first and second stages of labour, there was no difference between the two groups in duration of analgesia after the first injection (142 min in group A; 127 min in group B), number of injections (1.8 in group A; 1.9 in group B) and the total bupivacaine requirements (33.9 mg in group A; 34 mg in group B). The quality of analgesia was evaluated as very good in both groups (23/25 in group A; 24/25 in group B). The degree of motor block or the frequency of other side effects were not enhanced by clonidine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Analgesia for the cirrhotic patient: a literature review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Jeremy P; Jayasekera, Chatura; Nicoll, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The choice of analgesic agent in cirrhotic patients is problematic and must be individualized taking into account several factors including severity of liver disease, history of opioid dependence, and potential drug interactions. With a cautious approach including slow dose up-titration and careful monitoring, effective analgesia can be achieved in most cirrhotic patients without significant side effects or decompensation of their liver disease. Paracetamol is safe in patients with chronic liver disease but reduced doses of 2-3 grams daily is recommended for long-term use. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are best avoided because of risk of renal impairment, hepatorenal syndrome, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Opioids have an increased risk of toxicity particularly in patients with hypoalbuminaemia, and immediate-release as opposed to controlled-release formulations are advised. Co-prescription of laxatives is mandatory to avoid constipation and encephalopathy. Adjuvant analgesics such as tricyclic antidepressants and anti-convulsants may be used cautiously for cirrhotic patients with neuropathic pain. Gabapentin or pregabalin may be better tolerated in cirrhosis because of non-hepatic metabolism and a lack of anti-cholinergic side effects.

  15. Overview of current development in patient-controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lindley, C

    1994-09-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous trials have assessed the safety and efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Advantages over conventional parenteral narcotics reported from these trials include equivalent to superior pain relief, superior patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, faster return to normal functional status, and reduction in nursing time and hospitalization. The majority of these trials have been conducted in the postoperative patient population. In the mid to late 1980s, interest arose in applying PCA technology to the management of cancer pain. Factors that served as an impetus for the use of PCA in cancer pain included favorable reports from the postoperative setting and the often-cited statistics regarding the magnitude of the cancer pain problem. Advances in PCA technology coupled with advances in vascular access technology that allow the placement of long-term ports and catheters to facilitate intravenous, epidural, or intrathecal administration of opioid analgesics have made the applicability of PCA in ambulatory cancer patients an attractive option. The greatest breakthrough in PCA technology came with the introduction of devices making it possible to choose between intermittent (demand bolus) and continuous administration (continuous infusion) or both intermittent and continuous modes. A comparison of these types of PCA devices is described. The limitations of the literature involving PCA therapy in cancer patients make it difficult to identify optimal patient selection criteria, PCA administration schedules, drug selection and dosing, and optimal route of administration. The current status and pertinent issues related to these topics are addressed.

  16. Salmon calcitonin potentiates the analgesia induced by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Ormazábal, M J; Goicoechea, C; Sánchez, E; Martín, M I

    2001-01-01

    Antidepressants are used in the treatment of a variety of pain syndromes. Most of them act by blocking noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) reuptake. It is also well known that the serotonergic system is also involved in calcitonin (CT) analgesia. Taking these two evidences into account, the modification of the analgesic effect of nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and paroxetine in the presence of salmon CT (s-CT) was examined in mice. The forced-swimming test was carried out in order to choose doses of each drug that did not induce an antidepressant effect under our experimental conditions (nortriptyline: 0.2-5 mg/kg ip, amitriptyline: 2.5-20 mg/kg ip, and paroxetine: 5-30 mg/kg ip). The analgesic effect of each antidepressant was then evaluated using the acetic acid test. At the doses tested, the antidepressants induced a dose-dependent analgesic effect. When mice were pre-treated with a subanalgesic dose of s-CT (2.5 IU/kg), the analgesic effect of amitriptyline and paroxetine was significantly increased though no modification was found for nortriptyline. In summary, s-CT was able to increase the analgesic effect of the antidepressant drugs that reduce the uptake of 5-HT, suggesting that the joint administration of antidepressants and CT may be an interesting alternative in pain management.

  17. Neonatal analgesia: A neglected issue in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Obu, Herbert A.; Chinawa, Josephat M.

    2014-01-01

    Pain control in newborns is poorly understood and often neglected in neonatal practice in many settings in our environment. Managing pain among newborns can be quite challenging and the effectiveness of various interventions used to ameliorate pain in this category of patients are either unknown or poorly understood by many a people engaged in the care of newborns in one way or the other. A search for published works on neonatal analgesia was performed using Google and PubMed. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was also searched. The areas of focus were definition, pathophysiology and management of pain in neonates. Relevant information was extracted and processed. Contrary to what is widely believed in many quarters, howbeit erroneously, there is compelling evidence that newborns do indeed feel pain. Supportive care, comprising of use of sucrose, glucose, breastfeeding, kangaroo mother care are worthwhile measures in ameliorating pain in the newborn. Novel therapies (such as sensorial saturation and swaddling) have been evaluated and proven useful. The use of sedation did not show any beneficial results. PMID:25013246

  18. Kin interaction enhances morphine analgesia in male mice.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, F R

    1998-07-01

    The additive effect of social and pharmacological treatments was evaluated in pairs of male mice. Ineffective and effective doses of morphine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested on pain threshold in dyads of males at different times after pair formation and drug treatment. During the second hour of social interaction after reunion, saline-injected adult sibling male mice showed a decrease in nociception as measured by the tail-flick test. Pairs of unrelated, unfamiliar control mice showed no changes in pain sensitivity during a 2-h social session. An ineffective dose of 2.5 mg/kg of morphine in non-sibling males, significantly increased tail-flick latencies in sibling pairs, before the effect of the social environment (sibling) reached statistical significance. The higher dose of morphine (5.0 mg/kg) produced analgesia in sibling as well as in non-sibling males, but the effect in the latter disappeared 60 min after drug treatment, whereas siblings were still analgesic. These results indicate that an ineffective dose of morphine, combined with the activation of the endogenous opioid system by social factors, can affect nociception.

  19. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation.

  20. Meditative analgesia: the current state of the field.

    PubMed

    Grant, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Since the first demonstrations that mindfulness-based therapies could have a positive influence on chronic pain patients, numerous studies have been conducted with healthy individuals in an attempt to understand meditative analgesia. This review focuses explicitly on experimental pain studies of meditation and attempts to draw preliminary conclusions based on the work completed in this new field over the past 6 years. Dividing meditative practices into the broad categories of focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques allowed several patterns to emerge. The majority of evidence for FA practices suggests they are not particularly effective in reducing pain. OM, on the other hand, seems to influence both sensory and affective pain ratings depending on the tradition or on whether the practitioners were meditating. The neural pattern underlying pain modulation during OM suggests meditators actively focus on the noxious stimulation while inhibiting other mental processes, consistent with descriptions of mindfulness. A preliminary model is presented for explaining the influence of mindfulness practice on pain. Finally, the potential analgesic effect of the currently unexplored technique of compassion meditation is discussed.

  1. Quality of Labor Epidural Analgesia and Maternal Outcome With Levobupivacaine and Ropivacaine: A Double-Blinded Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, T. Senthil; Rani, P.; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Samal, Sunita; Parthasarathy, S.; Ravishankar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quality of labor analgesia plays a vital role in the maternal outcome. Very few literature are available analyzing the quality of epidural labor analgesia. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 0.1% levobupivacaine and 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl as an adjuvant for epidural labor analgesia in terms of onset, duration, quality of analgesia, and degree of motor blockade. Methodology: Sixty nulliparous parturients, with singleton uncomplicated pregnancy, were recruited by continuous sampling. Parturients were randomized to receive either levobupivacaine 0.1% or ropivacaine 0.1% with 2 μg/ml fentanyl as an intermittent epidural bolus. The epidural analgesia was initiated with 12 ml of study drug solution in the active stage of labor (cervix 3 cm dilated). Demand bolus was given whenever the visual analog scale (VAS) score >3. Onset, duration, and quality of analgesia and degree of motor blockade were analyzed. Maternal outcome was evaluated in terms of mode of delivery, duration of labor, and assisted vaginal delivery. Statistical Analysis: All the data were recorded in Microsoft Office Excel. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 19.0 (IBM SPSS, USA) software with Regression Modules installed. Descriptive analyses were reported as mean and standard deviation of continuous variables. Results: The mean onset of analgesia was shorter in ropivacaine (21.43 ± 2 min) than in levobupivacaine group (23.57 ± 1.71 min) (P = 0.000). Duration of analgesia was shorter in ropivacaine (60 ± 14 min) than levobupivacaine (68 ± 11 min) (P = 0.027). Levobupivacaine produced a better quality of analgesia in terms of not perceiving pain and uterine contraction during labor analgesia but was associated with 37% incidence of instrumental delivery. Duration of labor and rate of cesarean section were comparable between the groups. Conclusion: Quality of analgesia in labor epidural was superior to levobupivacaine but was associated

  2. Intravenous Remifentanil versus Epidural Ropivacaine with Sufentanil for Labour Analgesia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhendong; Su, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0∼180 min) (P<0.0001), and pain scores in the remifentanil group showed an increasing trend one hour later. The remifentanil group had a lower SpO2 (P<0.0001) and a higher sedation score (P<0.0001) within 30 min after treatment. The epidural group had a higher overall satisfaction score (3.8±0.4 vs. 3.7±0.6, P = 0.007) and pain relief score (2.9±0.3 vs. 2.8±0.4, P<0.0001) compared with the remifentanil group. There was no significant difference on side effects between the two groups, except that a higher rate of dizziness (1% vs. 21.8%, P<0.0001) was observed during remifentanil analgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative option for labor analgesia

  3. Analgesia Induced by Isolated Bovine Chromaffin Cells Implanted in Rat Spinal Cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Pappas, George D.; Pollard, Harvey B.

    1986-10-01

    Chromaffin cells synthesize and secrete several neuroactive substances, including catecholamines and opioid peptides, that, when injected into the spinal cord, induce analgesia. Moreover, the release of these substances from the cells can be stimulated by nicotine. Since chromaffin cells from one species have been shown to survive when transplanted to the central nervous system of another species, these cells are ideal candidates for transplantation to alter pain sensitivity. Bovine chromaffin cells were implanted into the subarachnoid space of the lumbar spinal region in adult rats. Pain sensitivity and response to nicotine stimulation was determined at various intervals following cell implantation. Low doses of nicotine were able to induce potent analgesia in implanted animals as early as one day following their introduction into the host spinal cord. This response could be elicited at least through the 4 months the animals were tested. The induction of analgesia by nicotine in implanted animals was dose related. This analgesia was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone and partially attenuated by the adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. These results suggest that the analgesia is due to the stimulated release of opioid peptides and catecholamines from the implanted bovine chromaffin cells and may provide a new therapeutic approach for the relief of pain.

  4. Effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on management of postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarvjeet; Saroa, Richa; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of opioids for perioperative analgesia is associated with sedation, respiratory depression and postoperative nausea and vomiting. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist such as ketamine has both analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. We studied the effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on postoperative analgesia and its management with opioids. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two equal groups in a randomized double-blinded way. The general anesthetic technique was standardized in both groups. Group K patients (n = 40) received bolus of ketamine 0.2 mg/kg intravenously followed by an infusion of 0.1 mg/kg/h before skin incision, which was continued up to the end of surgery. Similar volume of saline was infused in Group C (n = 40). The pain score at different intervals and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 h was observed. Secondary outcomes such as hemodynamic parameters, patient satisfaction score and incidences of side effects were also recorded. Results: Intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine resulted in effective analgesia in first 6 h of the postoperative period, which was evident from reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirements (P = 0.001). The incidence of side effects and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion provides good postoperative analgesia while reducing need of opioid analgesics, which must be considered for better management of postoperative analgesia. PMID:26283834

  5. Attitudes of patients to obstetric analgesia at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, O; Aimakhu, C O; Udoh, E S

    2003-01-01

    Pain relief, for different reasons, is controversial worldwide. We designed this study to assess the level of awareness of antenatal patients to analgesia in labour and to evaluate the effect of age, parity and educational status on the awareness and acceptability of pain relief in labour. A structured questionnaire was administered to 1,000 antenatal patients between 1 June 2000 and 31 May 2001. Spearman's correlation coefficient was applied to estimate the correlation between the ranked dependent variable (awareness and acceptability) and age, parity and educational status (independent variables). Awareness of pain relief methods was seen in only 27.1%. The most common method known was the use of systemic opioids (80%); only 10% were aware of epidural analgesia and about 14% knew of inhalational analgesia. Acceptance of methods was, however, 57.6%. The most common reason for non-acceptance was that 'The pain of labour is natural' in 76.5%, 12% feared complications to the baby and 25% gave other reasons. Age, parity and educational status did not affect awareness. Educational status had positive correlation (rho = 0.13, P < 0.05) with acceptance while age had a negative correlation (rho = -0.124, P<0.05). Awareness of obstetric analgesia is still relatively low in this environment; however, a high proportion of patients would accept analgesia in labour if offered.

  6. Post-ictal analgesia: involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Nora, J E; Herrero, C F; Tedeschi-Filho, W; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2001-01-12

    The neural mechanisms involved in post-ictal analgesia remain to be elucidated. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is used experimentally to induce seizure in animal subjects. This non-competitive antagonist blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 30 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naloxone (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg), methysergide (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and ketanserine (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. However, while naloxone antagonized analgesia 15 and 25 min post convulsions, the other drugs caused a blockade of the post-ictal analgesia in a relatively greater period of time. These results indicate that endogenous opioids, serotonin and acetylcholine may be involved in post-ictal analgesia.

  7. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  8. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  9. Obstetric analgesia: pharmacokinetics and its relation to neonatal behavioral and adaptive functions.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J; Erkkola, R

    1984-01-01

    The neonatal pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioral properties of certain agents used in obstetric analgesia are reviewed (local anesthetics, opiates, inhalation agents, benzodiazepines). Fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetic alterations partly explain the neurobehavioral differences observed between different drug groups and ways of drug administration. The most effective and safest method with fewest neonatal neurobehavioral effects appears to be regional epidural analgesia performed with plain bupivacaine. The use of epidural opiates remains problematic. Inhalation agents and parenteral pethidine (meperidine) are still clinically useful alternative compounds in circumstances where epidural analgesia is not possible. Pharmacokinetically and according to neurobehavioral assessments, inhalation agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine. Benzodiazepines, especially after high or repeated doses, may cause the so-called floppy-infant syndrome, at least partly, due to a slow neonatal drug elimination.

  10. [Obstetric analgesia for a patient with a history of 3 previous operations on the spine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Torres, B; Fontán Atalaya, I M; López Millán, J M; Alba Rivera, R; Senabre Carrera, J; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2006-01-01

    A history of spinal surgery is not currently considered a contraindication for regional obstetric analgesia. However, there are highly complex cases in which choosing the best analgesic technique presents genuine problems. We report the case of a woman in labor at full-term with 4-cm dilatation of the cervix who had undergone 3 operations for scoliosis and a herniated disk treated by T5-L4 and L4-sacral arthrodesis, laminectomy, and diskectomy. No previous anesthetic plan was in place, so we chose intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for labor and vaginal delivery and spinal anesthesia for a cesarean delivery. However, general anesthesia became necessary because it was impossible to reach the dura mater. The literature was reviewed to assess alternative forms of obstetric analgesia for patients who have undergone scoliosis surgery.

  11. Stress response dysregulation and stress-induced analgesia in nicotine dependent men and women.

    PubMed

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Nakajima, Motohiro; Grabowski, John

    2013-04-01

    Alterations in the stress response and endogenous pain regulation mechanisms may contribute directly and indirectly to maintenance of nicotine dependence and relapse. We examined the extent to which nicotine dependence alters endogenous pain regulatory systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, cardiovascular activity, and stress-induced analgesia. Smokers and nonsmokers attended a laboratory session that included assessment of hormonal and cardiovascular responses to stress. Smokers smoked at their regular rate prior to the session. The hand cold pressor and heat thermal pain tests were completed twice, once after acute stress (public speaking and math tasks) and the other after rest. While smokers and nonsmokers exhibited significant hormonal and cardiovascular responses to stress, smokers exhibited blunted stress responses relative to nonsmokers. They also exhibited diminished stress-induced analgesia. Results demonstrate altered stress response and diminished stress-induced analgesia among chronic smokers, and suggest that these dysregulated physiological responding may contribute to altered endogenous pain regulation.

  12. Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jiang-Ti; Schnyer, Rosa N.; Johnson, Kevin A.; Mackey, Sean

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations. PMID:23762107

  13. Understanding central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia using dynamic quantitative sensory testing: a review.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jiang-Ti; Schnyer, Rosa N; Johnson, Kevin A; Mackey, Sean

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations.

  14. Conditioned placebo analgesia persists when subjects know they are receiving a placebo

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Scott M.; Colloca, Luana; Wager, Tor D.

    2015-01-01

    Belief in the effectiveness of a placebo treatment is widely thought to be critical for placebo analgesia. Many types of placebo responses—even those that depend on conditioning—appear to be mediated by expectations that are strengthened as treatment cues are reinforced with positive outcomes. However, placebo effects may occur even when participants are aware they are receiving placebo. To address the question of whether conditioned placebo analgesia can persist in the absence of expectations, we studied the effects of long (4 days) vs. short (1 day) conditioning to a placebo treatment. After an initial placebo test, a “reveal” manipulation convincingly demonstrated to participants that they had never received an active drug. Placebo analgesia persisted after the reveal in the long conditioning group only. These findings suggest that reinforcing treatment cues with positive outcomes can create placebo effects that are independent of reported expectations for pain relief. PMID:25617812

  15. Src family kinases involved in CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Cyril; Sebaihi, Soumia; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Fouquet, Stéphane; Kitabgi, Patrick; Pohl, Michel; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2014-05-01

    Functional interactions between the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and opioid receptors have been reported in the brain, leading to a decreased morphine analgesic activity. However the cellular mechanisms responsible for this loss of opioid analgesia are largely unknown. Here we examined whether Src family-kinases (SFK)-linked mechanisms induced by CXCR4 contributed to the loss of acute morphine analgesia and could represent a new physiological anti-opioid signaling pathway. In this way, we showed by immunohistochemistry and western blot that CXCL12 rapidly activated SFK phosphorylation in vitro in primary cultured lumbar rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but also in vivo in the DRG and the spinal cord. We showed that SFK activation occurred in a sub population of sensory neurons, in spinal microglia but also in spinal nerve terminals expressing mu-(MOR) and delta-opioid (DOR) receptor. In addition we described that CXCR4 is detected in MOR- and DOR-immunoreactive neurons in the DRG and spinal cord. In vivo, we demonstrated that an intrathecal administration of CXCL12 (1μg) significantly attenuated the subcutaneous morphine (4mg/kg) analgesia. Conversely, pretreatment with a potent CXCR4 antagonist (5μg) significantly enhanced morphine analgesia. Similar effects were obtained after an intrathecal injection of a specific SFK inhibitor, PP2 (10μg). Furthermore, PP2 abrogated CXCL12-induced decrease in morphine analgesia by suppressing SFK activation in the spinal cord. In conclusion, our data highlight that CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia is linked to Src family kinases activation.

  16. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  17. Effect of maternal ambulation on labour with low-dose combined spinal-epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Harding, S A; Morgan, B M

    1999-06-01

    Two hundred and twenty-nine nulliparous women who requested regional analgesia during labour were given a combined spinal-epidural block. They were randomly allocated to stay in bed or spend at least 20 min of every hour out of bed. There was no significant difference in duration of labour, analgesia requirements, mode of delivery or condition of the baby between the groups. Ambulation appeared to be safe for the mother and baby. Maternal satisfaction with the low-dose combined spinal-epidural was high in both groups.

  18. Epidural analgesia, fetal monitoring and the condition of the baby at birth with breech presentation.

    PubMed

    Donnai, P; Nicholas, A D

    1975-05-01

    Between December 1970 and March 1973, 138 patients with a singleton fetus presenting by the breech after 36 weeks of pregnancy were deemed suitable for vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia; 130 were delivered vaginally, 10 of them by breech extraction. There was one stillbirth and no neonatal deaths. Epidural analgesia for vaginal breech delivery seemed beneficial. In 65 cases it was possible to compare the umbilical vein pH with the Apgar score at one minute. In 35 patients a continuous recording of the fetal heart rate was used to predict the Apgar score at one minute and the results are discussed.

  19. [Effect of met- and leu-enkephalins and their synthetic analog on stimulation and acupunture analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Iu D; Vasil'ev, Iu N; Kovalenko, V S; Titov, M I

    1981-08-01

    Experiments on unrestrained rats were carried out to study the effect of intraventricularly injected met- and leu-enkephalins and their synthetic analog Tyr-dAla-Cly-Phe-NH2 on analgesia induced by electrical stimulation of the central gray. It was shown that subanalgesic doses of enkephalins and their synthetic analog facilitated the appearance of analgesic action on subthreshold antinociceptive-brain stimulation and potentiated the analgesic effect of threshold central gray stimulation. Subanalgesic and low analgesic doses of the peptides increased antinociceptive effect of electroacupuncture. The data obtained are discussed from the standpoint of the implication of the peptidergic mechanisms in the realization of acupuncture and stimulation analgesia.

  20. Age-dependency of analgesia elicited by intraoral sucrose in acute and persistent pain models.

    PubMed

    Anseloni, Vanessa C Z; Weng, H-R; Terayama, R; Letizia, David; Davis, Barry J; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald; Ennis, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    Treatment of pain in newborns is associated with problematic drug side effects. Previous studies demonstrate that an intraoral infusion of sucrose and other sweet components of mother's milk are effective in alleviating pain in infant rats and humans. These findings are of considerable significance, as sweet tastants are used in pain and stress management in a number of clinical procedures performed in human infants. The ability of sweet stimuli to induce analgesia is absent in adult rats, suggesting that this is a developmentally transient phenomenon. However, the age range over which intraoral sucrose is capable of producing analgesia is not known. We investigated the effects of intraoral sucrose (7.5%) on nocifensive withdrawal responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli in naive and inflamed rats at postnatal days (P) P0-21. In some rats, Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected in a fore- or hindpaw to produce inflammation. In non-inflamed animals, for noxious thermal stimuli, sucrose-induced analgesia emerged at P3, peaked at P7-10, then progressively declined and was absent at P17. For mechanical forepaw stimuli, sucrose-induced analgesia emerged, and was maximal at approximately P10, then declined and was absent at P17. By contrast, maximal sucrose-induced analgesia for mechanical hindpaw stimuli was delayed (P13) compared to that for the forepaw, although it was also absent at P17. In inflamed animals, sucrose reduced hyperesthesia and hyperalgesia assessed with mechanical stimuli. Sucrose-induced analgesia in inflamed animals was initially present at P3 for the forepaw and P13 for the hindpaw, and was absent by P17 for both limbs. Intraoral sucrose produced significantly greater effects on responses in fore- and hindpaws in inflamed rats than in naive rats indicating that it reduces hyperalgesia and allodynia beyond its effects on responses in naive animals. These findings support the hypothesis that sucrose has a selective influence on analgesic

  1. Epidural catheter misplaced into the thoracic cavity: Utilized to provide interpleural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sundary, M. Thiriloga

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic epidural analgesia is one of the most effective and time-tested modalities of providing postthoracotomy pain relief. It improves postoperative pulmonary outcome. Nevertheless, being a blind procedure several complications have been associated with the technique. Pleural puncture is one rare complication that might occur following thoracic epidural catheterization. We have discussed a patient who underwent a right thoracotomy for excision of emphysematous bulla of lung under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural. The epidural catheter was misplaced in the pleural cavity and was detected intraoperatively after thoracotomy. The catheter was left in situ and was successfully utilized to provide postoperative analgesia via the interpleural route. PMID:25886437

  2. Nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia. A comparison of nalbuphine with pethidine for pain relief in labour when administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).

    PubMed

    Frank, M; McAteer, E J; Cattermole, R; Loughnan, B; Stafford, L B; Hitchcock, A M

    1987-07-01

    A double-blind, randomised study of 60 patients who received intravenous increments of nalbuphine 3 mg or pethidine 15 mg by patient-controlled analgesia during the first stage of labour, was carried out. Pain intensity, sedation, uterine contractions, maternal cardioventilatory variables and fetal heart rate were recorded as well as any side effects. Apgar scores, time to sustained respiration and resuscitative measures required for the neonate were noted at delivery. Modified neonatal neurobehavioural studies and a retrospective assessment of maternal analgesia, satisfaction and tolerance were also carried out. Group mean values of pain scores of nalbuphine-medicated primiparous women were statistically significantly lower than those of pethidine-medicated patients (p less than 0.01). Other assessments did not demonstrate a statistical significance between the two groups.

  3. Subarachnoid analgesia in advanced labor: a comparison of subarachnoid analgesia and pudendal block in advanced labor: analgesic quality and obstetric outcome.

    PubMed

    Pace, Maria Caterina; Aurilio, Caterina; Bulletti, Carlo; Iannotti, Mario; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Palagiano, Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Pain control during labor is a primary objective of antalgic therapy. The use of the peridural as an elective procedure for labor analgesia is now corroborated by the international scientific community. Sometimes a combined spinal-peridural procedure is used together with the intrathecal administration of opioids to also cover the first stage of labor. Unfortunately, patients and/or gynecologists often request analgesia in a late stage of labor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of using a subarachnoid block alone for labor analgesia when this is requested at a late stage, that is, in advanced labor with cervical dilation greater than 7 cm. After approval by our ethics committee and the written and informed consent of the patients, 111 women were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups. The first group (Group S: 55 patients) received a subarachnoid block with 2.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine + 25 mug fentanyl + 1 mL 10% glucose. A pudendal nerve block with 7 mL 2% mepivacaine in each side was administered to the second group (Group P: 56 patients). In both groups, careful maternal-fetal monitoring was conducted, and pain was scored on a numerical scale from 0 to 4, 10 minutes after placement of the block (time [T] 0), at delivery (T1), and at episiorrhaphy (T2). In all patients, we recorded any side effects, the Apgar score at birth and after 5 minutes, the administration of other analgesic and/or sedative drugs, the degree of satisfaction, and the time of hospitalization after delivery. Evaluations were performed by anesthesiologists unaware of patients' treatment group. The duration of spinal analgesia was considered to be the time from injection of study drugs to the time of the patient's first request for additional analgesia. In no cases were there any side effects worthy of note, and hospitalization never exceeded 72 hours. The Apgar score was always between 7 and 10. All except one of the women in Group S were satisfied or

  4. Role of brainstem serotonin in analgesia produced by low-intensity exercise on neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bobinski, Franciane; Ferreira, Tamara A A; Córdova, Marina M; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; da Cunha, Cláudio; Santo, Caroline C do Espírito; Poli, Anicleto; Pires, Rita G W; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Sluka, Kathleen A; Santos, Adair R S

    2015-12-01

    Physical exercise is a low-cost, safe, and efficient intervention for the reduction of neuropathic chronic pain in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms for how exercise reduces neuropathic pain are not yet well understood. Central monoaminergic systems play a critical role in endogenous analgesia leading us to hypothesize that the analgesic effect of low-intensity exercise occurs through activation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in descending inhibitory systems. To test this hypothesis, we induced peripheral nerve injury (PNI) by crushing the sciatic nerve. The exercise intervention consisted of low-intensity treadmill running for 2 weeks immediately after injury. Animals with PNI showed an increase in pain-like behaviors that were reduced by treadmill running. Reduction of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) synthesis using the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester prevented the analgesic effect of exercise. However, blockade catecholamine synthesis with the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine had no effect. In parallel, 2 weeks of exercise increased brainstem levels of the 5-HT and its metabolites (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), decreased expression of the serotonin transporter, and increased expression of 5-HT receptors (5HT-1B, 2A, 2C). Finally, PNI-induced increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta, in the brainstem, was reversed by 2 weeks of exercise. These findings provide new evidence indicating that low-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise suppresses pain-like behaviors in animals with neuropathic pain by enhancing brainstem 5-HT neurotransmission. These data provide a rationale for the analgesia produced by exercise to provide an alternative approach to the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

  5. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  6. The Effect of Epidural Analgesia on the Delivery Outcome of Induced Labour: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether the use of epidural analgesia during induced labour was a risk factor for instrumental vaginal delivery and caesarean section (CS) delivery. Study Design. This was a retrospective case series of primigravidae women being induced at term for all indications with a normal body mass index (BMI) at booking and under the age of 40 years. Results. We identified 1,046 women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of which 31.2% had an epidural analgesia. Those with an epidural analgesia had significantly greater maternal age, higher BMI, greater percentage of oxytocin usage, and a longer first and second stage of labour. Women with an epidural analgesia had a higher instrumental delivery (37.9% versus 16.4%; p < 0.001) and CS delivery rate (26% versus 10.1%; p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the use of an epidural was not a risk factor for a CS delivery but was a risk factor for an instrument-assisted delivery (adjusted OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 2.51–5.24; p < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study supports the literature evidence that the use of an epidural increases the instrumental delivery rates. It has also added that there is no effect on CS delivery and the observed increase is due to the presence of confounding factors. PMID:27990163

  7. [Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the perioperative treatment of a patient with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Sifre, C; López-Alarcón, D

    1998-12-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by a triad of symptoms--bronchiectasis, situs inversus and sinusitis--and is classified as an immotile cilia syndrome. Patients may experience specific airway problems when undergoing anesthesia for surgical procedures. We report the case of a woman with Kartagener's syndrome who underwent surgery under epidural anesthesia with postoperative epidural analgesia, both techniques proving successful.

  8. Side effects of spiramycin masquerading as local anesthetic toxicity during labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Julliac, B; Théophile, H; Begorre, M; Richez, B; Haramburu, F

    2010-07-01

    Significant fetal bradycardia occurred when a parturient receiving labor epidural analgesia experienced generalized numbness and tingling, a metallic taste and hot flushes. An emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia was performed with favorable outcomes for the mother and baby. The most likely source of the maternal symptoms was spiramycin, which was being administered for treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  9. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  10. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10th day. PMID:25190960

  11. Spinal cord distribution of sup 3 H-morphine after intrathecal administration: Relationship to analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Y.; Sinatra, R.S.; Kitahata, L.M.; Collins, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intrathecally administered {sup 3}H-morphine was examined by light microscopic autoradiography in rat spinal cord and temporal changes in silver grain localization were compared with results obtained from simultaneous measurements of analgesia. After tissue processing, radio-activity was found to have penetrated in superficial as well as in deeper layers (Rexed lamina V, VII, and X) of rat spinal cord within minutes after application. Silver grain density reached maximal values at 30 min in every region of cord studied. Radioactivity decreased rapidly between 30 min and 2 hr and then more slowly over the next 24 hr. In rats tested for responses to a thermal stimulus (tail flick test), intrathecal administration of morphine (5 and 15 micrograms) resulted in significant dose dependent analgesia that peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 5 hr (P less than 0.5). There was a close relationship between analgesia and spinal cord silver grain density during the first 4 hr of the study. It is postulated that the onset of spinal morphine analgesia depends on appearance of molecules at sites of action followed by the activation of anti-nociceptive mechanisms.

  12. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sucena Pita, Murillo; Sato, Sandra; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; do Nascimento, Cássio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac), panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine), and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients' pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time. PMID:25874243

  13. [Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia with remifentanyl in a patient with von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Novoa, L; Navarro Egea, M; Vieito Amor, M; Hernández Iniesta, J; Arxer, A; Villalonga, A

    2003-05-01

    A 30-year-old woman with von Willebrand's disease was admitted in labor. As epidural analgesia was ruled out due to risk of spinal hematoma, a pump for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was provided with boluses of remifentanil and set for intravenous infusion of 24 micrograms with a lockout time of 5 minutes. The patient reported analgesia to be satisfactory. Later, because of abnormal fetal positioning, an emergency cesarean was performed with the patient under general anesthesia with remifentanil, with propofol and succinylcholine for induction. A healthy girl was born free of respiratory depression. Von Willebrand's disease is a hemorrhagic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance due to a quantitative or functional factor VIII deficit. Various subtypes and degrees of severity of abnormal bleeding have been described. It is the most common genetic hemostatic disorder affecting obstetric procedures, and although epidural analgesia has been used with strict hematologic monitoring, that technique carries a risk of hematoma. PCA is useful in patients for whom regional techniques are contraindicated. With adequate fetal and maternal monitoring, remifentanil in PCA is safe and more effective than other opiates for labor pain.

  14. Epidural hydromorphone with and without epinephrine for post-operative analgesia after cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, T B; Baysinger, C L; Henenberger, J C; Gooding, D J

    1989-03-01

    The efficacy of epidural hydromorphone alone or in combination with epinephrine for postoperative analgesia was evaluated in 30 healthy women who underwent cesarean delivery with epidural anesthesia. They were assigned randomly to receive either 1.5 mg hydromorphone alone (N = 15) or 1.5 mg hydromorphone with 1/200,000 epinephrine (N = 15). Duration of analgesia (mean +/- SD) was 24.3 +/- 9.4 hours after the epidural injection of hydromorphone plus epinephrine. This was significantly greater (p less than 0.01) than the duration of 18.2 +/- 5.9 hours after the same dose of plain hydromorphone. Analgesia was more rapid in onset and significantly better at the 0.5, 1, 3, and 12 hours postoperatively in the hydromorphone-epinephrine group. Side effects including pruritus (73%), nausea (20%), and vomiting (15%) were of similar frequency with and without epinephrine. Although mean venous PCO2 (PvCO2) levels three and six hours after the hydromorphone-epinephrine dose were elevated significantly over the pre-drug PvCO2 levels, no respiratory depression was detected by an apnea monitor to which all patients were connected. The addition of epinephrine to epidural hydromorphone hastened onset and prolonged the duration of analgesia after cesarean section.

  15. Ventral tegmental analgesia in two strains of rats: effects of amphetamine, naloxone and parachlorophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Moreau, J L; Cohen, E; Lieblich, I

    1984-05-21

    Pain sensitivity and analgesia induced by the stimulation of the ventral tegmentum (VT) were studied in 72 male rats of two lines, LC2-Hi and LC2-Lo, genetically selected for high and low rates of lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation, respectively. LC2-Lo rats were more sensitive to acute peripheral pain and developed a stronger analgesia than their LC2-Hi counterparts. In order to assess the pharmacological substrate of ventral tegmental stimulation-induced analgesia (VT-SIA), the effects of amphetamine (AMP, 21 animals), naloxone (NX, 24 animals) and parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 27 animals) injections were studied. VT-SIA was found to be clearly decreased by PCPA, slightly decreased by AMP and not significantly affected by NX. Ventral tegmental self-stimulation ( VTSS ) was increased by PCPA treatment. The comparison of VTSS and VT-SIA did not reveal any correlation between both phenomena. These data suggest that VT-SIA may be mediated by serotonin while catecholamines may have a modulatory role in this analgesia and that VTSS and VT-SIA seem to be governed by different neuronal systems.

  16. High intensity social conflict in the Swiss albino mouse induces analgesia modulated by 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Canto de Souza, A; Nunes de Souza, R L; Péla, I R; Graeff, F G

    1997-03-01

    Social conflict between mice produces analgesia in the attacked mouse. Both the magnitude and type (opioid or nonopioid) of this analgesia have been related to attack intensity and strain of mouse. In the present study low intensity social conflict (7 bites) did not produce analgesia, whereas high intensity - 30 and 60 bites - interactions produced, respectively, short-lasting (5 min) and very short-lasting (1 min) analgesia in Swiss albino mice, when compared with nonaggressive interaction (0 bite). The 30 bites aggressive interaction induced analgesia (AIIA) was not affected by IP injection of either naloxone (5.0 and 7.5 mg/kg) or diazepam (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg). However, this attack-induced analgesia was reduced after IP administration of the 5-HT1A agonists, gepirone (0.3 and 3.0 mg/kg) and BAY R 1531 (0.01 mg/kg). These results indicate that the analgesia induced by 30 bites social conflict in Swiss albino mice does not involve opioid and GABA-benzodiazepine (GABA-BZD) mechanisms. In addition, they suggest that high-intensity social conflict activates serotonergic pain modulatory systems that act through 5-HT1A receptors.

  17. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  18. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-05

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

  19. Femoral versus Multiple Nerve Blocks for Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Sevi, Roger; Stav, Michael Yohay; Powell, Devorah; Dor, Yanai; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Bayadse, Fuaz; Sternberg, Ahud; Soudry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The PROSPECT (Procedure-Specific Postoperative Pain Management) Group recommended a single injection femoral nerve block in 2008 as a guideline for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. Other authors have recommended the addition of sciatic and obturator nerve blocks. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is also involved in pain syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that preoperative blocking of all four nerves would offer superior analgesia to femoral nerve block alone. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a femoral nerve block group, a multiple nerve block group, and a control group. All patients were treated postoperatively using patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. Pain intensity at rest, during flexion and extension, and morphine consumption were compared between groups over three days. Results A total of 90 patients completed the study protocol. Patients who received multiple nerve blocks experienced superior analgesia and had reduced morphine consumption during the postoperative period compared to the other two groups. Pain intensity during flexion was significantly lower in the “blocks” groups versus the control group. Morphine consumption was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions Pain relief after total knee arthroplasty immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day was significantly superior in patients who received multiple blocks preoperatively, with morphine consumption significantly lower during this period. A preoperative femoral nerve block alone produced partial and insufficient analgesia immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day. (Clinical trial registration number (NIH): NCT01303120) PMID:28178436

  20. [Postoperative analgesia with tramal in newborn children using the method of continuous intravenous infusion].

    PubMed

    Mikhel'son, V A; Zhirkova, Iu V; Beliaeva, I D; Stepanenko, S M; Manerova, A F; Butyleva, O Iu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of postoperative analgesia with tramal in the newborns. Analgesia with tramal (5% solution for injections, "Gruonental GmbH", Germany) was administered postoperatively in 20 newborn children. Thirteen children were operated for congenital malformations in the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, three children were operated for purulent-septic diseases and four children were operated for neoplasms. Hemodynamics indices, i.e. heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure, as well as SaO2, respiratory rate (RR), acid-base condition and behavioral reactions were assessed. Analgesia was implemented by the method of continuous intravenous infusion of tramal, 0.1-0.2 mg/kg.h combined with boluses, 1-2 mg/kg. The newborns were asleep for a major part of time during analgesia with tamal; the stable indices of hemodynamics, acid-base balance, glycemia and of the cortisol level were registered. Arterial hypertension, caused by several factors including the effect produced by tamal, was noted in 70% of children. Dose-dependent hypercapnia was registered in 80% of tests in children at unassisted respiration during the infusion of tamal, which is indicative of that tamal affects the respiratory center during the neonatal period and that it is necessary to monitor thoroughly the respiratory functions, i.e. RR, SatO2, pO2, pCO2, and to choose accurately a preparation dose. The continuous infusion of tamal ensures a sufficient analgesia after different operations and especially after medium-traumatic operations.

  1. Comparison of efficacy of bupivacaine and fentanyl with bupivacaine and sufentanil for epidural labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sumit; Saraswat, Namita; Agnihotri, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: A study to compare the efficacy between fentanyl and sufentanil combined with low concentration (0.0625%) of bupivacaine for epidural labor analgesia in laboring women Materials and Methods: Fifty full term parturients received an initial bolus dose of a 10 ml solution containing 0.125% bupivacaine. The patients were randomly divided into two: group F received 0.0625% bupivacaine with 2.5 mcg/ml fentanyl and group S received 0.0625% bupivacaine with 0.25 mcg/ml sufentanil. Verbal analogue pain scores, need of supplementary/rescue boluses dose of bupivacaine consumed, mode of delivery, maternal satisfaction, and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. No significant difference was observed between both groups. Results: Both the groups provided equivalent labor analgesia and maternal satisfaction. The chances of cesarean delivery were also not increased in any group. No difference in the cephalad extent of sensory analgesia, motor block or neonatal Apgar score were observed. Although mean pain scores throughout the labor and delivery were similar in both groups, more patients in fentanyl group required supplementary boluses though not statistically significant. Conclusion: We conclude that both 0.0625% bupivacaine-fentanyl (2.5 μg/ml) and 0.0625% bupivacaine-sufentanil (0.25 μg/ml) were equally effective by continuous epidural infusion in providing labor analgesia with hemodynamic stability achieving equivalent maternal satisfaction without serious maternal or fetal side effects. We found that sufentanil was 10 times more potent than fentanyl as an analgesic for continuous epidural labor analgesia. PMID:21189856

  2. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Mogil, J S; Japón, M; Chan, E C; Allen, R G; Low, M J

    1996-04-30

    A physiological role for beta-endorphin in endogenous pain inhibition was investigated by targeted mutagenesis of the proopiomelanocortin gene in mouse embryonic stem cells. The tyrosine codon at position 179 of the proopiomelanocortin gene was converted to a premature translational stop codon. The resulting transgenic mice display no overt developmental or behavioral alterations and have a normally functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Homozygous transgenic mice with a selective deficiency of beta-endorphin exhibit normal analgesia in response to morphine, indicating the presence of functional mu-opiate receptors. However, these mice lack the opioid (naloxone reversible) analgesia induced by mild swim stress. Mutant mice also display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. These changes may reflect compensatory upregulation of alternative pain inhibitory mechanisms.

  3. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, M; Mogil, J S; Japón, M; Chan, E C; Allen, R G; Low, M J

    1996-01-01

    A physiological role for beta-endorphin in endogenous pain inhibition was investigated by targeted mutagenesis of the proopiomelanocortin gene in mouse embryonic stem cells. The tyrosine codon at position 179 of the proopiomelanocortin gene was converted to a premature translational stop codon. The resulting transgenic mice display no overt developmental or behavioral alterations and have a normally functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Homozygous transgenic mice with a selective deficiency of beta-endorphin exhibit normal analgesia in response to morphine, indicating the presence of functional mu-opiate receptors. However, these mice lack the opioid (naloxone reversible) analgesia induced by mild swim stress. Mutant mice also display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. These changes may reflect compensatory upregulation of alternative pain inhibitory mechanisms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8633004

  4. [Clinical practices of analgesia for invasive procedures in critically ill sedated patients in Ile-de-France: a phone survey].

    PubMed

    Brocas, E; Adam, M; Alonso, A; Perrin-Gachadoat, D; Thierry, S; Tenaillon, A

    2005-06-01

    To assess the practice of analgesia for invasive procedures in critically ill sedated patient in Ile-de-France (French area including Paris). Observational study: phone survey using a standard questionnaire. Only one senior physician in each of 30 intensive care unit (ICU) was questioned. Baseline sedation included systematic analgesia with narcotics in all ICUs. Only 4 physicians declared using a specific pain scale for sedated patients. Only 3 ICUs used written protocols. Procedures, which were thought to be most invasive (catheterization, pleural drainage, fibroscopy) were in most cases preceded by analgesia, but this was seldom the case for less painful events (venous or arterial puncture, tracheal suctioning). Specific pain scales are still underused. In contrast with current guidelines, analgesia for invasive procedures is not systematic but depends on subjective opinions.

  5. Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in caudal analgesia in children

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vigya; Kubre, Jyotsna; Radhakrishnan, Krishnaprabha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Postoperative pain management is becoming an integral part of anesthesia care. Various techniques of pediatric pain relief have been designed among which the most commonly practiced is caudal epidural block. Several adjuvants have been used to prolong the duration of caudal analgesia such as clonidine, neostigmine, ketamine, opioids, and ephedrine. We have designed the study using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to assess analgesic efficacy, duration of postoperative analgesia, hemodynamic stability, postoperative sedation, and any adverse effects in children. Aims: The aim is to study the effects of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in caudal analgesia in pediatric patients posted for infraumbilical surgeries. Settings and Design: This is a randomized, double-blind study in which effect of dexmedetomidine is studied when added to bupivacaine in the caudal epidural block. The observations are made intraoperatively for hemodynamic stability and postoperatively for the duration of analgesia. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted in 100 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, aged 2–10 years, undergoing elective infraumbilical surgeries. They were divided into two groups as follows: Group A: (0.25%) bupivacaine 1 ml/kg + normal saline (NS) 1 ml. Group B: (0.25%) bupivacaine 1 ml/kg + 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine in 1 ml NS. As this study was double-blind, patients were randomly assigned to receive either (bupivacaine + saline) or (bupivacaine + dexmedetomidine) in each group. The patients were observed for hemodynamic stability, respiratory depression, and postoperative pain using face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) pain scale for 24 h postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired Student's t-test. Results: The mean duration of effective analgesia in Group A patients was 4.33 ± 0.98 h versus 9.88 ± 0.90 h in Group B patients. Likewise, the difference in mean FLACC score of both the

  6. Leukocyte opioid receptors mediate analgesia via Ca(2+)-regulated release of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Celik, Melih Ö; Labuz, Dominika; Henning, Karen; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are the most powerful analgesics. As pain is driven by sensory transmission and opioid receptors couple to inhibitory G proteins, according to the classical concept, opioids alleviate pain by activating receptors on neurons and blocking the release of excitatory mediators (e.g., substance P). Here we show that analgesia can be mediated by opioid receptors in immune cells. We propose that activation of leukocyte opioid receptors leads to the secretion of opioid peptides Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin A (1-17), which subsequently act at local neuronal receptors, to relieve pain. In a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, exogenous agonists of δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors injected at the damaged nerve infiltrated by opioid peptide- and receptor-expressing leukocytes, produced analgesia, as assessed with von Frey filaments. The analgesia was attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of opioid peptides, and by leukocyte depletion. This decrease in analgesia was restored by the transfer of wild-type, but not opioid receptor-lacking leukocytes. Ex vivo, exogenous opioids triggered secretion of opioid peptides from wild-type immune cells isolated from damaged nerves, which was diminished by blockade of Gαi/o or Gβγ (but not Gαs) proteins, by chelator of intracellular (but not extracellular) Ca(2+), by blockers of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and was partially attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitor. Similarly, the leukocyte depletion-induced decrease in exogenous opioid analgesia was re-established by transfer of immune cells ex vivo pretreated with extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, but was unaltered by leukocytes pretreated with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator or blockers of Gαi/o and Gβγ proteins. Thus, both ex vivo opioid peptide release and in vivo analgesia were mediated by leukocyte opioid receptors coupled to the G

  7. [Comparison of 0.125% bupivacaine and 0.2% ropivacaine in obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Zackova, M; Manfredini, P; Strali, W; Baravelli, A; Furnari, G; Accorsi, A

    2000-09-01

    This comparative study of low doses of ropivacaine was conducted in order to identify the most effective form of analgesia during labour with the aid of supplementary low doses of fentanyl and clonidine. 60 ASA I and II parturient primipares who had asked for epidural analgesia were randomly assigned to two groups. Group R was given 5-7 ml 0.2% ropivacaine and Group B 0.125% bupivacaine with both groups receiving 75 ng clonidine and 50 ng fentanyl with their first bolus of local anaesthetic. The parameters measured included the speed and spread of the sensory blockade and the scale of any motor blockade. The material haemodynamics and VAS pain relief scores were also measured at 30-minute intervals during labour and all side-effects (nausea, vomiting, localised or generalised itching, headache etc) were also monitored. Apgar anaesthetics and other drugs was decided on the basis of the VAS score (a further dose was given to women with a VAS of > 3-4). The study was completed by a telephone interview 6 months after delivery and the data were analysed using the Student's t-test and the chi 2 test. The analgesic effect was satisfactory in both groups and no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups under most of the headings analysed, apart from the top-up doses needed to maintain adequate analgesia. The average time between the first VAS to parturition was 292 mns in Group B and 267 mns in Groups R. Top-up doses of local anaesthetic (2.35 vs 5.05) came on average to 15.8 ml in Group B compared to 24.1 ml in Group R. There were 20% Caesarian sections in Group R and 13.8% in Group B. Optimum analgesia was achieved in Group R, the level of analgesia was insufficient or barely sufficient in 3.3% of cases. There was no Apgar score < 7 in either group. It was therefore concluded that both bupivacaine and ropivacaine offer excellent analgesia during labour and have no significant side effects on mothers or babies.

  8. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  9. Caudal Epidural Analgesia in Pediatric Patients: Comparison of 0.25% Levobupivacaine and 0.25% Ropivacaine in Terms of Motor Blockade and Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, P.; Remadevi, R.; Pratheeba, N.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Ropivacaine and Levo-Bupivacaine have been safely used for caudal anaesthesia in children, but there are limited studies comparing the efficacy of 0.25% Ropivacaine and 0.25% Levo-Bupivacaine for caudal anaesthesia in infraumbilical surgeries. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of motor blockade and postoperative analgesia with 0.25% ropivacaine and 0.25% levobupivacaine for the caudal block in children receiving infraumbilical surgery. Settings and Design: This was a randomized double-blinded study. Subjects and Methods: Sixty patients of either sex, between 1 and 10 years posted for elective infraumbilical surgeries, to receive caudal block with either (Group R) ropivacaine 0.25% or (Group L) levobupivacaine 0.25% of volume 1 ml/kg were included in the study. Motor blockade was assessed using motor power scale, and pain was assessed every 1 h for first 6 h, then 2nd hourly for following 18 h using modified Hannallah objective pain scale. If pain score is ≥4, the patients were given paracetamol suppositories 20 mg/kg as rescue analgesia. Statistical Analysis Used: All analyses were performed using Chi-square test, Student's independent t-test, Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: The time for full motor recovery was similar in both groups; in Group R, ropivacaine: 180.50 ± 14.68 min, and in Group L, levobupivacaine: 184.50 ± 18.02 min, with P = 0.163. The duration of postoperative pain relief between the groups was 330.50 ± 9.54 min in Group L (levobupivacaine) and 312.67 ± 5.56 min in Group R (ropivacaine) with P = 0.165 not statistically significant. Conclusions: Both ropivacaine 0.25% and levobupivacaine 0.25% have similar recovery from motor blockade and postoperative analgesia. PMID:28298789

  10. A comparison of ropivacaine, ropivacaine with tramadol and ropivacaine with midazolam for post-operative caudal epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnadas, A; Suvarna, K; Hema, VR; Taznim, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural analgesia is the most commonly used method of post-operative analgesia in children undergoing subumbilical surgeries. Many additive drugs have been used to prolong the post-operative analgesia. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of tramadol or midazolam addition to caudal ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia in children undergoing subumbilical surgeries. Methods: In this prospective, randomised, double-blinded comparative study, sixty children of either gender, in the age group of 1–5 years and scheduled for elective subumbilical surgeries were randomly divided into three groups of twenty each. Children in Group R received an epidural injection of 1 mL/kg of 0.2% plain ropivacaine whereas children in Group RT received an epidural injection of 2 mg/kg of tramadol plus 1 mL/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine and Group RM received an epidural injection of 50 μg/kg midazolam plus 1 mL/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine. The primary outcome variable was the duration of time to rescue analgesia. The secondary outcome variables were motor block, sedation score and urinary retention. Statistical comparison among the three groups was performed using one-way ANOVA with post hoc analysis using Bonferroni. For qualitative variables, Chi-square test was used. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results: The mean duration of time to rescue analgesia was significantly longer (P < 0.001) in Group RT (913 ± 315.5 min) and Group RM (769.2 ± 331.9 min) compared to Group R (437.75 ± 75.68 min). However, there was no significant difference in the duration of time to rescue analgesia between RT and RM groups. Motor block and sedation scores were comparable between groups. Conclusions: The addition of tramadol or midazolam to caudal epidural ropivacaine prolongs the duration of analgesia without causing significant side effects. PMID:27942056

  11. Nicotine Increases Codeine Analgesia Through the Induction of Brain CYP2D and Central Activation of Codeine to Morphine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Douglas M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2015-06-01

    CYP2D metabolically activates codeine to morphine, which is required for codeine analgesia. Permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and active efflux, suggests that initial morphine in the brain after codeine is due to brain CYP2D metabolism. Human CYP2D is higher in the brains, but not in the livers, of smokers and 7-day nicotine treatment induces rat brain, but not hepatic, CYP2D. The role of nicotine-induced rat brain CYP2D in the central metabolic activation of peripherally administered codeine and resulting analgesia was investigated. Rats received 7-day nicotine (1 mg/kg subcutaneously) and/or a single propranolol (CYP2D mechanism-based inhibitor; 20 μg intracerebroventricularly) pretreatment, and then were tested for analgesia and drug levels following codeine (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or morphine (3.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally), matched for peak analgesia. Nicotine increased codeine analgesia (1.59X AUC(0-30 min) vs vehicle; p<0.001), while propranolol decreased analgesia (0.56X; p<0.05); co-pretreatment was similar to vehicle controls (1.23X; p>0.1). Nicotine increased, while propranolol decreased, brain, but not plasma, morphine levels, and analgesia correlated with brain (p<0.02), but not plasma (p>0.4), morphine levels after codeine. Pretreatments did not alter baseline or morphine analgesia. Here we show that brain CYP2D alters drug response despite the presence of substantial first-pass metabolism of codeine and further that nicotine induction of brain CYP2D increases codeine response in vivo. Thus variation in brain CYP2D activity, due to genetics or environment, may contribute to individual differences in response to centrally acting substrates. Exposure to nicotine may increase central drug metabolism, not detected peripherally, contributing to altered drug efficacy, onset time, and/or abuse liability.

  12. The effects of preoperative oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Nicole M; Lerche, Phillip; Aarnes, Turi K; Gardner, Heather L; London, Cheryl A

    2015-08-01

    This prospective, blinded, controlled clinical study compared the effects of pre-emptive oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on pain scores and analgesic requirement in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal. Thirty-six client-owned dogs presenting for cutaneous tumor removal were randomly assigned to receive carprofen, tramadol, or no treatment prior to surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Modified Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Score (MGCMPS), and algometry at enrollment, prior to premedication, at extubation, then hourly for the first 4 h, and every 4 h for 24 h. Dogs scoring ≥ 7 (MGCMPS), or having a VAS measurement ≥ 40 mm were given rescue analgesia. There were no significant differences in pain VAS, MGCMPS, or algometry. There were no differences in rescue analgesia requirement, or time to rescue analgesia among groups. Carprofen, tramadol, or no pre-emptive analgesia, combined with pre-operative hydromorphone and rescue analgesia, resulted in satisfactory analgesia in the 24-hour postoperative period.

  13. The effects of preoperative oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Lerche, Phillip; Aarnes, Turi K.; Gardner, Heather L.; London, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, blinded, controlled clinical study compared the effects of pre-emptive oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on pain scores and analgesic requirement in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal. Thirty-six client-owned dogs presenting for cutaneous tumor removal were randomly assigned to receive carprofen, tramadol, or no treatment prior to surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Modified Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Score (MGCMPS), and algometry at enrollment, prior to premedication, at extubation, then hourly for the first 4 h, and every 4 h for 24 h. Dogs scoring ≥ 7 (MGCMPS), or having a VAS measurement ≥ 40 mm were given rescue analgesia. There were no significant differences in pain VAS, MGCMPS, or algometry. There were no differences in rescue analgesia requirement, or time to rescue analgesia among groups. Carprofen, tramadol, or no pre-emptive analgesia, combined with pre-operative hydromorphone and rescue analgesia, resulted in satisfactory analgesia in the 24-hour postoperative period. PMID:26246627

  14. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy.

  15. A Bayesian perspective on sensory and cognitive integration in pain perception and placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Anchisi, Davide; Zanon, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a component of any response to a treatment (effective or inert), but we still ignore why it exists. We propose that placebo analgesia is a facet of pain perception, others being the modulating effects of emotions, cognition and past experience, and we suggest that a computational understanding of pain may provide a unifying explanation of these phenomena. Here we show how Bayesian decision theory can account for such features and we describe a model of pain that we tested against experimental data. Our model not only agrees with placebo analgesia, but also predicts that learning can affect pain perception in other unexpected ways, which experimental evidence supports. Finally, the model can also reflect the strategies used by pain perception, showing that modulation by disparate factors is intrinsic to the pain process.

  16. Interactive technology in obstetric anaesthesia and analgesia: exploring seamless solutions to jagged problems.

    PubMed

    Sia, A T; Sng, B L; Tan, H S

    2013-11-01

    Perioperative care often involves treating rapid changes in a patient's physiological profile that requires timely intervention by anaesthetists. Interactive technology and closed-loop systems are currently developed in obstetric anaesthesia and analgesia for maintaining parameters during caesarean section and epidural analgesia. This review discusses the principles of interactive systems and the use of patient feedback to integrate these interactive systems. The components of an interactive system such as the input sensor or device, microprocessor-based control unit and the effector are introduced. Developments in continuous, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring, control algorithms and smart pump technology would help to redefine how technology can assist obstetric anaesthetists to provide better care and improve clinical outcomes for pregnant women.

  17. beta-Endorphin-induced analgesia is inhibited by synthetic analogs of beta-endorphin.

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, P; Hammonds, R G; Li, C H

    1984-01-01

    Competitive antagonism of human beta-endorphin (beta h-EP)-induced analgesia by synthetic beta h-EP analogs with high in vitro opiate receptor binding to in vivo analgesic potency ratio has been demonstrated. A parallel shift of the dose-response curve for analgesia to the right was observed when either beta h-EP or [ Trp27 ] -beta h-EP was coinjected with various doses of [Gln8, Gly31 ]-beta h-EP-Gly-Gly-NH2, [Arg9,19,24,28,29]-beta h-EP, or [ Cys11 ,26, Phe27 , Gly31 ]-beta h-EP. It was estimated that the most potent antagonist, [Gln8, Gly31 ]-beta h-EP-Gly-NH2, is at least 200 times more potent than naloxone. PMID:6328494

  18. Studying sex and gender differences in pain and analgesia: A consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, Joel D.; Craft, Rebecca M.; LeResche, Linda; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Berkley, Karen J.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Gold, Michael S.; Holdcroft, Anita; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Mayer, Emeran A.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Murphy, Anne Z.; Traub, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, members of the Sex, Gender and Pain Special Interest Group of the International Association for the Study of Pain met to discuss the following: (1) what is known about sex and gender differences in pain and analgesia; (2) what are the “best practice” guidelines for pain research with respect to sex and gender; and (3) what are the crucial questions to address in the near future? The resulting consensus presented herein includes input from basic science, clinical and psychosocial pain researchers, as well as from recognized experts in sexual differentiation and reproductive endocrinology. We intend this document to serve as a utilitarian and thought-provoking guide for future research on sex and gender differences in pain and analgesia, both for those currently working in this field as well as those still wondering, “Do I really need to study females?” PMID:17964077

  19. A Bayesian Perspective on Sensory and Cognitive Integration in Pain Perception and Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Anchisi, Davide; Zanon, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a component of any response to a treatment (effective or inert), but we still ignore why it exists. We propose that placebo analgesia is a facet of pain perception, others being the modulating effects of emotions, cognition and past experience, and we suggest that a computational understanding of pain may provide a unifying explanation of these phenomena. Here we show how Bayesian decision theory can account for such features and we describe a model of pain that we tested against experimental data. Our model not only agrees with placebo analgesia, but also predicts that learning can affect pain perception in other unexpected ways, which experimental evidence supports. Finally, the model can also reflect the strategies used by pain perception, showing that modulation by disparate factors is intrinsic to the pain process. PMID:25664586

  20. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  1. Morphine Analgesia Modification in Normotensive and Hypertensive Female Rats after Repeated Fluoxetine Administration.

    PubMed

    Kosiorek-Witek, Anna; Makulska-Nowak, Helena Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine through the use of fluoxetine the effect of administering a serotonin reuptake inhibitor over several days on the antinociceptive action of μ-morphine type opioid receptor agonist. Investigations were performed on rats of both sexes, both the WKY normotensive strains as well as on the SHR genetically conditioned hypertensive strains. Results showed that the efficacy of morphine analgesia is higher in the SHR strain compared to normotensive rats (WKY). Surprisingly, repeated administration of fluoxetine reduced morphine analgesia, with the weakening of opioid antinociceptive action comparable to the duration of serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration. It was also concluded that the antinociceptive action of morphine in female rats and the alteration of its efficacy as a result of fluoxetine premedication for several days depend on oestrus cycle phase. The highest sensitivity of female rats to morphine was reported in the dioestrus and oestrus phases; much lower values were reported for the metoestrus phase.

  2. Mycobacterial toxin induces analgesia in buruli ulcer by targeting the angiotensin pathways.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Song, Ok-Ryul; Christophe, Thierry; Babonneau, Jérémie; Fenistein, Denis; Eyer, Joël; Letournel, Frank; Henrion, Daniel; Clere, Nicolas; Paille, Vincent; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Gersbach, Philipp; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Comoglio, Yannick; Sandoz, Guillaume; Preisser, Laurence; Delneste, Yves; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2014-06-19

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, causes extensive skin lesions, which despite their severity are not accompanied by pain. It was previously thought that this remarkable analgesia is ensured by direct nerve cell destruction. We demonstrate here that M. ulcerans-induced hypoesthesia is instead achieved through a specific neurological pathway triggered by the secreted mycobacterial polyketide mycolactone. We decipher this pathway at the molecular level, showing that mycolactone elicits signaling through type 2 angiotensin II receptors (AT2Rs), leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization of neurons. We further validate the physiological relevance of this mechanism with in vivo studies of pain sensitivity in mice infected with M. ulcerans, following the disruption of the identified pathway. Our findings shed new light on molecular mechanisms evolved by natural systems for the induction of very effective analgesia, opening up the prospect of new families of analgesics derived from such systems.

  3. Effects of ethylenediamine on morphine analgesia and tolerance-dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1985-01-01

    Ethylenediamine, a GABA receptor agonist induced a small hyperalgesic state in mice, but increased morphine analgesia. The interaction with this morphine effect was not dose-dependent. Ethylenediamine significantly antagonized tolerance development at relatively low doses (5-10 mg/kg). The GABA mimetic agent increased the frequency of abstinence signs in the naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in mice. The effect of ethylenediamine on morphine withdrawal was suppressed by the irreversible GABA transaminase inhibitor, gamma-vinyl GABA.

  4. A Comparison of Intrathecal and Epidural Analgesia and Its Effect on Length of Labor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    meperidine > codeine. Their experiments indicated that the analgesic effects of systemically administered narcotics is in part mediated by the...explanation is that subjects who experience prolonged, painful labor may be more likely to ask for pain control with regional analgesia. Thus creating...reference to the use of different local anesthetic agents. Acta Anaesthesiology Scandinavia. 23, 519-529. Wood, C, Huig-Ng, K., & Hounslow, D. (1973). The

  5. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters on postoperative analgesia and outcomes after living liver donation.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Katz, Joel; Montbriand, Janice; Ladak, Salima; McCluskey, Stuart; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Ko, Raynauld; Grant, David; Bradbury, Ashleene; LeManach, Yannick; Clarke, Hance

    2015-04-01

    Living donor liver resections are associated with significant postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for postoperative pain management, although it is often refused or contraindicated. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters (AWCs) are a novel pain modality that can potentially provide pain relief for those patients who are unable to receive an epidural. A retrospective review was performed at a single center. Patients were categorized according to their postoperative pain modality: intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), AWCs with IV PCA, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Pain scores, opioid consumption, and outcomes were compared for the first 3 postoperative days. Propensity score matches (PSMs) were performed to adjust for covariates and to confirm the primary analysis. The AWC group had significantly lower mean morphine-equivalent consumption on postoperative day 3 [18.1 mg, standard error (SE)=3.1 versus 28.2 mg, SE=3.0; P=0.02] and mean cumulative morphine-equivalent consumption (97.2 mg, SE=7.2 versus 121.0 mg, SE=9.1; P=0.04) in comparison with the IV PCA group; the difference in cumulative-morphine equivalent remained significant in the PSMs. AWC pain scores were higher than those in the PCEA group and were similar to the those in the IV PCA group. The AWC group had a lower incidence of pruritus and a shorter hospital stay in comparison with the PCEA group and had a lower incidence of sedation in comparison with both groups. Time to ambulation, nausea, and vomiting were comparable among all 3 groups. The PSMs confirmed all results except for a decrease in the length of stay in comparison with PCEA. AWCs may be an alternative to epidural analgesia after living donor liver resections. Randomized trials are needed to verify the benefits of AWCs, including the safety and adverse effects.

  6. Opiate Analgesia Treatment Reduced Early Inflammatory Response After Severe Chest Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Krdzalic, Goran; Musanovic, Nermin; Krdzalic, Alisa; Mehmedagic, Indira; Kesetovic, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of severe chest injuries are increased. Their high morbidity is followed by systemic inflammatory response. The efficacy of pharmacological blockade of the response could prevent complications after chest injures. Aim: The aim of the study was to show an inflammatory response level, its prognostic significant and length of hospital stay after chest injures opiate analgesia treatment. Methods: Sixty patients from Department of Thoracic Surgery with severe chest injures were included in the prospective study. With respect of non opiate or opiate analgesia treatment, the patients were divided in two groups consisted of 30 patients. As a inflammatory markers, serum values of leukocytes, neutrophils, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen in three measurements: at the time of admission, 24hours and 48 hours after admission, were followed. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the examined groups in mean serum values of neutrophils (p=0.026 and p=0.03) in the second and the third measurement, CRP (p=0.05 and 0.25) in the second and the third measurement and leukocytes in the third measurement (p=0.016). 6 patients in group I and 3 in group II had initial stage of pneumonia, 13 patients in group I and 6 in group II had atelectasis and 7 patients from group I and 4 from group II had pleural effusion. The rate of complications was lower in group of patient who were under opiate analgesia treatment but without significant difference. The length of hospital stay for the patients in group I was 7.3±1.15 days and for the patients in group II it was 6.1±0.87 days with statistically significant difference p=0.017. Conclusion: The opiate analgesia in patients with severe chest injures reduced level of early inflammatory response, rate of intra hospital complications and length of hospital stay. PMID:28210021

  7. Negligible Effect of Perioperative Epidural Analgesia Among Patients Undergoing Elective Gastric and Pancreatic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R.; Brown, Erin; Russo, Jack E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Martinez, Steve R.; Coates, Jodi M.; Bold, Richard J.; Canter, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are conflicting data regarding improvements in postoperative outcomes with perioperative epidural analgesia. We sought to examine the effect of perioperative epidural analgesia versus intravenous narcotic analgesia on perioperative outcomes including pain control, morbidity, and mortality in patients undergoing gastric and pancreatic resections. Methods We evaluated 169 patients from 2007 to 2011 who underwent open gastric and pancreatic resections for malignancy at a university medical center. Emergency, traumatic, pediatric, enucleations, and disseminated cancer cases were excluded. Clinicopathologic data were reviewed among epidural (E) and non-epidural (NE) patients for their association with perioperative endpoints. Results 120 patients (71%) received an epidural, and 49 (29%) did not. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in mean pain scores at each of the four days (days 0-3) among E ( 3.2 ± 2.7, 3.2 ± 2.3, 2.3 ± 1.9, and 2.1 ± 1.9, respectively) and NE patients ( 3.7 ± 2.7, 3.4 ± 1.9, 2.9 ± 2.1, and 2.4 ± 1.9, respectively). Within each of the E and NE patient groups, there were significant differences (P < 0.0001) in mean pain scores from day 0 to day 3 (P < 0.0001). 69% of E patients also received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Ileus (13% E vs. 8% NE), pneumonia (12% E vs. 8% NE), venous thromboembolism (6% E vs. 4% NE), length of stay [ 11.0±12.1(8,4-107) E vs. 12.2±10.7(7,3-54) NE], overall morbidity (36% E vs. 39% NE), and mortality (4% E vs. 2% NE) were not significantly different. Conclusions Routine use of epidurals in this group of patients does not appear to be superior to PCA. PMID:23345053

  8. Hospital Analgesia Practices and Patient-reported Pain After Colorectal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E.; Mullard, Andrew J.; Peters, Nanette; Brooks, Shannon; Englesbe, Michael J.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Hendren, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to characterize patient-reported outcomes of analgesia practices in a population-based surgical collaborative. Background Pain control among hospitalized patients is a national priority and effective multimodal pain management is an essential component of postoperative recovery, but there is little understanding of the degree of variation in analgesia practice and patient-reported pain between hospitals. Methods We evaluated patient-reported pain scores after colorectal operations in 52 hospitals in a state-wide collaborative. We stratified hospitals by quartiles of average pain scores, identified hospital characteristics, pain management practices, and clinical outcomes associated with highest and lowest case-mix-adjusted pain scores, and compared against Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain management metrics. Results Hospitals with the lowest pain scores were larger (503 vs 452 beds; P<0.001), higher volume (196 vs 112; P=0.005), and performed more laparoscopy (37.7% vs 27.2%; P<0.001) than those with highest scores. Their patients were more likely to receive local anesthesia (31.1% vs 12.9%; P<0.001), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (33.5% vs 14.4%; P<0.001), and patient-controlled analgesia (56.5% vs 22.8%; P<0.001). Adverse postoperative outcomes were less common in hospitals with lowest pain scores, including complications (20.3% vs 26.4%; P<0.001), emergency department visits (8.2% vs 15.8%; P<0.001), and readmissions (11.3% vs 16.2%; P=0.01). Conclusions Pain management after colorectal surgery varies widely and predicts significant differences in patient-reported pain and clinical outcomes. Enhanced postoperative pain management requires dissemination of multimodal analgesia practices. Attention to patient-reported outcomes often omitted from surgical outcomes registries is essential to improving quality from the patient's perspective. PMID:26756749

  9. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  10. Chemical stability of hydromorphone hydrochloride in patient-controlled analgesia injector.

    PubMed

    Khondkar, Dristi; Chopra, Poonam; McArter, John P; Rosen, Joseph A; Li, S Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The chemical stability of hydromorphone hydrochloride in patient-controlled analgesia injectors was studied for 34 weeks at different temperatures. The sterility of the solution was also monitored at the end of 16-week storage. For the determination of stability of hydromorphone, five groups of six patient-controlled analgesia injectors containing hydromorphone solutions of 0.2 mg/mL (6 mg of drug solution in 30 mL 0.9% normal saline) sealed with plastic tip caps were stored at 5 degrees Celsius in refrigerator, 20 degrees Celsius on bench top, 20 degrees Celsius in dark, 35 degrees Celsius in dark, and 50 degrees Celsius in dark. Chemical stability was determined throughout a storage period of 34 weeks using high performance liquid chromatography. Sterility test was also performed at 16 weeks. Hydromorphone solutions stored in different conditions up to 34 weeks remained clear and free of visible precipitation throughout the study. After 8 weeks of storage in the patient-controlled analgesia injectors in different temperature conditions, the concentrations of hydromorphone in all the samples remained over 95% of their original value. At 16 and 34 weeks, the concentration of hydromorphone in the injectors decreased to 92% to 96% and 86% to 88% of their original value, respectively. In the sterility test of bacterial contamination of the hydromorphone solutions in the patient-controlled analgesia injectors at 16 weeks, none of the injector solutions showed evidence of microbial growth after 14 days of incubation in fluid thioglycolate medium. This study demonstrates the stability and sterility of hydromorphone hydrochloride solution.

  11. Addition of clonidine to bupivacaine in transversus abdominis plane block prolongs postoperative analgesia after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ranju; Kumar, Nishant; Jain, Aruna; Joy, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aim was to compare duration of postoperative analgesia with addition of clonidine to bupivacaine in bilateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block after lower segment cesarean section (LSCS). Material and Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II pregnant patients undergoing LSCS under spinal anesthesia were randomly divided to receive either 20 ml bupivacaine 0.25% (Group B; n = 50) or 20 ml bupivacaine+1ug/kg clonidine bilaterally (Group BC; n = 50) in TAP block in a double-blind fashion. The total duration of analgesia, patient satisfaction score, total requirement of analgesics in the first 24 h, and the side effects of clonidine such as sedation, dryness of mouth, hypotension, and bradycardia were observed. P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: In 99 patients analyzed, TAP block failed in five patients. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group BC (17.8 ± 3.7 h) compared to Group B (7.3 ± 1.2 h; P < 0.01). Mean consumption of diclofenac was 150 mg and 65.4 mg in Groups B and BC (P < 0.01), respectively. All patients in Group BC were extremely satisfied (P < 0.01) while those in Group B were satisfied. Thirteen patients (28%) in Group BC were sedated but arousable (P = 0.01) compared to none in Group B. In Group BC, 19 patients complained of dry mouth compared to 13 in Group B (P = 0.121). None of the patients experienced hypotension or bradycardia. Conclusion: Addition of clonidine 1 μg/kg to 20 ml bupivacaine 0.25% in TAP block bilaterally for cesarean section significantly increases the duration of postoperative analgesia, decreases postoperative analgesic requirement, and increases maternal comfort compared to 20 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% alone. PMID:28096583

  12. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  13. Olfactory exposure to males, including men, causes stress and related analgesia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Sorge, Robert E; Martin, Loren J; Isbester, Kelsey A; Sotocinal, Susana G; Rosen, Sarah; Tuttle, Alexander H; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Acland, Erinn L; Dokova, Anastassia; Kadoura, Basil; Leger, Philip; Mapplebeck, Josiane C S; McPhail, Martina; Delaney, Ada; Wigerblad, Gustaf; Schumann, Alan P; Quinn, Tammie; Frasnelli, Johannes; Svensson, Camilla I; Sternberg, Wendy F; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2014-06-01

    We found that exposure of mice and rats to male but not female experimenters produces pain inhibition. Male-related stimuli induced a robust physiological stress response that results in stress-induced analgesia. This effect could be replicated with T-shirts worn by men, bedding material from gonadally intact and unfamiliar male mammals, and presentation of compounds secreted from the human axilla. Experimenter sex can thus affect apparent baseline responses in behavioral testing.

  14. Maternal and foetal outcome after epidural labour analgesia in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Jain, Kajal; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Jain, Vanita; Samanta, Sujay; Saha, Rini

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Low concentration local anaesthetic improves uteroplacental blood flow in antenatal period and during labour in preeclampsia. We compared neonatal outcome after epidural ropivacaine plus fentanyl with intramuscular tramadol analgesia during labour in high-risk parturients with intrauterine growth restriction of mixed aetiology. Methods: Forty-eight parturients with sonographic evidence of foetal weight <1.5 kg were enrolled in this non-randomized, double-blinded prospective study. The epidural (E) group received 0.15% ropivacaine 10 ml with 30 μg fentanyl incremental bolus followed by 7–15 ml 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl in continuous infusion titrated until visual analogue scale was three. Tramadol (T) group received intramuscular tramadol 1 mg/kg as bolus as well as maintenance 4–6 hourly. Neonatal outcomes were measured with cord blood base deficit, pH, ionised calcium, sugar and Apgar score after delivery. Maternal satisfaction was also assessed by four point subjective score. Results: Baseline maternal demographics and neonatal birth weight were comparable. Neonatal cord blood pH, base deficit, sugar, and ionised calcium levels were significantly improved in the epidural group in comparison to the tramadol group. Maternal satisfaction (P = 0.0001) regarding labour analgesia in epidural group was expressed as excellent by 48%, good by 52% whereas it was fair in 75% and poor in 25% in the tramadol group. Better haemodynamic and pain scores were reported in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural labour analgesia with low concentration local anaesthetic is associated with less neonatal cord blood acidaemia, better sugar and ionised calcium levels. The analgesic efficacy and maternal satisfaction are also better with epidural labour analgesia. PMID:27013750

  15. Non-opioid analgesics: Novel approaches to perioperative analgesia for major spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Lauren K; Durieux, Marcel E; Nemergut, Edward C

    2016-03-01

    Perioperative pain management is a significant challenge following major spine surgery. Many pathways contribute to perioperative pain, including nociceptive, inflammatory, and neuropathic sources. Although opioids have long been a mainstay for perioperative analgesia, other non-opioid therapies have been increasingly used as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen to provide improved pain control while minimizing opioid-related side effects. Here we review the evidence supporting the use of novel analgesic approaches as an alternative to intravenous opioids for major spine surgery.

  16. [Stress, anxiety and audio-analgesia in dental treatment measured with the aid of biosignals].

    PubMed

    Mayer, R

    1989-09-01

    Fear of dental treatment is undoubtedly widespread. In the present study this fear, the "stress phenomenon", has been investigated. So-called biosignals were used to demonstrate the factual presence of these "anxiety conditions"; it has been found that they are increasing at the beginning of treatment and reach peak levels during certain much feared procedures. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that audio-analgesia may reduce anxiety and stress.

  17. Low dose intrathecal clonidine and fentanyl added to hyperbaric bupivacaine prolongs analgesia in gynecological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Pooja; Talwar, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Background: We undertook this study to ascertain if a small dose of clonidine (30 μg) when added to a bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture improves spinal analgesia, without producing side effects, as compared to a bupivacaine-fentanyl or a bupivacaine-clonidine mixture. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 75 (American Society of Anesthesiologists) ASA grade I-II patients, aged between 45 and 65 years, who were scheduled for vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic floor repair or non-descent vaginal hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia were recruited. The patients received hyperbaric bupivacaine (2.3 ml) with fentanyl 15 μg (Group BF) or clonidine 30 μg (Group BC) or both fentanyl (15 μg) and clonidine (30 μg) (Group BCF). The total amount of intrathecal mixture was constant (2.8 ml) in all the groups. Duration of sensory, motor block and effective analgesia, hemodynamic profile, postoperative pain score and analgesic requirements were recorded. Results: The duration of effective analgesia, mean time till two-segment regression, and duration of sensory and motor block were significantly longer in group BCF as compared to group BC (P ~ 0.002), and in group BC as compared to group BF (P ~ 0.01). The incidence of intraoperative pain and requirement of postoperative analgesics in the first 24 hours was significantly more in group BF as compared to the other groups (P ~ 0.01). There was no difference in the hemodynamic profile between the groups. Conclusion: Low-dose clonidine (30 μg) when added to a bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture increased the duration of effective analgesia and the duration of sensory and motor block in gynecological surgery. The incidence of intraoperative pain and requirement of postoperative analgesics was significantly less when clonidine was added to intrathecal bupivacaine with or without fentanyl. PMID:24803764

  18. Footpad dermatitis and pain assessment in turkey poults using analgesia and objective gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weber Wyneken, C.; Sinclair, A.; Veldkamp, T.; Vinco, L. J.; Hocking, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationships between litter moisture, footpad dermatitis (FPD) and pain in medium-heavy turkey strains was studied by gait analysis in two medium-heavy with and without analgesia (betamethasone or bupivacaine).The relationship between FPD and litter moisture was linear above a breakpoint of 49% litter moisture, and there were no differences between the two breeds in susceptibility to FPD.Gait analysis showed higher impulse, single support time, stride time and stance time in breed A compared to breed B. Significant interactions between breed, litter and analgesic for impulse, single support time and stride time were associated with higher means for breed A given saline injection on wet litter.Data from betamethasone analgesia in Experiments 1 and 3 were combined for analysis. Peak vertical force was higher in saline- compared to betamethasone-treated birds. Compared to the wet (high FPD) litter treatments, birds on dry (low FPD) litter had greater speed and lower double support time and longer stride length. Turkeys kept on wet litter had a longer stride length compared to dry litter when given saline, whereas in betamethasone-treated birds the means were similar.There were no differences between birds with or without bupivacaine analgesia. Peak vertical force was higher in breed A than B and in birds with a low FPD compared to a high FPD score.It was concluded that breeds A and B did not differ in susceptibility to develop FPD when housed on wet litter but may have natural gait differences. Significant changes in gait parameters were associated with wet litter and with analgesic treatments. The results showed that FPD affected the gait of the turkeys and, combined with evidence of behavioural changes when given analgesia, suggest that footpad lesions are painful. PMID:26248222

  19. Issues of consent for regional analgesia in labour: a survey of obstetric anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Black, J D B; Cyna, A M

    2006-04-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain consent and inform patients of material risks prior to administering regional analgesia in labour. We surveyed consultant members of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists with a special interest in obstetric anaesthesia, in order to identify and compare which risks of regional analgesia they report discussing with women prior to and during labour. We also asked about obstetric anaesthetists' beliefs about informed consent, the type of consent obtained and its documentation. Of 542 questionnaires distributed, 291 responses (54%) were suitable for analysis. The five most commonly discussed risks were post dural puncture headache, block failure, permanent neurological injury, temporary leg weakness and hypotension. Obstetric anaesthetists reported discussing a mean of 8.0 (SD 3.8) and 10 (SD 3.8) risks in the labour and antenatal settings respectively. Nearly 20% of respondents did not rank post dural puncture headache among their top five most important risks for discussion. Seventy percent of respondents indicated that they believe active labour inhibits a woman's ability to give 'fully informed consent'. Over 80% of respondents obtain verbal consent and 57 (20%) have no record of the consent or its discussion. Obstetric anaesthetists reported making a considerable effort to inform patients of risks prior to the provision of regional analgesia in labour. Verbal consent may be appropriate for labouring women, using standardized forms that serve as a reminder of the risks, and a record of the discussion. Consensus is required as to what are the levels of risk from regional analgesia in labour.

  20. Caudal epidural analgesia using lidocaine alone or in combination with ketamine in dromedary camels Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Azari, Omid; Molaei, Mohammad M; Ehsani, Amir H

    2014-02-27

    This study was performed to investigate the analgesic effect of lidocaine and a combination of lidocaine and ketamine following epidural administration in dromedary camels. Ten 12-18-month-old camels were randomly divided into two equal groups. In group L, the animals received 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) and in group LK the animals received a mixture of 10% ketamine (1 mg/kg) and 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) administered into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space while standing. Onset time and duration of caudal analgesia, sedation level and ataxia were recorded after drug administration. Data were analysed by U Mann-Whitney tests and significance was taken as p < 0.05. The results showed that epidural lidocaine and co-administration of lidocaine and ketamine produced complete analgesia in the tail, anus and perineum. Epidural administration of the lidocaine-ketamine mixture resulted in mild to moderate sedation, whilst the animals that received epidural lidocaine alone were alert and nervous during the study. Ataxia was observed in all test subjects and was slightly more severe in camels that received the lidocaine-ketamine mixture. It was concluded that epidural administration of lidocaine plus ketamine resulted in longer caudal analgesia in standing conscious dromedary camels compared with the effect of administering lidocaine alone.

  1. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine in addition to fentanyl with bupivacaine given caudally.

    PubMed

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Smaoui, Mohamed; Laabidi, Sofiene; Kolsi, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of clonidine in association with fentanyl as an additive to bupivacaine 0.25% given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. In the present prospective randomized double blind study, 40 children of ASA-I-II aged 1-5 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg and clonidine 1μg/kg (group I) or bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamic parameters, and side effects or complications. Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. Heart rate and blood pressure were not different in 2 groups. Significantly prolonged duration of post-operative analgesia was observed in group I (P<0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting and bradycardia were similar in both groups. The adjunction of clonidine to fentanyl as additives to bupivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children may provide better and longer analgesia after infraumblical surgical procedures.

  2. Evaluation of topical epidural morphine for postoperative analgesia following hemilaminectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wehrenberg, Aaron; Freeman, Lynetta; Ko, Jeff; Payton, Mark; Spivack, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    A randomized prospective study was conducted in dogs undergoing hemi-laminectomy procedures for Hansen type I disk protrusion to compare postoperative analgesia achieved with topical spinal application of morphine versus saline. An absorbable gelatin sponge was placed in the defect next to the dura and soaked with either preservative-free morphine (0.1 mg/kg) or saline (0.1 ml/kg) just before wound closure. For 48 hours after surgery, dogs were monitored for pain using visual analog and numeric descriptive scales and given rescue analgesia according to study guidelines. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that dogs in the morphine group had a longer (13.3 +/- 3.6 hours) duration of postoperative analgesia than those in the control saline group (5.3 +/- 1.8 hours), and dogs in the morphine group also required fewer doses of additional pain medication. Preservative-free morphine administered topically via an absorbable gelatin sponge appears to be a promising method to alleviate postoperative pain in dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy procedures.

  3. Epidural Dexamethasone for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Unilateral Inguinal Herniorrhaphy: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Razavizadeh, M. R.; Heydarian, N.; Atoof, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of adding dexamethasone to epidural bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia in unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods. Forty-four patients were enrolled in this double-blind, clinical trial study. Patients were randomly allocated into dexamethasone or control group. In the dexamethasone group, patients received 18 ml of bupivacaine 0.5% and 2 ml (8 mg) of dexamethasone; in the control group, patients received 18 ml of bupivacaine 0.5% and 2 ml of normal saline. The onset of sensory block and its duration and incidence of nausea and vomiting were recorded. Results. The onset of epidural anesthesia was significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group (P < 0.001). Duration of analgesia was markedly prolonged in the dexamethasone group than in the control group (P < 0.001). Five patients (22.7%) in the control group had nausea in the first hour after the procedure (P = 0.048). None of the patients in the dexamethasone group had nausea. None of our patients had vomiting in the two groups. Conclusions. This study showed that adding dexamethasone to bupivacaine significantly prolongs the duration of postoperative analgesia. This trial is registered with Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT) number IRCT2012062910137N1. PMID:28348504

  4. [The use of central acting analgesic nefopam in postoperative analgesia in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    Eremenko, A A; Sorokina, L S; Pavlov, M V

    2013-01-01

    A prospective, randomized, comparative study was conducted. 3 analgesia protocols were used: 1) patient controlled analgesia (PCA) with trimeperidine in combination with a nefopam constant infusion; 2) PCA with trimeperidine in combination with a nefopam bolus; 3) PCA with trimeperidine separately during early postoperative period in cardiac surgery patients. The study included 60 patients agedf rom 40 to 65 years of age (20 patients in each group). The analgesia efficacy was evaluated with a 5-point verbal rating scale (VRS) for pain intensity and inspiratory lung capacity (ILC), measured with incentive spirometer. The safety of nefopam during early postoperative period in cardiac surgery patients was shown. The combination of nefopam and trimeperidine led to a more pronounced analgetic effect. Trimeperidine consumption was significantly lower in nefopam groups than in the group of isolated PCA. Wholly adverse effects were associated with trimeperidine and were dose-related The incidence of nausea, vomiting, dizziness, weakness, bowel paresis was significantly higher in isolated PCA group than in the other two groups.

  5. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery after abdominal colectomy surgeries. Sixty-seven patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state and a higher sedation score right after extubation, than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours after surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia, and had a lower score in visual analog scale, than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed a higher recovery score from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine seems to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based patient-controlled analgesia, and speed recovery from surgery in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26512563

  6. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  7. THE EFFICACY OF HYPNOTIC ANALGESIA IN ADULTS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Stoelb, Brenda L.; Molton, Ivan R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This article both summarizes the previous reviews of randomized, controlled trials of hypnotic analgesia for the treatment of chronic and acute pain in adults, and reviews similar trials which have recently been published in the scientific literature. The results indicate that for both chronic and acute pain conditions: (1) hypnotic analgesia consistently results in greater decreases in a variety of pain outcomes compared to no treatment/standard care; (2) hypnosis frequently out-performs non-hypnotic interventions (e.g. education, supportive therapy) in terms of reductions in pain-related outcomes; and (3) hypnosis performs similarly to treatments that contain hypnotic elements (such as progressive muscle relaxation), but is not surpassed in efficacy by these alternative treatments. Factors that may influence the efficacy of hypnotic analgesia interventions are discussed, including, but not limited to, the patient's level of suggestibility, treatment outcome expectancy, and provider expertise. Based upon this body of literature, suggestions are offered for practitioners who are using, or would like to use, hypnosis for the amelioration of pain problems in their patients or clients. PMID:20161034

  8. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 counteracts morphine-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Boban Blagaic, A; Turcic, P; Blagaic, V; Dubovecak, M; Jelovac, N; Zemba, M; Radic, B; Becejac, T; Stancic Rokotov, D; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    Previously, the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, (PL 14736, Pliva) has been shown to have several beneficial effects, it exert gastroprotective, anti-inflammatory actions, stimulates would healing and has therapeutic value in inflammatory bowel disease. The present study aimed to study the effect of naloxone and BPC 157 on morphine-induced antinociceptive action in hot plate test in the mouse. It was found that naloxone and BPC 157 counteracted the morphine (16 mg/kg s.c.) - analgesia. Naloxone (10 mg/kg s.c.) immediately antagonised the analgesic action and the reaction time returned to the basic values, the development of BPC 157-induced action (10 pg/kg, 10 ng/kg, 10 microg/kg i.p.) required 30 minutes. When haloperidol, a central dopamine-antagonist (1 mg/kg i.p.), enhanced morphine-analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted this enhancement and naloxone reestablished the basic values of pain reaction. BPC 157, naloxone, and haloperidol per se failed to exert analgesic action. In summary, interaction between dopamine-opioid systems was demonstrated in analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted the haloperidol-induced enhancement of the antinociceptive action of morphine, indicating that BPC acts mainly through the central dopaminergic system.

  9. Linking pain and the body: neural correlates of visually induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Mancini, Flavia; Driver, Jon; Haggard, Patrick

    2012-02-22

    The visual context of seeing the body can reduce the experience of acute pain, producing a multisensory analgesia. Here we investigated the neural correlates of this "visually induced analgesia" using fMRI. We induced acute pain with an infrared laser while human participants looked either at their stimulated right hand or at another object. Behavioral results confirmed the expected analgesic effect of seeing the body, while fMRI results revealed an associated reduction of laser-induced activity in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and contralateral operculoinsular cortex during the visual context of seeing the body. We further identified two known cortical networks activated by sensory stimulation: (1) a set of brain areas consistently activated by painful stimuli (the so-called "pain matrix"), and (2) an extensive set of posterior brain areas activated by the visual perception of the body ("visual body network"). Connectivity analyses via psychophysiological interactions revealed that the visual context of seeing the body increased effective connectivity (i.e., functional coupling) between posterior parietal nodes of the visual body network and the purported pain matrix. Increased connectivity with these posterior parietal nodes was seen for several pain-related regions, including somatosensory area SII, anterior and posterior insula, and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings suggest that visually induced analgesia does not involve an overall reduction of the cortical response elicited by laser stimulation, but is consequent to the interplay between the brain's pain network and a posterior network for body perception, resulting in modulation of the experience of pain.

  10. Efficacy of two doses of tramadol versus bupivacaine in perioperative caudal analgesia in adult hemorrhoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Hanan M.; Esmat, Ibrahim M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was conducted to evaluate the perioperative analgesic efficacy of the two doses of caudally administered tramadol versus bupivacaine in adult hemorrhoidectomy. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 patients, aged 20-50 years, undergoing hemorrhoidectomy were randomly scheduled to receive bupivacaine 0.25% in 20 ml (Group B; n = 30), tramadol 1 mg/kg in 20 ml (Group T1; n = 30), tramadol 2 mg/kg in 20 ml (Group T2; n = 30) through caudal route after induction of general anesthesia. Postoperative pain was assessed every hour until the visual analog scale was 6, which is 1st time for rescue analgesia. Postoperative sedation, hemodynamic changes, serum cortisol, and epinephrine levels and incidence of side effects were also evaluated. Results: Duration of analgesia was longer in Group T2 (20 [1.14] h] compared with the Group B (7 [1.2] h) or Group T1 (12 [0.75] h); all P < 0.001. There were no significant hemodynamic changes. There were not incidences of side effects. Conclusion: Caudal tramadol 2 mg/kg provided a longer duration of postoperative analgesia with rapid onset and no incidence of complications or adverse effects in adult hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:27051362

  11. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27532001

  12. Analgesia induced by morphine microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus: effects on tonic pain.

    PubMed

    Dualé, Christian; Sierralta, Fernando; Dallel, Radhouane

    2007-07-01

    One of the possible sites of action of the analgesic effect of morphine is the Nucleus Raphe Magnus, as morphine injected into this structure induces analgesia in transient pain models. In order to test if morphine in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is also analgesic in a tonic pain model, 5 microg of morphine or saline (control) were microinjected into the Nucleus Raphe Magnus of the rat. Analgesic effects were assessed following nociceptive stimulation using transient heating of the tail (phasic pain) and subcutaneous orofacial injection of 1.5 % formalin (tonic pain). While morphine was strongly analgesic for the tail-flick response (p <0.0001 compared to control), analgesia on the response to formalin was also observed for both early (p = 0.007) and late responses (p = 0.02). However, the response to formalin was not completely blunted. These results suggest that the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is not the exclusive site of action of morphine-induced analgesia in clinical conditions.

  13. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine in addition to fentanyl with bupivacaine given caudally

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Smaoui, Mohamed; Laabidi, Sofiene; Kolsi, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of clonidine in association with fentanyl as an additive to bupivacaine 0.25% given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. In the present prospective randomized double blind study, 40 children of ASA-I-II aged 1-5 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg and clonidine 1μg/kg (group I) or bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamic parameters, and side effects or complications. Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. Heart rate and blood pressure were not different in 2 groups. Significantly prolonged duration of post-operative analgesia was observed in group I (P<0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting and bradycardia were similar in both groups. The adjunction of clonidine to fentanyl as additives to bupivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children may provide better and longer analgesia after infraumblical surgical procedures. PMID:27795779

  14. Paracetamol versus ibuprofen: a randomized controlled trial of outpatient analgesia efficacy for paediatric acute limb fractures.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Michael; Aickin, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Paediatric limb fracture is a common injury that presents frequently to the ED. The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether ibuprofen provides better analgesia than paracetamol for paediatric patients discharged with acute limb fractures. A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted in a children's ED. Children aged 5-14 years with an acute limb fracture were randomized to be prescribed paracetamol 15 mg/kg/dose every 4 h or ibuprofen 10 mg/kg/dose every 8 h. Objective (child-reported) pain scores using the 'Faces' pain scale were measured over a 48 h period. Child-reported pain did not differ significantly between the paracetamol and ibuprofen groups (mean pain score paracetamol 2.8 [95% CI 2.4-3.4] vs 2.7 [95% CI 2.1-3.3], P = 0.73). Parent-reported sleep quality did not differ between the two groups (P = 0.78). Child-reported pain score decreased over the 48 h of measurement (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in side-effects detected between the two groups. The present study shows that in the outpatient paediatric population, ibuprofen does not provide better analgesia than paracetamol. Pain from an acute fracture can be managed by regular simple oral analgesia and immobilization.

  15. A Comparison of the Effect of Epidural Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia on Pain Control after Posterior Lumbar Instrumented Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Cheong, Seong-Mee; Kim, Sumi; Kooh, Mirang

    2011-01-01

    Objective Retrospective analysis to compare the effect and complication of epidural patient-controlled analgesia (epidural PCA) with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) for the treatment of the post-operative pain after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion. Methods Sixty patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disease at our institution from September 2007 to January 2008 were enrolled in this study. Out of sixty patients, thirty patients received IV PCA group and thirty patients received epidural PCA group. The pain scale was measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results There were no significant difference between IV PCA group and epidural PCA group on the PCA related complications (p=0.7168). Ten patients in IV PCA group and six patients in epidural PCA group showed PCA related complications. Also, there were no significant differences in reduction of VAS score between two groups on postoperative 2 hours (p=0.9618) and 6 hours (p=0.0744). However, postoperative 12 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours showed the significant differences as mean of reduction of VAS score (p=0.0069, 0.0165, 0.0058 respectively). Conclusion The epidural PCA is more effective method to control the post-operative pain than IV PCA after 12 hours of spinal fusion operation. However, during the first twelve hours after operation, there were no differences between IV PCA and epidural PCA. PMID:22102950

  16. Comparison Between the Use of Ropivacaine Alone and Ropivacaine With Sufentanil in Epidural Labor Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Xu, Shiqin; Qin, Xiang; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Shan-Wu; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhou

    2015-10-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of the sole local anesthetic ropivacaine with the combination of both local anesthetic ropivacaine and opioidergic analgesic sufentanil given epidurally on the labor pain control.After institutional review board approval and patient consent, a total of 500 nulliparas requesting epidural labor analgesia were enrolled and 481 eventually were randomized into 2 groups: a sole local anesthetic group (ropivacaine 0.125%) and a combination of local anesthetic and opioidergic analgesic group (0.125% ropivacaine + 0.3 μg/mL sufentanil). After the test dose, a 10-mL epidural analgesic solution was given in a single bolus, followed by intermittent bolus injection of 10 to 15 mL of the solution. The primary outcome was the analgesic efficacy measured using Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain. Other maternal and infant variables were evaluated as secondary outcomes.A total of 346 participants completed the study. The median NRS pain score during the 1st stage of labor was significantly lower in the combination group 2.2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.8-2.7) comparing to the sole local analgesic group 2.4 (IQR: 2.0-2.8) (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was observed in NRS pain score prior epidural analgesia and during the 2nd stage of labor. Patients in both groups rated same satisfaction of analgesia. Patients in the sole local analgesic group experienced fewer side effects than those in the combination group (37.7% vs 47.2%, P = 0.082). The individual analgesia-related cost in the sole local analgesic group was less ($5.7 ± 2.06) than that in the combination group ($9.76 ± 3.54) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of 1-minute Apgar ≤ 7 was lower in the sole local analgesic group 2 (1.2%) than the combination group 10 (5.5%) (P = 0.038). No difference was found between other secondary outcomes.The sole local anesthetic ropivacaine produces a comparable labor analgesic effect as the combination of

  17. Comparison Between the Use of Ropivacaine Alone and Ropivacaine With Sufentanil in Epidural Labor Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Xu, Shiqin; Qin, Xiang; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Shan-Wu; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of the sole local anesthetic ropivacaine with the combination of both local anesthetic ropivacaine and opioidergic analgesic sufentanil given epidurally on the labor pain control. After institutional review board approval and patient consent, a total of 500 nulliparas requesting epidural labor analgesia were enrolled and 481 eventually were randomized into 2 groups: a sole local anesthetic group (ropivacaine 0.125%) and a combination of local anesthetic and opioidergic analgesic group (0.125% ropivacaine + 0.3 μg/mL sufentanil). After the test dose, a 10-mL epidural analgesic solution was given in a single bolus, followed by intermittent bolus injection of 10 to 15 mL of the solution. The primary outcome was the analgesic efficacy measured using Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain. Other maternal and infant variables were evaluated as secondary outcomes. A total of 346 participants completed the study. The median NRS pain score during the 1st stage of labor was significantly lower in the combination group 2.2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.8–2.7) comparing to the sole local analgesic group 2.4 (IQR: 2.0–2.8) (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was observed in NRS pain score prior epidural analgesia and during the 2nd stage of labor. Patients in both groups rated same satisfaction of analgesia. Patients in the sole local analgesic group experienced fewer side effects than those in the combination group (37.7% vs 47.2%, P = 0.082). The individual analgesia-related cost in the sole local analgesic group was less ($5.7 ± 2.06) than that in the combination group ($9.76 ± 3.54) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of 1-minute Apgar ≤ 7 was lower in the sole local analgesic group 2 (1.2%) than the combination group 10 (5.5%) (P = 0.038). No difference was found between other secondary outcomes. The sole local anesthetic ropivacaine produces a comparable labor analgesic effect as the

  18. Analgesia dose prescribing and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline: a general practice database linkage cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Doos, Lucy; Strauss, Vicky Y; Lambie, Mark; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to quantify the short-term effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and paracetamol analgesia dose prescribing on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline in the general practice population. Design A population-based longitudinal clinical data linkage cohort study. Setting Two large general practices in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Patients aged 40 years and over with ≥2 eGFR measurements spaced ≥90 days apart between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 were selected. Exposure Using WHO Defined Daily Dose standardised cumulative analgesia prescribing, patients were categorised into non-user, normal and high-dose groups. Outcome measure The primary outcome was defined as a >5 mL/min/1.73 m2/year eGFR decrease between the first and last eGFR. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, baseline chronic kidney disease (CKD) status, renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors and other analgesia prescribing. Results There were 4145 patients (mean age 66 years, 55% female) with an analgesia prescribing prevalence of 17.2% for NSAIDs, 39% for aspirin and 22% for paracetamol and stage 3–5 CKD prevalence was 16.1% (n=667). Normal or high-dose NSAID and paracetamol prescribing was not significantly associated with eGFR decline. High-dose aspirin prescribing was associated with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in patients with a baseline (first) eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2; OR=0.52 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.77). Conclusions NSAID, aspirin and paracetamol prescribing over 2 years did not significantly affect eGFR decline with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in high-dose aspirin users with well-preserved renal function. However, the long-term effects of analgesia use on eGFR decline remain to be determined. PMID:25138808

  19. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  20. [Clinical values of multimodal preventive analgesia in patients with partial hepatectomy for liver cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Jia, W D; Qiao, X F; Liu, F P; Chen, L; Hu, C L

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical values of multimodal preventive analgesia in patients with partial hepatectomy for liver cancer. Methods: A perspective study was conducted to collect data of patients with liver cancer who underwent partial hepatectomy from March 2014 to March 2015.The 90 patients involved in the study were randomly divided into two groups as multimodal analgesia and control groups, and each group had 45 cases. In multimodal analgesia group, 40 mg parecoxib sodium was injected intravenously 30 minutes before anesthetic induction, and 0.375% ropivacaine 150 mg combined with dexamethasone 5 mg were applied to transversus abdominis plane block before closing abdomen.The patients in control group without above treatment. Patient controlled intravenous analgesia was used in all patients. Three days after surgery, 40 mg parecoxib sodium was injected intravenously, twice a day for all patients.Visual analogue scales (VAS) was used to evaluate postoperative pain, and postoperative adverse events were observed.The number of cases of postoperative ambulation (>6 h for every day), time of flatus and defecation, and duration of hospital stay were recorded in two groups.Pearson chi-square test was used to compare the rate or constituent ratio between two groups.Independent sample t test or Mann-Whitney U was used to analyzed the measurement data between two groups. Results: There were no difference between two groups in aging, gender, weight, body mass index, ASA classification, blood loss volume, time of operation(all P>0.05). The scores of VAS in multimodal analgesia group was significantly lower than that in control group(3.0±0.8 vs. 4.6±1.1, t=7.814, P<0.01 for day 1; 2.2±1.0 vs. 3.6±1.2, t=5.825, P<0.01 for day 2; 1.6±0.8 vs. 2.4±1.2, t=3.894, P<0.01 for day 3). The number of cases of postoperative ambulation(>6 h) in multimodal analgesia group was significantly more than that in control group (10 cases vs. 0 case, χ(2)=11.250, P<0.01 for day

  1. Ear tagging in piglets: the cortisol response with and without analgesia in comparison with castration and tail docking.

    PubMed

    Numberger, J; Ritzmann, M; Übel, N; Eddicks, M; Reese, S; Zöls, S

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were to compare the cortisol response caused by ear tagging piglets with the distress caused by other known painful husbandry procedures (e.g. castration and tail docking) and to evaluate the effectiveness of analgesia with meloxicam to reduce the cortisol response caused by these procedures. In total, 210 male piglets were randomised to equal numbers (n=30) into one of seven groups: a control group which was only handled (H), an ear tagged group that received no analgesia (ET), an ear tagged group with analgesia (ETM), a castration group with no analgesia (C), a castration group with analgesia (CM), a tail-docked group with no analgesia (TD) and a tail-docked group with analgesia (TDM). The procedures were carried out on day 3 or 4 after farrowing. Five blood samples were taken from each piglet: 30 min before the respective procedure (baseline value), and 30, 60 min, 4 and 7 h after processing, to assess cortisol concentrations. Means as well as the area under the curve (AUC) value were analysed and the effective sizes of the procedures were established. At 7 h after the experimental treatment, cortisol concentrations had returned to base values in all groups. ET evoked a greater cortisol response than H piglets at 30 min (P<0.001) and 60 min (P=0.001). The cortisol response to ET was lower than C at 30 min (P=0.001) but did not differ significantly at the other sample times. The mean cortisol response was similar between ET and TD piglets over all sample times. Taking both intensity and duration of the cortisol response into account (AUC), ET evoked a greater response than TD. Analgesia (ETM) resulted in significantly lower cortisol levels than ET at 30 and 60 min post-procedure. Castration (C) provoked the highest cortisol response of all procedures; a significant analgesic effect (CM) was shown only at 4 h post-procedure. TD resulted in significantly higher cortisol levels than H piglets only at 30 min; analgesia (TDM

  2. Comparison of dexmedetomidine/fentanyl with midazolam/fentanyl combination for sedation and analgesia during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Li, S; Deng, F; Yao, Y; Qian, L

    2014-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that causes minimal respiratory depression compared with alternative drugs. This study investigated whether combined dexmedetomidine/fentanyl offered better sedation and analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl in dental surgery. Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral impacted tooth extraction were randomly assigned to receive either dexmedetomidine and fentanyl (D/F) or midazolam and fentanyl (M/F). Recorded variables were patient preoperative anxiety scores, vital signs, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAAS) scores after drug administration, surgeon and patient degree of satisfaction, and the duration of analgesia after surgery. The OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients administered D/F compared to those who received M/F. The duration of analgesia after the surgical procedure was significantly longer in patients who received D/F (5.3 h) than in those who received M/F (4.1 h; P=0.017). The number of surgeons satisfied with the level of sedation/analgesia provided by D/F was significantly higher than for M/F (P=0.001). Therefore, dexmedetomidine/fentanyl appears to provide better sedation, stable haemodynamics, surgeon satisfaction, and postoperative analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl during office-based unilateral impacted tooth extraction.

  3. COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib prevents chronic morphine-induced promotion of angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality, without compromising analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, M; Li, Y; Rogers, T; Poonawala, T; Griffin, R J; Song, C W; Gupta, K

    2007-01-01

    Morphine and its congener opioids are the main therapy for severe pain in cancer. However, chronic morphine treatment stimulates angiogenesis and tumour growth in mice. We examined if celecoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor) prevents morphine-induced tumour growth without compromising analgesia. The effect of chronic treatment with celecoxib (by gavage) and/or morphine (subcutaneously), or PBS on tumour prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), COX-2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis, pain behaviour and survival was determined in a highly invasive SCK breast cancer model in A/J mice. Two weeks of chronic morphine treatment at clinically relevant doses stimulates COX-2 and PGE2 (4.5-fold compared to vehicle alone) and angiogenesis in breast tumours in mice. This is accompanied by increased tumour weight (∼35%) and increased metastasis and reduced survival. Co-administration of celecoxib prevents these morphine-induced effects. In addition, morphine and celecoxib together provided better analgesia than either agent alone. Celecoxib prevents morphine-induced stimulation of COX-2, PGE2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality without compromising analgesia in a murine breast cancer model. In fact, the combination provided significantly better analgesia than with morphine or celecoxib alone. Clinical trials of this combination for analgesia in chronic and severe pain in cancer are warranted. PMID:17971769

  4. A comparison of the postoperative analgesic efficacy between epidural and intravenous analgesia in major spine surgery: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yichen; Jiang, Heng; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhao, Jianquan; Wang, Ce; Gao, Rui; Zhou, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia remains a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare the efficacy of epidural analgesia (EA) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) following major spine surgery. We searched electronic databases, including the PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid and Cochrane databases, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before June 2016. The quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Random effects models were used to estimate the standardized mean differences (SMDs) and relative risks (RRs), with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Subgroup analyses stratified by the type of epidural-infused medication and epidural delivery were also performed. A total of 17 trials matched the inclusion criteria and were chosen for the following meta-analysis. Overall, EA provided significantly superior analgesia, higher patient satisfaction and decreased overall opioid consumption compared with IV-PCA following major spine surgery. Additionally, no differences were found in the side effects associated with these two methods of analgesia. Egger’s and Begg’s tests showed no significant publication bias. We suggest that EA is superior to IV-PCA for pain management after major spine surgery. More large-scale, high-quality trials are needed to verify these findings. PMID:28243145

  5. Effect of Combined Single-Injection Femoral Nerve Block and Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae-Ryung; Choi, Duck-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Joo; Hahm, Tae-Soo; Kim, Ga-Hyun; Moon, Young-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Total knee replacement is one of the most painful orthopedic procedures, and effective pain relief is essential for early mobility and discharge from hospital. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether addition of single-injection femoral nerve block to epidural analgesia would provide better postoperative pain control, compared to epidural analgesia alone, after total knee replacement. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients received a single-injection femoral nerve block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (30 mL) combined with epidural analgesia (femoral nerve block group) and 40 patients received epidural analgesia alone (control group). Pain intensity and volume of patient-controlled epidural analgesia medication and rescue analgesic requirements were measured in the first 48 hours after surgery at three time periods; 0-6 hours, 6-24 hours, and 24-48 hours. Also, side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and pruritus were evaluated. Results Median visual analog scale at rest and movement was significantly lower until 48 hours in the femoral nerve block group. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia volume was significantly lower throughout the study period, however, rescue analgesia requirements were significantly lower only up to 6 hours in the femoral nerve block group. The incidences of nausea and vomiting and rescue antiemetic requirement were significantly lower in the femoral nerve block group up to 6 hours. Conclusion The combination of femoral nerve block with epidural analgesia is an effective pain management regimen in patients undergoing unilateral total knee replacement. PMID:21155047

  6. Changes in plasma cortisol concentrations before, during and after analgesia, anaesthesia and anaesthesia plus ovariohysterectomy in bitches.

    PubMed

    Fox, S M; Mellor, D J; Firth, E C; Hodge, H; Lawoko, C R

    1994-07-01

    Plasma cortisol concentrations were determined before, during and after analgesia, anaesthesia and anaesthesia plus ovariohysterectomy in six New Zealand border collie cross bitches. The treatments were: control, analgesia with butorphanol, anaesthesia with thiopentone sodium, halothane and oxygen and anaesthesia plus surgery. In addition, each bitch was given an ACTH challenge. All the bitches showed transient increases in plasma cortisol concentrations and the integrated cortisol responses (calculated as the area under the cortisol curve above the pre-treatment concentration) for 6.25 hours after treatment increased in the order: control, anaesthesia, analgesia, surgery. The control group had increased cortisol concentrations attributable to the excitement from handling. The plasma cortisol concentrations of the group subjected to surgery were greater than the other groups for at least 6.25 hours, with an approximately four-fold increase above pre-treatment values, but they had returned to pre-treatment levels after 24 hours.

  7. Oral self-administration of buprenorphine in the diet for analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Molina-Cimadevila, M J; Segura, S; Merino, C; Ruiz-Reig, N; Andrés, B; de Madaria, E

    2014-07-01

    Postsurgical oral self-administration of analgesics in rodents is an interesting technique of providing analgesia, avoiding the negative effects of manipulation. Several strategies, using gelatin or nutella, have already been described. However, rodents require some habituation period to reach a good intake because of their neophobic behavior. The current study aimed to explore whether buprenorphine when mixed with an extruded diet offers a potential treatment option in the pain management of mice using a triple approach: by measuring the spontaneous intake in healthy animals; by using the hot-plate test; and finally by assessing the drug's ability to provide postoperative analgesia in a surgical intervention of moderate severity (intra-utero electroporation). Mice consumed during 20 hours, similar amounts of extruded diet alone, mixed with glucosaline, and mixed with buprenorphine (0.03 mg per pellet) or meloxicam (0.25 mg per pellet) both of which were diluted in glucosaline, showing that no neophobia was associated with these administrations. Relative increase from baseline latency (% maximal possible effect) in the hot-plate test at 20 h of administration was significantly higher for oral buprenorphine in diet 0.03 mg/pellet, and diet 0.15 mg/pellet, compared with placebo and no differences were found between those oral administrations and subcutaneous buprenorphine 0.1 mg/kg measured 3 h later. The treatment was also effective in attenuating the reductions in food consumption and body weight that occur after surgery. These data suggest that providing buprenorphine with the diet is a feasible and effective way of self-administration of analgesia in mice and does not cause neophobia and may easily contribute to the refinement of surgical procedures.

  8. Cutaneous analgesia after subcutaneous injection of memantine and amantadine and their systemic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Chen, Yu-Chung; Leung, Yuk-Man; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of the study is to find subcutaneous equianalgesic doses of memantine, amantadine and bupivacaine and use these doses to quantify the cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity of these agents after intravenous administration. Memantine, amantadine and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic, in a dose-related fashion were determined for cutaneous analgesia by a block of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in rats, and equipotent doses were calculated. Following rapid intravenous infusion of equianalgesic bupivacaine, memantine, amantadine and saline (vehicle) in rats, we observed the onset time of seizure, apnea and impending death, and monitored mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Memantine and amantadine elicited dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. At the 50% effective dose (ED(50)), the rank of potencies was bupivacaine [1.8 (1.7-2.0)]>memantine [19.1 (17.6-21.8)]>amantadine [36.1 (32.0-40.3)] (P<0.05). On ED(25), ED(50) and ED(75) basis, the duration caused by bupivacaine was similar to that caused by memantine or amantadine. At equianalgesic doses, the infusion time of memantine or amantadine required to induce seizure, impending death, and apnea was longer than that of bupivacaine during rapid intravenous infusion (P<0.01). The decreasing slope in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate was slower with memantine and amantadine when compared with bupivacaine at equivalent doses (P<0.01). Our data showed that memantine and amantadine (i) were equal to bupivacaine at producing durations of cutaneous analgesia but (ii) were less likely than bupivacaine to cause cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity.

  9. Synergistic analgesia of duloxetine and celecoxib in the mouse formalin test: a combination analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Hai; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors.

  10. Fentanyl-trazodone-paracetamol triple drug combination: multimodal analgesia in a mouse model of visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Poveda, Raquel; Fernández, Alejandro; Sánchez, Sílvia; Planas, Eulàlia; Ciruela, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Multimodal or balanced analgesia is commonly used in the management of acute and chronic pain in humans, in order to achieve the best analgesic/safety profile. Here, by using a model of visceral acute tonic pain, the acetic acid-induced writhing test of mice, we show a synergistic interaction between fentanyl, trazodone and paracetamol on the inhibition of nociception. First of all, once assessed that all drugs induced dose-related antinociceptive effects, they were mixed in fixed ratio (1:1) combinations and a synergistic drug-drug interaction was obtained in all circumstances. Thereafter, we assayed the effects of the triple combination of fentanyl-trazodone-paracetamol and it was demonstrated that they displayed a potent synergistic interaction on the inhibition of acetic acid-mediated nociception. Interestingly, drug dosage reduction permitted to reduce the incidence of possible adverse effects, namely exploratory activity and motor coordination, thus it was demonstrated that it improved the benefit/risk profile of such treatment. Afterwards, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism of action of such interaction, by means of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Interestingly, naloxone completely antagonized the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl, and it also partially reversed paracetamol and trazodone mediated analgesia. Furthermore, when naloxone was co-administered with the triple-drug treatment it blocked the previously observed enhanced antinociceptive effects of the combination. Thus, these results indicated that the endogenous opioid system played a main role in the present drug-drug interaction. Overall, the triple combination of fentanyl-trazodone-paracetamol induced a potent synergistic antinociceptive effect, which could be of interest for optimal multimodal clinical analgesia.

  11. Comparison between two doses of dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine for caudal analgesia in paediatric infraumbilical surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshi Karuppiah, Niveditha Padma; Shetty, Sumalatha R; Patla, Krishna Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block (CB) with adjuvants is routinely used in children for anaesthesia. We evaluated the efficacy of the α2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine at two different doses as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in CB. Methods: This study was conducted on ninety children. Control group BD0 received 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg, whereas, the study groups BD1 and BD2 received 1 μg/kg and 2 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, respectively, with 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg as a single shot CB. Adequacy of the block, haemodynamic changes, duration of analgesia and side effects were compared. Analysis of Variance was used for between-group comparisons of numerical variables. Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used for quantitative data. Results: The demography was comparable. Anal sphincter 5 min after administration of the CB was relaxed in 89.3%, 82.1% and 75% of cases in BD0, BD1 and BD2 groups, respectively. The sphincter was relaxed at the end of surgery in all the cases. Comparable haemodynamics was noted with significantly prolonged duration of analgesia in the groups BD1 (964.2 ± 309 min) and BD2 (1152.6 ± 380.4 min) compared to control (444.6 ± 179.4 min). While no complications were encountered in groups BD0 and BD1, bradycardia was observed in four cases of BD2 group with accompanied hypotension in one of them. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine improves the quality of CB, provides good operating conditions and increases the duration of post-operative analgesia. We conclude that 1 μg/kg is as effective as 2 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine and with a better safety profile. PMID:27330203

  12. Bedside Diode Laser Photocoagulation Under Remifentanil Analgesia for Retinopathy of Prematurity: Early Structural Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Şekeroğlu, Mehmet Ali; Hekimoğlu, Emre; Özcan, Beyza; Baş, Ahmet Yağmur; Demirel, Nihal; Karakaya, Jale

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate one-year structural outcomes of bedside diode laser photocoagulation with remifentanil analgesia for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and discuss clinical and demographic characteristics of infants and other possible risk factors that may affect the outcome. Materials and Methods: The medical records of premature infants who were treated with bedside transpupillary diode laser photocoagulation under remifentanil analgesia for ROP were evaluated for clinical and demographic characteristics, accompanying systemic risk factors, laser parameters, complications of treatment, retreatment rate and one-year structural outcomes. Results: One-hundred and ninety-five eyes of 99 infants (59 males, 40 females) were recruited for the study. The mean gestational age and birth weight were 27.4±2.3 weeks (23-34) and 1003.3±297.8 g (570-2250), respectively. Laser therapy was performed for high-risk prethreshold ROP in 66.2% of eyes, aggressive posterior ROP (APROP) in 15.4% and threshold ROP in 18.4%. The mean number of laser spots was 1510.4±842.1 per laser session. No adverse effects of laser photocoagulation were observed except small lens opacities in two eyes and corneal opacity in one eye. Retreatment was needed in only three eyes, and vitreoretinal surgery was needed in six eyes of six patients despite laser treatment. Anatomic outcome was favorable in 189 eyes (96.9%) at the end of a 1-year follow-up. Presence of dilated and tortuous iris vessels (p=0.002) and tunica vasculosa lentis (p=0.009) along with type of ROP (APROP and stage 4a ROP at initial presentation) (p=0.001) were associated with poor anatomical outcome. Conclusion: Accurate and timely bedside transpupillary diode-laser photocoagulation under remifentanil analgesia is an effective and safe treatment modality for ROP, and may prevent vision-threatening retinal detachment and reduce the need for vitreoretinal surgery. PMID:28058162

  13. Synergistic Analgesia of Duloxetine and Celecoxib in the Mouse Formalin Test: A Combination Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors. PMID:24116126

  14. Efficacy of the methoxyflurane as bridging analgesia during epidural placement in laboring parturient

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Khalil, Laith; Terkawi, Abdullah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Establishing an epidural in an agitated laboring woman can be challenging. The ideal pain control technique in such a situation should be effective, fast acting, and short lived. We assessed the efficacy of inhalational methoxyflurane (Penthrox™) analgesia as bridging analgesia for epidural placement. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four laboring women who requested epidural analgesia with pain score of ≥7 enrolled in an observational study, 56 of which completed the study. The parturients were instructed to use the device prior to the onset of uterine contraction pain and to stop at the peak of uterine contraction, repeatedly until epidural has been successfully placed. After each (methoxyflurane inhalation-uterine contraction) cycle, pain, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS), nausea and vomiting were evaluated. Maternal and fetal hemodynamics and parturient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The mean baseline pain score was 8.2 ± 1.5 which was reduced to 6.2 ± 2.0 after the first inhalation with a mean difference of 2.0 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.3, P < 0.0001), and continued to decrease significantly over the study period (P < 0.0001). The RASS scores continuously improved after each cycle (P < 0.0001). Only 1 parturient from the cohort became lightly sedated (RASS = −1). Two parturients vomited, and no significant changes in maternal hemodynamics or fetal heart rate changes were identified during treatment. 67% of the parturients reported very good or excellent satisfaction with treatment. Conclusion: Penthrox™ provides rapid, robust, and satisfactory therapy to control pain and restlessness during epidural placement in laboring parturient. PMID:26543451

  15. Non-invasive combined surrogates of remifentanil blood concentrations with relevance to analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Skarke, Carsten; Darimont, Jutta; Zimmermann, Michael; Bräutigam, Lutz; Geisslinger, Gerd; Ultsch, Alfred; Oertel, Bruno G

    2013-10-01

    Surrogates may provide easy and quick access to information about pharmacological parameters of interest that can be directly measured only with difficulty. Surrogates have been proposed for opioid blood concentrations to replace invasive sampling, serving as a basis for target-controlled infusion systems to optimize analgesia. We aimed at identifying surrogates of remifentanil steady-state blood concentrations with relevance for its clinical, in particular, analgesic, effects. A "single ascending dose" study design assessed concentration-dependent effects of remifentanil in a double-blind randomized fashion in 16 healthy volunteers. Remifentanil was administered by means of computerized infusion aimed at steady-state effect-site concentrations of 0, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4, 3, 3.6, 4.8, and 6 ng/ml (one concentration per subject, two subjects per concentration). Arterial remifentanil blood concentrations were measured during apparent steady state. Pharmacodynamic parameters were measured at baseline and during steady-state conditions. Potential surrogate parameters included the pupil diameter, the amplitude of pupil light reflex, and the performance in a visual tracking task. Clinical parameters were analgesia to experimental pain, nausea, tiredness, and visual acuity. Remifentanil blood concentrations were well predicted by its effects on the pupil light reflex amplitude, better than by its miotic effects. However, the best prediction for both remifentanil blood concentrations and analgesic effects was obtained using a combination of three surrogate parameters (pupil diameter, light reflex amplitude, and tracking performance). This combination of pharmacodynamic parameters provided even better predictions of analgesia than could be obtained using the measured opioid blood concentrations. Developing surrogates only for opioid blood concentrations is insufficient when opioid effects are the final goal. Combining pharmacodynamic surrogate parameters seems to provide a

  16. Intraarticular analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery: comparison of neostigmine, clonidine, tenoxicam, morphine and bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Alagol, A; Calpur, O U; Usar, P Saral; Turan, N; Pamukcu, Z

    2005-11-01

    We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blinded study to compare the analgesic effects of intraarticular neostigmine, morphine, tenoxicam, clonidine and bupivacaine in 150 patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. General anaesthesia protocol was same in all patients. At the end of the surgical procedure, patients were randomized into six intraarticular groups equally. Group N received 500 mug neostigmine, Group M received 2 mg morphine, Group T received 20 mg tenoxicam, Group C received 1 microg kg(-1) clonidine, Group B received 100 mg bupivacaine and Group S received saline 20 ml. Visual analog scale scores 0, 30 and 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, time to first analgesic need, analgesic consumption at 48 h and 72 h and side effects were noted. Demographic and operational parameters were similar in six groups. All study groups provided analgesia when compared with saline group (P<0.05). Duration of analgesia in Group N and C was longer than other groups (P<0.001). Analgesic consumptions of Group N, C and T were lower than other groups (P<0.01). Pain scores during 2 h postoperatively were lower in all study groups than the control group (P<0.001). In Group B, median pain scores were higher than Groups N and C at 0 min and 30 min postoperatively (P<0.001). Side effects were not significantly different among the six groups. We conclude that the most effective drugs that are administered intraarticularly are neostigmine and clonidine among the five drugs we studied. Tenoxicam provided longer analgesia when compared with morphine and bupivacaine, postoperatively.

  17. Role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in an experimental model of epilepsy-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2004-10-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The neurotransmission in the postictal period has been the focus of many studies, and there is evidence suggesting antinociceptive mechanisms following tonic-clonic seizures in both animals and men. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of acetylcholine in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). Analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in eight albino Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increases in tail-flick latencies (TFLs) at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of atropine (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated by peripheral administration of mecamylamine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor blocker, at the same doses (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) used for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. The recruitment of the muscarinic receptor was made 10 min postconvulsions and in subsequent periods of postictal analgesia, whereas the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor was implicated only after 30 min postseizures. The cholinergic antagonists caused a minimal reduction in body temperature, but did not impair baseline TFL, spontaneous exploration or motor coordination in the rotarod test at the maximal dose of 4 mg/kg. These results indicate that acetylcholine may be involved as a neurotransmitter in postictal analgesia.

  18. Analgesia in hip fractures. Do fascia-iliac blocks make any difference?

    PubMed Central

    Callear, Jacqueline; Shah, Ku

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent national advances in the care for the hip fracture patient, significant morbidity and mortality persists. Some of this morbidity is attributable to the analgesia provided in the hospital setting. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland recommend the use of simple oral analgesia including opioids, with fascia-iliac blocks (FIB) used as an adjunct. Literature review reveals a paucity of evidence on this. The aim of this project was to evaluate the proportion of patients receiving a fascia-iliac block prior to operative intervention. A secondary aim was to evaluate the efficacy of these blocks through analysis of pre and post-operative opioid usage, post-operative delirium, time to bowel opening, and naloxone use. Patients who received a fascia-iliac block received significantly less post-operative and total analgesia (p=0.04, p=0.03), had lower rates of delirium (p=0.03) and those patients which were discharged directly home had a shorter inpatient stay (p=0.03). No patients who received a fascia-iliac block (FIB) needed naloxone to reverse opioid toxicity, whilst two without fascia-iliac block did. The results of the project eventually led to the introduction of a hip fracture care pathway which incorporates a single shot fascia-iliac block for all patients who are eligible. Within a two year study period, compliance with fascia-iliac blocks improved from 54% to 90%. Our experience shows a great improvement in compliance with fascia-iliac blocks in the pre-operative period. This work has also underpinned the introduction of a new hip fracture care pathway ultimately to better patient care and outcomes. PMID:26893899

  19. Heart-rate control during pain and suggestions of analgesia without deliberate induction of hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Carli, Giancarlo; Migliorini, Silvia; Fontani, Giuliano; Varanini, Maurizio; Balocchi, Rita

    2008-07-01

    Heart rate and heart-rate variability (HRV) were studied through a set of different methods in high (highs) and low hypnotizable subjects (lows) not receiving any deliberate hypnotic induction in basal conditions (simple relaxation) and during nociceptive-pressor stimulation with and without suggestions of analgesia. ANOVA did not reveal any difference between highs and lows for heart rate and for the HRV indexes extracted from the series of the interbeat intervals (RR) of the ECG in the frequency (spectral analysis) and time domain (standard deviation, Poincare plot) in both basal and stimulation conditions. Factors possibly accounting for the results and likely responsible for an underestimation of group differences are discussed.

  20. Tyr-MIF-1 attenuates antinociceptive responses induced by three models of stress-analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Galina, Z. H.; Kastin, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Tyr-MIF-1 (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2), a biologically active brain peptide, has previously been shown to antagonize the analgesia induced by morphine. In this report experiments are described in which mice were tested on the hot-plate in three models of antinociception - shock, novel environment, and warm-water swim - after the administration of various doses of Tyr-MIF-1 without any exogenous opiates. The peptide reduced the antinociception produced by all three methods of inducing endogenous antinociception. These results add further support for the existence of peptides like Tyr-MIF-1 that act as opiate antagonists. PMID:2884005

  1. Comparison of Intraabdominal and Trocar Site Local Anaesthetic Infiltration on Postoperative Analgesia After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Altuntaş, Gülsüm; Akkaya, Ömer Taylan; Özkan, Derya; Sayın, Mehmet Murat; Balas, Şener; Özlü, Elif

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the efficacy of local anaesthetic infiltration to trocar wounds and intraperitoneally on postoperative pain as a part of a multimodal analgesia method after laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods The study was performed on 90 ASA I–III patients aged between 20 and 70 years who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. All patients had the same general anaesthesia drug regimen. Patients were randomized into three groups by a closed envelope method: group I (n=30), trocar site local anaesthetic infiltration (20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine); group II (n=30), intraperitoneal local anaesthetic instillation (20 mL of 0.5%) and group III (n=30), saline infiltration both trocar sites and intraperitoneally. Postoperative i.v. patient controlled analgesia was initiated for 24 h. In total, 4 mg of i.v. ondansetron was administered to all patients. Visual analogue scale (VAS), nausea and vomiting and shoulder pain were evaluated at 1., 2., 4., 8., 12., 24. hours. An i.v. nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (50 mg of dexketoprofen) as a rescue analgesic was given if the VAS was ≥5. Results There were no statistical significant differences between the clinical and demographic properties among the three groups (p≥0.005). During all periods, VAS in group I was significantly lower than that in groups II and III (p<0.001). Among the groups, although there was no significant difference in nausea and vomiting (p=0.058), there was a significant difference in shoulder pain. Group III (p<0.05) had more frequent shoulder pain than groups I and II. The total morphine consumption was higher in groups II and III (p<0.001 vs p<0.001) than in group I. The requirement for a rescue analgesic was significantly higher in group III (p<0.05). Conclusion Trocar site local anaesthetic infiltration is more effective for postoperative analgesia, easier to apply and safer than other analgesia methods. Morphine consumption is lesser and side effects

  2. Comparison of subcutaneous hydromorphone with intramuscular meperidine for immediate postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chan, W H; Lin, C J; Sun, W Z; Tsai, S P; Tsai, S K; Hsieh, C Y

    1999-07-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) injection with meperidine is the most common analgesic approach to treat postoperative pain in Taiwan. Hydromorphone (Dilaudid) can provide very potent and rapid analgesic effect through subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Although hydromorphone is widely used in North America, no study has compared the analgesic efficacy, side effect profiles and patients' satisfaction with the method of injection of hydromorphone s.c. and meperidine i.m. for the immediate post-operative analgesia. In this randomized and double-blind study, 60 female patients scheduled for abdominal total hysterectomy were treated either with 1 mg hydromorphone s.c. (n = 30) or 50 mg meperidine i.m. (n = 30) when they regained consciousness and asked for analgesic treatment in the recovery room. Visual analogue score (VAS) of wound pain was obtained at 0, 10 and 30 min after injection by a blinded observer. The occurrence and severity of nausea, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, flatus passage and respiratory depression were recorded. Post-operative analgesia in the ward was maintained by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous morphine. Time to first PCA demand, the number of demands, delivery, delivery/demand ratio and 24 h morphine consumption were documented. We found that VAS was reduced at 10 min and, to a greater extent, at 30 min postinjection in both groups but with no significant difference between the two groups. The occurrence and severity of side effect profiles were similar in both groups except that dizziness was more frequently observed after meperidine injection. Delivery, demand, delivery/demand ratio and 24 hr morphine consumption by PCA were not significantly different between the two groups. Time to first PCA trigger was also similar. Patients receiving hydromorphone s.c. injection exhibited higher satisfactory score than those receiving meperidine i.m. injection. Hydromorphone 1 mg, injected subcutaneously, was as effective as intramuscular

  3. A Survey of Intravenous Remifentanil Use for Labor Analgesia at Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Jaime; Abramovitz, Sharon; Smiley, Richard; Tangel, Virginia; Landau, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Remifentanil is most commonly offered when neuraxial labor analgesia is contraindicated. There is no consensus regarding the optimal administration, dosing strategy, or requirements for maternal monitoring, which may pose a patient safety issue. This exploratory survey evaluated the current practices regarding remifentanil use for labor analgesia at academic centers in the United States. Of 126 obstetric anesthesia directors surveyed, 84 (67%) responded. In 2014 to 2015, an estimated 36% (95% confidence interval: 25.7-46.3) of centers used remifentanil, most of which did so less than 5 times. Some serious maternal and neonatal respiratory complications occurred, emphasizing that clinical protocols and adequate monitoring are key to ensure maternal and neonatal safety.

  4. Ontogeny of analgesia elicited by non-nutritive suckling in acute and persistent neonatal rat pain models.

    PubMed

    Anseloni, V; Ren, K; Dubner, R; Ennis, M

    2004-06-01

    Significant analgesic and calming effects in human infants and neonatal rodents are produced by orogustatory and orotactile stimuli associated with nursing. These naturally occurring analgesic stimuli may help to protect the vulnerable developing nervous system from the long-term effects of neonatal tissue injury. However, the efficacy of orotactile-induced analgesia across the pre-weaning period, as well as its effects on persistent inflammatory pain, is unknown. Here, we investigated the developmental profile of analgesia produced by orotactile stimulation during non-nutritive suckling in rats. The effects of suckling, as compared to non-suckling littermates, on nocifensive withdrawal responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli were examined at postnatal (P) days P0, P3, P10, P17 and P21. In some rats, Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected in a fore- or hindpaw to produce inflammation. For thermal stimuli, suckling significantly increased forepaw withdrawal latencies at P3, P10 and P17, while hindpaw responses were increased at P3 and P10, but not at P17. In inflamed pups, suckling increased fore- and hindpaw response latencies at P10 and P17, but not at P0 or P21. Suckling-induced analgesia was naloxone-insensitive. For mechanical stimuli, suckling-induced analgesia was present at P3, P10 and P17, but not at P21, for both fore- and hindpaws in naïve and inflamed animals. Additionally, suckling had a small but significant effect at P0 for the forepaw in inflamed pups. In nearly all experiments, the peak effect of suckling for thermal and mechanical stimuli occurred at P10. These results indicate that orotactile analgesia, like orogustatory analgesia, is absent or minimal at P0, appears consistently at approximately P3 and is maximal at P10. Unlike gustatory analgesia in rats however, orotactile analgesia persists at least to P17. Orotactile stimulation during suckling effectively reduces transient pain elicited by thermal and mechanical stimuli, as well

  5. A dual action of valproic acid upon morphine analgesia and morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1983-01-01

    Effects of valproic acid administration on morphine analgesia and on morphine tolerance and dependence were investigated in mice. Valproate increased the reaction time to thermal stimulation in naive animals. This effect was additive with morphine when valproate was administered shortly before the analgesic. However, an antagonism was observed if a 4-hour period elapsed between valproate and morphine administration. When administered to mice receiving a sustained release preparation of morphine, valproate antagonized the development of tolerance to morphine. Valproate elicited a dual action on the abstinence signs observed after naloxone administration in morphine-treated mice. The effect consisted in a reduction of abstinence behavior if the anticonvulsant was administered a few minutes before naloxone; the same treatment increased the severity of the abstinence behavior when valproate was injected 1 h before the precipitating dose of naloxone. In this latter schedule, concomitant administration of gamma-vinyl-GABA failed to reduce the severity of the convulsions observed during the abstinence syndrome. These results suggest that valproate is metabolized to a compound responsible for decreased analgesia and intensified withdrawal signs.

  6. Evaluation of a Sustained-Release Formulation of Buprenorphine for Analgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Patricia L; Liang, Haixiang; Crichlow, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Preventing and minimizing pain in laboratory animals is a basic tenet of biomedical research and is warranted for ethical, legal, and scientific reasons. Postoperative analgesia is an important facet of pain management. A sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine was tested in rats for analgesic efficacy and plasma concentration over a 72-h time period. Rats were injected subcutaneously with either 1.2 mg/kg sustained-release formulation (Bup-SR), 0.2 mL/kg buprenorphine HCl (Bup-HCl), or an equivalent volume of sustained-release vehicle and tested in a thermal nociception model or a surgical postoperative pain model. In both models, Bup-SR showed evidence of providing analgesia for 2 to 3 d. Thermal latency response in rats that received the sustained-release formulation increased 28.4% and 15.6% compared with baseline values on days 1 and 2, respectively. Rats with a unicortical tibial defect and treated with Bup-SR showed similar willingness to bear weight on the hindlimbs as did negative-control animals (no surgery), demonstrated by counting vertical raises; rats treated with Bup-HCl had significantly fewer vertical raises than did control rats for 5 d after surgery. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine remained over 1 ng/mL for 72 h after a single dose of Bup-SR. Taken together, the results indicate that this formulation of buprenorphine may be a viable option for treating postsurgical pain in laboratory rats. PMID:21439213

  7. Factors influencing the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia: an observational multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Piotr; Andersen, Hege; Nordbø, Arve; Kongsgaard, Ulf E

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia (EDA) is used widely for postoperative pain treatment. However, studies have reported a failure rate of EDA of up to 30%. We aimed to evaluate the quality of postoperative EDA in patients undergoing a laparotomy in five Norwegian hospitals. Methods This was a multicenter observational study in patients undergoing a laparotomy with epidural-based postoperative analgesia. Data were registered at three time points. Technical aspects, infusion rates, pain intensity, assessment procedures, side effects, and satisfaction of patients and health personnel were recorded. The use of other pain medications and coanalgesics was registered. Results Three hundred and seventeen patients were included. Pain control at rest was satisfactory in 89% of patients at 24 hours and in 91% at 48 hours. Pain control when coughing was satisfactory in 62% at 24 hours and in 59% at 48 hours. The spread of hypoesthesia was consistent for each individual patient but varied between patients. The hypoesthetic area was not associated with pain intensity, and the precision of the EDA insertion point was not associated with the pain score. Few side effects were reported. EDA was regarded as effective and functioning well by 64% of health personnel. Conclusion EDA was an effective method for postoperative pain relief at rest but did not give sufficient pain relief during mobilization. The use of cold stimulation to assess the spread of EDA had limited value as a clinical indicator of the efficacy of postoperative pain control. Validated tools for the control of EDA quality are needed. PMID:25206312

  8. The role of cognitive reappraisal in placebo analgesia: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Marian; Kamping, Sandra; Anton, Fernand

    2017-03-17

    Placebo analgesia (PA) depends crucially on the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is assumed to be responsible for initiating the analgesic response. Surprisingly little research has focused on the psychological mechanisms mediated by the PFC and underlying PA. One increasingly accepted theory is that cognitive reappraisal - the reinterpretation of the meaning of adverse events - plays an important role, but no study has yet addressed the possible functional relationship with PA. We studied the influence of individual differences in reappraisal ability on PA and its prefrontal mediation. Participants completed a cognitive reappraisal ability (CRA) task, which compared negative affect evoked by pictures in a reappraise versus a control condition. In a subsequent fMRI session, PA was induced using thermal noxious stimuli and an inert skin cream. We found a region in the left dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), which showed a positive correlation between placebo-induced activation and 1) the reduction in participants' pain intensity ratings; and 2) CRA scores. Moreover, this region showed increased placebo-induced functional connectivity with the periaqueductal grey, indicating its involvement in descending nociceptive control. These initial findings thus suggest that cognitive reappraisal mechanisms mediated by the DLPFC may play a role in initiating pain inhibition in placebo analgesia.

  9. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeffrey; Ayad, Sabry; Gonzales, Jeffrey J; Mehta, Jaideep; Boublik, Jan; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by administration of a local anesthetic in close proximity, TAP infiltration involves administration and spread of local anesthetic within an anatomical plane of the surgical site. PMID:26677342

  10. A clinical and mechanistic study of topical borneol-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Zhang, Dan; Hu, Jinsheng; Jia, Qi; Xu, Wei; Su, Deyuan; Song, Hualing; Xu, Zhichun; Cui, Jianmin; Zhou, Ming; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-04-10

    Bingpian is a time-honored herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is an almost pure chemical with a chemical composition of (+)-borneol and has been historically used as a topical analgesic for millennia. However, the clinical efficacy of topical borneol lacks stringent evidence-based clinical studies and verifiable scientific mechanism. We examined the analgesic efficacy of topical borneol in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study involving 122 patients with postoperative pain. Topical application of borneol led to significantly greater pain relief than placebo did. Using mouse models of pain, we identified the TRPM8 channel as a molecular target of borneol and showed that topical borneol-induced analgesia was almost exclusively mediated by TRPM8, and involved a downstream glutamatergic mechanism in the spinal cord. Investigation of the actions of topical borneol and menthol revealed mechanistic differences between borneol- and menthol-induced analgesia and indicated that borneol exhibits advantages over menthol as a topical analgesic. Our work demonstrates that borneol, which is currently approved by the US FDA to be used only as a flavoring substance or adjuvant in food, is an effective topical pain reliever in humans and reveals a key part of the molecular mechanism underlying its analgesic effect.

  11. Heart rate variability in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility receiving nociceptive stimulation and suggestions of analgesia.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Varanini, M; Menicucci, D; Santarcangelo, E L; Migliorini, S; Fontani, G; Carli, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible hypnotizability-related modulation of heart activity during nociceptive stimulation (pressor pain) and during nociceptive stimulation associated with the suggestion of analgesia in not hypnotized healthy individuals with a high (Highs) and a low (Lows) hypnotic susceptibility. ECG and respirogram were recorded. Standard time and frequency domain indexes were evaluated, together with the sd1 and sd2 values of the Poincaré plot over the RR series. Results showed self reports of analgesia in Highs and a significant increase of the respiratory frequency during stimulation in both groups. Very few significant differences between groups and among conditions were detected for mean RR and heart rate variability (HRV) through spectral analysis. and through the Poincaré indexes evaluation. On the contrary, a promising approach seems to be the study of the correlations among standard and Poincaré variables. In particular, different changes in (or even lost of) correlations were enlightened in Highs and Lows, suggesting a different modulation of RR in the two groups, probably due to the very low frequency components of HRV. Different roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic activities during stimulation can be suggested.

  12. Evolution of the transversus abdominis plane block and its role in postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Merritt, Christopher; Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    Since it was first described by Rafi in 2001, the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block can be best described as a peripheral nerve block to the anterior abdominal wall (T6 to L1). The TAP block is specifically a local anesthetic injection into the fascial plane superficial to the transversus abdominis muscle and deep to the internal oblique muscle. The TAP block has been a subject of controversy with regard to utility, to indications, and more fundamentally, how best to place the block and its precise mechanism of action. The evolution of thinking with regard to this block, or more correctly family of interrelated blocks, includes knowledge of underlying anatomy, as well as an appreciation of its varied approaches. The TAP block affords excellent analgesia for abdominal procedures. In summary, the TAP block affords effective analgesia with opioid sparing effects, technical simplicity, and long duration of action. Some disadvantages include the need for bilateral block for midline incisions and absence of effectiveness for visceral pain.

  13. A prospective review of the labor analgesia programme in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Indranil; Singh, Shivinder; Setlur, Rangraj; Mohan, C.V.R.; Datta, Rashmi; Patrikar, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The structured labor analgesia programme in our tertiary care hospital has been in place for the past few years. We undertook this study to analyze the programme and to draw conclusions to further improve the outcomes. Methods A prospective analysis of the data pertaining to 200 patients participating in an ongoing labor analgesia programme in a tertiary care hospital from Nov 2008 to Aug 2009 was performed. Results Mean visual analog score (VAS) before epidural block was 8.34 ± 0.79. Post procedure the average VAS score was 2.20 ± 0.79. One hundred and fifty six (78%) parturients delivered vaginally, 18 (9%) required instrumentation with vacuum including 1 forceps delivery in a multiparous parturient. In 17parturients (8.7%) fetal distress led to a decision to perform LSCS for delivery. Multiparous patients were significantly more satisfied as compared to nulliparous patients (p = 0.010). Conclusion The study demonstrated excellent pain relief and patient satisfaction with minimal complications. The safety and efficacy of epidural bupivacaine in concentrations less than 0.625% combined with 25 mcg of fentanyl demonstrated in our study should be considered are commendation for the widespread adoption of the procedure in tertiary care hospitals. PMID:24600144

  14. Effects of stress and. beta. -funal trexamine pretreatment on morphine analgesia and opioid binding in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.U.; Andrews, J.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Holtzman, S.G.

    1987-12-28

    This study was essentially an in vivo protection experiment designed to test further the hypothesis that stress induces release of endogenous opiods which then act at opioid receptors. Rats that were either subjected to restraint stress for 1 yr or unstressed were injected ICV with either saline or 2.5 ..mu..g of ..beta..-funaltrexamine (..beta..-FNA), an irreversible opioid antagonist that alkylates the mu-opioid receptor. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested unstressed for morphine analgesia or were sacrificed and opioid binding in brain was determined. (/sup 3/H)D-Ala/sup 2/NMePhe/sup 4/-Gly/sup 5/(ol)enkephalin (DAGO) served as a specific ligand for mu-opioid receptors, and (/sup 3/H)-bremazocine as a general ligand for all opioid receptors. Rats injected with saline while stressed were significantly less sensitive to the analgesic action of morphine 24 hr later than were their unstressed counterparts. ..beta..-FNA pretreatment attenuated morphine analgesia in an insurmountable manner. Animals pretreated with ..beta..-FNA while stressed were significantly more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine than were animals that received ..beta..-FNA while unstressed. ..beta..-FNA caused small and similar decreases in (/sup 3/H)-DAGO binding in brain of both stressed and unstressed animals. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Comparison of the Effects of Sufentanil and Fentanyl Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia after Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Keun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Kim, Ji Yong; Oh, Chang Hyun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kim, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Postoperative pain is one of the major complaints of patients after lumbar fusion surgery. The authors evaluated the effects of intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using fentanyl or sufentanil on postoperative pain management and pain-related complications. Methods Forty-two patients that had undergone surgery with lumbar instrumentation and fusion at single or double levels constituted the study cohort. Patients were equally and randomly allocated to a sufentanil group (group S) or a fentanyl group (group F) for patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Group S received sufentanil at a dose of 4 μg/kg IV-PCA and group F received fentanyl 24 μg/kg IV-PCA. A numeric rating scale (NRS) of postoperative pain was applied before surgery, and immediately and at 1, 6, and 24 hours (hrs) after surgery. Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores were obtained before surgery and one month after surgery. Opioid-related side effects were also evaluated. Results No significant intergroup difference was observed in NRS or ODI scores at any of the above-mentioned time points. Side effects were more frequent in group F. More specifically, nausea, vomiting rates were significantly higher (p=0.04), but pruritus, hypotension, and headache rates were non-significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion Sufentanil displayed no analgesic advantage over fentanyl postoperatively. However, sufentanil should be considerable for patients at high risk of GI issues, because it had lower postoperative nausea and vomiting rates than fentanyl. PMID:28061485

  16. Opioid neurotransmission in the post-ictal analgesia: involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Freitas, R L; Savoldi, M; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Kishi, R; Weltson, A; Resende, G C

    2001-06-08

    Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux, was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significative increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), for at least 120 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naltrexone (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated with peripheral administration of naloxonazine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), a mu(1)-opioid blocker, in the same doses used for non-specific antagonist. These results indicate that endogenous opioids may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia. The involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor was also considered.

  17. Transdermal nitroglycerin as an adjuvant to patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orbach-Zinger, Sharon; Lenchinsky, Artium; Paul-Kesslin, Lesley; Velks, Steven; Salai, Moses; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitroglycerin (NTG) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for pain treatment without increasing adverse side effects. The effects of NTG on postoperative morphine consumption after knee replacement were evaluated. METHODS: After undergoing total knee replacement, patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia were randomly assigned to receive either an NTG or a placebo patch. The blinded investigator assessed each patient using a visual analogue scale at rest and while moving, as well as the patient’s morphine requirements, sedation score, sleep quality, nausea and vomiting, vital signs and postoperative bleeding. RESULTS: Two of the patients in the NTG group suffered postoperative myocardial infarctions after removal of the patch. Because of these two serious adverse effects, the study was stopped prematurely. In the subset of patients studied, NTG conferred no advantage over placebo in pain control (visual analogue scale at rest or during movement) and in satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: The use of NTG patches conferred no advantage over the use of placebo in patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee replacement. Two myocardial infarcts occurred in this group. Therefore, the safety of postoperative NTG patch use for pain control must be questioned. PMID:19532851

  18. No tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia in presence of opioid expression in inflamed synovia.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, C; Pflüger, M; Yassouridis, A; Hoelzl, J; Lehrberger, K; Welte, C; Hassan, A H

    1996-01-01

    Pain treatment with centrally acting opiates is limited by tolerance. Tolerance is a decreasing effect of a drug with prolonged administration of that drug or of a related (e.g., endogenous) compound acting at the same receptor. This is often associated with a downregulation of receptors. In peripheral inflamed tissue, both locally expressed opioid peptides and morphine can produce powerful analgesia mediated by similar populations of opioid receptors. We hypothesized that the chronic presence of endogenous opioids in inflamed joints might convey downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors and tolerance to the analgesic effects of intraarticular morphine. We assessed these effects after arthroscopic surgery in patients with and without histologically verified synovial cellular infiltration, and we examined synovial opioid peptides and opioid receptors by immunocytochemistry and autoradiography, respectively. We found that, despite an abundance of opioid-containing cells in pronounced synovitis, morphine is at least as effective as in patients without such cellular infiltrations, and there is no major downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors. Thus, opioids expressed in inflamed tissue do not produce tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia. Tolerance may be less pronounced for peripherally than for centrally acting opioids, which provides a promising perspective for the treatment of chronic pain in arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:8698872

  19. Shielding, but not zeroing of the ambient magnetic field reduces stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Choleris, E; Del Seppia, C; Thomas, A W; Luschi, P; Ghione, G; Moran, G R; Prato, F S

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic field exposure was consistently found to affect pain inhibition (i.e. analgesia). Recently, we showed that an extreme reduction of the ambient magnetic and electric environment, by mu-metal shielding, also affected stress-induced analgesia (SIA) in C57 mice. Using CD1 mice, we report here the same findings from replication studies performed independently in Pisa, Italy and London, ON, Canada. Also, neither selective vector nulling of the static component of the ambient magnetic field with Helmholtz coils, nor copper shielding of only the ambient electric field, affected SIA in mice. We further show that a pre-stress exposure to the mu-metal box is necessary for the anti-analgesic effects to occur. The differential effects of the two near-zero magnetic conditions may depend on the elimination (obtained only by mu-metal shielding) of the extremely weak time-varying component of the magnetic environment. This would provide the first direct and repeatable evidence for a behavioural and physiological effect of very weak time-varying magnetic fields, suggesting the existence of a very sensitive magnetic discrimination in the endogenous mechanisms that underlie SIA. This has important implications for other reported effects of exposures to very weak magnetic fields and for the theoretical work that considers the mechanisms underlying the biological detection of weak magnetic fields. PMID:11798436

  20. A multidimensional comparison of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rapp, S E; Egan, K J; Ross, B K; Wild, L M; Terman, G W; Ching, J M

    1996-05-01

    Although patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps have been in use for more than a decade, the optimal PCA analgesic has yet to be identified. Many drugs are used; however, morphine remains the "gold standard" of opioid analgesics worldwide. The present study evaluated morphine and hydromorphone (Dilaudid) PCA with respect to analgesic efficacy, side effects, mood, and cognitive function. Sixty-one opioid naive patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery participated in the double-blind protocol. Verbal rating scores, use of medication, and side effects for the two medications were recorded. Cognitive functioning was assessed by computation of Digit Symbol and Trails Making B Tests. Self-reported affective state (mood) was measured by Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory. Both medications provided adequate analgesia without a difference in side effects. Cognitive performance was poorer in the hydromorphone group (P < 0.05). Patients receiving hydromorphone reported less anger/hostility (P < 0.01) and generally better mood elevations on the other subscales than those receiving morphine. A similar incidence of side effects and dose medication can be anticipated with morphine and hydromorphone. When considering cognitive effects, morphine had less adverse consequences, while hydromorphone appeared to result in improved mood. We conclude that hydromorphone may provide a suitable alternative to morphine.

  1. Placebo analgesia as a case of a cognitive style driven by prior expectation.

    PubMed

    Morton, Debbie L; El-Deredy, Wael; Watson, Alison; Jones, Anthony K P

    2010-11-04

    Placebo analgesia has been shown to be driven by expectations of treatment effects. We suggest that the expectation of treatment creates uncertainty about the sensory information of pain. We tested the hypothesis that in placebo responders uncertainty generated by expectations generalizes to other cognitive processes by recruiting participants for a placebo study who had previously taken part in a visual cue-picture decision making perceptual task. The task investigated how participants utilised prior cues against discrepant and uncertain sensory information. Participants were selected based on their degree of acquiescence in the cue-picture task. The placebo experiment was split into three blocks of pre-treatment, treatment and post-treatment. Participants were told that they may or may not receive an anaesthetic cream on one arm. However, all participants received inactive cream paired with non-painful stimuli during the treatment block. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to measure pain evoked potentials to laser heat to determine if the behavioural misperception of pain translated into a physiological response. Regression models showed that both behavioural and physiological placebo responses could be predicted by participants' scores of acquiescence in the cue-picture decision making task. Placebo analgesia seems to be influenced by a cognitive style that assimilates responses to expectations increasing the chances of error when detecting discrepant sensory information.

  2. Postoperative Analgesia Using PSOAS Sheath Block Versus Three-in-One Block in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this study, the effects of two regional anesthetic techniques on postoperative pain of patients...TERMS Regional Anesthesia; Lumbar Plexus Block, Postoperative Pain Management; Pre-emptive analgesia 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...violations. v ABSTRACT In this study, the effects of two regional anesthetic techniques on postoperative pain of patients undergoing anterior cruciate

  3. The degree of labor pain at the time of epidural analgesia in nulliparous women influences the obstetric outcome

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jae Hee; Lee, Guie Yong; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Youn Jin; Chung, Rack Kyung; Yun, Du Gyun; Lim, Chae Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Background The increased pain at the latent phase can be associated with dysfunctional labor as well as increases in cesarean delivery frequency. We aimed to research the effect of the degree of pain at the time of epidural analgesia on the entire labor process including the mode of delivery. Methods We performed epidural analgesia to 102 nulliparous women on patients' request. We divided the group into three based on NRS (numeric rating scale) at the moment of epidural analgesia; mild pain, NRS 1-4; moderate pain, NRS 5-7; severe pain, NRS 8-10. The primary outcome was the mode of delivery (normal labor or cesarean delivery). Results There were significant differences in the mode of delivery among groups. Patients with severe labor pain had a significantly higher cesarean delivery compared to patients with moderate labor pain (P = 0.006). The duration of the first and second stage of labor, fetal heart rate, use of oxytocin and premature rupture of membranes had no differences in the three groups. Conclusions Our research showed that the degree of pain at the time of epidural analgesia request might influence the rate of cesarean delivery. Further research would be necessary for clarifying the mechanism that the augmentation of pain affects the mode of delivery. PMID:26045927

  4. Foetal heart rate deceleration with combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labour: a maternal haemodynamic cardiac study.

    PubMed

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Vasapollo, Barbara; Frigo, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms those are involved in the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations (FHR) after the combined epidural analgesia in labour. Observational study done at University Hospital for 86-term singleton pregnant women with spontaneous labour. Serial bedside measurement of the main cardiac maternal parameters with USCOM technique; stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and total vascular resistances (TVR) inputting systolic and diastolic blood pressure before combined epidural analgesia and after 5', 10', 15' and 20 min. FHR was continuously recorded though cardiotocography before and after the procedure. Correlation between the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations and the modification of maternal haemodynamic parameters. Fourteen out of 86 foetuses showed decelerations after the combined spino epidural procedure. No decelerations occurred in the women with low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) at the basal evaluation. FHR abnormalities were concentrated in 39 women who presented elevated TVR values at the basal evaluation (>1200 dyne/s/cm(-5)). Soon after the epidural procedure, the absence of increase in SV and CO was observed in these women. No variations in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found. The level of TVR before combined epidural analgesia in labour may indicate the risk of FHR abnormalities after the procedure. Low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) showed a reduced risk of FHR abnormalities. FHR decelerations seem to occur in women without the ability to upregulate SV and CO in response to the initial effects of analgesia.

  5. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  6. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Maitreyi Gajanan; Sardesai, Shalini Pravin; Ghodki, Poonam Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a fascial plane block providing post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing surgery with infra-umbilical incisions. We evaluated analgesic efficacy of TAP block with ropivacaine for 24 h after caesarean section through a Pfannenstiel incision. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were randomised to undergo TAP block with ropivacaine (n = 30) versus control group (n = 30) with normal saline, in addition to standard analgesia with intravenous paracetamol and tramadol. At the end of the surgery, ultrasound-guided TAP plane block was given bilaterally using ropivacaine or normal saline (15 ml on either side). Each patient was assessed post-operatively by a blinded investigator at regular intervals up to 24 h for visual analogue score (VAS) and requirement of analgesia. SPSS version 18.0 software was used. Demographic data were analysed using Student's t-test and the other parameters using paired t-test. Results: TAP block with ropivacaine compared with normal saline reduced post-operative VAS at 24 h (P = 0.004918). Time for rescue analgesia in the study group was prolonged from 4.1 to 9.53 h (P = 0.01631). Mean requirement of tramadol in the first 24 h was reduced in the study group. Conclusion: US guided TAP block after caesarean section reduces the analgesic requirement in the first 24 h. PMID:27141108

  7. Conventional versus Analgesia-Oriented Combination Sedation on Recovery Profiles and Satisfaction after ERCP: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Jae Bok; Song, Si Young; Cho, Jooyoun; Park, Sang-Hun; Yoo, Young Chul; Bang, Seungmin

    2015-01-01

    Background The importance of providing effective analgesia during sedation for complex endoscopic procedures has been widely recognized. However, repeated administration of opioids in order to achieve sufficient analgesia may carry the risk of delayed recovery after propofol based sedation. This study was done to compare recovery profiles and the satisfaction of the endoscopists and patients between conventional balanced propofol sedation and analgesia-oriented combination sedation for patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods Two hundred and two adult patients scheduled for ERCP were sedated by either the Conventional (initial bolus of meperidine with propofol infusion) or Combination (repeated bolus doses of fentanyl with propofol infusion) method. Recovery profiles, satisfaction levels of the endoscopists and patients, drug requirements and complications were compared between groups. Results Patients of the Combination Group required significantly less propofol compared to the Conventional Group (135.0 ± 68.8 mg vs. 165.3 ± 81.7 mg, P = 0.005). Modified Aldrete scores were not different between groups throughout the recovery period, and recovery times were also comparable between groups. Satisfaction scores were not different between the two groups in both the endoscopists and patients (P = 0.868 and 0.890, respectively). Conclusions Considering the significant reduction in propofol dose, the non-inferiority of recovery profiles and satisfaction scores of the endoscopists and patients, analgesia oriented combination sedation may be a more safe yet effective sedative method compared to conventional balanced propofol sedation during ERCP. PMID:26402319

  8. Selective antagonism of opioid-induced ventilatory depression by an ampakine molecule in humans without loss of opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Oertel, B G; Felden, L; Tran, P V; Bradshaw, M H; Angst, M S; Schmidt, H; Johnson, S; Greer, J J; Geisslinger, G; Varney, M A; Lötsch, J

    2010-02-01

    Ventilatory depression is a significant risk associated with the use of opioids. We assessed whether opioid-induced ventilatory depression can be selectively antagonized by an ampakine without reduction of analgesia. In 16 healthy men, after a single oral dose of 1,500 mg of the ampakine CX717, a target concentration of 100 ng/ml alfentanil decreased the respiratory frequency by only 2.9 +/- 33.4% as compared with 25.6 +/- 27.9% during placebo coadministration (P < 0.01).Blood oxygenation and the ventilatory response to hypercapnic challenge also showed significantly smaller decreases with CX717 than with placebo. In contrast, CX717 did not affect alfentanil-induced analgesia in either electrical or heat-based experimental models of pain. Both ventilatory depression and analgesia were reversed with 1.6 mg of naloxone. These results support the use of ampakines as selective antidotes in humans to counter opioid-induced ventilatory depression without affecting opioid-mediated analgesia.

  9. Epidural administration of liposome-encapsulated hydromorphone provides extended analgesia in a rodent model of stifle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer R; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Heath, Timothy D; Sullivan, Ruth; Smith, Lesley J

    2011-07-01

    Liposome encapsulation of opioids by using an ammonium-sulfate-gradient loading technique significantly slows the release time of the drug. This study evaluated the duration of analgesia in a rodent model of monoarthritis after epidural administration of liposome-encapsulated hydromorphone (LE-hydromorphone; prepared by ammonium-sulfate-gradient loading) compared with standard hydromorphone and a negative control of blank liposomes. Analgesia was assessed by changes in thermal withdrawal latency, relative weight-bearing, and subjective behavioral scoring. Analgesia in arthritic rats was short-lived after epidural hydromorphone; increases in pain threshold were observed only at 2 h after administration. In contrast, thermal pain thresholds after epidural LE-hydromorphone were increased for as long as 72 h, and subjective lameness scores were lower for as long as 96 h after epidural administration. Injection of LE-hydromorphone epidurally was associated with various mild changes in CNS behavior, and 2 rats succumbed to respiratory depression and death. In conclusion, LE-hydromorphone prolonged the duration of epidural analgesia compared with the standard formulation of hydromorphone, but CNS side effects warrant careful administration of this LE-hydromorphone in future studies.

  10. Genetic inactivation of pleiotrophin but not midkine potentiates clonidine-induced alpha-2 adrenergic-mediated analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Gramage, Esther; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2013-09-01

    Genetic deletion of the heparin-binding cytokines pleiotrophin (PTN) or midkine (MK) potentiates morphine-induced antinociceptive effects in animal models. Despite the known interactions between the opioid and noradrenergic systems in the control of pain, the possible roles of PTN and/or MK in analgesia induced by agonists of α2-adrenergic receptors remained to be studied. We have now tested the antinociceptive effects of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine in female PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-), MK genetically deficient (MK-/-) and wild type (WT+/+) mice. We did not find differences among genotypes in the hot-plate test, an assay in which supraspinal and spinal mechanisms contribute to nociceptive responses, suggesting that endogenous expression of PTN and MK is not key in the analgesia induced by clonidine in this test. In contrast, we found that clonidine-induced analgesia was significantly enhanced in PTN-/- mice compared to MK-/- and WT+/+ mice in the tail-immersion test. Interestingly, the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine prevented clonidine-induced analgesia in the tail immersion test in all the 3 genotypes. The data suggest that the spinal antinociceptive effects caused by stimulation of α2-adrenoceptors are differentially regulated by endogenous expression of PTN.

  11. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local dorsal cutaneous noxious pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-10-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epinephrine as additive for propranolol as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we tested the effect of co-administration of epinephrine with propranolol on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Bupivacaine, a long-lasting local anesthetic, was used as control. Subcutaneous propranolol and bupivacaine elicited a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [2.05 (1.95-2.21) μmol/kg]>propranolol [9.21 (9.08-9.42) μmol/kg] (P<0.01 for each comparison). Subcutaneous epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. Mixtures of epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) with drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, intensified and prolonged drug action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of combined drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) exhibited no cutaneous analgesia. We concluded that propranolol was less potent but produced a similar duration of action when compared to bupivacaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine enhanced the potency and extended the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia.

  12. Double blind comparison of combination of 0.1% ropivacaine and fentanyl to combination of 0.1% bupivacaine and fentanyl for extradural analgesia in labour

    PubMed Central

    Bawdane, Kishori Dhaku; Magar, Jyoti S; Tendolkar, Bharati A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ropivacaine is considered as a safe alternative to bupivacaine for labor analgesia. The aim was to compare epidural ropivacaine and bupivacaine in intermittent doses for obstetric analgesia. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 60 women in labor were randomly allocated to receive either bupivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 2 μg/mL (BF), or ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 2 μg/mL (RF). Bromage scale, loss of cold sensation to ether swab in midclavicular line, visual analog scale were used to test for motor block, sensory block and pain, respectively. Hemodynamic parameters, onset of analgesia, dose requirement of drug to produce analgesia, duration of labor, and incidence of side effects were also recorded. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and analyzed using students unpaired t-test, Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests at P < 0.05. Results: Both drugs were similar with respect to hemodynamic stability, onset of analgesia, quality of analgesia, sensory blockade, neonatal outcome, requirement of drugs, duration of labor, and incidence of side effects. Three parturient in bupivacaine (B-F) group had a motor block of Bromage 1 and were delivered using forceps. None of the parturient in ropivacaine (R-F) group had any motor block, and all had spontaneous vaginal delivery, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.081). Conclusions: Bupivacaine and ropivacaine provide equivalent analgesia in low (0.1%) concentration. PMID:27006539

  13. A D2-like receptor family agonist produces analgesia in mechanonociception but not in thermonociception at the spinal cord level in rats.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; Coffeen, Ulises; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Contreras, Bernardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Mercado, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The administration of dopaminergic drugs produces analgesia in individuals experiencing different types of pain. Analgesia induced by these drugs at the spinal cord level is mediated by D2-like agonists, which specifically inhibit the detection of nociceptive stimuli by sensory afferents. The extent of the analgesia provided by spinal dopamine agonists remains controversial, and the cellular mechanism of this analgesic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of quinpirole, a D2-like agonist, based on two nociceptive tests and at various doses that were selected to specifically activate dopamine receptors. We found that intrathecal quinpirole administration produces analgesia of mechanical but not thermal nociception and that the analgesic effect of quinpirole is reversed by a mix of D2, D3, and D4 receptor-specific antagonists, suggesting that the activation of all D2-like receptors is involved in the analgesia produced by intrathecal quinpirole. The differential effect on thermal and mechanical nociception was also tested upon the activation of μ-opioid receptors. As reported previously, low doses of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO produced analgesia of only thermonociception. This evidence shows that a D2-like receptor agonist administered at the spinal cord level produces analgesia specific to mechanonociception but not thermonociception.

  14. The Effect of Epidural Analgesia on Labour, Mode of Delivery and Neonatal Outcome in Nullipara of India, 2011-2014

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Bela; Arora, Manjeet; Haritwal, Arpana; Gurha, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of ropivacaine epidural analgesia on duration and outcome of labour in nulliparous parturients of India with parturient not receiving any analgesia. Settings and Design: One hundred and twenty nulliparous parturient in established labour at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group (n=60), whereas those not enthusiastic to labour analgesia were allocated in the control group (n=60). Materials and Methods: Epidural analgesia was provided by a bolus injection of 10 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% and 50μg fentanyl and maintained by using a continuous infusion of ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 2μl/ml at a 10ml/hour rate. The outcomes were duration of labour, incidence of cesarean sections and instrumental vaginal delivery and neonatal outcome. Statistical Analysis used: Statistical analysis was conducted using unpaired student t-test and chi-square test as required. All tests of significance were performed using two-tailed probability tests. Differences were considered significant when p-value was <0.05. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of socio-demographic data. The mean duration of first stage of labour was shorter in epidural group (4.83 ± 1.59 h) compared with control group (5.48 ± 1.56 h) while the duration of second stage of labour was prolong in epidural group (33.13 ± 12.78 min) as compared to control (27.53 ± 11.73 min). Instrumental vaginal or caesarean delivery rate did not increase in the epidural group. The APGAR scores at 5 min were statistically similar in both groups. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by ropivacaine in Indian nulliparous resulted in shorter duration of first stage and prolongs duration of second stage of labour compared with parturients without analgesia; however, instrumental vaginal or caesarean delivery rate does not increase in the epidural group. PMID:25478409

  15. Is intramuscular morphine satisfying frontline medical personnels’ requirement for battlefield analgesia in Helmand Province, Afghanistan? A questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Lorna M; Claydon, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Background: All deployed British Army personnel carry intramuscular (IM) morphine auto-injectors to treat battlefield casualties. No other nation supplies parenteral opiate analgesia on individual issue. Studies highlight this agent’s inefficacy and safety issues, but are limited by a relative lack of inclusion of frontline personnel. We aimed to determine the opinions of frontline medical personnel on current battlefield analgesia. Methods: We surveyed 88 British Army frontline medical personnel (medical officers (n = 12), nurses (n = 7), combat medical technicians (CMTs) (n = 67), paramedics (n = 1) and health-care assistants (n = 1)) upon completion of a six-month deployment (September 2011 to April 2012) to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, using Likert scale questions on the efficacy of battlefield analgesia, complications of IM morphine, safety of morphine auto-injectors and its suitability for treating child casualties. Results: A total of 88/88 questionnaires were returned. Of these, 61/88 had treated casualties on the battlefield, 26/86 agreed that current battlefield analgesia is effective, 80/87 agreed that a more potent analgesic with a faster onset than IM morphine is desirable in the first hour following injury, 47/65 CMTs agreed that they can manage complications of current battlefield analgesia and 53/86 respondents correctly disagreed that current battlefield analgesia is suitable for child casualties. The potential for accidental self-injection was reported. Conclusions: A more potent, faster onset analgesic than IM morphine is desirable in the first hour following injury. Pre-deployment training should emphasise management of complications of opiate analgesics and treatment of child casualties. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate is now being issued to all frontline medical personnel. IM morphine will remain on individual issue to all deployed soldiers for environments where an oral agent is not suitable, for example, chemical, biological

  16. Dexamethasone as an Adjuvant to Bupivacaine in Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Paediatrics for Post-operative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karl Sa; Ollapally, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sensory blockade of the brachial plexus with local anaesthetics for perioperative analgesia leads to stable haemodynamics intraoperatively, smoother emergence from general anaesthesia and decreased need for supplemental analgesics or suppositories in the Post-operative period. However, increasing the duration of local anaesthetic action is often desirable because it prolongs surgical anaesthesia and analgesia. Various studies in adults prove that steroids increase the duration of action of local anaesthetics when used as adjuncts. Aim The study aimed at determining the efficacy of dexame-thasone as an adjuvant to bupivacaine for Post-operative analgesia following sensory blockade of the brachial plexus in paediatrics. Materials and Methods The study was divided into two groups of 15 each, group BD receiving dexamethasone (0.1mg/kg) as an adjunct to bupivacaine 0.125% and group B receiving bupivacaine alone. The duration of analgesia was taken as time from completion of the block to the patient receiving rescue analgesia, the haemodynamics were measured until 180 minutes after surgery, the incidence of Post-operative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV) was measured. Results The duration of analgesia in the group BD was 27.1±13.4 hours and was significantly higher as compared to the group B, in which it was 13.9±11.3 hours (p<0.05). The pulse rate measured Post-operatively between both groups at 20 minutes (p-value 0.634), 60 minutes (p-value 0.888), 120 minutes (p-value 0.904) and 180 minutes (p-value 0.528) showed no statistical significance. Likewise the mean blood pressure measured between the two groups at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, 120 minutes and 180 minutes Post-operatively showed no significance. There was no significant difference in incidence of PONV in both groups with p-value of 0.624. Conclusion Dexamethasone as an adjuvant to local anaesthetic in brachial plexus blocks significantly, prolongs duration of analgesia in children undergoing upper limb

  17. A Comparative Study for Post Operative Analgesia in the Emergency Laparotomies: Thoracic Epidural Ropivacaine with Nalbuphine and Ropivacaine with Butorphanol

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Saravana; Gupta, Bikram Kumar; Gautam, Gyanendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Adequate postoperative pain therapy for emergency abdominal surgeries is important far beyond the perioperative period because sensitization to painful stimuli can cause postoperative morbidity. A prospective, double-blind, randomized study was carried out to compare the quality of postoperative analgesia and side-effect profile between epidurally administered butorphanol and nalbuphine as an adjuvant to 0.2% ropivacaine. Materials and Methods: A total of eighty patients, 43 men and 37 women between the age of 18 and 65 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I E and II E, who underwent intestinal perforation repair surgery were randomly allocated into two groups ropivacaine with butorphanol (RB) and ropivacaine with nalbuphine (RN), comprising of 40 patients each. Group RB received 0.2% ropivacaine containing 2 mg butorphanol while Group RN received 0.2% ropivacaine containing 10 mg nalbuphine through thoracic epidural catheter. Quality of analgesia, cardiorespiratory parameters, side-effects, and the need of rescue intravenous analgesia were observed. Results: The demographic profile and ASA Class were comparable between the groups. RN group had good quality of analgesia and stable cardiorespiratory parameters for the initial 6 h of postoperative period, after which they were comparable in both groups. Furthermore, the need of rescue analgesia was higher (20%) in the RB group during the first 6 h. The side-effect profile was comparable with a little higher incidence of nausea in both groups. Conclusion: Thoracic epidurally administered ropivacaine with nalbuphine is more effective than ropivacaine with butorphanol for immediate postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing emergency exploratory laparotomy. PMID:28298776

  18. Neuraxial Analgesia In Neonates And Infants: Review of Clinical and Preclinical Strategies for the Development of Safety and Efficacy Data

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Neuraxial agents provide robust pain control, have the potential to improve outcomes, and are an important component of the perioperative care of children. Opioids or clonidine improve analgesia when added to perioperative epidural infusions; analgesia is significantly prolonged by addition of clonidine, ketamine, neostigmine or tramadol to single shot caudal injections of local anesthetic; and neonatal intrathecal anesthesia/analgesia is increasing in some centers. However, it is difficult to determine the relative risk-benefit of different techniques and drugs without detailed and sensitive data related to analgesia requirements, side-effects, and follow-up. Current data related to benefits and complications in neonates and infants are summarized, but variability in current neuraxial drug use reflects the relative lack of high quality evidence. Recent preclinical reports of adverse effects of general anesthetics on the developing brain have increased awareness of the potential benefit of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia to avoid or reduce general anesthetic dose requirements. However, the developing spinal cord is also vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, and although there are well-established preclinical models and criteria for assessing spinal cord toxicity in adult animals, until recently there had been no systematic evaluation during early life. Therefore, the second half of this review presents preclinical data evaluating age-dependent changes in the pharmacodynamic response to different spinal analgesics, and recent studies evaluating spinal toxicity in specific developmental models. Finally, we advocate use of neuraxial agents with the widest demonstrable safety margin and suggest minimum standards for preclinical evaluation prior to adoption of new analgesics or preparations into routine clinical practice. PMID:22798528

  19. Combination of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil for labor analgesia: A double-blinded, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Waleed; Ammar, Mona Ahmed; Tharwat, Ayman Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Satisfactory analgesia is of great importance in the labor. The clinical efficacy and side effects of remifentanil in the management of labor pain had been evaluated. Dexmedetomidine (DMET) demonstrates an antinociceptive effect in visceral pain conditions. Aims of the study were to assess whether the combination of DMET with remifentanil would produce a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements. Furthermore, whether this combination would have less maternal and neonatal adverse effects. Patients and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II pregnant women had been enrolled into this study. All were full term (37-40 weeks’ gestation), singleton fetus with cephalic presentation in the first stage of spontaneous labor. They were divided into two groups group (I) Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min) increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a loading dose of DMET 1 μg/kg over 20 min, followed by infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h group (II) Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (PCA) (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min) increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a the same volume of normal saline as a loading dose, followed by a continuous saline infusion. Visual analog scale score, maternal, and fetal complications and patients’ satisfaction were recorded. Results: Patients receiving a combination of PCA remifentanil and DMET had a lower pain score compared with remifentanil alone in the second stage of labor (P = 0.001). The Total consumption of remifentanil was reduced by 53.3% in group I. There was an increased incidence of maternal complications and a lower patient satisfaction score in group II. Conclusion: DMET has an opioid sparing effect; a combination of DMET and remifentanil produces a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements and less

  20. Obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M B; Fenton, L A; Fields, S A

    2000-03-01

    Several analgesic options are available for patients during labor. Selection of the appropriate technique must be individualized. Education and preparation begins during prenatal care. If medications are to be used, the risks and benefits to the mother and infant must be considered. Continued patient-doctor communication throughout labor is essential. Patient preferences, tempered by sound medical judgement, should guide the selection of the optimal modality for pain control during labor.

  1. Calcium channel antagonists increase morphine-induced analgesia and antagonize morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Amigo, M

    1988-04-13

    The influence of calcium channel blockers on morphine-induced analgesia and on tolerance to the chronic administration of the opiate was investigated in mice. The effects of a test dose of morphine were significantly increased by the administration of diltiazem, flunarizine, nicardipine and verapamil. In contrast, nifedipine induced an antagonistic effect. The calcium channel antagonists did not change the reaction time to thermal stimulation in mice (hot plate test). The administration of nifedipine, flunarizine and verapamil reduced the intensity of the tolerance induced by a single dose of morphine administered in a slow release preparation. Diltiazem induced a non-significant decrease of the process. The present results are in accordance with the known interaction of acute and chronic morphine administration with the intracellular calcium concentration in neurones of the central nervous system.

  2. Use of Neurofeedback to Enhance Response to Hypnotic Analgesia in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Gianas, Ann; George, Holly R; Sherlin, Leslie H; Kraft, George H; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-01-01

    This proof of principle study examined the potential benefits of EEG neurofeedback for increasing responsiveness to self-hypnosis training for chronic pain management. The study comprised 20 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) who received 5 sessions of self-hypnosis training--1 face-to-face session and 4 prerecorded sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to have the prerecorded sessions preceded by either (a) EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) training to increase left anterior theta power (NF-HYP) or (b) a relaxation control condition (RLX-HYP). Eighteen participants completed all treatment sessions and assessments. NF-HYP participants reported greater reductions in pain than RLX-HYP participants. The findings provide support for the potential treatment-enhancing effects of neurofeedback on hypnotic analgesia and also suggest that effective hypnosis treatment can be provided very efficiently.

  3. Procedural sedation and analgesia in children undergoing digestive endoscopic procedures – paediatrician or anaesthesiologist?

    PubMed Central

    Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita; Ignyś, Iwona; Grześkowiak, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Marzena; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures of the gastrointestinal tract were successfully introduced into paediatric practice in the 1970s. Recent expansive development has become useful for improvement of both diagnosis and treatment in many children with gastrointestinal diseases. Most of these procedures are performed under procedural sedation (PSA) knowing anatomical, physiological and psychological differences and requiring good experience from the paediatrician and anaesthesiologist. These principles help to provide the procedure safely and minimise adverse events, which are greater the smaller the child is. Procedural sedation and analgesia in healthy children can be performed by a paediatrician, but children with congenital defects and serious coexisting diseases (ASA ≥ III) and also during the usage of anaesthetics (e.g. propofol), should be managed by an anaesthesiologist. PMID:25061486

  4. The conditioning of dyspneic suffocation fear. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration on behavioral freezing and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mongeluzi, Donna L; Rosellini, Robert A; Ley, Ronald; Caldarone, Barbara J; Stock, Howard S

    2003-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that a single exposure to 100% carbon dioxide (CO2) can serve as an effective unconditioned stimulus (US) in a Pavlovian aversive-context conditioning paradigm in rats. Although the US exposure parameters employed in the initial studies were sufficient for producing a context-specific enhancement of behavioral freezing and analgesia, it had yet to be determined whether variations of these CO2 conditioning procedures would produce other conditioning effects. Thus, the purpose of the following experiment was to investigate the intensity of the US on the conditioned response (CR). The findings confirm that variations in CO2 concentrations produce changes in the CR that are consistent with principles of Pavlovian conditioning. The findings lend additional support to the tenability of a dyspneic suffocation fear theory of panic disorder, a theory that postulates that at least one type of panic attack could be a consequence of Pavlovian conditioning.

  5. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  6. Odour-induced analgesia mediated by hypothalamic orexin neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Shogo; Yamaguchi, Ran; Ishikawa, Sodemi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kajiya, Katsuko; Kanmura, Yuichi; Kuwaki, Tomoyuki; Kashiwadani, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Various folk remedies employ certain odorous compounds with analgesic effects. In fact, linalool, a monoterpene alcohol found in lavender extracts, has been found to attenuate pain responses via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and oral administration. However, the analgesic effects of odorous compounds mediated by olfaction have not been thoroughly examined. We performed behavioural pain tests under odourant vapour exposure in mice. Among six odourant molecules examined, linalool significantly increased the pain threshold and attenuated pain behaviours. Olfactory bulb or epithelium lesion removed these effects, indicating that olfactory sensory input triggered the effects. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that linalool activated hypothalamic orexin neurons, one of the key mediators for pain processing. Formalin tests in orexin neuron-ablated and orexin peptide-deficient mice showed orexinergic transmission was essential for linalool odour-induced analgesia. Together, these findings reveal central analgesic circuits triggered by olfactory input in the mammalian brain and support a potential therapeutic approach for treating pain with linalool odour stimulation. PMID:27845440

  7. The 2015 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Labor Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W

    2016-05-01

    Every year the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review the literature pertinent to obstetric anesthesiology published the previous calendar year. This individual selects the most notable contributions, creates a syllabus of the articles, and then presents his/her overview in an annual lecture named in honor of the late Gerard W. Ostheimer, a pioneering obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital. This article reviews the literature published in 2014 focusing on the themes of labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. Its contents were presented as the Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, May 16, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The syllabus is available as Supplemental Digital Content (http://links.lww.com/AA/B397).

  8. Ask the Experts: Is there a place for placebo analgesia in everyday clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    Fabrizio Benedetti, MD is Professor of Physiology and Neuroscience at the University of Turin Medical School and at the National Institute of Neuroscience, Turin, Italy. He is a nominated member of The Academy of Europe and the European Dana Alliance for the Brain. He was consultant of the Placebo Project at the NIH and member of the six-strong Placebo Study Group at Harvard University (MA, USA), and held positions at the University of California (CA, USA) and the University of Texas (TX, USA). He identified some basic mechanisms of placebo responses across a variety of medical conditions, such as the involvement of endogenous opioids in placebo analgesia and of cholecystokinin in nocebo hyperalgesia, as well as the neuronal circuit that is affected by placebos in Parkinson's disease. He is author of the book Placebo Effects (Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 2008), which received the Highly Commended Book Award of the British Medical Association, and The Patient's Brain (Oxford University Press 2010).

  9. Nephrotoxicity in dogs associated with methoxyflurane anesthesia and flunixin meglumine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mathews, K A; Doherty, T; Dyson, D H; Wilcock, B; Valliant, A

    1990-11-01

    Uremia unexpectedly developed in five dogs 24 hours after undergoing thoracotomy in a student laboratory. In all dogs general anesthesia had been maintained with methoxyflurane, muscle relaxation had been induced with gallamine, and each dog received a single intravenous dose of 1.0 mg/kg flunixin meglumine for analgesia upon termination of anesthesia. In a subsequent group of dogs undergoing an orthopedic procedure, we assessed the effects on renal function of methoxyflurane anesthesia plus oxymorphone, or of methoxyflurane or halothane anesthesia in combination with a single IM 1.0 mg/kg dose of flunixin meglumine. Significant elevations in serum urea and creatinine values, and necrosis of collecting ducts and loops of Henle, were noted only in the dogs receiving methoxyflurane and flunixin meglumine.We conclude that the use of combination of methoxyflurane and flunixin meglumine is contraindicated in dogs.

  10. Chronic pain management in dermatology: pharmacotherapy and therapeutic monitoring with opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Enamandram, Monica; Rathmell, James P; Kimball, Alexandra B

    2015-10-01

    A number of chronic dermatologic conditions may necessitate long-term adjunctive pain management in addition to treatment of the primary skin disease, such as hidradenitis suppurativa, lichen planus, and other systemic diseases associated with significant pain. Adequate management of chronic pain can represent a unique challenge, but remains an integral component of clinical treatment in relevant contexts. For nociceptive pain of moderate to severe intensity, opioid analgesics can be beneficial when other pain management strategies have failed to produce adequate relief. The decision to initiate long-term opioid therapy must be carefully weighed, and individualized treatment plans are often necessary to effectively treat pain while minimizing adverse effects. Part II of this 2-part continuing medical education article will describe the appropriate settings for initiation of opioid analgesia for dermatology patients and detail therapeutic strategies and patient monitoring guidelines.

  11. [Medicamentous obstetric analgesia with pentazocine in comparison with an untreated control group].

    PubMed

    Freise, K; Brockerhoff, P; Rathgen, G H; Gundlach, G; Schicketanz, K H

    1988-01-01

    In order to establish whether a powerful analgesic such as pentazocine administered during birth may damage the child or have negative influence on the course of birth, the course of delivery was studied in 40 patients, 20 of whom were given a single dose of 30 mg pentazocine administered intramuscularly. There were no differences in duration of birth, CTG, blood gases post partum, or Apgar scores as compared to the untreated control group. As regards the pharmacokinetics, the serum pentazocine levels of the gravidae corresponded to those found in non-pregnant subjects; the levels found in blood from umbilical cords and new-borns were at the lower limit of detectability. Almost all of the gravidae described the obstetric analgesia as good or adequate. The principal side effect, mentioned by one-third of the pentazocine group, was slight fatigue. As regards the newborns, the fetal outcome in the two groups was the same.

  12. [Effectiveness and tolerance of tramadol with or without an antiemetic and pethidine in obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Kainz, C; Joura, E; Obwegeser, R; Plöckinger, B; Gruber, W

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomised, blind study was to investigate the analgesic potency and tolerance of intramuscular Tramadol compared to a standard obstetric analgesia with Pethidine. Triflupromazine was administrated in combination with the two tested analgesics in order to study its efficacy in alleviating the emetic side effects of the tested analgesics. 66 parturients were randomly assigned to three groups: group A: 100 mg Tramadol (Tramal), group B: 100 mg Tramadol (Tramal) and 10 mg Triflupromazine (Psyquil), group C: 50 mg Pethidine (Alodan) and 10 mg Triflupromazine (Psyquil). No significant differences concerning duration of labour, FHR-alterations, umbilical cord blood gases, respiration pattern and Apgar Scores of the neonate occurred. In all three groups the analgesic effect was equally good. Combination of the analgesic with the antiemetic showed no reduction of the incidence and severity of side effects.

  13. Nitrous Oxide for Labor Analgesia: Expanding Analgesic Options for Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Michelle R; Starr, Sarah A; Bishop, Judith T; Baysinger, Curtis L

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a commonly used labor analgesic in many Western countries, but is used infrequently in the United States. The University of California at San Francisco has been offering N2O for labor analgesia for more than 30 years. Vanderbilt University Medical Center recently began offering N2O as an option for pain relief in laboring women. Many women report that N2O provides effective pain relief during labor and argue that it should be made more widely available in the United States. This article discusses the use of N2O for pain management during labor, including its history, properties, clinical indications, and use and environmental safety issues. Practical issues regarding implementation of N2O service in a medical center setting are also discussed. PMID:23483795

  14. Differences Between Patient and Provider Perceptions of Informed Decision Making About Epidural Analgesia Use During Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist between patient and provider perceptions regarding the decision-making process around use of epidural analgesia during childbirth. The dyadic patient–provider Decisional Conflict Scale was modified to measure first-time mother (n = 35) and maternity care provider (n = 52) perceptions. Providers perceived a greater degree of informed decision making than patients (84.97 vs. 79.41, p = .04) and were more likely to recall they upheld patients’ rights to make informed choices than patients were to perceive their rights had been upheld (85.95 vs. 71.73, p < .01). This incongruity highlights the need to align legal principles with practice to create mutual agreement between stakeholder perceptions of informed decision making. PMID:24839385

  15. A Combined [11C]diprenorphine PET Study and fMRI Study of Acupuncture Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Darin D.; Kong, Jian; Webb, Megan; Bonab, Ali A.; Fischman, Alan J.; Gollub, Randy L.

    2008-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that a lateral network in the brain is associated with the sensory aspects of pain perception while a medial network is associated with affective aspects. The highest concentration of opioid receptors is in the medial network. There is significant evidence that endogenous opioids are central to the experience of pain and analgesia. We applied an integrative multimodal imaging approach during acupuncture. We found functional magnetic resonance imaging signal changes in the orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and pons and [11C]diprenorphine positron emission tomography signal changes in the orbitofrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, insula, thalamus, and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings include brain regions within both the lateral and medial pain networks. PMID:18562019

  16. Activation of TREK-1 by morphine results in analgesia without adverse side effects.

    PubMed

    Devilliers, Maïly; Busserolles, Jérôme; Lolignier, Stéphane; Deval, Emmanuel; Pereira, Vanessa; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Christin, Marine; Mazet, Bruno; Delmas, Patrick; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Morphine is the gold-standard pain reliever for severe acute or chronic pain but it also produces adverse side effects that can alter the quality of life of patients and, in some rare cases, jeopardize the vital prognosis. Morphine elicits both therapeutic and adverse effects primarily through the same μ opioid receptor subtype, which makes it difficult to separate the two types of effects. Here we show that beneficial and deleterious effects of morphine are mediated through different signalling pathways downstream from μ opioid receptor. We demonstrate that the TREK-1 K(+) channel is a crucial contributor of morphine-induced analgesia in mice, while it is not involved in morphine-induced constipation, respiratory depression and dependence-three main adverse effects of opioid analgesic therapy. These observations suggest that direct activation of the TREK-1 K(+) channel, acting downstream from the μ opioid receptor, might have strong analgesic effects without opioid-like adverse effects.

  17. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2013-09-08

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators.

  18. [Analgesia for childbirth in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation].

    PubMed

    Puértolas Ortega, M; Izquierdo Villarroya, B; Oliva Perales, P; Lafuente Ojeda, N; Izquierdo Villarroya, J; Ruiz Pérez, R

    2007-01-01

    Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common congenital thrombophilic disorder, affecting between 5% and 8% of the Caucasian population. Pregnancy creates a state of hypercoagulability and all factors that increase the risk of thrombosis should be considered, as they may be cumulative. In recent years, the diagnosis of new allelic variants of thrombophilic states have increased the incidence of pregnant women receiving anticoagulant therapy, with the anesthetic considerations that implies. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with heterozygous Leiden factor V mutation who was admitted with spontaneous amniorrhexis in the 38th week of gestation. She was taking low molecular weight heparin therapy. An epidural catheter was inserted to provide analgesia for labor, with all safety precautions to prevent an epidural hematoma. Epidural anesthesia is the technique of choice for obstetric labor in patients with hypercoagulability because of its effects of favoring blood flow and inhibiting clot formation.

  19. Alarm pheromone induces stress analgesia via an opioid system in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Núñez, J; Almeida, L; Balderrama, N; Giurfa, M

    1997-12-31

    Changes of the stinging response threshold of Apis mellifera scutellata were measured on foragers fixed on a holder and stimulated with an electric shock as a noxious stimulus. The threshold of responsiveness to the noxious stimulus increased when bees were previously stimulated with isopentyl acetate, which is a main component of the alarm pheromone of the sting chamber. This effect is antagonised by previous injection of naloxone-hydrochloride (Endo Laboratories Inc.). Results suggest that in the honeybee an endogenous opioid system activated by isopentyl acetate is responsible for modulation of perception for nociceptive stimuli. The resulting stress-induced analgesia in the defender bee would reduce its probability of withdrawal thus increasing its efficiency against enemies.

  20. Thoracic epidural analgesia to control malignant pain until viability in a pregnant patient

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Gibson, Mary Elizabeth; Amaro-Driedger, David; Hussain, Mahammad N

    2016-01-01

    Management of nonobstetric pain in the pregnant patient presents unique challenges related to transplacental fetal exposure to opioids and the subsequent risk of neonatal withdrawal syndrome. We present the case of a pregnant patient suffering from the pain of a progressively enlarging thoracoabdominal sarcoma. Epidural analgesia (using local anesthetics with minimal opioid) was utilized over a span of weeks to manage oncologic pain, limiting fetal opioid exposure and culminating in the birth of a healthy infant. While nonobstetric abdominal pain during pregnancy is not that uncommon, neoplastic abdominal pain does appear to be rare. Combined local anesthetic and opioid continuous epidural infusion should be considered a viable option in the pain management approach to obstetric patients with nonobstetric pain associated with malignancy. PMID:27358573

  1. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  2. Long-term outcome of hypnotic-analgesia treatment for chronic pain in persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Hanley, Marisol A; Engel, Joyce M; Romano, Joan M; Cardenas, Diana D; Kraft, George H; Hoffman, Amy J; Patterson, David R

    2008-04-01

    Data from 26 participants in a case series of hypnotic analgesia for chronic pain were examined to determine the long-term effects of hypnosis treatment. Statistically significant decreases in average daily pain intensity, relative to pretreatment values, were observed at posttreatment and at 3- and 9-month follow-up but not at 6- or 12-month follow-up. The percent of participants who reported clinically meaningful decreases in pain were 27%, 19%, 19%, and 23%, at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up points, respectively. Moreover, at 12-months posttreatment, 81% of the sample reported that they still used the self-hypnosis skills learned in treatment. Overall, the results indicate that about 20% of the sample obtained substantial and lasting long-term reductions in average daily pain following hypnosis treatment and that many more continue to use self-hypnosis up to 12 months following treatment.

  3. Involvement of pro- and antinociceptive factors in minocycline analgesia in rat neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Jurga, Agnieszka M; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2014-12-15

    In neuropathic pain the repeated minocycline treatment inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of the microglial markers and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The minocycline diminished the pronociceptive (IL-6, IL-18), but not antinociceptive (IL-1alpha, IL-4, IL-10) cytokines at the spinal cord level. In vitro primary cell culture studies have shown that MMP-9, TIMP-1, IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 are of microglial origin. Minocycline reduces the production of pronociceptive factors, resulting in a more potent antinociceptive effect. This change in the ratio between pro- and antinociceptive factors, in favour of the latter may be the mechanism of minocycline analgesia in neuropathy.

  4. Comparison between IV Paracetamol and Tramadol for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to use safer drug with minimal side effects for postoperative analgesia are growing day by day for surgeries of shorter duration or which may require day care only, search for ideal agent has been a never ending process. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods This study was done at Department of Anaesthesiology, Era’s Medical College, Lucknow, India. Sixty ASA-I or II patients between 18-55 years of age, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 each. Group A received IV infusion of paracetamol 1g in 100 ml solution, while Group B received IV infusion of Tramadol 100 mg in 100 ml NS at 0 (first complain of pain postoperatively), 6, 12 and 18 hours respectively. Pain intensity was measured by a 10 point Visual Analogue Scale (0→no pain and 10→worst imaginable pain) VAS at T(0)→just before analgesic administration, at 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours thereafter, in addition to HR, SBP, DBP. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, Student t-test and p-values <0.05 was considered significant. Results During postoperative follow-up intervals, paracetamol showed significantly lower VAS scores as compared to tramadol at 1.5 hour, 3 hour, 6 hour, 12 hour and 24 hour follow up intervals. One patient in tramadol group had nausea postoperatively (p>0.05). No adverse effect attributable to paracetamol was noticed. Conclusion Intravenous Paracetamol can be advocated as an effective and safe analgesic agent for postoperative pain relief. PMID:27656532

  5. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, p<0.001; n = 8). All effects of NTSPOMC activation were blocked by systemic naloxone (opioid antagonist) but not by SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control. PMID:27077912

  6. A prospective cohort study of intrathecal versus epidural analgesia for patients undergoing hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kasivisvanathan, Ramanathan; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Prout, Jeremy; Clevenger, Ben; Fusai, Giuseppe K; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare peri/post-operative outcomes of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) versus intrathecal morphine and fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (ITM+fPCA) for patients undergoing a hepatic resection (HR). Method Patients undergoing elective, one-stage, open HR for benign and malignant liver lesions, receiving central neuraxial block as part of the anaesthetic, in a high-volume hepato-pancreato-biliary unit, were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was post-operative length of stay (LoS). Results A total of 73 patients (36 TEA and 37 ITM+fPCA) were included in the study. The median (IQR) post-operative LoS was 13 (11–15) and 11 (9–13) days in the TEA and ITM+fPCA groups, respectively (P = 0.011). There was significantly lower median intra-operative central venous pressure (P < 0.001) and blood loss (P = 0.017) in the TEA group, and a significant reduction in the time until mobilization (P < 0.001), post-operative intra-venous fluid/vasopressor requirement (P < 0.001/P = 0.004) in the ITM+fPCA group. Pain scores were lower at a clinically significant level 12 h post-operatively in the TEA group (P < 0.001); otherwise there were no differences out to day five. There were no differences in quality of recovery or postoperative morbidity/mortality between the two groups. Conclusion ITM+fPCA provides acceptable post-operative outcomes for HR, but may also increase the incidence of intra-operative blood loss in comparison to TEA. PMID:24467320

  7. Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Analgesia Following Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy*

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Troitsa, Anton; Kirshon, Mark; Alfici, Ricardo; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that preoperative (pre-op) ultrasound (US)-guided posterior transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) and US-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block (ILI+IHG) will produce a comparable analgesia after Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in adult men. The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve will be blocked separately. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 166 adult men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a pre-op TAP group, a pre-op ILI+IHG group, and a control group. An intraoperative block of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve was performed in all patients in all three groups, followed by postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. The pain intensity and morphine consumption immediately after surgery and during the 24 hours after surgery were compared between the groups. Results A total of 149 patients completed the study protocol. The intensity of pain immediately after surgery and morphine consumption were similar in the two “block” groups; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the control group. During the 24 hours after surgery, morphine consumption in the ILI+IHG group decreased compared with the TAP group, as well as in each “block” group versus the control group. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all evaluated parameters were similar. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided ILI+IHG provided better pain control than US-guided posterior TAP following the Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in men during 24 hours after surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01429480.) PMID:27487311

  8. Combined adductor canal block with periarticular infiltration versus periarticular infiltration for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinhui; Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong; Wang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Both adductor canal block (ACB) and periarticular infiltration (PI) have been shown to reduce pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without the motor blockade. However, the efficacy and safety of combined ACB with PI (ACB + PI) as compared to PI alone for analgesia after TKA remains controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to compare the effects of ACB + PI with PI alone on pain controll after TKA. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies comparing ACB + PI with PI alone for TKA patients. The primary outcomes included pain score with rest or activity and morphine consumption. Secondary outcomes were distance walked, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Relevant data were analyzed using RevMan v5.3. Results: Three studies involving 337 patients were included. Combined ACB with PI was associated with longer distances walked than PI alone (MD = 7.27, 95% CI: 0.43–14.12, P = 0.04) on postoperative day 1. The outcomes of pain, morphine consumption, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications were not statistically different between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggests that combined ACB with PI may achieve earlier ambulation for patients after TKA without a reduction in analgesia when compared to PI alone in the early postoperative period. There were no significant differences in morphine consumption, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications between the 2 groups. However, owing to the variation of included studies, no firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:28033266

  9. The efficacy and safety of intravenous lidocaine for analgesia in the older adult: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Daykin, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of analgesia for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain. Even in the young, the use of opioids can be associated with an increased incidence of post-operative complications such as respiratory depression, vomiting, pruritus, excessive sedation, slowing of gastrointestinal function, and urinary retention. The need to manage acute pain in the older patient is becoming more common as the population ages, and increasingly older patients are undergoing more major surgery. Medical conditions are more common in older people and can result in the requirement of systemic analgesia for fractures, malignancy, nociceptive or neuropathic pain and peripheral vascular disease. Effective pain control can be difficult in older patients as there is a higher incidence of coexistent diseases, polypharmacy and age-related changes in physiology, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. Consequently, due to the fear of respiratory depression in older people, this leads to inadequate doses of opioid being given for the treatment of their pain. Lidocaine has analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and is metabolized by the liver which is limited by perfusion, and heart failure or drugs can alter this, affecting its clearance. Therefore, there are concerns regarding safety in older patients as plasma concentrations have both intersubject and intrasubject variability. The aim of this literature review is to assess the efficacy and safety of intravenous lidocaine as an adjuvant in pain management for the older patient. In total, 12 studies fulfilled the criteria. Lidocaine infusions were found to reduce pain scores and be opioid sparing in abdominal and urological surgery, in patients with opioid-refractory malignancy pain, neuropathic pain and critical limb ischaemia. Patients with malignancy were more likely to develop adverse effects, but no patients required treatment for lidocaine toxicity. PMID:28386401

  10. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Saim Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  11. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase augments GABAA receptor-mediated analgesia via a spinal mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Marina N.; Mejia, Galo L.; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury negatively influences spinal GABAergic networks via a reduction in the neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter KCC2. This process has been linked to the emergence of neuropathic allodynia. In vivo pharmacological and modeling studies show that a loss of KCC2 function results in a decrease in the efficacy of GABAA -mediated spinal inhibition. One potential strategy to mitigate this effect entails inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity to reduce HCO3- -dependent depolarization via GABAA receptors when KCC2 function is compromised. We have tested this hypothesis here. Our results show that, similarly to when KCC2 is pharmacologically blocked, peripheral nerve injury causes a loss of analgesic effect for neurosteroid GABAA allosteric modulators at maximally effective doses in naïve mice in the tail flick test. Remarkably, inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity with intrathecal acetazolamide rapidly restores an analgesic effect for these compounds suggesting an important role of carbonic anhydrase activity in regulating GABAA -mediated analgesia after peripheral nerve injury. Moreover, spinal acetazolamide administration leads to a profound reduction in the mouse formalin pain test indicating that spinal carbonic anhydrase inhibition produces analgesia when primary afferent activity is driven by chemical mediators. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic administration of acetazolamide to rats with peripheral nerve injury produces an anti-allodynia effect by itself and an enhancement of the peak analgesic effect with a change in the shape of the dose response curve of the α1-sparing benzodiazepine L-838,417. Thus, carbonic anhydrase inhibition mitigates the negative effects of loss of KCC2 function after nerve injury in multiple species and through multiple administration routes resulting in an enhancement of analgesic effects for several GABAA allosteric modulators. We suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, many of which are clinically

  12. Post-operative Analgesia in Opioid Dependent Patients: Comparison of Intravenous Morphine and Sublingual Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaabanali; Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Solhi, Hassan; Sadeghi-Sedeh, Bahman; Behzadi, Reza; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain is prevalent in patients with opioid dependence. Lack of knowledge concerning the complex relationship between pain, opioid use, and withdrawal syndrome can account for the barriers encountered for pain management. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia, compared with intravenous (IV) morphine. Methods A total of 68 patients, aged 20-60 years were randomly selected from whom had been underwent laparotomy due to acute abdomen in a University Teaching Hospital in Arak, Iran, and were also opioid (opium or heroin) abuser according to their history. After end of the surgery and patients’ arousal, the patients were evaluated for abdominal pain and withdrawal syndrome by visual analog scale (VAS) and clinical opioid withdrawal score (COWS), respectively 1, 6, and 24 h after the surgery. They received either morphine 5 mg IV or buprenorphine 2 mg SL, 1 h after end of the surgery, and then every 6 h for 24 h. Findings VAS was 4.47 ± 0.73 and 2.67 ± 0.53 at h 6 and 24 in buprenorphine group, respectively. The corresponding score was 5.88 ± 0.69 and 4.59 ± 0.74 in morphine group. At the same time, patients in buprenorphine experienced less severe withdrawal syndrome. Conclusion The present study confirmed the efficacy of SL buprenorphine as a non-invasive, but effective method for management of post-operative pain in opioid dependent patients. Result of this study showed that physicians can rely on SL buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia. PMID:26322212

  13. Transdermal fentanyl combined with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for analgesia in horses.

    PubMed

    Thomasy, S M; Slovis, N; Maxwell, L K; Kollias-Baker, C

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the pharmcokinetics, efficacy, and safety of the fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) in horses in which there was an inadequate analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) alone. Nine horses with pain that was refractory to therapeutic doses of phenylbutazone (n = 3) or flunixin meglumine (n = 6) subsequently also received between 39 and 110 microg/kg of transdermal fentanyl. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours after patch application, and a radioimmunoassay was used to determine serum fentanyl concentrations. Pharmacokinetic values were determined by noncompartmental analysis. Physical examination findings were recorded in all horses, and pain and lameness grading systems were used to assign scores to 8 and 6 horses, respectively. All horses tolerated the administration of fentanyl TTS, in that no clinically significant adverse effects attributable to fentanyl were observed. Use of the TTS resulted in variable serum concentrations of fentanyl, with a peak serum concentration of 2.2+/-1.1 ng/mL (mean+/-SD) and a time to peak serum concentration of 26+/-13 hours. After transdermal fentanyl administration, mean time to reach serum fentanyl concentrations consistent with analgesia in other species (1 ng/mL) was 14 hours. In addition, serum fentanyl concentrations of 1 ng/mL or greater were maintained in all but one horse for at least 18 hours. Pain scores were significantly decreased after fentanyl TTS and NSAID administration (P < .05), but lameness scores were not significantly different (P > .05). Overall, administration of fentanyl TTS had a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in horses with clinical pain, and the fentanyl TTS in combination with NSAIDs appeared to provide safe and effective analgesia in most of the horses with pain that was refractory to NSAID therapy alone.

  14. Postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia. A technique for relief of postoperative pain following major extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Buch, R; Khurana, J S; Garvey, T; Rice, L

    1991-05-01

    A new technique using postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia (PICRA) for postoperative pain relief was investigated in 23 surgical patients treated by amputation (12 patients) or by limb-salvage resection operations (11 patients). Bupivacaine was delivered into peripheral nerve sheaths via catheters placed therein at the time of surgery. Only patients in whom the nerves were easily accessible were treated. Catheters were placed in the axillary sheath, the lumbosacral trunk, and the femoral nerve sheaths of patients treated with shoulder girdle and pelvic procedures (resections and amputations), and within the sciatic nerve sheath of those treated with lower extremity procedures. The anesthetic agent was delivered at controllable rates. Regional analgesia was obtained in the operative site with minimal motor or sensory decrease. To assess the efficacy of this technique, the results of this study group were compared with those of a matched group of 11 patients treated with similar surgical procedures but who received epidural morphine. Eleven of the 23 patients on PICRA required no supplemental narcotic agents. The mean level of the narcotic agents required by the remaining 13 PICRA patients was approximately one third of that required by the matched group of 11 patients receiving epidural morphine. Overall, the patients on PICRA had an 80% reduction of narcotic requirements when compared to the historical controls. The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time. It has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible (e.g., pelvic fractures and revision hip surgery) and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.

  15. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea.

    PubMed

    Cerritelli, Serena; Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, p<0.001; n = 8). All effects of NTSPOMC activation were blocked by systemic naloxone (opioid antagonist) but not by SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control.

  16. [C fiber is not necessary in electroacupuncture analgesia, but necessary in diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC)].

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Zhou, Z; Yu, Y; Han, J

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were carried on rats. We applied capsaicin topically on sciatic nerve and used the techniques of extracellular recording and nerve trunk recording, Our results showed that the size of C compound action potentials in nerve trunk and C fiber response of spinal cord WDR neurons were decreased by at least 70% (mean) after topical application of capsaicin (250 micrograms) on the nerve, but A compound action potentials and A fiber response did not change significantly. It indicated that capsaicin blocked C fiber conduction selectively. Electroacupuncture (EA: 100 Hz, 0.1 ms, 3V) applied on left Zusanli (S36) and Sanyinjiao (Sp6) points inhibited C fiber response of spinal WDR neurons in the right side. The effect was similar to animal behavior analgesia elicited by EA. After applying capsaicin (250 micrograms) topically on left sciatic nerve, the inhibitory effect of EA on WDR neurons remained essentially intact (from 61.3 +/- 12.0% to 59.0 +/- 11.6%, n = 6, P greater than 0.05). It indicated that C fiber was not important in EA analgesia. Noxious heat (NH) applied on left hind paw by immersing the hind paw into 52 degrees C water inhibited C fiber response of spinal WDR neurons in the right side. It was called diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC). After applying capsaicin (250 micrograms) topically on left sciatic nerve, the inhibitory effect of NH on WDR neurons was dramatically decreased (from 77.7 +/- 8.5% to 8.1 +/- 8.9%, n = 6, P less than 0.001). It indicated that C fiber was important in DNIC. Both inhibitory effects of NH and EA were not changed by vehicle treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg) was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI), and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS) but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10) factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception.

  18. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg) was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI), and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS) but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10) factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception. PMID:26426693

  19. Efficacy and Effects of Parenteral Pethidine or Meptazinol and Regional Analgesia for Pain Relief during Delivery. A Comparative Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J.; Jank, A.; Amara, S.; Stepan, P. D. H.; Kaisers, U.; Hoehne, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripartum anesthesia may consist of parenteral opioids and/or regional analgesia. There is only limited data in the literature comparing both methods in daily obstetric practice. This observational study investigated the opioids pethidine and meptazinol as well as regional analgesics with regard to their administration, efficacy, side effects and subjective maternal satisfaction with therapy. The rates of secondary regional analgesia administration after administration of the respective opioid served as a means of evaluating treatment. Methods: This study collected data on pain management during vaginal delivery in a German university hospital over a twelve month period. Severity of pain was measured intrapartum using a numerical rating scale. Maternal, neonatal and delivery-related data were obtained postpartum from the clinical records and from the mothers using a questionnaire. Results: The study is based on data obtained from 449 deliveries. Pain relief achieved by the administration of pethidine and meptazinol was similarly low; maternal satisfaction with the respective therapy was high. Meptazinol was usually administered intravenously (83 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), repeatedly (27 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) and closer to the birth (1.9 ± 2.7 h vs. 2.6 ± 2.8 h; p < 0.05) compared to pethidine. Secondary regional analgesia was more common after the administration of pethidine (16 % vs. 8 %; p < 0.05). Regional analgesia resulted in greater pain relief compared to opioid therapy (78 % vs. 24 % after 30 min; p < 0.001) and was associated with longer times to delivery (7.6 ± 2.5 h vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 h; p < 0.001) and higher levels of maternal satisfaction with therapy (6.1 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 1.6 on a 7-point scale; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In daily clinical practice, meptazinol can be adapted more readily to changes during birth and requires less secondary analgesia. Regional neuraxial

  20. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  1. [The first labor analgesia with drug was performed in late Meiji Period (1868-1912). Hypnosis also attracted attention as a method of labor analgesia in mid-Meiji Period].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Ether or chloroform, was in use for ambulatory surgery after 1861 in Japan. An inhalational anesthetic, especially chloroform, was administered for cesarean section in early Meiji Period (from 1868) up to 1897. According to an article in 1903, chloroform was recommended as a strategy for internal cephalic version. However, it is uncertain whether inhalational anesthetic had been utilized for vaginal deliveries before 1903. There is evidence that hypnosis had attracted attention as a method of labor analgesia around that time.

  2. BEST-PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR FIELD-BASED SURGERY AND ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING WILDLIFE. I. ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Fiorello, Christine V; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Field anesthesia is often necessary for both invasive and noninvasive procedures on wild animals. We describe basic principles of safe anesthetic delivery, monitoring, and recovery for application in procedures involving free-ranging wildlife. For invasive procedures, the potential for immediate and lasting pain must be addressed and appropriate analgesia provided. In situations where the minimum standard of safe anesthesia and effective analgesia cannot be provided, the investigator and approving bodies should rigorously evaluate the risk to the patient against the value of the data obtained. This document is intended to serve as a resource for Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, biologists, veterinarians, and other researchers planning projects that involve free-ranging wildlife in field conditions.

  3. [Peri- and postoperative pain therapy with mechanical patient-controlled disposable analgesia pumps in general surgery. Report of initial trial].

    PubMed

    Fieseler, H G; Vogt, B; Menges, H W

    1996-01-01

    The patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or "ondemand analgesia" is a pain-relieving therapy, which is regulated and monitored by the patient himself. Postoperative pain therapy is the main approach for PCA, which facilitates a long-term, individually controlled pain relief. In certain situations we use mechanical PCA-pumps filled with piritramid (Dipidolor) as an opioid-analgetic for reducing postoperative pain. This kind of therapy needs the acceptance and understanding of the patient as a main condition for the success. Beside an increase of patients' comfort and patients' independence of analgetic demand from the medical staff a reduction in postoperative complications can be expected, the time of hospitalisation might be decreased.

  4. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  5. Regional anesthesia or patient-controlled analgesia and compartment syndrome in orthopedic surgical procedures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Elizabeth BS; Maleki, Ana Hosseinzadeh; Jahromi, Leila; Hermecz, Brittany Nelson; Nelson, Lauren E; Vetter, Imelda L; Evenhuis, Spencer; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on the use of regional anesthesia (RA) and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was conducted in patients who require orthopedic extremity procedures to determine whether either analgesic technique contributes to a delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome (CS). A total of 34 relevant articles (28 case reports and six research articles) were identified. Of all case report articles published after 2009, the majority (75%) concluded that RA does not put the patient at an increased risk of a delayed diagnosis of CS. Of these, only two relevant prospective research studies focusing on RA or PCA and their relationship to CS were identified. Neither study resulted in any cases of CS. However, both had relatively small sample sizes. Given the lack of evidence identified in this systematic review, prospective studies or large-scale retrospective data reviews are needed to more strongly advocate the use of one modality of analgesia over the other in this patient population. PMID:27785097

  6. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  7. Analgesia Following Arthroscopy – a Comparison of Intra-articular Bupivacaine and/or Midazolam and or Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Nahravani, Mahmoud; Tekye, Seyed Mostafa Moosavi; Alipour, Mohammad; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Aghaee, Monnavar Afzal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic intervention is very common for conducting orthopedic surgeries. After a knee arthroscopic surgery, different drugs are used through intra-articular administration to induce analgesia. The aim of this study was to evaluate analgesic effects of Bupivacaine (marcaine), Bupivacaine plus midazolam, and Bupivacaine plus fentanyl in reducing pain after knee arthroscopic surgery. Methods: Frothy five patients who were candidate for knee arthroscopy were divided into three groups. Group A, B and C received Bupivacaine (50 mg), Bupivacaine (50 mg) plus midazolam (50 µg/kg), and Bupivacaine (50 mg) plus fentanyl (3 µg/kg), respectively. The analgesic solutions were diluted with normal saline up to 20 ml. The analgesic effects were evaluated by VAS during first 24 hrs after surgery. With the VAS > 4, extra analgesic (pethidine) was administrated for patient. Results: The amount of induced analgesia and need for extra analgesic was different between groups; however, it was not statistically significant (p<0.109). The amount of administered analgesic (pethidine) in first 24 hours post-operatively was 275 mg for group A, while it was 150 mg for group B and 75 mg for group C. In group A, 46.67% of patients required further analgesic while this was 26.67% and 13.34% for groups B and C respectively (p<0.109). Conclusion: Intra-articular administration of studied drugs in all three groups reduced post-operation pain. The amount of induced analgesia was the highest for group C, while group B drugs induced better analgesia compared to group C. PMID:28271084

  8. Comparison of caudal tramadol versus caudal fentanyl with bupivacaine for prolongation of postoperative analgesia in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, NM; Engineer, SR; Jansari, DB; Patel, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block is a common technique for pediatric analgesia for infraumblical surgeries. Because of the short duration of analgesia with bupivacaine alone various additive have been used to prolong the action of bupivacaine. The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic effect of tramadol or fentanyl added to bupivacaine for infraumblical surgeries in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind controlled trial. After written informed consent from parents, 100 patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I-II, in the age group of 1-12 years, of either sex undergoing infraumblical surgery under general anesthesia were divided into two groups. Group BT received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with tramadol 2 mg/kg in normal saline and Group BF received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/kg in normal saline with maximum volume of 12 ml in both groups. All patients were assessed intraoperatively for hemodynamic changes, the requirement of sevoflurane concentration, as well as postoperatively for pain by using FLACC (F = Face, L = Leg, A = Activity, C = Cry, C = Consolability), pain score and for sedation by using four point sedation score. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 10–18 h in Group BT while in Group BF it was 7-11 h. The postoperatively period up to 1½ h, Group BF had higher sedation score up to two as compared to that below one on Group BT. Conclusion: Caudal tramadol significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia as compared to caudal fentanyl without any side effects. PMID:27051365

  9. Evaluation of caudal dexamethasone with ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia in paediatric herniotomies: A randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Santosh; Dogra, Neelam; Dogra, Jaideep; Jain, Priyanka; Ola, Sandeep Kumar; Ratre, Brajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal analgesia is one of the most popular regional blocks in paediatric patients undergoing infra-umbilical surgeries but with the drawback of short duration of action after single shot local anaesthetic injection. We evaluated whether caudal dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg as an adjuvant to the ropivacaine improved analgesic efficacy after paediatric herniotomies. Methods: Totally 128 patients of 1–5 years age group, American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I and II undergoing elective inguinal herniotomy were randomly allocated to two groups in double-blind manner. Group A received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine caudally and Group B received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine, in which 0.1 mg/kg dexamethasone was added for caudal analgesia. Post operative pain by faces, legs, activity, cry and consolability tool score, rescue analgesic requirement and adverse effects were noted for 24 h. Results: Results were statistically analysed using Student's t-test. Pain scores measured at 1, 2, 4, and 6 h post-operative, were lower in Group B as compared to Group A. Mean duration of analgesia in Group A was 248.4 ± 54.1 min and in Group B was 478.046 ± 104.57 min with P = 0.001. Rescue analgesic requirement was more in Group A as compared to Group B. Adverse effects after surgery were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: Caudal dexamethasone added to ropivacaine is a good alternative to prolong post-operative analgesia with less pain score compared to caudal ropivacaine alone. PMID:26962252

  10. Obstetric analgesia for vaginal birth in contemporary obstetrics: a survey of the practice of obstetricians in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary obstetrics in sub-Saharan Africa is yet to meet the analgesic needs of most women during child birth for a satisfactory birth experience and expectedly, obstetricians have a major role to play in achieving this. Methods This was a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study of 151 obstetricians and gynecologists that attended the 46th Annual General Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria (SOGON) held in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria in November, 2012. SOGON is the umbrella body that oversees the obstetric and gynecological practice in Nigeria. Data was collated and analyzed with Epi-info statistical software, and conclusions were drawn by means of simple percentages and inferential statistics using Odds Ratio, with P-value < 0.05 at 95% Confidence Interval (CI) taken to be statistically significant. Results Of the 151 participants, males predominated; 110 (72.9%) practiced in government-owned tertiary hospitals in urban locations. Only 74 (49%) offered obstetric analgesia. Among users, only 20 (13.3%) offered obstetric analgesia routinely to parturients, 44 (29.1%) sometimes and 10 (6.6%) on patients’ requests. The commonest analgesia was opioids (41.1%). Among non-users, the commonest reasons adduced were fear of respiratory distress (31.1%), cost (24.7%) and late presentation in labour (15.6%). Conclusion The routine prescription and utilization of obstetric analgesia by obstetricians in Nigeria is still low. Obstetricians are encouraged to step up its use to make childbirth a more fulfilling experience for parturients. PMID:24725280

  11. Assessment of Postoperative Analgesia after Application of Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Surgery in a Swine Femoral Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Joseph M; Settle, Timothy L; Bodo, Michael; Lombardini, Eric; Kent, Michael L; Upp, Justin; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    Management of pain in research swine used for studies involving painful procedures is a considerable challenge. Here we assessed whether a regional anesthesia method is effective for pain control of hindlimb injuries in pigs used for research in bone fracture healing. For this randomized controlled study, we administered regional anesthesia before an experimental femoral injury was produced. Using ultrasound guidance, we placed sterile infusion catheters near the sciatic and femoral nerves and administered local anesthetic (bupivacaine) for the first 24 h after surgery. We evaluated various behavioral and physiologic parameters to test the hypothesis that this regional anesthesia would provide superior analgesia compared with systemic analgesia alone. We also collected blood samples to evaluate serum levels of cortisol and fentanyl postoperatively. At the end of the study period, we collected sciatic and femoral nerves and surrounding soft tissues for histopathologic evaluation. Treatment pigs had lower subjective pain scores than did control animals. Control pigs had a longer time to first feed consumption and required additional analgesia earlier in the postoperative period than did treatment pigs. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is a viable and effective adjunct to systemic analgesics for providing pain control in swine with experimental femoral fractures. PMID:23849409

  12. Thoracic Paravertebral Block, Multimodal Analgesia, and Monitored Anesthesia Care for Breast Cancer Surgery in Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare idiopathic neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons and characterized by spasticity, muscle weakness, and bulbar involvement. It can sometimes mimic early stage of more common and fatal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Surgical patients with a history of neurodegenerative disorders, including PLS, may be at increased risk for general anesthesia related ventilatory depression and postoperative respiratory complications, abnormal response to muscle relaxants, and sensitivity to opioids, sedatives, and local anesthetics. We present a case of a patient with PLS and recent diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent a simple mastectomy surgery uneventfully under an ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block, multimodal analgesia, and monitored anesthesia care. Patient reported minimal to no pain or discomfort in the postoperative period and received no opioids for pain management before being discharged home. In patients with PLS, thoracic paravertebral block and multimodal analgesia can provide reliable anesthesia and effective analgesia for breast surgery with avoidance of potential risks associated with general anesthesia, muscle paralysis, and opioid use. PMID:27200193

  13. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  14. Clinical assessment of epidural analgesia induced by xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation in calves

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether epidural administration of a xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation would provide satisfactory analgesia for some surgical procedures on 10 calves admitted to the Department of Veterinary Surgery, University of Kafkas with perineal urolithiasis (n:2), rectovaginal fistula (n:1), atresia ani (n:2), omphalophlebitis (n:2), omphaloarteritis (n:1) and umbilical hernia (n:2). Following intramuscular injection of xylazine at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg for sedation, xylazine-lidocaine combination (0.2 mg/kg lidocaine + 0.02 mg/kg xylazine + 5 ml 0.9% NaCl) was administrated into the lumbosacral (L6-S1), sacrococcygeal (S5-Co1) or intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) space. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were recorded prior to and during analgesia at 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes. Furthermore, depth and duration of analgesia were evaluated during surgical intervention. The study revealed that the combination of epidural xylazine-lidocaine with xylazine sedation was highly satisfactory for surgery of the lower urinary tract and the perineal region, but it was less so for surgery of the umbilical area. PMID:21851664

  15. A study of pethidine kinetics and analgesia in women in labour following intravenous, intramuscular and epidural administration.

    PubMed Central

    Husemeyer, R P; Cummings, A J; Rosankiewicz, J R; Davenport, H T

    1982-01-01

    1 Epidural administration of opiates for analgesia has recently generated widespread interest and would theoretically be advantageous as a method for relief of pain in labour. 2 Plasma pethidine concentrations were measured after intravenous, intramuscular and epidural administration of pethidine to women in labour and after epidural administration to non-pregnant female surgical patients. 3 Kinetic parameters were derived from the plasma concentration data in each group of subjects and the relationship between plasma kinetics and analgesia in labour were examined. 4 Absorption of pethidine from the epidural space in pregnant women in rapid and excepting the lower initial values, the average plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration v time curve did not differ significantly (P less than 0.01) from those obtained with intravenous dosage, but were significantly higher (P less than 0.01) during the first 2 h after dosage than the results after intramuscular administration. The analgesia provided by the epidural route of administration was greater than with intravenous or intramuscular administration. 5 It is postulated that the analgesic efficacy of epidural pethidine in women in labour is due to a combination of systemic and local effects and that the local effect is attributable to the local anaesthetic properties of pethidine rather than a selective anti-nociceptive action on the spinal cord. PMID:7059414

  16. Effect of continuous psoas compartment block and intravenous patient controlled analgesia on postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Mi Kyoung; Lim, Byung Gun; Hur, Wonseok

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) generates severe postoperative pain in 60% of patients and moderate pain in 30% of patients. Because inadequate postoperative pain control can hinder early physiotherapy and rehabilitation, it is the most influential factor dictating a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous psoas compartment block (PCB) in comparison to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in TKA patients. Methods 40 TKA patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group IVPCA (n = 20) received intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) for 48 hours. Group PCB (n = 20) received continuous PCB for 48 hours at the fourth intertransverse process of the lumbar using the C-arm. Pain scores, side effects, satisfaction, the length of hospital stay, rescue antiemetics, and analgesics were recorded. Results Pain scores (VNRS 0-100) were higher in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. Nausea and sedation occurred more frequently in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. There were no differences between the groups in the length of the hospital stay, satisfaction scores, and the use of rescue antiemetics and analgesics. Conclusions Continuous PCB seemed to be an appropriate and reliable technique for TKA patients, because it provided better analgesia and fewer side effects such as nausea and sedation when compared to IVPCA. PMID:22323954

  17. Pain management and potentially life-shortening analgesia in the terminally ill child: the ethical implications for pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Siever, B A

    1994-10-01

    Optimal pain control in the dying child often requires aggressive opioid therapy that exceeds recommended parameters and may hasten death caused by respiratory depression. For pediatric nurses caring for the dying child, the administration of potentially life-shortening analgesia gives rise to a number of ethical issues. Pediatric nurses often express concern that aggressive pain control is a form of euthanasia or fear the child will develop a drug dependence. Lack of clarity about the ethical obligations and professional responsibilities of nurses who administer potentially life-shortening analgesia may also contribute to the dilemmas surrounding such situations. If left unresolved, these issues can interfere with the nurse's ability to implement an appropriate pain regimen. To provide adequate pain control, pediatric nurses who care for dying children must accomplish the following: critically examine ethical issues and underlying principles; understand the phenomena of addiction, tolerance, and physical dependence; and identify the boundaries of acceptable nursing practice when administering potentially life-shortening analgesia to terminally ill children.

  18. Intravenous non-opioid analgesia for peri- and postoperative pain management: a scientific review of intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wonuk; Nguyen, Kimngan Pham

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a predictable consequence following operations, but the management of postoperative pain is another challenge for anesthesiologists and inappropriately controlled pain may lead to unwanted outcomes in the postoperative period. Opioids are indeed still at the mainstream of postoperative pain control, but solely using only opioids for postoperative pain management may be connected with risks of complications and adverse effects. As a consequence, the concept of multimodal analgesia has been proposed and is recommended whenever possible. Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used analgesic and antipyretic drug for its good tolerance and high safety profiles. The introduction of intravenous form of acetaminophen has led to a wider flexibility of its use during peri- and postoperative periods, allowing the early initiation of multimodal analgesia. Many studies have revealed the efficacy, safety and opioid sparing effects of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous ibuprofen has also shown to be well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant opioid sparing effects during the postoperative period. However, the number of randomized controlled trials confirming the efficacy and safety is small and should be used in caution in certain group of patients. Intravenous acetaminophen and ibuprofen are important options for multimodal postoperative analgesia, improving pain and patient satisfaction. PMID:25664148

  19. Reduction of empathy for pain by placebo analgesia suggests functional equivalence of empathy and first-hand emotion experience.

    PubMed

    Rütgen, Markus; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Riečanský, Igor; Lamm, Claus

    2015-06-10

    Previous research in social neuroscience has consistently shown that empathy for pain recruits brain areas that are also activated during the first-hand experience of pain. This has been interpreted as evidence that empathy relies upon neural processes similar to those underpinning the first-hand experience of emotions. However, whether such overlapping neural activations imply that equivalent neural functions are engaged by empathy and direct emotion experiences remains to be demonstrated. We induced placebo analgesia, a phenomenon specifically modulating the first-hand experience of pain, to test whether this also reduces empathy for pain. Subjective and neural measures of pain and empathy for pain were collected using self-report and event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants underwent painful electrical stimulation or witnessed that another person was undergoing such stimulation. Self-report showed decreased empathy during placebo analgesia, and this was mirrored by reduced amplitudes of the pain-related P2, an ERP component indexing neural computations related to the affective-motivational component of pain. Moreover, these effects were specific for pain, as self-report and ERP measures of control conditions unrelated to pain were not affected by placebo analgesia. Together, the present results suggest that empathy seems to rely on neural processes that are (partially) functionally equivalent to those engaged by first-hand emotion experiences. Moreover, they imply that analgesics may have the unwanted side effect of reducing empathic resonance and concern for others.

  20. Effects of analgesia of the distal interphalangeal joint and navicular bursa on experimental lameness caused by solar pain in horses.

    PubMed

    Sardari, K; Kazemi, H; Mohri, M

    2002-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that pain originating from the dorsal margin of the sole of the hoof in horses can be attenuated by analgesia of either the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint, or of the navicular bursa (NB). To test this hypothesis, an experimental lameness was induced in the toe region of the left forelimb in six adult horses. After this, both synovial structures were blocked and the effects on the lameness were semi-quantitatively scored. Lameness was induced by creating pressure on the dorsal margin of the sole with the help of set-screws that were screwed into a nut, welded to the inside of each branch of the shoe. Gaits were recorded on a videotape before and after application of the screws, and after application of either a local anaesthetic or saline into the DIP joint or NB. The gaits were independently evaluated by two blinded clinicians and scored. Lameness scores were high after application of the screws and remained high after the administration of saline, but decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after administration of the local anaesthetic. Analgesia of the DIP joint as well as the NB appeared to be able to desensitize a portion of the sole. It was concluded that pain arising from the toe region of the sole should not be excluded as a cause of lameness when lameness is attenuated by analgesia of the DIP joint, or of the NB.

  1. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  2. Differential Effects of Epidural Analgesia on Modes of Delivery and Perinatal Outcomes between Nulliparous and Multiparous Women: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tai-Ho; Hsieh, T’sang-T’ang; Liu, Hung-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia is considered one of the most effective methods for pain relief during labor. However, it is not clear whether similar effects of epidural analgesia on the progression of labor, modes of delivery, and perinatal outcomes exist between nulliparous and multiparous women. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze all deliveries after 37 weeks of gestation, with the exclusion of pregnancies complicated by multiple gestations and fetal anomalies and deliveries without trials of labor; these criteria produced a study population of n=16,852. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to control for confounders. In total, 7260 of 10,175 (71.4%) nulliparous and 2987 of 6677 (44.7%) multiparous parturients were administered epidural analgesia. The independent factors for intrapartum epidural analgesia included a low prepregnancy body mass index, genetic amniocentesis, group B streptococcal colonization of the genito-rectal tract, and augmentation and induction of labor. In the nulliparous women, epidural analgesia was a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-2.54); however, it was a protective factor against Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.69). Epidural analgesia remained a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.58-2.97) but not for Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.77-1.55) in the multiparous women. Furthermore, the women who were administered epidural analgesia during the trials of labor had similar rates of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with the women who were not administered epidural analgesia, except that a higher rate of 1-minute Apgar scores less than 7 was noted in the nulliparous women who were administered epidural analgesia. Conclusions/Significance Intrapartum epidural analgesia has differential effects on the

  3. Must we press on until a young mother dies? Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in labour may not be suited as a “poor man’s epidural”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidural route is still considered the gold standard for labour analgesia, although it is not without serious consequences when incorrect placement goes unrecognized, e.g. in case of intravascular, intrathecal and subdural placements. Until now there has not been a viable alternative to epidural analgesia especially in view of the neonatal outcome and the need for respiratory support when long-acting opioids are used via the parenteral route. Pethidine and meptazinol are far from ideal having been described as providing rather sedation than analgesia, affecting the cardiotocograph (CTG), causing fetal acidosis and having active metabolites with prolonged half-lives especially in the neonate. Despite these obvious shortcomings, intramuscular and intravenously administered pethidine and comparable substances are still frequently used in delivery units. Since the end of the 90ths remifentanil administered in a patient-controlled mode (PCA) had been reported as a useful alternative for labour analgesia in those women who either don’t want, can’t have or don’t need epidural analgesia. Discussion In view of the need for conversion to central neuraxial blocks and the analgesic effect remifentanil has been demonstrated to be superior to pethidine. Despite being less effective in terms of the resulting pain scores, clinical studies suggest that the satisfaction with analgesia may be comparable to that obtained with epidural analgesia. Owing to this fact, remifentanil has gained a place in modern labour analgesia in many institutions. However, the fact that remifentanil may cause harm should not be forgotten when the use of this potent mu-agonist is considered for the use in labouring women. In the setting of one-to-one midwifery care, appropriate monitoring and providing that enough experience exists with this potent opioid and the treatment of potential complications, remifentanil PCA is a useful option in addition to epidural analgesia and other

  4. Epidural analgesia and cesarean delivery in multiple sclerosis post-partum relapses: the Italian cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies have systematically addressed the role of epidural analgesia and caesarean delivery in predicting the post-partum disease activity in women with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to assess the impact of epidural analgesia (EA) and caesarean delivery (CD) on the risk of post-partum relapses and disability in women with MS. Methods In the context of an Italian prospective study on the safety of immunomodulators in pregnancy, we included pregnancies occurred between 2002 and 2008 in women with MS regularly followed-up in 21 Italian MS centers. Data were gathered through a standardized, semi-structured interview, dealing with pregnancy outcomes, breastfeeding, type of delivery (vaginal or caesarean) and EA. The risk of post-partum relapses and disability progression (1 point on the Expanded Disability Status Sclae, EDSS, point, confirmed after six months) was assessed through a logistic multivariate regression analysis. Results We collected data on 423 pregnancies in 415 women. Among these, 349 pregnancies resulted in full term deliveries, with a post-partum follow-up of at least one year (mean follow-up period 5.5±3.1 years). One hundred and fifty-five patients (44.4%) underwent CD and 65 (18.5%) EA. In the multivariate analysis neither CD, nor EA were associated with a higher risk of post-partum relapses. Post-partum relapses were related to a higher EDSS score at conception (OR=1.42; 95% CI 1.11-1.82; p=0.005), a higher number of relapses in the year before pregnancy (OR=1.62; 95% CI 1.15-2.29; p=0.006) and during pregnancy (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.40-6.72; p=0.005). Likewise, CD and EA were not associated with disability progression on the EDSS after delivery. The only significant predictor of disability progression was the occurrence of relapses in the year after delivery (disability progression in the year after delivery: OR= 4.00; 95% CI 2.0-8.2; p<0.001; disability progression over the whole follow-up period: OR= 2.0; 95

  5. Efficacy of Pregabalin as Premedication for Post-Operative Analgesia in Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Geetha Chamanhalli; Vig, Saurabh; Bevanaguddaiah, Yatish; Anadaswamy, Tejesh C

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin, a structural analogue of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), is shown to be effective in treatment of several types of neuropathic pain, incisional injury, and inflammatory injury. Objectives The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two doses (75 mg or 150 mg) of pregabalin with the administration of a placebo for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. Patients and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 135 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. The patients were divided in three groups of 45 patients each: group 0, placebo; group 1, 75 mg pregabalin; and group 2, 150 mg pregabalin; each treatment of which was administered one hour before surgery. The Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) was used for pre-operative assessment and the visual analog scale (VAS) was used to determine pain at rest and for cough on the first post-operative day. The time for the requirement of rescue analgesics on the first post-operative day was also assessed. Results The RSS scores were significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the controls (P < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores for pain both at rest and on cough were significantly reduced in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Rescue analgesic consumption decreased significantly in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). The time at which rescue analgesia was administered (first dose) was 4.45 hours in group 0, 10.86 hours in group 1, and 16.82 hours in group 2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Pregabalin administered as premedication provided significant postoperative pain relief and decreased the requirement of other parenteral analgesics. Pregabalin doses of 150 mg had a better analgesic profile, but the advantages of their use may be limited by side effects such as dizziness. Thus, it is concluded that pregabalin doses of 75 mg may be the optimal pre-emptive dose. PMID:27642577

  6. Salient concerns in using analgesia for cancer pain among outpatients: A cluster analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify unique clusters of patients based on their concerns in using analgesia for cancer pain and predictors of the cluster membership. METHODS This was a 3-mo prospective observational study (n = 207). Patients were included if they were adults (≥ 18 years), diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myelomas, and had at least one prescription of around-the-clock pain medication for cancer or cancer-treatment-related pain. Patients were recruited from two outpatient medical oncology clinics within a large health system in Philadelphia. A choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis experiment was used to elicit analgesic treatment preferences (utilities). Patients employed trade-offs based on five analgesic attributes (percent relief from analgesics, type of analgesic, type of side-effects, severity of side-effects, out of pocket cost). Patients were clustered based on CBC utilities using novel adaptive statistical methods. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of cluster membership. RESULTS The analyses found 4 unique clusters: Most patients made trade-offs based on the expectation of pain relief (cluster 1, 41%). For a subset, the main underlying concern was type of analgesic prescribed, i.e., opioid vs non-opioid (cluster 2, 11%) and type of analgesic side effects (cluster 4, 21%), respectively. About one in four made trade-offs based on multiple concerns simultaneously including pain relief, type of side effects, and severity of side effects (cluster 3, 28%). In multivariable analysis, to identify predictors of cluster membership, clinical and socioeconomic factors (education, health literacy, income, social support) rather than analgesic attitudes and beliefs were found important; only the belief, i.e., pain medications can mask changes in health or keep you from knowing what is going on in your body was found significant in predicting two of the four clusters [cluster 1 (-); cluster 4 (+)]. CONCLUSION Most patients appear to be driven

  7. Adenosine for postoperative analgesia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Perioperative infusion of adenosine has been suggested to reduce the requirement for inhalation anesthetics, without causing serious adverse effects in humans. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of adenosine on postoperative analgesia. Methods We retrieved articles in computerized searches of Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases, up to July 2016. We used adenosine, postoperative analgesia, and postoperative pain(s) as key words, with humans, RCT, and CCT as filters. Data of eligible studies were extracted, which included pain scores, cumulative opioid consumption, adverse reactions, and vital signs. Overall incidence rates, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated employing fixed-effects or random-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included trials. Results In total, 757 patients from 9 studies were included. The overall effect of adenosine on postoperative VAS/VRS scores and postoperative opioid consumption was not significantly different from that of controls (P >0.1). The occurrence of PONV and pruritus was not statistically significantly different between an adenosine and nonremifentanil subgroup (P >0.1), but the rate of PONV occurrence was greater in the remifentanil subgroup (P <0.01). Time to first postoperative analgesic requirement in the adenosine group was not significantly difference from that of the saline group (SMD = 0.07, 95%CI: −0.28 to 0.41, P = 0.71); but this occurred significantly later than with remifentanil (SMD = 1.10, 95%CI: 2.48 to 4.06, P < 0.01). Time to hospital discharge was not significantly different between the control and adenosine groups (P = 0.78). The perioperative systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the adenosine than in the control group in the mannitol subgroup (P < 0.01). The incidence of bradycardia, transient first- degree atrioventricular block, and tachycardia was not

  8. Impact of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Grace C; Megalla, Sohair A; Habib, Ashraf S

    2010-06-18

    Postoperative pain continues to be inadequately managed. While opioids remain the mainstay for postoperative analgesia, their use can be associated with adverse effects, including ileus, which can prolong hospital stay. A number of studies have investigated the use of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion for improving postoperative analgesia and enhancing recovery of bowel function. This systematic review was performed to determine the overall efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery in patients undergoing various surgical procedures. We searched the databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2009. We searched for randomized controlled comparisons of lidocaine infusion with placebo in the surgical setting and reporting on postoperative analgesia and other aspects of patient recovery from surgery. The quality of all included studies was assessed using the Modified Oxford Scale. Information on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirements was extracted from the trials and compared qualitatively. Other relevant data such as return of bowel function, length of hospital stay, intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and adverse effects were also compared. Sixteen trials were included. A total of 395 patients received intravenous lidocaine with 369 controls. In open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery, as well as in ambulatory surgery patients, intravenous perioperative infusion of lidocaine resulted in significant reductions in postoperative pain intensity and opioid consumption. Pain scores were reduced at rest and with cough or movement for up to 48 hours postoperatively. Opioid consumption was reduced by up to 85% in lidocaine-treated patients when compared with controls. Infusion of lidocaine also resulted in earlier return of bowel function, allowing for earlier rehabilitation and shorter duration of hospital stay. First flatus occurred up to 23 hours earlier

  9. Patient Controlled Epidural Labour Analgesia (PCEA): A Comparison Between Ropivacaine, Ropivacaine-Fentanyl and Ropivacaine-Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi; Kushwaha, Brij Bihari; Gaurav, Amrita; Verma, Reetu; Singh, Dinesh; Singh, Vineeta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Feeling of pain is one of the most important emotional determinants which dominate the perception of females who undergo the process of labour and delivery. Patient controlled epidural labour analgesia (PCEA) is convenient and safer technique for this purpose. Very few studies compared clonidine and fentanyl with ropivacaine in labour analgesia in past. This study was undertaken to compare fentanyl and clonidine in PCEA. Aims: To compare low concentration ropivacaine with or without fentanyl or clonidine for labour analgesia and its effect on maternal and foetal safety. Settings and Design: Prospective, double blind, randomized, comparative study. Materials and Methods: Ninety primegravida in labour were divided into three groups (n=30) and patient controlled epidural labour analgesia was given to them: Initial bolus of 10ml of ropivacaine 0.125% in Group I; with fentanyl 2 μg/ml in Group II and with clonidine 1μg/kg in Group III. Subsequently each group received ropivacaine 0.125% through patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) as background infusion of 5 ml/hr with lockout interval time of 10min and subsequent bolus of 5ml. Hemodynamic parameters, sensory level, motor block and pain relief were noted. Total analgesic dose of local anaesthetic and feto-maternal adverse effects were also recorded. Results: At baseline, groups were matched demographically, hemodynamically as well as for intensity of pain. There was a statistically significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters from baseline in all groups with maximum reduction in group III. A significant difference among groups in VAS was observed at zero min and from 120min till 240min intervals and lowest values were in Group III. No significant difference was observed among the groups for mode of delivery and expulsive efforts. Total analgesic dose and PCA bolus requirement was maximum in Group I and minimum in Group III and the difference was statistically significant among groups. Six (20

  10. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo conditioning, (3) sham mindfulness meditation, or (4) book-listening control intervention. We assessed intervention efficacy using psychophysical evaluation of experimental pain and functional neuroimaging. Importantly, all cognitive manipulations (i.e., mindfulness meditation, placebo conditioning, sham mindfulness meditation) significantly attenuated pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to rest and the control condition (p < 0.05). Mindfulness meditation reduced pain intensity (p = 0.032) and pain unpleasantness (p < 0.001) ratings more than placebo analgesia. Mindfulness meditation also reduced pain intensity (p = 0.030) and pain unpleasantness (p = 0.043) ratings more than sham mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness-meditation-related pain relief was associated with greater activation in brain regions associated with the cognitive modulation of pain, including the orbitofrontal, subgenual anterior cingulate, and anterior insular cortex. In contrast, placebo analgesia was associated with activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation of sensory processing regions (secondary somatosensory cortex). Sham mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia was not correlated with significant neural activity, but rather by greater reductions in respiration rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that mindfulness-related pain relief is mechanistically distinct from placebo analgesia. The elucidation of this distinction confirms the existence of multiple

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Clonidine as an Adjuvant to Bupivacaine for Caudal Analgesia in Paediatric Infra-Umbilical Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Priolkar, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caudal analgesia, has gained popularity in paediatric intraoperative and postoperative pain management, more so with the use of adjuvants to prolong its duration, each of them having various results. Clonidine, an alpha2-adrenergic agonist is being used for its analgesic effects in various doses with 0.25% Bupivacaine. Aim The study was conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy, haemodynamic safety and side effects of 1 μg/kg Clonidine added to 1 ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine solution for caudal analgesia. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled study was carried out in 60 children of ASA Physical Status I, aged 1-10 years, scheduled for infraumbilical operations in a tertiary care centre. They were randomly assigned for caudal analgesia, to either group B: 1ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine solution or group BC: 1ml/kg of 0.125% Bupivacaine and preservative free Clonidine 1μ/kg. All were premedicated with midazolam 0.75 mg/kg orally 30 minutes prior to induction of anaesthesia. Heart rate (HR), Mean Arterial blood Pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were monitored. General anaesthesia was induced with thiopentone (1.25%) 5mg/kg and inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. Postoperative pain, sedation and motor block was assessed by the various scores and patients were monitored for adverse effects. Results The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 3 times longer in group BC. Group B received significantly more doses of rescue analgesic than group BC (p-value of 0.004). There was no significant bradycardia, hypotension, sedation or urinary retention in either of the groups. There was no residual motor blockade at 6 hours. Incidence of vomiting was similar in both the groups. Conclusion Caudal Clonidine in the dose of 1 μg/kg in children is a satisfactory and efficacious adjuvant to caudal Bupivacaine for producing prolonged postoperative analgesia with minimum side effects. PMID:27790555

  12. Breast-feeding problems after epidural analgesia for labour: a retrospective cohort study of pain, obstetrical procedures and breast-feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Volmanen, P; Valanne, J; Alahuhta, S

    2004-01-01

    Various clinical practices have been found to be associated with breast-feeding problems. However, little is known about the effect of pain, obstetrical procedures and analgesia on breast-feeding behaviour. We designed a retrospective study with a questionnaire concerning pain, obstetrical procedures and breast-feeding practices mailed to 164 primiparae in Lapland. Altogether 99 mothers (60%) returned completed questionnaires that could be included in the analysis, which was carried out in two steps. Firstly, all accepted questionnaires were grouped according to the success or failure to breast-feed fully during the first 12 weeks of life. Secondly, an ad hoc cohort study was performed on the sub-sample of 64 mothers delivered vaginally. As many as 44% of the 99 mothers reported partial breast feeding or formula feeding during the first 12 weeks. Older age of the mother, use of epidural analgesia and the problem of "not having enough milk" were associated with the failure to breast-feed fully. Caesarean section, other methods of labour analgesia and other breast-feeding problems were not associated with partial breast feeding or formula feeding. In the sub-sample, 67% of the mothers who had laboured with epidural analgesia and 29% of the mothers who laboured without epidural analgesia reported partial breast feeding or formula feeding (P = 0.003). The problem of "not having enough milk" was more often reported by those who had had epidural analgesia. Further studies conducted prospectively are needed to establish whether a causal relationship exists between epidural analgesia and breast-feeding problems.

  13. Comparison of Perioperative Thoracic Epidural Fentanyl with Bupivacaine and Intravenous Fentanyl for Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Amitabh Chanchal; Rajan, Sunil; Balachandran, Rakhi; Kumar, Lakshmi; Nair, Suresh Gangadharan

    2017-01-01

    Context: Two-thirds of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery report moderate to severe pain, particularly with ambulatory or respiratory effort. Aims: The aim of this study is to compare the analgesic effect of perioperative thoracic epidural fentanyl with bupivacaine and intravenous fentanyl in patients undergoing CABG surgery. Settings and Design: The study was a prospective, randomized, nonblinded comparative study. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients coming under the American Society of Anesthesiologists Class III who were posted for CABG surgery were recruited in this study. The patients were randomized into one of two groups, higher thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) group receiving general anesthesia with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in the postoperative period, and intravenous fentanyl analgesia group receiving general anesthesia with fentanyl infusion in the postoperative period. The pain was assessed at 4 h after extubation when the patient was fully awake, then at 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Both groups received intravenous tramadol 100 mg as rescue analgesia whenever visual analog scale score was 5 and above. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), sedation scores, and physiotherapy cooperation were also assessed. Statistical Analysis Used: The numerical data were analyzed using an independent t-test, repeated-measures ANOVA, and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Pain at rest and on cough was significantly lower in HTEA patients as compared to control group. Patients HTEA group got less frequent rescue analgesia than the control group. Physiotherapy cooperation was significantly better in HTEA patients at 4, 12, and 24 h postextubation. They also had significantly lower heart rate, MAP, and sedation scores. Conclusion: Perioperative TEA using fentanyl with bupivacaine provided optimal postoperative analgesia at rest and during coughing in patients following CABG surgery as compared to postoperative analgesia with

  14. Morphine for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia May Inhibit Delirium Tremens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia-Ta; Liao, Wen-Wei; Huang, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholism is common among trauma patients and often lacks the appropriate monitoring. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), including delirium tremens (DT), can be associated with significant postoperative morbidity and mortalit